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Sample records for correlation transport measurements

  1. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Hebert, Benedict; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Grutter, Peter; Wiseman, Paul W

    2007-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic errors caused by fluorescence blinking of the nanoparticles. Temporal correlation analysis of fluorescence microscopy image time series of streptavidin-functionalized (CdSe)ZnS QDs freely diffusing in two dimensions shows that the correlation functions are fit well to a commonly used diffusion decay model, but the transport coefficients can have significant systematic errors in the measurements due to blinking. Image correlation measurements of the diffusing QD samples measured at different laser excitation powers and analysis of computer simulated image time series verified that the effect we observe is caused by fluorescence intermittency. We show that reciprocal space image correlation analysis can be used for mobility measurements in the presence of blinking emission because it separates the contributions of fluctuations due to photophysics from those due to transport. We also demonstrate application of the image correlation methods for measurement of the diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins tagged with QDs as imaged on living fibroblasts.

  2. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  3. Correlating spin transport and electrode magnetization in a graphene spin valve: Simultaneous magnetic microscopy and non-local measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Andrew J. Page, Michael R.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Chris Hammel, P.; Wen, Hua; Kawakami, Roland K.; McCreary, Kathleen M.

    2015-10-05

    Using simultaneous magnetic force microscopy and transport measurements of a graphene spin valve, we correlate the non-local spin signal with the magnetization of the device electrodes. The imaged magnetization states corroborate the influence of each electrode within a one-dimensional spin transport model and provide evidence linking domain wall pinning to additional features in the transport signal.

  4. Correlated biofilm imaging, transport and metabolism measurements via combined nuclear magnetic resonance and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Ona, Ositadinma N; Majors, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional communities found nearly everywhere in nature and are also associated with many human diseases. Detailed metabolic information is critical to understand and exploit beneficial biofilms as well as combat antibiotic-resistant, disease-associated forms. However, most current techniques used to measure temporal and spatial metabolite profiles in these delicate structures are invasive or destructive. Here, we describe imaging, transport and metabolite measurement methods and their correlation for live, non-invasive monitoring of biofilm processes. This novel combination of measurements is enabled by the use of an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). NMR methods provide macroscopic structure, metabolic pathway and rate data, spatially resolved metabolite concentrations and water diffusion profiles within the biofilm. In particular, current depth-resolved spectroscopy methods are applied to detect metabolites in 140–190 nl volumes within biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and the oral bacterium implicated in caries disease, Streptococcus mutans strain UA159. The perfused sample chamber also contains a transparent optical window allowing for the collection of complementary fluorescence information using a unique, in-magnet CLSM. In this example, the entire three-dimensional biofilm structure was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging. This was then correlated to a fluorescent CLSM image by employing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct of S. oneidensis. Non-invasive techniques such as described here, which enable measurements of dynamic metabolic processes, especially in a depth-resolved fashion, are expected to advance our understanding of processes occurring within biofilm communities. PMID:18253132

  5. GIS measured environmental correlates of active school transport: A systematic review of 14 studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Emerging frameworks to examine active school transportation (AST) commonly emphasize the built environment (BE) as having an influence on travel mode decisions. Objective measures of BE attributes have been recommended for advancing knowledge about the influence of the BE on school travel mode choice. An updated systematic review on the relationships between GIS-measured BE attributes and AST is required to inform future research in this area. The objectives of this review are: i) to examine and summarize the relationships between objectively measured BE features and AST in children and adolescents and ii) to critically discuss GIS methodologies used in this context. Methods Six electronic databases, and websites were systematically searched, and reference lists were searched and screened to identify studies examining AST in students aged five to 18 and reporting GIS as an environmental measurement tool. Fourteen cross-sectional studies were identified. The analyses were classified in terms of density, diversity, and design and further differentiated by the measures used or environmental condition examined. Results Only distance was consistently found to be negatively associated with AST. Consistent findings of positive or negative associations were not found for land use mix, residential density, and intersection density. Potential modifiers of any relationship between these attributes and AST included age, school travel mode, route direction (e.g., to/from school), and trip-end (home or school). Methodological limitations included inconsistencies in geocoding, selection of study sites, buffer methods and the shape of zones (Modifiable Areal Unit Problem [MAUP]), the quality of road and pedestrian infrastructure data, and school route estimation. Conclusions The inconsistent use of spatial concepts limits the ability to draw conclusions about the relationship between objectively measured environmental attributes and AST. Future research should explore

  6. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  7. Solving Inverse Radiation Transport Problems with Multi-Sensor Data in the Presence of Correlated Measurement and Modeling Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.; Stork, Christopher L.; Mattingly, John K.

    2015-07-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is traditionally solved by finding the set of transport model parameter values that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature pre dicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. The traditional implicit (often inaccurate) assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. Here, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated using an inverse problem based on the combination of gam ma and neutron multiplicity counting measurements.

  8. A nu-space for image correlation spectroscopy: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency (ν, nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for spatio-temporal ICS (STICS) that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins (α6- and αLβ2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrin-ligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results.

  9. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  10. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties. PMID:21571541

  11. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties.

  12. Correlated signals and causal transport in ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a framework for interpreting the time-lagged correlation of oceanographic data in terms of physical transport mechanisms. Previous studies have inferred aspects of ocean circulation by correlating fluctuations in temperature and salinity measurements at distant stations. Typically, the time-lag of greatest correlation is interpreted as an advective transit time and hence the advective speed of the current. In this paper we relate correlation functions directly to the underlying equations of fluid transport. This is accomplished by expressing the correlation functions in terms of the Green's function of the transport equation. Two types of correlation functions are distinguished: field-forcing correlation and field-field correlation. Their unique relationships to the Green's function are illustrated in two idealized models of geophysical transport: a leaky pipe model and an advective-diffusive model. Both models show that the field-forcing correlation function converges to the Green's function as the characteristic (time or length) scale of forcing autocorrelation decreases. The leaky pipe model provides an explanation for why advective speeds inferred from time-lagged correlations are often less than the speed of the main current. The advective-diffusive model reveals a structural bias in the field-field correlation function when used to estimate transit times.

  13. Transport of correlations in a harmonic chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicacio, F.; Semião, F. L.

    2016-07-01

    We study the propagation of different types of correlations through a quantum bus formed by a chain of coupled harmonic oscillators. This includes steering, entanglement, mutual information, quantum discord, and Bell-like nonlocality. The whole system consists of the quantum bus (propagation medium) and other quantum harmonic oscillators (sources and receivers of quantum correlations) weakly coupled to the chain. We are particularly interested in using the point of view of transport to spot distinctive features displayed by different kinds of correlations. We found, for instance, that there are fundamental differences in the way steering and discord propagate, depending on the way they are defined with respect to the parties involved in the initial correlated state. We analyzed both the closed- and open-system dynamics as well as the role played by thermal excitations in the propagation of the correlations.

  14. Intraclass correlations of periodontal measurements.

    PubMed

    Haffajee, A D; Socransky, S S; Goodson, J M; Lindhe, J

    1985-03-01

    Components of variance and intraclass correlation coefficients were computed for changes in attachment level, pocket depth, gingival and plaque index scores for 5 groups of treated periodontal disease patients and 1 group of untreated subjects with periodontal disease. The intraclass correlation coefficients for attachment level change ranged from 0.011 to 0.165 (median 0.067), while intraclass correlation coefficients for pocket depth changes ranged from -0.009 to 0.178 (median 0.071). These intraclass correlation coefficients were much lower than those computed for changes in measurements of plaque which ranged from 0.086 to 0.568 (median 0.268) or gingival inflammation which ranged from 0.119 to 0.522 (median 0.264). Intraclass correlation coefficients at baseline for pocket depths ranged from 0.000 to 0.199 (median 0.053), for plaque accumulation from 0.121 to 0.531 (median 0.222) and for gingival inflammation from 0.229 to 0.596 (median 0.391). The differences in the intraclass correlation coefficients between pocket depth and attachment level on the one hand and plaque accumulation or gingival inflammation on the other could not be explained on the basis of differences in the measurement scale employed, since collapsing measurement scales had little effect on the intraclass correlation coefficients. The observed larger intraclass correlation coefficients for changes in plaque and gingival indices suggest a larger rôle for host contribution to these measurements. In contrast, the data suggest that the major but by no means the sole factor determining the variability of attachment level or pocket depth changes is the nature of the local factors.

  15. Electronic transport and dynamics in correlated heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, G.; Amaricci, A.; Capone, M.; Fabrizio, M.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate by means of the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation the transport properties of a strongly correlated slab subject to Hubbard repulsion and connected with to two metallic leads kept at a different electrochemical potential. We focus on the real-time evolution of the electronic properties after the slab is connected to the leads and consider both metallic and Mott insulating slabs. When the correlated slab is metallic, the system relaxes to a steady state that sustains a finite current. The zero-bias conductance is finite and independent of the degree of correlations within the slab as long as the system remains metallic. On the other hand, when the slab is in a Mott insulating state, the external bias leads to currents that are exponentially activated by charge tunneling across the Mott-Hubbard gap, consistent with the Landau-Zener dielectric breakdown scenario.

  16. Strongly correlated thermoelectric transport beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit; Le Hur, Karyn

    2013-12-01

    We investigate nonlinear thermoelectric transport through quantum impurity systems with strong on-site interactions. We show that the steady-state transport through interacting quantum impurities in contact with electron reservoirs at significantly different temperatures can be captured by an effective-equilibrium density matrix, expressed compactly in terms of the Lippmann-Schwinger operators of the system. In addition, the reservoirs can be maintained at arbitrary chemical potentials. The interplay between the temperature gradient and bias voltage gives rise to a nontrivial breaking of particle-hole symmetry in the strongly correlated regime, manifest in the Abrikosov-Suhl localized electron resonance. This purely many-body effect, which is in agreement with experimental results, is beyond the purview of mean-field arguments.

  17. Optimal measurements for nonlocal correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Sacha; Stefanov, André; Wolf, Stefan; Montina, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    A problem in quantum information theory is to find the experimental setup that maximizes the nonlocality of correlations with respect to some suitable measure such as the violation of Bell inequalities. There are however some complications with Bell inequalities. First and foremost it is unfeasible to determine the whole set of Bell inequalities already for a few measurements and thus unfeasible to find the experimental setup maximizing their violation. Second, the Bell violation suffers from an ambiguity stemming from the choice of the normalization of the Bell coefficients. An alternative measure of nonlocality with a direct information-theoretic interpretation is the minimal amount of classical communication required for simulating nonlocal correlations. In the case of many instances simulated in parallel, the minimal communication cost per instance is called nonlocal capacity, and its computation can be reduced to a convex-optimization problem. This quantity can be computed for a higher number of measurements and turns out to be useful for finding the optimal experimental setup. Focusing on the bipartite case, we present a simple method for maximizing the nonlocal capacity over a given configuration space and, in particular, over a set of possible measurements, yielding the corresponding optimal setup. Furthermore, we show that there is a functional relationship between Bell violation and nonlocal capacity. The method is illustrated with numerical tests and compared with the maximization of the violation of CGLMP-type Bell inequalities on the basis of entangled two-qubit as well as two-qutrit states. Remarkably, the anomaly of nonlocality displayed by qutrits turns out to be even stronger if the nonlocal capacity is employed as a measure of nonlocality.

  18. Transportation control measure information documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The document, sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, is intended to provide information on Transportation Control Measures (TCMs) to transportation planning and air quality planning management and staff at all government levels. The document provides descriptions and examples of the TCMs listed in Section 108(f) of the Clean Air Act. Each TCM is described in terms of its objectives, variation in the ways it may be applied, expected transportation and emissions impacts, and other important implementation and policy considerations that State, regional, and local decision-making agencies will face.

  19. Correlated electron and X ray measurements of quiet time electron precipitation - A comparative study of bremsstrahlung production and transport in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, E. E.; Imhof, W. L.; Francis, W. E.; Walt, M.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1986-12-01

    Five cases of X-ray observations from balloons, coordinated with measurements of precipitating electrons, were obtained during passes of the polar-orbiting satellite P78-1 near Siple, Antarctica, the launch point of the balloons. The observations, made during a geomagnetically quiet period in late December 1980 to early January 1981, showed small enhancements of the X-ray fluxes (E greater than 25 keV) and moderate trapped electron fluxes (E greater than 68 keV) with pitch angle distributions extending into the edge of the loss cone sufficient to produce the less than about 0.5 dB of cosmic noise absorption recorded by the Siple 30-MHz riometer. Bremsstrahlung production and transport in the atmosphere were calculated using the measured electron fluxes, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions for the source. The X-ray fluxes and spectra calculated for the balloon altitudes were in good agreement with those measured from the balloons when the total energy deposition from electrons, E greater than 10 keV, exceeded 0.002 erg/sq cm s. The observed electron fluxes show that a significant continuous electron precipitation occurs at the western edge of the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly even at times of low geomagnetic activity.

  20. Correlated electron and X ray measurements of quiet time electron precipitation: a comparative study of Bremsstrahlung production and transport in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, E.E.; Imhof, W.L.; Francis, W.E.; Walt, M.; Rosenberg, T.J.

    1986-12-01

    Five cases of X ray observations from balloons coordinated with measurements of precipitating electrons were obtained during passes of the polar-orbiting satellite P78-1 near Siple, Antarctica (L--4.1), the launch point of the balloons. The observations, made during a geomagnetically quiet period in late December 1980 to early January 1981, showed small enhancements of the X ray fluxes (E>25 keV) and moderate trapped electron fluxes (E>68 keV) with pitch angle distributions extending into the edge of the loss cone sufficient to produce the approx. <0.5 dB of cosmic noise absorption recorded by the Siple 30-MHz riometer. Bremsstrahlung production and transport in the atmosphere were calculated using the measured electron fluxes, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions for the source. The X ray fluxes and spectra calculated for the balloon altitudes were in good agreement with those measured from the balloons when the total energy deposition from electrons, E>10 keV, exceeded 2 x 10/sup -3/ erg/cm/sup 2/ s. The observed electron fluxes show that a significant continuous electron precipitation occurs at the western edge of the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly even at times of low geomagnetic activity.

  1. Eddy correlation measurements of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Berg, P.; Koopmans, D.J.; Erban, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new, non-invasive means of quantifying groundwater discharge into marine waters using an eddy correlation approach. The method takes advantage of the fact that, in virtually all aquatic environments, the dominant mode of vertical transport near the sediment-water interface is turbulent mixing. The technique thus relies on measuring simultaneously the fluctuating vertical velocity using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and the fluctuating salinity and/or temperature using rapid-response conductivity and/or temperature sensors. The measurements are typically done at a height of 5-15??cm above the sediment surface, at a frequency of 16 to 64??Hz, and for a period of 15 to 60??min. If the groundwater salinity and/or temperature differ from that of the water column, the groundwater specific discharge (cm d- 1) can be quantified from either a heat or salt balance. Groundwater discharge was estimated with this new approach in Salt Pond, a small estuary on Cape Cod (MA, USA). Estimates agreed well with previous estimates of discharge measured using seepage meters and 222Rn as a tracer. The eddy correlation technique has several desirable characteristics: 1) discharge is quantified under in-situ hydrodynamic conditions; 2) salinity and temperature can serve as two semi-independent tracers of discharge; 3) discharge can be quantified at high temporal resolution, and 4) long-term records of discharge may be possible, due to the low power requirements of the instrumentation. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlated measurement error hampers association network inference.

    PubMed

    Kaduk, Mateusz; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Vis, Daniel J; Reijmers, Theo; van der Greef, Jan; Smilde, Age K; Hendriks, Margriet M W B

    2014-09-01

    Modern chromatography-based metabolomics measurements generate large amounts of data in the form of abundances of metabolites. An increasingly popular way of representing and analyzing such data is by means of association networks. Ideally, such a network can be interpreted in terms of the underlying biology. A property of chromatography-based metabolomics data is that the measurement error structure is complex: apart from the usual (random) instrumental error there is also correlated measurement error. This is intrinsic to the way the samples are prepared and the analyses are performed and cannot be avoided. The impact of correlated measurement errors on (partial) correlation networks can be large and is not always predictable. The interplay between relative amounts of uncorrelated measurement error, correlated measurement error and biological variation defines this impact. Using chromatography-based time-resolved lipidomics data obtained from a human intervention study we show how partial correlation based association networks are influenced by correlated measurement error. We show how the effect of correlated measurement error on partial correlations is different for direct and indirect associations. For direct associations the correlated measurement error usually has no negative effect on the results, while for indirect associations, depending on the relative size of the correlated measurement error, results can become unreliable. The aim of this paper is to generate awareness of the existence of correlated measurement errors and their influence on association networks. Time series lipidomics data is used for this purpose, as it makes it possible to visually distinguish the correlated measurement error from a biological response. Underestimating the phenomenon of correlated measurement error will result in the suggestion of biologically meaningful results that in reality rest solely on complicated error structures. Using proper experimental designs that allow

  3. An easy measure of quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Zhao-Qin; Hu, Li-Yun; Xu, Xue-Xiang; Huang, Jie-Hui

    2015-11-01

    To measure the quantum correlation of a bipartite state, a test matrix is constructed through the commutations among the blocks of its density matrix, which turns out to be a zero matrix for a classical state with zero quantum correlation, and a nonzero one for a quantum state with positive quantum correlation. The Frobenius norm of the test matrix is used to measure the quantum correlation, which satisfies the basic requirements for a good measure and coincides with Wootters concurrence for two-qubit pure states. Since no optimization is involved in the definition, this measure of quantum correlation is easy to compute and even can be calculated manually.

  4. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  5. Methylone and Monoamine Transporters: Correlation with Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sogawa, Chiharu; Sogawa, Norio; Ohyama, Kazumi; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Sora, Ichiro; Kitayama, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Methylone (2-methylamino-1-[3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl]propane-1-one) is a synthetic hallucinogenic amphetamine analog, like MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy- methamphetamine), considered to act on monoaminergic systems. However, the psychopharmacological profile of its cytotoxicity as a consequence of monoaminergic deficits remains unclear. We examined here the effects of methylone on the transporters for dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET), and serotonin (SERT), using a heterologous expression system in CHO cells, in association with its cytotoxicity. Methylone inhibited the activities of DAT, NET, and SERT, but not GABA transporter-1 (GAT1), in a concentration-dependent fashion with a rank order of NET > DAT > SERT. Methylone was less effective at inhibiting DAT and NET, but more effective against SERT, than was methamphetamine. Methylone alone was not toxic to cells except at high concentrations, but in combination with methamphetamine had a synergistic effect in CHO cells expressing the monoamine transporters but not in control CHO cells or cells expressing GAT1. The ability of methylone to inhibit monoamine transporter function, probably by acting as a transportable substrate, underlies the synergistic effect of methylone and methamphetamine. PMID:21886563

  6. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  7. Postulates for measures of genuine multipartite correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2011-01-15

    A lot of research has been done on multipartite correlations, but the problem of satisfactorily defining genuine multipartite correlations--those not trivially reducible to lower partite correlations--remains unsolved. In this paper we propose three reasonable postulates which each measure or indicator of genuine multipartite correlations (or genuine multipartite entanglement) should satisfy. We also introduce the concept of degree of correlations, which gives partial characterization of multipartite correlations. Then, we show that covariance does not satisfy two postulates and hence it cannot be used as an indicator of genuine multipartite correlations. Finally, we propose a candidate for a measure of genuine multipartite correlations based on the work that can be drawn from a local heat bath by means of a multipartite state.

