Science.gov

Sample records for correctly folded recombinant

  1. An overview on molecular chaperones enhancing solubility of expressed recombinant proteins with correct folding.

    PubMed

    Mamipour, Mina; Yousefi, Mohammadreza; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The majority of research topics declared that most of the recombinant proteins have been expressed by Escherichia coli in basic investigations. But the majority of high expressed proteins formed as inactive recombinant proteins that are called inclusion body. To overcome this problem, several methods have been used including suitable promoter, environmental factors, ladder tag to secretion of proteins into the periplasm, gene protein optimization, chemical chaperones and molecular chaperones sets. Co-expression of the interest protein with molecular chaperones is one of the common methods The chaperones are a group of proteins, which are involved in making correct folding of recombinant proteins. Chaperones are divided two groups including; cytoplasmic and periplasmic chaperones. Moreover, periplasmic chaperones and proteases can be manipulated to increase the yields of secreted proteins. In this article, we attempted to review cytoplasmic chaperones such as Hsp families and periplasmic chaperones including; generic chaperones, specialized chaperones, PPIases, and proteins involved in disulfide bond formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The production of soluble and correctly folded recombinant bovine beta-lactoglobulin variants A and B in Escherichia coli for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Komala; Loo, Trevor S; Edwards, Patrick J B; Pascal, Steven M; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Norris, Gillian E

    2010-04-01

    The production of soluble and correctly folded eukaryotic proteins in prokaryotic systems has always been hampered by the difference in or lack of cell machinery responsible for folding, post-translation modification and secretion of the proteins involved. In the case of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen and a protein widely used for protein folding studies, a eukaryotic yeast expression system has been the preferred choice of many researchers, particularly for the production of isotopically labeled protein required for NMR studies. Although this system yields high amounts of recombinant protein, the BLG produced is usually associated with extracellular polysaccharides, which is problematic for NMR analysis. In our study we show that when co-expressed with the signal-sequence-less disulfide bond isomerase (Delta ssDsbC) in the dual expression vector, pETDUET-1, both BLG A and BLG B can be reproducibly produced in a soluble form. Expression was carried out in Escherichia coli Origami(DE3), a trxB/gor mutant for thioredoxin- and glutathione reductase, which allows for proper formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. The protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography followed by salting-out at low pH and size exclusion chromatography. Our expression system is able to consistently produce milligram quantities of correctly folded BLG A and B with no additional amino acid residues at the N-terminus, except for a methionine. (15)N-labeled BLG A and B, prepared and purified using this method, produced HSQC spectra typical of native bovine BLG.

  3. Expression of Jug r 1, the 2S albumin allergen from walnut (Juglans regia), as a correctly folded and functional recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Camille; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Rancé, Fabienne; Didier, Alain; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Jug r 1, the 2S albumin allergen from walnut, was isolated from ripe nuts as a native allergen and expressed in Escherichia coli using the Gateway technology as a recombinant allergen. The recombinant Jug r 1 (15 kDa) differs from the native allergen by the absence of cleavage of the polypeptide chain in two covalently associated light (3.5 kDa) and heavy (8 kDa) chains. Recombinant rJug r 1 adopts the canonical alpha-helical fold of plant 2S albumins as checked on CD spectra. Four IgE-binding epitopic stretches were identified along the amino acid sequence of Jug r 1 and localized on the molecular surface of the modeled allergen. Both native and recombinant allergens exhibit similar IgE-binding activity and similarly trigger the degranulation of a FcepsilonRI-expressing rat basophilic leukaemia cell line previously treated by IgE-containing sera. Native Jug r 1 resists to heat denaturation and to the proteolytic attack of trypsin and chymotrypsin but is readily hydrolyzed in the presence of pepsin at acidic pH after 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in vitro. Recombinant Jug r 1 could be used for a component-resolved diagnosis of food-allergy.

  4. Improved methodology to obtain large quantities of correctly folded recombinant N-terminal extracellular domain of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor for inducing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenjing; Zhang, Hongliang; Xu, Jiang; Gao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular system. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is a well-established animal model for MG that can be induced by active immunization with the Torpedo californica-derived acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Due to the expensive cost of purifying AChR from Torpedo californica, the development of an easier and more economical way of inducing EAMG remains critically needed. Material and methods Full-length cDNA of the human skeletal muscle AChR α1 subunit was obtained from TE671 cells. The DNA fragment encoding the extracellular domain (ECD) was then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inserted into pET-16b. The reconstructed plasmid was transformed into the host strain BL21(DE3)pLysS, which was derived from Escherichia coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used to induce the expression of the N-terminal ECD. The produced protein was purified with immobilized Ni2+ affinity chromatography and refolded by dialysis. Results The recombinant protein was efficiently refolded to soluble active protein, which was verified by ELISA. After immunization with the recombinant ECD, all rats acquired clinical signs of EAMG. The titer of AChR antibodies in the serum was significantly higher in the EAMG group than in the control group, indicating successful induction of EAMG. Conclusions We describe an improved procedure for refolding recombinant ECD of human muscle AChR. This improvement allows for the generation of large quantities of correctly folded recombinant ECD of human muscle AChR, which provides for an easier and more economical way of inducing the animal model of MG. PMID:24904677

  5. Ion recombination correction in carbon ion beams.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Lee, N D; Delor, A; Thomas, R A S; Romano, F; Fukumura, A; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-07-01

    In this work, ion recombination is studied as a function of energy and depth in carbon ion beams. Measurements were performed in three different passively scattered carbon ion beams with energies of 62 MeV/n, 135 MeV/n, and 290 MeV/n using various types of plane-parallel ionization chambers. Experimental results were compared with two analytical models for initial recombination. One model is generally used for photon beams and the other model, developed by Jaffé, takes into account the ionization density along the ion track. An investigation was carried out to ascertain the effect on the ion recombination correction with varying ionization chamber orientation with respect to the direction of the ion tracks. The variation of the ion recombination correction factors as a function of depth was studied for a Markus ionization chamber in the 62 MeV/n nonmodulated carbon ion beam. This variation can be related to the depth distribution of linear energy transfer. Results show that the theory for photon beams is not applicable to carbon ion beams. On the other hand, by optimizing the value of the ionization density and the initial mean-square radius, good agreement is found between Jaffé's theory and the experimental results. As predicted by Jaffé's theory, the results confirm that ion recombination corrections strongly decrease with an increasing angle between the ion tracks and the electric field lines. For the Markus ionization chamber, the variation of the ion recombination correction factor with depth was modeled adequately by a sigmoid function, which is approximately constant in the plateau and strongly increasing in the Bragg peak region to values of up to 1.06. Except in the distal edge region, all experimental results are accurately described by Jaffé's theory. Experimental results confirm that ion recombination in the investigated carbon ion beams is dominated by initial recombination. Ion recombination corrections are found to be significant and cannot be

  6. CFTR Folding Consortium: methods available for studies of CFTR folding and correction.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathryn W; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Balch, William E; Braakman, Ineke; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Guggino, William B; Penland, Christopher M; Pollard, Harvey B; Sorscher, Eric J; Skach, William R; Thomas, Philip J; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR Folding Consortium (CFC) was formed in 2004 under the auspices of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and its drug discovery and development affiliate, CFF Therapeutics. A primary goal of the CFC is the development and distribution of reagents and assay methods designed to better understand the mechanistic basis of mutant CFTR misfolding and to identify targets whose manipulation may correct CFTR folding defects. As such, reagents available from the CFC primarily target wild-type CFTR NBD1 and its common variant, F508del, and they include antibodies, cell lines, constructs, and proteins. These reagents are summarized here, and two protocols are described for the detection of cell surface CFTR: (a) an assay of the density of expressed HA-tagged CFTR by ELISA and (b) the generation and use of an antibody to CFTR's first extracellular loop for the detection of endogenous CFTR. Finally, we highlight a systematic collection of assays, the CFC Roadmap, which is being used to assess the cellular locus and mechanism of mutant CFTR correction. The Roadmap queries CFTR structure-function relations at levels ranging from purified protein to well-differentiated human airway primary cultures.

  7. CFTR Folding Consortium: Methods Available for Studies of CFTR Folding and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kathryn W.; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Balch, William E.; Braakman, Ineke; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Guggino, William B.; Penland, Christopher M.; Pollard, Harvey B.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Skach, William R.; Thomas, Philip J.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2012-01-01

    The CFTR Folding Consortium (CFC) was formed in 2004 under the auspices of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and its drug discovery and development affiliate, CFF Therapeutics. A primary goal of the CFC is the development and distribution of reagents and assay methods designed to better understand the mechanistic basis of mutant CFTR misfolding and to identify targets whose manipulation may correct CFTR folding defects. As such, reagents available from the CFC primarily target wild-type CFTR NBD1 and its common variant, F508del, and they include antibodies, cell lines, constructs, and proteins. These reagents are summarized here, and two protocols are described for the detection of cell surface CFTR: (a) an assay of the density of expressed HA-tagged CFTR by ELISA and (b) the generation and use of an antibody to CFTR’s first extracellular loop for the detection of endogenous CFTR. Finally, we highlight a systematic collection of assays, the CFC Roadmap, which is being used to assess the cellular locus and mechanism of mutant CFTR correction. The Roadmap queries CFTR structure–function relations at levels ranging from purified protein to well-differentiated human airway primary cultures. PMID:21547742

  8. Trigger factor assisted folding of the recombinant epoxide hydrolases identified from C. pelagibacter and S. nassauensis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Priya; Wani, Shadil Ibrahim; Kumar, Ranjai; Chhabra, Ravneet; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh; Sareen, Dipti

    2014-12-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs), are enantioselective enzymes as they catalyze the kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides into the corresponding enantiopure vicinal diols, which are useful precursors in the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical compounds. Here, we have identified and cloned two putative epoxide hydrolase genes (cpeh and sneh) from marine bacteria, Candidatus pelagibacter ubique and terrestrial bacteria, Stackebrandtia nassauensis, respectively and overexpressed them in pET28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The CPEH protein (42kDa) was found to be overexpressed as inactive inclusion bodies while SNEH protein (40kDa) was found to form soluble aggregates. In this study, the recombinant CPEH was successfully transformed from insoluble aggregates to the soluble and functionally active form, using pCold TF vector, though with low EH activity. To prevent the soluble aggregate formation of SNEH, it was co-expressed with GroEL/ES chaperone and was also fused with trigger factor (TF) chaperone at its N-terminus. The TF chaperone-assisted correct folding of SNEH led to a purified active EH with a specific activity of 3.85μmol/min/mg. The pure enzyme was further used to biocatalyze the hydrolysis of 10mM benzyl glycidyl ether (BGE) and α-methyl styrene oxide (MSO) with an enantiomeric excess of the product (eep) of 86% and 73% in 30 and 15min, respectively. In conclusion, this is the first report about the heterologous expression of epoxide hydrolases using TF as a molecular chaperone in pCold TF expression vector, resulting in remarkable increase in the solubility and activity of the otherwise improperly folded recombinant epoxide hydrolases.

  9. Two-Step Folding of Recombinant Mitochondrial Porin in Detergent

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Denice C.; O'Neil, Joe D.; Court, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Precise information regarding the transmembrane topology of mitochondrial porin is essential for understanding the mechanisms by which this protein functions. Porin acts as a channel in the outer membrane and interacts with small solutes and proteins to regulate mitochondrial function. The acquisition of high-resolution structural data requires a method of maintaining high concentrations of unaggregated, properly folded porin. In the current studies, several mixed detergent systems were analyzed for their ability to fold Neurospora mitochondrial porin expressed in and isolated from Escherichia coli. A mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside in a 1:6 molar ratio supports a β-strand-rich conformation. In this state, the two tryptophan residues in the protein reside in hydrophobic environments, and about half of the nine tyrosines are solvent exposed. Most importantly, heat-labile tertiary contacts, as detected by near-UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, in the sodium dodecyl sulfate/dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside-solubilized porin are very similar to those of the protein following functional reconstitution into liposomes. Similarly, both forms are protease resistant. Thus, a method has been identified with the potential to solubilize high concentrations of mitochondrial porin in a state virtually indistinguishable from the membrane-embedded form. PMID:17872960

  10. Further corrections to the theory of cosmological recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    Krolik (1989) pointed out that frequency redistribution due to scattering is more important than cosmological expansion in determining the Ly-alpha frequency profile during cosmological recombination, and that its effects substantially modify the rate of recombination. Although the first statement is true, the second statement is not: a basic symmetry of photon scattering leads to identical cancellations which almost completely erase the effects of both coherent and incoherent scattering. Only a small correction due to atomic recoil alters the line profile from the prediction of pure cosmological expansion, so that the pace of cosmological recombination can be well approximated by ignoring Ly-alpha scattering.

  11. GATEWAY technology and E. coli recombinant system produce a properly folded and functional recombinant allergen of the lipid transfer protein of apple (Mal d 3).

    PubMed

    Borges, Jean-Philippe; Culerrier, Raphaël; Aldon, Didier; Barre, Annick; Benoist, Hervé; Saurel, Olivier; Milon, Alain; Didier, Alain; Rougé, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    The lipid transfer protein of apple fruit, Mal d 3, has been produced as a soluble recombinant protein in transformed Escherichia coli cells using the GATEWAY technology. Circular dichroism spectra showing the protein essentially consists of alpha-helices indicate that the rMal d 3 is properly folded. The (1)H NMR spectra also indicates a correct fold for the recombinant allergen. The reactivity of rMal d 3 towards IgE from apple allergic patients and in vitro degranulation activity measured on transformed rat basophil leukemia cells expressing the human Fc epsilon RI alpha-subunit of rMal d 3 is similar to those of the native allergen purified from apple fruits. The expression of active rMal d 3 in E. coli is readily feasible and offers an interesting alternative to the production of recombinant allergen in the yeast Pichia pastoris. This expression in E. coli open the way to the modification of Mal d 3 by site-directed mutagenesis for immunotherapy purposes. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High Double Eyelid Fold Correction Using Wide Dual-Plane Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth K.; Kim, Woo-Seok; Oh, Se Kwang; Kim, Hong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background The ability to correct unnatural-appearing, high, and deep double eyelid folds has been limited by the lack of redundant upper eyelid skin and the presence of prior incision line scars in patients. Methods From January 2000 to September 2011, 256 patients with high and deep double eyelid folds underwent our fold-lowering procedure. The first dissection was made at the superficial layer between the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbital septum/retroorbicularis oculi fat. The second dissection was at a deeper layer between the preaponeurotic fat and levator aponeurosis. The dissection proceeded 7 to 8 mm farther cephalad to the prior fold line to separate the upper flap and the floor from the prior fold line. The lower flap was undermined caudally to obtain normal skin tension, and the lower flap was secured to the septoaponeurosis junctional thickening or pretarsal tissue. Six months after surgery, the correction of the high fold scar and change in fold height (with eyes closed) was documented. Results Using the authors' technique, unnatural-appearing, high, and deep double eyelid folds were converted to lower nondepressed folds. Although prior high fold incision scars could be seen postoperatively on close examination, they were not easily visible. Complications included fold height asymmetry in 10 cases, persistence of the prior fold in 5 cases, and redundant upper flap skin that needed further excision in 25 cases. Conclusions Using a wide double-layer dissection, high folds were lowered successfully even in situations where there was no redundant upper eyelid skin for excision. PMID:27740951

  13. Recombinant prosegment peptide acts as a folding catalyst and inhibitor of native pepsin.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Filonowicz, Shaun; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y

    2009-12-01

    Porcine pepsin A, a gastric aspartic peptidase, is initially produced as the zymogen pepsinogen that contains an N-terminal, 44 residue prosegment (PS) domain. In the absence of the PS, native pepsin (Np) is irreversibly denatured and when placed under refolding conditions, folds to a thermodynamically stable denatured state. This denatured, refolded pepsin (Rp) state can be converted to Np by the exogenous addition of the PS, which catalyzes the folding of Rp to Np. In order to thoroughly study the mechanism by which the PS catalyzes pepsin folding, a soluble protein expression system was developed to produce recombinant PS peptide in a highly pure form. Using this system, the wild-type and three-mutant PS forms, in which single residue substitutions were made (V4A, R8A and K36A), were expressed and purified. These PS peptides were characterized for their ability to inhibit Np enzymatic activity and to catalyze the folding of Rp to Np. The V4A, R8A and K36A mutant PS peptides were found to have nanomolar inhibition constants, Ki, of 82.4, 58.3 and 95.6 nM, respectively, approximately a two-fold increase from that of the wild-type PS (36.2 nM). All three-mutant PS peptides were found to catalyze Np folding with a rate constant of 0.06 min(-1), five-fold lower than that of the wild-type. The observation that the mutant PS peptides retained their inhibition and folding-catalyst functionality suggests a high level of resilience to mutations of the pepsin PS.

  14. Protein folding and conformational stress in microbial cells producing recombinant proteins: a host comparative overview

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Brigitte; Saloheimo, Markku; Rinas, Ursula; Dragosits, Martin; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Baumann, Kristin; Giuliani, Maria; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Branduardi, Paola; Lang, Christine; Porro, Danilo; Ferrer, Pau; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Mattanovich, Diethard; Villaverde, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Different species of microorganisms including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria have been used in the past 25 years for the controlled production of foreign proteins of scientific, pharmacological or industrial interest. A major obstacle for protein production processes and a limit to overall success has been the abundance of misfolded polypeptides, which fail to reach their native conformation. The presence of misfolded or folding-reluctant protein species causes considerable stress in host cells. The characterization of such adverse conditions and the elicited cell responses have permitted to better understand the physiology and molecular biology of conformational stress. Therefore, microbial cell factories for recombinant protein production are depicted here as a source of knowledge that has considerably helped to picture the extremely rich landscape of in vivo protein folding, and the main cellular players of this complex process are described for the most important cell factories used for biotechnological purposes. PMID:18394160

  15. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy study of recombinant T β4 folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Chin; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chen, Peng-Jen; Chang, Chia-Ching

    Thymosin beta 4 (T β4) is a 43-amino acid small peptide, has been demonstrated that it can promote cardiac repair, wound repair, tissue protection, and involve in the proliferation of blood cell precursor stem cells of bone marrow. Moreover, T β4 has been identified as a multifunction intrinsically disordered protein, which is lacking the stable tertiary structure. Owing to the small size and disordered character, the T β4 protein degrades rapidly and the storage condition is critical. Therefore, it is not easy to reveal its folding mechanism of native T β4. However, recombinant T β4 protein (rT β4), which fused with a 5-kDa peptide in its amino-terminal, is stable and possesses identical function of T β4. Therefore, rT β4 can be used to study its folding mechanism. By using over-critical folding process, stable folding intermediates of rT β4 can be obtained. Structure analysis of folding intermediates by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies indicate that rT β4 is a random coli major protein and its hydrophobic region becomes compact gradually. Moreover, the rT β4 folding is a two state transition. Thermal denaturation analysis indicates that rT β4 lacks stable tertiary structure. These results indicated that rT β4, similar to T β4, is an intrinsically disordered protein. Research is supported by MOST, Taiwan. MOST 103-2112-M-009-011-MY3. Corresponding author: Chia-Ching Chang; ccchang01@faculty.nctu.edu.tw.

  16. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  17. A structural requirement of zinc for the folding of recombinant link protein.

    PubMed

    Varelas, J B; Roy, C; Hering, T M

    1997-11-01

    We have cloned and ligated a full-length bovine link protein (LP) in the pMAL-c2 vector and overexpressed it in fusion with maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli. We have demonstrated dose-dependent binding of MBP/LP to biotinylated hyaluronan in a dot blot assay. A greater percentage of the expressed fusion protein was soluble, monomeric, and undegraded when the growth temperature was lowered, the growth medium was supplemented with zinc, and metal chelators were omitted from the lysis buffers. Similar effects were observed when we tested the effects of lower growth temperature and zinc supplementation on another construct consisting of MBP in fusion with the first proteoglycan tandem repeat of LP. Our results suggest zinc may be necessary for the folding and disulfide bond formation of recombinant LP. In addition, a greater amount of monomeric MBP/LP produced at 27 degrees C with zinc supplementation bound to biotinylated hyaluronic acid-binding region of aggrecan than MBP/LP produced at 27 or 37 degrees C without zinc. This suggests that recombinant LP may have a conformational requirement for zinc necessary for binding to aggrecan. Factor Xa cleavage of MBP/LP expressed in the presence of zinc yielded much more intact LP product than cleavage of MBP/LP expressed without zinc. These data indicate a structural role of zinc that allows MBP/LP to fold in a manner such that it is resistant to proteolytic degradation. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  18. Folding correction of ABC-transporter ABCB1 by pharmacological chaperones: a mechanistic concept.

    PubMed

    Spork, Matthias; Sohail, Muhammad Imran; Schmid, Diethart; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter; Stockner, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Point mutations of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are a common cause of human diseases. Available crystal structures indicate a similarity in the architecture of several members of this protein family. Their molecular architecture makes these proteins vulnerable to mutation, when critical structural elements are affected. The latter preferentially involve the two transmembrane domain (TMD)/nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) interfaces (transmission interfaces), formation of which requires engagement of coupling helices of intracellular loops with NBDs. Both, formation of the active sites and engagement of the coupling helices, are contingent on correct positioning of ICLs 2 and 4 and thus an important prerequisite for proper folding. Here, we show that active site compounds are capable of rescuing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mutants ∆Y490 and ∆Y1133 in a concentration-dependent manner. These trafficking deficient mutations are located at the transmission interface in pseudosymmetric position to each other. In addition, the ability of propafenone analogs to correct folding correlates with their ability to inhibit transport of model substrates. This finding indicates that folding correction and transport inhibition by propafenone analogs are brought about by binding to the active sites. Furthermore, this study demonstrates an asymmetry in folding correction with cis-flupentixol, which reflects the asymmetric binding properties of this modulator to P-gp. Our results suggest a mechanistic model for corrector action in a model ABC transporter based on insights into the molecular architecture of these transporters.

  19. Direct assay for endo-α-mannosidase substrate preference on correctly folded and misfolded model glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Takeda, Yoichi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-03

    We previously reported a unique assay system for UDP-glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) toward glycoprotein folding intermediates during the folding process. The assay involved the in vitro folding of both high-mannose type oligosaccharyl crambin, which yielded only the correctly folded glycoprotein form (M9-glycosyl-native-crambin), and its mutant, which yielded misfolded glycoproteins (M9-glycosyl-misfolded-crambin), in the presence of UGGT. The process successfully yielded both mono-glucosylated M9-glycosyl-native-crambin (G1M9-glycosyl-native-crambin) and M9-glycosyl-misfolded-crambin (G1M9-glycosyl-misfolded-crambin). Here, we report the use of our in vitro folding system to evaluate the substrate preference of Golgi endo-α-mannosidase against G1M9-native and -misfolded glycoprotein forms. In our assay Golgi endo-α-mannosidase removed Glc-α-1-3-Man unit from G1M9-native and -misfolded-crambins clearly proving that Golgi endo-α-mannosidase does not have specific preference for correctly folded or misfolded protein structure.

  20. Correctly folded Pfs48/45 protein of Plasmodium falciparum elicits malaria transmission-blocking immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Outchkourov, Nikolay S.; Roeffen, Will; Kaan, Anita; Jansen, Josephine; Luty, Adrian; Schuiffel, Danielle; van Gemert, Geert Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2008-01-01

    Malaria kills >1 million people each year, in particular in sub-Saharan Africa. Although asexual forms are directly responsible for disease and death, sexual stages account for the transmission of Plasmodium parasites from human to the mosquito vector and therefore the spread of the parasite in the population. Development of a malaria vaccine is urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Vaccines against sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum are meant to decrease the force of transmission and consequently reduce malaria burden. Pfs48/45 is specifically expressed in sexual stages and is a well established transmission-blocking (TB) vaccine candidate. However, production of correctly folded recombinant Pfs48/45 protein with display of its TB epitopes has been a major challenge. Here, we show the production of a properly folded Pfs48/45 C-terminal fragment by simultaneous coexpression with four periplasmic folding catalysts in Escherichia coli. This C-terminal fragment fused to maltose binding protein was produced at medium scale with >90% purity and a stability over at least a 9-month period. It induces uniform and high antibody titers in mice and elicits functional TB antibodies in standard membrane feeding assays in 90% of the immunized mice. Our data provide a clear perspective on the clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based TB malaria vaccine. PMID:18332422

  1. Carbon dioxide therapy and hyaluronic acid for cosmetic correction of the nasolabial folds.

    PubMed

    Nisi, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Roberto; Brandi, Cesare; Grimaldi, Luca; Sisti, Andrea; D'Aniello, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The main application of hyaluronic acid filling, in esthetic medicine, is the augmentation of soft tissues. The carbon dioxide therapy, instead, improves quality and elasticity of the dermis and increases the oxygen release to the tissue through an enhancing of the Bohr's effect. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and effect duration of hyaluronic acid fillers and the use of carbon dioxide therapy plus hyaluronic acid in the cosmetic correction of nasolabial folds. Forty healthy female patients received a blinded and randomized treatment on nasolabial folds (hyaluronic acid in group A and hyaluronic acid plus subcutaneous injections of carbon dioxide in group B) for cosmetic correction of the nasolabial folds. The results were evaluated by two blinded plastic surgeons after the implant (1 week, 4 and 6 months) using a 1-5 graduated scale (GAIS), and at the same time, each patient was asked to express her opinion about the cosmetic result. Any long-term adverse reaction was reported. The blinded evaluation at 4 and 6 months from the implant shows in all patients a maintenance of a good cosmetic result higher for the side treated with carbon dioxide therapy plus hyaluronic acid. At the control visit, 6 months after the treatment, the patients treated with hyaluronic acid plus carbon dioxide therapy maintain a satisfactory esthetic result while the nasolabial fold treated only with hyaluronic acid shows, in almost all patients, a come back to pretreatment appearance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. FRankenstein becomes a cyborg: the automatic recombination and realignment of fold recognition models in CASP6.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Jan; Gajda, Michal J; Cymerman, Iwona A; Kurowski, Michal A; Pawlowski, Marcin; Boniecki, Michal; Obarska, Agnieszka; Papaj, Grzegorz; Sroczynska-Obuchowicz, Paulina; Tkaczuk, Karolina L; Sniezynska, Paulina; Sasin, Joanna M; Augustyn, Anna; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    In the course of CASP6, we generated models for all targets using a new version of the "FRankenstein's monster approach." Previously (in CASP5) we were able to build many very accurate full-atom models by selection and recombination of well-folded fragments obtained from crude fold recognition (FR) results, followed by optimization of the sequence-structure fit and assessment of alternative alignments on the structural level. This procedure was however very arduous, as most of the steps required extensive visual and manual input from the human modeler. Now, we have automated the most tedious steps, such as superposition of alternative models, extraction of best-scoring fragments, and construction of a hybrid "monster" structure, as well as generation of alternative alignments in the regions that remain poorly scored in the refined hybrid model. We have also included the ROSETTA method to construct those parts of the target for which no reasonable structures were generated by FR methods (such as long insertions and terminal extensions). The analysis of successes and failures of the current version of the FRankenstein approach in modeling of CASP6 targets reveals that the considerably streamlined and automated method performs almost as well as the initial, mostly manual version, which suggests that it may be a useful tool for accurate protein structure prediction even in the hands of nonexperts. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Folded or Not? Tracking Bet v 1 Conformation in Recombinant Allergen Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Seutter von Loetzen, Christian; Schweimer, Kristian; Bellinghausen, Iris; Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C.; Vogel, Lothar; Völker, Elke; Randow, Stefanie; Reuter, Andreas; Rösch, Paul; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Schiller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant Bet v 1a (rBet v 1a) has been used in allergy research for more than three decades, including clinical application of so-called hypoallergens. Quantitative IgE binding to rBet v 1a depends on its native protein conformation, which might be compromised upon heterologous expression, purification, or mutational engineering of rBet v 1a. Objective To correlate experimental/theoretical comparisons of IgE binding of defined molar ratios of folded/misfolded recombinant Bet v 1a variants and to determine accuracy and precision of immuno- and physicochemical assays routinely used to assess the quality of recombinant allergen preparations. Methods rBet v 1a and its misfolded variant rBet v 1aS112P/R145P were heterologously expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Structural integrities and oligomerisation of the recombinant allergens were evaluated by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). IgE binding of defined combinations of rBet v 1a and rBet v 1aS112P/R145P was assessed using immunoblotting (IB), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and mediator release (MR) of humanized rat basophilic leukemia cells sensitized with serum IgE of subjects allergic to birch pollen. Experimental and theoretically expected results of the analyses were compared. Results 1H-NMR spectra of rBet v 1a and rBet v 1aS112P/R145P demonstrate a native and highly disordered protein conformations, respectively. The CD spectra suggested typical alpha-helical and beta-sheet secondary structure content of rBet v 1a and random coil for rBet v 1aS112P/R145P. The hydrodynamic radii (RH) of 2.49 ± 0.39 nm (rBet v 1a) and 3.1 ± 0.56 nm (rBet v 1aS112P/R145P) showed monomeric dispersion of both allergens in solution. Serum IgE of birch pollen allergic subjects bound to 0.1% rBet v 1a in the presence of 99.9% of non-IgE binding rBet v 1aS112P/R145P. Immunoblot analysis overestimated, whereas ELISA and

  4. Optimal correction of distinct CFTR folding mutants in rectal cystic fibrosis organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Gogorza Gondra, Ricardo A; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte M; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Small-molecule therapies that restore defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gating (potentiators) or trafficking (correctors) are being developed for cystic fibrosis (CF) in a mutation-specific fashion. Options for pharmacological correction of CFTR-p.Phe508del (F508del) are being extensively studied but correction of other trafficking mutants that may also benefit from corrector treatment remains largely unknown.We studied correction of the folding mutants CFTR-p.Phe508del, -p.Ala455Glu (A455E) and -p.Asn1303Lys (N1303K) by VX-809 and 18 other correctors (C1-C18) using a functional CFTR assay in human intestinal CF organoids.Function of both CFTR-p.Phe508del and -p.Ala455Glu was enhanced by a variety of correctors but no residual or corrector-induced activity was associated with CFTR-p.Asn1303Lys. Importantly, VX-809-induced correction was most dominant for CFTR-p.Phe508del, while correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu was highest by a subgroup of compounds called bithiazoles (C4, C13, C14 and C17) and C5.These data support the development of mutation-specific correctors for optimal treatment of different CFTR trafficking mutants, and identify C5 and bithiazoles as the most promising compounds for correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu.

  5. A beta-turn rich barley seed protein is correctly folded in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamas, L; Greenfield, J; Halford, N G; Tatham, A S; Shewry, P R

    1994-08-01

    Wild-type and cysteine-containing mutant C hordeins from barley were expressed in Escherichia coli at high levels (> or = 30mg/liter). N-terminal sequence analysis, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, cd spectroscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering demonstrated that their physicochemical properties were similar to those of C hordeins isolated from barley grain. This indicates that the expressed proteins were correctly folded. The cysteine-containing mutant showed evidence of polymer formation in E. coli, nonreduced preparations of the protein showing the presence of polymers that were replaced by a single protein when a reducing agent was added.

  6. SHuffle, a novel Escherichia coli protein expression strain capable of correctly folding disulfide bonded proteins in its cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lobstein, Julie; Emrich, Charlie A; Jeans, Chris; Faulkner, Melinda; Riggs, Paul; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2012-05-08

    Production of correctly disulfide bonded proteins to high yields remains a challenge. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli is the popular choice, especially within the research community. While there is an ever growing demand for new expression strains, few strains are dedicated to post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation. Thus, new protein expression strains must be engineered and the parameters involved in producing disulfide bonded proteins must be understood. We have engineered a new E. coli protein expression strain named SHuffle, dedicated to producing correctly disulfide bonded active proteins to high yields within its cytoplasm. This strain is based on the trxB gor suppressor strain SMG96 where its cytoplasmic reductive pathways have been diminished, allowing for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. We have further engineered a major improvement by integrating into its chromosome a signal sequenceless disulfide bond isomerase, DsbC. We probed the redox state of DsbC in the oxidizing cytoplasm and evaluated its role in assisting the formation of correctly folded multi-disulfide bonded proteins. We optimized protein expression conditions, varying temperature, induction conditions, strain background and the co-expression of various helper proteins. We found that temperature has the biggest impact on improving yields and that the E. coli B strain background of this strain was superior to the K12 version. We also discovered that auto-expression of substrate target proteins using this strain resulted in higher yields of active pure protein. Finally, we found that co-expression of mutant thioredoxins and PDI homologs improved yields of various substrate proteins. This work is the first extensive characterization of the trxB gor suppressor strain. The results presented should help researchers design the appropriate protein expression conditions using SHuffle strains.

  7. SHuffle, a novel Escherichia coli protein expression strain capable of correctly folding disulfide bonded proteins in its cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Production of correctly disulfide bonded proteins to high yields remains a challenge. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli is the popular choice, especially within the research community. While there is an ever growing demand for new expression strains, few strains are dedicated to post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation. Thus, new protein expression strains must be engineered and the parameters involved in producing disulfide bonded proteins must be understood. Results We have engineered a new E. coli protein expression strain named SHuffle, dedicated to producing correctly disulfide bonded active proteins to high yields within its cytoplasm. This strain is based on the trxB gor suppressor strain SMG96 where its cytoplasmic reductive pathways have been diminished, allowing for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. We have further engineered a major improvement by integrating into its chromosome a signal sequenceless disulfide bond isomerase, DsbC. We probed the redox state of DsbC in the oxidizing cytoplasm and evaluated its role in assisting the formation of correctly folded multi-disulfide bonded proteins. We optimized protein expression conditions, varying temperature, induction conditions, strain background and the co-expression of various helper proteins. We found that temperature has the biggest impact on improving yields and that the E. coli B strain background of this strain was superior to the K12 version. We also discovered that auto-expression of substrate target proteins using this strain resulted in higher yields of active pure protein. Finally, we found that co-expression of mutant thioredoxins and PDI homologs improved yields of various substrate proteins. Conclusions This work is the first extensive characterization of the trxB gor suppressor strain. The results presented should help researchers design the appropriate protein expression conditions using SHuffle strains. PMID:22569138

  8. Assembling a Correctly Folded and Functional Heptahelical Membrane Protein by Protein Trans-splicing*

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Michaela; Eckert, Carl Elias; Busche, Alena; Kulhei, Jennifer; Michaelis, Jonas; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Wachtveitl, Josef; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Protein trans-splicing using split inteins is well established as a useful tool for protein engineering. Here we show, for the first time, that this method can be applied to a membrane protein under native conditions. We provide compelling evidence that the heptahelical proteorhodopsin can be assembled from two separate fragments consisting of helical bundles A and B and C, D, E, F, and G via a splicing site located in the BC loop. The procedure presented here is on the basis of dual expression and ligation in vivo. Global fold, stability, and photodynamics were analyzed in detergent by CD, stationary, as well as time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The fold within lipid bilayers has been probed by high field and dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR utilizing a 13C-labeled retinal cofactor and extensively 13C-15N-labeled protein. Our data show unambiguously that the ligation product is identical to its non-ligated counterpart. Furthermore, our data highlight the effects of BC loop modifications onto the photocycle kinetics of proteorhodopsin. Our data demonstrate that a correctly folded and functionally intact protein can be produced in this artificial way. Our findings are of high relevance for a general understanding of the assembly of membrane proteins for elucidating intramolecular interactions, and they offer the possibility of developing novel labeling schemes for spectroscopic applications. PMID:26405032

  9. Anchor epicanthoplasty combined with out-fold type double eyelidplasty for Asians: do we have to make an additional scar to correct the Asian epicanthal fold?

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Lee, E; Park, W J

    2000-04-01

    The epicanthal fold along with a lack of a superior palpebral fold, excessive fat, and laxity of pretarsal skin represent the ethnic characteristics and a traditional sense of beauty in the Asian upper eyelid. But, too prominent an epicanthal fold may ruin an otherwise beautiful eye; furthermore, it becomes a restriction that makes the out-fold type double eyelidplasty, one of the two main types of double eyelidplasty, impossible. If a double eyelid as an out-fold type is desired, a concomitant epicanthoplasty should be performed with the possibility of hypertrophic scarring of the medial canthal area in Asians. To address the Asian epicanthal fold without danger of hypertrophic scarring, the authors developed an anchor epicanthoplasty technique that leaves no additional scar when combined with a double eyelidplasty. This technique is based on the concept of trimming of muscle and soft tissue under the Asian epicanthal fold and downward medial advancement and anchoring of the medial canthal skin to the deep tissue. The technique consists of five procedures based on the assumed causes of the Asian epicanthal fold: (1) augmentation rhinoplasty, (2) downward medial advancement of the medial upper lid skin, (3) removal of the superficial insertion of the medial canthal ligament and selective removal of the orbicularis oculi muscle, (4) subcutaneous contouring of the thick nasal skin, and (5) anchoring of the medial end of the incision to the deep tissue. During the past 12 years (1988 to 1999), 67 anchor epicanthoplasty procedures have been performed. Twenty-eight cases were followed up for more than 3 months, and all of the patients were satisfied with the results. There were only a few minor complications, which could be corrected with minimal revision. As an ancillary procedure to a double eyelidplasty, this anchor epicanthoplasty can reduce the Asian epicanthal fold and make a double fold as an out-fold type without an additional scar. In terms of hypertrophic

  10. Efficient production of a correctly folded mouse α-defensin, cryptdin-4, by refolding during inclusion body solubilization.

    PubMed

    Tomisawa, Satoshi; Sato, Yuji; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Kawano, Keiichi; Demura, Makoto; Nakamura, Kiminori; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian α-defensins contribute to innate immunity by exerting antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. To perform structural and functional analysis of α-defensins, large amounts of α-defensins are essential. Although many expression systems for the production of recombinant α-defensins have been developed, attempts to obtain large amounts of α-defensins have been only moderately successful. Therefore, in this study, we applied a previously developed aggregation-prone protein coexpression method for the production of mouse α-defensin cryptdin-4 (Crp4) in order to enhance the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli expression system. By using this method, we succeeded in obtaining a large amount of Crp4 in the form of inclusion bodies. Moreover, we attempted to refold Crp4 directly during the inclusion-body solubilization step under oxidative conditions. Surprisingly, even without any purification, Crp4 was efficiently refolded during the solubilization step of inclusion bodies, and the yield was better than that of the conventional refolding method. NMR spectra of purified Crp4 suggested that it was folded into its correct tertiary structure. Therefore, the method described in this study not only enhances the expression of α-defensin as inclusion bodies, but also eliminates the cumbersome and time-consuming refolding step.

  11. Recombinant filaggrin is internalized and processed to correct filaggrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stout, Thomas E; McFarland, Trevor; Mitchell, John C; Appukuttan, Binoy; Timothy Stout, J

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to engineer a functional filaggrin (FLG) monomer linked to a cell-penetrating peptide (RMR) and to test the ability of this peptide to penetrate epidermal tissue as a therapeutic strategy for genetically determined atopic dermatitis (AD). A single repeat of the murine filaggrin gene (Flg) was covalently linked to a RMR motif and cloned into a bacterial expression system for protein production. Purified FLG+RMR (mFLG+RMR) was applied in vitro to HEK-293T cells and a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) tissue model. Immunochemistry demonstrated RMR-dependent cellular uptake of FLG+RMR in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HEK cells. Immunohistochemical staining of the RHE model identified penetration of FLG+RMR to the stratum granulosum, the epidermal layer at which FLG deficiency is thought to be pathologically relevant. In vivo application of FLG+RMR to FLG-deficient flaky tail (ft/ft) mice skin demonstrated internalization and processing of recombinant FLG+RMR to restore the normal phenotype. These results suggest that topically applied RMR-linked FLG monomers are able to penetrate epidermal tissue, be internalized into the appropriate cell type, and be processed to a size similar to wild-type functional barrier peptides to restore necessary barrier function, and prove to be therapeutic for patients with AD.

  12. A High Through-put Platform for Recombinant Antibodies to Folded Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Michael; Paduch, Marcin; Miersch, Shane; Sääf, Annika; Matsuguchi, Tet; Lee, Brian; Wypisniak, Karolina; Doak, Allison; King, Daniel; Usatyuk, Svitlana; Perry, Kimberly; Lu, Vince; Thomas, William; Luke, Judy; Goodman, Jay; Hoey, Robert J.; Lai, Darson; Griffin, Carly; Li, Zhijian; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Dong, Debbie; Campbell, Elliot; Anderson, Stephen; Zhong, Nan; Gräslund, Susanne; Koide, Shohei; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Wells, James

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key reagents in biology and medicine, but commercial sources are rarely recombinant and thus do not provide a permanent and renewable resource. Here, we describe an industrialized platform to generate antigens and validated recombinant antibodies for 346 transcription factors (TFs) and 211 epigenetic antigens. We describe an optimized automated phage display and antigen expression pipeline that in aggregate produced about 3000 sequenced Fragment antigen-binding domain that had high affinity (typically EC50<20 nm), high stability (Tm∼80 °C), good expression in E. coli (∼5 mg/L), and ability to bind antigen in complex cell lysates. We evaluated a subset of Fabs generated to homologous SCAN domains for binding specificities. These Fragment antigen-binding domains were monospecific to their target SCAN antigen except in rare cases where they cross-reacted with a few highly related antigens. Remarkably, immunofluorescence experiments in six cell lines for 270 of the TF antigens, each having multiple antibodies, show that ∼70% stain predominantly in the cytosol and ∼20% stain in the nucleus which reinforces the dominant role that translocation plays in TF biology. These cloned antibody reagents are being made available to the academic community through our web site recombinant-antibodies.org to allow a more system-wide analysis of TF and chromatin biology. We believe these platforms, infrastructure, and automated approaches will facilitate the next generation of renewable antibody reagents to the human proteome in the coming decade. PMID:26290498

  13. A High Through-put Platform for Recombinant Antibodies to Folded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, Michael; Paduch, Marcin; Miersch, Shane; Sääf, Annika; Matsuguchi, Tet; Lee, Brian; Wypisniak, Karolina; Doak, Allison; King, Daniel; Usatyuk, Svitlana; Perry, Kimberly; Lu, Vince; Thomas, William; Luke, Judy; Goodman, Jay; Hoey, Robert J; Lai, Darson; Griffin, Carly; Li, Zhijian; Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Dong, Debbie; Campbell, Elliot; Anderson, Stephen; Zhong, Nan; Gräslund, Susanne; Koide, Shohei; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kossiakoff, Anthony; Wells, James

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies are key reagents in biology and medicine, but commercial sources are rarely recombinant and thus do not provide a permanent and renewable resource. Here, we describe an industrialized platform to generate antigens and validated recombinant antibodies for 346 transcription factors (TFs) and 211 epigenetic antigens. We describe an optimized automated phage display and antigen expression pipeline that in aggregate produced about 3000 sequenced Fragment antigen-binding domain that had high affinity (typically EC50<20 nm), high stability (Tm∼80 °C), good expression in E. coli (∼5 mg/L), and ability to bind antigen in complex cell lysates. We evaluated a subset of Fabs generated to homologous SCAN domains for binding specificities. These Fragment antigen-binding domains were monospecific to their target SCAN antigen except in rare cases where they cross-reacted with a few highly related antigens. Remarkably, immunofluorescence experiments in six cell lines for 270 of the TF antigens, each having multiple antibodies, show that ∼70% stain predominantly in the cytosol and ∼20% stain in the nucleus which reinforces the dominant role that translocation plays in TF biology. These cloned antibody reagents are being made available to the academic community through our web site recombinant-antibodies.org to allow a more system-wide analysis of TF and chromatin biology. We believe these platforms, infrastructure, and automated approaches will facilitate the next generation of renewable antibody reagents to the human proteome in the coming decade.

  14. QED corrections to radiative recombination and radiative decay of heavy hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, J.; Artemyev, A. N.; Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2015-10-01

    One-loop quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections are studied for two basic atomic processes, radiative recombination of an electron with a bare nucleus and radiative decay of a hydrogenlike ion. The perturbations of the bound-state wave function and the binding energy due to the electron self-energy and the vacuum polarization are computed in the Feynman and Coulomb gauges. QED corrections induced by these perturbations are calculated for the differential cross section and the polarization of the emitted radiation in the radiative recombination of an electron and a bare uranium nuclei, as well as the corresponding corrections to the ratio of the E 1 (electric dipole) and M 2 (magnetic quadrupole) transition amplitudes in the 2 p3 /2→1 s radiative decay of hydrogenlike uranium. The results obtained indicate the expected magnitude of the QED effects in these processes on a subpercent level.

  15. Exploration of twin‐arginine translocation for expression and purification of correctly folded proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Adam C.; Kim, Jae‐Young; Perez‐Rodriguez, Ritsdeliz; Tullman‐Ercek, Danielle; Fish, Wallace R.; Henderson, Lee A.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Historically, the general secretory (Sec) pathway of Gram‐negative bacteria has served as the primary route by which heterologous proteins are delivered to the periplasm in numerous expression and engineering applications. Here we have systematically examined the twin‐arginine translocation (Tat) pathway as an alternative, and possibly advantageous, secretion pathway for heterologous proteins. Overall, we found that: (i) export efficiency and periplasmic yield of a model substrate were affected by the composition of the Tat signal peptide, (ii) Tat substrates were correctly processed at their N‐termini upon reaching the periplasm and (iii) proteins fused to maltose‐binding protein (MBP) were reliably exported by the Tat system, but only when correctly folded; aberrantly folded MBP fusions were excluded by the Tat pathway's folding quality control feature. We also observed that Tat export yield was comparable to Sec for relatively small, well‐folded proteins, higher relative to Sec for proteins that required cytoplasmic folding, and lower relative to Sec for larger, soluble fusion proteins. Interestingly, the specific activity of material purified from the periplasm was higher for certain Tat substrates relative to their Sec counterparts, suggesting that Tat expression can give rise to relatively pure and highly active proteins in one step. PMID:21261860

  16. Reversible protection of disulfide bonds followed by oxidative folding render recombinant hCGbeta highly immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    2000-03-06

    Active immunization of women against human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been considered as a promising option for contraception. However, prototype hCG vaccines based on natural sources of antigen are expected to be costlier for use by common people. In the present report, a functionally active, cost-effective antigen of bacterial origin has been described. Sulfonation of thiol groups of the protein, anion-exchange purification, refolding with concomitant formation of disulfide bonds in the presence of cysteamine-cystamine redox buffer, and slow removal of denaturant resulted in 95% homogeneous, monomeric form of the antigen. The recombinant processed antigen [CGbeta(p)] obtained this way was highly immunopotent. Cellular DNA and endotoxin contaminants were appreciably low in the final product. The immunogenic response was drastically reduced with the unprocessed antigen. This finding envisages better prospect of a cost-effective hCG vaccine for birth control.