  8. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  9. Unified entropic measures of quantum correlations induced by local measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Bellomo, G.; Zozor, S.; Portesi, M.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce quantum correlation measures based on the minimal change in unified entropies induced by local rank-one projective measurements, divided by a factor that depends on the generalized purity of the system in the case of nonadditive entropies. In this way, we overcome the issue of the artificial increasing of the value of quantum correlation measures based on nonadditive entropies when an uncorrelated ancilla is appended to the system, without changing the computability of our entropic correlation measures with respect to the previous ones. Moreover, we recover as limiting cases the quantum correlation measures based on von Neumann and Rényi entropies (i.e., additive entropies), for which the adjustment factor becomes trivial. In addition, we distinguish between total and semiquantum correlations and obtain some inequalities between them. Finally, we obtain analytical expressions of the entropic correlation measures for typical quantum bipartite systems.

  10. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations.

    PubMed

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system. PMID:22680558

  11. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system.

  12. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-15

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  13. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  14. Street canyon aerosol pollutant transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Longley, I D; Gallagher, M W; Dorsey, J R; Flynn, M; Bower, K N; Allan, J D

    2004-12-01

    Current understanding of dispersion in street canyons is largely derived from relatively simple dispersion models. Such models are increasingly used in planning and regulation capacities but are based upon a limited understanding of the transport of substances within a real canyon. In recent years, some efforts have been made to numerically model localised flow in idealised canyons (e.g., J. Appl. Meteorol. 38 (1999) 1576-89) and stepped canyons (Assimakopoulos V. Numerical modelling of dispersion of atmospheric pollution in and above urban canopies. PhD thesis, Imperial College, London, 2001) but field studies in real canyons are rare. To further such an understanding, a measurement campaign has been conducted in an asymmetric street canyon with busy one-way traffic in central Manchester in northern England. The eddy correlation method was used to determine fluxes of size-segregated accumulation mode aerosol. Measurements of aerosol at a static location were made concurrently with measurements on a platform lift giving vertical profiles. Size-segregated measurements of ultrafine and coarse particle concentrations were also made simultaneously at various heights. In addition, a small mobile system was used to make measurements of turbulence at various pavement locations within the canyon. From this data, various features of turbulent transport and dispersion in the canyon will be presented. The concentration and the ventilation fluxes of vehicle-related aerosol pollutants from the canyon will be related to controlling factors. The results will also be compared with citywide ventilation data from a separate measurement campaign conducted above the urban canopy.

  15. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance. PMID:26465526

  16. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  17. Transport of electron beams with initial transverse-longitudinal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.; Poole, B. R.

    2013-08-01

    When an electron beam whose current varies in time is extracted from a DC gun, the competition between the time-dependent space charge force and the time-independent focusing force will cause a correlation between radius, divergence, current, and position along the beam. This correlation will determine the beam's configuration in trace space, and together with the design of the downstream transport system, will determine the quality of the transport solutions that can be obtained, including the amplitude of the mismatch oscillations occurring in each slice of the beam. Recent simulations of a simplified diode with Pierce-type focusing operating at nonrelativistic voltages indicated that the radius and divergence of beams extracted from such guns can be approximated to high accuracy as linear functions of current. Here, we consider the impact of this dependence on the beam configuration in trace space and investigate the implications for matching and transport of such correlated beams in uniform linear focusing channels.

  18. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  19. Engineering quantum correlations to enhance transport in cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Schell, Torben; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi; Wimberger, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    We show experimentally that precise phase modulation of an optical potential allows us to control quantum correlations for atomic wave packets in a way that greatly enhances momentum transport. Experimentally, this means that for the same laser power and pulse frequency, atoms are accelerated to much higher energies. We explain our results with a pseudoclassical analysis along with numerical simulations, highlighting the existence of transporting islands in phase space.

  20. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  1. Generating nonclassical correlations without fully aligning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, Joel J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Liang, Yeong-Cherng

    2011-02-15

    We investigate the scenario where spatially separated parties perform measurements in randomly chosen bases on an N-partite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. We show that without any alignment of the measurements, the observers will obtain correlations that violate a Bell inequality with a probability that rapidly approaches 1 as N increases and that this probability is robust against noise. We also prove that restricting these randomly chosen measurements to a plane perpendicular to a common direction will always generate correlations that violate some Bell inequality. Specifically, if each observer chooses their two measurements to be locally orthogonal, then the N observers will violate one of two Bell inequalities by an amount that increases exponentially with N. These results are also robust against noise and perturbations of each observer's reference direction from the common direction.

  2. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  3. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  4. Neutrino mass measurement from correlation dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuelei

    2015-08-01

    The large scale structure measurement can be used as a precision probe for neutrinos. It is well known that the power spectrum is suppressed at relatively small scales by the free-streaming of neutrinos, and this is used to measure the neutrino mass. However, this method is prone to scale-dependent galaxy bias, which can lead to significant system error in the measurement. We proposed a new method to measure the neutrino mass which is free of this problem. Due to their smaller masses, the neutrinos can develop large relative velocities with respect to the dark matter, the neutrino distribution can then affect the structure formation process. Although the effect is very small, it may generate significant dipole in the galaxy cross-correlation function or the galaxy lensing. The neutrino mass may by determined by such observations. We present the feasibility for such measurement.

  5. Transportability of Deductive Measurement across Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Donald E., Jr.; Colberg, Magda

    1983-01-01

    A theory and test of cross-cultural transportability of measurement were constructed on a logico-mathematical basis regarding the deductive measures and on a basis of syntactic reduction and Latin-based vocabulary regarding the linguistic measuring medium. A pilot study was administered in Spain, France, and the United States. (Author/PN)

  6. Aerosol pattern correlation techniques of wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of lidar image correlation techniques of remote wind measurement. It also examines the potential use of satellite borne lidar global wind measurements using this approach. Lidar systems can easily detect spatial variations in the volume scattering cross section of naturally occurring aerosols. Lidar derived RHI, PPI and range-time displays of aerosol backscatter have been extensively employed in the study of atmospheric structure. Descriptions of this type of data can be obtained in many references including Kunkel et al. (1977), Kunkel et al. (1980), Boers et al. (1984), Uthe et al. (1980), Melfi et al. (1985) and Browell et al. (1983). It is likely that the first space-borne lidars for atmospheric studies will observe aerosol backscatter to measure parameters such as boundary layer depth and cloud height. This paper examines the potential application of these relatively simple aerosol backscatter lidars to global wind measurements.

  7. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  8. The importance of transport parameter cross correlations in natural systems radioactive transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W

    2011-01-03

    Transport parameter cross correlations are rarely considered in models used to predict radionuclide transport in natural systems. In this paper, it is shown that parameter cross correlations could have a significant impact on radionuclide transport predictions in saturated media. In fractured rock, the positive correlation between fracture apertures and groundwater residence times is shown to result in significantly less retardation due to matrix diffusion than is predicted without the correlation. The suppression of matrix diffusion is further amplified by a tendency toward larger apertures, smaller matrix diffusion coefficients, and less sorption capacity in rocks of lower matrix porosity. In a hypothetical example, strong cross correlations between these parameters result in a decrease in predicted radionuclide travel times of an order of magnitude or more relative to travel times calculated with uncorrelated parameters. In porous media, expected correlations between permeability, porosity, and sorption capacity also result in shorter predicted travel times than when the parameters are assumed to be uncorrelated. Individual parameter standard deviations can also have a significant influence on predicted radionuclide travel times, particularly when cross correlations are considered.

  9. Cosmological measurements with general relativistic galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Montanari, Francesco; Bertacca, Daniele; Doré, Olivier; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the cosmological dependence and the constraining power of large-scale galaxy correlations, including all redshift-distortions, wide-angle, lensing and gravitational potential effects on linear scales. We analyze the cosmological information present in the lensing convergence and in the gravitational potential terms describing the so-called ``relativistic effects'', and we find that, while smaller than the information contained in intrinsic galaxy clustering, it is not negligible. We investigate how neglecting them does bias cosmological measurements performed by future spectroscopic and photometric large-scale surveys such as SKA and Euclid. We perform a Fisher analysis using the CLASS code, modified to include scale-dependent galaxy bias and redshift-dependent magnification and evolution bias. Our results show that neglecting relativistic terms, especially lensing convergence, introduces an error in the forecasted precision in measuring cosmological parameters of the order of a few tens of percent, in particular when measuring the matter content of the Universe and primordial non-Gaussianity parameters. The analysis suggests a possible substantial systematic error in cosmological parameter constraints. Therefore, we argue that radial correlations and integrated relativistic terms need to be taken into account when forecasting the constraining power of future large-scale number counts of galaxy surveys.

  10. Gene-Family Extension Measures and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Gon; Bolshoy, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The existence of multiple copies of genes is a well-known phenomenon. A gene family is a set of sufficiently similar genes, formed by gene duplication. In earlier works conducted on a limited number of completely sequenced and annotated genomes it was found that size of gene family and size of genome are positively correlated. Additionally, it was found that several atypical microbes deviated from the observed general trend. In this study, we reexamined these associations on a larger dataset consisting of 1484 prokaryotic genomes and using several ranking approaches. We applied ranking methods in such a way that genomes with lower numbers of gene copies would have lower rank. Until now only simple ranking methods were used; we applied the Kemeny optimal aggregation approach as well. Regression and correlation analysis were utilized in order to accurately quantify and characterize the relationships between measures of paralog indices and genome size. In addition, boxplot analysis was employed as a method for outlier detection. We found that, in general, all paralog indexes positively correlate with an increase of genome size. As expected, different groups of atypical prokaryotic genomes were found for different types of paralog quantities. Mycoplasmataceae and Halobacteria appeared to be among the most interesting candidates for further research of evolution through gene duplication. PMID:27527218

  11. Measurements of classical transport of fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Leneman, D.; Vincena, S.

    2005-05-15

    To study the fast-ion transport in a well controlled background plasma, a 3-cm diameter rf ion gun launches a pulsed, {approx}300 eV ribbon shaped argon ion beam parallel to or at 15 deg. to the magnetic field in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at UCLA. The parallel energy of the beam is measured by a two-grid energy analyzer at two axial locations (z=0.32 m and z=6.4 m) from the ion gun in LAPD. The calculated ion beam slowing-down time is consistent to within 10% with the prediction of classical Coulomb collision theory using the LAPD plasma parameters measured by a Langmuir probe. To measure cross-field transport, the beam is launched at 15 deg. to the magnetic field. The beam then is focused periodically by the magnetic field to avoid geometrical spreading. The radial beam profile measurements are performed at different axial locations where the ion beam is periodically focused. The measured cross-field transport is in agreement to within 15% with the analytical classical collision theory and the solution to the Fokker-Planck kinetic equation. Collisions with neutrals have a negligible effect on the beam transport measurement but do attenuate the beam current.

  12. Thermoelectric transport in strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Ronggui

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the thermoelectric transport properties (electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, power factor, and thermoelectric figure of merit) in strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites at low temperature (77 K) by using the dynamical mean-field theory and the Kubo formula. The periodic Anderson model is applied to describe the strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites with tunable parameters such as the size of quantum dots and the electron occupation number. The electron occupation number can be controlled by the doping concentration in the both matrix and quantum dots, the size of quantum dots, and the interdot spacing. These parameters control the transition between n -type like behavior (with negative Seebeck coefficient) and p -type like behavior (with positive Seebeck coefficient) of strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites. Large Seebeck coefficient up to 260μV/K due to the asymmetry of the electron bands with sharp electron density of states can be obtained in the strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites, along with moderate electrical conductivity values in the order of 105/Ωm . This results in optimal power factor about 78μW/cmK2 and optimal figure of merit (ZT) over 0.55 which is much larger than the value of the state-of-the-art low-temperature thermoelectric materials. This study shows that high efficiency thermoelectric materials at low temperature can be obtained in strongly correlated quantum dot nanocomposites.

  13. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  14. Microscopic theory on charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Current vertex correction (CVC), the backflowlike correction to the current, comes from conservation laws, and the CVC due to electron correlation contains information about many-body effects. However, it has been little understood how the CVC due to electron correlation affects the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. To improve this situation, I studied the in-plane resistivity ρa b and the Hall coefficient in the weak-field limit RH, in addition to the magnetic properties and the electronic structure, for a t2 g-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice in a paramagnetic state away from or near an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum-critical point (QCP) in the fluctuation-exchange (FLEX) approximation with the CVCs arising from the self-energy (Σ ), the Maki-Thompson (MT) irreducible four-point vertex function, and the main terms of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) one. Then, I found three main results about the CVCs. First, the main terms of the AL CVC do not qualitatively change the results obtained in the FLEX approximation with the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Second, ρa b and RH near the AF QCP have a high-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC, and a low-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Third, in case away from the AF QCP, the MT CVC leads to a considerable effect on only RH at low temperatures, although RH at high temperatures and ρa b at all temperatures considered are sufficiently described by including only the Σ CVC. Those findings reveal several aspects of many-body effects on the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. I also achieved the qualitative agreement with several experiments of Sr2RuO4 or Sr2Ru0.975Ti0.025O4 . Moreover, I showed several better points of this theory than other theories.

  15. Are the correlates of active school transport context-specific?

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous research consistently indicates that children who engage in active school transport (AST) are more active than their peers who use motorized modes (car or bus). However, studies of the correlates of AST have been conducted predominantly in high-income countries and have yielded mixed findings. Using data from a heterogeneous sample of 12 country sites across the world, we investigated the correlates of AST in 9–11-year olds. METHODS: The analytical sample comprised 6555 children (53.8% girls), who reported their main travel mode to school and the duration of their school trip. Potential individual and neighborhood correlates of AST were assessed with a parent questionnaire adapted from previously validated instruments. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the associations between individual and neighborhood variables and the odds of engaging in AST while controlling for the child's school. Site moderated the relationship of seven of these variables with AST; therefore we present analyses stratified by site. RESULTS: The prevalence of AST varied from 5.2 to 79.4% across sites and the school-level intra-class correlation ranged from 0.00 to 0.56. For each site, the final GLMM included a different set of correlates of AST. Longer trip duration (that is, ⩾16 min versus ⩽15 min) was associated with lower odds of AST in eight sites. Other individual and neighborhood factors were associated with AST in three sites or less. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate wide variability in the prevalence and correlates of AST in a large sample of children from twelve geographically, economically and culturally diverse country sites. This suggests that AST interventions should not adopt a ‘one size fits all' approach. Future research should also explore the association between psychosocial factors and AST in different countries. PMID:27152191

  16. Spatial correlations in bed load transport: Evidence, importance, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, J.; Ma, H. B.; Mettra, F.; Ancey, C.

    2014-08-01

    This article examines the spatial dynamics of bed load particles in water. We focus particularly on the fluctuations of particle activity, which is defined as the number of moving particles per unit bed length. Based on a stochastic model recently proposed by Ancey and Heyman (2014), we derive the second moment of particle activity analytically, that is, the spatial correlation functions of particle activity. From these expressions, we show that large moving particle clusters can develop spatially. Also, we provide evidence that fluctuations of particle activity are scale dependent. Two characteristic lengths emerge from the model: a saturation length ℓsat describing the length needed for a perturbation in particle activity to relax to the homogeneous solution and a correlation length ℓc describing the typical size of moving particle clusters. A dimensionless Péclet number can also be defined according to the transport model. Three different experimental data sets are used to test the theoretical results. We show that the stochastic model describes spatial patterns of particle activity well at all scales. In particular, we show that ℓc and ℓsat may be relatively large compared to typical scales encountered in bed load experiments (grain diameter, water depth, bed form wavelength, flume length, etc.) suggesting that the spatial fluctuations of particle activity have a nonnegligible impact on the average transport process.

  17. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-01

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer. PMID:25310861

  18. Correlation and symmetry effects in transport through an artificial molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, F.; Cota, E.; Ulloa, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    Spectral weights and current-voltage characteristics of an artificial diatomic molecule are calculated, considering cases where the dots connected in series are in general different. The spectral weights allow us to understand the effects of correlations, their connection with selection rules for transport, and the role of excited states in the experimental conductance spectra of these coupled double dot systems (DDS). An extended Hubbard Hamiltonian with varying interdot tunneling strength is used as a model, incorporating quantum confinement in the DDS, interdot tunneling as well as intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions. We find that interdot tunneling values determine to a great extent the resulting eigenstates and corresponding spectral weights. Details of the state correlations strongly suppress most of the possible conduction channels, giving rise to effective selection rules for conductance through the molecule. Most states are found to make insignificant contributions to the total current for finite biases. We find also that the symmetry of the structure is reflected in the I-V characteristics, and is in qualitative agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Correlations between outcomes of random measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Minh Cong; Dakić, Borivoje; Laskowski, Wiesław; Paterek, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    We recently showed that multipartite correlations between outcomes of random observables detect quantum entanglement in all pure and some mixed states. In this followup article we further develop this approach, derive a maximal amount of such correlations, and show that they are not monotonous under local operations and classical communication. Nevertheless, we demonstrate their usefulness in entanglement detection with a single random observable per party. Finally we study convex-roof extension of the correlations and provide a closed-form necessary and sufficient condition for entanglement in rank-2 mixed states and a witness in general.

  20. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport--generalized correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  1. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport--generalized correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  2. Strongly correlated quantum transport out-of-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit

    The revolutionary advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have facilitated the precise control and manipulation of mesoscopic systems where quantum effects are pronounced. Quantum devices with tunable gates have made it possible to access regimes far beyond the purview of linear response theory. In particular, the influence of strong voltage and thermal biases has led to the observation of novel phenomena where the non-equilibrium characteristics of the system are of paramount importance. We study transport through quantum-impurity systems in the regime of strong correlations and determine the effects of large temperature and potential gradients on its many-body physics. In Part I of this thesis we focus on the steady-state dynamics of the system, a commonly encountered experimental scenario. For a system consisting of several leads composed of non-interacting electrons, each individually coupled to a quantum impurity with interactions and maintained at different chemical potentials, we reformulate the system in terms of an effective-equilibrium density matrix. This density matrix has a simple Boltzmann-like form in terms of the system's Lippmann-Schwinger (scattering) operators. We elaborate the conditions for this description to be valid based on the microscopic Hamiltonian of the system. We then prove the equivalence of physical observables computed using this formulation with corresponding expressions in the Schwinger-Keldysh approach and provide a dictionary between Green's functions in either scheme. An imaginary-time functional integral framework to compute finite temperature Green's functions is proposed and used to develop a novel perturbative expansion in the interaction strength which is exact in all other system parameters. We use these tools to study the fate of the Abrikosov-Suhl regime on the Kondo-correlated quantum dot due to the effects of bias and external magnetic fields. Next, we expand the domain of this formalism to additionally

  3. Correlative studies of satellite ozone sensor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovill, J. E.; Ellis, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons are made between total ozone measurements made by four satellite ozone sensors (TOMS, SBUV, TOVS and MFR). The comparisons were made during July 1979 when all sensors were operating simultaneously. The TOMS and SBUV sensors were observed to measure less total ozone than the MFR sensor, 10 and 15 Dobson units (DU) respectively. The MFR and TOMS sensors measured less ozone than the TOVS sensor, 19 and 28 DU, respectively. Latitudinal variability of the total ozone comparisons is discussed.

  4. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  5. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation control measures. 51.213... Transportation control measures. (a) The plan must contain procedures for obtaining and maintaining data on actual emissions reductions achieved as a result of implementing transportation control measures. (b)...

  6. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation control measures. 51.213... Transportation control measures. (a) The plan must contain procedures for obtaining and maintaining data on actual emissions reductions achieved as a result of implementing transportation control measures. (b)...

  7. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation control measures. 51.213... Transportation control measures. (a) The plan must contain procedures for obtaining and maintaining data on actual emissions reductions achieved as a result of implementing transportation control measures. (b)...