  17. Benefits and risks of anemia correction with recombinant human erythropoietin in children maintained by hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Montini, G; Zacchello, G; Baraldi, E; Zanconato, S; Suppiej, A; Fabris, F; Andreetta, B; Pavanello, L; Zacchello, F

    1990-10-01

    Ten children with renal failure (age range 2 years 6 months to 18 years 9 months; median 11 years 10 months), maintained by long-term hemodialysis, had successful correction of their anemia after intravenous administration of recombinant human erythropoietin in a dosage escalating every 2 weeks (75 to 150 to 300 to 450 IU/kg/wk). Mean hemoglobin concentration increased from 6.4 +/- 0.9 to 11.5 +/- 1.0 gm/dl. Blood cell counts used to evaluate the correction of anemia were done after dialysis; this was especially important for children less compliant with water restriction. The higher hemoglobin concentration resulted in improvement of the quality of life, a greater tolerance for physical effort (exercise tolerance doubled and the ventilatory anaerobic threshold increased significantly), correction of some subclinical central nervous system abnormalities detected by evoked potentials testing, and reduction of bleeding time. Few side effects were noted; severe hypertension developed in one patient when postdialysis hematocrit was only 28%, and there were two episodes of hypertransaminasemia with no other evidence of liver dysfunction. We conclude that in children with renal failure the use of recombinant human erythropoietin to correct anemia is safe and strongly advisable, because of the resolution of many of the symptoms correlated with anemia.

  18. Mild Ptosis Correction with the Stitch Method During Incisional Double Fold Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Ilho

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous methods exist for simultaneous correction of mild blepharoptosis during double eyelid surgery. These methods are generally categorized into either incisional (open) or non-incisional (suture) methods. The incisional method is commonly used for the creation of the double eyelid crease in patients with excessive or thick skin. However, concurrent open ptosis correction is often marred by the lengthy period of intraoperative adjustment, causing more swelling, a longer recovery time, and an increased risk of postoperative complications. Methods The authors have devised a new, minimally invasive technique to alleviate mild ptosis during incisional double eyelid surgery. The anterior lamella is approached through the incisional technique for the creation of a double eyelid while the posterior lamella, including Muller's and levator muscles, is approached with the suture method for Muller's plication and ptosis correction. Results The procedure described was utilized in 28 patients from June 2012 to August 2012. Postoperative asymmetry was noted in one patient who had severe preoperative conjunctival scarring. Otherwise, ptosis was corrected as planned in the rest of the cases and all of the patients were satisfied with their postoperative appearance and experienced no complications. Conclusions Our hybrid technique combines the benefits of both the incisional and suture methods, allowing for a predictable and easily reproducible correction of blepharoptosis with an aesthetically pleasing double eyelid. PMID:24511498

  19. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  20. Correction: The effect of recombination under short-circuit conditions on the determination of charge transport properties in nanostructured photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Cab, J; Anta, J A; Oskam, G

    2016-05-28

    Correction for 'The effect of recombination under short-circuit conditions on the determination of charge transport properties in nanostructured photoelectrodes' by J. Villanueva-Cab et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 2303-2308.

  1. Efficiency of integron cassette insertion in correct orientation is ensured by the interplay of the three unpaired features of attC recombination sites

    PubMed Central

    Nivina, Aleksandra; Escudero, José Antonio; Vit, Claire; Mazel, Didier; Loot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The integron is a bacterial recombination system that allows acquisition, stockpiling and expression of cassettes carrying protein-coding sequences, and is responsible for the emergence and rise of multiresistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The functionality of this system depends on the insertion of promoterless cassettes in correct orientation, allowing their expression from the promoter located upstream of the cassette array. Correct orientation is ensured by strand selectivity of integron integrases for the bottom strand of cassette recombination sites (attC), recombined in form of folded single-stranded hairpins. Here, we investigated the basis of such strand selectivity by comparing recombination of wild-type and mutated attC sites with different lengths, sequences and structures. We show that all three unpaired structural features that distinguish the bottom and top strands contribute to strand selectivity. The localization of Extra-Helical Bases (EHBs) directly favors integrase binding to the bottom strand. The Unpaired Central Spacer (UCS) and the Variable Terminal Structure (VTS) influence strand selectivity indirectly, probably through the stabilization of the bottom strand and the resulting synapse due to the nucleotide skew between the two strands. These results underscore the importance of the single-stranded nature of the attC site that allows such tight control over integron cassette orientation. PMID:27496283

  2. Correct folding of an α-helix and a β-hairpin using a polarized 2D torsional potential

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ya; Li, Yongxiu; Mou, Lirong; Lin, Bingbing; Zhang, John Z. H.; Mei, Ye

    2015-01-01

    A new modification to the AMBER force field that incorporates the coupled two-dimensional main chain torsion energy has been evaluated for the balanced representation of secondary structures. In this modified AMBER force field (AMBER032D), the main chain torsion energy is represented by 2-dimensional Fourier expansions with parameters fitted to the potential energy surface generated by high-level quantum mechanical calculations of small peptides in solution. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the folding of two model peptides adopting either α-helix or β-hairpin structures. Both peptides are successfully folded into their native structures using an AMBER032D force field with the implementation of a polarization scheme (AMBER032Dp). For comparison, simulations using a standard AMBER03 force field with and without polarization, as well as AMBER032D without polarization, fail to fold both peptides successfully. The correction to secondary structure propensity in the AMBER03 force field and the polarization effect are critical to folding Trpzip2; without these factors, a helical structure is obtained. This study strongly suggests that this new force field is capable of providing a more balanced preference for helical and extended conformations. The electrostatic polarization effect is shown to be indispensable to the growth of secondary structures. PMID:26039188

  3. Characterization of a defensin from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Recombinant production, folding, solution structure, antimicrobial activities, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Yannick; Herpin, Amaury; Aumelas, André; Garnier, Julien; Fievet, Julie; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Bulet, Philippe; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Lelong, Christophe; Favrel, Pascal; Bachère, Evelyne

    2006-01-06

    In invertebrates, defensins were found in arthropods and in the mussels. Here, we report for the first time the identification and characterization of a defensin (Cg-Def) from an oyster. Cg-def mRNA was isolated from Crassostrea gigas mantle using an expressed sequence tag approach. To gain insight into potential roles of Cg-Def in oyster immunity, we produced the recombinant peptide in Escherichia coli, characterized its antimicrobial activities, determined its solution structure by NMR spectroscopy, and quantified its gene expression in vivo following bacterial challenge of oysters. Recombinant Cg-Def was active in vitro against Gram-positive bacteria but showed no or limited activities against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The activity of Cg-Def was retained in vitro at a salt concentration similar to that of seawater. The Cg-Def structure shares the so-called cystine-stabilized alpha-beta motif (CS-alphabeta) with arthropod defensins but is characterized by the presence of an additional disulfide bond, as previously observed in the mussel defensin (MGD-1). Nevertheless, despite a similar global fold, the Cg-Def and MGD-1 structures mainly differ by the size of their loops and by the presence of two aspartic residues in Cg-Def. Distribution of Cg-def mRNA in various oyster tissues revealed that Cg-def is mainly expressed in mantle edge where it was detected by mass spectrometry analyses. Furthermore, we observed that the Cg-def messenger concentration was unchanged after bacterial challenge. Our results suggest that Cg-def gene is continuously expressed in the mantle and would play a key role in oyster by providing a first line of defense against pathogen colonization.

  4. Correction of sickle cell disease by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Chen; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Ryan, Thomas M; Pawlik, Kevin M; Ren, Jinxiang; Townes, Tim M

    2006-08-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sickle cell disease (SCD) can be corrected in mouse models by transduction of hematopoietic stem cells with lentiviral vectors containing antisickling globin genes followed by transplantation of these cells into syngeneic recipients. Although self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors with or without insulator elements should provide a safe and effective treatment in humans, some concerns about insertional mutagenesis persist. An ideal correction would involve replacement of the sickle globin gene (beta(S)) with a normal copy of the gene (beta(A)). We recently derived embryonic stem (ES) cells from a novel knock-in mouse model of SCD and tested a protocol for correcting the sickle mutation by homologous recombination. In this paper, we demonstrate the replacement of the human beta(S)-globin gene with a human beta(A)-globin gene and the derivation of mice from these cells. The animals produce high levels of normal human hemoglobin (HbA) and the pathology associated with SCD is corrected. Hematologic values are restored to normal levels and organ pathology is ameliorated. These experiments provide a foundation for similar studies in human ES cells derived from sickle cell patients. Although efficient methods for production of human ES cells by somatic nuclear transfer must be developed, the data in this paper demonstrate that sickle cell disease can be corrected without the risk of insertional mutagenesis.

  5. Folding, Assembly, and Aggregation of Recombinant Murine Amelogenins with T21I and P41T Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Lei, Ya-Ping; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Two point mutations (T21I and P40T) within amelogenin have been identified from human DNA sequences in 2 instances of amelogenesis imperfecta. We studied the folding and self-assembly of recombinant amelogenin (rM180) compared to the T21I and P40T mutants analogs. At pH 5.8 and 25°C, rM180 and the P41T mutant existed as monomers, whereas the T21I mutant formed small oligomers. At pH 8 and 25°C, all of the amelogenin samples formed nanospheres with hydrodynamic radii (RH) of around 15–16 nm. Upon heating to 37°C, particles of P41T increased in size (RH = 18 nm). During thermal denaturation at pH 5.8, both of the mutant proteins refolded more slowly than the wild-type (WT) rM180. Variable temperature tryptophan fluorescence and dynamic light scattering studies showed that the WT transformed to a partially folded conformation upon heating and remained stable. Thermal denaturation and refolding studies indicated that the mutants were less stable and exhibit a greater ability to prematurely aggregate compared to the WT. Our data suggest that in the case of P41T, alterations in the self-assembly of amelogenin are a consequence of destabilization of the secondary structure, while in the case of T21I they are a consequence of change in the overall hydrophobicity at the N-terminal region. We propose that alterations in the assembly (i.e. premature aggregation) of mutant amelogenins may have a profound effect on intra- and extracellular processes such as amelogenin secretion, proteolysis, and its interactions with nonamelogenins as well as with the forming mineral. PMID:21540557

  6. Refolding and simultaneous purification of recombinant human proinsulin from inclusion bodies on protein-folding liquid-chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Zhou, Huifang; Yang, Yicong; Li, Weimin; Wan, Yi; Wang, Lili

    2015-05-01

    Protein-folding liquid chromatography (PFLC) is an effective and scalable method for protein renaturation with simultaneous purification. However, it has been a challenge to fully refold inclusion bodies in a PFLC column. In this work, refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human proinsulin (rhPI) from inclusion bodies from Escherichia coli were investigated using the surface of stationary phases in immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The results indicated that both the ligand structure on the surface of the stationary phase and the composition of the mobile phase (elution buffer) influenced refolding of rhPI. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, the mass recoveries of IMAC column and HPSEC column were 77.8 and 56.8% with purifies of 97.6 and 93.7%, respectively. These results also indicated that the IMAC column fails to refold rhPI, and the HPSEC column enables efficient refolding of rhPI with a low-urea gradient-elution method. The refolded rhPI was characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The molecular weight of the converted human insulin was further confirmed with SDS-18% PAGE, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and the biological activity assay by HP-RPLC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The beta104-109 sequence is essential for the secretion of correctly folded single-chain beta alpha horse LH/CG and for its FSH activity.

    PubMed

    Galet, Colette; Guillou, Florian; Foulon-Gauze, Florence; Combarnous, Yves; Chopineau, Maryse

    2009-10-01

    The dual LH and FSH activity of the equine LH (eLH)/equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) in heterologous species makes eLH/CG a good model to study structure/function relationships of gonadotropins. In order to bypass the problem of intracellular association of the heterodimer, a recombinant single-chain beta alpha eLH/CG was used to identify sequences in the beta-subunit involved in the secretion and activities of the hormone. The C-terminal region of the beta-subunit was progressively truncated. All resulting truncated single-chains were secreted in the media as detected by an anti-beta peptide antibody in reducing conditions. However, using a conformation sensitive ELISA we show that the truncated single-chains were differently recognized: deletion of the last 40 amino acids of the beta-subunit (beta109alpha eLH/CG) resulted in a 90% decrease in the recognized correctly folded hormone compared with the full-length beta alpha eLH/CG single-chain and no properly folded hormone was detected in the secretion medium when the last 46 amino acids of the beta-subunit were deleted (beta103alpha eLH/CG). We thus focused on the six amino acids sequence 104-109, which belongs to the seat-belt region. Mutation of the 104-109 sequence in alanines in the full-length beta alpha eLH/CG (beta104-109Ala alpha) led to a 50% decrease in the production of properly folded hormone in COS-7 as well as in alphaT3 pituitary cells. Moreover, the FSH activity of this mutant was decreased by 70% whereas its LH activity remained intact. These data lead us to conclude that the 104-109 region of the beta eLH/CG subunit is essential for the secretion of a fully folded beta alpha eLH/CG and for its FSH activity but not for its LH activity.

  8. Native folding of aggregation-prone recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli by osmolytes, plasmid- or benzyl alcohol–overexpressed molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    de Marco, Ario; Vigh, Laszlo; Diamant, Sophia; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    When massively expressed in bacteria, recombinant proteins often tend to misfold and accumulate as soluble and insoluble nonfunctional aggregates. A general strategy to improve the native folding of recombinant proteins is to increase the cellular concentration of viscous organic compounds, termed osmolytes, or of molecular chaperones that can prevent aggregation and can actively scavenge and convert aggregates into natively refoldable species. In this study, metal affinity purification (immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography [IMAC]), confirmed by resistance to trypsin digestion, was used to distinguish soluble aggregates from soluble nativelike proteins. Salt-induced accumulation of osmolytes during induced protein synthesis significantly improved IMAC yields of folding-recalcitrant proteins. Yet, the highest yields were obtained with cells coexpressing plasmid-encoded molecular chaperones DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE, ClpB, GroEL-GroES, and IbpA/B. Addition of the membrane fluidizer heat shock–inducer benzyl alcohol (BA) to the bacterial medium resulted in similar high yields as with plasmid-mediated chaperone coexpression. Our results suggest that simple BA-mediated induction of endogenous chaperones can substitute for the more demanding approach of chaperone coexpression. Combined strategies of osmolyte-induced native folding with heat-, BA-, or plasmid-induced chaperone coexpression can be thought to optimize yields of natively folded recombinant proteins in bacteria, for research and biotechnological purposes. PMID:16333986

  9. Fold-change correction values for testicular somatic transcripts in gene expression studies of human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Feig, Caroline; Schulze, Wolfgang; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai

    2013-03-01

    for all spermatogenic levels and were compiled in a reference crosstable. Validation on an independent test set showed ratios within 0.5 units of our reference crosstable. Analysis of the resulting transcripts with respect to functional enrichment for Sertoli- and Leydig-cell-specific functions and protein expression, as obtained from an immunohistochemical database, indicated filtering of data sets highly enriched for Sertoli and Leydig cell function. The dilution/enrichment ratios differed significantly when transcripts were interrogated in samples with Y-chromosomal microdeletions, pointing to an overall decreased expression of somatic markers in a genetically altered background. The defined reference ratios might apply with some restrictions in samples that display very heterogeneous histology (e.g. Sertoli cell only with a significant proportion of spermatogenic foci) or when spermatogenic impairment is a consequence of an altered genetic background. The reference dilution/enrichment values for somatic testicular transcripts as defined in this study are to be seen as cut-off values for discriminating between simple transcript dilution/enrichment as a consequence of an altered germ cell composition and actual transcriptional regulation. Future studies dealing with transcriptional changes in testicular somatic cells in a background of altered germ cell quantities should consider these correction factors in order to avoid the description of transcriptional changes that are based simply on shifts in somatic cellular quantities. Financial support was from grant Sp721/1-3 of the German Research Foundation. There are no competing interests to be declared.

  10. Adaptive Correction from Virtually Complex Dynamic Libraries: The Role of Noncovalent Interactions in Structural Selection and Folding.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Maria; Atcher, Joan; Solà, Jordi; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    The hierarchical self-assembling of complex molecular systems is dictated by the chemical and structural information stored in their components. This information can be expressed through an adaptive process that determines the structurally fittest assembly under given environmental conditions. We have set up complex disulfide-based dynamic covalent libraries of chemically and topologically diverse pseudopeptidic compounds. We show how the reaction evolves from very complex mixtures at short reaction times to the almost exclusive formation of a major compound, through the establishment of intramolecular noncovalent interactions. Our experiments demonstrate that the systems evolve through error-check and error-correction processes. The nature of these interactions, the importance of the folding and the effects of the environment are also discussed.

  11. VX-809 corrects folding defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein through action on membrane-spanning domain 1.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong Yu; Grove, Diane E; De La Rosa, Oxana; Houck, Scott A; Sopha, Pattarawut; Van Goor, Fredrick; Hoffman, Beth J; Cyr, Douglas M

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal genetic disorder associated with defective hydration of lung airways due to the loss of chloride transport through the CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). CFTR contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), and a regulatory domain, and its channel assembly requires multiple interdomain contacts. The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, occurs in NBD1 and results in misfolding and premature degradation of F508del-CFTR. VX-809 is an investigational CFTR corrector that partially restores CFTR function in people who are homozygous for F508del-CFTR. To identify the folding defect(s) in F508del-CFTR that must be repaired to treat CF, we explored the mechanism of VX-809 action. VX-809 stabilized an N-terminal domain in CFTR that contains only MSD1 and efficaciously restored function to CFTR forms that have missense mutations in MSD1. The action of VX-809 on MSD1 appears to suppress folding defects in F508del-CFTR by enhancing interactions among the NBD1, MSD1, and MSD2 domains. The ability of VX-809 to correct F508del-CFTR is enhanced when combined with mutations that improve F508del-NBD1 interaction with MSD2. These data suggest that the use of VX-809 in combination with an additional CFTR corrector that suppresses folding defects downstream of MSD1 may further enhance CFTR function in people with F508del-CFTR.

  12. Increasing the Endoplasmic Reticulum Pool of the F508del Allele of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Leads to Greater Folding Correction by Small Molecule Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chung, W. Joon; Goeckeler-Fried, Jennifer L.; Havasi, Viktoria; Chiang, Annette; Rowe, Steven M.; Plyler, Zackery E.; Hong, Jeong S.; Mazur, Marina; Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; White, E. Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Weissman, Allan M.; Denny, R. Aldrin; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules that correct the folding defects and enhance surface localization of the F508del mutation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) comprise an important therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, compounds that rescue the F508del mutant protein to wild type (WT) levels have not been identified. In this report, we consider obstacles to obtaining robust and therapeutically relevant levels of F508del CFTR. For example, markedly diminished steady state amounts of F508del CFTR compared to WT CFTR are present in recombinant bronchial epithelial cell lines, even when much higher levels of mutant transcript are present. In human primary airway cells, the paucity of Band B F508del is even more pronounced, although F508del and WT mRNA concentrations are comparable. Therefore, to augment levels of “repairable” F508del CFTR and identify small molecules that then correct this pool, we developed compound library screening protocols based on automated protein detection. First, cell-based imaging measurements were used to semi-quantitatively estimate distribution of F508del CFTR by high content analysis of two-dimensional images. We evaluated ~2,000 known bioactive compounds from the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository in a pilot screen and identified agents that increase the F508del protein pool. Second, we analyzed ~10,000 compounds representing diverse chemical scaffolds for effects on total CFTR expression using a multi-plate fluorescence protocol and describe compounds that promote F508del maturation. Together, our findings demonstrate proof of principle that agents identified in this fashion can augment the level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident “Band B” F508del CFTR suitable for pharmacologic correction. As further evidence in support of this strategy, PYR-41—a compound that inhibits the E1 ubiquitin activating enzyme—was shown to synergistically enhance F508del rescue by C

  13. Increasing the Endoplasmic Reticulum Pool of the F508del Allele of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Leads to Greater Folding Correction by Small Molecule Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, W Joon; Goeckeler-Fried, Jennifer L; Havasi, Viktoria; Chiang, Annette; Rowe, Steven M; Plyler, Zackery E; Hong, Jeong S; Mazur, Marina; Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; White, E Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Weissman, Allan M; Denny, R Aldrin; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules that correct the folding defects and enhance surface localization of the F508del mutation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) comprise an important therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, compounds that rescue the F508del mutant protein to wild type (WT) levels have not been identified. In this report, we consider obstacles to obtaining robust and therapeutically relevant levels of F508del CFTR. For example, markedly diminished steady state amounts of F508del CFTR compared to WT CFTR are present in recombinant bronchial epithelial cell lines, even when much higher levels of mutant transcript are present. In human primary airway cells, the paucity of Band B F508del is even more pronounced, although F508del and WT mRNA concentrations are comparable. Therefore, to augment levels of "repairable" F508del CFTR and identify small molecules that then correct this pool, we developed compound library screening protocols based on automated protein detection. First, cell-based imaging measurements were used to semi-quantitatively estimate distribution of F508del CFTR by high content analysis of two-dimensional images. We evaluated ~2,000 known bioactive compounds from the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository in a pilot screen and identified agents that increase the F508del protein pool. Second, we analyzed ~10,000 compounds representing diverse chemical scaffolds for effects on total CFTR expression using a multi-plate fluorescence protocol and describe compounds that promote F508del maturation. Together, our findings demonstrate proof of principle that agents identified in this fashion can augment the level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident "Band B" F508del CFTR suitable for pharmacologic correction. As further evidence in support of this strategy, PYR-41-a compound that inhibits the E1 ubiquitin activating enzyme-was shown to synergistically enhance F508del rescue by C18, a small

  14. Safety and Effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus Injectable Gel in Correcting Severe Nasolabial Folds in Chinese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xie, Yun; Li, Qin; Sun, Jiaming; Jiang, Ping; Jia, Yi; Murphy, Diane K; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers are effective in correcting severe nasolabial folds (NLFs) in non-Asian populations. We assessed safety and effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus in a Chinese population. This double-blind study randomized Chinese subjects with severe NLFs to Juvéderm Ultra Plus (24 mg/mL) in 1 NLF and Restylane injectable gel (20 mg/mL) in the other NLF. NLFs were evaluated using the validated 5-point photonumeric Allergan NLF Severity Scale (0 is "no wrinkle" and 4 is "very deep wrinkle"). Investigator-assessed responder rates (primary outcome at 6 months), NLF mean improvements, and subject-assessed responder rates and preference were assessed. Of 124 subjects randomized, 122 completed the 6-month visit. NLFs treated with Juvéderm Ultra Plus required less volume than those treated with Restylane (median [range]: 0.80 [0.3-2.0] vs 1.00 [0.3-1.9]; P<0.001). Investigator-assessed responder rates were 90.4% for Juvéderm Ultra Plus and 89.6% for Restylane, establishing noninferiority of Juvéderm Ultra Plus. Mean (SD) improvements in NLF Severity Scale scores from baseline at 6 months were 1.5 (0.75) for Juvéderm Ultra Plus and 1.6 (0.73) for Restylane. Subject-assessed responder rates were similar to investigator-assessed rates (87.3%, Juvéderm Ultra Plus; 83.9%, Restylane). Of subjects reporting a preference, 62.1% preferred Juvéderm Ultra Plus. The most common treatment site responses were swelling and tenderness; most were mild or moderate in severity and resolved without intervention. Juvéderm Ultra Plus had fewer severe treatment site responses than Restylane. In this study in Chinese subjects, Juvéderm Ultra Plus was safe and effective for correcting severe NLFs.

  15. 76 FR 72903 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Correction to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice... the antidumping duty order on folding metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China...'').'' \\2\\ \\1\\ See Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

  16. A two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölli, Heikki; Sjögren, Rickard; Wendelsten, Mikael

    2010-08-01

    The correction for general recombination losses in liquid ionization chambers (LICs) is more complex than that in air-filled ionization chambers. The reason for this is that the saturation charge in LICs, i.e. the charge that escapes initial recombination, depends on the applied voltage. This paper presents a method, based on measurements at two different dose rates in a pulsed beam, for general recombination correction in LICs. The Boag theory for pulsed beams is used and the collection efficiency is determined by numerical methods which are equivalent to the two-voltage method used in dosimetry with air-filled ionization chambers. The method has been tested in experiments in water in a 20 MeV electron beam using two LICs filled with isooctane and tetramethylsilane. The dose per pulse in the electron beam was varied between 0.1 mGy/pulse and 8 mGy/pulse. The relative standard deviations of the collection efficiencies determined with the two-dose-rate method ranged between 0.1% and 1.5%. The dose-rate variations of the general recombination corrected charge measured with the LICs are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values obtained with an air-filled plane parallel ionization chamber.

  17. Participation of the BC loop in the correct folding of bacteriorhodopsin as revealed by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Izuru; Tanabe, Junko; Ohmine, Masato; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tuzi, Satoru; Naito, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Structural changes in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in two different processes of retinal reconstitutions were investigated by observing the (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR spectra of [1-(13)C]Val- and [(15)N]Pro-labeled bR. We found that NMR signals of the BC loop were sensitive to changes in protein structure and dynamics, from wild-type (WT) bR to bacterio-opsin (bO), regenerated bR and E1001 bR. Regenerated bR was prepared following the addition of retinal into bO obtained from photobleached WT-bR. E1001 bR was cultured from a retinal-deficient strain termed E1001 following the addition of retinal to growing cells. (15)N NMR signal at Pro70 in the BC loop in WT-bR was observed at 122.4 p.p.m., whereas signals were not apparent or partly suppressed in bO and regenerated bR, respectively. Similarly, the (13)C NMR signal at Val69 in the BC loop at 172.0 p.p.m. that was observed in WT-bR was significantly decreased in both regenerated bR and bO. These results suggest that the dynamic structure of the BC loop in bO was substantially altered following the removal of retinal. As a consequence, the correct protein structure failed to be recovered via the regenerating process of retinal to bO. On the other hand, (13)C and (15)N NMR signals at the BC loop in E1001 bR appeared at positions identical to those of WT-bR. The results of the current study indicate that the BC loop may not always fold correctly in the regenerated bR, which leads to different properties in the regenerated bR compared to that of WT-bR.

  18. Safety and Effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus Injectable Gel in Correcting Severe Nasolabial Folds in Chinese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Xie, Yun; Li, Qin; Sun, Jiaming; Jiang, Ping; Jia, Yi; Murphy, Diane K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers are effective in correcting severe nasolabial folds (NLFs) in non-Asian populations. We assessed safety and effectiveness of Juvéderm Ultra Plus in a Chinese population. Methods: This double-blind study randomized Chinese subjects with severe NLFs to Juvéderm Ultra Plus (24 mg/mL) in 1 NLF and Restylane injectable gel (20 mg/mL) in the other NLF. NLFs were evaluated using the validated 5-point photonumeric Allergan NLF Severity Scale (0 is “no wrinkle” and 4 is “very deep wrinkle”). Investigator-assessed responder rates (primary outcome at 6 months), NLF mean improvements, and subject-assessed responder rates and preference were assessed. Results: Of 124 subjects randomized, 122 completed the 6-month visit. NLFs treated with Juvéderm Ultra Plus required less volume than those treated with Restylane (median [range]: 0.80 [0.3–2.0] vs 1.00 [0.3–1.9]; P<0.001). Investigator-assessed responder rates were 90.4% for Juvéderm Ultra Plus and 89.6% for Restylane, establishing noninferiority of Juvéderm Ultra Plus. Mean (SD) improvements in NLF Severity Scale scores from baseline at 6 months were 1.5 (0.75) for Juvéderm Ultra Plus and 1.6 (0.73) for Restylane. Subject-assessed responder rates were similar to investigator-assessed rates (87.3%, Juvéderm Ultra Plus; 83.9%, Restylane). Of subjects reporting a preference, 62.1% preferred Juvéderm Ultra Plus. The most common treatment site responses were swelling and tenderness; most were mild or moderate in severity and resolved without intervention. Juvéderm Ultra Plus had fewer severe treatment site responses than Restylane. Conclusion: In this study in Chinese subjects, Juvéderm Ultra Plus was safe and effective for correcting severe NLFs. PMID:28203492

  19. Homogeneous human complex-type oligosaccharides in correctly folded intact glycoproteins: evaluation of oligosaccharide influence on protein folding, stability, and conformational properties.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Yasutaka; Sasaoka, Shun; Okamoto, Ryo

    2012-05-07

    The N-glycosylation of proteins is generated at the consensus sequence NXS/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) by the biosynthetic process, and occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In order to investigate the influence of human complex-type oligosaccharides on counterpart protein conformation, crambin and ovomucoide, which consist of 46 and 56 amino acid residues, respectively, were selected for synthesis of model glycoproteins. These small glycoproteins were intentionally designed to be glycosylated at the α-helix (crambin: 8 position), β-sheet (crambin: 2 position) and loop position between the antiparallel β-sheets (ovomucoide: 28 position), and were synthesized by using a peptide-segment coupling strategy. After preparation of these glycosylated polypeptide chains, protein folding experiments were performed under redox conditions by using cysteine-cystine. Although the small glycoproteins bearing intentional glycosylation at the α-helix and β-sheet exhibited a suitable folding process, glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands caused multiple products. The conformational differences in the isolated homogeneous glycoproteins compared with non-glycosylated counterparts were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. These analyses suggested that this intentional N-glycosylation did not result in large conformational changes in the purified protein structures, including the case of glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands. In addition to these experiments, the conformational properties of three glycoproteins were evaluated by CD spectroscopy under different temperatures. The oligosaccharides on the protein surface fluctuated considerably; this was dependent on the increase in the solution temperature and was thought to disrupt the protein tertiary structure. Based on the measurement of the CD spectra, however, the glycoproteins bearing three disulfide

  20. Folding recombinant spider-silk in H2 O: Effect of osmolytes on the solution conformation of a 15-repeat spider-silk mimetic.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Glendon D; Gandjian, Babak; Alhumaidan, Hind

    2016-10-01

    The folding of a recombinant spider silk protein-polymer in the presence of the tri-methylamine osmolytes TMANO and Betaine in 80% H2 O is reported. Circular dichroism measurements (CD) reveal an increase in α-helical secondary structure with increasing osmolyte concentrations, as determined by an increase in ellipticity at 222 nm. Consistent with this observation, the signal for random coil sampling, observed at 205 nm, is greatly reduced with increasing trimethylamine. Fluorescence spectra of a single tyrosine positioned within the conserved 33-amino acid repeat primary sequence (of the spider-silk mimetic) complements the conformational changes observed by CD. Importantly, there is a correlation between the number of Alkyl-groups (CH3 -) on the amine of the osmolyte and enhanced helicity of the 15-repeat silk-mimetic for the osmolytes tested, ie TMANO, Betaine, Sarcosine and Glycine. These preliminary results are applicable to storing and processing recombinant silk sequences in H2 O, an important mile-stone for widespread use of recombinant silk polymers. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  1. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    PubMed

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min-1. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  3. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-21

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min(-1). The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C(8)H(18)) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH(3))(4)). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  4. Ion recombination correction factor in scanned light-ion beams for absolute dose measurement using plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossomme, S.; Horn, J.; Brons, S.; Jäkel, O.; Mairani, A.; Ciocca, M.; Floquet, V.; Romano, F.; Rodriguez Garcia, D.; Vynckier, S.; Palmans, H.

    2017-07-01

    Based on international reference dosimetry protocols for light-ion beams, a correction factor (k s) has to be applied to the response of a plane-parallel ionisation chamber, to account for recombination of negative and positive charges in its air cavity before these charges can be collected on the electrodes. In this work, k s for IBA PPC40 Roos-type chambers is investigated in four scanned light-ion beams (proton, helium, carbon and oxygen). To take into account the high dose-rates used with scanned beams and LET-values, experimental results are compared to a model combining two theories. One theory, developed by Jaffé, describes the variation of k s with the ionization density within the ion track (initial recombination) and the other theory, developed by Boag, describes the variation of k s with the dose rate (volume recombination). Excellent agreement is found between experimental and theoretical k s-values. All results confirm that k s cannot be neglected. The solution to minimise k s is to use the ionisation chamber at high voltage. However, one must be aware that charge multiplication may complicate the interpretation of the measurement. For the chamber tested, it was found that a voltage of 300 V can be used without further complication. As the initial recombination has a logarithmic variation as a function of 1/V, the two-voltage method is not applicable to these scanned beams.

  5. Efficacy and safety of porcine collagen filler for nasolabial fold correction in Asians: a prospective multicenter, 12 months follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ho; Choi, Yong Sung; Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Young Jin; Rhie, Jong Won; Jun, Young Joon

    2014-11-01

    Recently, injectable dermal fillers have become important alternatives to surgical procedures for the correction of facial wrinkles. Bovine collagen is the first approved material for filler injection, and several studies have shown its efficacy. However, the risk of developing an allergic reaction and xenogenic transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy remain among its disadvantages. In this randomized, double-blinded, split-face study, we compared the efficacy and safety of a porcine collagen filler (TheraFill®) with that of a bovine collagen filler (KOKEN®) for nasolabial fold correction. A total of sixty one patients with mild to severe nasolabial fold were randomized to receive TheraFill® and KOKEN® on contralateral sides of the face. During the 12-month follow-up period, improvement in the Wrinkle-Severity Rating Scale score was slightly higher in TheraFill® group than KOKEN® group, although the difference was not statistically significant. No serious adverse reactions were observed and both materials were tolerable in most cases. In conclusion, the long-term effect of TheraFill® on nasolabial fold correction was comparable to that of KOKEN®, and it may be a good alternative to bovine collagen filler.

  6. l-Arginine hydrochloride increases the solubility of folded and unfolded recombinant plasminogen activator rPA

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Alexander; Lilie, Hauke; Rudolph, Rainer; Lange, Christian

    2010-01-01

    l-Arginine hydrochloride (l-ArgHCl) was found to be an effective enhancer for in vitro protein refolding more than two decades ago. A detailed understanding of the mechanism of action, by which l-ArgHCl as co-solvent is capable to effectively suppress protein aggregation, while protein stability is preserved, has remained elusive. Concepts for the effects of co-solvents, which have been established over the last decades, were found to be insufficient to completely explain the effects of l-ArgHCl on protein refolding. In this article, we present data, which clearly establish that l-ArgHCl acts on the equilibrium solubility of the native model protein recombinant plasminogen activator (rPA), while for S-carboxymethylated rPA (IAA-rPA) that served as a model protein for denatured protein states, equilibrium solubilities could not be obtained. Solid to solute free transfer energies for native rPA were lowered by up to 14 kJ mol-1 under the tested conditions. This finding is in marked contrast to a previously proposed model in which l-ArgHCl acts as a neutral crowder which exclusively has an influence on the stability of the transition state of aggregation. The effects on the apparent solubility of IAA-rPA, as well as on the aggregation kinetics of all studied protein species, that were observed in the present work could tentatively be explained within the framework of a nucleation-aggregation scheme, in which l-ArgHCl exerts a strong effect on the pre-equilibria leading to formation of the aggregation seed. PMID:20665695

  7. Structural Insights into the Folding Defects of Oncogenic pVHL Lead to Correction of Its Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Merav D.; Schnaider, Lee; Rosenblum, Daniel; Herzog, Gal; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL) tumor suppressor protein are tumorigenic. In silico analysis of the structure and folding of WT pVHL identified in its core an aromatic tetrahedron, essential for stabilizing the protein. The mutations disrupt the aromatic tetrahedron, leading to misfolding of pVHL. Using biophysical methods we confirmed the in silico predictions, demonstrating that mutant pVHL proteins have lower stability than the WT, distort the core domain and as a result reduce the ability of the protein to bind its target HIF-1α. Using bacterial pVHL-EGFP based assay we screened for osmolytes capable of restoring folding of mutant pVHL. Among them, Arginine was the most effective and was verified by in vitro assays as a potent re-folder of pVHL. This resulted in functional restoration of the mutant proteins to the level of the WT. PMID:23840444

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Growth Factor Concentrate in the Treatment of Nasolabial Fold Correction: Split Face Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Gema P; Dhurat, Rachita S; Shetty, Geetanjali; Kadam, Prashant P; Totey, Satish M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Growth factors have long been known as an effective treatment for facial wrinkles. We developed growth factor concentrate (GFC) from the platelets and evaluated their clinical outcome in nasolabial folds. Aims and Objectives: We evaluated safety and efficacy of autologous GFC on patients with nasolabial folds. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted on 80 patients for nasolabial folds in two groups. Group I (20) received bilateral single injection of GFC and group II (60) received single injection of GFC on the right side of the face and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the left side of the face. Severity of nasolabial folds was determined at the baseline and 3 months of follow-up visits based on wrinkle severity rating scale (WSRS), Global aesthetic improvement scale (GAIS) and atlas photographic grading at rest and at full smile. Objective clinical assessment and subjective satisfaction scale was determined for overall improvement at the end of the study. Results: In group I, 2 subjects showed improvement after GFC treatment with the score of 3.1–4 (76–100%), 3 subjects with the score of 2.1–3 (51–75%), 14 with the score of 1.1–2 (26–50%) and 1 subject with the score of 0–1 (<25%) at the end of study. In group II, 51 subjects were evaluated at the end of study where, 34 (66%) showed superior improvements after GFC, 6 (11%) patients showed similar improvement on both side of the face, 10 (19.6%) patients showed no noticeable improvement on the either side of the face and only 1 patient (1.96%) showed superior improvement for PRP at the end of the study. Overall improvement score analysis showed that GFC was significantly superior to PRP (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Present study is a strong evidence to support the use of GFC for nasolabial folds. The results showed that the single application of GFC is highly effective and safe. PMID:26538718

  9. Recombinant encapsulated cells overexpressing alpha-L-iduronidase correct enzyme deficiency in human mucopolysaccharidosis type I cells.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Guilherme; Quoos Mayer, Fabiana; Burin, Maira; Carrillo-Farga, Joaquín; Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease due to deficient α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) activity. It results in the accumulation of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan and dermatan sulfate and leads to several clinical manifestations. Available treatments are limited in their efficacy to treat some aspects of the disease. Thus, new approaches have been studied for the treatment of MPS I. Here, we tested the ability of recombinant baby hamster kidney cells transfected with human IDUA cDNA in correcting skin fibroblasts from MPS I patients in vitro. Our results showed an increase in IDUA activity in MPS I fibroblasts after 15, 30 and 45 days of coculture with the capsules. Cytological analysis showed a marked reduction in GAG storage within MPS I cells. Enzyme uptake by the fibroblasts was blocked in a dose-dependent manner with mannose-6-phosphate (M6P), indicating that cells use the M6P receptor to internalize the recombinant enzyme. Capsules were effective in correcting MPS I cells even after a 12-month period of cryopreservation. Taken together, our results indicate that cell encapsulation is a potential approach for treatment of MPS I. This approach becomes particularly interesting as a complementary approach, since the capsules could be implanted in sites which current treatments available are not able to reach. Future studies will focus on the efficacy of this approach in vivo.

  10. Variable correction of Artemis deficiency by I-Sce1-meganuclease-assisted homologous recombination in murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rivière, J; Hauer, J; Poirot, L; Brochet, J; Souque, P; Mollier, K; Gouble, A; Charneau, P; Fischer, A; Pâques, F; de Villartay, J-P; Cavazzana, M

    2014-05-01

    The correction of genetic mutations by homologous recombination is an attractive approach to gene therapy. We used the DNA double-strand breaks introduced by the site-specific endonuclease I-Sce1 as a means of increasing homologous recombination of an exogenous DNA template in murine hematopoietic stem cells (mHSCs). To develop this approach, we chose an Artemis knockout (Art(-/-)) mouse in which exon 12 of the Artemis gene had been replaced by an I-Sce1 recognition site. The I-Sce1 enzyme and the Artemis correction template were each delivered by a self-inactivating (SIN)-integrase-defective lentiviral vector (SIN-IDLV-CMV-ISce1 and SIN-IDLV-Art, respectively). Transduction of Art(-/-) mHSCs with the two vectors successfully reverted the Art(-/-) phenotype in 2 of our 10 experiments. Even though the potential for genotoxicity has yet to be evaluated, this new approach to gene editing appears to be promising. Improving the efficacy of this approach will require further technical work.

  11. Charge Neutralization of the Central Lysine Cluster in Prion Protein (PrP) Promotes PrPSc-like Folding of Recombinant PrP Amyloids*

    PubMed Central

    Groveman, Bradley R.; Kraus, Allison; Raymond, Lynne D.; Dolan, Michael A.; Anson, Kelsie J.; Dorward, David W.; Caughey, Byron

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the infectious form of prion protein, PrPSc, remains unclear. Most pure recombinant prion protein (PrP) amyloids generated in vitro are not infectious and lack the extent of the protease-resistant core and solvent exclusion of infectious PrPSc, especially within residues ∼90–160. Polyanionic cofactors can enhance infectivity and PrPSc-like characteristics of such fibrils, but the mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. In considering structural models of PrPSc multimers, we identified an obstacle to tight packing that might be overcome with polyanionic cofactors, namely, electrostatic repulsion between four closely spaced cationic lysines within a central lysine cluster of residues 101–110. For example, in our parallel in-register intermolecular β-sheet model of PrPSc, not only would these lysines be clustered within the 101–110 region of the primary sequence, but they would have intermolecular spacings of only ∼4.8 Å between stacked β-strands. We have now performed molecular dynamics simulations predicting that neutralization of the charges on these lysine residues would allow more stable parallel in-register packing in this region. We also show empirically that substitution of these clustered lysine residues with alanines or asparagines results in recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils with extended proteinase-K resistant β-sheet cores and infrared spectra that are more reminiscent of bona fide PrPSc. These findings indicate that charge neutralization at the central lysine cluster is critical for the folding and tight packing of N-proximal residues within PrP amyloid fibrils. This charge neutralization may be a key aspect of the mechanism by which anionic cofactors promote PrPSc formation. PMID:25416779

  12. Comparative study of the effectiveness and safety of porcine and bovine atelocollagen in Asian nasolabial fold correction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jae; Rhie, Jong-Won; Suh, Dong-Sam; Oh, Deuk-Young; Lee, Joong-Ho; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Sue-Min; Jun, Young-Joon

    2015-06-01

    Bovine-derived collagen has been used for soft-tissue augmentation since 1977. However, there are issues regarding the possibility of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Researchers discovered that the histologic structure of porcine-derived collagen is similar to that of human dermal collagen and that it is free from the risk of BSE. This study was conducted to establish the effectiveness and safety of porcine-derived collagen compared to bovine-derived collagen. The 73 patients included in this study were healthy volunteers who responded to an advertisement approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). They had visited the authors' hospital complaining of wrinkles on their nasolabial fold. Either porcine (TheraFill®) or bovine atelocollagen was randomly injected into each side of their nasolabial folds, and the five-grade Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale (WSRS) was used to evaluate the wrinkles before and after the injection. The average age of the 73 study patients was 46.18 years. The WSRS scores of the porcine and bovine atelocollagen-injected patients were 2.90 ± 0.71 and 2.85 ± 0.72 at the baseline and 2.15 ± 0.70 and 2.21 ± 0.67 after 6 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Adverse effects of the porcine atelocollagen injection were seen in 12 patients, with the most common symptom being redness. This study showed that porcine atelocollagen can be used easily and without the need for the skin testing which is necessary before bovine atelocollagen injection. The efficacy of porcine atelocollagen is also similar to that of bovine atelocollagen.

  13. Efficacy and safety of injection with poly-L-lactic acid compared with hyaluronic acid for correction of nasolabial fold: a randomized, evaluator-blinded, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hyun, M Y; Lee, Y; No, Y A; Yoo, K H; Kim, M N; Hong, C K; Chang, S E; Won, C H; Kim, B J

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) fillers are frequently used to correct facial wrinkles. To compare the efficacy and safety of a novel injectable poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) filler and a well-studied biphasic HA filler for the treatment of moderate to severe nasolabial folds. In this multicentre, randomized, evaluator-blinded, comparative study, subjects were randomized for injections with PLA or HA into both nasolabial folds. Efficacy was determined by calculating the change in Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale (WSRS) relative to baseline. Local safety was assessed by reported adverse events. At week 24, mean improvement in WSRS from baseline was 2.09 ± 0.68 for the PLA side and 1.54 ± 0.65 for the HA side. Both injections were well tolerated, and the adverse reactions were mild and transient in most cases. PLA provides noninferior efficacy compared with HA 6 months after being used to treat moderate to severe nasolabial folds. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Intraperitoneal implant of recombinant encapsulated cells overexpressing alpha-L-iduronidase partially corrects visceral pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Guilherme; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Martinelli, Barbara; Meyer, Fabiola Schons; Burin, Maira; Meurer, Luise; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula

    2012-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is characterized by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in several tissues. Current available treatments present limitations, thus the search for new therapies. Encapsulation of recombinant cells within polymeric structures combines gene and cell therapy and is a promising approach for treating MPS I. We produced alginate microcapsules containing baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing IDUA and implanted these capsules in the peritoneum of MPS I mice. An increase in serum and tissue IDUA activity was observed at early time-points, as well as a reduction in GAG storage; however, correction in the long term was only partially achieved, with a drop in the IDUA activity being observed a few weeks after the implant. Analysis of the capsules obtained from the peritoneum revealed inflammation and a pericapsular fibrotic process, which could be responsible for the reduction in IDUA levels observed in the long term. In addition, treated mice developed antibodies against the enzyme. The results suggest that the encapsulation process is effective in the short term but improvements must be achieved in order to reduce the immune response and reach a stable correction.