  8. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation control measures. 51.213... Transportation control measures. (a) The plan must contain procedures for obtaining and maintaining data on actual emissions reductions achieved as a result of implementing transportation control measures. (b)...

  9. Filtering with perfectly correlated measurement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of (radar) Doppler data which are formed by mi1ing the returning microwave signal with a replica of the transmitted signal, counting the cycles of the beat, and sampling the counter at evenly spaced intervals t sub i. It is shown that the amount of information which can be extracted from a set of data may be larger if the associated noise is perfectly correlated than if it is white, and that the use of the white noise assumption in the filter may result in the loss of some of this information.

  10. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  11. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  12. Nanoscale Electron Transport Measurements of Immobilized Cytochrome P450 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bostick, Christopher D.; Flora, Darcy R.; Gannett, Peter M.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Lederman, David

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanopillars, functionalized with an organic self-assembled monolayer, can be used to measure the electrical conductance properties of immobilized proteins without aggregation. Measurements of the conductance of nanopillars with cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) proteins using conducting probe atomic force microscopy demonstrate that a correlation exists between the energy barrier height between hopping sites and CYP2C9 metabolic activity. Measurements performed as a function of tip force indicate that, when subjected to a large force, the protein is more stable in the presence of a substrate. This agrees with the hypothesis that substrate entry into the active site helps to stabilize the enzyme. The relative distance between hopping sites also increases with increasing force, possibly because protein functional groups responsible for electron transport depend on the structure of the protein. The inhibitor sulfaphenazole, in addition to the previously studied aniline, increased the barrier height for electron transfer and thereby makes CYP2C9 reduction more difficult and inhibits metabolism. This suggests that P450 Type II binders may decrease the ease of electron transport processes in the enzyme, in addition to occupying the active site. PMID:25804257

  13. Measurement of hydrocarbon transport in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic, volatility, and relatively low aqueous solubility of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, transport of these chemicals by bacteria has not been extensively studied. These issues make transport assays difficult to carry out, and as a result, strong evidence for the active tran...

  14. Measurement of Hydrocarbon Transport in Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrocarbon uptake by bacteria has not been extensively studied, and strong evidence for active transport of hydrocarbons is lacking. The volatile nature of hydrocarbons, their hydrophobicity, and their relatively low aqueous solubilities can complicate transport assays. Here we present a detailed...

  15. TRANSPORT PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF HFC-236EA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of transport properties of 1,1,1,2,3,3,-hexafluoropropane (HFC-236ea), with liquid viscosity and thermal conductivity being the two main transport properties of interest. In addition, the specific heat and density of refrigerant/lubrican...

  16. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  17. Fissile mass-multiplication factor correlation for Pu measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.; De Ridder, P.; Verrecchia, G.P.D.; Chare, P.; Vocino, V.

    1993-06-01

    An empirical correlation between the fissile mass and the leakage multiplication factor, as determined by High Level Neutron Coincidence (HLNC) counting, was developed based on available measurement data. This correlation has been used successfully for the simulation of HLNC counting. With the singles count rate (totals), the correlation can be used to obtain a quick estimate of the plutonium mass of the sample in less time than required to measure the real coincidence count rate. The correlation can also be used to evaluate samples contaminated with ({alpha},n) sources such as fluorine.

  18. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement.

    PubMed

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    A compact multifunctional optical correlator system for pulse width measurement of ultrashort ultraviolet (UV) pulses has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. Both autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions are measured using a single nonlinear crystal, and the switching between two measurements requires no adjustment of phase matching and detector. The system can measure UV pulse widths from sub-picoseconds to 100 ps, and it involves no auxiliary pulse in the measurement. The measurement results on a burst-mode picosecond UV laser show a high-quality performance on speed, accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range. The proposed correlator can be applied to measure any ultrashort UV pulses produced through sum-frequency generation or second-harmonic generation. PMID:25402928

  19. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parametermore » dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  1. Diffusion, transport, and cell membrane organization investigated by imaging fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Jagadish; Manna, Manoj; Guo, Lin; Kraut, Rachel; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Cell membrane organization is dynamic and is assumed to have different characteristic length scales. These length scales, which are influenced by lipid and protein composition as well as by the cytoskeleton, can range from below the optical resolution limit (as with rafts or microdomains) to far above the resolution limit (as with capping phenomena or the formation of lipid "platforms"). The measurement of these membrane features poses a significant problem because membrane dynamics are on the millisecond timescale and are thus beyond the time resolution of conventional imaging approaches. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a widely used spectroscopic technique to measure membrane dynamics, has the required time resolution but lacks imaging capabilities. A promising solution is the recently introduced method known as imaging total internal reflection (ITIR)-FCS, which can probe diffusion phenomena in lipid membranes with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this work, we extend ITIR-FCS to perform ITIR fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCCS) between pixel areas of arbitrary shape and derive a generalized expression that is applicable to active transport and diffusion. ITIR-FCCS is applied to model systems exhibiting diffusion, active transport, or a combination of the two. To demonstrate its applicability to live cells, we observe the diffusion of a marker, the sphingolipid-binding domain (SBD) derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, on live neuroblastoma cells. We investigate the organization and dynamics of SBD-bound lipid microdomains under the conditions of cholesterol removal and cytoskeleton disruption. PMID:19883607

  2. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K. G. L.; Andersen, B. M.; Soerensen, A. S.; Bruun, G. M.; Syljuaasen, O. F.

    2011-10-15

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites. For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate for the doped repulsive Hubbard model.

  3. Visual Decisions in the Presence of Measurement and Stimulus Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Manisha; Carroll, Samuel; Ma, Wei Ji; Josić, Krešimir

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other animals base their decisions on noisy sensory input. Much work has been devoted to understanding the computations that underlie such decisions. The problem has been studied in a variety of tasks and with stimuli of differing complexity. However, how the statistical structure of stimuli, along with perceptual measurement noise, affects perceptual judgments is not well understood. Here we examine how correlations between the components of a stimulus—stimulus correlations—together with correlations in sensory noise, affect decision making. As an example, we consider the task of detecting the presence of a single or multiple targets among distractors. We assume that both the distractors and the observer’s measurements of the stimuli are correlated. The computations of an optimal observer in this task are nontrivial yet can be analyzed and understood intuitively. We find that when distractors are strongly correlated, measurement correlations can have a strong impact on performance. When distractor correlations are weak, measurement correlations have little impact unless the number of stimuli is large. Correlations in neural responses to structured stimuli can therefore have a strong impact on perceptual judgments. PMID:26378875

  4. Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam; Mishra, Utkarsh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar

    2014-11-15

    Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources. - Highlights: • Extension of weak measurement reversal scheme to protect multiparty quantum correlations. • Protection of multiparty quantum correlation under local amplitude damping noise. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum teleportation in one sender and many receivers setting. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum information splitting protocol.

  5. Apparatus for Measurements of Time and Space Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favre, Alexandre; Gaviglio, J; Dumas, R

    1955-01-01

    A brief review is made of improvements to an experimental apparatus for time and space correlation designed for study of turbulence. Included is a description of the control of the measurements and a few particular applications.

  6. Scalings of field correlations and heat transport in turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K; Pandey, Ambrish; Paul, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection under free-slip boundary condition, we show that the normalized correlation function between the vertical velocity field and the temperature field, as well as the normalized viscous dissipation rate, scales as Ra-0.22 for moderately large Rayleigh number Ra. This scaling accounts for the Nusselt number Nu exponent of approximately 0.3, as observed in experiments. Numerical simulations also reveal that the aforementioned normalized correlation functions are constants for the convection simulation under periodic boundary conditions.

  7. Atmospheric correlation time measurements using coherent CO2 lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed TEA-CO2 lidar with coherent detection was used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter return signal is important in studies of atmospheric turbulence and its effects on optical propagation and backscatter. If the temporal coherence of the pulse is large enough, then the temporal coherence of the return signal is dominated by the turbulence and shear for a variety of interesting atmospheric conditions. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed and evaluated.

  8. Correlating Atomic Structure and Transport in Suspended Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising candidates for next generation integrated circuit (IC) components; this fact motivates exploration of the relationship between crystallographic structure and transport of graphene patterned at IC-relevant length scales (<10 nm). We report on the controlled fabrication of pristine, freestanding GNRs with widths as small as 0.7 nm, paired with simultaneous lattice-resolution imaging and electrical transport characterization, all conducted within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Few-layer GNRs very frequently formed bonded-bilayers and were remarkably robust, sustaining currents in excess of 1.5 μA per carbon bond across a 5 atom-wide ribbon. We found that the intrinsic conductance of a sub-10 nm bonded bilayer GNR scaled with width as GBL(w) ≈ 3/4(e2/h)w, where w is the width in nanometers, while a monolayer GNR was roughly five times less conductive. Nanosculpted, crystalline monolayer GNRs exhibited armchair-terminated edges after current annealing, presenting a pathway for the controlled fabrication of semiconducting GNRs with known edge geometry. Finally, we report on simulations of quantum transport in GNRs that are in qualitative agreement with the observations. PMID:24954396

  9. Correlating atomic structure and transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Botello-Méndez, Andrés R; Hong, Sung Ju; Stach, Eric A; Park, Yung Woo; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Drndić, Marija; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2014-08-13

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising candidates for next generation integrated circuit (IC) components; this fact motivates exploration of the relationship between crystallographic structure and transport of graphene patterned at IC-relevant length scales (<10 nm). We report on the controlled fabrication of pristine, freestanding GNRs with widths as small as 0.7 nm, paired with simultaneous lattice-resolution imaging and electrical transport characterization, all conducted within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Few-layer GNRs very frequently formed bonded-bilayers and were remarkably robust, sustaining currents in excess of 1.5 μA per carbon bond across a 5 atom-wide ribbon. We found that the intrinsic conductance of a sub-10 nm bonded bilayer GNR scaled with width as GBL(w) ≈ 3/4(e(2)/h)w, where w is the width in nanometers, while a monolayer GNR was roughly five times less conductive. Nanosculpted, crystalline monolayer GNRs exhibited armchair-terminated edges after current annealing, presenting a pathway for the controlled fabrication of semiconducting GNRs with known edge geometry. Finally, we report on simulations of quantum transport in GNRs that are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  10. Charge transport in organic crystals: critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy "bonding"-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the "missing link" for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals.

  11. Charge transport in organic crystals: Critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy “bonding”-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the “missing link” for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals.

  12. Charge transport in organic crystals: critical role of correlated fluctuations unveiled by analysis of Feynman diagrams.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Oniwa, Kazuaki; Jin, Tienan; Asao, Naoki

    2015-04-14

    Organic crystals have unique charge transport properties that lie somewhere between delocalised band-type transport and localised hopping transport. In this paper, we use a stochastic tight-binding model to explore how dynamical disorder in organic crystals affects charge transport. By analysing the model in terms of Feynman diagrams (virtual processes), we expose the crucial role of correlated dynamical disorder to the charge transport dynamics in the model at short times in the order of a few hundred femtoseconds. Under correlated dynamical disorder, the random motions of molecules in the crystal allow for low-energy "bonding"-type interactions between neighboring molecular orbitals can persist over long periods of time. On the other hand, the dependence of charge transport on correlated dynamical disorder also tends to localize the charge, as correlated disorder cannot persist far in space. This concept of correlation may be the "missing link" for describing the intermediate regime between band transport and hopping transport that occurs in organic crystals. PMID:25877586

  13. Computable measure of total quantum correlations of multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behdani, Javad; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Quantum discord as a measure of the quantum correlations cannot be easily computed for most of density operators. In this paper, we present a measure of the total quantum correlations that is operationally simple and can be computed effectively for an arbitrary mixed state of a multipartite system. The measure is based on the coherence vector of the party whose quantumness is investigated as well as the correlation matrix of this part with the remainder of the system. Being able to detect the quantumness of multipartite systems, such as detecting the quantum critical points in spin chains, alongside with the computability characteristic of the measure, makes it a useful indicator to be exploited in the cases which are out of the scope of the other known measures.

  14. Quantum Correlations Are Stronger Than All Nonsignaling Correlations Produced by n -Outcome Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmann, Matthias; Cabello, Adán

    2016-10-01

    We show that, for any n , there are m -outcome quantum correlations, with m >n , which are stronger than any nonsignaling correlation produced from selecting among n -outcome measurements. As a consequence, for any n , there are m -outcome quantum measurements that cannot be constructed by selecting locally from the set of n -outcome measurements. This is a property of the set of measurements in quantum theory that is not mandatory for general probabilistic theories. We also show that this prediction can be tested through high-precision Bell-type experiments and identify past experiments providing evidence that some of these strong correlations exist in nature. Finally, we provide a modified version of quantum theory restricted to having at most n -outcome quantum measurements.

  15. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlated with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Fowler, J.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.L.; Telang, F.; Wang, Chang, L.; Ernst, T.; /Fowler, J.S.

    2009-06-01

    Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [{sup 11}C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer) and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7) and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32). With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness) and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference). These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT) in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  16. Transport through a correlated interface: Auxiliary master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titvinidze, Irakli; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    We present improvements of a recently introduced numerical method [E. Arrigoni et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 086403 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.086403] to compute steady-state properties of strongly correlated electronic systems out of equilibrium. The method can be considered as a nonequilibrium generalization of exact diagonalization based dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). The key modification for the nonequilibrium situation consists in addressing the DMFT impurity problem within an auxiliary system consisting of the correlated impurity, Nb uncorrelated bath sites, and two Markovian environments (sink and reservoir). Algorithmic improvements in the impurity solver allow to treat efficiently larger values of Nb than previously in DMFT. This increases the accuracy of the results and is crucial for a correct description of the physical behavior of the system in the relevant parameter range including a semiquantitative description of the Kondo regime. To illustrate the approach, we consider a monoatomic layer of correlated orbitals, described by the single-band Hubbard model, attached to two metallic leads. The nonequilibrium situation is driven by a bias voltage applied to the leads. For this system, we investigate the spectral function and the steady-state current-voltage characteristics in the weakly as well as in the strongly interacting limit. In particular, we investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of quasiparticle excitations within the Mott gap of the correlated layer. We find for low-bias voltage Kondo-type behavior in the vicinity of the insulating phase. In particular, we observe a splitting of the Kondo resonance as a function of the bias voltage.

  17. Overview of mitigation policies and measures in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the author looks at the general question of what can be done in the transportation sector to address the problem of greenhouse gas emissions. Obviously, fewer vehicles is less emission. But on a global scale he reviews the population growth in major cities, the type of transport employed, the correlation of vehicle ownership and gross national product, as well as the costs, direct and indirect of letting more personal wealth drive one to personal vehicles as a way to transport oneself to work. The increased speed comes with many costs for the individual and for society. The development of mass transportation systems provides a number of benefits, in the form of urban development, less reliance on imported fuels, transport system health, general health and productivity of work force, and reduced costs to government to support transportation systems.

  18. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  19. The Measurement and Correlates of Career Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harren, Vincent A.; Kass, Richard A.

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding career decision making (CDM); introduces an instrument, Assessment of Career Decision Making (ACDM) to measure CDM with college students; and presents correlational data on sex role and cognitive style factors hypothesized to influence CDM. The ACDM, designed to measure the Tiedeman and…

  20. Internalized Heterosexism: Measurement, Psychosocial Correlates, and Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Dawn M.; Kashubeck-West, Susan; Meyer, Jill

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an integrated critical review of the literature on internalized heterosexism/internalized homophobia (IH), its measurement, and its psychosocial correlates. It describes the psychometric properties of six published measures used to operationalize the construct of IH. It also critically reviews empirical studies on correlates…

  1. Statistical measures of Planck scale signal correlations in interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.; Kwon, Ohkyung

    2015-06-22

    A model-independent statistical framework is presented to interpret data from systems where the mean time derivative of positional cross correlation between world lines, a measure of spreading in a quantum geometrical wave function, is measured with a precision smaller than the Planck time. The framework provides a general way to constrain possible departures from perfect independence of classical world lines, associated with Planck scale bounds on positional information. A parametrized candidate set of possible correlation functions is shown to be consistent with the known causal structure of the classical geometry measured by an apparatus, and the holographic scaling of information suggested by gravity. Frequency-domain power spectra are derived that can be compared with interferometer data. As a result, simple projections of sensitivity for specific experimental set-ups suggests that measurements will directly yield constraints on a universal time derivative of the correlation function, and thereby confirm or rule out a class of Planck scale departures from classical geometry.

  2. Appropriate burnup measurements for transportation burnup credit

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses two of the measurement specifications used in analyzing spent fuel packages to gain burnup credit. The philosophy and calculation of rejection criteria and measurement accuracy are discussed. Any assembly for which the declared measured value and reactor record value deviate by more than 10% will be rejected. Measurement accuracy requirements are established for dependent and independent systems. The requirements have been tested and are achievable, ensuring safe operation without extra cost. 6 refs.

  3. Analysis of applicability of the transport level concept in organic materials, providing correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Nikitenko, V. R.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of charge transport in disordered organic materials are actively developing area of science today. We investigated hopping carrier transport in disordered organic materials according to the model of correlated disorder (namely, the model of dipole glass). Numerical Monte-Carlo simulation of a random walk of charge after it's jump from deep localized state was performed. The applicability of transport level concept was held.

  4. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene: correlation between sulfate transport activity and chondrodysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Karniski, L P

    2001-07-01

    The diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene encodes a transmembrane protein that transports sulfate into chondrocytes to maintain adequate sulfation of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene are responsible for four recessively inherited chondrodysplasias that include diastrophic dysplasia, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). To determine whether the DTDST mutations found in individuals with these chondrodysplasias differ functionally from each other, we compared the sulfate transport activity of 11 reported DTDST mutations. Five mutations, G255E, Delta a1751, L483P, R178X and N425D, had minimal sulfate transport function following expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two mutations, Delta V340 and R279W, transported sulfate at rates of 17 and 32%, respectively, of wild-type DTDST. Four mutations, A715V, C653S, Q454P and G678V, had rates of sulfate transport nearly equal to that of wild-type DTDST. Transport kinetics were not different among the four mutations with near-normal sulfate transport function and wild-type DTDST. When the sulfate transport function of the different DTDST mutations are grouped according to the general phenotypes, individuals with the most severe form, ACG-1B, tend to be homozygous for null mutations, individuals with the moderately severe atelosteogenesis type 2 have at least one allele with a loss-of-function mutation, and individuals with the mildest forms are typically homozygous for mutations with residual sulfate transport function. However, in the X.laevis oocyte expression system, the correlation between residual transport function and the severity of phenotype was not absolute, suggesting that factors in addition to the intrinsic sulfate transport properties of the DTDST protein may influence the phenotype in individuals with DTDST mutations. PMID:11448940

  5. First Measurements of Pion Correlations by the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S C

    2001-04-11

    First identical-pion correlations measured at RHIC energies by PHENIX are presented. Two analyses with separate detectors, systematics, and statistics provide consistent results. The resulting HBT radii are moderately larger than those measured at lower energies. The k{sub t} dependence of the Bertsch-Pratt HBT radii is also similar to previous measures and is consistent with the conjecture of an expanding source.

  6. The role of clustering effects in interpreting nondiffusive transport measurements in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Dendy, R. O.; Hopcraft, K. I.; Jakeman, E.