  15. Autonomous folding of the recombinant large cytoplasmic loop of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase probed by affinity labeling and trypsin digestion.

    PubMed

    Moutin, M J; Rapin, C; Miras, R; Vinçon, M; Dupont, Y; McIntosh, D B

    1998-02-01

    Recombinant large cytoplasmic loop (LCL, residues 329-740) of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, comprises most of the active site and binds ATP [Moutin, M.-J., Cuillel, M., Rapin, C., Miras, R., Anger, M., Lompré, A.-M. & Dupont, Y. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 11147-11154]. In this study, we show that fluorescein-5' isothiocyanate (FITC) specifically labels the same lysine residue as in the native Ca2+-ATPase (Lys515), with similar kinetics and pH dependence. ATP blocks the reaction with the lysine residue, but at higher concentrations compared with those for the native pump, in agreement with the lower ATP-binding affinity found previously. Graded tryptic digestion of LCL shows that favored cleavage is at the T1 site and that the N-terminal 75% of LCL are resistant to trypsin, as is native Ca2+-ATPase. Other experiments reveal differences to the native pump. (a) FITC derivatizes some -SH groups of LCL. (b) The C-terminal 25% of the polypeptide is susceptible to end-clipping by trypsin. (c) 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-ATP fails to specifically label the LCL (on the equivalent of Lys492), although it binds tightly (KD = 1.3 microM) and (d) Glutaraldehyde does not specifically cross-link LCL (between the equivalent of Lys492 and Arg678). These results could be explained by a flexible and loose structure of the hinge region of LCL (C-terminal 25%). Anchoring this region in the membrane and/or interaction with the missing beta-strand domain may be required for its compact folding and proper interaction with the rest of LCL. The results suggest that the N-terminal 75% of LCL expressed in E. coli folds autonomously to a fairly stable unit and native-like structure, encompassing the phosphorylation and central ATP binding sections. The hinge region does not appear to be part of the FITC-binding site but constitutes portions of the 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-ATP and, probably, ATP-binding site.

  16. Chemical modification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid protein p24 leads to the release of a hidden epitope prior to changes of the overall folding of the protein.

    PubMed

    Ehrhard, B; Misselwitz, R; Welfle, K; Hausdorf, G; Glaser, R W; Schneider-Mergener, J; Welfle, H

    1996-07-16

    It was found that the affinity of a monoclonal antibody directed against a recombinantly expressed HIV-1 capsid protein p24 (rp24) strongly increased after chemical modification of the Iysine residues of rp24 with different amounts of maleic anhydride. The extent and the sites of modification were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Unmodified rp24 and the differently modified rp24 samples were tested for binding the murine monoclonal antibody CB4-1 which recognizes the epitope GATPQDLNTML comprising residues 46-56 of rp24. An increase in the number of modified lysine residues led to enhanced binding affinity of CB4-1. Most pronounced effects were observed after substitution of the first amino groups: an average number of three modified residues per protein molecule increases the binding affinity by a factor of 23, but the substitution of the remaining nine residues increases the binding affinity only by a factor of 11. Fully modified rp24 variant proteins were bound by CB4-1 with Kd values comparable to that of the peptide epitope. Conformation and stability of the unmodified rp24, highly (rp24F, 9 residues; rp24G, 11 residues) modified, and fully modified protein (rp24I, 11 lysine residues and N-terminus) were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy under different solvent conditions. Little difference in conformation and unfolding behavior was observed between the unmodified and highly modified rp24, which differ drastically in the antibody binding behavior. The fully modified sample, however, displayed a significant decrease in alpha-helical content. Thus, the epitope seems to be hidden (cryptotope) in the unmodified rp24 in a low-affinity binding conformation and becomes displayed at low levels of chemical modification which obviously induce subtle structural changes prior to changes of the overall folding observable by spectroscopic means.

  17. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-02

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions.

  18. Subject global evaluation and subject satisfaction using injectable poly-L-lactic acid versus human collagen for the correction of nasolabial fold wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Brown, Spencer A; Rohrich, Rod J; Baumann, Leslie; Brandt, Fredric S; Fagien, Steven; Glazer, Scott; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Lowe, Nicholas J; Monheit, Gary D; Narins, Rhoda S; Rendon, Marta I; Werschler, William Philip

    2011-04-01

    This is a report of the secondary endpoints, Subject Global Evaluation (overall improvement) and Subject Satisfaction scores, from a study designed to examine the efficacy of injectable poly-L-lactic acid for the correction of nasolabial fold wrinkles over 25 months. A randomized, subject-blinded, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was conducted to compare the effects of injectable poly-L-lactic acid with those of human collagen for the treatment of nasolabial fold wrinkles at 13 months following the last treatment. Injectable poly-L-lactic acid-treated subjects were followed for 25 months. From month 3 through month 13 following the last treatment, injectable poly-L-lactic acid-treated subjects (n = 116) reported significantly higher Subject Global Evaluation scores compared with human collagen-treated subjects (n = 117; p < 0.001). Overall Subject Global Evaluation scores for injectable poly-L-lactic acid-treated subjects were 99 percent at week 3, 91 percent at month 13, and 81 percent at month 25 (all times following the last treatment). In contrast, for human collagen-treated subjects, overall Subject Global Evaluation scores declined by 84 percent, from 96 percent at week 3 to 15 percent at month 13. Subject Satisfaction scores were significantly different (p < 0.01) between treatment groups beginning week 3 and continuing through month 13. Overall Subject Satisfaction scores were maintained for over 80 percent of injectable poly-l-lactic acid-treated subjects (n = 106) at month 25 after the last treatment. Treatment of nasolabial fold wrinkles with injectable poly-l-lactic acid resulted in statistically significantly higher Subject Global Evaluation and Subject Satisfaction scores compared with human collagen at 13 months. Injectable poly-l-lactic acid-treated subjects maintained improvements for up to 25 months after treatment.

  19. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    Seismic images of the Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska, reveal crustal-scale duplexing: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 65 68 (January 1995) The correct Figure 4A, for the loose insert, is given here. See Figure 4A below. Corrected inserts will be available to those requesting copies of the article from the senior author, Gary S. Fuis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Figure 4A. P-wave velocity model of Brooks Range region (thin gray contours) with migrated wide-angle reflections (heavy red lines) and migreated vertical-incidence reflections (short black lines) superimposed. Velocity contour interval is 0.25 km/s; 4,5, and 6 km/s contours are labeled. Estimated error in velocities is one contour interval. Symbols on faults shown at top are as in Figure 2 caption.

  20. Modeling correction of severe urea cycle defects in the growing murine liver using a hybrid recombinant adeno-associated virus/piggyBac transposase gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sharon C; Siew, Susan M; Hallwirth, Claus V; Bolitho, Christine; Sasaki, Natsuki; Garg, Gagan; Michael, Iacovos P; Hetherington, Nicola A; Carpenter, Kevin; de Alencastro, Gustavo; Nagy, Andras; Alexander, Ian E

    2015-08-01

    Liver-targeted gene therapy based on recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV) shows promising therapeutic efficacy in animal models and adult-focused clinical trials. This promise, however, is not directly translatable to the growing liver, where high rates of hepatocellular proliferation are accompanied by loss of episomal rAAV genomes and subsequently a loss in therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a hybrid rAAV/piggyBac transposon vector system combining the highly efficient liver-targeting properties of rAAV with stable piggyBac-mediated transposition of the transgene into the hepatocyte genome. Transposition efficiency was first tested using an enhanced green fluorescent protein expression cassette following delivery to newborn wild-type mice, with a 20-fold increase in stably gene-modified hepatocytes observed 4 weeks posttreatment compared to traditional rAAV gene delivery. We next modeled the therapeutic potential of the system in the context of severe urea cycle defects. A single treatment in the perinatal period was sufficient to confer robust and stable phenotype correction in the ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient Spf(ash) mouse and the neonatal lethal argininosuccinate synthetase knockout mouse. Finally, transposon integration patterns were analyzed, revealing 127,386 unique integration sites which conformed to previously published piggyBac data. Using a hybrid rAAV/piggyBac transposon vector system, we achieved stable therapeutic protection in two urea cycle defect mouse models; a clinically conceivable early application of this technology in the management of severe urea cycle defects could be as a bridging therapy while awaiting liver transplantation; further improvement of the system will result from the development of highly human liver-tropic capsids, the use of alternative strategies to achieve transient transposase expression, and engineered refinements in the safety profile of piggyBac transposase-mediated integration. © 2015 by

  1. Corrections.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Lai Y-S, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, et al. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 2015; published online May 22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3—Figure 1 of this Article should have contained a box stating ‘100 references added’ with an arrow pointing inwards, rather than a box stating ‘199 records excluded’, and an asterisk should have been added after ‘1473 records extracted into GNTD’. Additionally, the positioning of the ‘§ and ‘†’ footnotes has been corrected in table 1. These corrections have been made to the online version as of June 4, 2015.

  2. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error.

  3. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  4. The efficacy and safety of a monophasic hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of nasolabial folds: A randomized, multicenter, single blinded, split-face study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Jung; Ko, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Eun Ja; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Yang Won

    2017-09-14

    The different rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler reflect their specific manufacturing processes and resultant physicochemical characteristics. However, there are few researches about the relationship between product differences and clinical outcome when HA fillers are used for nasolabial folds (NLFs). This study sought to compare the rheological properties, efficacy and safety of a monophasic HA filler, and a well-studied biphasic HA filler, in the treatment of NLFs. A total of 72 Korean subjects with moderate to severe NLFs were randomized to receive injections with monophasic HA or biphasic HA on the left or right side of the face. Efficacy was evaluated by the change in the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale (WSRS) at 2, 10, 18, 26, and 52 weeks. Safety was assessed on the basis of all abnormal reactions during the clinical test period. To compare the rheological characteristics of two cross-linked HA fillers, viscoelastic analysis was performed. At week 26, the mean WSRS was 2.26±0.56 for the monophasic HA side and 2.24±0.54 for the biphasic HA side. Both treatments were well tolerated. The adverse reactions were mild and transient. Monophasic HA filler had lower elasticity and higher viscosity than biphasic HA filler. Despite a number of different rheological properties, monophasic HA is noninferior to biphasic HA in the treatment of moderate to severe NLFs for 52 weeks. Therefore, monophasic HA provides an alternative option for NLFs correction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Recombinant human insulin IX. Investigation of factors, influencing the folding of fusion protein-S-sulfonates, biotechnological precursors of human insulin.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Roman V; Pechenov, Sergey E; Belacheu, Irina A; Yakimov, Sergey A; Klyushnichenko, Vadim E; Tunes, Heloisa; Thiemann, Josef E; Vilela, Luciano; Wulfson, Andrey N

    2002-11-01

    The peculiarities of molecular structures and the influence of reaction conditions on the folding efficiency of fusion proteins-biotechnological precursors of human insulin, expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies have been investigated. The fusion proteins contained proinsulin sequence with various leader peptides connected by an Arg residue to the insulin B-chain. The kind and the size of leader peptide do not have essential influence on folding efficiency. However, the efficiency of protein folding depends on the location of the (His)6 site, which is used for metal-chelating affinity chromatography. In our study the protein folding depends on the reaction medium composition (including additives), the presence of accompanied cell components, pH, temperature, concentrations of protein, and redox agents. A negative influence of nucleic acid and heavy metal ions on folding has been found. S-sulfonated fusion protein has proinsulin-like secondary structure (by CD-spectroscopy data) that is the key point for 95% efficient folding proceeding. Folded fusion proteins are transformed into insulin by enzymatic cleavage.

  6. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Gillingham, M B; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2006-03-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudotyped with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pah(enu2) mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pah(enu2) mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5+/-2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism.

  7. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, DD

    2009-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pahenu2 mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5±2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  8. Correction: Weak backbone CHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C and side chain tButBu London interactions help promote helix folding of achiral NtBu peptoids.

    PubMed

    Angelici, G; Bhattacharjee, N; Roy, O; Faure, S; Didierjean, C; Jouffret, L; Jolibois, F; Perrin, L; Taillefumier, C

    2016-05-14

    Correction for 'Weak backbone CHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C and side chain tButBu London interactions help promote helix folding of achiral NtBu peptoids' by G. Angelici et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 4573-4576.

  9. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  10. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  11. A galaxy of folds

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  12. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains.

  13. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  14. The disulphide mapping, folding and characterisation of recombinant Ber e 1, an allergenic protein, and SFA8, two sulphur-rich 2S plant albumins.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Marcos J C; Murtagh, Gareth J; Bailey, Kevin; Dumoulin, Mireille; Meseguer, Amparo Sarabia; Parker, Martin J; Archer, David B

    2002-11-15

    We have cloned and expressed genes encoding the allergenic brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e 1) and the sunflower albumin 8 (SFA8) in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We show that both proteins were secreted at high levels and that the purified proteins were properly folded. We also showed that Ber e 1 is glycosylated during secretion and that the glycan does not interfere with the folding or immunoreactivity. The disulphide map of the Ber e 1 protein was experimentally established and is in agreement with the conserved disulphide structure of other members of the 2S albumin family. A model three-dimensional structure of the allergen was generated. During the expression studies and through mutation we have also shown that alteration of the sequences around the Kex2 endoproteolytic processing site in the expressed fusion protein can compromise the secretion by targeting part of the protein for possible degradation. The secreted production of these properly folded sulphur-rich plant albumins presents an opportunity to delineate the attributes that make an allergen and to facilitate the diagnosis and therapy of type I allergy.

  15. Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Bruggmoser, G; Saum, R; Schmachtenberg, A; Schmid, F; Schüle, E

    2007-01-21

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor k(S) depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  16. Transtensional folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossen, Haakon; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.

    2014-05-01

    For now three decades transpression has dominated the concepts that underlie oblique tectonics, but in more recent years transtension has garnered much interest as a simple model that can be applied to shallow and deep crustal tectonics. One fundamental aspect that distinguishes transtension from transpression is that material lines in transtension rotate toward the direction of oblique divergence. Another point that may be less intuitive when thinking of transtension is that while transtensional strain involves shortening in the vertical direction, one of the horizontal axes is also a shortening axis, whatever the angle of divergence. It is the combination of these two shortening axes that leads to constrictional finite strain in transtension. The existence of a horizontal shortening strain axis implies that transtension offers the potential for folds of horizontal layers to form and then rotate toward the direction of oblique divergence. An investigation of transtensional folding using 3D strain modeling reveals that folding is more likely for simple shear dominated transtension (large wrench component). Transtensional folds can only accumulate a fixed amount of horizontal shortening and tightness that are prescribed by the angle of oblique divergence, regardless of finite strain. Transtensional folds are characterized by hinge-parallel stretching that exceeds that expected from pure wrenching. In addition, the magnitude of hinge-parallel stretching always exceeds hinge-perpendicular shortening, causing constrictional fabrics and hinge-parallel boudinage to develop. Because the dominant vertical strain axis is shortening, transtensional fold growth is generally suppressed, but when folds do develop their limbs enter the field of shortening, resulting in possible fold interference patterns akin to cascading folds. Application of these transtensional folding principles to regions of oblique rifting (i.e. Gulf of California) or exhumation of deep crust (i.e. Western

  17. A recombinant peptide model of the first nucleotide-binding fold of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: comparison of wild-type and delta F508 mutant forms.

    PubMed Central

    Yike, I.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Manavalan, P.; Gerken, T. A.; Dearborn, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    A series of recombinant peptides, each including the sequence proposed to be the first nucleotide-binding fold of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), has been produced in an attempt to find a model peptide that would autologously fold into a soluble structure with native-like properties. The peptide NBDIF, which contains the 267-amino acid sequence of CFTR from 384 to 650, meets these requirements. The peptide was produced with a high expression bacterial plasmid pRSET, purified from inclusion bodies following solubilization with 6 M guanidine-HCl and refolded from 8 M urea. Competitive displacement of trinitrophenol-ATP by nucleotides reveals binding of ATP and related nucleotides with KDs in the low micromolar range; the KD for ATP gamma S is 1.0 +/- 0.4 microM and for ADP 8.8 +/- 3.1 microM. The native-like character of the model peptide's structure is further supported by the findings that the KD for the ATP analog, 5'-adenylimidodiphosphate, is fourfold lower than the KD for the methylene analog, 5'-adenylmethylenediphosphonate, and that ATP binding slows the trypsin proteolysis of NBDIF. The CD spectra of NBDIF and the parallel peptide containing the most common cystic fibrosis mutation, deletion of Phe 508, are essentially indistinguishable, both spectra indicating 28% alpha-helix and 23% beta-sheet, with insignificant differences in the amounts of beta-turns and random structure. Extensive investigation using multiple conditions with highly purified preparations of the model peptides demonstrates that they do not support ATP hydrolysis. These large recombinant peptides offer practical models for the investigation of the first nucleotide-binding domain of CFTR. PMID:8771200

  18. Native Folding of a Recombinant gpE1/gpE2 Heterodimer Vaccine Antigen from a Precursor Protein Fused with Fc IgG

    PubMed Central

    Law, John; Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Hockman, Darren; Landi, Amir; Chen, Chao; Crawford, Kevin; Kundu, Juthika; Baldwin, Lesley; Johnson, Janelle; Dahiya, Anita; LaChance, Gerald; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Law, Mansun; Foung, Steven; Tyrrell, Lorne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recombinant strain HCV1 (hepatitis C virus [HCV] genotype 1a) gpE1/gpE2 (E1E2) vaccine candidate was previously shown by our group to protect chimpanzees and generate broad cross-neutralizing antibodies in animals and humans. In addition, recent independent studies have highlighted the importance of conserved neutralizing epitopes in HCV vaccine development that map to antigenic clusters in E2 or the E1E2 heterodimer. E1E2 can be purified using Galanthis nivalis lectin agarose (GNA), but this technique is suboptimal for global production. Our goal was to investigate a high-affinity and scalable method for isolating E1E2. We generated an Fc tag-derived (Fc-d) E1E2 that was selectively captured by protein G Sepharose, with the tag being removed subsequently using PreScission protease. Surprisingly, despite the presence of the large Fc tag, Fc-d E1E2 formed heterodimers similar to those formed by GNA-purified wild-type (WT) E1E2 and exhibited nearly identical binding profiles to HCV monoclonal antibodies that target conserved neutralizing epitopes in E2 (HC33.4, HC84.26, and AR3B) and the E1E2 heterodimer (AR4A and AR5A). Antisera from immunized mice showed that Fc-d E1E2 elicited anti-E2 antibody titers and neutralization of HCV pseudotype viruses similar to those with WT E1E2. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that antisera from immunized mice inhibited monoclonal antibody binding to neutralizing epitopes. Antisera from Fc-d E1E2-immunized mice exhibited stronger competition for AR3B and AR5A than the WT, whereas the levels of competition for HC84.26 and AR4A were similar. We anticipate that Fc-d E1E2 will provide a scalable purification and manufacturing process using protein A/G-based chromatography. IMPORTANCE A prophylactic HCV vaccine is still needed to control this global disease despite the availability of direct-acting antivirals. Previously, we demonstrated that a recombinant envelope glycoprotein (E1E2) vaccine

  19. NMR and MD Studies Reveal That the Isolated Dengue NS3 Protease Is an Intrinsically Disordered Chymotrypsin Fold Which Absolutely Requests NS2B for Correct Folding and Functional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Garvita; Lim, Liangzhong; Song, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    Dengue genome encodes a two component protease complex (NS2B-NS3pro) essential for the viral maturation/infectivity, thus representing a key drug target. Previously, due to its “complete insolubility”, the isolated NS3pro could not be experimentally studied and it remains elusive what structure it adopts without NS2B and why NS2B is indispensable. Here as facilitated by our previous discovery, the isolated NS3pro has been surprisingly deciphered by NMR to be the first intrinsically-disordered chymotrypsin-like fold, which exists in a loosely-packed state with non-native long-range interactions as revealed by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). The disordered NS3pro appears to be needed for binding a human host factor to trigger the membrane remodeling. Moreover, we have in vitro refolded the NS3pro in complex with either NS2B (48–100) or the full-length NS2B (1–130) anchored into the LMPC micelle, and the two complexes have similar activities but different dynamics. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the results revealed that NS2B shows the highest structural fluctuations in the complex, thus providing the dynamic basis for the observation on its conformational exchange between open and closed states. Remarkably, the NS2B cofactor plays a central role in maintaining the correlated motion network required for the catalysis as we previously decoded for the SARS 3CL protease. Indeed, a truncated NS2B (48–100;Δ77–84) with the flexible loop deleted is able to trap the NS2B-NS3pro complex in a highly dynamic and catalytically-impotent state. Taken together, our study implies potential strategies to perturb the NS2B-NS3pro interface for design of inhibitors for treating dengue infection. PMID:26258523

  20. Native Folding of a Recombinant gpE1/gpE2 Heterodimer Vaccine Antigen from a Precursor Protein Fused with Fc IgG.

    PubMed

    Logan, Michael; Law, John; Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Hockman, Darren; Landi, Amir; Chen, Chao; Crawford, Kevin; Kundu, Juthika; Baldwin, Lesley; Johnson, Janelle; Dahiya, Anita; LaChance, Gerald; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Law, Mansun; Foung, Steven; Tyrrell, Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A recombinant strain HCV1 (hepatitis C virus [HCV] genotype 1a) gpE1/gpE2 (E1E2) vaccine candidate was previously shown by our group to protect chimpanzees and generate broad cross-neutralizing antibodies in animals and humans. In addition, recent independent studies have highlighted the importance of conserved neutralizing epitopes in HCV vaccine development that map to antigenic clusters in E2 or the E1E2 heterodimer. E1E2 can be purified using Galanthis nivalis lectin agarose (GNA), but this technique is suboptimal for global production. Our goal was to investigate a high-affinity and scalable method for isolating E1E2. We generated an Fc tag-derived (Fc-d) E1E2 that was selectively captured by protein G Sepharose, with the tag being removed subsequently using PreScission protease. Surprisingly, despite the presence of the large Fc tag, Fc-d E1E2 formed heterodimers similar to those formed by GNA-purified wild-type (WT) E1E2 and exhibited nearly identical binding profiles to HCV monoclonal antibodies that target conserved neutralizing epitopes in E2 (HC33.4, HC84.26, and AR3B) and the E1E2 heterodimer (AR4A and AR5A). Antisera from immunized mice showed that Fc-d E1E2 elicited anti-E2 antibody titers and neutralization of HCV pseudotype viruses similar to those with WT E1E2. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that antisera from immunized mice inhibited monoclonal antibody binding to neutralizing epitopes. Antisera from Fc-d E1E2-immunized mice exhibited stronger competition for AR3B and AR5A than the WT, whereas the levels of competition for HC84.26 and AR4A were similar. We anticipate that Fc-d E1E2 will provide a scalable purification and manufacturing process using protein A/G-based chromatography.

  1. Correction: BTI-Tnao38, a new cell line derived from Trichoplusia ni, is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Shiying; Chen, Yun-Ru; Blissard, Gary W

    2012-04-24

    After publication we discovered an error in the identification of the origin of the cell line reported in our article in BMC Biotechnology (2010, 10:50), entitled "Ao38, a new cell line from eggs of the black witch moth, Ascalapha odorata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins". Upon analysis of primary A. odorata cultures, we found that they were contaminated with cells of Trichoplusia ni origin. The origin of the Ao38 cell line was determined as T. ni using three marker genes and the Ao38 cell line was renamed BTI-Tnao38. References to the origin of the cell line as Ascalapha odorata should be replaced with "a cell line of Trichoplusia ni origin". The absence of TNCL virus detection in the BTI-Tnao38 (Ao38) cell line was confirmed using a highly sensitive RT-PCR protocol capable of detecting TNCL virus RNA at approximately 0.018 copies/cell. Because of these observations, we have revised the title of the original article to "Correction: BTI-Tnao38, a new cell line derived from Trichoplusia ni, is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins" and two additional authors were added to reflect their contributions to the analysis of this cell line.

  2. Long-term correction of obesity and diabetes in genetically obese mice by a single intramuscular injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding mouse leptin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John E.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Giese, Klaus; Williams, Lewis T.; Escobedo, Jaime A.; Dwarki, Varavani J.

    1997-01-01

    The ob/ob mouse is genetically deficient in leptin and exhibits a phenotype that includes obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes melitus. This phenotype closely resembles the morbid obesity seen in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that a single intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding mouse leptin (rAAV-leptin) in ob/ob mice leads to prevention of obesity and diabetes. The treated animals show normalization of metabolic abnormalities including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and lethargy. The effects of a single injection have lasted through the 6-month course of the study. At all time points measured the circulating levels of leptin in the serum were similar to age-matched control C57 mice. These results demonstrate that maintenance of normal levels of leptin (2–5 ng/ml) in the circulation can prevent both the onset of obesity and associated non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Thus a single injection of a rAAV vector expressing a therapeutic gene can lead to complete and long-term correction of a genetic disorder. Our study demonstrates the long-term correction of a disease caused by a genetic defect and proves the feasibility of using rAAV-based vectors for the treatment of chronic disorders like obesity. PMID:9391128

  3. Ion recombination and polarity corrections for small-volume ionization chambers in high-dose-rate, flattening-filter-free pulsed photon beams.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Megan A; Miller, Jessica R; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2017-02-01

    To investigate ion recombination and polarity effects in scanning and microionization chambers when used with digital electrometers and high-dose-rate linac beams such as flattening-filter-free (FFF) fields, and to compare results against conventional pulsed and continuous photon beams. Saturation curves were obtained for one Farmer-type ionization chamber and eight small-volume chamber models with volumes ranging from 0.01 to 0.13 cm(3) using a Varian TrueBeam™ STx with FFF capability. Three beam modes (6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF) were investigated, with nominal dose-per-pulse values of 0.0278, 0.0648, and 0.111 cGy/pulse, respectively, at dmax . Saturation curves obtained using the Theratronics T1000 (60) Co unit at the UWADCL and a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Clinac iX) were used to establish baseline behavior. Jaffé plots were fitted to obtain Pion , accounting for exponential effects such as charge multiplication. These values were compared with the two-voltage technique recommended in TG-51, and were plotted as a function of dose-per-pulse to assess the ability of small-volume chambers to meet reference-class criteria in FFF beams. Jaffé- and two-voltage-determined Pion values measured for high-dose-rate beams agreed within 0.1% for the Farmer-type chamber and 1% for scanning and microionization chambers, with the exception of the CC01 which agreed within 2%. With respect to ion recombination and polarity effects, the Farmer-type chamber, scanning chambers and the Exradin A26 microchamber exhibited reference-class behavior in all beams investigated, with the exception of the IBA CC04 scanning chamber, which had an initial recombination correction that varied by 0.2% with polarity. All microchambers investigated, with the exception of the A26, exhibited anomalous polarity and ion recombination behaviors that make them unsuitable for reference dosimetry in conventional and high-dose-rate photon beams. The results of this work demonstrate that

  4. XRD-based 40Ar/39Ar age correction for fine-grained illite, with application to folded carbonates in the Monterrey Salient (northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz-Díaz, Elisa; Hall, Chris M.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their minute size, 40Ar/39Ar analysis of illite faces significant analytical challenges, including mineral characterization and, especially, effects of grain size and crystallography on 39Ar recoil. Quantifying the effects of 39Ar recoil requires the use of sample vacuum encapsulation during irradiation, which permits the measurement of the fraction of recoiled 39Ar as well as the 39Ar and 40Ar∗ retained within illite crystals that are released during step heating. Total-Gas Ages (TGA) are calculated by using both recoiled and retained argon, which is functionally equivalent to K-Ar ages, while Retention Ages (RA) only involve retained Ar in the crystal. Natural applications have shown that TGA fits stratigraphic constraints of geological processes when the average illite crystallite thickness (ICT) is smaller than 10 nm, and that RA matches these constraints for ICTs larger than 50 nm. We propose a new age correction method that takes into account the average ICT and corresponding recoiled 39Ar for a sample, with X-ray Corrected Ages (XCA) lying between Total-Gas and Retention Ages depending on ICT. This correction is particularly useful in samples containing authigenic illite formed in the anchizone, with typical ICT values between 10 and 50 nm. In three samples containing authigenic illite from Cretaceous carbonates in the Monterrey Salient in northern Mexico, there is a range in TGAs among the different size-fractions of 46-49, 36-43 and 40-52 Ma, while RAs range from 54-64, 47-52 and 53-54 Ma, respectively. XCA calculations produce tighter age ranges for these samples of 52.5-56, 45.5-48.5 and 49-52.5 Ma, respectively. In an apparent age vs ICT or %2M 1illite plot, authigenic illite grains show a slope that is in general slightly positive for TGA, slightly negative for RA, but close to zero for XCA, with thinner crystallites showing more dispersion than thicker ones. In order to test if dispersion is due to a different formation history or the result

  5. Ion-recombination correction for different ionization chambers in high dose rate flattening-filter-free photon beams.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Leong, Aidan; Klöck, Stephan

    2012-05-07

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators. Removal of the filter results in available dose rates up to 24 Gy min(-1) (for nominal energy 10 MV in depth of maximum dose, a source-surface distance of 100 cm and a field size of 10×10 cm2). To guarantee accurate relative and reference dosimetry for the FFF beams, we investigated the charge collection efficiency of multiple air-vented and one liquid ionization chamber for dose rates up to 31.9 Gy min(-1). For flattened beams, the ion-collection efficiency of all air-vented ionization chambers (except for the PinPoint chamber) was above 0.995. By removing the flattening filter, we found a reduction in collection efficiency of approximately 0.5-0.9% for a 10 MV beam. For FFF beams, the Markus chamber showed the largest collection efficiency of 0.994. The observed collection efficiencies were dependent on dose per pulse, but independent of the pulse repetition frequency. Using the liquid ionization chamber, the ion-collection efficiency for flattened beams was above 0.990 for all dose rates. However, this chamber showed a low collection efficiency of 0.940 for the FFF 10 MV beam at a dose rate of 31.9 Gy min(-1). All investigated air-vented ionization chambers can be reliably used for relative dosimetry of FFF beams. The order of correction for reference dosimetry is given in the manuscript. Due to their increased saturation in high dose rate FFF beams, liquid ionization chambers appear to be unsuitable for dosimetry within these contexts.

  6. Ion-recombination correction for different ionization chambers in high dose rate flattening-filter-free photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Leong, Aidan; Klöck, Stephan

    2012-05-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators. Removal of the filter results in available dose rates up to 24 Gy min-1 (for nominal energy 10 MV in depth of maximum dose, a source-surface distance of 100 cm and a field size of 10×10 cm2). To guarantee accurate relative and reference dosimetry for the FFF beams, we investigated the charge collection efficiency of multiple air-vented and one liquid ionization chamber for dose rates up to 31.9 Gy min-1. For flattened beams, the ion-collection efficiency of all air-vented ionization chambers (except for the PinPoint chamber) was above 0.995. By removing the flattening filter, we found a reduction in collection efficiency of approximately 0.5-0.9% for a 10 MV beam. For FFF beams, the Markus chamber showed the largest collection efficiency of 0.994. The observed collection efficiencies were dependent on dose per pulse, but independent of the pulse repetition frequency. Using the liquid ionization chamber, the ion-collection efficiency for flattened beams was above 0.990 for all dose rates. However, this chamber showed a low collection efficiency of 0.940 for the FFF 10 MV beam at a dose rate of 31.9 Gy min-1. All investigated air-vented ionization chambers can be reliably used for relative dosimetry of FFF beams. The order of correction for reference dosimetry is given in the manuscript. Due to their increased saturation in high dose rate FFF beams, liquid ionization chambers appear to be unsuitable for dosimetry within these contexts.

  7. A novel melanocortin-4 receptor mutation MC4R-P272L associated with severe obesity has increased propensity to be ubiquitinated in the ER in the face of correct folding.

    PubMed

    Granell, Susana; Serra-Juhé, Clara; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Díaz, Francisca; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Baldini, Giulia; Argente, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene represent the most frequent cause of monogenic obesity in humans. MC4R mutation analysis in a cohort of 77 children with morbid obesity identified previously unreported heterozygous mutations (P272L, N74I) in two patients inherited from their obese mothers. A rare polymorphism (I251L, allelic frequency: 1/100) reported to protect against obesity was found in another obese patient. When expressed in neuronal cells, the cell surface abundance of wild-type MC4R and of the N74I and I251L variants and the cAMP generated by these receptors in response to exposure to the agonist, α-MSH, were not different. Conversely, MC4R P272L was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and had reduced cell surface expression and signaling (by ≈ 3-fold). The chemical chaperone PBA, which promotes protein folding of wild-type MC4R, had minimal effects on the distribution and signaling of the P272L variant. In contrast, incubation with UBE-41, a specific inhibitor of ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, inhibited ubiquitination of MC4R P272L and increased its cell surface expression and signaling to similar levels as wild-type MC4R. UBE41 had much less profound effects on MC4R I316S, another obesity-linked MC4R variant trapped in the ER. These data suggest that P272L is retained in the ER by a propensity to be ubiquitinated in the face of correct folding, which is only minimally shared by MC4R I316S. Thus, studies that combine clinical screening of obese patients and investigation of the functional defects of the obesity-linked MC4R variants can identify specific ways to correct these defects and are the first steps towards personalized medicine.

  8. A Novel Melanocortin-4 Receptor Mutation MC4R-P272L Associated with Severe Obesity Has Increased Propensity To Be Ubiquitinated in the ER in the Face of Correct Folding

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Susana; Serra-Juhé, Clara; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á.; Díaz, Francisca; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Baldini, Giulia; Argente, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene represent the most frequent cause of monogenic obesity in humans. MC4R mutation analysis in a cohort of 77 children with morbid obesity identified previously unreported heterozygous mutations (P272L, N74I) in two patients inherited from their obese mothers. A rare polymorphism (I251L, allelic frequency: 1/100) reported to protect against obesity was found in another obese patient. When expressed in neuronal cells, the cell surface abundance of wild-type MC4R and of the N74I and I251L variants and the cAMP generated by these receptors in response to exposure to the agonist, α-MSH, were not different. Conversely, MC4R P272L was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and had reduced cell surface expression and signaling (by ≈3-fold). The chemical chaperone PBA, which promotes protein folding of wild-type MC4R, had minimal effects on the distribution and signaling of the P272L variant. In contrast, incubation with UBE-41, a specific inhibitor of ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, inhibited ubiquitination of MC4R P272L and increased its cell surface expression and signaling to similar levels as wild-type MC4R. UBE41 had much less profound effects on MC4R I316S, another obesity-linked MC4R variant trapped in the ER. These data suggest that P272L is retained in the ER by a propensity to be ubiquitinated in the face of correct folding, which is only minimally shared by MC4R I316S. Thus, studies that combine clinical screening of obese patients and investigation of the functional defects of the obesity-linked MC4R variants can identify specific ways to correct these defects and are the first steps towards personalized medicine. PMID:23251400

  9. Simple Model of Protein Folding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwanzig, Robert

    1995-10-01

    A simple model of the kinetics of protein folding is presented. The reaction coordinate is the "correctness" of a configuration compared with the native state. The model has a gap in the energy spectrum, a large configurational entropy, a free energy barrier between folded and partially folded states, and a good thermodynamic folding transition. Folding kinetics is described by a master equation. The folding time is estimated by means of a local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption and then is calculated both numerically and analytically by solving the master equation. The folding time has a maximum near the folding transition temperature and can have a minimum at a lower temperature.

  10. Visualization of coupled protein folding and binding in bacteria and purification of the heterodimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoyong; Chong, Shaorong

    2003-01-01

    During overexpression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, misfolded proteins often aggregate and form inclusion bodies. If an aggregation-prone recombinant protein is fused upstream (as an N-terminal fusion) to GFP, aggregation of the recombinant protein domain also leads to misfolding of the downstream GFP domain, resulting in a decrease or loss of fluorescence. We investigated whether the GFP domain could fold correctly if aggregation of the upstream protein domain was prevented in vivo by a coupled protein folding and binding interaction. Such interaction has been previously shown to occur between the E. coli integration host factors α and β, and between the domains of the general transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein and the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors. In this study, fusion of integration host factor β or the CREB-binding protein domain upstream to GFP resulted in aggregation of the fusion protein. Coexpression of their respective partners, on the other hand, allowed soluble expression of the fusion protein and a dramatic increase in fluorescence. The study demonstrated that coupled protein folding and binding could be correlated to GFP fluorescence. A modified miniintein containing an affinity tag was inserted between the upstream protein domain and GFP to allow rapid purification and identification of the heterodimeric complex. The GFP coexpression fusion system may be used to identify novel protein–protein interactions that involve coupled folding and binding or protein partners that can solubilize aggregation-prone recombinant proteins. PMID:12515863

  11. Identification of an oxidative refolding intermediate of recombinant consensus interferon from inclusion bodies and design of a two-stage strategy to promote correct disulfide-bond formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Gui-Feng; Li, Jing-Jing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Yin-Jue; Ding, Hong; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-12-01

    Dilution refolding of recombinant consensus IFN (interferon) from inclusion bodies suffers from low yield. A stable intermediate was found to mix with the correct product and to have an antiviral activity of less than 10% of the latter. This intermediate would form precipitates upon removal of the precipitation inhibitor arginine. Compared with the native protein, the intermediate moved more slowly on non-reducing SDS/PAGE. The CD and fluorescence spectra indicated that it had formed a native-like structure, but had only one disulfide bond: Cys(29)-Cys(139). Further evidence showed that the formation of Cys(29)-Cys(139) is specific and very likely to happen, even in the presence of a high concentration of reducing agent, whereas pairing of the other disulfide (Cys(1)-Cys(99)) needed a stronger oxidative condition. It competed with intermolecular disulfide bonding to form covalent oligomers. On the basis of this discovery, a two-stage refolding step strategy was designed that employed a modified dilution refolding step followed by a dialysis refolding step. The first stage used a high concentration of reducing agent together with the precipitation inhibitor arginine. The purpose was to hinder any reaction through Cys(1) or Cys(99) but allow the intramolecular disulfide bonding of Cys(29)-Cys(139). The second stage was a dialysis step that gradually increased the oxidative agent concentration and simultaneously decreased the arginine concentration. The refolding yield was increased from 35 to 82%, while the mass recovery was increased from 60 to 96%. Moreover, this strategy could suppress precipitation even after arginine was completely removed.

  12. Use of folding modulators to improve heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Olga; Spada, Stefania; Robin, Sylvain; Wall, J Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of E. coli in the manufacture of a wide range of biotechnological and biomedical products, extensive process and/or target optimisation is routinely required in order to achieve functional yields in excess of low mg/l levels. Molecular chaperones and folding catalysts appear to present a panacea for problems of heterologous protein folding in the organism, due largely to their broad substrate range compared with, e.g., protein-specific mutagenesis approaches. Painstaking investigation of chaperone overproduction has, however, met with mixed – and largely unpredictable – results to date. The past 5 years have nevertheless seen an explosion in interest in exploiting the native folding modulators of E. coli, and particularly cocktails thereof, driven largely by the availability of plasmid systems that facilitate simultaneous, non-rational screening of multiple chaperones during recombinant protein expression. As interest in using E. coli to produce recombinant membrane proteins and even glycoproteins grows, approaches to reduce aggregation, delay host cell lysis and optimise expression of difficult-to-express recombinant proteins will become even more critical over the coming years. In this review, we critically evaluate the performance of molecular chaperones and folding catalysts native to E. coli in improving functional production of heterologous proteins in the bacterium and we discuss how they might best be exploited to provide increased amounts of correctly-folded, active protein for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:19173718

  13. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  14. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  15. Correction in trans for Fabry disease: expression, secretion and uptake of alpha-galactosidase A in patient-derived cells driven by a high-titer recombinant retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Tudor, M; Simovitch, R; Quirk, J M; Jacobson, S; Murray, G J; Brady, R O

    1996-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic disorder due to a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-gal A; EC 3.2.1.22). Patients accumulate glycosphingolipids with terminal alpha-galactosyl residues that come from intracellular synthesis, circulating metabolites, or from the biodegradation Of senescent cells. Patients eventually succumb to renal, cardio-, or cerebrovascular disease. No specific therapy exists. One possible approach to ameliorating this disorder is to target corrective gene transfer therapy to circulating hematopoietic cells. Toward this end, an amphotropic virus-producer cell line has been developed that produces a high titer (>10(6) i.p. per ml) recombinant retrovirus constructed to transduce and correct target cells. Virus-producer cells also demonstrate expression of large amounts of both intracellular and secreted alpha-gal A. To examine the utility of this therapeutic vector, skin fibroblasts from Fabry patients were corrected for the metabolic defect by infection with this recombinant virus and secreted enzyme was observed. Furthermore, the secreted enzyme was found to be taken up by uncorrected cells in a mannose-6-phosphate receptor-dependent manner. In related experiments, immortalized B cell lines from Fabry patients, created as a hematologic delivery test system, were transduced. As with the fibroblasts, transduced patient B cell lines demonstrated both endogenous enzyme correction and a small amount of secretion together with uptake by uncorrected cells. These studies demonstrate that endogenous metabolic correction in transduced cells, combined with secretion, may provide a continuous source of corrective material in trans to unmodified patient bystander cells (metabolic cooperativity). Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8755577

  16. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  17. How Does Your Protein Fold? Elucidating the Apomyoglobin Folding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-01-17

    conformational ensembles formed in the presence of denaturing agents and low pH can be characterized as models for the unfolded states of the protein. Newer NMR techniques such as measurement of residual dipolar couplings in the various partly folded states, and relaxation dispersion measurements to probe invisible states present at low concentrations, have contributed to providing a detailed picture of the apomyoglobin folding pathway. The research summarized in this Account was aimed at characterizing and comparing the equilibrium and kinetic intermediates both structurally and dynamically, as well as delineating the complete folding pathway at a residue-specific level, in order to answer the question: "What is it about the amino acid sequence that causes each molecule in the unfolded protein ensemble to start folding, and, once started, to proceed towards the formation of the correctly folded three-dimensional structure?"

  18. BRCA1 deficient embryonic stem cells display a decreased homologous recombination frequency and an increased frequency of non-homologous recombination that is corrected by expression of a brca1 transgene.

    PubMed

    Snouwaert, J N; Gowen, L C; Latour, A M; Mohn, A R; Xiao, A; DiBiase, L; Koller, B H

    1999-12-20

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that has been classified as a tumor suppressor based on the fact that women carrying a mutated copy of the BRCA1 gene are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The association of BRCA1 with RAD51 has led to the hypothesis that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. We describe here the generation and analysis of murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines in which both copies of the murine homologue of the human BRCA1 gene have been disrupted by gene targeting. We show that exogenous DNA introduced into these BRCA1 deficient cells by electroporation is randomly integrated into the genome at a significantly higher rate than in wild type ES cells. In contrast, integration of exogenous DNA by homologous recombination occurs in BRCA1 deficient cells at a significantly lower rate than in wild type controls. When BRCA1 expression is re-established at 5-10% of normal levels by introduction of a Brca1 transgene into BRCA1 deficient ES cells, the frequency of random integration is reduced to wild type levels, although the frequency of homologous recombination is not significantly improved. These results suggest that BRCA1 plays a role in determining the response of cells to double stranded DNA breaks.

  19. Gene correction by homologous recombination with zinc finger nucleases in primary cells from a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Jon P; Barker, Jenny C; Pruett-Miller, Shondra; Porteus, Matthew H

    2010-06-01

    Zinc Finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been used to create precise genome modifications at frequencies that might be therapeutically useful in gene therapy. We created a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease to establish a preclinical system to develop the use of ZFN-mediated gene correction for gene therapy. We knocked a mutated GFP gene into the ROSA26 locus in murine embryonic stem (ES) cells and used these cells to create a transgenic mouse. We used ZFNs to determine the frequency of gene correction by gene targeting in different primary cells from this model. We achieved targeting frequencies from 0.17 to 6% in different cell types, including primary fibroblasts and astrocytes. We demonstrate that ex vivo gene-corrected fibroblasts can be transplanted back into a mouse where they retained the corrected phenotype. In addition, we achieved targeting frequencies of over 1% in ES cells, and the targeted ES cells retained the ability to differentiate into cell types from all three germline lineages. In summary, potentially therapeutically relevant frequencies of ZFN-mediated gene targeting can be achieved in a variety of primary cells and these cells can then be transplanted back into a recipient.

  20. Amphipol-assisted in vitro folding of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Dahmane, Tassadite; Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Popot, Jean-Luc; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2009-07-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate numerous physiological functions. The primary difficulty presented by their study in vitro is to obtain them in sufficient amounts under a functional and stable form. Escherichia coli is a host of choice for producing recombinant proteins for structural studies. However, the insertion of GPCRs into its plasma membrane usually results in bacterial death. An alternative approach consists of targeting recombinant receptors to inclusion bodies, where they accumulate without affecting bacterial growth, and then folding them in vitro. This approach, however, stumbles over the very low folding yields typically achieved, whether in detergent solutions or in detergent-lipid mixtures. Here, we show that synthetic polymers known as amphipols provide a highly efficient medium for folding GPCRs. Using a generic protocol, we have folded four class A GPCRs to their functional state, as evidenced by the binding of their respective ligands. This strategy thus appears to have the potential to be generalized to a large number of GPCRs. These data are also of interest from a more fundamental point of view: they indicate that the structural information stored in the sequence of these four receptors allows them to reach their correct three-dimensional structure in an environment that bears no similarity, beyond the amphiphilic character, to lipid bilayers.

  1. Effects of Ca2+ on refolding of the recombinant hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2009-05-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from Cucumaria echinata. Although recombinant CEL-III (rCEL-III) expressed in Escherichia coli showed very weak hemolytic activity compared with native protein, it was considerably enhanced by refolding in the presence of Ca(2+). This suggests that Ca(2+) supported correct folding of the carbohydrate-binding domains of rCEL-III, leading to effective binding to the cell surface and subsequent self-oligomerization.