    2002-05-01

    Recent measurements in tokamak plasmas provide clear evidence for rapid nondiffusive transport and non-Gaussian fluctuations, and have been widely interpreted in terms of the sandpile and self-organized criticality (SOC) paradigms. Many of the statistical physics inferences that can be drawn from observations of, for example, avalanching transport remain to be explored. This paper will show that the statistical characterization of both experimentally observed and simulated avalanching transport phenomena reveals several points of contact with existing stochastic process models that have seldom been deployed in a plasma physics context. It will be shown that statistical physics techniques developed to model clustering of events can be used to characterize microscopic fluctuations in both local density and flux, as well as the global transport properties to which they give rise. This provides a fresh interpretation for some of the key aspects of observed critical gradient-driven transport phenomenology in tokamaks. In particular it provides new evidence for scale-free correlations in the fluctuations which drive the transport, and quantifies their distribution in terms of few-parameter non-Gaussian models. The correlation properties of density fluctuations can be interpreted in terms of random walk models, whereas flux fluctuations cannot: instead they can be described by the discrete negative binomial distribution, which again indicates clustering. Some of the spatio-temporal correlations considered emulate multichannel measurements in tokamaks, and it is shown how these can be used to characterize the transport of naturally arising coherent structures.

  7. Analyzing complex networks through correlations in centrality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan Ronqui, José Ricardo; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Many real world systems can be expressed as complex networks of interconnected nodes. It is frequently important to be able to quantify the relative importance of the various nodes in the network, a task accomplished by defining some centrality measures, with different centrality definitions stressing different aspects of the network. It is interesting to know to what extent these different centrality definitions are related for different networks. In this work, we study the correlation between pairs of a set of centrality measures for different real world networks and two network models. We show that the centralities are in general correlated, but with stronger correlations for network models than for real networks. We also show that the strength of the correlation of each pair of centralities varies from network to network. Taking this fact into account, we propose the use of a centrality correlation profile, consisting of the values of the correlation coefficients between all pairs of centralities of interest, as a way to characterize networks. Using the yeast protein interaction network as an example we show also that the centrality correlation profile can be used to assess the adequacy of a network model as a representation of a given real network.

  8. Transport phenomena in correlated quantum liquids: Ultracold Fermi gases and F/N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua

    Landau Fermi-liquid theory was first introduced by L. D. Landau in the effort of understanding the normal state of Fermi systems, where the application of the concept of elementary excitations to the Fermi systems has proved very fruitful in clarifying the physics of strongly correlated quantum systems at low temperatures. In this thesis, I use Landau Fermi-liquid theory to study the transport phenomena of two different correlated quantum liquids: the strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases and the ferromagnet/normal-metal (F/N) junctions. The detailed work is presented in chapter II and chapter III of this thesis, respectively. Chapter I holds the introductory part and the background knowledge of this thesis. In chapter II, I study the transport properties of a Fermi gas with strong attractive interactions close to the unitary limit. In particular, I compute the transport lifetimes of the Fermi gas due to superfluid fluctuations above the BCS transition temperature Tc. To calculate the transport lifetimes I need the scattering amplitudes. The scattering amplitudes are dominated by the superfluid fluctuations at temperatures just above Tc. The normal scattering amplitudes are calculated from the Landau parameters. These Landau parameters are obtained from the local version of the induced interaction model for computing Landau parameters. I also calculate the leading order finite temperature corrections to the various transport lifetimes. A calculation of the spin diffusion coefficient is presented in comparison to the experimental findings. Upon choosing a proper value of F0a, I am able to present a good match between the theoretical result and the experimental measurement, which indicates the presence of the superfluid fluctuations near Tc. Calculations of the viscosity, the viscosity/entropy ratio and the thermal conductivity are also shown in support of the appearance of the superfluid fluctuations. In chapter III, I study the spin transport in the low

  9. Measurement of tracheal mucous transport rate in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Hampe, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    Tracheal mucous transport rates were measured in 12 nonanesthetized horses after an intratracheal injection of 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid. The transport rate of the subsequent bolus of radioactivity was determined, using a portable scaler rate meter fitted with a high-energy gamma-scintillation probe. A gamma-scintillation camera was used to verify bolus form and movement in 1 horse. The mean tracheal mucous transport rate was 1.66 +/- 0.24 cm/min.

  10. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

  11. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  12. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  13. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  14. Transport Measurements on Individual Branched Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Li, Wenzhi; Naughton, M. J.

    2005-03-01

    We have made electrical measurements on individual branched (``Y-junction") carbon nanotubes. After isolation on silicon substrates and identification via electron microscopy, photo and e-beam lithography were used to deposit metal electrodes (e.g. Au/Ti) onto individual branches of the nanostructures, including 4-probe configurations across a branch point (Y-junction). Various post-processing procedures, such as rapid thermal annealing and electron beam welding, were employed in attempts to improve contact resistances. Four-probe I-V measurements at room temperature yield varied intrinsic conductivity in these nanostructures (resistances between 10^4 and 10^7φ). Transmission microscopy reveals a fishbone internal structure, which could be responsible for the low conductance. We also report on the construction of ``divining rod'' cantilevers out of these branched nanotubes, using an etch-well technique, toward potential SPM applications, and on similar attempts using inorganic (e.g. ZnO2) nanowires.

  15. Correlating Electronic Transport to Atomic Structures in Self-Assembled Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, An-Ping; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Ouyang, Wenjie; Zhang, Yanning; Weitering, Harm H; Shih, Chih-Kang; Baddorf, Arthur P; Wu, Ruiqian

    2012-01-01

    Quantum wires, as a smallest electronic conductor, are expected to be a fundamental component in all quantum architectures. The electronic conductance in quantum wires, however, is often dictated by structural instabilities and electron localization at the atomic scale. Here we report on the evolutions of electronic transport as a function of temperature and interwire coupling as the quantum wires of GdSi{sub 2} are self-assembled on Si(100) wire-by-wire. The correlation between structure, electronic properties, and electronic transport are examined by combining nanotransport measurements, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. A metal-insulator transition is revealed in isolated nanowires, while a robust metallic state is obtained in wire bundles at low temperature. The atomic defects lead to electron localizations in isolated nanowire, and interwire coupling stabilizes the structure and promotes the metallic states in wire bundles. This illustrates how the conductance nature of a one-dimensional system can be dramatically modified by the environmental change on the atomic scale.

  16. Measurement-induced disturbances and nonclassical correlations of Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Mista, Ladislav Jr.; Tatham, Richard; Korolkova, Natalia; Girolami, Davide; Adesso, Gerardo

    2011-04-15

    We study quantum correlations beyond entanglement in two-mode Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems by means of the measurement-induced disturbance (MID) and its ameliorated version (AMID). In analogy with the recent studies of the Gaussian quantum discord, we define a Gaussian AMID by constraining the optimization to all bi-local Gaussian positive operator valued measurements. We solve the optimization explicitly for relevant families of states, including squeezed thermal states. Remarkably, we find that there is a finite subset of two-mode Gaussian states comprising pure states where non-Gaussian measurements such as photon counting are globally optimal for the AMID and realize a strictly smaller state disturbance compared to the best Gaussian measurements. However, for the majority of two-mode Gaussian states the unoptimized MID provides a loose overestimation of the actual content of quantum correlations, as evidenced by its comparison with Gaussian discord. This feature displays strong similarity with the case of two qubits. Upper and lower bounds for the Gaussian AMID at fixed Gaussian discord are identified. We further present a comparison between Gaussian AMID and Gaussian entanglement of formation, and classify families of two-mode states in terms of their Gaussian AMID, Gaussian discord, and Gaussian entanglement of formation. Our findings provide a further confirmation of the genuinely quantum nature of general Gaussian states, yet they reveal that non-Gaussian measurements can play a crucial role for the optimized extraction and potential exploitation of classical and nonclassical correlations in Gaussian states.

  17. Optimizing quantum correlation dynamics by weak measurement in dissipative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie; Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the protection of quantum correlations of two qubits in independent vacuum reservoirs by means of weak measurements. It is found that the weak measurement can reduce the amount of quantum correlation for one type of initial state at the beginning in a non-Markovian environment and meanwhile it can reduce the occurrence time of entanglement sudden death (ESD) in the process of time evolution. In a Markovian environment, the quantum entanglements of the two kinds of initial states decay rapidly and the weak measurement can further weaken the quantum entanglement, therefore in this case the entanglement cannot be optimized in the evolution process. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012 and No.11147019).

  18. Rheology of fluids measured by correlation force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Robbins, Brian; Honig, Christopher D. F.; Walz, John Y.; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2012-04-01

    We describe a method, correlation force spectrometry (CFS), which characterizes fluids through measurement of the correlations between the thermally stimulated vibrations of two closely spaced micrometer-scale cantilevers in fluid. We discuss a major application: measurement of the rheological properties of fluids at high frequency and high spatial resolution. Use of CFS as a rheometer is validated by comparison between experimental data and finite element modeling of the deterministic ring-down of cantilevers using the known viscosity of fluids. The data can also be accurately fitted using a harmonic oscillator model, which can be used for rapid rheometric measurements after calibration. The method is non-invasive, uses a very small amount of fluid, and has no actively moving parts. It can also be used to analyze the rheology of complex fluids. We use CFS to show that (non-Newtonian) aqueous polyethylene oxide solution can be modeled approximately by incorporating an elastic spring between the cantilevers.

  19. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  20. Magnetic noise measurements using cross-correlated Hall sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, G.; Ocio, M.; Paltiel, Y.; Shtrikman, H.; Zeldov, E.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental technique for measuring magnetic fluctuations by means of a double-layer Hall sensor array is described. The technique relies on cross-correlating Hall signals from two independent sensors positioned one above the other in two separate two-dimensional-electron-gas layers of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated by a reduction of the magnitude of the background noise floor of the correlated sensors with respect to the noise level of the best single sensor.

  1. On correlation measurements of electron Bernstein wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A.; Irzak, M.

    2014-02-01

    A systematic study of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) emission from either overdense plasmas or plasmas with moderate electron temperatures is presented. Starting from description of the bare electrons microscopic thermal radiation we finally arrive at the macroscopic expression for the radiation temperature. The latter is shown to be a sum of the electron temperature and a fluctuating piece caused by the fluctuations of both the EBW emission source and the EBW damping rate within the ECR layer. It is shown that the correlation measurements of the EBW emission at two separate frequencies reveal information on the correlation length of the low frequency turbulence.

  2. Characterization of dilute optical lattices using pump-probe spectroscopy and photon correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Ethan; Ross, Preston; Rapp, Anthony; Cai, Hong; Reigle, Alex; Schlonsky, Eli; Lee, Hoseong; Clemens, James; Bali, Samir

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate optical lattices using three different methods: pump-probe spectroscopy of vibrational energy levels, photon correlation of light scattered by cold atoms, and fluorescence imaging. Photon correlations of the scattered light can be used to measure lattice dwell times and crossover times between lattice sites. From this information we can derive the diffusion constant which can then be compared to direct measurement via fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, by Fourier transforming the time delayed photon correlations we can obtain the intensity spectrum which can be compared directly to pump-probe spectroscopy of the vibrational energy levels. We plan to carefully study situations in which the atomic transport properties deviate from Boltzman Gibbs statistics.

  3. Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

    2009-02-14

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

  4. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  5. Correlation-timing-based erythrocyte velocity measurement using CCD imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, William J.; Hudetz, Anthony

    2001-05-01

    An automated correlation method is introduced to estimate erythrocyte velocity component of erythrocyte flux within the cerebral capillary network. Erythrocyte flux, defined as the number of red blood cells passing through a plane orthogonal to the axis of erythrocyte flow in a vessel per unit time, is considered to be the closest index of capillary flow. Introduced previously is the two-point cross-correlation method, a method whereby a video photometric analyzer captures the voltage produced from two electronic windows placed over a vessel of interest. In our new method, instead of using electronic windows, we use a CCD array, focused on a two- dimensional projection of the three-dimensional capillary structure. Simulations of this method yields accurate velocity measurements at a measured cell intensity of .2 standard deviations above mean noise values or cell counts fewer than 30 cells per minute for image sequences of 180 frames captured over a time interval of three seconds. We conclude that with proper reduction in the measured standard deviation of noise and by increasing the percentage of fluorscently labeled erythrocytes injected into the rat, the correlation timing method of estimating erythrocyte velocity is an accurate substitute for hand-measured velocity calculation.

  6. Correlations between LDEX Measurements and the Lunar Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Jamey; Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Halekas, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is an impact ionization dust detector capable of measuring the mass of sub-micron sized dust grains above the lunar surface. LDEX can also search for the putative population of grains with radii on the order of ~ 0.1 μm lofted over the terminator regions by measuring the collective current of dust grains that are below the detection threshold for single impacts. This current, intended to measure the collective impact plasma from multiple small grain impacts, has also shown considerable correlations with plasma measurements from the ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, & Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission. Through LADEE's many orbits, LDEX sees time periods with very low variability, having almost no activity as well as periods with very high variability. Since this type of high activity is also observed in anti-ram pointing measurements, much of this current cannot be explained by collections of small dust grain impacts. Given this, comparisons to ARTEMIS data provide a promising way to explain such measurements. This presentation will focus on the correlations between LDEX and ARTEMIS data.

  7. Interplay between computable measures of entanglement and other quantum correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Girolami, Davide; Adesso, Gerardo

    2011-11-15

    Composite quantum systems can be in generic states characterized not only by entanglement but also by more general quantum correlations. The interplay between these two signatures of nonclassicality is still not completely understood. In this work we investigate this issue, focusing on computable and observable measures of such correlations: entanglement is quantified by the negativity N, while general quantum correlations are measured by the (normalized) geometric quantum discord D{sub G}. For two-qubit systems, we find that the geometric discord reduces to the squared negativity on pure states, while the relationship D{sub G}{>=}N{sup 2} holds for arbitrary mixed states. The latter result is rigorously extended to pure, Werner, and isotropic states of two-qudit systems for arbitrary d, and numerical evidence of its validity for arbitrary states of a qubit and a qutrit is provided as well. Our results establish an interesting hierarchy, which we conjecture to be universal, between two relevant and experimentally friendly nonclassicality indicators. This ties in with the intuition that general quantum correlations should at least contain and in general exceed entanglement on mixed states of composite quantum systems.

  8. Molecular transport in collagenous tissues measured by gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hunckler, Michael D; Tilley, Jennifer M R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-11-26

    Molecular transport in tissues is important for drug delivery, nutrient supply, waste removal, cell signaling, and detecting tissue degeneration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate gel electrophoresis as a simple method to measure molecular transport in collagenous tissues. The electrophoretic mobility of charged molecules in tissue samples was measured from relative differences in the velocity of a cationic dye passing through an agarose gel in the absence and presence of a tissue section embedded within the gel. Differences in electrophoretic mobility were measured for the transport of a molecule through different tissues and tissue anisotropy, or the transport of different sized molecules through the same tissue. Tissue samples included tendon and fibrocartilage from the proximal (tensile) and distal (compressive) regions of the bovine flexor tendon, respectively, and bovine articular cartilage. The measured electrophoretic mobility was greatest in the compressive region of the tendon (fibrocartilage), followed by the tensile region of tendon, and lowest in articular cartilage, reflecting differences in the composition and organization of the tissues. The anisotropy of tendon was measured by greater electrophoretic mobility parallel compared with perpendicular to the predominate collagen fiber orientation. Electrophoretic mobility also decreased with increased molecular size, as expected. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that gel electrophoresis may be a useful method to measure differences in molecular transport within various tissues, including the effects of tissue type, tissue anisotropy, and molecular size.

  9. Automated measurement of fast mitochondrial transport in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle E.; Liu, Xin-An; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing, and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility. PMID:26578890

  10. A rain splash transport equation assimilating field and laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Thomas; Malmon, Daniel V.; Mudd, Simon M.

    2010-03-01

    Process-based models of hillslope evolution require transport equations relating sediment flux to its major controls. An equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow was constructed by modifying an approach developed by Reeve (1982) and parameterizing it with measurements from single-drop laboratory experiments and simulated rainfall on a grassland in East Africa. The equation relates rain splash to hillslope gradient, the median raindrop diameter of a storm, and ground cover density; the effect of soil texture on detachability can be incorporated from other published results. The spatial and temporal applicability of such an equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow on uncultivated hillslopes can be estimated from hydrological calculations. The predicted transport is lower than landscape-averaged geologic erosion rates from Kenya but is large enough to modify short, slowly eroding natural hillslopes as well as microtopographic interrill surfaces between which overland flow transports the mobilized sediment.

  11. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  12. Economic evaluation of traffic safety measures for transport companies.

    PubMed

    Rienstra, S A; Rietveld, P; Lindeijer, J E

    2000-09-01

    This paper addresses the economic feasibility of measures to reduce the material damage of transport companies. Results are presented of a series of interviews among transport companies as well as from a postal questionnaire survey. Next, calculations are presented for three types of companies: a small family company, a large family company and a large formalised company. From the viewpoint of costs and benefits, damage prevention measures appear to be particularly interesting to larger companies. Small companies, being the largest group, tend to have an informal culture in which measures are less effective. Especially those measures for which no large investments are needed, which influence the behaviour of drivers and need not to be contracted out, are perceived as attractive by the transport companies.

  13. Immobility responses between mouse strains correlate with distinct hippocampal serotonin transporter protein expression and function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man; He, Tao; Meng, Qing-yan; Broussard, John Isaac; Yao, Lan; Diao, Yao; Sang, Xiu-bo; Liu, Qing-peng; Liao, Ying-jun; Li, Yuge; Zhao, Shulei

    2014-11-01

    Mouse strain differences in immobility and in sensitivity to antidepressants have been observed in the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST). However, the neurotransmitter systems and neural substrates that contribute to these differences remain unknown. To investigate the role of the hippocampal serotonin transporter (5-HTT), we measured baseline immobility and the immobility responses to fluoxetine (FLX) in the FST and the TST in male CD-1, C57BL/6, DBA and BALB/c mice. We observed strain differences in baseline immobility time, with CD-1 mice showing the longest and DBA mice showing the shortest. In contrast, DBA and BALB/c mice showed the highest sensitivity to FLX, whereas CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice showed the lowest sensitivity. Also we found strain differences in both the total 5-HTT protein level and the membrane-bound 5-HTT level (estimated by V max) as follows: DBA>BALB/c>CD-1=C57BL/6. The uptake efficiency of the membrane-bound 5-HTT (estimated by 1/K m) was highest in DBA and BALB/c mice and lowest in CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice. A correlation analysis of subregions within the hippocampus revealed that immobility time was negatively correlated with V max and positively correlated with K m in the hippocampus. Therefore a higher uptake capacity of the membrane-bound 5-HTT in the hippocampus was associated with lower baseline immobility and greater sensitivity to FLX. These results suggest that alterations in hippocampal 5-HTT activity may contribute to mouse strain differences in the FST and the TST.

  14. Measuring the Hydrodynamic Size of Nanoparticles Using Fluctuation Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Blankenburg, Jan; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuation correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established analytical technique traditionally used to monitor molecular diffusion in dilute solutions, the dynamics of chemical reactions, and molecular processes inside living cells. In this review, we present the recent use of FCS for measuring the size of colloidal nanoparticles in solution. We review the theoretical basis and experimental implementation of this technique and its advantages and limitations. In particular, we show examples of the use of FCS to measure the size of gold nanoparticles, monitor the rotational dynamics of gold nanorods, and investigate the formation of protein coronas on nanoparticles.

  15. Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR Cross-Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Timothy; Daranciang, Dan; Lindenberg, Aaron; Corbett, Jeff; Fisher, Alan; Goodfellow, John; Huang, Xiaobiao; Mok, Walter; Safranek, James; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using cross-correlation between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.

  16. Optomechanical correlations and signal self-amplification in interferometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohadon, P.-F.; Verlot, P.; Tavernarakis, A.; Briant, T.; Heidmann, A.