  2. Paper Folding Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a paper folding activity that can be used for teaching fractions. This activity can be used to describe areas of folded polygons in terms of a standard unit of measure. A paper folding fractions worksheet and its corresponding solutions are also presented in this article. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  4. Recombinant Production of Human Aquaporin-1 to an Exceptional High Membrane Density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bomholt, Julie; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C-terminally tagged with yeast enhanced GFP for quantification of functional expression, determination of sub-cellular localization, estimation of in vivo folding efficiency and establishment of a purification protocol. Aquaporin-1 was found to constitute 8.5 percent of total membrane protein content after expression at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction of the expression temperature to 15°C almost completely prevented Aquaporin-1 mal-folding. Bioimaging of live yeast cells revealed that recombinant Aquaporin-1 accumulated in the yeast plasma membrane. A detergent screen for solubilization revealed that CYMAL-5 was superior in solubilizing recombinant Aquaporin-1 and generated a monodisperse protein preparation. A single Ni-affinity chromatography step was used to obtain almost pure Aquaporin-1. Recombinant Aquaporin-1 produced in S. cerevisiae was not N-glycosylated in contrast to the protein found in human erythrocytes. PMID:23409185

  5. Glycoengineering approach to half-life extension of recombinant biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Constantinou, Antony; Chester, Kerry A; Vyas, Bijal; Canis, Kevin; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Epenetos, Agamemnon A; Deonarain, Mahendra P

    2012-08-15

    The potential for protein-engineered biotherapeutics is enormous, but pharmacokinetic modulation is a major challenge. Manipulating pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and bioavailability of small peptide/protein units such as antibody fragments is a major pharmaceutical ambition, illustrated by the many chemical conjugation and recombinant fusion approaches being developed. We describe a recombinant approach that leads to successful incorporation of polysialic acid, PSA for the first time, onto a therapeutically valuable protein. This was achieved by protein engineering of the PSA carrier domain of NCAM onto single-chain Fv antibody fragments (one directed against noninternalizing carcinoembryonic antigen-CEA and one against internalizing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-HER2). This created novel polysialylated antibody fragments with desired pharmacokinetics. Production was achieved in human embryonic kidney cells engineered to express human polysialyltransferase, and the recombinant, glycosylated product was successfully fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. Polysialylation was verified by glycosidase digestion and mass spectrometry, which showed the correct glycan structures and PSA chain length similar to that of native NCAM. Binding was demonstrated by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance and on live cells by flow cytometry and confocal immunofluorescence. Unexpectedly, polysialylation inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of the anti-HER2 scFv. Recombinant polysialylation led to an estimated 3-fold increase in hydrodynamic radius, comparable to PEGylation, leading to an almost 30-fold increase in blood half-life and a similar increase in blood exposure. This increase in bioavailability led to a 12-fold increase in tumor uptake by 24 h. In summary, recombinant polysialylation of antibody fragments in our system is a novel and feasible approach applicable for pharmacokinetic modulation, and may have wider applications.

  6. Molecular characterization of two soybean-infecting begomoviruses from India and evidence for recombination among legume-infecting begomoviruses from South [corrected] South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Girish, K R; Usha, R

    2005-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of two soybean-infecting begomoviruses have been determined from central and southern parts of India. Sequence analyses show that the isolate from central India is a strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and the southern Indian isolate is a strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV). Multiple DNA B components could be detected with the soybean strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus species. The nucleotide sequence similarity between the DNA A components of the two isolates is higher (82%) than that between the corresponding DNA B components (71%). Analyses of the common region of the genomic components of these two virus isolates indicate considerable divergence in the origin of replication (ori), which did not impair their infectivity as demonstrated for the central Indian isolate by agroinfection with partial tandem repeats (PTRs) of the genomic components. Detailed sequence and phylogenetic analyses reveal the distribution and possible recombination events among legume-infecting begomoviruses from South-East Asia.

  7. Widespread correction of lysosomal storage following intrahepatic injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus in the adult MPS VII mouse.

    PubMed

    Sferra, Thomas J; Backstrom, Kristin; Wang, Chuansong; Rennard, Rachel; Miller, Matt; Hu, Yan

    2004-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the acid hydrolase beta-glucuronidase. MPS VII mice develop progressive lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans within multiple organs, including the brain. Using this animal model, we investigated whether gene transfer mediated by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) type 2 vector is capable of reversing the progression of storage in adult mice. We engineered an rAAV2 vector to carry the murine beta-glucuronidase cDNA under the transcriptional direction of the human elongation factor-1alpha promoter. Intrahepatic administration of this vector in adult MPS VII mice resulted in stable hepatic beta-glucuronidase expression (473 +/- 254% of that found in wild-type mouse liver) for at least 1 year postinjection. There was widespread distribution of vector genomes and beta-glucuronidase within extrahepatic organs. The level of enzyme activity was sufficient to reduce lysosomal storage within the liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung, and brain. Within selected regions of the brain, neuronal, glial, and perivascular cells had histopathologic evidence of reduced storage. Also, brain alpha-galactosidase and beta-hexosaminidase enzyme levels, secondarily elevated by the storage abnormality, were normalized. These data demonstrate that peripheral administration of an rAAV2 vector in adult MPS VII mice can lead to transgene expression levels sufficient for improvements in both the peripheral and the central manifestations of this disease.

  8. Norovirus recombination.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rowena A; Tanaka, Mark M; White, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    RNA recombination is a significant driving force in viral evolution. Increased awareness of recombination within the genus Norovirus of the family Calicivirus has led to a rise in the identification of norovirus (NoV) recombinants and they are now reported at high frequency. Currently, there is no classification system for recombinant NoVs and a widely accepted recombinant genotyping system is still needed. Consequently, there is duplication in reporting of novel recombinants. This has led to difficulties in defining the number and types of recombinants in circulation. In this study, 120 NoV nucleotide sequences were compiled from the current GenBank database and published literature. NoV recombinants and their recombination breakpoints were identified using three methods: phylogenetic analysis, SimPlot analysis and the maximum chi2 method. A total of 20 NoV recombinant types were identified in circulation worldwide. The recombination point is the ORF1/2 overlap in all isolates except one, which demonstrated a double recombination event within the polymerase region.

  9. The effect of different media composition and temperatures on the production of recombinant human growth hormone by CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, M; Zarkesh-Esfahani, S H; Gharagozloo, M

    2013-07-01

    Cell lines derived from mammalian are dominant systems for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins because of their capacity for correct protein folding, assembly and post-translational modification. In the search of an efficient method for the production of a recombinant protein using animal cell culture, we investigated the effects of different treatment including fetal calf serum concentration, glycerol and culture temperature on a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line on the production of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) viability. The GH production was assessed using ELISA and western blotting methods and cell viability was determined by flow cytometry. The production of recombinant protein increased by 2-fold when stimulatory chemical such as glycerol was added in two stages, first cells were cultured without glycerol for a period of time in order to obtain enough cell density and then glycerol was added to achieve high specific productivity.. Moreover, glycerol addition increased cell viability. Low culture temperature (below 37°C) led to enhanced cellular productivity of the rhGH by 3-fold but decreased cell viability. These findings indicate that quite simple factors such as culture temperature and addition of simple chemicals may lead to the improvement of industrial process for the production of recombinant proteins such as rhGH.

  10. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. As a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  11. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; ...

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  12. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  13. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 13149, as Cycle 20.

  14. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 12778, as Cycle 19.

  15. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis, Proposal 12416, as Cycle 18.

  16. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {10035} during Cycle 12.

  17. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {11863} during Cycle 17.

  18. Laminin-121--recombinant expression and interactions with integrins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takako; Takagi, Junichi; Giudici, Camilla; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Deutzmann, Rainer; Timpl, Rupert; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Tonge, David

    2010-07-01

    Laminin-121, previously referred as to laminin-3, was expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells by triple transfection of full-length cDNAs encoding mouse laminin α1, β2 and γ1 chains. The recombinant laminin-121 was purified using Heparin-Sepharose followed by molecular sieve chromatography and shown to be correctly folded by electron microscopy and circular dichroism (CD). The CD spectra of recombinant laminin-121 were very similar to those of laminin-111 isolated from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor (EHS-laminin) but its T(m) value was smaller than EHS-laminin and recombinant lamnin-111 suggesting that the replacement of the β chain reduced the stability of the coiled-coil structure of laminin-121. Its binding to integrins was compared with EHS-laminin, laminin-3A32 purified from murine epidermal cell line and recombinantly expressed laminins-111, -211 and -221. Laminin-121 showed the highest affinity to α6β1 and α7β1 integrins and furthermore, laminin-121 most effectively supported neurite outgrowth. Together, this suggests that the β2 laminins have higher affinity for integrins than the β1 laminins.

  19. Fast protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Fast-folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast-folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms, which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well <1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even 'slow' folding processes: fast folders are small; relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast-folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast-folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general, as well as some work that is left to do.

  20. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  1. In vitro refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (rhPTH 1-34) from Escherichia coli directed by protein folding size exclusion chromatography (PF-SEC): implication of solution additives and their role on aggregates and renaturation.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Vemula, Sushma; Dedaniya, Akshay; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are frequently hampered by aggregation during the refolding and purification process. A simple and rapid method for in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (rhPTH 1-34) expressed in Escherichia coli with protein folding size exclusion chromatography (PF-SEC) was developed in the present work. Discrete effects of potential solution additives such as urea, polypolyethylene glycol, proline, and maltose on the refolding with simultaneous purification of rhPTH were investigated. The results of individual additives indicated that both maltose and proline had remarkable influences on the efficiency of refolding with a recovery yield of 65 and 66% respectively. Further, the synergistic effect of these additives on refolding was also explored. These results demonstrate that the additive combinations are more effective for inhibiting protein aggregation during purification of rhPTH in terms of recovery yield, purity, and specific activity. The maltose and proline combination system achieved the highest renatured rhPTH having a recovery yield of 78%, a purity of ≥99%, and a specific activity of 3.31 × 10(3) cAMP pM/cell respectively, when compared to the classical dilution method yield (41%) and purity (97%). In addition, the role of maltose and proline in a combined system on protein aggregation and refolding has been explained. The molecular docking (in silico) scores of maltose (-10.91) and proline (-9.0) support the in vitro results.

  2. Neonatal intramuscular injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus results in prolonged beta-glucuronidase expression in situ and correction of liver pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Daly, T M; Okuyama, T; Vogler, C; Haskins, M E; Muzyczka, N; Sands, M S

    1999-01-01

    For many metabolic diseases, early correction of the inherited deficiency is required to prevent long-term sequelae. We examined the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to mediate efficient gene transfer during the neonatal period in mice with the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). Quadriceps of newborn MPS VII mice were injected with an AAV vector containing human beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) cDNA. High-level intramuscular GUSB expression was seen as early as 2 weeks of age, and persisted for at least 16 weeks with no reduction in activity. In addition, GUSB activity was detected in both liver and spleen at later time points. The level of GUSB activity resulted in a significant reduction in lysosomal storage in the liver and a minimal reduction in the spleen at 16 weeks. However, the temporal and spatial pattern of hepatic GUSB activity, coupled with the presence of GUSB cDNA in liver sections, suggests that hematogenous dissemination of virus at the time of injection led to gene transfer to hepatic cells. These results demonstrate that AAV vectors can successfully infect neonatal muscle and persist through the rapid growth phase following birth. However, GUSB secretion from an intramuscular source is inefficient, limiting the therapeutic efficacy of this approach.

  3. The Protein Folding Problem

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Ken A.; Ozkan, S. Banu; Shell, M. Scott; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    The “protein folding problem” consists of three closely related puzzles: (a) What is the folding code? (b) What is the folding mechanism? (c) Can we predict the native structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence? Once regarded as a grand challenge, protein folding has seen great progress in recent years. Now, foldable proteins and nonbiological polymers are being designed routinely and moving toward successful applications. The structures of small proteins are now often well predicted by computer methods. And, there is now a testable explanation for how a protein can fold so quickly: A protein solves its large global optimization problem as a series of smaller local optimization problems, growing and assembling the native structure from peptide fragments, local structures first. PMID:18573083

  4. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  5. Protein Folding: Detailed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Vijay

    Proteins play a fundamental role in biology. With their ability to perform numerous biological roles, including acting as catalysts, antibodies, and molecular signals, proteins today realize many of the goals that modern nanotechnology aspires to. However, before proteins can carry out these remarkable molecular functions, they must perform another amazing feat — they must assemble themselves. This process of protein self-assembly into a particular shape, or "fold" is called protein folding. Due to the importance of the folded state in the biological activity of proteins, recent interest from misfolding related diseases [1], as well as a fascination of just how this process occurs [2-4], there has been much work performed in order to unravel the mechanism of protein folding [5].

  6. NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS SMOV as proposal 13555 {visit 5}.

  7. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  8. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  9. Folding of polyglutamine chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manan; Reddy, Allam S.; Abbott, N. L.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    Long polyglutamine chains have been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. These include Huntington's disease, where expanded polyglutamine (PolyQ) sequences longer than 36 residues are correlated with the onset of symptoms. In this paper we study the folding pathway of a 54-residue PolyQ chain into a β-helical structure. Transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations are used to generate unbiased reactive pathways between unfolded configurations and the folded β-helical structure of the polyglutamine chain. The folding process is examined in both explicit water and an implicit solvent. Both models reveal that the formation of a few critical contacts is necessary and sufficient for the molecule to fold. Once the primary contacts are formed, the fate of the protein is sealed and it is largely committed to fold. We find that, consistent with emerging hypotheses about PolyQ aggregation, a stable β-helical structure could serve as the nucleus for subsequent polymerization of amyloid fibrils. Our results indicate that PolyQ sequences shorter than 36 residues cannot form that nucleus, and it is also shown that specific mutations inferred from an analysis of the simulated folding pathway exacerbate its stability.

  10. Ultrafast protein folding in cages and zippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Linlin; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2003-03-01

    The smallest, fastest-folding proteins fold on the ˜μ s time scale, where state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulation can finally overlap with the fastest experimental probes such as laser temperature-jump spectroscopy. For such proteins, one can now ask whether molecular dynamics correctly predicts the native structure and/or the folding speed. We will present experimental measurements of folding speed in two small proteins that acquire a stable tertiary fold rapidly enough to have been simulated in MD: (a) The 20-residue tryptophan (Trp) cage, which constitutes both the smallest truly protein-like molecule and also the fastest-folding [Neidigh et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 9 425 (2002); Qiu et al., JACS 124 12952 (2002)], and (b) the 12-residue Trp zippers (e.g. TrpZip1), monomeric β-hairpins engineered by Cochran et al. [PNAS 98 5578 (2001)]. Both proteins fold in a cooperative, two-state transition at rates exceeding 10^5 s-1 (τ < 10 μs). We will compare the folding kinetics of these proteins with the predictions of MD simulations.

  11. Local vs global motions in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Liwo, Adam; Senet, Patrick; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to know whether local fluctuations in a polypeptide chain play any role in the mechanism by which the chain folds to the native structure of a protein. This question is addressed by analyzing folding and non-folding trajectories of a protein; as an example, the analysis is applied to the 37-residue triple β-strand WW domain from the Formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (PDB ID: 1E0L). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were generated with the coarse-grained united-residue force field, and one- and two-dimensional free-energy landscapes (FELs) along the backbone virtual-bond angle θ and backbone virtual-bond-dihedral angle γ of each residue, and principal components, respectively, were analyzed. The key residues involved in the folding of the FBP28 WW domain are elucidated by this analysis. The correlations between local and global motions are found. It is shown that most of the residues in the folding trajectories of the system studied here move in a concerted fashion, following the dynamics of the whole system. This demonstrates how the choice of a pathway has to involve concerted movements in order for this protein to fold. This finding also sheds light on the effectiveness of principal component analysis (PCA) for the description of the folding dynamics of the system studied. It is demonstrated that the FEL along the PCs, computed by considering only several critically-placed residues, can correctly describe the folding dynamics. PMID:23914144

  12. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-01

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. The specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  13. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  14. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    DOE PAGES

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surfacemore » codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.« less

  15. Programmable matter by folding

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  16. Folding of apominimyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, G; Ascoli, F; Brunori, M

    1994-01-01

    The acid unfolding pathway of apominimyoglobin (apo-mini-Mb), a 108-aa fragment (aa 32-139) of horse heart apomyoglobin has been studied by means of circular dichroism, in comparison with the native apoprotein. Similar to sperm whale apomyoglobin [Hughson, F. M., Wright, P. E. & Baldwin, R. L. (1990) Science 249, 1544-1548], a partly folded intermediate (alpha-helical content approximately 35%) is populated at pH 4.2 for horse heart apomyoglobin. For this intermediate, Hughson et al. proposed a structural model with a compact subdomain involving tertiary interactions between the folded A, G, and H helices, with the remainder of the protein essentially unfolded. As described in this paper, a folding intermediate with an alpha-helical content of approximately 33% is populated at pH 4.3-5.0 also in apo-mini-Mb. The acid unfolding pathway is similarly affected in both the native and the mini apoprotein by 15% trifluoroethanol, a helix-stabilizing compound. Thus, the folding of the apo-mini-Mb intermediate is similar to that observed for the native apoprotein, in spite of the absence in the miniprotein of the A helix and of a large part of the H helix, which are crucial for the stability of apo-Mb intermediate. Our results suggest that acquisition of a folded state in apo-mini-Mb occurs through an alternative pathway, which may or may not be shared also by apo-Mb. PMID:7972092

  17. Recombinant expression in moderate halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko

    2010-04-01

    A novel expression of recombinant proteins was developed using moderate halophiles that accumulate osmolytes and hence provide cytoplasmic environments where osmolyte-driven folding can take place. Promoters and selection marker were developed for high expression of foreign proteins. Examples are given for expression of bacterial nucleoside diphosphate kinase and human serine racemase.

  18. Synthesizing folded band chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Hayes, Scott T.; Pethel, Shawn D.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics.

  19. Protein folding and misfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Christopher M.

    2003-12-01

    The manner in which a newly synthesized chain of amino acids transforms itself into a perfectly folded protein depends both on the intrinsic properties of the amino-acid sequence and on multiple contributing influences from the crowded cellular milieu. Folding and unfolding are crucial ways of regulating biological activity and targeting proteins to different cellular locations. Aggregation of misfolded proteins that escape the cellular quality-control mechanisms is a common feature of a wide range of highly debilitating and increasingly prevalent diseases.

  20. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  1. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  2. Humanized recombinant vaccinia virus complement control protein (hrVCP) with three amino acid changes, H98Y, E102K, and E120K creating an additional putative heparin binding site, is 100-fold more active than rVCP in blocking both classical and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Odunuga, Odutayo O; Janse, Kristen; Kotwal, Girish J

    2005-11-01

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) is able to modulate the host complement system by regulating both pathways of complement activation. Efficient downregulation of complement activation depends on the ability of the regulatory protein to effectively bind the activated third (C3b) and fourth (C4b) complement components. Based on native crystallographic structure, molecular modeling, and sequence alignment with other Orthopoxviral complement control proteins (CCPs) and their host homologs, putative sites have been found on VCP as contact points for C3b/C4b. Here, we report that using site-directed mutagenesis, modified proteins have been generated. In addition, we report that the generated modified proteins with postulated contact point substitutions have shown greater ability to regulate both the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation than the recombinant Western Reserve VCP, with one modified protein showing nearly 100-fold more potency in regulating both complement activation pathways independently. The augmented in vitro inhibitory activity of the modified protein together with the newly created putative heparin binding site suggests its promising potential as a competent therapeutic agent in modulating various complement-mediated ailments, for example, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, reperfusion injury, and xenorejection.

  3. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  4. Oxidative folding in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Disulfide-bonded proteins in chloroplasts from green plants exist in the envelope and the thylakoid membrane, and in the stroma and the lumen. The formation of disulfide bonds in proteins is referred to as oxidative folding and is linked to the import and folding of chloroplast proteins as well as the assembly and repair of thylakoid complexes. It is also important in the redox regulation of enzymes and signal transfer. Green-plant chloroplasts contain enzymes that can form and isomerize disulfide bonds in proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four proteins are identified that are relevant for the catalysis of disulfide bond formation in chloroplast proteins. The proteins' low quantum yield of Photosystem II 1 (LQY1, At1g75690) and snowy cotyledon 2 (SCO2, At3g19220) exhibits protein disulfide isomerase activity and is suggested to function in the assembly and repair of Photosystem II (PSII), and the biogenesis of thylakoids in cotyledons, respectively. The thylakoid-located Lumen thiol oxidoreductase 1 (LTO1, At4g35760) can catalyze the formation of the disulfide bond of the extrinsic PsbO protein of PSII. In addition, the stroma-located protein disulfide isomerase PDIL1-3 (At3g54960) may have a role in oxidative folding. Research on oxidative folding in chloroplasts plants is in an early stage and little is known about the mechanisms of disulfide bond formation in chloroplast proteins. The close link between the import and folding of chloroplast proteins suggests that Hsp93, a component of the inner envelope's import apparatus, may have co-chaperones that can catalyze disulfide bond formation in newly imported proteins.

  5. Congenital hypothyroidism mutations affect common folding and trafficking in the α/β-hydrolase fold proteins.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-12-01

    The α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins is composed of structurally related members that, despite great diversity in their catalytic, recognition, adhesion and chaperone functions, share a common fold governed by homologous residues and conserved disulfide bridges. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in various family members have been found for congenital endocrine, metabolic and nervous system disorders. By examining the amino acid sequence from the various proteins, mutations were found to be prevalent in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold of the homologous proteins. This is the case for the thyroglobulin mutations linked to congenital hypothyroidism. To address whether correct folding of the common domain is required for protein export, we inserted the thyroglobulin mutations at homologous positions in two correlated but simpler α/β-hydrolase fold proteins known to be exported to the cell surface: neuroligin3 and acetylcholinesterase. Here we show that these mutations in the cholinesterase homologous region alter the folding properties of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain, which are reflected in defects in protein trafficking, folding and function, and ultimately result in retention of the partially processed proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accordingly, mutations at conserved residues may be transferred amongst homologous proteins to produce common processing defects despite disparate functions, protein complexity and tissue-specific expression of the homologous proteins. More importantly, a similar assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain tertiary structure among homologous members of the superfamily is required for correct trafficking of the proteins to their final destination.

  6. Native signal peptide of human ERp57 disulfide isomerase mediates secretion of active native recombinant ERp57 protein in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Slibinskas, Rimantas

    2013-06-01

    Human ERp57 protein is disulfide isomerase, facilitating proper folding of glycoprotein precursors in the concert with ER lectin chaperones calreticulin and calnexin. Growing amount of data also associates ERp57 with many different functions in subcellular locations outside the ER. Analysis of protein functions requires substantial amounts of correctly folded, biologically active protein, and in this study we introduce yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a perfect host for production of human ERp57. Our data suggest that native signal peptide of human ERp57 protein is recognized and correctly processed in the yeast cells, which leads to protein secretion. Secreted recombinant ERp57 protein possesses native amino acid sequence and is biologically active. Moreover, secretion allows simple one-step purification of recombinant ERp57 protein with the yields reaching up to 10mg/L. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Folding pathways of the Tetrahymena ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Russell, Rick

    2014-06-12

    Like many structured RNAs, the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme folds through multiple pathways and intermediates. Under standard conditions in vitro, a small fraction reaches the native state (N) with kobs ≈ 0.6 min(-1), while the remainder forms a long-lived misfolded conformation (M) thought to differ in topology. These alternative outcomes reflect a pathway that branches late in folding, after disruption of a trapped intermediate (Itrap). Here we use catalytic activity to probe the folding transitions from Itrap to the native and misfolded states. We show that mutations predicted to weaken the core helix P3 do not increase the rate of folding from Itrap but they increase the fraction that reaches the native state rather than forming the misfolded state. Thus, P3 is disrupted during folding to the native state but not to the misfolded state, and P3 disruption occurs after the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, P3-strengthening mutants also increase native folding. Additional experiments show that these mutants are rapidly committed to folding to the native state, although they reach the native state with approximately the same rate constant as the wild-type ribozyme (~1 min(-1)). Thus, the P3-strengthening mutants populate a distinct pathway that includes at least one intermediate but avoids the M state, most likely because P3 and the correct topology are formed early. Our results highlight multiple pathways in RNA folding and illustrate how kinetic competitions between rapid events can have long-lasting effects because the "choice" is enforced by energy barriers that grow larger as folding progresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Folding pathways of the Tetrahymena ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David; Russell, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Like many structured RNAs, the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme folds through multiple pathways and intermediates. Under standard conditions in vitro, a small fraction reaches the native state (N) with kobs ≈ 0.6 min–1, while the remainder forms a long-lived misfolded conformation (M) thought to differ in topology. These alternative outcomes reflect a pathway that branches late in folding, after disruption of a trapped intermediate (Itrap). Here, we use catalytic activity to probe the folding transitions from Itrap to the native and misfolded states. We show that mutations predicted to weaken the core helix P3 do not increase the rate of folding from Itrap but they increase the fraction that reaches the native state rather than forming the misfolded state. Thus, P3 is disrupted during folding to the native state but not to the misfolded state, and P3 disruption occurs after the rate-limiting step. Interestingly, P3-strengthening mutants also increase native folding. Additional experiments show that these mutants are rapidly committed to folding to the native state, although they reach the native state with approximately the same rate constant as the wild-type ribozyme (~1 min–1). Thus, the P3-strengthening mutants populate a distinct pathway that includes at least one intermediate but avoids the M state, most likely because P3 and the correct topology are formed early. Our results highlight multiple pathways in RNA folding and illustrate how kinetic competitions between rapid events can have long-lasting effects because the ‘choice’ is enforced by energy barriers that grow larger as folding progresses. PMID:24747051

  9. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  10. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2008-06-24

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  11. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  12. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-14

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  13. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  14. Palaeomagnetic analysis of plunging fold structures: Errors and a simple fold test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Simon A.

    1995-02-01

    The conventional corrections for bedding dip in palaeomagnetic studies involve either untilting about strike or about some inclined axis—the choice is usually governed by the perceived fold hinge orientation. While it has been recognised that untilting bedding about strike can be erroneous if the beds lie within plunging fold structures, there are several types of fold which have plunging hinges, but whose limbs have rotated about horizontal axes. Examples are interference structures and forced folds; restoration about inclined axes may be incorrect in these cases. The angular errors imposed upon palaeomagnetic lineation data via the wrong choice of rotation axis during unfolding are calculated here and presented for lineations in any orientation which could be associated with an upright, symmetrical fold. This extends to palaeomagnetic data previous analyses which were relevant to bedding-parallel lineations. This numerical analysis highlights the influence of various parameters which describe fold geometry and relative lineation orientation upon the angular error imparted to lineation data by the wrong unfolding method. The effect of each parameter is described, and the interaction of the parameters in producing the final error is discussed. Structural and palaeomagnetic data are cited from two field examples of fold structures which illustrate the alternative kinematic histories. Both are from thin-skinned thrust belts, but the data show that one is a true plunging fold, formed by rotation about its inclined hinge, whereas the other is an interference structure produced by rotation of the limbs about non-parallel horizontal axes. Since the angle between the palaeomagnetic lineations and the inclined fold hinge is equal on both limbs in the former type of structure, but varies from limb to limb in the latter, a simple test can be defined which uses palaeomagnetic lineation data to identify rotation axes and hence fold type. This test can use pre- or syn-folding

  15. [Benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Pickhard, A; Reiter, R

    2013-05-01

    Benign vocal fold lesions are grouped in lesions arising from the epithelium like papillomas, lesions affecting the Reinke's space (nodules, polyps, cysts, Reinkes's edema as a form of chronic laryngitis) and lesions affecting the arytenoid (granulomas). A multifactorial genesis is assumed. Main symptoms are dysphonia and hyperfunctional vocal behavior that might also be a cause of these lesions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  17. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  18. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  19. Paediatric vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Isabel; Peñorrocha-Teres, Julio; Perez-Ortin, Magdalena; Cerpa, Mauricio; Rabanal, Ignacio; Gavilan, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) is a relatively common cause of stridor and dysphonia in the paediatric population. This report summarises our experience with VFP in the paediatric age group. All patients presenting with vocal fold paralysis over a 12-month period were included. Medical charts were revised retrospectively. The diagnosis was performed by flexible endoscopic examination. The cases were evaluated with respect to aetiology of the paralysis, presenting symptoms, delay in diagnosis, affected side, vocal fold position, need for surgical treatment and outcome. The presenting symptoms were stridor and dysphonia. Iatrogenic causes formed the largest group, followed by idiopathic, neurological and obstetric VFP. Unilateral paralysis was found in most cases. The median value for delay in diagnosis was 1 month and it was significantly higher in the iatrogenic group. Surgical treatment was not necessary in most part of cases. The diagnosis of VFP may be suspected based on the patient's symptoms and confirmed by flexible endoscopy. Infants who develop stridor or dysphonia following a surgical procedure have to be examined without delay. The surgeon has to keep in mind that there is a possibility of late spontaneous recovery or compensation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  1. Political Correctness--Correct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boase, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of political correctness, its roots and objectives, and its successes and failures in coping with the conflicts and clashes of multicultural campuses. Argues that speech codes indicate failure in academia's primary mission to civilize and educate through talk, discussion, thought,166 and persuasion. (SR)

  2. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  3. Improving Protein Fold Recognition by Deep Learning Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Taeho; Hou, Jie; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    For accurate recognition of protein folds, a deep learning network method (DN-Fold) was developed to predict if a given query-template protein pair belongs to the same structural fold. The input used stemmed from the protein sequence and structural features extracted from the protein pair. We evaluated the performance of DN-Fold along with 18 different methods on Lindahl’s benchmark dataset and on a large benchmark set extracted from SCOP 1.75 consisting of about one million protein pairs, at three different levels of fold recognition (i.e., protein family, superfamily, and fold) depending on the evolutionary distance between protein sequences. The correct recognition rate of ensembled DN-Fold for Top 1 predictions is 84.5%, 61.5%, and 33.6% and for Top 5 is 91.2%, 76.5%, and 60.7% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. We also evaluated the performance of single DN-Fold (DN-FoldS), which showed the comparable results at the level of family and superfamily, compared to ensemble DN-Fold. Finally, we extended the binary classification problem of fold recognition to real-value regression task, which also show a promising performance. DN-Fold is freely available through a web server at http://iris.rnet.missouri.edu/dnfold.

  4. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  5. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  6. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  7. Information from folds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudleston, Peter J.; Treagus, Susan H.

    2010-12-01

    Folds are spectacular geological structures that are seen in layered rock on many different scales. To mark 30 years of the Journal of Structural Geology, we review the information that can be gained from studies of folds in theory, experiment and nature. We first review theoretical considerations and modeling, from classical approaches to current developments. The subject is dominated by single-layer fold theory, with the assumption of perfect layer-parallel shortening, but we also review multilayer fold theory and modeling, and folding of layers that are oblique to principal stresses and strains. This work demonstrates that viscosity ratio, degree of non-linearity of the flow law, anisotropy, and the thickness and spacing distribution of layers of different competence are all important in determining the nature and strength of the folding instability. Theory and modeling provide the basis for obtaining rheological information from natural folds, through analysis of wavelength/thickness ratios of single layer folds, and fold shapes. They also provide a basis for estimating the bulk strain from folded layers. Information about folding mechanisms can be obtained by analysis of cleavage and fabric patterns in folded rocks, and the history of deformation can be revealed by understanding how asymmetry can develop in folds, by how folds develop in shear zones, and how folds develop in more complex three-dimensional deformations.

  8. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  9. Insertion DNA Accelerates Meiotic Interchromosomal Recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ding-Hong; Xue, Jia-Yu; Yang, Si-Hai; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Li, Mi-Mi; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide insertions/deletions are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes, and the resulting hemizygous (unpaired) DNA has significant, heritable effects on adjacent DNA. However, little is known about the genetic behavior of insertion DNA. Here, we describe a binary transgenic system to study the behavior of insertion DNA during meiosis. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines were generated to carry two different defective reporter genes on nonhomologous chromosomes, designated as "recipient" and "donor" lines. Double hemizygous plants (harboring unpaired DNA) were produced by crossing between the recipient and the donor, and double homozygous lines (harboring paired DNA) via self-pollination. The transfer of the donor's unmutated sequence to the recipient generated a functional β-glucuronidase gene, which could be visualized by histochemical staining and corroborated by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. More than 673 million seedlings were screened, and the results showed that meiotic ectopic recombination in the hemizygous lines occurred at a frequency  >6.49-fold higher than that in the homozygous lines. Gene conversion might have been exclusively or predominantly responsible for the gene correction events. The direct measurement of ectopic recombination events provided evidence that an insertion, in the absence of an allelic counterpart, could scan the entire genome for homologous counterparts with which to pair. Furthermore, the unpaired (hemizygous) architectures could accelerate ectopic recombination between itself and interchromosomal counterparts. We suggest that the ectopic recombination accelerated by hemizygous architectures may be a general mechanism for interchromosomal recombination through ubiquitously dispersed repeat sequences in plants, ultimately contributing to genetic renovation and eukaryotic evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights

  10. Homologous recombination in plants is organ specific.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alexander; Filkowski, Jody; Hudson, Darryl; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-03-20

    In this paper we analysed the genome stability of various Arabidopsis thaliana plant organs using a transgenic recombination system. The system was based on two copies of non-functional GUS (lines #651 and #11) or LUC (line #15D8) reporter genes serving as a recombination substrate. Both reporter assays showed that recombination in flowers or stems were rare events. Most of the recombination sectors were found in leaves and roots, with leaves having over 2-fold greater number of the recombination events per single cell genome as compared to roots. The recombination events per single genome were 9.7-fold more frequent on the lateral half of the leaves than on the medial halves. This correlated with a 2.5-fold higher metabolic activity in the energy source (lateral) versus energy sink (medial) of leaves. Higher metabolic activity was paralleled by a higher anthocyanin production in lateral halves. The level of double strand break (DSB) occurrence was also different among plant organs; the highest level was observed in roots and the lowest in leaves. High level of DSBs strongly positively correlated with the activity of the key repair enzymes, AtKU70 and AtRAD51. The ratio of AtRAD51 to AtKU70 expression was the highest in leaves, supporting the more active involvement of homologous recombination pathway in the repair of DSBs in this organ. Western blot analysis confirmed the real time PCR expression data for AtKU70 gene.

  11. Folds on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 26, 1998, shows features on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa that a scientific report published today interprets as signs of compressive folding.

    The imaged area is in the Astypalaea Linea region of Europa's southern hemisphere, seen with low-angle sunshine coming from the upper right. North is toward the top.

    Astypalaea Linea is the smooth, gray area that stretches from north to south across the image mosaic. It is thought to have formed by a combination of pulling apart and sliding of the icy surface. The telltale fold features are within the smoother portions of the surface between the more dominant ridges, which are attributed to upwelling of material through surface ice. In the smooth areas, the surface has gentle swells and dips, which show most clearly in the version on the right, processed to accentuate broader-scale shapes. For example, a dip about 15 kilometers (about 10 miles) wide cuts diagonally across the northern half of the largest smooth area, and a rise runs parallel to that in the southern half of the smooth area. closeup detail

    Louise M. Prockter, at Johns Hopkins University, and Robert T. Pappalardo, at Brown University, report in the journal Science today that those rises, or anticlines, and dips, or synclines, appear to be the result of compression causing the crust to fold.

    Additional evidence comes from smaller features more visible in the version on the left, covering the same area. At the crest of the gentle rise in the largest smooth area are small fractures that could be caused by the stretching stress of bending the surface layer upwards. Similarly, at the bottom of the adjacent dip are small, wrinkle-like ridges that could be caused by stress from bending the surface layer downwards.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California

  12. Protein Folding: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiwen; Ding, Feng; Nie, Huifen; Serohijos, Adrian W.; Sharma, Shantanu; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Yin, Shuangye; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital in understanding diseases and our abilities to rationally manipulate cellular life by engineering protein folding pathways. We review and contrast past and recent developments in the protein folding field. Specifically, we discuss the progress in our understanding of protein folding thermodynamics and kinetics, the properties of evasive intermediates, and unfolded states. We also discuss how some abnormalities in protein folding lead to protein aggregation and human diseases. PMID:17585870

  13. Protein photo-folding and quantum folding theory.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liaofu

    2012-06-01

    The rates of protein folding with photon absorption or emission and the cross section of photon -protein inelastic scattering are calculated from quantum folding theory by use of a field-theoretical method. All protein photo-folding processes are compared with common protein folding without the interaction of photons (non-radiative folding). It is demonstrated that there exists a common factor (thermo-averaged overlap integral of the vibration wave function, TAOI) for protein folding and protein photo-folding. Based on this finding it is predicted that (i) the stimulated photo-folding rates and the photon-protein resonance Raman scattering sections show the same temperature dependence as protein folding; (ii) the spectral line of the electronic transition is broadened to a band that includes an abundant vibration spectrum without and with conformational transitions, and the width of each vibration spectral line is largely reduced. The particular form of the folding rate-temperature relation and the abundant spectral structure imply the existence of quantum tunneling between protein conformations in folding and photo-folding that demonstrates the quantum nature of the motion of the conformational-electronic system.

  14. Oriented morphometry of folds on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Maxime; Evans, Alan; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2009-01-01

    The exterior surface of the brain is characterized by a juxtaposition of crests and troughs that together form a folding pattern. The majority of the deformations that occur in the normal course of adult human development result in folds changing their length or width. Current statistical shape analysis methods cannot easily discriminate between these two cases. Using discrete exterior calculus and Tikhonov regularization, we develop a method to estimate a dense orientation fiel in the tangent space of a surface described by a triangulated mesh, in the direction of its folds. We then use this orientation field to distinguish between shape differences in the direction parallel to folds and those in the direction across them. We test the method quantitatively on synthetic data and qualitatively on a database consisting of segmented cortical surfaces of 92 healthy subjects and 97 subjects with Alzheimer's disease. The method estimates the correct fold directions and also indicates that the healthy and diseased subjects are distinguished by shape differences that are in the direction perpendicular to the underlying hippocampi, a finding which is consistent with the neuroscientific literature. These results demonstrate the importance of direction specific computational methods for shape analysis.

  15. Protein Flexibilty and Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael

    2003-10-01

    In this talk we apply a novel approach to the exploration of energy landscapes of macromolecules and proteins that uses constraint theory. Constraints fix the bond lengths and bond angles and allow the use of theorems from graph theory to perform a rigid region decomposition of the network of atoms, which identifies the rigid regions, the flexible joints between them and also the stressed regions. We will show movies of the diffusive motion of various proteins. The protein unfolding transition is an example of a rigid to floppy transition and is shown to be more first order than second order because of the self-organized nature of the cross-linked polypeptide chain in the native protein. This approach emphasizes the universality in protein unfolding and allows the folding core and the transition state to be identified. Useful reference are: M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs and Leslie A. Kuhn Protein Flexibility Predictions using Graph Theory, Proteins 44, 150 - 165, (2001). A. J. Rader, Brandon M. Hespenheide, Leslie A. Kuhn and M. F. Thorpe Protein Unfolding: Rigidity Lost Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99, 3540-3545 (2002). More details of this work can be found via http://physics.asu.edu/mfthorpe

  16. Folded dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Salaris, Claudio; DeRossi, Danilo

    2007-04-01

    Polymer-based linear actuators with contractile ability are currently demanded for several types of applications. Within the class of dielectric elastomer actuators, two basic configurations are available today for such a purpose: the multi-layer stack and the helical structure. The first consists of several layers of elementary planar actuators stacked in series mechanically and parallel electrically. The second configuration relies on a couple of helical compliant electrodes alternated with a couple of helical dielectrics. The fabrication of both these configurations presents some specific drawbacks today, arising from the peculiarity of each structure. Accordingly, the availability of simpler solutions may boost the short-term use of contractile actuators in practical applications. For this purpose, a new configuration is here described. It consists of a monolithic structure made of an electroded sheet, which is folded up and compacted. The resulting device is functionally equivalent to a multi-layer stack with interdigitated electrodes. However, with respect to a stack the new configuration is advantageously not discontinuous and can be manufactured in one single phase, avoiding layer-by-layer multi-step procedures. The development and preliminary testing of prototype samples of this new actuator made of a silicone elastomer are presented here.

  17. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  18. Protein folding by distributed computing and the denatured state ensemble.

    PubMed

    Marianayagam, Neelan J; Fawzi, Nicolas L; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2005-11-15

    The distributed computing (DC) paradigm in conjunction with the folding@home (FH) client server has been used to study the folding kinetics of small peptides and proteins, giving excellent agreement with experimentally measured folding rates, although pathways sampled in these simulations are not always consistent with the folding mechanism. In this study, we use a coarse-grain model of protein L, whose two-state kinetics have been characterized in detail by using long-time equilibrium simulations, to rigorously test a FH protocol using approximately 10,000 short-time, uncoupled folding simulations starting from an extended state of the protein. We show that the FH results give non-Poisson distributions and early folding events that are unphysical, whereas longer folding events experience a correct barrier to folding but are not representative of the equilibrium folding ensemble. Using short-time, uncoupled folding simulations started from an equilibrated denatured state ensemble (DSE), we also do not get agreement with the equilibrium two-state kinetics because of overrepresented folding events arising from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE. The DC approach using uncoupled short trajectories can make contact with traditionally measured experimental rates and folding mechanism when starting from an equilibrated DSE, when the simulation time is long enough to sample the lowest energy states of the unfolded basin and the simulated free-energy surface is correct. However, the DC paradigm, together with faster time-resolved and single-molecule experiments, can also reveal the breakdown in the two-state approximation due to observation of folding events from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE.

  19. Pharmacological correction of misfolding of ABC proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L.; Stockner, Thomas; Trauner, Michael; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system distinguishes between correctly and incorrectly folded proteins to prevent processing of aberrantly folded conformations along the secretory pathway. Non-synonymous mutations can lead to misfolding of ABC proteins and associated disease phenotypes. Specific phenotypes may at least partially be corrected by small molecules, so-called pharmacological chaperones. Screening for folding correctors is expected to open an avenue for treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25027379

  20. Clinical features of congenital retinal folds.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Sachiko; Suzuki, Yumi; Yokoi, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Yuri; Noda, Eiichiro; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the clinical features and prognosis of congenital retinal folds without systemic associations. Retrospective observational case series. The characteristics, clinical course, ocular complications, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of eyes with congenital retinal folds were studied during the follow-up periods. The affected and fellow eyes were examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy, and fundus fluorescein angiography. The parents and siblings of each patient also underwent ophthalmoscopic examinations. The BCVA was measured using a Landolt ring VA chart. One hundred forty-seven eyes of 121 patients with congenital retinal folds were examined. Fifty-five patients (45.5%) were female. The fold was unilateral in 95 patients (78.5%), and 69 of those patients (72.6%) had retinal abnormalities in the fellow eye. The meridional distribution of folds was temporal in 136 eyes (92.5%). The family history was positive in 32 patients (26.4%). Secondary fundus complications, including fibrovascular proliferation and tractional, rhegmatogenous, and exudative retinal detachments, developed in 44 eyes (29.9%). The BCVAs could be measured in 119 eyes and ranged from 20/100 to 20/20 in 5 eyes (4.2%), 2/100 to 20/200 in 45 eyes (37.8%), and 2/200 or worse in 69 eyes (58.0%). The follow-up periods ranged from 4 to 243 months (mean, 79.7 ± 58.9 months). These clinical features suggested that most congenital retinal folds may result from insufficient retinal vascular development, as in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, rather than persistent fetal vasculature. Adequate management of active retinopathy and late-onset complications, especially retinal detachment, is required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  2. Predicting protein folds with fold-specific PSSM libraries.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoojin; Chintapalli, Sree Vamsee; Ko, Kyung Dae; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Zhang, Zhenhai; van Rossum, Damian; Patterson, Randen L

    2011-01-01

    Accurately assigning folds for divergent protein sequences is a major obstacle to structural studies. Herein, we outline an effective method for fold recognition using sets of PSSMs, each of which is constructed for different protein folds. Our analyses demonstrate that FSL (Fold-specific Position Specific Scoring Matrix Libraries) can predict/relate structures given only their amino acid sequences of highly divergent proteins. This ability to detect distant relationships is dependent on low-identity sequence alignments obtained from FSL. Results from our experiments demonstrate that FSL perform well in recognizing folds from the "twilight-zone" SABmark dataset. Further, this method is capable of accurate fold prediction in newly determined structures. We suggest that by building complete PSSM libraries for all unique folds within the Protein Database (PDB), FSL can be used to rapidly and reliably annotate a large subset of protein folds at proteomic level. The related programs and fold-specific PSSMs for our FSL are publicly available at: http://ccp.psu.edu/download/FSLv1.0/.

  3. Evolutionary Optimization of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, 3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last 1.5 billion years that began during the “big bang” of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  4. How do metal ions direct ribozyme folding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, Natalia A.; Thirumalai, D.

    2015-10-01

    Ribozymes, which carry out phosphoryl-transfer reactions, often require Mg2+ ions for catalytic activity. The correct folding of the active site and ribozyme tertiary structure is also regulated by metal ions in a manner that is not fully understood. Here we employ coarse-grained molecular simulations to show that individual structural elements of the group I ribozyme from the bacterium Azoarcus form spontaneously in the unfolded ribozyme even at very low Mg2+ concentrations, and are transiently stabilized by the coordination of Mg2+ ions to specific nucleotides. However, competition for scarce Mg2+ and topological constraints that arise from chain connectivity prevent the complete folding of the ribozyme. A much higher Mg2+ concentration is required for complete folding of the ribozyme and stabilization of the active site. When Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+ the ribozyme folds, but the active site remains unstable. Our results suggest that group I ribozymes utilize the same interactions with specific metal ligands for both structural stability and chemical activity.