    2010-05-01

    Radiation pressure exerted by light in interferometric measurements is responsible for displacements of mirrors which appear as an additional back-action noise and limit the sensitivity of the measurement. We experimentally study these effects by monitoring in a very high-finesse optical cavity the displacements of a mirror with a sensitivity at the 10-20 m/ level. This very high sensitivity is a step towards the observation of fundamental quantum effects of radiation pressure such as the standard quantum limit in interferometric measurements. We report the observation of optomechanical correlations between two optical beams sent into the same moving mirror cavity. We also observed a self-amplification of a signal, which is a consequence of dynamical back-action of radiation pressure in a detuned cavity, and may improve the interferometric measurement sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  17. Measuring Fisher information accurately in correlated neural populations.

    PubMed

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively.

  18. Euler and Potential Experiment/CFD Correlations for a Transport and Two Delta-Wing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Cliff, S. E.; Melton, J. E.; Langhi, R. G.; Goodsell, A. M.; Robertson, D. D.; Moyer, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A selection of successes and failures of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is discussed. Experiment/CFD correlations involving full potential and Euler computations of the aerodynamic characteristics of four commercial transport wings and two low aspect ratio, delta wing configurations are shown. The examples consist of experiment/CFD comparisons for aerodynamic forces, moments, and pressures. Navier-Stokes equations are not considered.

  19. Correlative Stratospheric Ozone Measurements with the Airborne UV DIAL System during TOTE/VOTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Fenn, Marta A.; Browell, Edward V.; McGee, Thomas J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Gross, Michael R.; McDermid, I. Stuart; Froidevaux, Lucien; Wang, Pi-Huang

    1998-01-01

    The airborne UV differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system participated in the Tropical Ozone Transport Experiment/Vortex Ozone Transport Experiment (TOTE/VOTE) in late 1995/early 1996. This mission afforded the opportunity to compare the DIAL system's stratospheric ozone measuring capability with other remote-sensing instruments through correlative measurements over a latitude range from the tropics to the Arctic. These instruments included ground-based DIAL and space-based stratospheric instruments: HALOE; MLS; and SAGE II. The ozone profiles generally agreed within random error estimates for the various instruments in the middle of the profiles in the tropics, but regions of significant systematic differences, especially near or below the tropopause or at the higher altitudes were also found. The comparisons strongly suggest that the airborne UV DIAL system can play a valuable role as a mobile lower-stratospheric ozone validation instrument.

  20. ATLAS-3 correlative measurement opportunities with UARS and surface observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Edwin F.; Denn, Fred M.; Gibson, Gary G.

    1995-01-01

    The third ATmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission was flown aboard the Space Shuttle launched on November 3, 1994. The mission length was approximately 10 days and 22 hours. The ATLAS-3 Earth-viewing instruments provided a large number of measurements which were nearly coincident with observations from experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Based on ATLAS-3 instrument operating schedules, simulations were performed to determine when and where correlative measurements occurred between ATLAS and UARS instruments, and between ATLAS and surface observations. Results of these orbital and instrument simulations provide valuable information for scientists to compare measurements between various instruments on the two satellites and at selected surface sites.

  1. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  2. Estimating correlation for a real-time measure of connectivity.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Akhil; Panday, Ashish; Joshi, Bharat; Ravindran, Arun; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2012-01-01

    There has recently been considerable interest in connectivity analysis of fMRI and scalp and intracranial EEG time-series. The computational requirements of the pair-wise correlation (PWC), the core time-series measure used to estimate connectivity, presents a challenge to the real-time estimation of the PWC between all pairs of multiple time-series. We describe a parallel algorithm for computing PWC in real-time for streaming data from multiple channels. The algorithm was implemented on the Intel Xeon™ and IBM Cell Broadband Engine™ platforms. We evaluated time to estimate correlation for signals recorded with different acquisition parameters as a comparison to real-time constraints. We demonstrate that the execution time of these efficient implementations meet real-time constraints in most instances.

  3. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  4. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  5. Used digital speckle correlation method to measure vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haitao; Zhen, Zhiqiang; Tang, Zhengxin

    2009-11-01

    Used digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) to measure is researched. The experiment is designed and the laser irradiates a PZT which is driven by some signal to obtain the dynamic speckle patterns. The dynamic speckle patterns are shot by CCD, then the DSCM is used to process the sequential images and also the experiment is simulated. The movement of reflection target is controlled by PZT which is driven by the different model signal. When the reflection target is moving, the dynamic speckle patterns are shot by CCD, the sequential images are stored in computer through an image board. Then the digital speckle correlation method is used to process the sequential images. There are three output parameters after the images correlation calculation: (xi ,yi) and α that represent for position and moving direction of the object, Initial (xi ,yi) is (0,0). (▵xi , ▵yi) represents pixel difference in coordinates of two adjacent images. α is the angle specifying the direction of the object's motion relative to the x-axis: αɛ[00,900]. Varying the speed of the aluminum plate, variant values of (▵xi ,▵i) are obtained and varying the direction of numeric control caterpillar track, variant values of α were obtained. From the obtained displacement and the collected frequency, the vibration frequency was obtained. The experimental results show the DSCM can confirm the frequency and displacement of vibration, and have a good agreement with the simulation results, and the results show the digital speckle correlation method can be used to measure vibation.

  6. Ultrasonic Cross-Correlation Flow Measurement: Theory, Noise Contamination Mechanisms, and a Noise Mitigation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D.M.; Lysak, P.D.; Capone, D.E.; Brown, W.L.; Askari, V.

    2006-07-01

    Based on past experience with ultrasonic cross-correlation flow meters in power plant environments, the presence of spatially correlated noise due to pressure waves, vibration, or sources other than transport of turbulent eddies will cause a bias in the time delays measured by the meter. Several techniques were developed to detect the existence of such correlated noise and correct for its effect at plant conditions. An analytical and experimental investigation was performed to further understand the basic physics of the noise mechanisms. The dominant error mechanisms investigated in this work were speed of sound perturbations due to pressure fluctuations and beam path length changes due to wall vibration. An analytical model was formulated which estimates the signal level of the flow meter based on the turbulent velocity field. From this model, an estimate of the system noise which would cause contamination could be determined. A test at a water tunnel facility was performed in order to evaluate the noise mechanisms. During this test, measurements were taken with and without controlled noise sources. Pressure and acceleration measurements were used to evaluate a coherent noise removal technique developed to mitigate the impact of noise in the ultrasonic cross-correlation flow measurement. The coherent noise removal technique was shown to be effective in removing noise during the water tunnel test. (authors)

  7. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P.; Shi, Li

    2015-04-15

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  8. Measurement of particle transport coefficients on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, T.C.T.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the behavior of the plasma transport during the divertor detachment in order to explain the central electron density rise. The measurement of particle transport coefficients requires sophisticated diagnostic tools. A two color interferometer system was developed and installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the electron density with high spatial ({approx} 2 cm) and high temporal ({le} 1.0 ms) resolution. The system consists of 10 CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) and 4 HeNe (.6328 {mu}m) chords that are used to measure the line integrated density to within 0.08 CO{sub 2} degrees or 2.3 {times} 10{sup 16}m{sup {minus}2} theoretically. Using the two color interferometer, a series of gas puffing experiments were conducted. The density was varied above and below the threshold density for detachment at a constant magnetic field and plasma current. Using a gas modulation technique, the particle diffusion, D, and the convective velocity, V, were determined. Profiles were inverted using a SVD inversion and the transport coefficients were extracted with a time regression analysis and a transport simulation analysis. Results from each analysis were in good agreement. Measured profiles of the coefficients increased with the radius and the values were consistent with measurements from other experiments. The values exceeded neoclassical predictions by a factor of 10. The profiles also exhibited an inverse dependence with plasma density. The scaling of both attached and detached plasmas agreed well with this inverse scaling. This result and the lack of change in the energy and impurity transport indicate that there was no change in the underlying transport processes after detachment.

  9. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Estrada, T.; García, L.; López Bruna, D.; Carreras, B. A.; Xu, Y.; Ochando, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Reynolds-Barredo, J. M.; López Fraguas, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ({\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 ) was purposely scanned outward through an electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity were characterized using a two channel Doppler reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the {\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 rational surface. Near the rational surface, the Hurst exponent, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was reduced below 0.5 (indicating subdiffusion), while at radii smaller than that of the rational surface, it was found to be significantly enhanced (superdiffusion). In the latter region, heat transport was enhanced as well, thus establishing a link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The observed variation of the Hurst exponent was consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulation.

  10. Analysis of Low-Frequency Geostrophic Transport in the Southern Ocean Measurable with Ocean Bottom Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Chambers, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    We sought to understand the relative importance of barotropic transport as measured from bottom pressure to total transport in the Southern Ocean. We used ocean bottom pressure and velocity data from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) state estimate run at Jet Propulsion Laboratory to quantify the percentage of total transport in various areas of the Southern Ocean that can be explained by ocean bottom pressure measurements. Only low-frequency (> 1-year) transport variations from 1993 to 2011 were considered. We examined the standard deviations, correlation, and percent variance for low-pass filtered transport integrated from 65°S - 40°S for each 1° longitude from 50°E to 150°E by vertically integrating the zonal velocity, the zonal component of the bottom current, and geostrophic current from bottom pressure gradients. We found that the transport computed from bottom pressure explained more of the full transport variability than that calculated from the bottom current.

  11. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  12. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J.; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length.

  13. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length. PMID:27661710

  14. 3D robust digital image correlation for vibration measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xianmin; Fatikow, Sergej

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies of speckle images under dynamic measurement due to the different viewing angles will deteriorate the correspondence in 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC) for vibration measurement. Facing this kind of bottleneck, this paper presents two types of robust 3D-DIC methods for vibration measurement, SSD-robust and SWD-robust, which use a sum of square difference (SSD) estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term and a Welch estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term, respectively. Because the regulating term with an adaptive rejecting bound can lessen the influence of the abnormal pixel data in the dynamical measuring process, the robustness of the algorithm is enhanced. The robustness and precision evaluation experiments using a dual-frequency laser interferometer are implemented. The experimental results indicate that the two presented robust estimators can suppress the effects of the abnormality in the speckle images and, meanwhile, keep higher precision in vibration measurement in contrast with the traditional SSD method; thus, the SWD-robust and SSD-robust methods are suitable for weak image noise and strong image noise, respectively. PMID:26974624

  15. A Pipeline Transport Correlation for Slurries with Small but Dense Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P; Etchells, Arthur W; Chun, Jaehun; Adkins, Harold E; Casella, Andrew M; Minette, Michael J; Yokuda, Satoru T

    2010-04-01

    Most correlations/models for minimum transport or critical velocity of slurry were developed for slurries composed of particles greater than ~100-200 µm diameter with narrow particle-size distributions which is typical of the minerals industry. Many other process industries handle smaller particles. In particular waste slurries at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have broad size distributions and significant fractions of smaller particles. Despite the size of these wastes, recent PNNL studies indicate that the small particles might be of sufficient density to pose a significant risk for pipeline deposition and plugging. To allow predictive assessment of deposition of fine dense particles for waste slurry transport at the U.S. DOE Hanford site, a pipeline-transport correlation for critical velocity was developed using a simple power-law between two dimensionless numbers important for slurry transport, the deposition Froude and Archimedes numbers. The correlation accords well with experimental data for slurries with Archimedes numbers <80 and is an adequate pipeline design guide for processing Hanford waste slurry.

  16. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  17. Radial ion transport measurements in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.L.; Petty, C.C.; Post, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Experimental radial ion transport rates and diffusion coefficients are presented for the Constance-B magnetic mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 58}, 1853 (1987)). The transport experiments are performed by measuring steady state equilibrium radial profiles of plasma density, ionization source, end loss current, electric field, electron temperature, and ion temperature. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera system (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 60}, 2835 (1989)) is used to measure the two-dimensional radial density, source, and electron temperature profiles. End loss diagnostics including movable Faraday cups, electrostatic end loss analyzers, and an ion time-of-flight analyzer (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 59}, 601 (1988)) are used to measure radial profiles of potential and ion temperature. The ion confinement time perpendicular to the magnetic field is found to be an order of magnitude shorter than predicted by classical and neoclassical transport theories. The radial profiles of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient ({ital D}{sub {perpendicular}}) are presented for hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas. The coefficients are a factor of 10 larger than the maximum classical and neoclassical coefficients in all three plasmas. Plasma fluctuations resulting from whistler mode microinstability (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 1821 (1987)) as well as nonaxisymmetric potentials are suggested as possible explanations for the experimentally measured radial transport rate.

  18. Sea level variation as an indicator of Florida current volume transport: comparisons with direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Maul, G A; Chew, F; Bushnell, M; Mayer, D A

    1985-01-18

    Sea level measurements from tide gauges at Miami, Florida, and Cat Cay, Bahamas, and bottom pressure measurements from a water depth of 50 meters off Jupiter, Florida, and a water depth of 10 meters off Memory Rock, Bahamas, were correlated with 81 concurrent direct volume transport observations in the Straits of Florida. Daily-averaged sea level from either gauge on the Bahamian side of the Straits was poorly correlated with transport. Bottom pressure off Jupiter had a linear coefficient of determination ofr(2) = 0.93, and Miami sea level, when adjusted for weather effects, had r(2) = 0.74; the standard errors of estimating transports were +/- 1.2 x 10(6) and +/- 1.9 x 10(6) cubic meters per second, respectively. A linear multivariate regression, which combined bottom pressure, weather, and the submarine cable observations between Jupiter and the Bahamas, had r(2) = 0.94 with a standard error of estimating transport of +/- 1.1 x 10(6) cubic meters per second. These results suggest that a combination of easily obtained observations is sufficient to adequatelv monitor the daily volume transport fluctuations of the Florida Current. PMID:17742102

  19. Measures of correlations in infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    Several important measures of correlations of the state of a finite-dimensional composite quantum system are defined as linear combinations of marginal entropies of this state. This paper is devoted to infinite-dimensional generalizations of such quantities and to an analysis of their properties. We introduce the notion of faithful extension of a linear combination of marginal entropies and consider several concrete examples, the simplest of which are quantum mutual information and quantum conditional entropy. Then we show that quantum conditional mutual information can be defined uniquely as a lower semicontinuous function on the set of all states of a tripartite infinite-dimensional system possessing all the basic properties valid in finite dimensions. Infinite-dimensional generalizations of some other measures of correlations in multipartite quantum systems are also considered. Applications of the results to the theory of infinite-dimensional quantum channels and their capacities are considered. The existence of a Fawzi-Renner recovery channel reproducing marginal states for all tripartite states (including states with infinite marginal entropies) is shown. Bibliography: 47 titles.

  20. Strongly correlated two-dimensional plasma explored from entropy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuntsevich, A Y; Tupikov, Y V; Pudalov, V M; Burmistrov, I S

    2015-06-23

    Charged plasma and Fermi liquid are two distinct states of electronic matter intrinsic to dilute two-dimensional electron systems at elevated and low temperatures, respectively. Probing their thermodynamics represents challenge because of lack of an adequate technique. Here, we report a thermodynamic method to measure the entropy per electron in gated structures. Our technique appears to be three orders of magnitude superior in sensitivity to a.c. calorimetry, allowing entropy measurements with only 10(8) electrons. This enables us to investigate the correlated plasma regime, previously inaccessible experimentally in two-dimensional electron systems in semiconductors. In experiments with clean two-dimensional electron system in silicon-based structures, we traced entropy evolution from the plasma to Fermi liquid regime by varying electron density. We reveal that the correlated plasma regime can be mapped onto the ordinary non-degenerate Fermi gas with an interaction-enhanced temperature-dependent effective mass. Our method opens up new horizons in studies of low-dimensional electron systems.

  1. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  2. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  3. Transport level in disordered organics: correlated energetic disorder in dipole glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, V. R.; Sukharev, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper Monte-Carlo modeling is in use in order to further approve and quantify the concept of effective transport level in the respect to organic materials with correlated disorder. We consider a model of dipole glass (simple cubic lattice, which sites are occupied by randomly oriented dipoles). Both the absolute values and dependence of the effective transport level on the disorder and temperature, in the limit of low electric field, is very similar to the same in the case of uncorrelated disorder

  4. Measurement of the radiative transport properties of reticulated alumina foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.J.; Bohn, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents a method for determining radiative transport properties of reticulated materials. The method has both experimental and analytical components. A polar nephelometer is used to measure the scattering profile of a sample of the reticulated material. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment are then combined with the experimental results to give the scatter albedo and extinction coefficient. This paper presents the results of using this method to determine the radiative transport properties of four different porosities (10, 20, 30, 65 pores per inch) of cylindrical reticulated alumina samples ranging in thickness form 0.5 inches to 2. 5 inches.

  5. Self-organized criticality, long-time correlations, and the standard transport paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-02-11

    Some aspects of low-frequency, long-wavelength fluctuations are considered. A stochastic model is used to show that power-law time correlations need not arise from self-organized criticality. A formula for the frequency spectrum of uncorrelated, overlapping avalanches is shown to be a special case of the spectral balance equation of renormalized statistical turbulence theory. It is argued that there need be no contradiction between the presence of long-time correlations and the existence of local transport coefficients.

  6. Sequential Measurement of Intermodal Variability in Public Transportation PM2.5 and CO Exposure Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Che, W W; Frey, H Christopher; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-08-16

    A sequential measurement method is demonstrated for quantifying the variability in exposure concentration during public transportation. This method was applied in Hong Kong by measuring PM2.5 and CO concentrations along a route connecting 13 transportation-related microenvironments within 3-4 h. The study design takes into account ventilation, proximity to local sources, area-wide air quality, and meteorological conditions. Portable instruments were compacted into a backpack to facilitate measurement under crowded transportation conditions and to quantify personal exposure by sampling at nose level. The route included stops next to three roadside monitors to enable comparison of fixed site and exposure concentrations. PM2.5 exposure concentrations were correlated with the roadside monitors, despite differences in averaging time, detection method, and sampling location. Although highly correlated in temporal trend, PM2.5 concentrations varied significantly among microenvironments, with mean concentration ratios versus roadside monitor ranging from 0.5 for MTR train to 1.3 for bus terminal. Measured inter-run variability provides insight regarding the sample size needed to discriminate between microenvironments with increased statistical significance. The study results illustrate the utility of sequential measurement of microenvironments and policy-relevant insights for exposure mitigation and management.

  7. Sequential Measurement of Intermodal Variability in Public Transportation PM2.5 and CO Exposure Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Che, W W; Frey, H Christopher; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-08-16

    A sequential measurement method is demonstrated for quantifying the variability in exposure concentration during public transportation. This method was applied in Hong Kong by measuring PM2.5 and CO concentrations along a route connecting 13 transportation-related microenvironments within 3-4 h. The study design takes into account ventilation, proximity to local sources, area-wide air quality, and meteorological conditions. Portable instruments were compacted into a backpack to facilitate measurement under crowded transportation conditions and to quantify personal exposure by sampling at nose level. The route included stops next to three roadside monitors to enable comparison of fixed site and exposure concentrations. PM2.5 exposure concentrations were correlated with the roadside monitors, despite differences in averaging time, detection method, and sampling location. Although highly correlated in temporal trend, PM2.5 concentrations varied significantly among microenvironments, with mean concentration ratios versus roadside monitor ranging from 0.5 for MTR train to 1.3 for bus terminal. Measured inter-run variability provides insight regarding the sample size needed to discriminate between microenvironments with increased statistical significance. The study results illustrate the utility of sequential measurement of microenvironments and policy-relevant insights for exposure mitigation and management. PMID:27182735

  8. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Paul C.; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, T. Zac

    2016-01-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides. PMID:27443503

  9. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Paul C; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T; Ward, T Zac

    2016-01-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides. PMID:27443503

  10. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  11. Impulsive noise of printers: measurement metrics and their subjective correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Terrence; Otto, Norman; Bray, Wade; Stephan, Mike

    2005-09-01

    In the office and home computing environments, printer impulsive noise has become a significant contributor to user perceived quality or lack thereof, and can affect the user's comfort level and ability to concentrate. Understanding and quantifying meaningful metrics for printer impulsivity is becoming an increasingly important goal for printer manufacturers. Several methods exist in international standards for measuring the impulsivity of noise. For information technology equipment (ITE), the method for detection of impulsive noise is provided in ECMA-74 and ISO 7779. However, there is a general acknowledgement that the current standard method of determining impulsivity by simply measuring A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL) with the impulsive time weighting, I, applied is inadequate to characterize impulsive noise and ultimately to predict user satisfaction and acceptance. In recent years, there has been a variety of new measurement methods evaluated for impulsive noise for both environmental and machinery noise. This paper reviews several of the available metrics, applies the metrics to several printer impulsive noise sources, and makes an initial assessment of their correlation to the subjective impressions of users. It is a review and continuation of the work presented at InterNoise 2005 (Baird, Bray, and Otto).