  5. Molecular chaperoning function of Ric-8 is to fold nascent heterotrimeric G protein α subunits.

    PubMed

    Chan, Puiyee; Thomas, Celestine J; Sprang, Stephen R; Tall, Gregory G

    2013-03-05

    We have shown that resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric-8) proteins regulate an early step of heterotrimeric G protein α (Gα) subunit biosynthesis. Here, mammalian and plant cell-free translation systems were used to study Ric-8A action during Gα subunit translation and protein folding. Gα translation rates and overall produced protein amounts were equivalent in mock and Ric-8A-immunodepleted rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL). GDP-AlF4(-)-bound Gαi, Gαq, Gα13, and Gαs produced in mock-depleted RRL had characteristic resistance to limited trypsinolysis, showing that these G proteins were folded properly. Gαi, Gαq, and Gα13, but not Gαs produced from Ric-8A-depleted RRL were not protected from trypsinization and therefore not folded correctly. Addition of recombinant Ric-8A to the Ric-8A-depleted RRL enhanced GDP-AlF4(-)-bound Gα subunit trypsin protection. Dramatic results were obtained in wheat germ extract (WGE) that has no endogenous Ric-8 component. WGE-translated Gαq was gel filtered and found to be an aggregate. Ric-8A supplementation of WGE allowed production of Gαq that gel filtered as a ∼100 kDa Ric-8A:Gαq heterodimer. Addition of GTPγS to Ric-8A-supplemented WGE Gαq translation resulted in dissociation of the Ric-8A:Gαq heterodimer and production of functional Gαq-GTPγS monomer. Excess Gβγ supplementation of WGE did not support functional Gαq production. The molecular chaperoning function of Ric-8 is to participate in the folding of nascent G protein α subunits.

  6. Detachment folding, fold amplification, and diapirism in thrust wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco

    2003-12-01

    The relations between detachment folding, fold amplification, and salt diapirism in contractional settings have been investigated by means of scaled analogue models. The viscosity of the silicone layer simulating salt in nature and the shortening rates were combined in order to reproduce weak (type 1 models) and strong (type 2 models) décollements. Deformation patterns in the roof sequence exhibited two contrasting styles, (1) outward propagation of detachment folding along the décollement (OFP mode) and (2) passive roof duplex (PRD mode). In type 2 models, detachment folding propagated away from the most external thrust in the floor sequence, while in type 1 models, long-lived detachment folds almost invariably localized amplified above a floor thrust tip as a result of strain localization. A silicone wall intruded occasionally into the crestal graben of detachment folds in type 1 and OFP models. Best fitting of transition models data points indicates nonlinear relations with regression curves close to the equilateral hyperbola equation for both OFP-PRD and amplified detachment folds-box folds transitions. A quantitative comparison of model results with nature has been attempted by plotting salt-based fold-and-thrust belts data points on the scaled transition curves obtained from the modeling. Such a comparison relates shear stress products and ratios to the conditions favoring the amplification of detachment folds and the potential emplacement of ductile diapirs in their core. By reducing the roof sequence strength, pore fluid pressure λb is inferred to shift the equilibrium of fold-and-thrust belts toward the field of OFP and diapirism.

  7. Early Events in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Lee, Namkyung; Woodson, Sarah A.; Klimov, Dk

    2001-10-01

    We describe a conceptual framework for understanding the way large RNA molecules fold based on the notion that their free-energy landscape is rugged. A key prediction of our theory is that RNA folding can be described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism (KPM). According to KPM a small fraction of molecules folds rapidly to the native state whereas the remaining fraction is kinetically trapped in a low free-energy non-native state. This model provides a unified description of the way RNA and proteins fold. Single-molecule experiments on Tetrahymena ribozyme, which directly validate our theory, are analyzed using KPM. We also describe the earliest events that occur on microsecond time scales in RNA folding. These must involve collapse of RNA molecules that are mediated by counterion-condensation. Estimates of time scales for the initial events in RNA folding are provided for the Tetrahymena ribozyme.

  8. Kinetic Intermediates in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrinkar, Patrick P.; Williamson, James R.

    1994-08-01

    The folding pathways of large, highly structured RNA molecules are largely unexplored. Insight into both the kinetics of folding and the presence of intermediates was provided in a study of the Mg2+-induced folding of the Tetrahymena ribozyme by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotide probes. This RNA folds via a complex mechanism involving both Mg2+-dependent and Mg2+-independent steps. A hierarchical model for the folding pathway is proposed in which formation of one helical domain (P4-P6) precedes that of a second helical domain (P3-P7). The overall rate-limiting step is formation of P3-P7, and takes place with an observed rate constant of 0.72 ± 0.14 minute-1. The folding mechanism of large RNAs appears similar to that of many multidomain proteins in that formation of independently stable substructures precedes their association into the final conformation.

  9. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  10. Physical experiments of transpressional folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, Basil; Peterson, Karl

    1998-06-01

    In order to understand the process of folding in obliquely convergent settings, we formed folds within a shear box capable of creating homogeneous transpressional deformations. Folds were created in a single layer of stiff mixed plasticine and silicone that overlay a Newtonian silicone, for a variety of plate convergence angles. As small amplitude folds became visible, they were parallel to the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse. With increasing deformation, the fold hinges rotated parallel with the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse for all angles of convergence. This parallelism indicates that fold hinges, once formed, rotate with the horizontal strain ellipse rather than as material lines. The experiments highlight several interesting effects of transpression dynamics. The fold hinges initiate parallel to either ṡ1 or ṡ2 and are parallel to either S1 or S2 with increasing deformation. Neither infinitesimal strain (stress) nor finite strain is resolvable solely from fold geometry. Further, the net amount of contraction determined by folding across the zone was overestimated in all cases except pure contraction. This effect is obvious for the case of wrenching, where folding implies that the zone contracts if elongation parallel to the fold hinge is not considered. Therefore, attempts to balance cross-sections in transpressional zones will tend to overestimate contraction unless the wrench component of deformation is addressed. This result is validated by applying the modeling results in folding in central California adjacent to the San Andreas fault, where cross-section balancing indicates higher amounts of contraction than predicted by plate motion.

  11. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {12723} during Cycle 19.

  12. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {11891} during Cycle 17.

  13. In situ protein folding and activation in bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Natalello, Antonino; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2008-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that bacterial inclusion bodies formed in absence of the main chaperone DnaK result largely enriched in functional, properly folded recombinant proteins. Unfortunately, the molecular basis of this intriguing fact, with obvious biotechnological interest, remains unsolved. We have explored here two non-excluding physiological mechanisms that could account for this observation, namely selective removal of inactive polypeptides from inclusion bodies or in situ functional activation of the embedded proteins. By combining structural and functional analysis, we have not observed any preferential selection of inactive and misfolded protein species by the dissagregating machinery during inclusion body disintegration. Instead, our data strongly support that folding intermediates aggregated as inclusion bodies could complete their natural folding process once deposited in protein clusters, which conduces to significant functional activation. In addition, in situ folding and protein activation in inclusion bodies is negatively regulated by the chaperone DnaK.

  14. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  16. Changes of protein stiffness during folding detect protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Małek, Katarzyna E; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule force-quench atomic force microscopy (FQ-AFM) is used to detect folding intermediates of a simple protein by detecting changes of molecular stiffness of the protein during its folding process. Those stiffness changes are obtained from shape and peaks of an autocorrelation of fluctuations in end-to-end length of the folding molecule. The results are supported by predictions of the equipartition theorem and agree with existing Langevin dynamics simulations of a simplified model of a protein folding. In the light of the Langevin simulations the experimental data probe an ensemble of random-coiled collapsed states of the protein, which are present both in the force-quench and thermal-quench folding pathways.

  17. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  18. Structural Bridges through Fold Space.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M

    2015-09-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes.

  19. Structural Bridges through Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2015-01-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes. PMID:26372166

  20. Engineering the protein folding landscape in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Thomas J; Fisher, Adam C; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2008-04-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli, are often the preferred hosts for recombinant protein production because of their fast doubling times, ability to grow to high cell density, propensity for high recombinant protein titers and straightforward protein purification techniques. The utility of simple bacteria in such studies continues to improve as a result of an ever-increasing body of knowledge regarding their native protein biogenesis machinery. From translation on the ribosome to interaction with cytosolic accessory factors to transport across the inner membrane into the periplasmic space, cellular proteins interact with many different types of cellular machinery and each interaction can have a profound effect on the protein folding process. This review addresses key aspects of cellular protein folding, solubility and expression in E. coli with particular focus on the elegant biological machinery that orchestrates the transition from nascent polypeptide to folded, functional protein. Specifically highlighted are a variety of different techniques to intentionally alter the folding environment of the cell as a means to understand and engineer intracellular protein folding and stability.

  1. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  2. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13128.

  3. Engineering chimaeric proteins from fold fragments: 'hopeful monsters' in protein design.

    PubMed

    Höcker, Birte

    2013-10-01

    Modern highly complex proteins evolved from much simpler and less specialized subunits. The same concept can be applied in protein engineering to construct new well-folded proteins. Hybrid proteins or chimaeras can be built from contemporary protein fragments through illegitimate recombination. Even parts from different globular folds can be fitted together using rational design methodologies. Furthermore, intrinsic functional properties encoded in the fold fragments allow rapid adaptation of the new proteins and thus provide interesting starting scaffolds for further redesign.

  4. Glucocorticoids alleviate intestinal ER stress by enhancing protein folding and degradation of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Indrajit; Png, Chin Wen; Oancea, Iulia; Hasnain, Sumaira Z; Lourie, Rohan; Proctor, Martina; Eri, Rajaraman D; Sheng, Yong; Crane, Denis I; Florin, Timothy H; McGuckin, Michael A

    2013-06-03

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in intestinal secretory cells has been linked with colitis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endogenous intestinal glucocorticoids are important for homeostasis and glucocorticoid drugs are efficacious in IBD. In Winnie mice with intestinal ER stress caused by misfolding of the Muc2 mucin, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) suppressed ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), substantially restoring goblet cell Muc2 production. In mice lacking inflammation, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist increased ER stress, and DEX suppressed ER stress induced by the N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (Tm). In cultured human intestinal secretory cells, in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner, DEX suppressed ER stress and UPR activation induced by blocking N-glycosylation, reducing ER Ca(2+) or depleting glucose. DEX up-regulated genes encoding chaperones and elements of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), including EDEM1. Silencing EDEM1 partially inhibited DEX's suppression of misfolding-induced ER stress, showing that DEX enhances ERAD. DEX inhibited Tm-induced MUC2 precursor accumulation, promoted production of mature mucin, and restored ER exit and secretion of Winnie mutant recombinant Muc2 domains, consistent with enhanced protein folding. In IBD, glucocorticoids are likely to ameliorate ER stress by promoting correct folding of secreted proteins and enhancing removal of misfolded proteins from the ER.

  5. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings. PMID:27493521

  6. Inframammary fold: a histologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Muntan, C D; Sundine, M J; Rink, R D; Acland, R D

    2000-02-01

    The inframammary fold is a defining element in the shape and structure of the female breast. It should be preserved whenever possible in ablative procedures and recreated accurately when the breast is reconstructed after mastectomy. To date, no accurate anatomic description of this essential structure exists. Previous studies have suggested that the fold is produced by a supporting ligament running from the dermis in the fold region to a variety of locations on the rib cage. This clinic's experience with mastectomy, augmentation mammaplasty, and breast reconstruction does not support the existence of a ligamentous structure. To define the structure of the inframammary fold, 10 female and 2 male cadavers were studied. The anterior chest wall was removed en bloc and frozen in orthostatic position. Parasagittal sections were made of the inframammary fold with the chest wall intact. After decalcification of the ribs and routine histologic preparation, thin sections were stained with Gomori's trichrome. On light microscopic examination, no demonstrable ligamentous structure of dense regular connective tissue could be identified in the fold region in any of the 12 specimens. Superficial and deep fascial layers were uniformly observed anterior to the pectoralis major and serratus anterior muscles. The superficial fascia was connected to the dermis in the fold region in a variety of configurations. In some cases, the deep fascia fused with the superficial fascia and dermis at the fold level. In other cases, bundles of collagen fibers arising from the superficial fascial layer were found to insert into the dermis at the inframammary fold, slightly inferior to it, or both. These bundles were observed consistently in sections from the sternum to the middle axillary line. They were distinct from Cooper's suspensory ligaments, which are seen more superiorly in the glandular tissue.

  7. DSMC modeling of flows with recombination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimelshein, Sergey; Wysong, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    An empirical microscopic recombination model is developed for the direct simulation Monte Carlo method that complements the extended weak vibrational bias model of dissociation. The model maintains the correct equilibrium reaction constant in a wide range of temperatures by using the collision theory to enforce the number of recombination events. It also strictly follows the detailed balance requirement for equilibrium gas. The model and its implementation are verified with oxygen and nitrogen heat bath relaxation and compared with available experimental data on atomic oxygen recombination in argon and molecular nitrogen.

  8. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  9. Folding gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. R.; Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. Alternative interferometer topologies can mitigate the impact of thermal noise on interferometer noise curves. In this work, we explore the impact of introducing a single folding mirror into the arm cavities of dual-recycled Fabry–Perot interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options. Improvements to the folding mirror thermal noise through crystalline coatings or cryogenic cooling can increase interferometer range by as much as a factor of two over the Advanced LIGO reference design.

  10. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  11. Protein folding by motion planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  12. Protein folding by motion planning.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M

    2005-11-09

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L.

  13. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  14. CosmoRec: Cosmological Recombination code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Thomas, Rajat Mani

    2013-04-01

    CosmoRec solves the recombination problem including recombinations to highly excited states, corrections to the 2s-1s two-photon channel, HI Lyn-feedback, n>2 two-photon profile corrections, and n≥2 Raman-processes. The code can solve the radiative transfer equation of the Lyman-series photon field to obtain the required modifications to the rate equations of the resolved levels, and handles electron scattering, the effect of HeI intercombination transitions, and absorption of helium photons by hydrogen. It also allows accounting for dark matter annihilation and optionally includes detailed helium radiative transfer effects.

  15. The two dimensional fold test in paleomagnetism using ipython notebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiabudidaya, Dedi; Piper, John D. A.

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of paleomagnetic analysis prone to controversy is the result of the fold test used to evaluate the age of a magnetisation component relative to the age of a structural event. Initially, the fold test was conducted by comparing the Fisherian precision parameter (k) to results from different limbs of a fold structure before and after tilt adjustment. To accommodate synfolding magnetisation, the tilt correction can be performed in stepwise fashion to both limbs simultaneously, here called one dimensional (1D) fold test. The two dimensional (2D) fold test described in this paper is carried out by applying stepwise tilt adjustment to each limb of the fold separately. The rationale for this is that tilts observed on contrasting limbs of deformed structure may not be synchronous or even belong to the same episode of deformation. A program for the procedure is presented here which generates two dimensional values of the k-parameter visually presented in contoured form. The use of ipython notebook enables this 2D fold test to be performed interactively and yield a more precise evaluation than the primitive 1D fold test.

  16. One Sequence, Two Folds: A Metastable Structure of CD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Alison J.; Lewis, Sally J.; Barclay, A. Neil; Brady, R. Leo

    1995-08-01

    When expressed as part of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein the NH_2-terminal domain of the lymphocyte cell adhesion molecule CD2 is shown to adopt two different folds. The immunoglobulin superfamily structure of the major (85%) monomeric component has previously been determined by both x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We now describe the structure of a second, dimeric, form present in about 15% of recombinant CD2 molecules. After denaturation and refolding in the absence of the fusion partner, dimeric CD2 is converted to monomer, illustrating that the dimeric form represents a metastable folded state. The crystal structure of this dimeric form, refined to 2.0-Å resolution, reveals two domains with overall similarity to the IgSF fold found in the monomer. However, in the dimer each domain is formed by the intercalation of two polypeptide chains. Hence each domain represents a distinct folding unit that can assemble in two different ways. In the dimer the two domains fold around a hydrophilic interface believed to mimic the cell adhesion interaction at the cell surface, and the formation of dimer can be regulated by mutating single residues at this interface. This unusual misfolded form of the protein, which appears to result from inter- rather than intramolecular interactions being favored by an intermediate structure formed during the folding process, illustrates that evolution of protein oligomers is possible from the sequence for a single protein domain.

  17. Cortical folding and the potential for prognostic neuroimaging in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuixia; Iwabuchi, Sarina; Balain, Vijender; Feng, Jianfeng; Liddle, Peter; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    In 41 patients with schizophrenia, we used neuroanatomical information derived from structural imaging to identify patients with more severe illness, characterised by high symptom burden, low processing speed, high degree of illness persistence and lower social and occupational functional capacity. Cortical folding, but not thickness or volume, showed a high discriminatory ability in correctly identifying patients with more severe illness. PMID:26206860

  18. Corrective work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Leslie A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some general principles for planning corrective instruction and exercises in English as a second language, and follows with examples from the areas of phonemics, phonology, lexicon, idioms, morphology, and syntax. (IFS/WGA)

  19. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  20. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  1. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. © 2014 Middleton and Kim; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function—for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. PMID:25234928

  3. ER chaperones in neurodegenerative disease: Folding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Huerta, Paula; Bargsted, Leslie; Rivas, Alexis; Matus, Soledad; Vidal, Rene L

    2016-10-01

    Proteins along the secretory pathway are co-translationally translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded polypeptide chains. Afterwards, they are usually modified with N-linked glycans, correctly folded and stabilized by disulfide bonds. ER chaperones and folding enzymes control these processes. The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER activates a signaling response, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The hallmark of this response is the coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of ER chaperones and folding enzymes. In order to discuss the importance of the proper folding of certain substrates we will address the role of ER chaperones in normal physiological conditions and examine different aspects of its contribution in neurodegenerative disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  4. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Spiwok, Vojtěch Oborský, Pavel; Králová, Blanka; Pazúriková, Jana

    2015-03-21

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable.

  5. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  6. Use of Protein Folding Reagents.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The reagents and methods for purification and use of the most commonly used denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea, are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and "oxido-shuffling" (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described.

  7. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  8. Protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Mary-Jane; Sambrook, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    In the cell, as in vitro, the final conformation of a protein is determined by its amino-acid sequence. But whereas some isolated proteins can be denatured and refolded in vitro in the absence of other macromolecular cellular components, folding and assembly of polypeptides in vivo involves other proteins, many of which belong to families that have been highly conserved during evolution.

  9. Probing cellular processes with oligo-mediated recombination; using knowledge gained to optimize recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Sawitzke, James A.; Costantino, Nina; Li, Xin-tian; Thomason, Lynn C.; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Court, Carolyn; Court, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Recombination with single-strand DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) in E. coli is an efficient and rapid way to modify replicons in vivo. The generation of a nucleotide alteration by oligo recombination provides novel assays for studying cellular processes. Single-strand exonucleases inhibit oligo recombination, and by mutating all four known exonucleases recombination is increased. Increasing the oligo concentration or addition of non-specific carrier oligo titrates out the exonucleases. In a model for oligo recombination, λ Beta protein anneals the oligo to complementary single-strand DNA at the replication fork. Mismatches are created and the methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) system acts to eliminate the mismatches inhibiting recombination. Three ways to evade MMR through oligo design include, in addition to the desired change 1) a C~C mismatch six bp from that change, 2) four or more adjacent mismatches, or 3) mismatches at four or more consecutive wobble positions. The latter proves useful for making high frequency changes that alter only the target amino-acid sequence and even allows modification of essential genes. Efficient uptake of DNA is important for oligo-mediated recombination. Uptake of oligos or plasmids is growth media-dependent and is 10,000-fold reduced for cells grown in minimal vs rich medium. Genome-wide engineering technologies utilizing recombineering will benefit from both optimized recombination frequencies and a greater understanding of how biological processes such as DNA replication and cell division impact recombinants formed at multiple chromosomal loci. Recombination events at multiple loci in individual cells are described here. PMID:21256136

  10. Production of recombinant albumin by a herd of cloned transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Echelard, Yann; Williams, Jennifer L; Destrempes, Margaret M; Koster, Julie A; Overton, Susan A; Pollock, Daniel P; Rapiejko, Karen T; Behboodi, Esmail; Masiello, Nicholas C; Gavin, William G; Pommer, Jerry; Van Patten, Scott M; Faber, David C; Cibelli, Jose B; Meade, Harry M

    2009-06-01

    Purified plasma derived human albumin has been available as a therapeutic product since World War II. However, cost effective recombinant production of albumin has been challenging due to the amount needed and the complex folding pattern of the protein. In an effort to provide an abundant source of recombinant albumin, a herd of transgenic cows expressing high levels of rhA in their milk was generated. Expression cassettes efficiently targeting the secretion of human albumin to the lactating mammary gland were obtained and tested in transgenic mice. A high expressing transgene was transfected in primary bovine cell lines to produce karyoplasts for use in a somatic cell nuclear transfer program. Founder transgenic cows were produced from four independent cell lines. Expression levels varying from 1-2 g/l to more than 40 g/l of correctly folded albumin were observed. The animals expressing the highest levels of rhA exhibited shortened lactation whereas cows yielding 1-2 g/l had normal milk production. This herd of transgenic cattle is an easily scalable and well characterized source of rhA for biomedical uses.

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  13. Elucidate Chromatin Folding at the Mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiangyun

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of chromatin, an active participant of all gene-directed processes, is required to decode its (epi)genetics-structure-function relationships. Albeit often simplified as ``beads-on-a-string'', chromatin possesses daunting complexity in its intricate intra- and inter-nucleosome interactions, as well as the myriad types of molecules acting on it. On the other hand, the folding of chromatin from an extended chain of nucleosomes is highly constrained, e.g., by rather bulky nucleosomes and semi-rigid linker dsDNAs. Further given the well-defined nucleosome and dsDNA structures at the nanometer scale, this creates an opportunity for low-resolution structural methods such as small angle scattering to obtain mesoscale structures of chromatin, which can be further refined computationally to yield atomistic structures of chromatin. Here we present results from our recent studies of recombinant nucleosome arrays with solution small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and ensemble structure modeling.

  14. Expression, Purification, and Refolding of Recombinant Collagen α1(XI) Amino Terminal Domain Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Lisa R.; Blasick, Christina M.; Brown, Raquel J.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2009-01-01

    The amino terminal domain of collagen type XI α1 chain is a noncollagenous structure that is essential for the regulation of fibrillogenesis in developing cartilage. The amino terminal domain is alternatively spliced at the mRNA level, resulting in proteins expressed as splice variants. These splice variants, or isoforms, have unique distribution in growing tissues, alluding to distinct roles in development. We report here a rapid and straightforward method for expression, purification and in vitro folding of recombinant collagen XI isoforms α1(XI) NTD[p7] and α1(XI) NTD[p6b+7]. The recombinant isoforms were expressed in Escherichia coli as bacterial inclusion bodies. Unfolded carboxy terminal polyhistidine tagged proteins were purified via nickel affinity chromatography and refolded with specific protocols optimized for each isoform. Purity was assessed by SDS-PAGE and correct secondary structure by a comparison of circular dichroism data with that obtained for Npp. Protein expression and purification of the recombinant collagen XI splice variants will allow further studies to elucidate the structure and molecular interactions with components of the extracellular matrix. This research will clarify the mechanism of collagen XI mediated regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:17166742

  15. On-column refolding of recombinant chemokines for NMR studies and biological assays

    PubMed Central

    Veldkamp, Christopher T.; Peterson, Francis C.; Hayes, Paulette L.; Mattmiller, Jessie E.; Haugner, John C.; de la Cruz, Norberto; Volkman, Brian F.

    2007-01-01

    We have applied an efficient solid-phase protein refolding method to the milligram scale production of natively folded recombinant chemokine proteins. Chemokines are intensely studied proteins because of their roles in immune system regulation, response to inflammation, fetal development, and numerous disease states including, but not limited to, HIV-1/AIDS, cancer metastasis, Crohn’s disease, asthma and arthritis. Many investigators use recombinant chemokines for research purposes, however these proteins partition almost exclusively to the inclusion body fraction when produced in E. coli. A major hurdle is to correctly refold the chemokine and oxidize the two highly conserved disulfide bonds found in nearly all chemokines. Conventional methods for oxidation and refolding by dialysis or extreme dilution are effective but slow and yield large volumes of dilute chemokine. Here we use an on-column approach for rapid refolding and oxidation of four chemokines, CXCL12/SDF-1α (stromal cell derived factor-1α), CCL5/RANTES, XCL1/lymphotactin, and CX3CL1/fractalkine. NMR spectra of SDF-1α, RANTES, lymphotactin, and fractalkine indicate these chemokines adopt native structures. On-column refolded SDF-1α is fully active in an intracellular calcium flux assay. Our success with multiple SDF-1α mutants and members of all four chemokine subfamilies suggests that on-column refolding is a robust method for preparative scale production of recombinant chemokine proteins. PMID:17071104

  16. Optimization of recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Samuel P; Muto, Machiko; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Through advances in molecular and genetic techniques, protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has been optimized for high-level expression. Recombinant proteins expressed in algae have the potential to provide novel and safe treatment of disease and infection where current, high-cost drugs are the only option, or worse, where therapeutic drugs are not available due to their prohibitively high-cost to manufacture. Optimization of recombinant protein expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts has been accomplished by employing chloroplast codon bias and combinatorial examination of promoter and UTR combinations. In addition, as displayed by the expression of an anti-herpes antibody, the C. reinhardtii chloroplast is capable of correctly folding and assembling complex mammalian proteins. These data establish algal chloroplasts as a system for the production of complex human therapeutic proteins in soluble and active form, and at significantly reduced time and cost compared to existing production systems. Production of recombinant proteins in algal chloroplasts may enable further development of safe, efficacious and cost-effective protein therapeutics.

  17. Jitter Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

  18. Dissociation of recombinant prion autocatalysis from infectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Geoffrey P; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Within the mammalian prion field, the existence of recombinant prion protein (PrP) conformers with self-replicating (ie. autocatalytic) activity in vitro but little to no infectious activity in vivo challenges a key prediction of the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication--that autocatalytic PrP conformers should be infectious. To understand this dissociation of autocatalysis from infectivity, we recently performed a structural and functional comparison between a highly infectious and non-infectious pair of autocatalytic recombinant PrP conformers derived from the same initial prion strain. (1) We identified restricted, C-terminal structural differences between these 2 conformers and provided evidence that these relatively subtle differences prevent the non-infectious conformer from templating the conversion of native PrP(C) substrates containing a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. (1) In this article we discuss a model, consistent with these findings, in which recombinant PrP, lacking post-translational modifications and associated folding constraints, is capable of adopting a wide variety of autocatalytic conformations. Only a subset of these recombinant conformers can be adopted by post-translationally modified native PrP(C), and this subset represents the recombinant conformers with high specific infectivity. We examine this model's implications for the generation of highly infectious recombinant prions and the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication.

  19. Principles and engineering of antibody folding and assembly.

    PubMed

    Feige, Matthias J; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    Antibodies are uniquely suited to serve essential roles in the human immune defense as they combine several specific functions in one hetero-oligomeric protein. Their constant regions activate effector functions and their variable domains provide a stable framework that allows incorporation of highly diverse loop sequences. The combination of non-germline DNA recombination and mutation together with heavy and light chain assembly allows developing variable regions that specifically recognize essentially any antigen they may encounter. However, this diversity also requires tailor-made mechanisms to guarantee that folding and association of antibodies is carefully this diversity also requires tailor-made mechanisms to guarantee that folding and association of antibodies is carefully controlled before the protein is secreted from a plasma cell. Accordingly, the generic immunoglobulin fold β-barrel structure of antibody domains has been fine-tuned during evolution to fit the different requirements. Work over the past decades has identified important aspects of the folding and assembly of antibody domains and chains revealing domain specific variations of a general scheme. The most striking is the folding of an intrinsically disordered antibody domain in the context of its partner domain as the basis for antibody assembly and its control on the molecular level in the cell. These insights have not only allowed a better understanding of the antibody folding process but also provide a wealth of opportunities for rational optimization of antibody molecules. In this review, we summarize current concepts of antibody folding and assembly and discuss how they can be utilized to engineer antibodies with improved performance for different applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in the molecular engineering of antibodies.

  20. Purification of secreted recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le, H V; Trotta, P P

    1991-01-01

    Secretion systems engineered for the expression of heterologous protein in E. coli provide several advantages for subsequent isolation of purified product. Proteins released from the periplasmic space, which represent a small fraction (i.e., 4-10%) of total cell protein, can readily be separated from other cellular proteins by centrifugation of the remaining cellular debris or cross-flow ultrafiltration. The starting material derived from secretion systems is generally of higher purity than comparable material produced from strains expressing cytoplasmically for systems exhibiting similar expression levels. The available evidence suggests that recombinant proteins derived from the periplasm are generally, but not always (44-46), soluble in a nonaggregated form. Consequently, simple purification protocols can be effectively employed for producing homogeneous product with a high yield. The majority of the secreted recombinant proteins reviewed in this chapter were purified by simple one- or two-step chromatography procedures. High-resolution techniques such as reversed phase HPLC were found necessary only in cases where the secreted polypeptides were contaminated with proteolytic degradation variants, e.g., hirudin (51) and beta-endorphin (22). The fact that a high level of biological activity has been shown to be characteristic of purified recombinant proteins secreted into the periplasmic space suggests the presence of a native conformation stabilized by the expected disulfide linkages. Intramolecular disulfide bonds most probably form either as the polypeptide is translocated through the cytoplasmic membrane into the periplasm or within the periplasmic compartment, which has a higher oxidation potential than that found in the cytoplasm (57). Studies performed with hGH (31) and muIL-2 (35) provide excellent examples of differences observed in protein folding and disulfide bond formation between heterologous proteins expressed in the cytoplasmic and periplasmic

  1. Quantitative Morphology of Epithelial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Štorgel, Nick; Krajnc, Matej; Mrak, Polona; Štrus, Jasna; Ziherl, Primož

    2016-01-01

    The shape of spatially modulated epithelial morphologies such as villi and crypts is usually associated with the epithelium-stroma area mismatch leading to buckling. We propose an alternative mechanical model based on intraepithelial stresses generated by differential tensions of apical, lateral, and basal sides of cells as well as on the elasticity of the basement membrane. We use it to theoretically study longitudinal folds in simple epithelia and we identify four types of corrugated morphologies: compact, invaginated, evaginated, and wavy. The obtained tissue contours and thickness profiles are compared to epithelial folds observed in invertebrates and vertebrates, and for most samples, the agreement is within the estimated experimental error. Our model establishes the groove-crest modulation of tissue thickness as a morphometric parameter that can, together with the curvature profile, be used to estimate the relative differential apicobasal tension in the epithelium. PMID:26745429

  2. Folded waveguide designs for tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, D. J.; Bigelow, T. S.; Fogelman, C. H.; Yugo, J. J.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Gardner, W. L.; Carter, M. D.; Probert, P. H.; Barbato, E.

    The folded waveguide (FWG) has been tested to the megawatt level in RFTF and shows great promise for tokamak use. It has three primary advantages: low electric field (anywhere) per unit power coupled to the plasma, strong structural capabilities, and better spectral content than loops. A tokamak test is now needed. Potential candidates include C-Mod at 80 MHz and FTU at 433 MHz. The waveguide test on the first machine will be directed at conventional ion cyclotron heating, while the test on the latter will be directed at direct electron heating. In addition, a variation of the folded waveguide is proposed to be tested on Phaedrus-T. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of the waveguide, the design layout, some of the potential physics programs, and how these programs may have an impact on its potential use in ITER.

  3. 3D finite amplitude folding: Implications for stress evolution during crustal and lithospheric deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Boris J. P.; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2006-07-01

    Compression of the lithosphere, sedimentary sequences or quartz veins may result in a folding instability. We perform numerical simulations of viscous single-layer folding to study this instability in 3D. It is demonstrated that linear theories correctly describe the instability for small amplitudes. At larger amplitudes, however, the theory breaks down. For these stages we present a new nonlinear amplification equation. Numerical simulations of folding of an initially horizontal layer, perturbed with random noise, demonstrate that in most cases fold axes form perpendicular to the main shortening direction. Aspect ratios of folds are finite and the patterns are relatively insensitive to the applied background shortening directions. Furthermore, the 3D folding instability reduces the averaged differential stress within the folded (``strong'') layer, in agreement with 2D results. This implies that the Christmas-tree approach to represent the strength of the crust and lithosphere may be invalid if folding occurs during the deformation.

  4. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  5. Force generation by titin folding.

    PubMed

    Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Bianco, Pasquale; Naftz, Katalin; Ferenczy, György G; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2017-07-01

    Titin is a giant protein that provides elasticity to muscle. As the sarcomere is stretched, titin extends hierarchically according to the mechanics of its segments. Whether titin's globular domains unfold during this process and how such unfolded domains might contribute to muscle contractility are strongly debated. To explore the force-dependent folding mechanisms, here we manipulated skeletal-muscle titin molecules with high-resolution optical tweezers. In force-clamp mode, after quenching the force (<10 pN), extension fluctuated without resolvable discrete events. In position-clamp experiments, the time-dependent force trace contained rapid fluctuations and a gradual increase of average force, indicating that titin can develop force via dynamic transitions between its structural states en route to the native conformation. In 4 M urea, which destabilizes H-bonds hence the consolidated native domain structure, the net force increase disappeared but the fluctuations persisted. Thus, whereas net force generation is caused by the ensemble folding of the elastically-coupled domains, force fluctuations arise due to a dynamic equilibrium between unfolded and molten-globule states. Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating a compact molten-globule intermediate in the folding landscape recovered all features of our nanomechanics results. The ensemble molten-globule dynamics delivers significant added contractility that may assist sarcomere mechanics, and it may reduce the dissipative energy loss associated with titin unfolding/refolding during muscle contraction/relaxation cycles. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  7. Complex fold patterns developed by progressive deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, Jordi; Druguet, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Folds arise from shortening instabilities in rocks containing layers with contrasting viscosities or bearing mechanical anisotropies. A complete understanding of this fact requires a three-dimensional approach, because of the variable geometrical relations between strain and kinematic tensors and the surfaces subjected to folding. This is especially common in progressive non-coaxial flow, under which folds become unstable, leading to fold hinge curvature, axial surface curvature or both. The resulting complex fold patterns generated by progressive folding can be morphologically indistinguishable from interference patterns produced by the superposition of two fold systems, and a detailed 3-D analysis is needed to distinguish between them. This study is focused on complex fold shapes arisen from progressive single deformations. Examples can be grouped into: (i) non-cylindrical (or non-cylindroidal) folds and (ii) folds with non-planar axial surfaces (or non-plane folds). In both cases, hinge lines and axial surfaces can display up to a 180° curvature. Hinge line curvature leads to the development of sheath folds, while axial surface curvature leads to the development of polyclinal folds, being these cylindroidal if the hinges remain straight. The two end-member situations (sheath folds and polyclinal folds) are illustrated using examples from the Variscan Cap de Creus massif (Eastern Pyrenees). Fold Hinge rotation and development of sheath folds In simple shear zones, folds commonly nucleate with hinges at a high angle to the shear direction and progressively rotate towards parallelism with the shear/extension direction, giving rise to sheath folds. Axial surfaces also change in attitude with increasing strain, becoming parallel to the shear plane. Development of polyclinal folds with strongly curved axial surfaces A peculiar complex fold pattern consists of strongly curved axial surfaces but straight hinges. This folding type is opposed to sheath folds where axial

  8. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  9. Cortical thickness and folding deficits in conduct-disordered adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Christopher J.; Haney-Caron, Emily; Stevens, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of pediatric conduct disorder (CD) have described frontal and temporal lobe structural abnormalities that parallel findings in antisocial adults. The purpose of this study was to examine previously unexplored cortical thickness and folding as markers for brain abnormalities in “pure CD”-diagnosed adolescents. Based on current fronto-temporal theories, we hypothesized that CD youth would have thinner cortex or less cortical folding in temporal and frontal lobes than control subjects. Methods We obtained T1-weighted brain structure images from n=24 control and n=19 CD participants aged 12–18 years, matched by overall gender and age. We measured group differences in cortical thickness and local gyrification index (regional cortical folding measure) using surface-based morphometry with clusterwise correction for multiple comparisons. Results CD participants, when compared with controls, showed both reduced cortical thickness and folding. Thinner cortex was located primarily in posterior brain regions, including left superior temporal and parietal lobes, temporoparietal junction and paracentral lobule, right superior temporal and parietal lobes, temporoparietal junction and precuneus. Folding deficits were located mainly in anterior brain regions and included left insula, ventro- and dorsomedial prefrontal, anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices, temporal lobe, right superior frontal and parietal lobes and paracentral lobule. Conclusions Our findings generally agree with previous CD volumetric studies, but here show the unique contributions of cortical thickness and folding to gray matter reductions in pure CD in different brain regions. PMID:22209639

  10. Thermally triggered self-assembly of folded proteins into vesicles.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Min; Champion, Julie A

    2014-12-31

    We report thermally triggered self-assembly of folded proteins into vesicles that incorporates globular proteins as building blocks. Leucine zipper coiled coils were combined with either globular proteins or elastin-like polypeptides as recombinant fusion proteins, which form "rod-coil" and "globule-rod-coil" protein complex amphiphiles. In aqueous solution, they self-assembled into hollow vesicles via temperature-responsive inverse phase transition. The characteristic of the protein vesicle membranes enables preferential encapsulation of simultaneously formed protein coacervate. Furthermore, the type of encapsulated cargo extends to small molecules and nanoparticles. Our approach offers a versatile strategy to create protein vesicles as vehicles with biological functionality.

  11. New decoding methods of interleaved burst error-correcting codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Y.; Kasahara, M.; Namekawa, T.

    1983-04-01

    A probabilistic method of single burst error correction, using the syndrome correlation of subcodes which constitute the interleaved code, is presented. This method makes it possible to realize a high capability of burst error correction with less decoding delay. By generalizing this method it is possible to obtain probabilistic method of multiple (m-fold) burst error correction. After estimating the burst error positions using syndrome correlation of subcodes which are interleaved m-fold burst error detecting codes, this second method corrects erasure errors in each subcode and m-fold burst errors. The performance of these two methods is analyzed via computer simulation, and their effectiveness is demonstrated.

  12. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  13. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  14. Prolonged activity of a recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein in hemophilia A mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Jennifer A.; Liu, Tongyao; Low, Susan C.; Zhang, Xin; Kamphaus, George; Sakorafas, Paul; Fraley, Cara; Drager, Douglas; Reidy, Thomas; McCue, Justin; Franck, Helen W. G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite proven benefits, prophylactic treatment for hemophilia A is hampered by the short half-life of factor VIII. A recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) was constructed to determine the potential for reduced frequency of dosing. rFVIIIFc has an ∼ 2-fold longer half-life than rFVIII in hemophilia A (HemA) mice and dogs. The extension of rFVIIIFc half-life requires interaction of Fc with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In FcRn knockout mice, the extension of rFVIIIFc half-life is abrogated, and is restored in human FcRn transgenic mice. The Fc fusion has no impact on FVIII-specific activity. rFVIIIFc has comparable acute efficacy as rFVIII in treating tail clip injury in HemA mice, and fully corrects whole blood clotting time (WBCT) in HemA dogs immediately after dosing. Furthermore, consistent with prolonged half-life, rFVIIIFc shows 2-fold longer prophylactic efficacy in protecting HemA mice from tail vein transection bleeding induced 24-48 hours after dosing. In HemA dogs, rFVIIIFc also sustains partial correction of WBCT 1.5- to 2-fold longer than rFVIII. rFVIIIFc was well tolerated in both species. Thus, the rescue of FVIII by Fc fusion to provide prolonged protection presents a novel pathway for FVIII catabolism, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22246033

  15. Folded MEMS approach to NMRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundeti, Venu Madhav

    Atomic gyroscopes have a potential for good performance advantages and several attempts are being made to miniaturize them. This thesis describes the efforts made in implementing a Folded MEMS based NMRG. The micro implementations of all the essential components for NMRG (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) are described in detail in regards to their design, fabrication, and characterization. A set of micro-scale Helmholtz coils are described and the homogeneity of the generated magnetic field is analyzed for different designs of heaters. The dielectric mirrors and metallic mirrors are compared in terms of reflectivity and polarization change up on reflection. A pyramid shaped folded backbone structure is designed, fabricated, and assembled along with all the required components. A novel double-folded structure 1/4th the size of original version is fabricated and assembled. Design and modeling details of a 5 layered shield with shielding factor > 106 and total volume of around 90 cc are also presented. A table top setup for characterization of atomic vapor cell is described in detail. A micro vapor cell based Rb magnetometer with a sensitivity of 108 pT/√Hz is demonstrated. The challenges due to DC heating are addressed and mitigated using an AC heater. Several experiments related to measuring the relaxation time of Xe are provided along with results. For Xe131, relaxation times of T1 = 23.78 sec, T2 = 18.06 sec and for Xe129, T1 = 21.65 sec and T2 = 20.45 sec are reported.

  16. Filter-Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for Improved Proteome Analysis of Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian host cell line for biopharmaceutical production because of their ability to correctly fold and posttranslationally modify recombinant proteins that are compatible with human use. Proteomics, along with other 'omic platforms, are being used to understand the biology of CHO cells with the ultimate aim of enhancing CHO cell factories for more efficient production of biopharmaceuticals. In this chapter, we will describe an efficient protocol called Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for the extraction of proteins from CHO cells for proteomic studies. FASP uses a common ultrafiltration device whereby the membrane pores are small enough to allow contaminating detergents to pass through, while proteins are too large and are retained and concentrated in the filter unit. This method of sample preparation and protein digestion is universally applicable and can be easily employed in any proteomics facilities as standard everyday laboratory reagents and equipment are used.

  17. Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor-Trypsin Complex as a Detection System for Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borjigin, Jimo; Nathans, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) binds to trypsin and anhydrotrypsin (an enzymatically inactive derivative of trypsin) with affinities of 6 x 10-14 and 1.1 x 10-13 M, respectively. We have taken advantage of the high affinity and specificity of this binding reaction to develop a protein tagging system in which biotinylated trypsin or biotinylated anhydrotrypsin is used as the reagent to detect recombinant fusion proteins into which BPTI has been inserted. Two proteins, opsin and growth hormone, were used as targets for insertional mutagenesis with BPTI. In each case, both domains of the fusion protein appear to be correctly folded. The fusion proteins can be specifically and efficiently detected by biotinylated trypsin or biotinylated anhydrotrypsin, as demonstrated by staining of transfected cells, protein blotting, affinity purification, and a mobility shift assay in SDS/polyacrylamide gels.

  18. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  19. Hydrodynamic interactions in protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Niewieczerzał, Szymon

    2009-03-01

    We incorporate hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) in a coarse-grained and structure-based model of proteins by employing the Rotne-Prager hydrodynamic tensor. We study several small proteins and demonstrate that HIs facilitate folding. We also study HIV-1 protease and show that HIs make the flap closing dynamics faster. The HIs are found to affect time correlation functions in the vicinity of the native state even though they have no impact on same time characteristics of the structure fluctuations around the native state.

  20. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  1. Activity of recombinant and natural defensins from Vigna unguiculata seeds against Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Géssika Silva; do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; de Carvalho, Laís Pessanha; de Melo, Edésio José Tenório; Fernandes, Keysson Vieira; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Retamal, Claudio Andres; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Carvalho, André de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are differentiated from other antibiotic peptides, such as gramicidins and polymyxins, because they are synthesized by large enzymatic complex and bear modified amino acids including d-amino acids, are short polymers of l-amino acids synthesized by ribosomes upon which all living organisms rely to defend themselves from invaders or competitor microorganisms. AMPs have received a great deal of attention from the scientific community as potential new drugs for neglected diseases such as Leishmaniasis. In plants, they include several families of compounds, including the plant defensins. The aim of the present study was to improve the expression of recombinant defensin from Vigna unguiculata seeds (Vu-Defr) and to test its activity against Leishmania amazonensis promatigotes. Recombinant expression was performed in LB and TB media and under different conditions. The purification of Vu-Defr was achieved by immobilized metal ion affinity and reversed-phase chromatography. The purified Vu-Defr was analyzed by circular dichroism (CD), and its biological activity was tested against L. amazonenis promastigotes. To demonstrate that the recombinant production of Vu-Defr did not interfere with its fold and biological activity, the results of all experiments were compared with the results from the natural defensin (Vu-Def). The CD spectra of both peptides presented good superimposition indicating that both peptides present very similar secondary structure and that the Vu-Defr was correctly folded. L. amazonensis treated with Vu-Defr led to the elimination of 54.3% and 46.9% of the parasites at 24 and 48h of incubation time, respectively. Vu-Def eliminated 50% and 54.8% of the parasites at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Both were used at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. These results suggested the potential for plant defensins to be used as new antiparasitic substances.

  2. Twin arginine translocation system in secretory expression of recombinant human growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir-Mohammad; Abedi, Daryoush; Chou, C. Perry; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in E. coli has several advantages over other expression systems. Misfolding, inclusion body formation, and lack of eukaryotic post translational modification are the most disadvantages of this system. Exporting of correctly folded proteins to the outside of reductive cytoplasmic environment through twin-arginine system could help to pass these limiting steps. Two signal sequences, TorA and SufI are used at N-terminal of human growth hormone (hGH) bearing DsbA gene sequence at C-terminal to enhance folding. The synthetic cassettes including the signal sequence, hGH and DsbA were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) to study the effect of signal sequence and DsbA chaperone on translocation and folding of the protein. The results confirmed using signal sequence at N-terminal of targeted protein and coexpression with DsbA could transport proteins to the periplasmic space and culture media compared to control groups. Although there is no protein band of somatropin in SDS-Page of culture media samples when using SufI as signaling sequence, the study demonstrated TorA signal sequence could transport the target protein to the culture media. However, there was a considerable amount of hGH in periplasmic space when using SufI compared to control. PMID:28003839

  3. On Inductive and Coinductive Proofs via Unfold/Fold Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Hirohisa

    We consider a new application condition of negative unfolding, which guarantees its safe use in unfold/fold transformation of stratified logic programs. The new condition of negative unfolding is a natural one, since it is considered as a special case of replacement rule. The correctness of our unfold/fold transformation system in the sense of the perfect model semantics is proved. We then consider the coinductive proof rules proposed by Jaffar et al. We show that our unfold/fold transformation system, when used together with Lloyd-Topor transformation, can prove a proof problem which is provable by the coinductive proof rules by Jaffar et al. To this end, we propose a new replacement rule, called sound replacement, which is not necessarily equivalence-preserving, but is essential to perform a reasoning step corresponding to coinduction.

  4. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  5. Characterization of purified recombinant Bet v 1 with authentic N-terminus, cloned in fusion with maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Spangfort, M D; Ipsen, H; Sparholt, S H; Aasmul-Olsen, S; Larsen, M R; Mørtz, E; Roepstorff, P; Larsen, J N

    1996-11-01

    A gene encoding the pollen major allergen Bet v 1 from Betula verrucosa (White Birch) has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with maltose-binding protein and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage site. A generally applicable cloning strategy based on polymerase chain reaction was designed to position the Factor Xa proteolytic site so that the authentic amino terminus of Bet v 1 was generated after cleavage. Fusion protein was isolated by amylose affinity chromatography and enzymatically cleaved by incubation with Factor Xa. Recombinant Bet v 1 was isolated by gel filtration and gave rise to a single band with apparent molecular weight of 17 kDa when analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. N-terminal sequencing of the first 20 amino acids showed complete agreement with the deduced Bet v 1 DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry showed that recombinant Bet v 1 has a molecular mass of 17,440 +/- 2 Da; 86% of the recombinant Bet v 1 amino acid sequence could be verified by digestion with Lys-C and mass spectrometric peptide mapping. The yield of purified recombinant Bet v 1 was 10 mg per liter E. coli cell culture. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of purified recombinant protein gave rise to one major protein spot and one or two minor spots focusing at slightly different pHs. The immunochemical properties of recombinant protein were indistinguishable from those of naturally occurring Bet v 1 when compared using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies and serum IgE from birch pollen allergic patients. Furthermore, recombinant Bet v 1 elicited T-cell proliferation comparable to that of natural Bet v 1. Thus, the methods used for bacterial expression and protein purification result in relatively high yields of folded recombinant Bet v 1 with correct N-terminal sequence and molecular mass. Furthermore, the B- and T-cell epitope structures of recombinant Bet v 1 closely resemble those of the natural protein from pollen.

  6. Improvement in the visual discrimination of recombinant clones by size reduction of non-recombinant colonies.

    PubMed

    Sektas, Marian; Furmanek-Blaszk, Beata

    2013-11-01

    A flexible approach circumventing cloning problems related to incomplete vector double digest is described. DNA methyltransferase gene insertion into MCS of commonly used expression vectors facilitates identification of both: i) the correct linear fragment in agarose gels due to the dilator effect, and ii) recombinant colonies by size and opacity differences resulting from methyltransferase toxicity.

  7. [Construction of replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector with hTFPI-2 gene by AdMax system and expression in U937 monocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Pan, Junjie; Shi, Haiming; Luo, Xinping; Ma, Duan; Liang, Wang; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jian

    2011-04-01

    We tried to construct and identify the recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus vector coding for human tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (hTFPI-2) gene by AdMax system in HEK293 cells. Firstly, we obtained hTFPI-2 gene from the recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-TFPI-2 by PCR using primers with restriction endonuclease site of EcoRI or SacI. After digesting the hTFPI-2 gene and plasmid PDC316-IRES-EGFP shuttle vector, we ligated them with T4 ligase and formed the recombinant shuttle vector PDC316-IRES-EGFP-hTFPI-2. It was confirmed that the ligation product was inserted the gene of hTFPI-2 correctly by sequencing. Then we took cotransfection of HEK293 cells with the recombinant shuttle vector and genomic plasmid pBHGloxdeltaE1,3Cre by liposome lipofectamine2000, and finished the package of recombinant adenovirus Ad-hTFPI-2. The results of the PCR test and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed the successful construction of the recombinants Ad-hTFPI-2. Furthermore, we measured the titre of Ad-hTFPI-2 with the aid of green fluorescence protein expression after multiplication and purification. The titre was 0.931 x 10(12) pfu/ml. Finally, we infected U937 monocytes by purified Ad-hTFPI-2, and determined the infection efficiency and the TFPI-2's level and activity. The efficiency of Ad-hTFPI-2 infection in U937 cells was 89.33%. After infected by Ad-hTFPI-2, the TFPI-2's level in supernatant increased about 7 fold. Also the TFPI-2 in supernatant had activities of inhibiting trypsin and plasmin. The recombinant adenovirus with the hTFPI-2 gene was constructed successfully. It will be helpful for the further investigation of its potentiality to be applied in antiatherosclerosis.

  8. The perception of surface folding in static and animated displays.

    PubMed

    Massironi, M; Bruno, N

    1997-01-01

    of the vertexes of the folding parts. Results demonstrated that even in these conditions observers are unable to interpret the foldings correctly. These results might be taken to indicate that projective, static information leading to a simpler and more regular interpretation of the display can prevail over explicit motion information that should force the system to achieve a nonregular solution.

  9. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E; McClafferty, Heather; Ashley, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP) with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells) after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded) β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS) domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP's topology, could provide

  10. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences.

  11. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences. PMID:17905832

  12. Kinematics and thermodynamics of a folding heteropolymer.

    PubMed Central

    Fukugita, M; Lancaster, D; Mitchard, M G

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the folding dynamics of protein, we have carried out numerical simulations of a heteropolymer model of self-interacting random chains. We find that folding propensity depends strongly on sequence and that both folding and nonfolding sequences exist. Furthermore we show that folding is a two-step process: the transition from coil state to unique folded state takes place through a globule phase. In addition to the continuous coil-globule transition, there exists an abrupt transition that separates the unique folded state from the globule state and ensures the stability of the native state. PMID:8327518

  13. Recombination enhancement by replication (RER) in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Morales, E; Romero, D

    2000-01-01

    Studies in several organisms show that recombination and replication interact closely. Recombinational repair usually requires associated replication at some stage; moreover, additional replication can induce recombination through either homologous or illegitimate events. In prokaryotes, stimulation of recombination by replication is more dramatic when rolling circle replication is employed. In contrast, theta-type replication induces only a modest increase in recombination frequency. In this article, we show that induction of theta-type replication from a supernumerary origin in the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli leads to a 1000-fold increase in deletion formation on this plasmid. These deletions span 120 kb (the symbiotic region) and have as endpoints the reiterated nitrogenase operons. We have named this phenomenon RER, for recombination enhancement by replication. RER is not affected by the position of the replication origin in the pSym, the direction of advance of the replication fork, or the distance from the origin to the recombining repeats. On the other hand, RER is dependent on an active recA allele, indicating that it is due to homologous recombination. RER displays a strong regionality restricted to the symbiotic region. The similarities and differences of RER with the recombination process observed at the terminus of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome are discussed. PMID:10757747

  14. Recombination enhancement by replication (RER) in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Morales, E; Romero, D

    2000-03-01

    Studies in several organisms show that recombination and replication interact closely. Recombinational repair usually requires associated replication at some stage; moreover, additional replication can induce recombination through either homologous or illegitimate events. In prokaryotes, stimulation of recombination by replication is more dramatic when rolling circle replication is employed. In contrast, theta-type replication induces only a modest increase in recombination frequency. In this article, we show that induction of theta-type replication from a supernumerary origin in the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli leads to a 1000-fold increase in deletion formation on this plasmid. These deletions span 120 kb (the symbiotic region) and have as endpoints the reiterated nitrogenase operons. We have named this phenomenon RER, for recombination enhancement by replication. RER is not affected by the position of the replication origin in the pSym, the direction of advance of the replication fork, or the distance from the origin to the recombining repeats. On the other hand, RER is dependent on an active recA allele, indicating that it is due to homologous recombination. RER displays a strong regionality restricted to the symbiotic region. The similarities and differences of RER with the recombination process observed at the terminus of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome are discussed.

  15. A CORRECTION.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D

    1940-03-22

    IN a recently published volume on "The Origin of Submarine Canyons" the writer inadvertently credited to A. C. Veatch an excerpt from a submarine chart actually contoured by P. A. Smith, of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The chart in question is Chart IVB of Special Paper No. 7 of the Geological Society of America entitled "Atlantic Submarine Valleys of the United States and the Congo Submarine Valley, by A. C. Veatch and P. A. Smith," and the excerpt appears as Plate III of the volume fist cited above. In view of the heavy labor involved in contouring the charts accompanying the paper by Veatch and Smith and the beauty of the finished product, it would be unfair to Mr. Smith to permit the error to go uncorrected. Excerpts from two other charts are correctly ascribed to Dr. Veatch.

  16. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  17. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 171 RIN 3150-AJ16 Technical Corrections; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... corrections, including updating the street address for the Region I office, correcting authority citations and... rule. DATES: The correction is effective on December 5, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  18. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  19. Folding tools for flat conductor cable harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loggins, R.

    1971-01-01

    Vise grip pliers have detachable metal gripping plates which are changed to accommodate cables from 1 to 3 in. wide and to form any desired fold angle. A second tool squeezes cable along crease to complete the fold.

  20. Geometry of Miura-folded metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two folded metamaterials based on the Miura-ori fold pattern. The structural mechanics of these metamaterials are dominated by the kinematics of the folding, which only depends on the geometry and therefore is scale-independent. First, a folded shell structure is introduced, where the fold pattern provides a negative Poisson’s ratio for in-plane deformations and a positive Poisson’s ratio for out-of-plane bending. Second, a cellular metamaterial is described based on a stacking of individual folded layers, where the folding kinematics are compatible between layers. Additional freedom in the design of the metamaterial can be achieved by varying the fold pattern within each layer. PMID:23401549

  1. The parallel universe of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Batey, R T; Doudna, J A

    1998-05-01

    How do large RNA molecules find their active conformations among a universe of possible structures? Two recent studies reveal that RNA folding is a rapid and ordered process, with surprising similarities to protein folding mechanisms.

  2. Dynamics of Folds in the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krylov, Nikolai A.; Rogers, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Take a strip of paper and fold a crease intersecting the long edges, creating two angles. Choose one edge and consider the angle with the crease. Fold the opposite edge along the crease, creating a new crease that bisects the angle. Fold again, this time using the newly created crease and the initial edge, creating a new angle along the chosen…

  3. Dynamics of Folds in the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krylov, Nikolai A.; Rogers, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Take a strip of paper and fold a crease intersecting the long edges, creating two angles. Choose one edge and consider the angle with the crease. Fold the opposite edge along the crease, creating a new crease that bisects the angle. Fold again, this time using the newly created crease and the initial edge, creating a new angle along the chosen…

  4. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  5. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  6. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  7. Large Folded, Deployable Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Amy; Kiley, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of Airbus Defence and Space in-house development activity associated with the large foldable deployable structures and analytical process tools initiated in 2007.Industrially the concept of stored energy, self- motorising structures is 'typically' limited to deployable boom concepts with the application to larger secondary or even primary structures having very little heritage. The concept of being able to 'collapse' a structure to fit into the available launcher fairing volume has numerous advantages and applications. One key advantage is the ability to launch very large structures of typical spacecraft cross-sectionand 50m+ deployed length. Another advantage is reduction of body inertia thus promoting dynamic efficiency with possible mass saving.Recent tape spring material characterisation has focused on torque versus angle stiffness characterisation of composite laminates. This work has been extended further to characterise for CFRP Damage Evolution; visco-elastic effect as a function of folded storage duration and impact of stiffness degradation. Further research has been performed around life testing and latched position repeatability.

  8. Recombination spots prediction using DNA physical properties in the saccharomyces cerevisiae genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shou-Hui; Xu, Li-Qin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guo-Qing; Lin, Hao

    2012-09-01

    The prediction of meiotic recombination is difficult and current available methods are limited. In this study, we propose a novel method for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots using support vector machine(SVM) with the DNA physical properties. Results of optimized pseudo-tetranucleotide show overall accuracy of 83.1% by using 5-fold cross-validation. High predictive successful rate exhibit that this model can be applied for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots.

  9. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  10. Folding of viscous sheets and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the nonlinear folding behavior of a viscous filament or a sheet under the influence of an external force such as gravity. Everyday examples of this phenomenon are provided by the periodic folding of a sheet of honey as it impinges on toast, or the folding of a stream of shampoo as it falls on one's hand. To understand the evolution of a fold, we formulate and solve a free-boundary problem for the phenomenon, give scaling laws for the size of the folds and the frequency with which they are laid out, and verify these experimentally.

  11. 3D fold growth in transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Geological folds in transpression are inherently 3D structures; hence their growth and rotation behavior is studied using 3D numerical finite-element simulations. Upright single-layer buckle folds in Newtonian materials are considered, which grow from an initial point-like perturbation due to a combination of in-plane shortening and shearing (i.e., transpression). The resulting fold growth exhibits three components: (1) fold amplification (vertical), (2) fold elongation (parallel to fold axis), and (3) sequential fold growth (perpendicular to axial plane) of new anti- and synforms adjacent to the initial fold. Generally, the fold growth rates are smaller for shearing-dominated than for shortening-dominated transpression. In spite of the growth rate, the folding behavior is very similar for the different convergence angles. The two lateral directions always exhibit similar growth rates implying that the bulk fold structure occupies an increasing roughly circular area. Fold axes are always parallel to the major horizontal principal strain axis (λ→max, i.e., long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse), which is initially also parallel to the major horizontal instantaneous stretching axis (ISA→max). After initiation, the fold axes rotate together with λ→max. Sequential folds appearing later do not initiate parallel to ISA→max, but parallel to λ→max, i.e. parallel to the already existing folds, and also rotate with λ→max. Therefore, fold axes do not correspond to passive material lines and hinge migration takes place as a consequence. The fold axis orientation parallel to λ→max is independent of convergence angle and viscosity ratio. Therefore, a triangular relationship between convergence angle, amount of shortening, and fold axis orientation exists. If two of these values are known, the third can be determined. This relationship is applied to the Zagros fold-and-thrust-belt to estimate the degree of strain partitioning between the Simply

  12. Purification and partial characterisation of recombinant human hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Daniel F; Jones, Marc D; Pedersen, Palle; Rivas, Lucy; Sly, Lindsay I; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-expressed antimicrobial and iron regulatory peptide. A number of studies have indicated that hepcidin is important for the correct regulation of body iron homeostasis. The aims of this study were to analyse the expression, trafficking and regulation of human hepcidin in an in vitro cell culture system. Human hepcidin was transfected into human embryonic kidney cells. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that recombinant hepcidin localised to the Golgi complex. Recombinant hepcidin is secreted from the cell within 1 h of its synthesis. Recombinant hepcidin was purified from the cell culture medium using ion-exchange and metal-affinity chromatography and was active in antimicrobial assays. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of the secreted peptide revealed that it was the mature 25 amino acid form of hepcidin. Our results show that recombinant myc-His tagged human hepcidin was expressed, processed and secreted correctly and biologically active in antimicrobial assays.

  13. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  14. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  15. Anatomy and Histology of an Epicanthal Fold.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the precise anatomical and histological detail of the epicanthal fold.Thirty-two hemifaces of 16 Korean adult cadavers were used in this study (30 hemifaces with an epicanthal fold, 2 without an epicanthal fold). In 2 patients who had an epicanthoplasty, the epicanthal folds were sampled.In a dissection, the periorbital skin and subcutaneous tissues were removed and the epicanthal fold was observed in relation to each part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Specimens including the epicanthal fold were embeddedin in paraffin, sectioned at 10 um, and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. The horizontal section in the level of the paplebral fissure was made and the prepared slides were observed under a light microscope.In the specimens without an epicanthal fold, no connection between the upper preseptal muscle and the lower preseptal muscle was found. In the specimens with an epicanthal fold, a connection of the upper preseptal muscle to the lower preseptal muscle was observed. It was present in all 15 hemifaces (100%). There was no connection between the pretarsal muscles. In a horizontal section, the epicanthal fold was composed of 3 compartments: an outer skin lining, a core structure, and an innerskin lining. The core structure was mainly composed of muscular fibers and fibrotic tissue and they were intermingled.Surgeons should be aware of the anatomical details of an epicanthal fold. In removing or reconstructing an epicanthal fold, the fibromuscular core band should also be removed or reconstructed.

  16. Controlled Folding of Single Crystal Graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Ming; Kim, Na Yeon; Cunning, Benjamin V; Huang, Yuan; Qu, Deshun; Chen, Xianjue; Jin, Sunghwan; Biswal, Mandakini; Zhang, Xu; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lim, Hyunseob; Yoo, Won Jong; Lee, Zonghoon; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2017-03-08

    Folded graphene in which two layers are stacked with a twist angle between them has been predicted to exhibit unique electronic, thermal, and magnetic properties. We report the folding of a single crystal monolayer graphene film grown on a Cu(111) substrate by using a tailored substrate having a hydrophobic region and a hydrophilic region. Controlled film delamination from the hydrophilic region was used to prepare macroscopic folded graphene with good uniformity on the millimeter scale. This process was used to create many folded sheets each with a defined twist angle between the two sheets. By identifying the original lattice orientation of the monolayer graphene on Cu foil, or establishing the relation between the fold angle and twist angle, this folding technique allows for the preparation of twisted bilayer graphene films with defined stacking orientations and may also be extended to create folded structures of other two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  17. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    background genotype for the outcome of the test. Up to a 60-fold variation was found between the different genotypes in the response to procarcinogens, evidently dependent on differences in the metabolic activation of procarcinogens. In 1989 Schiestl presented results on intrachromosomal recombination in the strain RS112 of Saccharomyces, which indicated a capability to detect a range of chemical carcinogens, which gave negative results in Ames Salmonella assay. Such a test system, which could identify a larger range of potential carcinogens than conventional short-term tests evidently would be of great value and it therefore seemed of importance to follow up the observations by Schiestl. However, studies within this programme on the same strain of Saccharomyces, as well as the strains D7 (measuring intragenic recombination, intergenic recombination, and point mutation) and JD1 (measuring intragenic recombination at two loci) could not support the observations and interpretation by Schiestl (1989). The Drosophila white-ivory system, which presumably responds primarily by intrachromosomal recombination, did not give positive results with these Salmonella-negative agents either. One system to measure mitotic recombination in mammalian cell cultures was developed in the present programme. It was based on heterozygous mutations in both alleles of the adenosine deaminase gene (ADA). The system selects for proficient recombinants generated by the deficient cells. So far only pilot experiments, indicating that this experimental system operates as planned, have been performed. 6.2 Mechanisms of mitotic recombination The induction of mosaic spots in the wing spot and the white/white+ assays is predominantly dependent on interchromosomal recombination. This is evident from the fact that heterozygous inversions reduce the frequency of spots. A relationship between the length of inversions and the reduction of spots was demonstrated in the white/white+ assay--the long inversion ln(l)sc4

  18. Protein Folding: Adding a Nucleus to Guide Helix Docking Reduces Landscape Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Wensley, Beth G.; Kwa, Lee Gyan; Shammas, Sarah L.; Rogers, Joseph M.; Clarke, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The elongated three-helix‐bundle spectrin domains R16 and R17 fold and unfold unusually slowly over a rough energy landscape, in contrast to the homologue R15, which folds fast over a much smoother, more typical landscape. R15 folds via a nucleation–condensation mechanism that guides the docking of the A and C-helices. However, in R16 and R17, the secondary structure forms first and the two helices must then dock in the correct register. Here, we use variants of R16 and R17 to demonstrate that substitution of just five key residues is sufficient to alter the folding mechanism and reduce the landscape roughness. We suggest that, by providing access to an alternative, faster, folding route over their landscape, R16 and R17 can circumvent their slow, frustrated wild-type folding mechanism. PMID:22917971

  19. 78 FR 75449 - Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ..., 50, 52, and 70 RIN 3150-AJ23 Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... final rule in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013, to make miscellaneous corrections to its regulations... miscellaneous corrections to its regulations in chapter I of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10...

  20. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elizabeth A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  1. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  2. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology - Applications overview.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for cloning and characterizing new CBMs. In addition, it has been employed to improve the purity and availability of many CBMs, but mainly, to construct bi-functional CBM-fused proteins for specific applications. This review presents a comprehensive summary of the uses of CBMs recombinantly produced from heterologous organisms, or by the original host, along with the latest advances. Emphasis is given particularly to the applications of recombinant CBM-fusions in: (a) modification of fibers, (b) production, purification and immobilization of recombinant proteins, (c) functionalization of biomaterials and (d) development of microarrays and probes.

  3. Surface recombination in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, J.M.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-07-01

    We propose two general criteria for a surface defect state to act as an efficient, nonradiative recombination center. The first is that the thermal ionization energy should not deviate from the mid-gap energy by more than the relaxation energy of the defect, In this case the activation energy for the recombination is given by the barrier for the capture of the first carrier, whereas the second carrier is captured athermally. The second citerion is related to the position of the average dangling bond energy relative to the band edges. If, as in the cases of InP or InAs, it is located close to a band edge, a low surface recombination velocity is expected. However a much faster recombination is predicated and experimentally observed in the materials with the average dangling bond energy located close to the mid-gap. The relevance of these criteria for the novel wide-gap optoelectronic materials is discussed.

  4. Stress and strain evolution of folding rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Weikusat, Ilka

    2015-04-01

    One of the main objectives of structural geology is to unravel rock deformation histories. Fold shapes can be used to estimate the orientation and amount of strain associated with folding. However, much more information on rheology and kinematics can potentially be extracted from fold geometries (Llorens et al., 2013a). We can study the development of folds, quantify the relationships between the different parameters that determine their geometries and estimate their mechanical evolution. This approach allows us to better understand and predict not only rock but also ice deformation. One of the main parameters in fold development is the viscosity contrast between the folding layer and the matrix in which it is embedded (m), since it determines the initial fold wavelength and the amplification rate of the developing folds. Moreover, non-linear viscous rheology influences fold geometry too (Llorens et al., 2013b). We present a series of 2-dimensional simulations of folding of viscous single layers in pure and simple shear. We vary different parameters in order to compare and determine their influence on the resulting fold patterns and the associated mechanical response of the material. To perform these simulations we use the software platform ELLE (www.elle.ws) with the non-linear viscous finite element code BASIL. The results show that layers thicken at the beginning of deformation in all simulations, and visible folds start earlier or later depending on the viscosity contrast. When folds start to nucleate the layer maximum shear strain decreases, moving away from the theoretical trend for homogeneous strain (no folding). This allows the accurate determination of the onset of folding. Maximum deviatoric stresses are higher in power-law than in linear-viscosity materials, and it is initially double in pure shear than in simple shear conditions. Therefore, folding a competent layer requires less work in simple than in pure shear. The maximum deviatoric stress

  5. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  6. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  8. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  9. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  11. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right–left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use. PMID:25368178

  12. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.

  13. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  14. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  15. Dali/FSSP classification of three-dimensional protein folds.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1997-01-01

    The FSSP database presents a continuously updated structural classification of three-dimensional protein folds. It is derived using an automatic structure comparison program (Dali) for the all-against-all comparison of over 6000 three-dimensional coordinate sets in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Sequence-related protein families are covered by a representative set of 813 protein chains. Hierachical clustering based on structural similarities yields a fold tree that defines 253 fold classes. For each representative protein chain, there is a database entry containing structure-structure alignments with its structural neighbours in the PDB. The database is accessible online through World Wide Web browsers and by anonymous ftp (file transfer protocol). The overview of fold space and the individual data sets provide a rich source of information for the study of both divergent and convergent aspects of molecular evolution, and define useful test sets and a standard of truth for assessing the correctness of sequence-sequence or sequence-structure alignments.

  16. Production of recombinant PvDBPII, receptor binding domain of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein, and evaluation of immunogenicity to identify an adjuvant formulation for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Rukmini; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Hans, Dhiraj; Gupta, Pankaj; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Pandey, Gaurav; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2017-08-01

    Plasmodium vivax is dependent on interaction with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) for invasion of human erythrocytes. The P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) mediates interaction of P. vivax merozoites with DARC. The DARC receptor-binding domain lies in a conserved N-terminal cysteine-rich region of PvDBP referred to as region II (PvDBPII). PvDBPII is an attractive vaccine candidate since antibodies raised against PvDBPII block erythrocyte invasion by P. vivax. Here, we describe methods to produce recombinant PvDBPII in its correctly folded conformation. A synthetic gene optimized for expression of PvDBPII in Escherichia coli and fed batch fermentation process based on exponential feeding strategy was used to achieve high levels of expression of recombinant PvDBPII. Recombinant PvDBPII was isolated from inclusion bodies, refolded by rapid dilution and purified by ion exchange chromatography. Purified recombinant PvDBPII was characterized for identity, purity and functional activity using standardized release assays. Recombinant PvDBPII formulated with various human compatible adjuvants including glycosylpyranosyl lipid A-stable emulsion (GLA-SE) and alhydrogel was used for immunogenicity studies in small animals to downselect a suitable formulation for clinical development. Sera collected from immunized animals were tested for recognition of PvDBPII and inhibition of PvDBPII-DARC binding. GLA-SE formulations of PvDBPII yielded higher ELISA and binding inhibition titres compared to PvDBPII formulated with alhydrogel. These data support further development of a recombinant vaccine for P. vivax based on PvDBPII formulated with GLA-SE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, David J; Søballe, Britta; Barre, François-Xavier; Filipe, Sergio; Lau, Ivy; Massey, Thomas; Yates, James

    2004-01-01

    The duplication of DNA and faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes at cell division is frequently dependent on recombinational processes. The rebuilding of broken or stalled replication forks is universally dependent on homologous recombination proteins. In bacteria with circular chromosomes, crossing over by homologous recombination can generate dimeric chromosomes, which cannot be segregated to daughter cells unless they are converted to monomers before cell division by the conserved Xer site-specific recombination system. Dimer resolution also requires FtsK, a division septum-located protein, which coordinates chromosome segregation with cell division, and uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to activate the dimer resolution reaction. FtsK can also translocate DNA, facilitate synapsis of sister chromosomes and minimize entanglement and catenation of newly replicated sister chromosomes. The visualization of the replication/recombination-associated proteins, RecQ and RarA, and specific genes within living Escherichia coli cells, reveals further aspects of the processes that link replication with recombination, chromosome segregation and cell division, and provides new insight into how these may be coordinated. PMID:15065657

  18. Recombinant levels of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in various replication, recombination, or repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zieg, J; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains containing mutations in lexA, rep, uvrA, uvrD, uvrE, lig, polA, dam, or xthA were constructed and tested for conjugation and transduction proficiencies and ability to form Lac+ recombinants in an assay system utilizing a nontandem duplication of two partially deleted lactose operons (lacMS286phi80dIIlacBK1). lexA and rep mutants were as deficient (20% of wild type) as recB and recC strains in their ability to produce Lac+ progeny. All the other strains exhibited increased frequencies of Lac+ recombinant formation, compared with wild type, ranging from 2- to 13-fold. Some strains showed markedly increased conjugation proficiency (dam uvrD) compared to wild type, while others appeared deficient (polA107). Some differences in transduction proficiency were also observed. Analysis of the Lac+ recombinants formed by the various mutants indicated that they were identical to the recombinants formed by a wild-type strain. The results indicate that genetic recombination in E. coli is a highly regulated process involving multiple gene products. PMID:350859

  19. [Management of T1a vocal fold carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Brosch, S; Smith, E; Pickhard, A

    2013-12-01

    About 2/3 of the larynx carcinomas affect the vocal chords. The main risk factor is smoking. Carcinomas in this localisation often arise from leukoplakias with dysplasia. A typical symptom is dysphonia. Arrest of vibration in microlaryngostroboscopy is a hint that a carcinoma could be present. Transoral laser cordectomy or radiotherapy show equivalent oncological results and results in quality of voice in the treatment of vocal fold carcinoma (T1a). As lymph node and distant metastasis are very rare, follow-up can concentrate on microlaryngoscopy. In case of a suspicious area on the vocal fold, biopsy of the affected tissue is needed to plan correct treatment. The prognosis of the T1 vocal chord carcinoma is quite good with a 5-year survival rate of almost 100%.

  20. Two-mirror optical system with a small fold mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinping; Li, Yingcai; Yang, Jianfeng

    1998-09-01

    A new configuration of two-mirror optical system with a small fold mirror is presented in this paper. Consisting of a concave (positive power) primary mirror followed by a small flat mirror, a concave (positive power) secondary mirror, four lenses and a beam splitter, it gives the excellent image quality. A 1.5-m EFL, F/10 system of the upper configuration is designed over the 4 degree(s) field angle and 0.50 approximately 0.70 micrometers wavelength range. The aberrations have been highly corrected and the distortion is less than 0.3% over the field. The obscuration could be minimized by reducing primary radius of curvature and avoiding the spider that holds the small fold mirror.

  1. Fold Recognition Using Sequence Fingerprints of Protein Local Substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kryshtafovych, A A; Hvidsten, T; Komorowski, J; Fidelis, K

    2003-06-04

    A protein local substructure (descriptor) is a set of several short non-overlapping fragments of the polypeptide chain. Each descriptor describes local environment of a particular residue and includes only those segments that are located in the proximity of this residue. Similar descriptors from the representative set of proteins were analyzed to reveal links between the substructures and sequences of their segments. Using detected sequence-based fingerprints specific geometrical conformations are assigned to new sequences. The ability of the approach to recognize correct SCOP folds was tested on 273 sequences from the 49 most popular folds. Good predictions were obtained in 85% of cases. No performance drop was observed with decreasing sequence similarity between target sequences and sequences from the training set of proteins.

  2. Fold pattern formation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Daniel W.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Krotkiewski, Marcin

    2010-05-01

    The vast majority of studies concerned with folding focus on 2D and assume that the resulting fold structures are cylindrically extended in the out of place direction. This simplification is often justified as fold aspect ratios, length/width, are quite large. However, folds always exhibit finite aspect ratios and it is unclear what controls this (cf. Fletcher 1995). Surprisingly little is known about the fold pattern formation in 3D for different in-plane loading conditions. Even more complicated is the pattern formation when several folding events are superposed. Let us take the example of a plane strain pure shear superposed by the same kind of deformation but rotated by 90 degrees. The text book prediction for this event is the formation of an egg carton structure; relevant analogue models either agree and produce type 1 interference patterns or contradict and produce type 2. In order to map out 3D fold pattern formation we have performed a systematic parameter space investigation using BILAMIN, our efficient unstructured mesh finite element Stokes solver. BILAMIN is capable of solving problems with more than half a billion unknowns. This allows us to study fold patterns that emerge in randomly (red noise) perturbed layers. We classify the resulting structures with differential geometry tools. Our results show that there is a relationship between fold aspect ratio and in-plane loading conditions. We propose that this finding can be used to determine the complete parameter set potentially contained in the geometry of three dimensional folds: mechanical properties of natural rocks, maximum strain, and relative strength of the in-plane far-field load components. Furthermore, we show how folds in 3D amplify and that there is a second deformation mode, besides continuous amplification, where compression leads to a lateral rearrangement of blocks of folds. Finally, we demonstrate that the textbook prediction of egg carton shaped dome and basin structures resulting

  3. Structural features of protein folding nuclei.

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Kondratova, M S

    2008-03-05

    A crucial event of protein folding is the formation of a folding nucleus. We demonstrate the presence of a considerable coincidence between the location of folding nuclei and the location of so-called "root structural motifs", which have unique overall folds and handedness. In the case of proteins with a single root structural motif, the involvement in the formation of a folding nucleus is in average significantly higher for amino acids residues that are in root structural motifs, compared to residues in other parts of the protein. The tests carried out revealed that the observed difference is statistically reliable. Thus, a structural feature that corresponds to the protein folding nucleus is now found.

  4. Protein vivisection reveals elusive intermediates in folding

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-01-01

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu→Glu−) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We apply this strategy to Ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the β5 strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high energy states. PMID:20144618

  5. Optical methods for measuring DNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam D.; Ukogu, Obinna A.; Devenica, Luka M.; White, Elizabeth D.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important biological processes is the dynamic folding and unfolding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The folding process is crucial for DNA to fit within the boundaries of the cell, while the unfolding process is essential for DNA replication and transcription. To accommodate both processes, the cell employs a highly active folding mechanism that has been the subject of intense study over the last few decades. Still, many open questions remain. What are the pathways for folding or unfolding? How does the folding equilibrium shift? And, what is the energy landscape for a particular process? Here, we review these emerging questions and the in vitro, optical methods that have provided answers, introducing the topic for those physicists seeking to step into biology. Specifically, we discuss two iconic experiments for DNA folding, the tethered particle motion (TPM) experiment and the optical tweezers experiment.

  6. 3D Finite Amplitude Folding: Implications for the Stress Evolution During Crustal and Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Schmalholz, S.

    2006-12-01

    Compression of the lithosphere, sedimentary sequences or quartz veins may all result in a folding instability, provided that the effective viscosity contrast between "strong" and "weak" layers is sufficiently large. Whereas this process is relatively well understood in 2D, little is known about the finite amplitude instability in 3D. We perform 3D numerical simulations of viscous single-layer folding to study the growth of the fold amplitude during progressive shortening for different amounts of shortening in the two horizontal directions. We demonstrate that existing, linear theories correctly describe the behavior of the instability for small amplitudes. For larger amplitudes, however, numerical results strongly deviate from the linear theory. Therefore, we present a new nonlinear amplification equation that successfully describes folding up to finite amplitudes. Numerical simulations of folding of an initially horizontal layer, perturbed with random noise, demonstrate that in most cases fold axes form perpendicular to the main shortening direction. Aspect ratios of folds are finite and the patterns are relatively insensitive to the applied background shortening directions. Furthermore, the 3D folding instability reduces the averaged differential stress within the folded ("strong") layer, in agreement with 2D results. This implies that the Christmas-tree approach to represent the strength of the crust and lithosphere may be invalid if folding occurs during the deformation.

  7. Protocol for recombinant RBD-based SARS vaccines: protein preparation, animal vaccination and neutralization detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Zhang, Xiujuan; Liu, Jixiang; Jiang, Shibo

    2011-05-02

    Based on their safety profile and ability to induce potent immune responses against infections, subunit vaccines have been used as candidates for a wide variety of pathogens. Since the mammalian cell system is capable of post-translational modification, thus forming properly folded and glycosylated proteins, recombinant proteins expressed in mammalian cells have shown the greatest potential to maintain high antigenicity and immunogenicity. Although no new cases of SARS have been reported since 2004, future outbreaks are a constant threat; therefore, the development of vaccines against SARS-CoV is a prudent preventive step and should be carried out. The RBD of SARS-CoV S protein plays important roles in receptor binding and induction of specific neutralizing antibodies against virus infection. Therefore, in this protocol, we describe novel methods for developing a RBD-based subunit vaccine against SARS. Briefly, the recombinant RBD protein (rRBD) was expressed in culture supernatant of mammalian 293T cells to obtain a correctly folded protein with proper conformation and high immunogenicity. The transfection of the recombinant plasmid encoding RBD to the cells was then performed using a calcium phosphate transfection method with some modifications. Compared with the lipid transfection method, this modified calcium phosphate transfection method is cheaper, easier to handle, and has the potential to reach high efficacy once a transfection complex with suitable size and shape is formed. Finally, a SARS pseudovirus neutralization assay was introduced in the protocol and used to detect the neutralizing activity of sera of mice vaccinated with rRBD protein. This assay is relatively safe, does not involve an infectious SARS-CoV, and can be performed without the requirement of a biosafety-3 laboratory. The protocol described here can also be used to design and study recombinant subunit vaccines against other viruses with class I fusion proteins, for example, HIV

  8. Implicit modeling of folds and overprinting deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Ailleres, Laurent; Grose, Lachlan; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark; Armit, Robin

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional structural modeling is gaining importance for a broad range of quantitative geoscientific applications. However, existing approaches are still limited by the type of structural data they are able to use and by their lack of structural meaning. Most techniques heavily rely on spatial data for modeling folded layers, but are unable to completely use cleavage and lineation information for constraining the shape of modeled folds. This lack of structural control is generally compensated by expert knowledge introduced in the form of additional interpretive data such as cross-sections and maps. With this approach, folds are explicitly designed by the user instead of being derived from data. This makes the resulting structures subjective and deterministic. This paper introduces a numerical framework for modeling folds and associated foliations from typical field data. In this framework, a parametric description of fold geometry is incorporated into the interpolation algorithm. This way the folded geometry is implicitly derived from observed data, while being controlled through structural parameters such as fold wavelength, amplitude and tightness. A fold coordinate system is used to support the numerical description of fold geometry and to modify the behavior of classical structural interpolators. This fold frame is constructed from fold-related structural elements such as axial foliations, intersection lineations, and vergence. Poly-deformed terranes are progressively modeled by successively modeling each folding event going backward through time. The proposed framework introduces a new modeling paradigm, which enables the building of three-dimensional geological models of complex poly-deformed terranes. It follows a process based on the structural geologist approach and is able to produce geomodels that honor both structural data and geological knowledge.

  9. A successful strategy for the recovering of active P21, an insoluble recombinant protein of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Marlus Alves Dos; Teixeira, Francesco Brugnera; Moreira, Heline Hellen Teixeira; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Clemente, Tatiana Mordente; Brigido, Paula Cristina; Silva, Rebecca Tavares E.; Purcino, Cecílio; Gomes, Rafael Gonçalves Barbosa; Bahia, Diana; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Munte, Claudia Elisabeth; Horjales, Eduardo; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2014-03-01

    Structural studies of proteins normally require large quantities of pure material that can only be obtained through heterologous expression systems and recombinant technique. In these procedures, large amounts of expressed protein are often found in the insoluble fraction, making protein purification from the soluble fraction inefficient, laborious, and costly. Usually, protein refolding is avoided due to a lack of experimental assays that can validate correct folding and that can compare the conformational population to that of the soluble fraction. Herein, we propose a validation method using simple and rapid 1D 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra that can efficiently compare protein samples, including individual information of the environment of each proton in the structure.

  10. Protein Folding and Self-Organized Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, Arun; Murray, Joelle

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. However, the complex dynamics of protein folding and the way they consistently fold into the same structures is not fully understood. Self-organized criticality (SOC) has provided a framework for understanding complex systems in various systems (earthquakes, forest fires, financial markets, and epidemics) through scale invariance and the associated power law behavior. In this research, we use a simple hydrophobic-polar lattice-bound computational model to investigate self-organized criticality as a possible mechanism for generating complexity in protein folding.

  11. Deterministic Folding in Stiff Elastic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, T.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2008-09-01

    Crumpled membranes have been found to be characterized by complex patterns of spatially seemingly random facets separated by narrow ridges of high elastic energy. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that compression of stiff elastic membranes with small randomness in their initial configurations leads to either random ridge configurations (high entropy) or nearly deterministic folds (low elastic energy). For folding with symmetric ridge configurations to appear in part of the crumpling processes, the crumpling rate must be slow enough. Folding stops when the thickness of the folded structure becomes important, and crumpling continues thereafter as a random process.

  12. Vocal fold dynamics for frequency change.

    PubMed

    Hollien, Harry

    2014-07-01

    This article provides a review of data drawn from a series of related experiments to demonstrate how frequency change (Δf0) is accomplished in the modal register. The research cited involves studies of (1) laryngeal size, (2) vocal fold length, (3) vocal fold thickness, and (4) subglottic pressure; new data describe their effect on vocal fold mass. It was found that changes in these dimensions (1) explain how the shifts in frequency are accomplished, (2) establish the way vocal fold mass can be measured, and (3) strongly support the aerodynamic-myoelastic theory of phonation. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Macromolecule-Assisted de novo Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Il; Son, Ahyun; Lim, Keo-Heun; Jeong, Hotcherl; Seong, Baik L.

    2012-01-01

    In the processes of protein synthesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptides are tightly connected to the macromolecules, such as ribosomes, lipid bilayers, or cotranslationally folded domains in multidomain proteins, representing a hallmark of de novo protein folding environments in vivo. Such linkage effects on the aggregation of endogenous polypeptides have been largely neglected, although all these macromolecules have been known to effectively and robustly solubilize their linked heterologous proteins in fusion or display technology. Thus, their roles in the aggregation of linked endogenous polypeptides need to be elucidated and incorporated into the mechanisms of de novo protein folding in vivo. In the classic hydrophobic interaction-based stabilizing mechanism underlying the molecular chaperone-assisted protein folding, it has been assumed that the macromolecules connected through a simple linkage without hydrophobic interactions and conformational changes would make no effect on the aggregation of their linked polypeptide chains. However, an increasing line of evidence indicates that the intrinsic properties of soluble macromolecules, especially their surface charges and excluded volume, could be important and universal factors for stabilizing their linked polypeptides against aggregation. Taken together, these macromolecules could act as folding helpers by keeping their linked nascent chains in a folding-competent state. The folding assistance provided by these macromolecules in the linkage context would give new insights into de novo protein folding inside the cell. PMID:22949867

  14. COS Side 2 NUV MAMA Fold Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacinski, John

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {13128} during Cycle 20.This proposal is an exact duplication of nominal COS MAMA Fold Analysis {proposal 13128, Cycle 20}. Any changes 13128 or subsequent cycle submissions should be reflected in this proposal and vice versa.

  15. Characterization of a hypoallergenic recombinant Bet v 1 variant as a candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, H; Suck, R; Weber, B; Nandy, A; Wald, M; Keller, W; Cromwell, O; Fiebig, H

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant allergens and especially their hypoallergenic variants are promising candidates for a more effective and safer specific immunotherapy. Physicochemical and immunological characteristics of a folding variant of recombinant Bet v 1 (rBet v 1-FV) were investigated in comparison to natural Bet v 1 (nBet v 1) and the correctly folded recombinant Bet v 1 (rBet v 1-WT) by SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, multi-angle light scattering, circular dichroism, immunoblotting and enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition assay for detection of IgE reactivity and ELISA with Bet v 1-specific monoclonal antibodies. The functional IgE reactivity of the different Bet v 1 proteins was investigated using basophil activation in terms of CD203c expression and histamine release. T cell reactivity was investigated using T cell lines raised from birch pollen-allergic subjects against nBet v 1. Immunogenicity was investigated in mice. Physicochemical characterization revealed purity, homogeneity and monomeric properties of rBet v 1-FV. Unlike nBet v 1 and rBet v 1-WT, rBet v 1-FV showed almost no IgE binding in immunoblots. The reduction of allergenicity was further proved by IgE-binding inhibition assays, basophil activation and histamine release. T cell reactivity was completely conserved, as demonstrated by proliferation of Bet v 1-specific T cell lines with multiple epitope specificities. rBet v 1-FV showed strong immunogenicity in mice. Due to its reduced IgE reactivity and decreased capacity to activate basophils, but retained T cell reactivity and strong immunogenicity, rBet v 1-FV proved to be a very promising candidate for specific immunotherapy in birch pollen-allergic subjects. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Distinguishing between sequential and nonsequentially folded proteins: implications for folding and misfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Maizel, J. V.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here an algorithm for distinguishing sequential from nonsequentially folding proteins. Several experiments have recently suggested that most of the proteins that are synthesized in the eukaryotic cell may fold sequentially. This proposed folding mechanism in vivo is particularly advantageous to the organism. In the absence of chaperones, the probability that a sequentially folding protein will misfold is reduced significantly. The problem we address here is devising a procedure that would differentiate between the two types of folding patterns. Footprints of sequential folding may be found in structures where consecutive fragments of the chain interact with each other. In such cases, the folding complexity may be viewed as being lower. On the other hand, higher folding complexity suggests that at least a portion of the polypeptide backbone folds back upon itself to form three-dimensional (3D) interactions with noncontiguous portion(s) of the chain. Hence, we look at the mechanism of folding of the molecule via analysis of its complexity, that is, through the 3D interactions formed by contiguous segments on the polypeptide chain. To computationally splice the structure into consecutively interacting fragments, we either cut it into compact hydrophobic folding units or into a set of hypothetical, transient, highly populated, contiguous fragments ("building blocks" of the structure). In sequential folding, successive building blocks interact with each other from the amino to the carboxy terminus of the polypeptide chain. Consequently, the results of the parsing differentiate between sequentially vs. nonsequentially folded chains. The automated assessment of the folding complexity provides insight into both the likelihood of misfolding and the kinetic folding rate of the given protein. In terms of the funnel free energy landscape theory, a protein that truly follows the mechanism of sequential folding, in principle, encounters smoother free energy barriers

  17. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  18. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  19. Efficient export of prefolded, disulfide-bonded recombinant proteins to the periplasm by the Tat pathway in Escherichia coli CyDisCo strains.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina F R O; Robinson, Colin; Alanen, Heli I; Prus, Piotr; Uchida, Yuko; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Numerous high-value therapeutic proteins are produced in Escherichia coli and exported to the periplasm, as this approach simplifies downstream processing and enables disulfide bond formation. Most recombinant proteins are exported by the Sec pathway, which transports substrates across the plasma membrane in an unfolded state. The Tat system also exports proteins to the periplasm, but transports them in a folded state. This system has attracted interest because of its tendency to transport correctly folded proteins, but this trait renders it unable to export proteins containing disulfide bonds since these are normally acquired only in the periplasm; reduced substrates tend to be recognized as incorrectly folded and rejected. In this study we have used a series of novel strains (termed CyDisCo) which oxidise disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm, and we show that these cells efficiently export a range of disulfide-containing proteins when a Tat signal peptide is attached. These test proteins include alkaline phosphatase (PhoA), a phytase containing four disulfide bonds (AppA), an antiinterleukin 1β scFv and human growth hormone. No export of PhoA or AppA is observed in wild-type cells lacking the CyDisCo factors. The PhoA, AppA and scFv proteins were exported in an active form by Tat in the CyDisCo strain, and mass spectrometry showed that the vast majority of the scFv protein was disulfide-bonded and correctly processed. The evidence indicates that this combination of Tat + CyDisCo offers a novel means of exporting active, correctly folded disulfide bonded proteins to the periplasm.