  12. Exact occupation probabilities for intermittent transport and application to image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Caracciolo, G.; Schmidt, T.

    2014-11-01

    Intermittent transport is frequently observed in nature and has been proven to accelerate search processes at both the macroscopic (e.g., animals looking for food) and microscopic scale (e.g., protein-DNA interactions). In living cells, active transport of membrane proteins (e.g., membrane receptors) or intracellular vesicles (organelles) has been extensively studied as an example of intermittent behavior. The intermittent stochastic process is commonly analyzed in terms of first-passage probabilities. Here we derive exact occupation probabilities of intermittent active transport, making such analysis available for image correlation spectroscopy techniques. The power of this new theoretical framework is demonstrated on intracellular trafficking of lipid/DNA nanoparticles in living cells for which we were allowed to quantify switching time scales.

  13. Hot electron transport in a strongly correlated transition-metal oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Yajima, Takeaki; Parui, Subir; Kemper, Alexander F.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2013-01-01

    Oxide heterointerfaces are ideal for investigating strong correlation effects to electron transport, relevant for oxide-electronics. Using hot-electrons, we probe electron transport perpendicular to the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO)- Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) interface and find the characteristic hot-electron attenuation length in LSMO to be 1.48 ± 0.10 unit cells (u.c.) at −1.9 V, increasing to 2.02 ± 0.16 u.c. at −1.3 V at room temperature. Theoretical analysis of this energy dispersion reveals the dominance of electron-electron and polaron scattering. Direct visualization of the local electron transport shows different transmission at the terraces and at the step-edges. PMID:23429420

  14. Spam Source Clustering by Constructing Spammer Network with Correlation Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jeongkyu; Kim, Seunghwan

    Spam filtering is one of the most challenging problems in electric message systems. In general, recent studies on specifying real spam source are based on content filtering because spammers usually falsify their origin. We propose a method to specify spam source based on structural analysis with complex network. We assume that each spam sources either has the same victim list or uses the same spam-hosting program. We treat spam source - target relationship as a bipartite network and construct weighted spam source network by network projection using correlation measure. We find that community clustering methods are inappropriate with spammer network. We group spammers with gradient-based grouping, which uses correlations between nodes as gradient between nodes. We convert them into local minima, which helps to cluster spammers into a few spam source groups. We investigate the weblog spam data with the proposed method and validate it. The method that we propose can be applied to diverse categorization problems, such as multiple text categorization and network subunit clustering.

  15. Longterm Measurements of Bedload-Transport in alpine Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achleitner, Stefan; Kammerlander, Johannes; Eichner, Bernhard; Schöber, Johannes; Chiari, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the necessity of predicting the long-term behavior of sediment transport has increased. On the one hand, the effects of technical measures (e.g. retaining measures, hydropower, etc.) in the natural system are to be evaluated. On the other hand long term ecological studies that are strongly linked to the sediment budgets and its variation are more and more evolving. The ACRP Project DevoBeta-CC addresses the dynamics of long term sediment transport dynamics and its temporal altering. The focus is put on smaller tributary catchments enabling the model development. In total the data from ten catchments connected to the hydropower station Kaunertal (Tyrol/Austria) and eleven catchments linked to the power plant group Sellrain-Silz (Tyrol/Austria) are available. The considered catchments vary regarding their characteristics such as size (3 km³ to 27 km²), glaciation (0 % to 53 %), mean catchment slope (53 % to 92 %) and mean channel gradient (4 % to 49 %). The main data basis are records from the water intake structures operated (partly since 1965) by the TIWAG (Tiroler Wasserkraft AG). The sedimentation dynamics and operational flushings of the connected settling basins are used to measure the transported sediments. Since 1985 even high resolution data (15min intervals) are available. At selected catchments, the operationally recorded data (flushings, load membrane measurements,...) are verified within measuring campaigns using bed load traps upstream. Further, the sedimentation dynamics and grain size distributions in the settling basins are evaluated. Therefor two water intakes were put temporally out of operation, allowing an improved measurement of settled volumes by means of terrestrial surveying. Uncertainty assessments reveal an overall accuracy of estimated annual bed load volumes lower than a factor of two. Additionally, the data set enables to address sediment transport at a sub-annual basis, hence, the presented data set is unique regarding

  16. A rain splash transport equation assimilating field and laboratory measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, T.; Malmon, D.V.; Mudd, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Process-based models of hillslope evolution require transport equations relating sediment flux to its major controls. An equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow was constructed by modifying an approach developed by Reeve (1982) and parameterizing it with measurements from single-drop laboratory experiments and simulated rainfall on a grassland in East Africa. The equation relates rain splash to hillslope gradient, the median raindrop diameter of a storm, and ground cover density; the effect of soil texture on detachability can be incorporated from other published results. The spatial and temporal applicability of such an equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow on uncultivated hillslopes can be estimated from hydrological calculations. The predicted transport is lower than landscape-averaged geologic erosion rates from Kenya but is large enough to modify short, slowly eroding natural hillslopes as well as microtopographic interrill surfaces between which overland flow transports the mobilized sediment. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Viscosity Measurements and Correlation of the Squalane + CO2 Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, D.; Kumagai, A.; Yokoyama, C.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results for the viscosity of squalane + CO2 mixtures are reported. The viscosities were measured using a rolling ball viscometer. The experimental temperatures were 293.15, 313.15, 333.15, and 353.15 K, and pressures were 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 MPa. The CO2 mole fraction of the mixtures varied from 0 to 0.417. The experimental uncertainties in viscosity were estimated to be within ±3.0%. The viscosity of the mixtures decreased with an increase in the CO2 mole fraction. The experimental data were compared with predictions from the Grunberg-Nissan and McAllister equations, which correlated the experimental data with maximum deviations of 10 and 8.7%, respectively.

  18. Correlations for weight, height and two measures of batting performance.

    PubMed

    Hamburg, L; Hines, T M

    1999-04-01

    The hypothesis that heavier baseball players are better batters was examined in two correlational studies of major league baseball players' performance. Neither height nor weight was significantly correlated with batting average. Both variables correlated significantly and positively with the number of home runs hit by American League players in the 1997 season. After partial correlations were computed, only the correlation between weight and number of home runs hit remained significant.

  19. Solution processable semiconductor thin films: Correlation between morphological, structural, optical and charge transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Dilek

    This Ph.D. thesis is a result of multidisciplinary research bringing together fundamental concepts in thin film engineering, materials science, materials processing and characterization, electrochemistry, microfabrication, and device physics. Experiments were conducted by tackling scientific problems in the field of thin films and interfaces, with the aim to correlate the morphology, crystalline structure, electronic structure of thin films with the functional properties of the films and the performances of electronic devices based thereon. Furthermore, novel strategies based on interfacial phenomena at electrolyte/thin film interfaces were explored and exploited to control the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Three main chemical systems were the object of the studies performed during this Ph.D., two types of organic semiconductors (azomethine-based oligomers and polymers and soluble pentacene derivatives) and one metal oxide semiconductor (tungsten trioxide, WO3). To explore the morphological properties of the thin films, atomic force microscopy was employed. The morphological properties were further investigated by hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy and tentatively correlated to the charge transport properties of the films. X-ray diffraction (Grazing incidence XRD, GIXRD) was used to investigate the crystallinity of the film and the effect of the heat treatment on such crystallinity, as well as to understand the molecular arrangement of the organic molecules in the thin film. The charge transport properties of the films were evaluated in thin film transistor configuration. For electrolyte gated thin film transistors, time dependent transient measurements were conducted, in parallel to more conventional transistor characterizations, to explore the specific effects played on the gating by the anion and cation constituting the electrolyte. The capacitances of the electrical double layers at the electrolyte/WO3 interface were obtained from

  20. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Noonan, W. A.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1996-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 10--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ, which can be measured with a high-resolution spectrometer. Results of proof-of-principle experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques will be presented. Progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will also be presented. This work is supported by DoE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ NRC-NRL Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., accepted for publication in Rev. Sci. Instrum.

  1. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. Results We have developed openBEB (open Biological Experiment Browser), a software framework for data acquisition, coordination, annotation and synchronization with database solutions such as openBIS. OpenBEB consists of two main parts: A core program and a plug-in manager. Whereas the data-type independent core of openBEB maintains a local container of raw-data and metadata and provides annotation and data management tools, all data-specific tasks are performed by plug-ins. The open architecture of openBEB enables the fast integration of plug-ins, e.g., for data acquisition or visualization. A macro-interpreter allows the automation and coordination of the different modules. An update and deployment mechanism keeps the core program, the plug-ins and the metadata definition files in sync with a central repository. Conclusions The versatility, the simple deployment and update mechanism, and the scalability in terms of module integration offered by openBEB make this software interesting for a large scientific community. OpenBEB targets three types of researcher, ideally working closely together: (i) Engineers and scientists developing new methods and instruments, e.g., for systems-biology, (ii) scientists performing biological experiments, (iii) theoreticians and mathematicians analyzing data. The design of openBEB enables the rapid development of plug-ins, which will inherently benefit from the “house keeping” abilities of the core program. We report the use of openBEB to combine live cell microscopy

  2. Electronic transport in DNA sequences: The role of correlations and inter-strand coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the electronic properties in sequences of single and double-strand DNA molecules made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. Using a tight-binding formulation we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to compute the spread of initially localized wave packets. We also compute the localization length in finite segments by employing a Green's function recursion method. We compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of two artificial sequences, namely the quasiperiodic Rudin-Shapiro one, which has long-range correlations, and a intra-strand pair correlated DNA sequence. We found that the short-range character of the intra-strand correlations suffices for a quantitative description of the one-electron wave-packet dynamics in the double-strand real DNA sequences. Further, the inter-strand coupling promotes electronic transport over a longer segment.

  3. Correlated Protein Motion Measurements of Dihydrofolate Reductase Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengyang; Niessen, Katherine; Pace, James; Cody, Vivian; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first direct measurements of the long range structural vibrational modes in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR is a universal housekeeping enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of 7,8-dihydrofolate to 5,6,7,8-tetra-hydrofolate, with the aid of coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). This crucial enzymatic role as the target for anti-cancer [methotrexate (MTX)], and other clinically useful drugs, has made DHFR a long-standing target of enzymological studies. The terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1), corresponds to global correlated protein motions. In our lab we have developed Crystal Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), which directly measures these large scale intra-molecular protein vibrations, by removing the relaxational background of the solvent and residue side chain librational motions. We demonstrate narrowband features in the anisotropic absorbance for mouse DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals as well as Escherichia coli DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI2 grant DBI2959989.

  4. Deformation-phase measurement by digital speckle correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ran; Sun, Ping

    2016-10-01

    A novel algorithm which extracts the out-of-plane component of deformation phase from two continuous fringe patterns is proposed. The velocity field between two consecutive frames is estimated by digital speckle correlation method (DSCM). After that, according to the optical flow constrained equation, the whole-field deformation-phase map is obtained by the estimations of the velocity field and the local frequency of the original image. The operation of the proposed method is simple compared with other phase demodulation methods. Moreover, the new method works perfectly at the areas with dense fringes. In this paper, the proposed algorithm is introduced. Meanwhile, in order to verify the effectiveness, the new algorithm is applied to simulated interferogram and real fringe pattern with a centrally loaded and edge-clamped plate. The results of simulation and experiment show that the new method can demodulate the out-of-plane component of deformation phase from the visible in-plane velocity field without unwrapping process. Further, dynamic deformation-phase extraction will be realized when we know the time interval of two continuous images. The proposed algorithm provides a new approach for whole-field deformation-phase measurement and dynamic deformation measurement.

  5. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown. PMID:24113712

  6. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Neri, J. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Noonan, W. A.

    1997-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 1--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ. These Δ λZ will be resolved using an etalon as a narrowband, high-throughput optical filter. Available results from benchtop experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques, and progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will be presented. Work supported by DOE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ National Research Council Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 1032 (1997).

  7. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown.

  8. Genetic correlation estimates between ultrasound measurements on yearling bulls and carcass measurements on finished steers.

    PubMed

    Devitt, C J; Wilton, J W

    2001-11-01

    Carcass and growth measurements of finished crossbred steers (n = 843) and yearling ultrasound and growth measurements of purebred bulls (n = 5,654) of 11 breeds were analyzed to estimate genetic parameters. Multiple-trait restricted maximum likelihood (REML) was used to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations between finished steer carcass measurements and yearling bull ultrasound measurements. Separate analyses were conducted to examine the effect of adjustment to three different end points: age, backfat thickness, and weight at measurement. Age-constant heritability estimates from finished steer measurements of hot carcass weight, carcass longissimus muscle area, carcass marbling score, carcass backfat, and average daily feedlot gain were 0.47, 0.45, 0.35, 0.41, and 0.30, respectively. Age-constant heritability estimates from yearling bull measurements of ultrasound longissimus muscle area, ultrasound percentage of intramuscular fat, ultrasound backfat, and average daily postweaning gain were 0.48, 0.23, 0.52, and 0.46, respectively. Similar estimates were found for backfat and weight-constant traits. Age-constant genetic correlation estimates between steer carcass longissimus muscle area and bull ultrasound longissimus muscle area, steer carcass backfat and bull ultrasound backfat, steer carcass marbling and bull ultrasound intramuscular fat, and steer average daily gain and bull average daily gain were 0.66, 0.88, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. The strong, positive genetic correlation estimates between bull ultrasound measurements and corresponding steer carcass measurements suggest that genetic improvement for steer carcass traits can be achieved by using yearling bull ultrasound measurements as selection criteria.

  9. Millisecond measurement of transport during and after an electroporation pulse.

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, M R; Corbett, J D; Gimm, J A; Golan, D E; Langer, R; Weaver, J C

    1995-01-01

    Electroporation involves the application of an electric field pulse that creates transient aqueous pathways in lipid bilayer membranes. Transport through these pathways can occur by different mechanisms during and after a pulse. To determine the time scale of transport and the mechanism(s) by which it occurs, efflux of a fluorescent molecule, calcein, across erythrocyte ghost membranes was measured with a fluorescence microscope photometer with millisecond time resolution during and after electroporation pulses several milliseconds in duration. One of four outcomes was typically observed. Ghosts were: (1) partially emptied of calcein, involving efflux primarily after the pulse; (2) completely emptied of calcein, involving efflux primarily after the pulse; (3) completely emptied of calcein, involving efflux both during and after the pulse; or (4) completely emptied of calcein, involving efflux primarily during the pulse. Partial emptying, involving significant efflux during the pulse, was generally not observed. We conclude that under some conditions transport caused by electroporation occurs predominantly by electrophoresis and/or electroosmosis during a pulse, although under other conditions transport occurs in part or almost completely by diffusion within milliseconds to seconds after a pulse. PMID:7612828

  10. Measurement of Flow and Transport in Macroporous Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhne, J. M.; Mohanty, B. P.; Castiglione, P.

    2002-12-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural regions poses a serious environmental threat by allowing chemicals to bypass the soil matrix and to be channeled into ground water. Although a long-known phenomenon, our understanding of and ability to predict macropore flow and transport remain far from complete. To analyze the processes that control macropore flow in soil, we have built large (25 cm diam., 80 cm length) repacked soil columns with different macropore/matrix domain configurations: (i) In column I, multiple macropores were created in one-half cross-section. Water flow and chloride transport experiments were performed for macropores open to the atmosphere and buried-macropores. Measurements at the bottom boundary as well as across the profile consistently revealed the higher degree of preferential flow in open macropores as compared to the buried macropores. (ii) In column II, a single cylindrical macropore was located in the center of the surrounding soil matrix. We conducted experiments of water flow and solute transport using KBr as a conservative tracer. In the soil matrix, TDR-probes measure soil water content and solute concentration, and mini-tensiometers register matric potential. In and adjacent to the macropore-system, TDR-coil probes (diam. 0.3 cm, length of copper coil 1.5 cm) and mini-tensiometers (ceramic cup diam. 0.1-0.2 cm) monitored macropore flow and provided information to quantify inter-region water transfer. Bromide specific electrodes measured the bromide concentration in the effluent of the macropore region and of the matrix region as well as directly inside the soil matrix. The experimental setup seems promising for analyzing basic flow and transport processes in macroporous soils. In future experimental analyses, the complexity of the macropore configuration will be systematically increased in terms of macropore number, geometry, continuity, and physical properties of macropore walls.

  11. Transportable IOT measurement station for direct-broadcast satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Michael

    A transportable 11.7-12.5-GHz flux-density measurement facility for use in the in-orbit testing (IOT) of the FRG TV-Sat direct-broadcast satellites is described. Major components include a 1.2-m-diameter antenna, the fluxmeter, a radiometer to determine atmospheric attenuation, a weather station, and a control and data-processing computer; all of the components are mounted on a 5.10 x 2.35 x 2.70-m trailer. IOT performance parameters include gain/temperature ratio 15.9 dB/K, measurement range -97 to -117 dBW/sq m, measurement accuracy less than 0.5 dB rms, and measurement rate 250-650 msec. Photographs and a block diagram are provided.

  12. Lidar Measurements of Stratospheric Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol During 1992 UARS Correlative Measurement Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Thomas J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Gross, Michael; Heaps, William S.; Ferrare, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric ozone, temperature, and aerosols were made by the NASA/GSFC mobile stratospheric lidar during the UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) Correlative Measurement Campaign at the JPL-Table Mountain Facility in Feb. and Mar. 1992. Due to the presence of substantial amounts of residual volcanic aerosol from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, the GSFC lidar system was modified for an accurate measurement of ozone concentration in the stratosphere. While designed primarily for the measurement of stratospheric ozone, this lidar system was also used to measure middle atmosphere temperature and density from 30 to 65 km and stratospheric aerosol from 15 to 35 km. In the following sections, we will briefly describe and present some typical measurements made during this campaign. Stratospheric ozone, temperature, and aerosols profiles derived from data taken between 15 Feb. and 20 Mar., 1992 will be presented at the conference.

  13. Andreev transport in a correlated ferromagnet-quantum-dot-superconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, I.; Wójcik, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The spin-resolved Andreev reflection processes in a hybrid ferromagnet-quantum-dot-superconductor device are theoretically studied. In particular, the transport coefficients, such as the Andreev transmission as well as the linear-response Andreev conductance, are calculated by means of the numerical renormalization group method. It is shown that, generally, transport properties are conditioned by the interplay of correlations leading to the Kondo effect, superconducting proximity effect, and ferromagnetic-contact-induced exchange field. The exchange field is shown to greatly affect the low-energy behavior of the Andreev transmission by splitting the Kondo resonance. Moreover, it leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the Andreev conductance on the dot level position. At low temperatures, the conductance has a peak at the particle-hole symmetry point, which however becomes quickly suppressed with increasing the temperature. The mechanisms responsible for those effects are thoroughly discussed.