  20. Are sheath folds late stage flanking structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2010-05-01

    Sheath folds can be described as highly non-cylindrical folds or as cone shaped with a rounded apex. A cross section of a sheath fold perpendicular to its elongation direction shows usually an elliptical shape. Sheath folds can be observed in nature within a wide range of materials and across many orders of size magnitude. A classification scheme has been developed by Alsop and Holdsworth (Journal of Structural Geology, 2006) which divides sheath folds into different categories depending on the ratio of the aspect ratio of the innermost and outermost "ring". Different initial conditions such as rigid objects and precursor folds formed through buckling were suggested as a trigger for the development of sheath folds. However, in nature sheath folds can also be observed where no rigid objects or precursor folds can be seen. In such cases we propose weak objects or zones as possible activators. According to this approach sheath folds represent a late stage of flanking structures. To simulate the weak zone we use an infinitely weak elliptical inclusion embedded in a homogeneous matrix. Planar markers such as bedding or foliation make the sheath geometry visible. To test the impact of the initial shape of the weak zone on the formation of the sheath folds the aspect ratio of the slip ellipse is changed systematically. As the geometry of sheath folds is truly three dimensional we use a 3D analytical model to investigate their formation. The model is based on an adapted internal and external Eshelby solution (Eshelby, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London series a-Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 1957 and 1959) for viscous rheologies and elliptical inclusions described in Exner and Dabrowski (Journal of Structural Geology, 2010 (submitted)). The ellipse as well as the matrix has linear viscous, isotropic, incompressible material properties. To analyze the cross-section the calculated folds are cut perpendicular to the simple shear stretching direction while the

  1. Retinal and Choroidal Folds in Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick A.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Garvin, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency, patterns, associations, and biomechanical implications of retinal and choroidal folds in papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods Retinal and choroidal folds were studied in patients enrolled in the IIH Treatment Trial using fundus photography (n = 165 study eyes) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT; n = 125). We examined the association between folds and peripapillary shape, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, disc volume, Frisén grade, acuity, perimetric mean deviation, intraocular pressure, intracranial pressure, and refractive error. Results We identified three types of folds in IIH patients with papilledema: peripapillary wrinkles (PPW), retinal folds (RF), and choroidal folds (CF). Frequency, with photos, was 26%, 19%, and 1%, respectively; SD-OCT frequency was 46%, 47%, and 10%. At least one type of fold was present in 41% of patients with photos and 73% with SD-OCT. Spectral-domain OCT was more sensitive. Structural parameters related to the severity of papilledema were associated with PPW and RF, whereas anterior deformation of the peripapillary RPE/basement membrane layer was associated with CF and RF. Folds were not associated with vision loss at baseline. Conclusions Folds in papilledema are biomechanical signs of stress/strain on the optic nerve head and load-bearing structures induced by intracranial hypertension. Folds are best imaged with SD-OCT. The patterns of retinal and choroidal folds are the products of a complex interplay between the degree of papilledema and anterior deformation of the load-bearing structures (sclera and possibly the lamina cribrosa), both modulated by structural geometry and material properties of the optic nerve head. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26335066

  2. Guiding the folding pathway of DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Katherine E; Dannenberg, Frits; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Turberfield, Andrew J; Bath, Jonathan

    2015-09-03

    DNA origami is a robust assembly technique that folds a single-stranded DNA template into a target structure by annealing it with hundreds of short 'staple' strands. Its guiding design principle is that the target structure is the single most stable configuration. The folding transition is cooperative and, as in the case of proteins, is governed by information encoded in the polymer sequence. A typical origami folds primarily into the desired shape, but misfolded structures can kinetically trap the system and reduce the yield. Although adjusting assembly conditions or following empirical design rules can improve yield, well-folded origami often need to be separated from misfolded structures. The problem could in principle be avoided if assembly pathway and kinetics were fully understood and then rationally optimized. To this end, here we present a DNA origami system with the unusual property of being able to form a small set of distinguishable and well-folded shapes that represent discrete and approximately degenerate energy minima in a vast folding landscape, thus allowing us to probe the assembly process. The obtained high yield of well-folded origami structures confirms the existence of efficient folding pathways, while the shape distribution provides information about individual trajectories through the folding landscape. We find that, similarly to protein folding, the assembly of DNA origami is highly cooperative; that reversible bond formation is important in recovering from transient misfoldings; and that the early formation of long-range connections can very effectively enforce particular folds. We use these insights to inform the design of the system so as to steer assembly towards desired structures. Expanding the rational design process to include the assembly pathway should thus enable more reproducible synthesis, particularly when targeting more complex structures. We anticipate that this expansion will be essential if DNA origami is to continue its

  3. Guiding the folding pathway of DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Katherine E.; Dannenberg, Frits; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Bath, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    DNA origami is a robust assembly technique that folds a single-stranded DNA template into a target structure by annealing it with hundreds of short `staple' strands. Its guiding design principle is that the target structure is the single most stable configuration. The folding transition is cooperative and, as in the case of proteins, is governed by information encoded in the polymer sequence. A typical origami folds primarily into the desired shape, but misfolded structures can kinetically trap the system and reduce the yield. Although adjusting assembly conditions or following empirical design rules can improve yield, well-folded origami often need to be separated from misfolded structures. The problem could in principle be avoided if assembly pathway and kinetics were fully understood and then rationally optimized. To this end, here we present a DNA origami system with the unusual property of being able to form a small set of distinguishable and well-folded shapes that represent discrete and approximately degenerate energy minima in a vast folding landscape, thus allowing us to probe the assembly process. The obtained high yield of well-folded origami structures confirms the existence of efficient folding pathways, while the shape distribution provides information about individual trajectories through the folding landscape. We find that, similarly to protein folding, the assembly of DNA origami is highly cooperative; that reversible bond formation is important in recovering from transient misfoldings; and that the early formation of long-range connections can very effectively enforce particular folds. We use these insights to inform the design of the system so as to steer assembly towards desired structures. Expanding the rational design process to include the assembly pathway should thus enable more reproducible synthesis, particularly when targeting more complex structures. We anticipate that this expansion will be essential if DNA origami is to continue its

  4. Making recombinant proteins in filamentous fungi- are we expecting too much?

    PubMed Central

    Nevalainen, Helena; Peterson, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Hosts used for the production of recombinant proteins are typically high-protein secreting mutant strains that have been selected for a specific purpose, such as efficient production of cellulose-degrading enzymes. Somewhat surprisingly, sequencing of the genomes of a series of mutant strains of the cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei, widely used as an expression host for recombinant gene products, has shed very little light on the nature of changes that boost high-level protein secretion. While it is generally agreed and shown that protein secretion in filamentous fungi occurs mainly through the hyphal tip, there is growing evidence that secretion of proteins also takes place in sub-apical regions. Attempts to increase correct folding and thereby the yields of heterologous proteins in fungal hosts by co-expression of cellular chaperones and foldases have resulted in variable success; underlying reasons have been explored mainly at the transcriptional level. The observed physiological changes in fungal strains experiencing increasing stress through protein overexpression under strong gene promoters also reflect the challenge the host organisms are experiencing. It is evident, that as with other eukaryotes, fungal endoplasmic reticulum is a highly dynamic structure. Considering the above, there is an emerging body of work exploring the use of weaker expression promoters to avoid undue stress. Filamentous fungi have been hailed as candidates for the production of pharmaceutically relevant proteins for therapeutic use. One of the biggest challenges in terms of fungally produced heterologous gene products is their mode of glycosylation; fungi lack the functionally important terminal sialylation of the glycans that occurs in mammalian cells. Finally, exploration of the metabolic pathways and fluxes together with the development of sophisticated fermentation protocols may result in new strategies to produce recombinant proteins in filamentous fungi. PMID:24578701

  5. Constructing a Rhombus through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duatepe-Paksu, Asuman

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an example of how paper folding can be used in a geometry class to support conceptual understanding. Specifically, it explains an activity that constructs a rhombus and explores its attributes by using paper folding. The steps of constructing a rhombus are described and some discussion questions are given to consolidate…

  6. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  7. Muscular anatomy of the human ventricular folds.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jerald; Alipour, Fariborz

    2013-09-01

    Our purpose in this study was to better understand the muscular anatomy of the ventricular folds in order to help improve biomechanical modeling of phonation and to better understand the role of these muscles during phonatory and nonphonatory tasks. Four human larynges were decalcified, sectioned coronally from posterior to anterior by a CryoJane tape transfer system, and stained with Masson's trichrome. The total and relative areas of muscles observed in each section were calculated and used for characterizing the muscle distribution within the ventricular folds. The ventricular folds contained anteriorly coursing thyroarytenoid and ventricularis muscle fibers that were in the lower half of the ventricular fold posteriorly, and some ventricularis muscle was evident in the upper and lateral portions of the fold more anteriorly. Very little muscle tissue was observed in the medial half of the fold, and the anterior half of the ventricular fold was largely devoid of any muscle tissue. All 4 larynges contained muscle bundles that coursed superiorly and medially through the upper half of the fold, toward the lateral margin of the epiglottis. Although variability of expression was evident, a well-defined thyroarytenoid muscle was readily apparent lateral to the arytenoid cartilage in all specimens.

  8. Fractures Sets Associated to Buckle Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Eckert, A.; Connolly, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Buckle folds of single and multilayered sedimentary strata in the literature are commonly associated to a variety of different fracture sets, both shear and tensile. Amongst the most noticeable fractures are tensile fractures occurring in the outer hinges of the fold crest and shear fractures in the bottom of fold hinge zones. These fractures are well explained and understood by the extensional and compressional strain/stress pattern in the fold hinge. However, tensile fractures parallel to the fold axis, tensile fractures cutting through the limb, normal faults on the fold hinge, and shear fractures of different orientations in the fold limb cannot intuitively be linked to the stress regime occurring during the buckling process. This study utilizes a 2D and 3D finite element modeling approach using Maxwell visco-elastic rheology to study the stress conditions during single and multilayer buckling for each fracture set to occur. The numerical simulations include sensitivity analyses on material parameters such as permeability, viscosity and overburden thickness. For fracture sets not likely to occur during the buckling process pre- and post folding processes such as initial overpressure, extensional unfolding, and erosional unloading are studied.

  9. Simultaneous Alignment and Folding of Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; O'Donnell, Charles W.; Will, Sebastian; Devadas, Srinivas; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Accurate comparative analysis tools for low-homology proteins remains a difficult challenge in computational biology, especially sequence alignment and consensus folding problems. We present partiFold-Align, the first algorithm for simultaneous alignment and consensus folding of unaligned protein sequences; the algorithm's complexity is polynomial in time and space. Algorithmically, partiFold-Align exploits sparsity in the set of super-secondary structure pairings and alignment candidates to achieve an effectively cubic running time for simultaneous pairwise alignment and folding. We demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques on transmembrane β-barrel proteins, an important yet difficult class of proteins with few known three-dimensional structures. Testing against structurally derived sequence alignments, partiFold-Align significantly outperforms state-of-the-art pairwise and multiple sequence alignment tools in the most difficult low-sequence homology case. It also improves secondary structure prediction where current approaches fail. Importantly, partiFold-Align requires no prior training. These general techniques are widely applicable to many more protein families (partiFold-Align is available at http://partifold.csail.mit.edu/). PMID:24766258

  10. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Stochastic Resonance in Protein Folding Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Aram; Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin; Papoian, Garegin A

    2016-05-04

    Although protein folding reactions are usually studied under static external conditions, it is likely that proteins fold in a locally fluctuating cellular environment in vivo. To mimic such behavior in in vitro experiments, the local temperature of the solvent can be modulated either harmonically or using correlated noise. In this study, coarse-grained molecular simulations are used to investigate these possibilities, and it is found that both periodic and correlated random fluctuations of the environment can indeed accelerate folding kinetics if the characteristic frequencies of the applied fluctuations are commensurate with the internal timescale of the folding reaction; this is consistent with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance observed in many other condensed-matter processes. To test this theoretical prediction, the folding dynamics of phosphoglycerate kinase under harmonic temperature fluctuations are experimentally probed using Förster resonance energy transfer fluorescence measurements. To analyze these experiments, a combination of theoretical approaches is developed, including stochastic simulations of folding kinetics and an analytical mean-field kinetic theory. The experimental observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions of stochastic resonance in phosphoglycerate kinase folding. When combined with an alternative experiment on the protein VlsE using a power spectrum analysis, elaborated in Dave et al., ChemPhysChem 2016, 10.1002/cphc.201501041, the overall data overwhelmingly point to the experimental confirmation of stochastic resonance in protein folding dynamics.

  12. A Computational Model of Cerebral Cortex Folding

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Faraco, Carlos; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The geometric complexity and variability of the human cerebral cortex has long intrigued the scientific community. As a result, quantitative description of cortical folding patterns and the understanding of underlying folding mechanisms have emerged as important research goals. This paper presents a computational 3-dimensional geometric model of cerebral cortex folding initialized by MRI data of a human fetal brain and deformed under the governance of a partial differential equation modeling cortical growth. By applying different simulation parameters, our model is able to generate folding convolutions and shape dynamics of the cerebral cortex. The simulations of this 3D geometric model provide computational experimental support to the following hypotheses: 1) Mechanical constraints of the skull regulate the cortical folding process. 2) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the global cell growth rate of the whole cortex. 3) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on relative rates of cell growth in different cortical areas. 4) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the initial geometry of the cortex. PMID:20167224

  13. Protein folding: When ribosomes pick the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Elin M.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Anfinsen's principle tells us that the folded structure of a protein is determined solely by its sequence. Now, it has been shown that the rate at which a polypeptide chain is synthesized in the cell can affect which of two alternative folded structures it adopts.

  14. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  15. Recent advances in the production of recombinant subunit vaccines in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Yefu

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant protein subunit vaccines are formulated using defined protein antigens that can be produced in heterologous expression systems. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has become an important host system for the production of recombinant subunit vaccines. Although many basic elements of P. pastoris expression system are now well developed, there is still room for further optimization of protein production. Codon bias, gene dosage, endoplasmic reticulum protein folding and culture condition are important considerations for improved production of recombinant vaccine antigens. Here we comment on current advances in the application of P. pastoris for the synthesis of recombinant subunit vaccines.

  16. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  17. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1996-06-11

    Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

  18. The origami of thioredoxin-like folds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jonathan L.; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Origami is the Japanese art of folding a piece of paper into complex shapes and forms. Much like origami of paper, Nature has used conserved protein folds to engineer proteins for a particular task. An example of a protein family, which has been used by Nature numerous times, is the thioredoxin superfamily. Proteins in the thioredoxin superfamily are all structured with a β-sheet core surrounded with α-helices, and most contain a canonical CXXC motif. The remarkable feature of these proteins is that the link between them is the fold; however, their reactivity is different for each member due to small variations in this general fold as well as their active site. This review attempts to unravel the minute differences within this protein family, and it also demonstrates the ingenuity of Nature to use a conserved fold to generate a diverse collection of proteins to perform a number of different biochemical tasks. PMID:17008712

  19. Protein folding at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2011-01-01

    The protein folding reaction carries great significance for cellular function and hence continues to be the research focus of a large interdisciplinary protein science community. Single-molecule methods are providing new and powerful tools for dissecting the mechanisms of this complex process by virtue of their ability to provide views of protein structure and dynamics without associated ensemble averaging. This review briefly introduces common FRET and force methods, and then explores several areas of protein folding where single-molecule experiments have yielded insights. These include exciting new information about folding landscapes, dynamics, intermediates, unfolded ensembles, intrinsically disordered proteins, assisted folding and biomechanical unfolding. Emerging and future work is expected to include advances in single-molecule techniques aimed at such investigations, and increasing work on more complex systems from both the physics and biology standpoints, including folding and dynamics of systems of interacting proteins and of proteins in cells and organisms. PMID:21303706

  20. The robustness and innovability of protein folds.

    PubMed

    Tóth-Petróczy, Agnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-06-01

    Assignment of protein folds to functions indicates that >60% of folds carry out one or two enzymatic functions, while few folds, for example, the TIM-barrel and Rossmann folds, exhibit hundreds. Are there structural features that make a fold amenable to functional innovation (innovability)? Do these features relate to robustness--the ability to readily accumulate sequence changes? We discuss several hypotheses regarding the relationship between the architecture of a protein and its evolutionary potential. We describe how, in a seemingly paradoxical manner, opposite properties, such as high stability and rigidity versus conformational plasticity and structural order versus disorder, promote robustness and/or innovability. We hypothesize that polarity--differentiation and low connectivity between a protein's scaffold and its active-site--is a key prerequisite for innovability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  2. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  3. Microbial host selection and periplasmic folding in Escherichia coli affect the biochemical characteristics of a cutinase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Nikolaivits, Efstratios; Kokkinou, Areti; Karpusas, Michael; Topakas, Evangelos

    2016-11-01

    A cutinase from the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum (FoCut5a) was functionally expressed in different hosts and their recombinant products were characterized regarding their activity, thermostability and tolerance in organic solvents. The cutinase gene cut5a was expressed in the BL21 and Origami 2 Escherichia coli strains and the resulting protein was folded either in the cytoplasm or in the periplasmic space, with the aim of correct formation of disulfide bonds. Increase of thermostability occurred when the enzyme was expressed in the oxidative cytoplasm of Origami 2. All expression products showed maximum enzyme activity at 40 °C, while thermostability increased by 73% when expressed in the Origami strain compared to the cytoplasmic expression in BL21 cells. The melting temperature of each protein construct was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy showing an additional transition at about 63 °C for enzymes expressed in Origami cells, indicating the co-presence of a different thermostable species. Kinetic studies performed on three p-nitrophenyl synthetic esters of aliphatic acids (C2, C4, C12) indicated that this cutinase shows higher affinity for the hydrolysis of the butyl ester. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of wild-type recombinant Bet v 1a as a candidate vaccine against birch pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Batard, Thierry; Didierlaurent, Alain; Chabre, Henri; Mothes, Nadine; Bussières, Laetitia; Bohle, Barbara; Couret, Marie-Noëlle; Ball, Tanja; Lemoine, Pierrick; Focks Tejkl, Margarete; Chenal, Alexandre; Clément, Gilles; Dupont, Francis; Valent, Peter; Krauth, Marie-Theres; André, Claude; Valenta, Rudolf; Moingeon, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We describe the production in Escherichia coli as a recombinant protein of clinical grade wild-type Bet v 1a (rBet v 1a), to be used as a candidate vaccine against birch pollen allergy. This recombinant protein was purified by hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange chromatography and characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoprint and circular dichroism in parallel with natural Bet v 1 (nBet v 1) purified from a birch pollen extract. We also compared rBet v 1 and nBet v 1 for their capacity to induce histamine release from basophils and to stimulate T lymphocyte proliferation. rBet v 1a appears in SDS-PAGE as an 18-kDa monomeric protein, whereas purified nBet v 1 comprises a mixture of isoforms (resolving as three distinct bands and six spots after 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively). Both recombinant and natural purified Bet v 1 molecules are recognized by IgE from birch pollen-allergic patients as well as anti-Bet v 1 murine monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the recombinant protein is correctly folded in a native configuration. Circular dichroism analysis confirmed that the two Bet v 1 molecules exhibit similar 3-dimensional structures, even if rBet v 1a appears more compact and stable in thermodenaturation/renaturation experiments. Both rBet v 1 and nBet v 1 induce the degranulation of sensitized basophils and proliferation of Bet v 1-specific T lymphocytes in a similar manner. On the basis of these structural and biological properties, rBet v 1a is a valid candidate vaccine against birch pollen allergy, currently evaluated in humans. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. From local structure to a global framework: recognition of protein folds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding has been a major area of research for many years. Nonetheless, the mechanisms leading to the formation of an active biological fold are still not fully apprehended. The huge amount of available sequence and structural information provides hints to identify the putative fold for a given sequence. Indeed, protein structures prefer a limited number of local backbone conformations, some being characterized by preferences for certain amino acids. These preferences largely depend on the local structural environment. The prediction of local backbone conformations has become an important factor to correctly identifying the global protein fold. Here, we review the developments in the field of local structure prediction and especially their implication in protein fold recognition. PMID:24740960

  6. The Structure-Forming Juncture in Oxidative Protein Folding: What Happens in the ER?

    PubMed

    Narayan, Mahesh

    2017-08-17

    The folding of disulfide bond containing proteins proceeds in a biphasic manner. Initially, cysteines are oxidized to form disulfide bonds. Structure is largely absent during this phase. Next, when a minimally correct number of native linkages of disulfide bonds have been acquired, the biopolymer conformationally folds into the native, or a native-like, state. Thus, at the end of this "oxidative folding" process, a stable and biologically active protein is formed. This review focuses on dissecting the "structure-forming step" in oxidative protein folding. The ability to follow this pivotal step in protein maturation in somewhat detail is uniquely facilitated in "oxidative" folding scenarios. We review this step using bovine pancreatic Ribonuclease A as a model while recognizing the impact that this step has in subcellular trafficking and protein aggregation.

  7. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  8. GroEL-mediated protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, W. A.; Horwich, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    I. Architecture of GroEL and GroES and the reaction pathway A. Architecture of the chaperonins B. Reaction pathway of GroEL-GroES-mediated folding II. Polypeptide binding A. A parallel network of chaperones binding polypeptides in vivo B. Polypeptide binding in vitro 1. Role of hydrophobicity in recognition 2. Homologous proteins with differing recognition-differences in primary structure versus effects on folding pathway 3. Conformations recognized by GroEL a. Refolding studies b. Binding of metastable intermediates c. Conformations while stably bound at GroEL 4. Binding constants and rates of association 5. Conformational changes in the substrate protein associated with binding by GroEL a. Observations b. Kinetic versus thermodynamic action of GroEL in mediating unfolding c. Crossing the energy landscape in the presence of GroEL III. ATP binding and hydrolysis-driving the reaction cycle IV. GroEL-GroES-polypeptide ternary complexes-the folding-active cis complex A. Cis and trans ternary complexes B. Symmetric complexes C. The folding-active intermediate of a chaperonin reaction-cis ternary complex D. The role of the cis space in the folding reaction E. Folding governed by a "timer" mechanism F. Release of nonnative polypeptides during the GroEL-GroES reaction G. Release of both native and nonnative forms under physiologic conditions H. A role for ATP binding, as well as hydrolysis, in the folding cycle V. Concluding remarks. PMID:9098884

  9. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  10. Mapping the Universe of RNA Tetraloop Folds.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2017-07-25

    We report a map of RNA tetraloop conformations constructed by calculating pairwise distances among all experimentally determined four-nucleotide hairpin loops. Tetraloops with similar structures are clustered together and, as expected, the two largest clusters are the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. We identify clusters corresponding to known tetraloop folds such as GGUG, RNYA, AGNN, and CUUG. These clusters are represented in a simple two-dimensional projection that recapitulates the relationship among the different folds. The cluster analysis also identifies 20 novel tetraloop folds that are peculiar to specific positions in ribosomal RNAs and that are stabilized by tertiary interactions. In our RNA tetraloop database we find a significant number of non-GNRA and non-UNCG sequences adopting the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. Conversely, we find a significant number of GNRA and UNCG sequences adopting non-GNRA and non-UNCG folds. Our analysis demonstrates that there is not a simple one-to-one, but rather a many-to-many mapping between tetraloop sequence and tetraloop fold. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombinations to the Rydberg states of hydrogen and their effect during the cosmological recombination epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, J.; Vasil, G. M.; Dursi, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the effect of recombinations to highly excited states (n > 100) in hydrogen during the cosmological recombination epoch. For this purpose, we developed a new ordinary differential equation solver for the recombination problem, based on an implicit Gear's method. This solver allows us to include up to 350 l-resolved shells or ~61000 separate levels in the hydrogen model and to solve the recombination problem for one cosmology in ~27 h. This is a huge improvement in performance over our previous recombination code, for which a 100-shell computation (5050 separate states) already required ~150 h on a single processor. We show that for 350 shells down to redshift z ~ 200, the results for the free electron fraction have practically converged. The final modification in the free electron fraction at z ~ 200 decreases from about ΔNe/Ne ~ 2.8 per cent for 100 shells to ΔNe/Ne ~ 1.6 per cent for 350 shells. However, the associated changes in the cosmic microwave background power spectra at large multipoles l are rather small, so that for accurate computations in connection with the analysis of Planck data already ~100 shells are expected to be sufficient. Nevertheless, the total value of τ could still be affected at a significant level. We also briefly investigate the effect of collisions on the recombination dynamics. With our current estimates for the collisional rates we find a correction of ΔNe/Ne ~ -8.8 × 10-4 at z ~ 700, which is mainly caused by l-changing collisions with protons. Furthermore, we present results on the cosmological recombination spectrum, showing that at low frequencies collisional processes are important. However, the current accuracy of collisional rates is insufficient for precise computations of templates for the recombination spectrum at ν <~ 1GHz, and also the effect of collisions on the recombination dynamics suffers from the uncertainty in these rates. Improvements in collisional rates will therefore become

  12. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  13. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  14. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  15. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  16. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  17. Cooperativity and modularity in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Masaki; Chikenji, George; Terada, Tomoki P.

    2016-01-01

    A simple statistical mechanical model proposed by Wako and Saitô has explained the aspects of protein folding surprisingly well. This model was systematically applied to multiple proteins by Muñoz and Eaton and has since been referred to as the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton (WSME) model. The success of the WSME model in explaining the folding of many proteins has verified the hypothesis that the folding is dominated by native interactions, which makes the energy landscape globally biased toward native conformation. Using the WSME and other related models, Saitô emphasized the importance of the hierarchical pathway in protein folding; folding starts with the creation of contiguous segments having a native-like configuration and proceeds as growth and coalescence of these segments. The Φ-values calculated for barnase with the WSME model suggested that segments contributing to the folding nucleus are similar to the structural modules defined by the pattern of native atomic contacts. The WSME model was extended to explain folding of multi-domain proteins having a complex topology, which opened the way to comprehensively understanding the folding process of multi-domain proteins. The WSME model was also extended to describe allosteric transitions, indicating that the allosteric structural movement does not occur as a deterministic sequential change between two conformations but as a stochastic diffusive motion over the dynamically changing energy landscape. Statistical mechanical viewpoint on folding, as highlighted by the WSME model, has been renovated in the context of modern methods and ideas, and will continue to provide insights on equilibrium and dynamical features of proteins. PMID:28409080

  18. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  19. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  20. A bidirectional shape memory alloy folding actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Jamie K.; Wood, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a low-profile bidirectional folding actuator based on annealed shape memory alloy sheets applicable for meso- and microscale systems. Despite the advantages of shape memory alloys—high strain, silent operation, and mechanical simplicity—their application is often limited to unidirectional operation. We present a bidirectional folding actuator that produces two opposing 180° motions. A laser-patterned nickel alloy (Inconel 600) heater localizes actuation to the folding sections. The actuator has a thin ( < 1 mm) profile, making it appropriate for use in robotic origami. Various design parameters and fabrication variants are described and experimentally explored in the actuator prototype.

  1. Geometric formalism for DNA quadruplex folding.

    PubMed

    Webba da Silva, Mateus

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the control of self-assembly and stereochemical properties of DNA higher order architectural folds is of fundamental importance in biology as well as biochemical technological applications. Guanine-rich DNA sequences can form tetrahelical architectures termed quadruplexes. A formalism is presented describing the interdependency of a set of structural descriptors as a geometric basis for folding of unimolecular quadruplex topologies. It represents a standard for interpretation of structural characteristics of quadruplexes, and is comprehensive in explicitly harmonizing the results of published literature with a unified language. The formalism is a fundamental step towards prediction of unimolecular quadruplex folding topologies from primary sequence.

  2. 77 FR 2435 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ...- Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of Preferences and for Other Purposes Correction In... following correction: On page 407, the date following the proclamation number should read ``December...

  3. 78 FR 2193 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement and for Other Purposes Correction In Presidential document... correction: On page 66507, the proclamation identification heading on line one should read...

  4. The oxidoreductase ERp57 efficiently reduces partially folded in preference to fully folded MHC class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antony N.; Ford, Stuart; Alphey, Magnus; Osborne, Andrew; Elliott, Tim; Powis, Simon J.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidoreductase ERp57 is an integral component of the peptide loading complex of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, formed during their chaperone-assisted assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Misfolded MHC class I molecules or those denied suitable peptides are retrotranslocated and degraded in the cytosol. The presence of ERp57 during class I assembly suggests it may be involved in the reduction of intrachain disulfides prior to retrotranslocation. We have studied the ability of ERp57 to reduce MHC class I molecules in vitro. Recombinant ERp57 specifically reduced partially folded MHC class I molecules, whereas it had little or no effect on folded and peptide-loaded MHC class I molecules. Reductase activity was associated with cysteines at positions 56 and 405 of ERp57, the N-terminal residues of the active CXXC motifs. Our data suggest that the reductase activity of ERp57 may be involved during the unfolding of MHC class I molecules, leading to targeting for degradation. PMID:12032078

  5. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  6. Increase of homologous recombination frequency in vascular tissue of Arabidopsis plants exposed to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alex; Hudson, Darryl; Bhomkar, Prasanna; Kathiria, Palak; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-06-01

    Here we analyzed the influence of salt stress on plant genome stability. Homologous recombination events were detected in transgenic Arabidopsis plants that carried in their genome a beta-glucuronidase recombination marker. Recombination events were scored as blue sectors using a stereo microscope. Exposure to 50 mM salt resulted in a 3.0-fold increase in recombination frequency. To analyze the organ and tissue specificity of recombination events, we examined cross-sections of leaves, stems and roots. We found that nearly 30% of recombination events in plants grown under normal conditions and nearly 50% of events in plants grown on salt were undetected by the conventional method. Most of the recombination events represented a cluster/group of cells (12 on average), although events with single cells were also detected. Recombination events were very frequent in leaf mesophyll cells. On average, individual recombination events located on leaves contained more cells than events located on roots or stems. Analysis of recombination events in cross-sectioned tissue of salt-treated plants revealed a shift in the distribution of recombination events towards the vascular tissue. We discuss the significance of the finding for plant stress physiology.

  7. Multiple folding pathways of proteins with shallow knots and co-translational folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We study the folding process in the shallowly knotted protein MJ0366 within two variants of a structure-based model. We observe that the resulting topological pathways are much richer than identified in previous studies. In addition to the single knot-loop events, we find novel, and dominant, two-loop mechanisms. We demonstrate that folding takes place in a range of temperatures and the conditions of most successful folding are at temperatures which are higher than those required for the fastest folding. We also demonstrate that nascent conditions are more favorable to knotting than off-ribosome folding.

  8. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J.; Probert, P.H.

    1993-12-31

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term stripline refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  9. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J. ); Probert, P.H. )

    1994-10-15

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term [ital stripline] refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  10. Geometric analysis of superposed folds in the Kimbi area (Cameroon Pan-African fold belt) based on the Fold Profiler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvestre, Ganno; Jean Paul, Nzenti; Boniface, Kankeu; Timoléon, Ngnotue

    2010-08-01

    Fold shape analyses using the program Fold Profiler method are presented for folds with interference in the Kimbi area with the aim of deciphering their geometry. Two types of functions, conic sections and cubic Bézier curves, were fitted to the natural fold profiles to analyse the fold shape. Two dominant families have been distinguished: parabolic folds for F 1 folds and parabolic to elliptical folds for F 2 and F 3 folds. We also use Ramsay's scheme ( t versus α plot) for classifying the geometry of the folded layers. In this classification, F 1 and F 3 folds belong to class 1C and class 3 folds while F 2 are of classes 1B, 1C and 3. Class 1B folds are formed by buckling while class 1C folds are formed by flattening of parallel folds. The variation of fold shape can be explained by the variation in the rheological properties of the folded layers as a result of changes in physical conditions, or by changes in the kinematics of the folding processes. These data, which are the first ever folding results in this region, can be integrated into the tectonic evolution models Northwestern Cameroon's Pan-African fold belt.

  11. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  12. Recombinant antibodies and their use in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Shen, Zhihong; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-04-01

    Inexpensive, noninvasive immunoassays can be used to quickly detect disease in humans. Immunoassay sensitivity and specificity are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies are produced biologically. As such, antibody quality and suitability for use in immunoassays cannot be readily determined or controlled by human intervention. However, the process through which high-quality antibodies can be obtained has been shortened and streamlined by use of genetic engineering and recombinant antibody techniques. Antibodies that traditionally take several months or more to produce when animals are used can now be developed in a few weeks as recombinant antibodies produced in bacteria, yeast, or other cell types. Typically most immunoassays use two or more antibodies or antibody fragments to detect antigens that are indicators of disease. However, a label-free biosensor, for example, a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) needs one antibody only. As such, the cost and time needed to design and develop an immunoassay can be substantially reduced if recombinant antibodies and biosensors are used rather than traditional antibody and assay (e.g. enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, ELISA) methods. Unlike traditional antibodies, recombinant antibodies can be genetically engineered to self-assemble on biosensor surfaces, at high density, and correctly oriented to enhance antigen-binding activity and to increase assay sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Additionally, biosensor surface chemistry and physical and electronic properties can be modified to further increase immunoassay performance above and beyond that obtained by use of traditional methods. This review describes some of the techniques investigators have used to develop highly specific and sensitive, recombinant antibody-based biosensors for detection of antigens in simple or complex biological samples.

  13. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Cycle 22 COS/NUV Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, T.; Welty, A.

    2016-09-01

    We summarize the Cycle 22 COS/NUV Fold Distribution for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph's (COS) MAMA detector on the Hubble Space Telescope. The detector micro-channel plate's health state is determined and the results are presented.

  15. Cycle 23 COS/NUV Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas; Welty, Alan

    2017-07-01

    We summarize the Cycle 23 COS/NUV Fold Distribution for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph's (COS) MAMA detector on the Hubble Space Telescope. The detector micro-channel plate's health state is determined and the results presented.

  16. Origami: Paper Folding--The Algorithmic Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heukerott, Pamela Beth

    1988-01-01

    Describes origami, the oriental art of paper folding as an activity to teach upper elementary students concepts and skills in geometry involving polygons, angles, measurement, symmetry, and congruence. (PK)

  17. The Ribosome Modulates Nascent Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christian M.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Chodera, John D.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized by the ribosome and generally must fold to become functionally active. Although it is commonly assumed that the ribosome affects the folding process, this idea has been extremely difficult to demonstrate. We have developed an experimental system to investigate the folding of single ribosome-bound stalled nascent polypeptides with optical tweezers. In T4 lysozyme, synthesized in a reconstituted in vitro translation system, the ribosome slows the formation of stable tertiary interactions and the attainment of the native state relative to the free protein. Incomplete T4 lysozyme polypeptides misfold and aggregate when free in solution, but they remain folding-competent near the ribosomal surface. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome not only decodes the genetic information and synthesizes polypeptides, but also promotes efficient de novo attainment of the native state. PMID:22194581

  18. Frustration in Condensed Matter and Protein Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Tanner, S.; Conroy, B.; Owens, F.; Tran, M. M.; Boekema, C.

    2014-03-01

    By means of computer modeling, we are studying frustration in condensed matter and protein folding, including the influence of temperature and Thomson-figure formation. Frustration is due to competing interactions in a disordered state. The key issue is how the particles interact to reach the lowest frustration. The relaxation for frustration is mostly a power function (randomly assigned pattern) or an exponential function (regular patterns like Thomson figures). For the atomic Thomson model, frustration is predicted to decrease with the formation of Thomson figures at zero kelvin. We attempt to apply our frustration modeling to protein folding and dynamics. We investigate the homogeneous protein frustration that would cause the speed of the protein folding to increase. Increase of protein frustration (where frustration and hydrophobicity interplay with protein folding) may lead to a protein mutation. Research is supported by WiSE@SJSU and AFC San Jose.

  19. Self-folding miniature elastic electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Meeker, Laura; Tolley, Michael T.; Wood, Robert J.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Printing functional materials represents a considerable impact on the access to manufacturing technology. In this paper we present a methodology and validation of print-and-self-fold miniature electric devices. Polyvinyl chloride laminated sheets based on metalized polyester film show reliable self-folding processes under a heat application, and it configures 3D electric devices. We exemplify this technique by fabricating fundamental electric devices, namely a resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Namely, we show the development of a self-folded stretchable resistor, variable resistor, capacitive strain sensor, and an actuation mechanism consisting of a folded contractible solenoid coil. Because of their pre-defined kinematic design, these devices feature elasticity, making them suitable as sensors and actuators in flexible circuits. Finally, an RLC circuit obtained from the integration of developed devices is demonstrated, in which the coil based actuator is controlled by reading a capacitive strain sensor.

  20. Folded Resonant Horns for Power Ultrasonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Askins, Stephen; Gradziel, Michael; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Dolgin, Benjamin; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Peterson, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Folded horns have been conceived as alternatives to straight horns used as resonators and strain amplifiers in power ultrasonic systems. Such systems are used for cleaning, welding, soldering, cutting, and drilling in a variety of industries. In addition, several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles have described instrumented drilling, coring, and burrowing machines that utilize combinations of sonic and ultrasonic vibrational actuation. The main advantage of a folded horn, relative to a straight horn of the same resonance frequency, is that the folded horn can be made shorter (that is, its greatest linear dimension measured from the outside can be made smaller). Alternatively, for a given length, the resonance frequency can be reduced. Hence, the folded-horn concept affords an additional degree of design freedom for reducing the length of an ultrasonic power system that includes a horn.

  1. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  2. Dew-driven folding of insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Beadles, Sam; Clement, Courtney; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    Small insect wings fold into tacos when exposed to dewfall or fog for extended times. Such shapes are tightly held together and require great force or long evaporation times for the wings to unfold. In this experimental investigation, we use time-lapse and high-speed videography on a mosquito wing exposed to fog to characterize the folding process from a flat wing to a taco. We observe a taco is formed through a series of processes involving wing bending, unbending, and subsequent tight folding of the wing following the sliding of the drop off the wing. We use a simplified 2D model to determine the forces coalescing drops exert on the wing, and present folding-resistant design suggestions for micro-aerial vehicle wings.

  3. Folding, Binding, Misfolding and Aggregation with AWSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Nicholas P.

    This thesis discusses our recent results using the Associative-memory, Water-mediated, Structure and Energy Model (AWSEM), an optimized, coarse-grained molecular dynamics protein folding model, to fold, bind, and predict the misfolding behavior of proteins. AWSEM is capable of performing de novo structure prediction on small alpha-helical protein domains and predict the binding interfaces of homo- and hetero-dimers. More recent work demonstrates how the misfolding behavior of tandem constructs in AWSEM is consistent with crucial aspects of ensemble and single molecule experiments on the aggregation and misfolding of these constructs. The first chapter is a review of the energy landscape theory of protein folding as it applies to the problem of protein structure prediction, and more specifically how energy landscape theory and the principle of minimal frustration can be used to optimize parameters of coarse-grained protein folding simulation models. The subsequent four chapters are reports of novel research performed with one such model.

  4. Origami: Paper Folding--The Algorithmic Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heukerott, Pamela Beth

    1988-01-01

    Describes origami, the oriental art of paper folding as an activity to teach upper elementary students concepts and skills in geometry involving polygons, angles, measurement, symmetry, and congruence. (PK)

  5. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding proceeds through a a slipknot conformation. We elucidate the mechanics and energetics of its formation. We show that the knotting probability in on-ribosome folding is a function of temperature and that there is an optimal temperature for the process. Our model often leads to the establishment of the native contacts without formation of the knot.

  6. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-09-09

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding proceeds through a a slipknot conformation. We elucidate the mechanics and energetics of its formation. We show that the knotting probability in on-ribosome folding is a function of temperature and that there is an optimal temperature for the process. Our model often leads to the establishment of the native contacts without formation of the knot.

  7. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  9. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  10. Transition-path sampling of -hairpin folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2003-10-01

    We examine the dynamical folding pathways of the C-terminal -hairpin of protein G-B1 in explicit solvent at room temperature by means of a transition-path sampling algorithm. In agreement with previous free-energy calculations, the resulting path ensembles reveal a folding mechanism in which the hydrophobic residues collapse first followed by backbone hydrogen-bond formation, starting with the hydrogen bonds inside the hydrophobic core. In addition, the path ensembles contain information on the folding kinetics, including solvent motion. Using the recently developed transition interface sampling technique, we calculate the rate constant for unfolding of the protein fragment and find it to be in reasonable agreement with experiments. The results support the validation of using all-atom force fields to study protein folding.

  11. Cold rescue of the thermolabile tailspike intermediate at the junction between productive folding and off-pathway aggregation.

    PubMed

    Betts, S D; King, J

    1998-07-01

    Off-pathway intermolecular interactions between partially folded polypeptide chains often compete with correct intramolecular interactions, resulting in self-association of folding intermediates into the inclusion body state. Intermediates for both productive folding and off-pathway aggregation of the parallel beta-coil tailspike trimer of phage P22 have been identified in vivo and in vitro using native gel electrophoresis in the cold. Aggregation of folding intermediates was suppressed when refolding was initiated and allowed to proceed for a short period at 0 degrees C prior to warming to 20 degrees C. Yields of refolded tailspike trimers exceeding 80% were obtained using this temperature-shift procedure, first described by Xie and Wetlaufer (1996, Protein Sci 5:517-523). We interpret this as due to stabilization of the thermolabile monomeric intermediate at the junction between productive folding and off-pathway aggregation. Partially folded monomers, a newly identified dimer, and the protrimer folding intermediates were populated in the cold. These species were electrophoretically distinguished from the multimeric intermediates populated on the aggregation pathway. The productive protrimer intermediate is disulfide bonded (Robinson AS, King J, 1997, Nat Struct Biol 4:450-455), while the multimeric aggregation intermediates are not disulfide bonded. The partially folded dimer appears to be a precursor to the disulfide-bonded protrimer. The results support a model in which the junctional partially folded monomeric intermediate acquires resistance to aggregation in the cold by folding further to a conformation that is activated for correct recognition and subunit assembly.

  12. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  13. FOLD PROFILER: A MATLAB ®—based program for fold shape classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisle, R. J.; Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Bobillo-Ares, N.; Menéndez, O.; Aller, J.; Bastida, F.

    2006-02-01

    FOLD PROFILER is a MATLAB code for classifying the shapes of profiles of folded surfaces. The classification is based on the comparison of the natural fold profile with curves representing mathematical functions. The user is offered a choice of four methods, each based on a different type of function: cubic Bezier curves, conic sections, power functions and superellipses. The comparison is carried out by the visual matching of the fold profile displayed on-screen from an imported digital image and computed theoretical curves which are superimposed on the image of the fold. To improve the fit with the real fold shape, the parameters of the theoretical curves are changed by simple mouse actions. The parameters of the mathematical function that best fits the real folds are used to classify the fold shape. FOLD PROFILER allows the rapid implementation of four existing methods for fold shape analysis. The attractiveness of this analytical tool lies in the way it gives an instant visual appreciation of the effect of changing the parameters that are used to classify fold geometry.

  14. Under-folded proteins: Conformational ensembles and their roles in protein folding, function, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-11-01

    For decades, protein function was intimately linked to the presence of a unique, aperiodic crystal-like structure in a functional protein. The two only places for conformational ensembles of under-folded (or partially folded) protein forms in this picture were either the end points of the protein denaturation processes or transiently populated folding intermediates. Recent years witnessed dramatic change in this perception and conformational ensembles, which the under-folded proteins are, have moved from the shadow. Accumulated to date data suggest that a protein can exist in at least three global forms-functional and folded, functional and intrinsically disordered (nonfolded), and nonfunctional and misfolded/aggregated. Under-folded protein states are crucial for each of these forms, serving as important folding intermediates of ordered proteins, or as functional states of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs), or as pathology triggers of misfolded proteins. Based on these observations, conformational ensembles of under-folded proteins can be classified as transient (folding and misfolding intermediates) and permanent (IDPs and stable misfolded proteins). Permanently under-folded proteins can further be split into intentionally designed (IDPs and IDPRs) and unintentionally designed (misfolded proteins). Although intrinsic flexibility, dynamics, and pliability are crucial for all under-folded proteins, the different categories of under-foldedness are differently encoded in protein amino acid sequences. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Vacuolar targeting of recombinant antibodies in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Carolina Gabriela; Lareu, Jorge Fabricio; Marin Viegas, Vanesa Soledad; Mangano, Silvina; Loos, Andreas; Steinkellner, Herta; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2016-12-01

    Plant-based platforms are extensively used for the expression of recombinant proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. However, to harness the approach effectively and leverage it to its full potential, a better understanding of intracellular processes that affect protein properties is required. In this work, we examined vacuolar (vac) targeting and deposition of the monoclonal antibody (Ab) 14D9 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Two distinct vacuolar targeting signals (KISIA and NIFRGF) were C-terminal fused to the heavy chain of 14D9 (vac-Abs) and compared with secreted and ER-retained variants (sec-Ab, ER-Ab, respectively). Accumulation of ER- and vac-Abs was 10- to 15-fold higher than sec-Ab. N-glycan profiling revealed the predominant presence of plant typical complex fucosylated and xylosylated GnGnXF structures on sec-Ab while vac-Abs carried mainly oligomannosidic (Man 7-9) next to GnGnXF forms. Paucimannosidic glycans (commonly assigned as typical vacuolar) were not detected. Confocal microscopy analysis using RFP fusions showed that sec-Ab-RFP localized in the apoplast while vac-Abs-RFP were exclusively detected in the central vacuole. The data suggest that vac-Abs reached the vacuole by two different pathways: direct transport from the ER bypassing the Golgi (Ab molecules containing Man structures) and trafficking through the Golgi (for Ab molecules containing complex N-glycans). Importantly, vac-Abs were correctly assembled and functionally active. Collectively, we show that the central vacuole is an appropriate compartment for the efficient production of Abs with appropriate post-translational modifications, but also point to a reconsideration of current concepts in plant glycan processing. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Geometric Folding Algorithms: Bridging Theory to Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-03

    Proved that any orthogonal polyhedron can be folded from a single, universal crease pattern (box pleating). 1.2 Origami Design • Developed...mathematical theory for what happens in paper between creases, in partic- ular for the case of circular creases. • Circular crease origami on permanent...sheet of paper. • Developing mathematical theory of Robert Lang’s TreeMaker framework for efficiently folding tree-shaped origami "bases

  17. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  18. The hydrogen exchange core and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R.; Woodward, C.

    1999-01-01

    A database of hydrogen-deuterium exchange results has been compiled for proteins for which there are published rates of out-exchange in the native state, protection against exchange during folding, and out-exchange in partially folded forms. The question of whether the slow exchange core is the folding core (Woodward C, 1993, Trends Biochem Sci 18:359-360) is reexamined in a detailed comparison of the specific amide protons (NHs) and the elements of secondary structure on which they are located. For each pulsed exchange or competition experiment, probe NHs are shown explicitly; the large number and broad distribution of probe NHs support the validity of comparing out-exchange with pulsed-exchange/competition experiments. There is a strong tendency for the same elements of secondary structure to carry NHs most protected in the native state, NHs first protected during folding, and NHs most protected in partially folded species. There is not a one-to-one correspondence of individual NHs. Proteins for which there are published data for native state out-exchange and theta values are also reviewed. The elements of secondary structure containing the slowest exchanging NHs in native proteins tend to contain side chains with high theta values or be connected to a turn/loop with high theta values. A definition for a protein core is proposed, and the implications for protein folding are discussed. Apparently, during folding and in the native state, nonlocal interactions between core sequences are favored more than other possible nonlocal interactions. Other studies of partially folded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Barbar E, Barany G, Woodward C, 1995, Biochemistry 34:11423-11434; Barber E, Hare M, Daragan V, Barany G, Woodward C, 1998, Biochemistry 37:7822-7833), suggest that developing cores have site-specific energy barriers between microstates, one disordered, and the other(s) more ordered. PMID:10452602

  19. Protein folding and misfolding: mechanism and principles.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Krishna, Mallela M G

    2007-11-01

    Two fundamentally different views of how proteins fold are now being debated. Do proteins fold through multiple unpredictable routes directed only by the energetically downhill nature of the folding landscape or do they fold through specific intermediates in a defined pathway that systematically puts predetermined pieces of the target native protein into place? It has now become possible to determine the structure of protein folding intermediates, evaluate their equilibrium and kinetic parameters, and establish their pathway relationships. Results obtained for many proteins have serendipitously revealed a new dimension of protein structure. Cooperative structural units of the native protein, called foldons, unfold and refold repeatedly even under native conditions. Much evidence obtained by hydrogen exchange and other methods now indicates that cooperative foldon units and not individual amino acids account for the unit steps in protein folding pathways. The formation of foldons and their ordered pathway assembly systematically puts native-like foldon building blocks into place, guided by a sequential stabilization mechanism in which prior native-like structure templates the formation of incoming foldons with complementary structure. Thus the same propensities and interactions that specify the final native state, encoded in the amino-acid sequence of every protein, determine the pathway for getting there. Experimental observations that have been interpreted differently, in terms of multiple independent pathways, appear to be due to chance misfolding errors that cause different population fractions to block at different pathway points, populate different pathway intermediates, and fold at different rates. This paper summarizes the experimental basis for these three determining principles and their consequences. Cooperative native-like foldon units and the sequential stabilization process together generate predetermined stepwise pathways. Optional misfolding errors

  20. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  1. "Wet" Versus "Dry" Folding of Polyproline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Bohrer, Brian C.; Kim, Doyong; Servage, Kelly A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-06-01

    When the all- cis polyproline-I helix (PPI, favored in 1-propanol) of polyproline-13 is introduced into water, it folds into the all- trans polyproline-II (PPII) helix through at least six intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we show that the solvent-free intermediates refold into the all- cis PPI helix with high (>90%) efficiency. Moreover, in the absence of solvent, each intermediate appears to utilize the same small set of pathways observed for the solution-phase PPII → PPI transition upon immersion of PPIIaq in 1-propanol. That folding in solution (under conditions where water is displaced by propanol) and folding in vacuo (where energy required for folding is provided by collisional activation) occur along the same pathway is remarkable. Implicit in this statement is that 1-propanol mimics a "dry" environment, similar to the gas phase. We note that intermediates with structures that are similar to PPIIaq can form PPII under the most gentle activation conditions—indicating that some transitions observed in water (i.e. , "we t" folding, are accessible (albeit inefficient) in vacuo. Lastly, these "dry" folding experiments show that PPI (all cis) is favored under "dry" conditions, which underscores the role of water as the major factor promoting preference for trans proline.

  2. Optimum folding pathways for growing protein chains.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Serife; Baday, Sefer; Arkun, Yaman; Erman, Burak

    2007-11-26

    The folding of a protein is studied as it grows residue by residue from the N-terminus and enters an environment that stabilizes the folded state. This mode of folding of a growing chain is different from refolding where the full chain folds from a disordered initial configuration to the native state. We propose a sequential dynamic optimization method that computes the evolution of optimum folding pathways as amino acid residues are added to the peptide chain one by one. The dynamic optimization formulation is deterministic and uses Newton's equations of motion and a Go-type potential that establishes the native contacts and excluded volume effects. The method predicts the optimal energy-minimizing path among all the alternative feasible pathways. As two examples, the folding of the chicken villin headpiece, a 36-residue protein, and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2), a 64-residue protein, are studied. Results on the villin headpiece show significant differences from the refolding of the same chain studied previously. Results on CI2 mostly agree with the results of refolding experiments and computational work.

  3. Cortical Folding Patterns and Predicting Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Niranjini; Busa, Evelina; Augustinack, Jean; Hinds, Oliver; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is made up of a mosaic of structural areas, frequently referred to as Brodmann areas (BAs). Despite the widespread use of cortical folding patterns to perform ad hoc estimations of the locations of the BAs, little is understood regarding 1) how variable the position of a given BA is with respect to the folds, 2) whether the location of some BAs is more variable than others, and 3) whether the variability is related to the level of a BA in a putative cortical hierarchy. We use whole-brain histology of 10 postmortem human brains and surface-based analysis to test how well the folds predict the locations of the BAs. We show that higher order cortical areas exhibit more variability than primary and secondary areas and that the folds are much better predictors of the BAs than had been previously thought. These results further highlight the significance of cortical folding patterns and suggest a common mechanism for the development of the folds and the cytoarchitectonic fields. PMID:18079129

  4. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  5. Stimulation of V(D)J recombination by histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    McBlane, F; Boyes, J

    2000-04-20

    V(D)J recombination assembles functional immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes from individual gene segments [1]. A common recombination mechanism, initiated by the proteins RAG1 and RAG2 at conserved recombination signal sequences (RSSs), operates at all rearranging loci [2] [3]. It has been proposed that the key regulator of the reaction is 'accessibility' of the RSS within chromatin [4]. Recently, the packaging of RSSs into nucleosomes was shown to inhibit initiation of V(D)J recombination [5] [6]. Nevertheless, the tight tissue specificity of regulation cannot be explained by nucleosome-mediated repression alone because a significant fraction of RSSs would be predicted to lie in linker regions between nucleosomes. Therefore, some aspect of the regulation of the recombination reaction must rely on the disruption of higher-order chromatin structure. Here, we report that histone acetylation directly stimulates the recombination reaction in vivo in the correct cell- and stage-specific manner. Neither expression of RAG genes nor activity of RAG proteins was increased by acetylation. Furthermore, histone acetylation failed to overcome nucleosome-mediated repression of RSS recognition and cleavage in vitro. Our data suggest a role for histone acetylation in stimulating recombination in vivo through disruption of higher-order chromatin structures.

  6. Distance and affinity dependence of triplex-induced recombination.

    PubMed

    Knauert, Melissa P; Lloyd, Janice A; Rogers, Faye A; Datta, Hirock J; Bennett, Michael L; Weeks, Daniel L; Glazer, Peter M

    2005-03-15

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have the potential to serve as gene therapeutic agents on the basis of their ability to mediate site-specific genome modification via induced recombination. However, high-affinity triplex formation is limited to polypurine/polypyrimidine sites in duplex DNA. Because of this sequence restriction, careful analysis is needed to identify suitable TFO target sites within or near genes of interest. We report here an examination of two key parameters which influence the efficiency of TFO-induced recombination: (1) binding affinity of the TFO for the target site and (2) the distance between the target site and the mutation to be corrected. To test the influence of binding affinity, we compared induced recombination in human cell-free extracts by a series of G-rich oligonucleotides with an identical base composition and an increasing number of mismatches in the third strand binding code. As the number of mismatches increased and, therefore, binding affinity decreased, induced recombination frequency also dropped. There was an apparent threshold at an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1 x 10(-)(7) M. In addition, TFO chemical modification with N,N-diethylethylenediamine (DEED) internucleoside linkages to confer improved binding was found to yield increased levels of induced recombination. To test the ability of triplex formation to induce recombination at a distance, episomal targets with informative reporter genes were constructed to contain polypurine TFO target sites at varying distances from the mutations to be corrected. TFO-induced recombination in mammalian cells between a plasmid vector and a donor oligonucleotide was detected at distances ranging from 24 to 750 bp. Together, these results indicate that TFO-induced recombination requires high-affinity binding but can affect sites hundreds of base pairs away from the position of triplex formation.

  7. Blepharoptosis correction with buried suture method.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Woo; Kang, Moon Seok; Nam, Seung Min; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-02-01

    Many surgical techniques have been developed to correct blepharoptosis, including the anterior levator resection or advancement, tarsoaponeurectomy, and Fasanella-Servat Müllerectomy. However, to minimize surgical scarring and reduce the postoperative recovery time, the procedure has been developed from a complete incision to a partial incision, which is appealing to patients. To aid the procedural development, this study describes a surgical technique in which the correction of blepharoptosis and a double eyelid fold operation are performed using a buried suture technique during the same operation. A retrospective review was conducted using the medical records and preoperative and postoperative photography of 121 patients who underwent simultaneous correction of blepharoptosis and had a double eyelid fold created between October 2010 and July 2011. All of the patients had mild (1-2 mm) or moderate (3-4 mm) bilateral blepharoptosis and excellent or good levator function (>8 mm). The average preoperative marginal reflex distance (MRD1) measured 1.174 (0.3) mm. No intraoperative complications occurred. The average postoperative MRD1 measured 3.968 (0.2) mm. There was statistical significance improvement between preoperative MRD1 and postoperative MRD1 (P<0.05). No symptomatic dry eye and exposure keratopathy were noted. Blepharoptosis correction using the buried suture technique is an effective technique for young patients experiencing mild to moderate blepharoptosis who want to have the double eyelid fold operation using the buried suture technique.

  8. Experimental and In Silico Modelling Analyses of the Gene Expression Pathway for Recombinant Antibody and By-Product Production in NS0 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma J.; Chiverton, Lesley M.; Spurgeon, Sarah K.; Martin, Elaine B.; Montague, Gary A.; Smales, C. Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway. PMID:23071804

  9. Experimental and in silico modelling analyses of the gene expression pathway for recombinant antibody and by-product production in NS0 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Chiverton, Lesley M; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Martin, Elaine B; Montague, Gary A; Smales, C Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway.

  10. TPX correction coil studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.D.

    1994-11-03

    Error correction coils are planned for the TPX (Tokamak Plasma Experiment) in order to avoid error field induced locked modes and disruption. The FT (Fix Tokamak) code is used to evaluate the ability of these correction coils to remove islands caused by symmetry breaking magnetic field errors. The proposed correction coils are capable of correcting a variety of error fields.

  11. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  12. Modeling Fold-And Belts Using Numerical Simulations and Physical Experiments: the Aconcagua and Mexican Fold-And Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Hilley, G. E.; Fitz, E.; Hudleston, P. J.; Malinski, J.; Hernandez, M.; Take, A.

    2010-12-01

    In this contribution we first investigate the impact of erosion on the geometry and kinematics of the central Argentine Aconcagua Fold-and-Thrust Belt (AFTB) using an integrated analog (sandbox) and numerical (Gale) modeling approach in which mass removal from the topographic surface is limited by the rate of fluvial bedrock incision. This method unifies principles of frictional failure used in Critical Coulomb Wedge (CCW) theory with a quasi-mechanistic erosion rule, which allows us to explicitly relate temporal changes in erosional efficiency in this fold-and-thrust belt to its kinematics. We show that theoretical predictions of AFTB geometry, as well as the kinematics predicted by both physical and numerical experiments are both internally consistent and correctly predict the interpreted and measured field geometries. Specifically, the geometric evolution of the AFTB requires relatively high erosion efficiency values (K) during the initial stage of deformation, and relatively low K values during the latter stages, which is consistent with the progressive exposure of different rock types during the different stages of deformation. Model results indicate that the activity of the faults in the hinterland is high when erosion is most efficient during the initial stage of deformation; this activity is facilitated by increased out-of-sequence thrusting. In contrast, the models predict that forward-propagating thrusts dominate the latter stages of deformation when erosion is far less efficient. We next explore the role of the initial configuration of materials with differing constitutive properties using the Gale numerical code, and published and new structural data from the well-documented Mexican Fold-and-Thrust Belt (MFTB). This fold-and-thrust belt is located in central Mexico and its kinematics appear to be influenced by spatially varying material properties within the accreted foreland rocks. Preliminary results from the MFTB simulations show that rheological

  13. Upright folding during extensional and transtensional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Fossen, Haakon; Rey, Patrice F.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2017-04-01

    Upright folds are common structures that develop in response to horizontal shortening in layered material, for example in foreland basins that surround orogens. While the contractional nature of these folds is not in doubt, interpretation of their tectonic setting needs careful consideration. Here we focus on two examples: (1) folds developed in transtension; and (2) folds developed during the flow of deep crust in response to lithospheric extension. In both cases we consider folding of nearly horizontal layers that are either primary (bedding) or secondary (foliation). Strain theory inspired by John Ramsay's work makes predictions for the behavior of material lines and planes as well as strain axes (instantaneous, finite) during transtensional deformation. Results show: folds can form in transtension; fold hinges rotate toward the direction of divergence (and not the shear zone boundary as they do in transpression), providing unique insight into ancient plate motions; fold tightness is controlled by the obliquity of divergence and not finite strain; hinge parallel stretching is always greater than hinge-perpendicular shortening, resulting in constriction strain and boudinage of fold hinges. Taken together these results provide a rigorous framework for interpreting field observations where structures are complex and boundary conditions unclear. These principles are applied to various tectonic settings ranging from active tectonic regions of oblique divergence in western North America to ancient folding that developed during oblique extension of the Western Gneiss Region, deposition of Devonian basins, and exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in the Norwegian Caledonides. The other class of upright folds that form during extension may require revision of the tectonic interpretation of structural overprints in orogenic cores, for example in gneiss/migmatite domes. Dynamic modeling of extension of thick/hot crust predicts a positive feedback between extension of

  14. Dual folding pathways of an α /β protein from all-atom ab initio folding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Wu, Chun; Duan, Yong

    2009-10-01

    Successful ab initio folding of proteins with both α-helix and β-sheet requires a delicate balance among a variety of forces in the simulation model, which may explain that the successful folding of any α /β proteins to within experimental error has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrate that it is an achievable goal to fold α /β proteins with a force field emphasizing the balance between the two major secondary structures. Using our newly developed force field, we conducted extensive ab initio folding simulations on an α /β protein full sequence design (FSD) employing both conventional molecular dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics in combination with a generalized-Born solvation model. In these simulations, the folding of FSD to the native state with high population (>64.2%) and high fidelity (Cα-Root Mean Square Deviation of 1.29 Å for the most sampled conformation when compared to the experimental structure) was achieved. The folding of FSD was found to follow two pathways. In the major pathway, the folding started from the formation of the helix. In the minor pathway, however, folding of the β-hairpin started first. Further examination revealed that the helix initiated from the C-terminus and propagated toward the N-terminus. The formation of the hydrophobic contacts coincided with the global folding. Therefore the hydrophobic force does not appear to be the driving force of the folding of this protein.

  15. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  16. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  17. Cross folding in southern Bighorn basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, T.L.

    1986-08-01

    Analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery coupled with surface structural investigations of well-exposed folds in the southern Bighorn basin have revealed two northwest-trending folds that have been refolded. The eastern boundary of the Owl Creek Mountains is characterized by a well-defined alignment of folds that extend north-northwest from the Owl Creek thrust front. Bridger monocline, Wildhorse Butte anticline, and Red Hole anticline lie along this trend. Initial Laramide folding, probably during latest Cretaceous time, resulted in a single, continuous, north-northwest-trending anticline with a southwestward vergence. This anticline was progressively unfolded from south to north as the Owl Creek Range was thrust southward over the Wind River basin in earliest Eocene time; scissors-like vertical motion along this flexure rotated the axial surface of the early formed Bridger anticline, resulting in a monocline with a reversed vergence (northeastward). Formation of the Thermopolis/East Warm Springs anticline parallel to the north flank of the range accompanied thrusting and effectively refolded the northern end of the Wildhorse Butte anticline along an east-west axis. Faulting of the oversteepened south limb of the Red Hole cross fold was contemporaneous with folding. Cross-cutting fold axes in this area and the Mud Creek area to the west are best explained by a counterclockwise change in stress direction during the latest phase of the Laramide orogeny. Vertical movement along the eastern side of the Owl Creek Range results from differential motion in the hanging wall of the crystalline thrust sheet.

  18. The nature of protein folding pathways

    PubMed Central

    Englander, S. Walter; Mayne, Leland

    2014-01-01

    How do proteins fold, and why do they fold in that way? This Perspective integrates earlier and more recent advances over the 50-y history of the protein folding problem, emphasizing unambiguously clear structural information. Experimental results show that, contrary to prior belief, proteins are multistate rather than two-state objects. They are composed of separately cooperative foldon building blocks that can be seen to repeatedly unfold and refold as units even under native conditions. Similarly, foldons are lost as units when proteins are destabilized to produce partially unfolded equilibrium molten globules. In kinetic folding, the inherently cooperative nature of foldons predisposes the thermally driven amino acid-level search to form an initial foldon and subsequent foldons in later assisted searches. The small size of foldon units, ∼20 residues, resolves the Levinthal time-scale search problem. These microscopic-level search processes can be identified with the disordered multitrack search envisioned in the “new view” model for protein folding. Emergent macroscopic foldon–foldon interactions then collectively provide the structural guidance and free energy bias for the ordered addition of foldons in a stepwise pathway that sequentially builds the native protein. These conclusions reconcile the seemingly opposed new view and defined pathway models; the two models account for different stages of the protein folding process. Additionally, these observations answer the “how” and the “why” questions. The protein folding pathway depends on the same foldon units and foldon–foldon interactions that construct the native structure. PMID:25326421

  19. Thermodynamic Origins of Monovalent Facilitated RNA Folding

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Fiore, Julie L.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cations have long been associated with formation of native RNA structure and are commonly thought to stabilize the formation of tertiary contacts by favorably interacting with the electrostatic potential of the RNA, giving rise to an “ion atmosphere”. A significant amount of information regarding the thermodynamics of structural transitions in the presence of an ion atmosphere has accumulated and suggests stabilization is dominated by entropic terms. This work provides an analysis of how RNA–cation interactions affect the entropy and enthalpy associated with an RNA tertiary transition. Specifically, temperature-dependent single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies have been exploited to determine the free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) of folding for an isolated tetraloop–receptor tertiary interaction as a function of Na+ concentration. Somewhat unexpectedly, increasing the Na+ concentration changes the folding enthalpy from a strongly exothermic process [e.g., ΔH° = −26(2) kcal/mol at 180 mM] to a weakly exothermic process [e.g., ΔH° = −4(1) kcal/mol at 630 mM]. As a direct corollary, it is the strong increase in folding entropy [Δ(ΔS°) > 0] that compensates for this loss of exothermicity for the achievement of more favorable folding [Δ(ΔG°) < 0] at higher Na+ concentrations. In conjunction with corresponding measurements of the thermodynamics of the transition state barrier, these data provide a detailed description of the folding pathway associated with the GAAA tetraloop–receptor interaction as a function of Na+ concentration. The results support a potentially universal mechanism for monovalent facilitated RNA folding, whereby an increasing monovalent concentration stabilizes tertiary structure by reducing the entropic penalty for folding. PMID:22448852

  20. Cell biology of mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination.

  1. Cell Biology of Mitotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination. PMID:25731763

  2. Time delay of critical images of a point source near the gravitational lens fold-caustic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Zhdanov, V.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the analytical theory of the gravitational lensing we derive asymptotic formula for the time delay of critical images of apoint source, which is situated near a fold-caustic. We found corrections of the first and second order in powers of a parameter, which describescloseness of the source to the caustic. Our formula modifies earlier result by Congdon, Keeton &Nordgren (MNRAS, 2008) obtained in zero-orderapproximation. We have proved the hypothesis put forward by these authors that the first-order correction to the relative time delay of two criticalmages is identically zero. The contribution of the corrections is illustrated in model example by comparison with exact expression.

  3. Meiotic recombination at the Lmp2 hotspot tolerates minor sequence divergence between homologous chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Masayasu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    1996-06-01

    Recombination is widely considered to linearly depend on the length of the homologous sequences. An 11% mismatch decreases the rate of phage-plasmid recombination 240-fold. Two single nucleotide mismatches, which reduce the longest uninterrupted stretch of similarity from 232 base pairs (bp) to 134 bp, reduce gene conversion in mouse L cells 20-fold. The efficiency of gene targeting through homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells can be increased by using an isogenic, rather than a non-isogenic, DNA construct. In this study we asked whether a high degree of sequence identity between homologous mouse chromosomes enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot. Sites of meiotic recombination in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region are not randomly distributed but are almost all clustered within short segments known as recombinational hotspots. The wm7 MHC haplotype, derived from Japanese wild mice Mus musculus molossinus, enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot near the Lmp2 gene. Heterozygotes between the wm7 haplotype and the b or k haplotypes have yielded a high frequency of recombination (2.1%) in 1.3 kilobase kb segment of this hotspot. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James CA

    2016-01-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding, where obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone:substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a novel structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed Residual Electron and Anomalous Density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the E. coli chaperone Spy. This study resulted in a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 while bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded and native-like states, and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  5. Petrofabric test of viscous folding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Charles M.

    1984-06-01

    Compression and extension axes are deduced from quartz deformation lamellae in a quartzite and a graywacke folded into an asymetrical syncline. Deformation lamellae fabrics in the two sandstones are distinctly different. In the graywacke, regardless of bedding orientation or position on the fold, compression axes are normal or nearly normal to the axial planar rough cleavage. Extension axes generally lie in the cleavage plane, parallel to dip. In most quartzite samples, compression axes are parallel or subparallel to bedding, at high angles to the fold axis and extension axes are normal to bedding. Two samples from the very base of the formation indicate compression parallel to the fold axis with extension parallel to bedding, at high angles to the fold axis. One of these two shows both patterns. The lamellae fabric geometry in these two samples suggests the presence of a neutral surface in the quartzite. The lamellae-derived compression and extension axes are in good agreement with the buckling behavior of a viscous layer (quartzite) embedded in a less viscous medium (graywacke and shale below and shale and carbonate above).

  6. Component Modal Analysis of a Folding Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan

    This thesis explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing with an arbitrary number of wing segments. Simplifying assumptions are made such that it is possible to derive the equations of motion analytically. First, a general structural dynamics model based on beam theory is derived from a modal analysis using Lagrange's equations, and is used to predict the natural frequencies of different folding wing configurations. Next, the structural model is extended to an aeroelastic model by incorporating the effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces. The aeroelastic model is used to predict the flutter speed and flutter frequencies of folding wings. Experiments were conducted for three folding wing configurations---a two-segment wing, a three-segment wing, and a four-segment wing---and the outboard fold angle was varied over a wide range for each configuration. Very good agreement in both magnitude and overall trend was obtained between the theoretical and experimental structural natural frequencies, as well as the flutter frequency. For the flutter speed, very good agreement was obtained for the two-segment model, but the agreement worsens as the number of wing segments increases. Possible sources of error and attempts to improve correlation are described. Overall, the aeroelastic model predicts the general trends to good accuracy, offers some additional physical insight, and can be used to efficiently compute flutter boundaries and frequency characteristics for preliminary design or sensitivity studies.

  7. Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson1, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-coding RNAs form unique three-dimensional structures, which perform many biochemical and regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting and native PAGE. Double and triple mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on native state stability. Instead, formation of core and peripheral structural motifs are cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native topology of the ribozyme. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses non-native structures and makes the search for the native state more efficient. We suggest that cooperativity in non-coding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures that promote a unique fold despite a rugged energy landscape. PMID:22500801

  8. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.

  9. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; ...

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperonemore » Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.« less

  10. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  11. Computational and theoretical methods for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Compiani, Mario; Capriotti, Emidio

    2013-12-03

    A computational approach is essential whenever the complexity of the process under study is such that direct theoretical or experimental approaches are not viable. This is the case for protein folding, for which a significant amount of data are being collected. This paper reports on the essential role of in silico methods and the unprecedented interplay of computational and theoretical approaches, which is a defining point of the interdisciplinary investigations of the protein folding process. Besides giving an overview of the available computational methods and tools, we argue that computation plays not merely an ancillary role but has a more constructive function in that computational work may precede theory and experiments. More precisely, computation can provide the primary conceptual clues to inspire subsequent theoretical and experimental work even in a case where no preexisting evidence or theoretical frameworks are available. This is cogently manifested in the application of machine learning methods to come to grips with the folding dynamics. These close relationships suggested complementing the review of computational methods within the appropriate theoretical context to provide a self-contained outlook of the basic concepts that have converged into a unified description of folding and have grown in a synergic relationship with their computational counterpart. Finally, the advantages and limitations of current computational methodologies are discussed to show how the smart analysis of large amounts of data and the development of more effective algorithms can improve our understanding of protein folding.

  12. Vocal Fold Surface Hydration: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leydon, Ciara; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Falciglia, Danielle Lodewyck; Atkins, Christopher; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2009-01-01

    Vocal fold surface liquid homeostasis contributes to optimal vocal physiology. In this paper we review emerging evidence that vocal fold surface liquid is maintained in part by salt and water fluxes across the epithelium. Based on recent immunolocalization and electrophysiological findings, we describe a transcellular pathway as one mechanism for regulating superficial vocal fold hydration. We propose that the pathway includes the sodium-potassium pump, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter, epithelial sodium channels, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator chloride channels, and aquaporin water channels. By integrating knowledge of the regulating mechanisms underlying ion and fluid transport with observations from hydration challenges and treatments using in vitro and in vivo studies, we provide a theoretical basis for understanding how environmental and behavioral challenges and clinical interventions may modify vocal fold surface liquid composition. We present converging evidence that clinical protocols directed at facilitating vocal fold epithelial ion and fluid transport may benefit healthy speakers, those with voice disorders, and those at risk for voice disorders. PMID:19111440

  13. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  14. Bifurcation of self-folded polygonal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Arif M.; Braun, Paul V.; Hsia, K. Jimmy

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the self-assembly of natural systems, researchers have investigated the stimulus-responsive curving of thin-shell structures, which is also known as self-folding. Self-folding strategies not only offer possibilities to realize complicated shapes but also promise actuation at small length scales. Biaxial mismatch strain driven self-folding bilayers demonstrate bifurcation of equilibrium shapes (from quasi-axisymmetric doubly curved to approximately singly curved) during their stimulus-responsive morphing behavior. Being a structurally instable, bifurcation could be used to tune the self-folding behavior, and hence, a detailed understanding of this phenomenon is appealing from both fundamental and practical perspectives. In this work, we investigated the bifurcation behavior of self-folding bilayer polygons. For the mechanistic understanding, we developed finite element models of planar bilayers (consisting of a stimulus-responsive and a passive layer of material) that transform into 3D curved configurations. Our experiments with cross-linked Polydimethylsiloxane samples that change shapes in organic solvents confirmed our model predictions. Finally, we explored a design scheme to generate gripper-like architectures by avoiding the bifurcation of stimulus-responsive bilayers. Our research contributes to the broad field of self-assembly as the findings could motivate functional devices across multiple disciplines such as robotics, artificial muscles, therapeutic cargos, and reconfigurable biomedical devices.

  15. On-column refolding of denatured lysozyme by the conjoint chromatography composed of SEC and immobilized recombinant DsbA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2011-10-15

    DsbA (disulfide bond formation protein A) located in the periplasm of Escherichia coli is a disulfide isomerase, which is vital to disulfide bonds formation directly affecting the nascent peptides folding to the correct conformation. In this paper, recombinant DsbA was firstly immobilized onto NHS-activated Sepharose Fast Flow gel. Then Sephadex G-100 gel was sequentially packed on the top of recDsbA Sepharose Fast Flow, and a so-called conjoint chromatography column composed of SEC and immobilized recombinant DsbA was constructed. Denatured lysozyme was applied on the conjoint column. The effect of SEC volume, flow rate, loading amount and volume, pre-equilibrium mode and KCl concentration in the buffer on lysozyme refolding were investigated in detail and the stability of DsbA immobilization was evaluated. Finally the reusability of the conjoint refolding column was also tested. When loading 2.4 mg denatured lysozyme in 0.5 ml solution, the activity recovery reached 92.7% at optimized experimental conditions, and the conjoint column renaturation capacity decreased only 7.7% after six run reuse due to the use of SEC section in the chromatographic refolding process. The conjoint chromatography offers an efficient strategy to refold proteins in vitro with high productivity and column reusability.

  16. Recombinant expression, purification and preliminary biophysical and structural studies of C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain from human galectin-4.

    PubMed

    Rustiguel, Joane K; Kumagai, Patricia S; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Nonato, Maria Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-4 (Gal4), a tandem-repeat type galectin, is expressed in healthy epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract. Altered levels of Gal4 expression are associated with different types of cancer, suggesting its usage as a diagnostic marker as well as target for drug development. The functional data available for this class of proteins suggest that the wide spectrum of cellular activities reported for Gal4 relies on distinct glycan specificity and structural characteristics of its two carbohydrate recognition domains. In the present work, two independent constructs for recombinant expression of the C-terminal domain of human galectin-4 (hGal4-CRD2) were developed. His6-tagged and untagged recombinant proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified by affinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Correct folding and activity of hGal4-CRD2 were assessed by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies, respectively. Diffraction quality crystals were obtained by vapor-diffusion sitting drop setup and the crystal structure of CRD2 was solved by molecular replacement techniques at 1.78 Å resolution. Our work describes the development of important experimental tools that will allow further studies in order to correlate structure and binding properties of hGal4-CRD2 and human galectin-4 functional activities.

  17. Production of recombinant buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and goat (Capra hircus) growth hormones from genetically modified E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Utpal Kumar; Sahni, Girish

    2002-08-28

    The growth hormone cDNAs of Indian reverine buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and beetal goat (Capra hircus) were cloned in Escherichia coli through RT-PCR technique. Nucleotide sequencing revealed several silent mutations in both cDNAs and only one amino acid change in the case of goat when compared to reported bovine (Bos taurus) sequence. The high level expression of both the polypeptide hormones was achieved in E. coli (> or =30% of soluble intracellular proteins) through the construction of two-cistronic gene expression system. The solubilisation of recombinant growth hormones from inclusion bodies and subsequent oxidation to correctly folded monomeric form was also carried out. A combination of reverse-phase HPLC and non-reducing SDS-PAGE was successfully applied to distinguish between reduced and oxidised forms of growth hormones. A moderate yield ( approximately 40% of starting material, with potential for upscaling), two-step purification process comprising of hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange chromatographies was developed. The process eliminates the need for costly, laborious and time-consuming steps of ultrafiltration and dialysis, as reported earlier for the purification of many recombinant animal growth hormones. The biophysical, biochemical and functional analyses of purified refolded polypeptides showed that the hormones produced in this study were identical to natural pituitary bovine growth hormone.

  18. AN ALMOST LINEAR TIME ALGORITHM FOR A GENERAL HAPLOTYPE SOLUTION ON TREE PEDIGREES WITH NO RECOMBINATION AND ITS EXTENSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin

    2010-01-01

    We study the haplotype inference problem from pedigree data under the zero recombination assumption, which is well supported by real data for tightly linked markers (i.e. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) over a relatively large chromosome segment. We solve the problem in a rigorous mathematical manner by formulating genotype constraints as a linear system of inheritance variables. We then utilize disjoint-set structures to encode connectivity information among individuals, to detect constraints from genotypes, and to check consistency of constraints. On a tree pedigree without missing data, our algorithm can output a general solution as well as the number of total specific solutions in a nearly linear time O(mn · α(n)), where m is the number of loci, n is the number of individuals and α is the inverse Ackermann function, which is a further improvement over existing ones. We also extend the idea to looped pedigrees and pedigrees with missing data by considering existing (partial) constraints on inheritance variables. The algorithm has been implemented in C++ and will be incorporated into our PedPhase package. Experimental results show that it can correctly identify all 0-recombinant solutions with great efficiency. Comparisons with other two popular algorithms show that the proposed algorithm achieves 10 to 105-fold improvements over a variety of parameter settings. The experimental study also provides empirical evidences on the complexity bounds suggested by theoretical analysis. PMID:19507288

  19. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant human serine proteinase inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hairong; Huang, Jinjiang; Li, Guodong; Ge, Kuikui; Wu, Hongyu; Huang, Qingshan

    2012-03-01

    Human serine proteinase inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6) belongs to the medically important SPINK family. Malfunctions of SPINK members are linked to many diseases, including pancreatitis, skin barrier defects, and cancer. SPINK6 has been shown to selectively inhibit Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) in human skin. As a SPINK protein, it contains a typical Kazal domain, which requires three intramolecular disulfide bonds for correct folding and activity. Preparation of functional protein is a prerequisite for studying this important human factor. Here, we report the successful generation of tagless SPINK6 using a yeast expression system. The recombinant protein was secreted and purified by cation exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The protein identity was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS and N-terminal sequencing. Pichia pastoris-derived recombinant human SPINK6 (rhSPINK6) showed higher inhibitory activity against Kallikrein-related peptidase 14 (KLK14) (K(i)=0.16 nM) than previously reported Escherichia coli-derived rhSPINK6 (K(i)=0.5 nM). This protein also exhibited moderate inhibition of bovine trypsin (K(i)=33 nM), while previous E. coli-derived rhSPINK6 did not. The results indicate that P. pastoris is a better system to generate active rhSPINK6, warranting further studies on this medically important SPINK family candidate.

  20. Folding at the birth of the nascent chain: coordinating translation with co-translational folding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-02-01

    In the living cells, the folding of many proteins is largely believed to begin co-translationally, during their biosynthesis at the ribosomes. In the ribosomal tunnel, the nascent peptide may establish local interactions and stabilize α-helical structures. Long-range contacts are more likely outside the ribosomes after release of larger segments of the nascent chain. Examples suggest that domains can attain native-like structure on the ribosome with and without population of folding intermediates. The co-translational folding is limited by the speed of the gradual extrusion of the nascent peptide which imposes conformational restraints on its folding landscape. Recent experimental and in silico modeling studies indicate that translation kinetics fine-tunes co-translational folding by providing a time delay for sequential folding of distinct portions of the nascent chain.

  1. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  2. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  3. Proteopedia: Rossmann Fold: A Beta-Alpha-Beta Fold at Dinucleotide Binding Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanukoglu, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The Rossmann fold is one of the most common and widely distributed super-secondary structures. It is composed of a series of alternating beta strand (ß) and alpha helical (a) segments wherein the ß-strands are hydrogen bonded forming a ß-sheet. The initial beta-alpha-beta (ßaß) fold is the most conserved segment of Rossmann folds. As this segment…

  4. Proteopedia: Rossmann Fold: A Beta-Alpha-Beta Fold at Dinucleotide Binding Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanukoglu, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The Rossmann fold is one of the most common and widely distributed super-secondary structures. It is composed of a series of alternating beta strand (ß) and alpha helical (a) segments wherein the ß-strands are hydrogen bonded forming a ß-sheet. The initial beta-alpha-beta (ßaß) fold is the most conserved segment of Rossmann folds. As this segment…

  5. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  6. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  7. Osmolyte-induced folding of an intrinsically disordered protein: folding mechanism in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chu; Oas, Terrence G

    2010-06-29

    Understanding the interconversion between thermodynamically distinguishable states present in a protein folding pathway provides not only the kinetics and energetics of protein folding but also insights into the functional roles of these states in biological systems. The protein component of the bacterial RNase P holoenzyme from Bacillus subtilis (P protein) was previously shown to be unfolded in the absence of its cognate RNA or other anionic ligands. P protein was used in this study as a model system to explore general features of intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) folding mechanisms. The use of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte that stabilizes the unliganded folded form of the protein, enabled us to study the folding process of P protein in the absence of ligand. Transient stopped-flow kinetic traces at various final TMAO concentrations exhibited multiphasic kinetics. Equilibrium "cotitration" experiments were performed using both TMAO and urea during the titration to produce a urea-TMAO titration surface of P protein. Both kinetic and equilibrium studies show evidence of a previously undetected intermediate state in the P protein folding process. The intermediate state is significantly populated, and the folding rate constants are relatively slow compared to those of intrinsically folded proteins similar in size and topology. The experiments and analysis described serve as a useful example for mechanistic folding studies of other IDPs.

  8. Non-cylindrical fold growth in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Nikolaus; Bretis, Bernhard; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountains extends over 1800 km from Kurdistan in N-Iraq to the Strait of Hormuz in Iran and is one of the world most promising regions for the future hydrocarbon exploration. The Zagros Mountains started to form as a result of the collision between the Eurasian and Arabian Plates, whose convergence began in the Late Cretaceous as part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system. Geodetic and seismological data document that both plates are still converging and that the fold and thrust belt of the Zagros is actively growing. Extensive hydrocarbon exploration mainly focuses on the antiforms of this fold and thrust belt and therefore the growth history of the folds is of great importance. This work investigates by means of structural field work and quantitative geomorphological techniques the progressive fold growth of the Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines located in the NE of the city of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq. This part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt belongs to the so-called Simply Folded Belt, which is dominated by gentle to open folding. Faults or fault related folds have only minor importance. The mechanical anisotropy of the formations consisting of a succession of relatively competent (massive dolomite and limestone) and incompetent (claystone and siltstone) sediments essentially controls the deformation pattern with open to gentle parallel folding of the competent layers and flexural flow folding of the incompetent layers. The characteristic wavelength of the fold trains is around 10 km. Due to faster erosion of the softer rock layers in the folded sequence, the more competent lithologies form sharp ridges with steeply sloping sides along the eroded flanks of the anticlines. Using an ASTER digital elevation model in combination with geological field data we quantified 250 drainage basins along the different limbs of the subcylindrical Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines. Geomorphological indices of the drainage

  9. The Risk of Vocal Fold Atrophy after Serial Corticosteroid Injections of the Vocal Fold.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lucy L; Giraldez-Rodriguez, Laureano A; Johns, Michael M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the risk of vocal fold atrophy in patients who receive serial subepithelial steroid injections for vocal fold scar. This study is a retrospective case report of two patients who underwent a series of weekly subepithelial infusions of 10 mg/mL dexamethasone for benign vocal fold lesion. Shortly after the procedures, both patients developed a weak and breathy voice. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with radiation-induced vocal fold stiffness. Six injections were performed unilaterally, and 1 week later, he developed unilateral vocal fold atrophy with new glottal insufficiency. The second patient was a 67-year-old woman with severe vocal fold inflammation related to laryngitis and calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophagean dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome. Five injections were performed bilaterally, and 1 week later, she developed bilateral vocal fold atrophy with a large midline glottal gap during phonation. In both cases, the steroid-induced vocal atrophy resolved spontaneously after 4 months. Serial subepithelial steroid infusions of the vocal folds, although safe in the majority of patients, carry the risk of causing temporary vocal fold atrophy when given at short intervals. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteins with Highly Similar Native Folds Can Show Vastly Dissimilar Folding Behavior When Desolvated**

    PubMed Central

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Proteins can be exposed to vastly different environments such as the cytosol or membranes, but the delicate balance between external factors and intrinsic determinants of protein structure, stability, and folding is only poorly understood. Here we used electron capture dissociation to study horse and tuna heart Cytochromes c in the complete absence of solvent. The significantly different stability of their highly similar native folds after transfer into the gas phase, and their strikingly different folding behavior in the gas phase, can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic interactions such as salt bridges. In the absence of hydrophobic bonding, protein folding is far slower and more complex than in solution. PMID:24259450

  11. Microbial Manipulation of the Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    DePas, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are encased in a protein, DNA and polysaccharide matrix that protects the community, promotes interactions with the environment, and helps cells to adhere together. The protein component of these matrices is often a remarkably stable, β-sheet-rich polymer called amyloid. Amyloids form ordered, self-templating fibers that are highly aggregative, making them a valuable biofilm component. Some eukaryotic proteins inappropriately adopt the amyloid fold and these misfolded protein aggregates disrupt normal cellular proteostasis, which can cause significant cytotoxicity. Indeed, until recently amyloids were considered solely the result of protein misfolding. However, research over the past decade has revealed how various organisms have capitalized on the amyloid fold by developing sophisticated biogenesis pathways that coordinate gene expression, protein folding, and secretion so that amyloid-related toxicities are minimized. How microbes manipulate amyloids, by augmenting their advantageous properties and by reducing their undesirable properties, will be the subject of this review. PMID:23108148

  12. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  13. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  14. A Method for Designing Conforming Folding Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litherland, Brandon L.; Patterson, Michael D.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Borer, Nicholas K.

    2017-01-01

    As the aviation vehicle design environment expands due to the in flux of new technologies, new methods of conceptual design and modeling are required in order to meet the customer's needs. In the case of distributed electric propulsion (DEP), the use of high-lift propellers upstream of the wing leading edge augments lift at low speeds enabling smaller wings with sufficient takeoff and landing performance. During cruise, however, these devices would normally contribute significant drag if left in a fixed or windmilling arrangement. Therefore, a design that stows the propeller blades is desirable. In this paper, we present a method for designing folding-blade configurations that conform to the nacelle surface when stowed. These folded designs maintain performance nearly identical to their straight, non-folding blade counterparts.

  15. The early folding kinetics of apomyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, R. V.; Weaver, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The folding pathway of apomyoglobin has been experimentally shown to have early kinetic intermediates involving the A, B, G, and H helices. The earliest detected kinetic events occur on a ns to micros time scale. We show that the early folding kinetics of apomyoglobin may be understood as the association of nascent helices through a network of diffusion-collision-coalescence steps G + H <--> GH + A <--> AGH + B <--> ABGH obtained by solving the diffusion-collision model in a chemical kinetics approximation. Our reproduction of the experimental results indicates that the model is a useful way to analyze folding data. One prediction from our fit is that the nascent A and H helices should be relatively more helix-like before coalescence than the other apomyoglobin helices. PMID:9521125

  16. Extreme Mechanics: Self-Folding Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangelo, Christian D.

    2017-03-01

    Origami has emerged as a tool for designing three-dimensional structures from flat films. Because they can be fabricated by lithographic or roll-to-roll processing techniques, they have great potential for the manufacture of complicated geometries and devices. This article discusses the mechanics of origami and kirigami with a view toward understanding how to design self-folding origami structures. Whether an origami structure can be made to fold autonomously depends strongly on the geometry and kinematics of the origami fold pattern. This article collects some of the results on origami rigidity into a single framework, and discusses how these aspects affect the foldability of origami. Despite recent progress, most problems in origami and origami design remain completely open.

  17. Thermal stability of idealized folded carbyne loops

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-unfolding items provide a practical convenience, wherein ring-like frames are contorted into a state of equilibrium and subsequently  pop up’ or deploy when perturbed from a folded structure. Can the same process be exploited at the molecular scale? At the limiting scale is a closed chain of single atoms, used here to investigate the limits of stability of such folded ring structures via full atomistic molecular dynamics. Carbyne is a one-dimensional carbon allotrope composed of sp-hybridized carbon atoms. Here, we explore the stability of idealized carbyne loops as a function of chain length, curvature, and temperature, and delineate an effective phase diagram between folded and unfolded states. We find that while overall curvature is reduced, in addition to torsional and self-adhesive energy barriers, a local increase in curvature results in the largest impedance to unfolding. PMID:24252156

  18. Paleostress magnitudes in folded sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrouch, Khalid; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Using Sheep Mountain Anticline (Wyoming, USA) as a case study, we propose a new approach to quantify effective paleo-principal stress magnitudes in the uppermost crust. The proposed mechanical scenario relies on a well-documented kinematic and chronological sequence of development of faults, fractures and microstructures in the folded strata. Paleostress orientations and regimes as well as differential stress magnitudes based on calcite twinning paleopiezometry are combined with rock mechanics data in a Mohr construction to derive principal stress magnitudes related to the successive steps of layer-parallel shortening and to late stage fold tightening. Such quantification also provides original insights into the evolution of the fluid (over)pressure and amount of syn-folding erosion.

  19. Imaging vibrating vocal folds with a high speed 1050 nm swept source OCT and ODT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Rubinstein, Marc; Saidi, Arya; Qi, Wenjuan; Foulad, Allen; Wong, Brian; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-06-06

    Vocal fold vibration is vital in voice production and the correct pitch of speech. We have developed a high speed functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a center wavelength of 1050 nm and an imaging speed of 100,000 A-lines per second. We imaged the vibration of an ex-vivo swine vocal fold. At an imaging speed of 100 frames per second, we demonstrated high quality vocal fold images during vibration. Functional information, such as vibration frequency and vibration amplitude, was obtained by analyzing the tissue surface during vibration. The axial direction velocity distribution in the cross-sectional images of the vibrating vocal folds was obtained with the Doppler OCT. The quantitative transverse direction velocity distribution in the cross-sectional images was obtained with the Doppler variance images.

  20. Environment-specific amino acid substitution tables: tertiary templates and prediction of protein folds.

    PubMed Central

    Overington, J.; Donnelly, D.; Johnson, M. S.; Sali, A.; Blundell, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The local environment of an amino acid in a folded protein determines the acceptability of mutations at that position. In order to characterize and quantify these structural constraints, we have made a comparative analysis of families of homologous proteins. Residues in each structure are classified according to amino acid type, secondary structure, accessibility of the side chain, and existence of hydrogen bonds from the side chains. Analysis of the pattern of observed substitutions as a function of local environment shows that there are distinct patterns, especially for buried polar residues. The substitution data tables are available on diskette with Protein Science. Given the fold of a protein, one is able to predict sequences compatible with the fold (profiles or templates) and potentially to discriminate between a correctly folded and misfolded protein. Conversely, analysis of residue variation across a family of aligned sequences in terms of substitution profiles can allow prediction of secondary structure or tertiary environment. PMID:1304904