  14. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  15. Effects of valence, geometry and electronic correlations on transport in transition metal benzene sandwich molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak, M.; Jacob, D.

    2016-11-01

    We study the impact of the valence and the geometry on the electronic structure and transport properties of different transition metal-benzene sandwich molecules bridging the tips of a Cu nanocontact. Our density-functional calculations show that the electronic transport properties of the molecules depend strongly on the molecular geometry which can be controlled by the nanocontact tips. Depending on the valence of the transition metal center certain molecules can be tuned in and out of half-metallic behaviour facilitating potential spintronics applications. We also discuss our results in the framework of an Anderson impurity model, indicating cases where the inclusion of local correlations alters the ground state qualitatively. For Co and V centered molecules we find indications of an orbital Kondo effect.

  16. Correlation of buffer strain relaxation modes with transport properties of two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, R.S.; Kavanagh, K.L.; Wieder, H.H.; Robbins, V.M.; Ehrlich, S.N.; Feenstra, R.M.

    1996-12-01

    We have investigated the effects of buffer strain relaxation on the transport properties of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs). The 2DEGs consist of modulation-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As heterostructures grown lattice-mismatched to GaAs via compositionally step-graded In{sub {ital x}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}As buffers, with different composition gradients, or lattice-matched to InP. We find a variation in 2DEG electronic properties which occurs simultaneously with large differences in epilayer tilt and mosaic spread in the step-graded buffers. This indicates a correlation between the {ital mechanism} of buffer strain relaxation and the 2DEG transport properties. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Effects of valence, geometry and electronic correlations on transport in transition metal benzene sandwich molecules.

    PubMed

    Karolak, M; Jacob, D

    2016-11-01

    We study the impact of the valence and the geometry on the electronic structure and transport properties of different transition metal-benzene sandwich molecules bridging the tips of a Cu nanocontact. Our density-functional calculations show that the electronic transport properties of the molecules depend strongly on the molecular geometry which can be controlled by the nanocontact tips. Depending on the valence of the transition metal center certain molecules can be tuned in and out of half-metallic behaviour facilitating potential spintronics applications. We also discuss our results in the framework of an Anderson impurity model, indicating cases where the inclusion of local correlations alters the ground state qualitatively. For Co and V centered molecules we find indications of an orbital Kondo effect. PMID:27605217

  18. Methods for measuring and transporting angular momentum in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David; Flanagan, Eanna; Stein, Leo; Vines, Justin

    2016-03-01

    For an observer in a curved spacetime, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincare transformations from the observer's tangent space to itself can naturally be interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We give an operational procedure by which the observer can measure such local linear and angular momenta from the local spacetime geometry. These momenta can be interpreted as approximate versions of the linear and angular momenta of the spacetime about the observer's location. The measurement algorithm allows for a more accurate determination of the linear and angular momentum of stationary, asymptotically flat systems than previous proposals do. We also describe a prescription by which observers at different locations can compare values of their measured linear and angular momentum by using a specific transport equation, which refines previous proposals. These operational definitions may also prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of Bondi-Metzner-Sachs asymptotic charges in asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  19. Hysteresis in Transport Critical-Current Measurements of Oxide Superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, L. F.; Stauffer, T. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated magnetic hysteresis in transport critical-current (Ic) measurements of Ag-matrix (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10–x (Bi-2223) and AgMg-matrix Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) tapes. The effect of magnetic hysteresis on the measured critical current of high temperature superconductors is a very important consideration for every measurement procedure that involves more than one sweep of magnetic field, changes in field angle, or changes in temperature at a given field. The existence of this hysteresis is well known; however, the implications for a measurement standard or interlaboratory comparisons are often ignored and the measurements are often made in the most expedient way. A key finding is that Ic at a given angle, determined by sweeping the angles in a given magnetic field, can be 17 % different from the Ic determined after the angle was fixed in zero field and the magnet then ramped to the given field. Which value is correct is addressed in the context that the proper sequence of measurement conditions reflects the application conditions. The hysteresis in angle-sweep and temperature-sweep data is related to the hysteresis observed when the field is swept up and down at constant angle and temperature. The necessity of heating a specimen to near its transition temperature to reset it to an initial state between measurements at different angles and temperatures is discussed. PMID:27500042

  20. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  1. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems.

  2. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  3. Transportation control measure: State Implementation Plan guidance (revised final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, D.S.; Deakin, E.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Morris, R.E.; Ireson, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The document has been developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency to summarize current knowledge about transportation control measures (TCMs). The target audience includes transportation and air quality management staff at all government levels. The guidance development effort is motivated by the need to provide post-1987 guidance to attain National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The document provides descriptions and examples of the most frequently implemented TCMs; institutional guidance such as assessing feasibility, agency responsibilities, and funding; and techniques for monitoring and enforcing TCMs. In addition, the document describes the tools available for evaluating TCM impacts on hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide emissions. Appendices present approaches to estimate TCM effects on PM-10 emissions; important sources of additional information; implementation experiences in various cities; and rules of thumb to quantitatively evaluate TCM transportation system effects. The information presented demonstrates that there have been significant advances in TCM development over the past decade, and that TCMs are appropriate control options for state implementation plans.

  4. Measurement of the Critical Deposition Velocity in Slurry Transport through a Horizontal Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Furfari, Daniel J.; Kellogg, Michael I.; Park, Walter R.

    2001-03-01

    Critical Deposition Velocity (CDV) is an important design and operational parameter in slurry transport. Almost all existing correlations that are used to predict this parameter have been obtained experimentally from slurry transport tests featuring single solid species in the slurry mixture. No correlations have been obtained to describe this parameter when the slurry mixture contains more than one solid species having a wide range of specific gravities, particle size distributions, and volume concentrations within the overall slurry mixture. There are no physical or empirical bases that can justify the extrapolation or modification of the existing single species correlations to include all these effects. New experiments must be carried out to obtain new correlations that would be suited for these types of slurries, and that would clarify the mechanics of solids deposition as a function of the properties of the various solid species. Our goal in this paper is to describe a robust experimental technique for the accurate determination of the critical deposition velocity associated with the transport of slurries in horizontal or slightly inclined pipes. Because of the relative difficulty encountered during the precise determination of this useful operational parameter, it has been the practice to connect it with some transitional behavior of more easily measurable flow parameters such as the pressure drop along the slurry pipeline. In doing so, the critical deposition velocity loses its unique and precise definition due to the multitude of factors that influence such transitional behaviors. Here, data has been obtained for single species slurries made up of washed garnet and water and flowing through a 1- inch clear pipe. The selected garnet had a narrow particle size distribution with a mean diameter of 100 mm, approximately. The critical deposition velocity was measured for garnet/water slurries of 10, 20, and 30 percent solids concentration by volume.

  5. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Correlating wine quality indicators to chemical and sensory measurements.

    PubMed

    Hopfer, Helene; Nelson, Jenny; Ebeler, Susan E; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2015-05-12

    Twenty-seven commercial Californian Cabernet Sauvignon wines of different quality categories were analyzed with sensory and chemical methods. Correlations between five quality proxies-points awarded during a wine competition, wine expert scores, retail price, vintage, and wine region-were correlated to sensory attributes, volatile compounds, and elemental composition. Wine quality is a multi-faceted construct, incorporating many different layers. Depending on the quality proxy studied, significant correlations between quality and attributes, volatiles and elements were found, some of them previously reported in the literature.

  7. A guide to accurate measurement of diffusion using fluorescence correlation techniques with blinking quantum dot nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Heinze, Katrin G; Hebert, Benedict; Wiseman, Paul W

    2008-06-14

    Fluctuation-based fluorescence correlation techniques are widely used to study dynamics of fluorophore labeled biomolecules in cells. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been developed as bright and photostable fluorescent probes for various biological applications. However, the fluorescence intermittency of QDs, commonly referred to as "blinking", is believed to complicate quantitative correlation spectroscopy measurements of transport properties, as it is an additional source of fluctuations that contribute on a wide range of time scales. The QD blinking fluctuations obey power-law distributions so there is no single characteristic fluctuation time for this phenomenon. Consequently, it is highly challenging to separate fluorescence blinking fluctuations from those due to transport dynamics. Here, we quantify the bias introduced by QD blinking in transport measurements made using fluctuation methods. Using computer simulated image time series of diffusing point emitters with set "on" and "off" time emission characteristics, we show that blinking results in a systematic overestimation of the diffusion coefficients measured with correlation analysis when a simple diffusion model is used to fit the time correlation decays. The relative error depends on the inherent blinking power-law statistics, the sampling rate relative to the characteristic diffusion time and blinking times, and the total number of images in the time series. This systematic error can be significant; moreover, it can often go unnoticed in common transport model fits of experimental data. We propose an alternative fitting model that incorporates blinking and improves the accuracy of the recovered diffusion coefficients. We also show how to completely eliminate the bias by applying k-space image correlation spectroscopy, which completely separates the diffusion and blinking dynamics, and allows the simultaneous recovery of accurate diffusion coefficients and QD blinking probability distribution

  8. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  9. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    DOE PAGES

    Snijders, Paul C.; Sen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-07-22

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The resultsmore » show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.« less

  10. Strain-Controlled Transport Mechanism in Strongly Correlated LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, D.; Kundu, T. K.

    2016-09-01

    A density functional theory + Hubbard U (DFT + U) method is employed to investigate the effect of strain on the electronic and transport properties of the correlated metal LaNiO3. LaNiO3 without strain is characterized by a low temperature Fermi liquid behaviour of resistivity, a negative Seebeck coefficient and a positive Hall coefficient. Density of states, resistivity, thermopower and Hall coefficient obtained within the DFT + U approach reveal that LaNiO3 under both compressive and tensile strain is more metallic compared to the unstrained system. However, LaNiO3 under tensile strain is found to be more strongly correlated than that under compressive strain. Electron localization function calculation shows that there is a substantial increase in the covalent part of the chemical bonding, which corroborates an increase in the resistivity for LaNiO3 under tensile strain. Our first-principle-based calculation clearly demonstrates that the transport properties of LaNiO3 can be tuned by applying suitable strain.

  11. Skin Friction and Transition Location Measurement on Supersonic Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Olsen, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative skin friction and transition location data in wind tunnel tests performed on two supersonic transport models at Mach 2.40. Oil-film interferometry was useful for verifying boundary layer transition, but careful monitoring of model surface temperatures and systematic examination of the effects of tunnel start-up and shutdown transients will be required to achieve high levels of accuracy for skin friction measurements. A more common technique, use of a subliming solid to reveal transition location, was employed to correct drag measurements to a standard condition of all-turbulent flow on the wing. These corrected data were then analyzed to determine the additional correction required to account for the effect of the boundary layer trip devices.

  12. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  13. Calorimetric measurement of water transport and intracellular ice formation during freezing in cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shoji; Choi, Jeunghwan; Devireddy, Ram V; Bischof, John C

    2012-12-01

    The current study presents a new and novel analysis of heat release signatures measured by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) associated with water transport (WT), intracellular ice formation (IIF) and extracellular ice formation (EIF). Correlative cryomicroscopy experiments were also performed to validate the DSC data. The DSC and cryomicroscopy experiments were performed on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDFs) at various cytocrit values (0-0.8) at various cooling rates (0.5-250 °C/min). A comparison of the cryomicroscopy experiments with the DSC analysis show reasonable agreement in the water transport (cellular dehydration) and IIF characteristics between both the techniques with the caveat that IIF measured by DSC lagged that measured by cryomicroscopy. This was ascribed to differences in the techniques (i.e. cell vs. bulk measurement) and the possibility that not all IIF is associated with visual darkening. High and low rates of 0.5 °C/min and 250 °C/min were chosen as HDFs did not exhibit significant IIF or WT at each of these extremes respectively. Analysis of post-thaw viability data suggested that 10 °C/min was the presumptive optimal cooling rate for HDFs and was independent of the cytocrit value. The ratio of measured heat values associated with IIF (q(IIF)) to the total heat released from both IIF and water transport or from the total cell water content in the sample (q(CW)) was also found to increase as the cooling rate was increased from 10 to 250 °C/min and was independent of the sample cytocrit value. Taken together, these observations suggest that the proposed analysis is capable of deconvolving water transport and IIF data from the measured DSC latent heat thermograms in cell suspensions during freezing.

  14. Spin transport measurements in gallium arsenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folk, Joshua Alexander

    This thesis presents a series of measurements investigating the spin physics of lateral quantum dots, defined electrostatically in the 2-D electron gas at the interface of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The experiments span a range from open dots, where the leads of the dot carry at least one fully transmitting mode, to closed dots, where the leads are set to be tunnel barriers. For open dots, spin physics is inferred from measurements of conductance fluctuations; the effects of spin degeneracy in the orbital levels as well as a spin-orbit interaction are observed. In the closed dot measurements, ground state spin transitions as electrons are added to the dot may be determined from the motion of Coulomb blockade peaks in an in-plane magnetic field. In addition, this thesis demonstrates for the first time a direct measurement of the spin polarization of current emitted from a quantum dot, or a quantum point contact, during transport. These experiments make use of a spin-sensitive focusing geometry in which a quantum point contact serves as a spin analyzer for the mesoscopic device under test. Measurements are presented both in the open dot regime, where good agreement with theory is found, as well as the closed dot regime, where the data defies a simple theoretical explanation.

  15. Solution processable semiconductor thin films: Correlation between morphological, structural, optical and charge transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Dilek

    This Ph.D. thesis is a result of multidisciplinary research bringing together fundamental concepts in thin film engineering, materials science, materials processing and characterization, electrochemistry, microfabrication, and device physics. Experiments were conducted by tackling scientific problems in the field of thin films and interfaces, with the aim to correlate the morphology, crystalline structure, electronic structure of thin films with the functional properties of the films and the performances of electronic devices based thereon. Furthermore, novel strategies based on interfacial phenomena at electrolyte/thin film interfaces were explored and exploited to control the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Three main chemical systems were the object of the studies performed during this Ph.D., two types of organic semiconductors (azomethine-based oligomers and polymers and soluble pentacene derivatives) and one metal oxide semiconductor (tungsten trioxide, WO3). To explore the morphological properties of the thin films, atomic force microscopy was employed. The morphological properties were further investigated by hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy and tentatively correlated to the charge transport properties of the films. X-ray diffraction (Grazing incidence XRD, GIXRD) was used to investigate the crystallinity of the film and the effect of the heat treatment on such crystallinity, as well as to understand the molecular arrangement of the organic molecules in the thin film. The charge transport properties of the films were evaluated in thin film transistor configuration. For electrolyte gated thin film transistors, time dependent transient measurements were conducted, in parallel to more conventional transistor characterizations, to explore the specific effects played on the gating by the anion and cation constituting the electrolyte. The capacitances of the electrical double layers at the electrolyte/WO3 interface were obtained from

  16. Theory and Measurement of Partially Correlated Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series methods can effectively estimate temporal surface changes induced by geophysical phenomena. However, such methods are susceptible to decorrelation due to spatial and temporal baselines (radar pass separation), changes in orbital geometries, atmosphere, and noise. These effects limit the number of interferograms that can be used for differential analysis and obscure the deformation signal. InSAR decorrelation effects may be ameliorated by exploiting pixels that exhibit phase stability across the stack of interferograms. These so-called persistent scatterer (PS) pixels are dominated by a single point-like scatterer that remains phase-stable over the spatial and temporal baseline. By identifying a network of PS pixels for use in phase unwrapping, reliable deformation measurements may be obtained even in areas of low correlation, where traditional InSAR techniques fail to produce useful observations. PS identification is challenging in natural terrain, due to low reflectivity and few corner reflectors. Shanker and Zebker [1] proposed a PS pixel selection technique based on maximum-likelihood estimation of the associated signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). In this study, we further develop the underlying theory for their technique, starting from statistical backscatter characteristics of PS pixels. We derive closed-form expressions for the spatial, rotational, and temporal decorrelation of PS pixels as a function of baseline and signal-to-clutter ratio. We show that previous decorrelation and critical baseline expressions [2] are limiting cases of our result. We then describe a series of radar scattering simulations and show that the simulated decorrelation matches well with our analytic results. Finally, we use our decorrelation expressions with maximum-likelihood SCR estimation to analyze an area of the Hayward Fault Zone in the San Francisco Bay Area. A series of 38 images of the area were obtained from C

  17. Correlates of Walking for Transportation and Use of Public Transportation Among Adults in St Louis, Missouri, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, James A.; Corseuil, Marui W.; Dodson, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Attributes of the built environment can influence active transportation, including use of public transportation. However, the relationship between perceptions of the built environment and use of public transportation deserves further attention. The objectives of this study were 1) to assess the relationship between personal characteristics and public transportation use with meeting national recommendations for moderate physical activity through walking for transportation and 2) to examine associations between personal and perceived environmental factors and frequency of public transportation use. Methods In 2012, we administered a mail-based survey to 772 adults in St Louis, Missouri, to assess perceptions of the built environment, physical activity, and transportation behaviors. The abbreviated International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess walking for transportation and use of public transportation. The Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale was used to examine perceptions of the built environment. Associations were assessed by using multinomial logistic regression. Results People who used public transportation at least once in the previous week were more likely to meet moderate physical activity recommendations by walking for transportation. Age and employment were significantly associated with public transportation use. Perceptions of high traffic speed and high crime were negatively associated with public transportation use. Conclusion Our results were consistent with previous research suggesting that public transportation use is related to walking for transportation. More importantly, our study suggests that perceptions of traffic speed and crime are related to frequency of public transportation use. Future interventions to encourage public transportation use should consider policy and planning decisions that reduce traffic speed and improve safety. PMID:24995654

  18. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  19. Reexamination of the purity entanglement measure: Peculiarities of a truly thermodynamic quantum correlation measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdalla, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purity entanglement measure introduced by Los Alamos group a decade ago is reexamined in the light of interesting features. The role played by purity, reaching a real thermodynamic limit, in detecting quantum phase transitions is studied with a different system, the bond-alternating X Y model in an external magnetic field. The properties of this system are described as well. By considering the dynamics of the original X Y model, we observe that nonergodicity is also grasped by the purity measure, in accordance with other quantum correlation measures that have no common physical or mathematical relation. Adiabaticity is not recovered from the dynamic to the static case, in accordance with one of the consequences of the celebrated Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  20. Tomato root growth, gravitropism, and lateral development: correlation with auxin transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Haworth, P.

    1994-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) roots were analyzed during growth on agar plates. Growth of these roots was inhibited by the auxin transport inhibitors naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and semicarbazone derivative I (SCB-1). The effect of auxin transport inhibitors on root gravitropism was analyzed by measurement of the angle of gravitropic curvature after the roots were reoriented 90 degrees from the vertical. NPA and SCB-1 abolished both the response of these roots to gravity and the formation of lateral roots, with SCB-1 being the more effective at inhibition. Auxins also inhibited root growth. Both auxins tested has a slight effect on the gravity response, but this effect is probably indirect, since auxins reduced the growth rate. Auxins also stimulated lateral root growth at concentration where primary root growth was inhibited. When roots were treated with both IAA and NPA simultaneously, a cumulative inhibition of root growth was found. When both compounds were applied together, analysis of gravitropism and lateral root formation indicated that the dominant effect was exerted by auxin transport inhibitors. Together, these data suggest a model for the role of auxin transport in controlling both primary and lateral root growth.

  1. Bidirectional transepithelial water transport: measurement and governing mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J E; Wong, L B; Yeates, D B

    1999-01-01

    In the search for the mechanisms whereby water is transported across biological membranes, we hypothesized that in the airways, the hydration of the periciliary fluid layer is regulated by luminal-to-basolateral water transport coupled to active transepithelial sodium transport. The luminal-to-basolateral (JWL-->B) and the basolateral-to-luminal (JWB-->L) transepithelial water fluxes across ovine tracheal epithelia were measured simultaneously. The JWL-->B (6.1 microliter/min/cm2) was larger than JWB-->L (4.5 microliter/min/cm2, p < 0.05, n = 30). The corresponding water diffusional permeabilities were PdL-->B = 1.0 x 10(-4) cm/s and PdB-->L = 7.5 x 10(-5) cm/s. The activation energy (Ea) of JWL-->B (11.6 kcal/mol) was larger than the Ea of JWB-->L (6.5 kcal/mol, p < 0.05, n = 5). Acetylstrophanthidin (100 microM basolateral) reduced JWL-->B from 6.1 to 4.4 microliter/min/cm2 (p < 0. 05, n = 5) and abolished the PD. Amiloride (10 microM luminal) reduced JWL-->B from 5.7 to 3.7 microliter/min/cm2 (p < 0.05, n = 5) and reduced PD by 44%. Neither of these agents significantly changed JWB-->L. These data indicate that in tracheal epithelia under homeostatic conditions, JWB-->L was dominated by diffusion (Ea = 4.6 kcal/mol), whereas approximately 30% of JWL-->B was coupled to the active Na+,K+-ATPase pump (Ea = 27 kcal/mol). PMID:9929488

  2. Effects of spin-orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Benjamin; Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of exchange correlations and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet-triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects.

  3. Effects of spin–orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine

    PubMed Central

    Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Summary The interplay of exchange correlations and spin–orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet–triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects. PMID:26885457

  4. Effects of spin-orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Benjamin; Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of exchange correlations and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet-triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects. PMID:26885457

  5. Polysulfide transport through separators measured by a linear voltage sweep method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi; Fu, Yongzhu

    2015-07-01

    Shuttle of polysulfide from the sulfur cathode to lithium metal anode in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries is a critical issue hindering cycling efficiency and life. Several approaches have been developed to minimize it including polysulfide-blocking separators; there is a need for measuring polysulfide transport through separators. We here show a linear voltage sweep method to measure anodic (oxidization) current of polysulfide crossed separators, which can be used as a quantitative measurement of the polysulfide transport. The electrochemical oxidation of polysulfide is diffusion controlled. The electrical charge in Coulombs produced by the oxidation of polysulfide is linearly related to the concentration of polysulfide within a certain range (≤0.5 M). Separators with a high porosity (large pore size) show high anodic currents, resulting in fast capacity degradation and low Coulombic efficiencies in Li-S cells. These results demonstrate this method can be used to correlate the polysulfide transport through separators with the separator structure and battery performance, therefore provide guidance for developing new separators for lithium-sulfur batteries.

  6. Benefits of Time Correlation Measurements for Passive Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murer, David; Blackie, Douglas; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The “FLASH Portals Project” is a collaboration between Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd (CH), the Atomic Weapons Establishment (UK), and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission), supported by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). The program's goal was to develop and demonstrate a technology to detect shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) more efficiently and less ambiguously by exploiting time correlation. This study presents experimental results of a two-sided portal monitor equipped with in total 16 4He fast neutron detectors as well as four polyvinyltoluene (PVT) plastic scintillators. All detectors have been synchronized to nanosecond precision, thereby allowing the resolution of time correlations from timescales of tens of microseconds (such as (n, γ) reactions) down to prompt fission correlations directly. Our results demonstrate that such correlations can be detected in a typical radiation portal monitor (RPM) geometry and within operationally acceptable time scales, and that exploiting these signatures significantly improves the performance of the RPM compared to neutron counting. Furthermore, the results show that some time structure remains even in the presence of heavy shielding, thus significantly improving the sensitivity of the detection system to shielded SNM.

  7. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  8. Transport measurements on monolayer and few-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomaki, Tauno; Zhao, Wenjin; Finney, Joe; Fei, Zaiyao; Nguyen, Paul; McKay, Frank; Cobden, David

    The behavior of the electrical contacts often dominates transport measurements in mono and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) devices. Creating good contacts for some TMDs is particularly challenging since the fabrication procedure should prevent the TMD from oxidizing or chemically interacting with the contacts. In this talk, we discuss our progress on creating mono and few-layer WSe2 devices with both good electrical contacts and minimal effects from the substrate, polymer contamination, oxidation and other chemistry. For example, we have developed a technique for encapsulating metallic contacts and WSe2 flakes together in hexagonal boron nitride with multiple gates to separate and control the contributions from the channel and the Schottky barriers at the contacts. Research supported in part by Samsung GRO grant US 040814

  9. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  10. Correlation measure to detect time series distances, whence economy globalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miśkiewicz, Janusz; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-11-01

    An instantaneous time series distance is defined through the equal time correlation coefficient. The idea is applied to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) yearly increments of 21 rich countries between 1950 and 2005 in order to test the process of economic globalisation. Some data discussion is first presented to decide what (EKS, GK, or derived) GDP series should be studied. Distances are then calculated from the correlation coefficient values between pairs of series. The role of time averaging of the distances over finite size windows is discussed. Three network structures are next constructed based on the hierarchy of distances. It is shown that the mean distance between the most developed countries on several networks actually decreases in time, -which we consider as a proof of globalization. An empirical law is found for the evolution after 1990, similar to that found in flux creep. The optimal observation time window size is found ≃15 years.

  11. Correlated optical measurements and plasmon mapping of silver nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Guiton, Beth S; Iberi, Vighter; Li, Shuzhou; Leonard, Donovan N; Parish, Chad M; Kotula, Paul G; Varela del Arco, Maria; Schatz, George C.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Camden, Jon P

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field, yet imaging of the plasmonic modes in complex nanoscale architectures is extremely challenging. Here we obtain spatial maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of high-aspect-ratio silver nanorods using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and correlate to optical data and classical electrodynamics calculations from the exact same particles. EELS mapping is thus demonstrated to be an invaluable technique for elucidating complex and overlapping plasmon modes.

  12. Correlated optical measurements and plasmon mapping of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Guiton, Beth S; Iberi, Vighter; Li, Shuzhou; Leonard, Donovan N; Parish, Chad M; Kotula, Paul G; Varela, Maria; Schatz, George C; Pennycook, Stephen J; Camden, Jon P

    2011-08-10

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field, yet imaging of the plasmonic modes in complex nanoscale architectures is extremely challenging. Here we obtain spatial maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of high-aspect-ratio silver nanorods using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and correlate to optical data and classical electrodynamics calculations from the exact same particles. EELS mapping is thus demonstrated to be an invaluable technique for elucidating complex and overlapping plasmon modes.

  13. Reduction of Gun Erosion and Correlation of Gun Erosion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, Dave; Wercinski, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gun barrel erosion is serious problem with two-stage light gas guns. Excessive barrel erosion can lead to poor or failed launches and frequent barrel changes, with the corresponding down time. Also, excessive barrel erosion can limit the maximum velocity obtainable by loading down the hydrogen working gas with eroded barrel material. Guided by a CFD code, the operating conditions of the Ames 0.5-inch gun were modified to reduce barrel erosion. The changes implemented included: (1) reduction in the piston mass, powder mass and hydrogen fill pressure; and (2) reduction in pump tube volume, while maintaining hydrogen mass. The latter change was found, in particular, to greatly reduce barrel erosion. For muzzle velocity ranges of 6.1 - 6.9 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 10. Even for the higher muzzle velocity range of 7.0 - 8.2 km/sec, the barrel erosion was reduced by a factor of 4. Gun erosion data from the Ames 0.5-inch, 1.0-inch, and 1.5-inch guns operated over a wide variety of launch conditions was examined and it was found that this data could be correlated using four different parameters: normalized powder charge energy, normalized hydrogen energy density, normalized pump tube volume and barrel diameter. The development of the correlation and the steps used to collapse the experimental data are presented. Over a certain parameter range in the correlation developed, the barrel erosion per shot is found to increase very rapidly. The correlation should prove useful in the selection of gun operating conditions and the design of new guns. Representative shapes of eroded gun barrels are also presented.

  14. Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Resultsfrom ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus,Jerry

    2006-06-05

    High precision uranium isotope measurements of marineclastic sediments are used to measure the transport and storage time ofsediment from source to site of deposition. The approach is demonstratedon fine-grained, late Pleistocene deep-sea sediments from Ocean DrillingProgram Site 984A on the Bjorn Drift in the North Atlantic. The sedimentsare siliciclastic with up to 30 percent carbonate, and dated by sigma 18Oof benthic foraminifera. Nd and Sr isotopes indicate that provenance hasoscillated between a proximal source during the last three interglacialperiods volcanic rocks from Iceland and a distal continental sourceduring glacial periods. An unexpected finding is that the 234U/238Uratios of the silicate portion of the sediment, isolated by leaching withhydrochloric acid, are significantly less than the secular equilibriumvalue and show large and systematic variations that are correlated withglacial cycles and sediment provenance. The 234U depletions are inferredto be due to alpha-recoil loss of234Th, and are used to calculate"comminution ages" of the sediment -- the time elapsed between thegeneration of the small (<_ 50 mu-m) sediment grains in the sourceareas by comminution of bedrock, and the time of deposition on theseafloor. Transport times, the difference between comminution ages anddepositional ages, vary from less than 10 ky to about 300 to 400 ky forthe Site 984A sediments. Long transport times may reflect prior storagein soils, on continental shelves, or elsewhere on the seafloor. Transporttime may also be a measure of bottom current strength. During the mostrecent interglacial periods the detritus from distal continental sourcesis diluted with sediment from Iceland that is rapidly transported to thesite of deposition. The comminution age approach could be used to dateQuaternary non-marine sediments, soils, and atmospheric dust, and may beenhanced by concomitant measurement of 226Ra/230Th, 230Th/234U, andcosmogenic nuclides.

  15. Noninvasive quantitative measurement of colloid transport in mesoscale porous media using time lapse fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Jonathan W; Banwart, Steven A; Heathwaite, A Louise

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate noninvasive quantitative imaging of colloid and solute transport at millimeter to decimeter (meso-) scale. Ultraviolet (UV) excited fluorescent solute and colloid tracers were independently measured simultaneously during co-advection through saturated quartz sand. Pulse-input experiments were conducted at constant flow rates and ionic strengths 10(-3), 10(-2) and 10(-1) M NaCl. Tracers were 1.9 microm carboxylate latex microspheres and disodium fluorescein. Spatial moments analysis was used to quantify relative changes in mass distribution of the colloid and solute tracers over time. The solute advected through the sand at a constant velocity proportional to flow rate and was described well by a conservative transport model (CXTFIT). In unfavorable deposition conditions increasing ionic strength produced significant reduction in colloid center of mass transport velocity over time. Velocity trends correlated with the increasing fraction of colloid mass retained along the flowpath. Attachment efficiencies (defined by colloid filtration theory) calculated from nondestructive retained mass data were 0.013 +/- 0.03, 0.09 +/- 0.02, and 0.22 +/- 0.05 at 10(-3), 10(-2), and 10(-1) M ionic strength, respectively, which compared well with previously published data from breakthrough curves and destructive sampling. Mesoscale imaging of colloid mass dynamics can quantify key deposition and transport parameters based on noninvasive, nondestructive, spatially high-resolution data.

  16. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  17. Inequivalence of correlation-based measures of non-Markovianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alaor Cervati; Karpat, Göktuǧ; Fanchini, Felipe Fernandes

    2016-09-01

    We conclusively show that the entanglement- and the mutual-information-based measures of quantum non-Markovianity are inequivalent. To this aim, we first analytically solve the optimization problem in the definition of the entanglement-based measure for a two-level system. We demonstrate that the optimal initial bipartite state of the open system and the ancillary is always given by one of the Bell states for any one-qubit dynamics. On top of this result, we present an explicit example dynamics where memory effects emerge according to the mutual-information-based measure, even though the time evolution remains memoryless with respect to the entanglement-based measure. Finally, we explain this disagreement between the two measures in terms of the information dynamics of the open system, exploring the accessible and inaccessible parts of information.

  18. Electrical conductivity measurements of nanofluids and development of new correlations.

    PubMed

    Konakanchi, Hanumantharao; Vajjha, Ravikanth; Misra, Debasmita; Das, Debendra

    2011-08-01

    In this study the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles dispersed in propylene glycol and water mixture were measured in the temperature range of 0 degrees C to 90 degrees C. The volumetric concentration of nanoparticles in these fluids ranged from 0 to 10% for different nanofluids. The particle sizes considered were from 20 nm to 70 nm. The electrical conductivity measuring apparatus and the measurement procedure were validated by measuring the electrical conductivity of a calibration fluid, whose properties are known accurately. The measured electrical conductivity values agreed within +/- 1% with the published data reported by the manufacturer. Following the validation, the electrical conductivities of different nanofluids were measured. The measurements showed that electrical conductivity of nanofluids increased with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in particle volumetric concentration. For the same nanofluid at a fixed volumetric concentration, the electrical conductivity was found to be higher for smaller particle sizes. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed for three nanofluids to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature, volumetric concentration and the size of the nanoparticles.

  19. [Tuberculosis prevention measure in medical and correlated facilities].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Keiichi

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection of healthcare workers in medical and correlated facilities is serious issue. For the prevention of TB transmission in the facilities, there are five important matters which are management of work environment, self protection manner, TB infection screening, a system for infection control, and TB education. The air containing TB nuclei must be exhausted from the work space mechanically, the workers should wear N95 mask at high risk places, regular chest X-ray examination and periodically QuantiFERON test for healthcare workers should undergo, the infection control committee must be active and TB education course for healthcare workers must be held annually. PMID:21838052

  20. Measuring hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the Dee estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños, R.; Souza, A.

    2010-03-01

    The capability of monitoring and predicting the marine environment leads to a more sustainable development of coastal and offshore regions. Therefore, the continuous measurement of environmental processes become an important source of information. The present paper shows data collected during 6 years, and in particular during 2008, in the Dee Estuary. The data aims to improve the observations of the mobile sediments in coastal areas and its forcing hydrodynamics and turbulence. Data involves the deployment of instrumented rigs measuring sediment in suspension, currents, waves, sea level, sediment size and bedforms as well as cruise work including grab sampling, CTD profiles and side-scan sonar. The data covers flood and ebb tides during spring and neap periods with moderate and mild wave events, thus, having a good coverage of the processes needed to improve knowledge of sediment transport and the parameterizations used in numerical modelling. The data, in raw and treated, is being banked at BODC (British Oceanographic Data Centre, http://www.bodc.ac.uk/) which is the formal British organization for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environment.

  1. Measuring hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños, R.; Souza, A.

    2010-06-01

    The capability of monitoring and prediction in the marine environment provides information that may allow sustainable development of coastal and offshore regions. Therefore, the continuous measurement of environmental processes becomes an important source of information. The present paper shows data collected during 6 years, and in particular during 2008, in the Dee Estuary. The aim of the data collection is to improve the observations of the mobile sediments in coastal areas and its forcing hydrodynamics and turbulence. Data includes information from the deployment of instrumented rigs measuring sediment in suspension, currents, waves, sea level, sediment size and bedforms as well as cruise work including grab sampling, CTD profiles and side-scan sonar. The data cover flood and ebb tides during spring and neap periods with moderate and mild wave events, thus, having a good coverage of the processes needed to improve knowledge of sediment transport and the parameterizations used in numerical modelling. The data, in raw and treated, are being banked at BODC (British Oceanographic Data Centre, http://www.bodc.ac.uk/) which is the formal British organization for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environment.

  2. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  3. Correlation of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties of a novel hydrogen transport membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongjun

    A key part of the FutureGen concept is to support the production of hydrogen to fuel a "hydrogen economy," with the use of clean burning hydrogen in power-producing fuel cells, as well as for use as a transportation fuel. One of the key technical barriers to FutureGen deployment is reliable and efficient hydrogen separation technology. Most Hydrogen Transport Membrane (HTM) research currently focuses on separation technology and hydrogen flux characterization. No significant work has been performed on thermo-mechanical properties of HTMs. The objective of the thesis is to understand the structure-property correlation of HTM and to characterize (1) thermo mechanical properties under different reducing environments and thermal cycles (thermal shock), and (2) evaluate the stability of the novel HTM material. A novel HTM cermet bulk sample was characterized for its physical and mechanical properties at both room temperature and at elevated temperature up to 1000°C. Micro-structural properties and residual stresses were evaluated in order to understand the changing mechanism of the microstructure and its effects on the mechanical properties of materials. A correlation of the microstructural and thermo mechanical properties of the HTM system was established for both HTM and the substrate material. Mechanical properties of both selected structural ceramics and the novel HTM cermet bulk sample are affected mainly by porosity and microstructural features, such as grain size and pore size-distribution. The Young's Modulus (E-value) is positively correlated to the flexural strength for materials with similar crystallographic structure. However, for different crystallographic materials, physical properties are independent of mechanical properties. Microstructural properties, particularly, grain size and crystallographic structure, and thermodynamic properties are the main factors affecting the mechanical properties at both room and high temperatures. The HTM cermet behaves

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO{sub 3} substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ∼18 K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ∼3 K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. These macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed bymore » soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.« less

  6. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  7. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  8. Development of Standardized Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Large Area Emission Measurements (DRAFT UNDER EPA REVIEW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-wittig, T. A.; Thoma, E.; Green, R.; Hater, G.; Swan, N.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heterogeneity, make direct (on-site) emission assessment difficult; methane emissions, from landfills for example, can be particularly complex [Thoma et al, 2009]. Recently, whole-facility (remote) measurement approaches based on tracer correlation have been utilized [Scheutz et al, 2011]. The approach uses a mobile platform to simultaneously measure a metered-release of a conservative gas (the tracer) along with the target compound (methane in the case of landfills). The known-rate tracer release provides a measure of atmospheric dispersion at the downwind observing location allowing the area source emission to be determined by a ratio calculation [Green et al, 2010]. Although powerful in concept, the approach has been somewhat limited to research applications due to the complexities and cost of the high-sensitivity measurement equipment required to quantify the part-per billion levels of tracer and target gas at kilometer-scale distances. The advent of compact, robust, and easy to use near-infrared optical measurement systems (such as cavity ring down spectroscopy) allow the tracer correlation approach to be investigated for wider use. Over the last several years, Waste Management Inc., the U.S. EPA, and collaborators have conducted method evaluation activities to determine the viability of a standardized approach through execution of a large number of field measurement trials at U.S. landfills. As opposed to previous studies [Scheutz et al, 2011] conducted at night (optimal plume transport conditions), the current work evaluated realistic use-scenarios; these scenarios include execution by non-scientist personnel, daylight operation, and full range of atmospheric condition (all plume transport

  9. Regional serotonin transporter availability and depression are correlated in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Barthel, H; Hermann, W; Murai, T; Kluge, R; Wagner, A; Sabri, O; Eggers, B

    2003-08-01

    In patients with Wilson's disease (WD), depression is a frequent psychiatric symptom. In vivo neuroimaging studies suggest that depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with central serotonergic deficits. However, in vivo measurements of serotonergic neurotransmission have not until now been performed in patients with this copper deposition disorder. The present prospective study revealed that depressive symptomatology is related to an alteration of presynaptic serotonin transporters (SERT) availability as measured by [123I]-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]beta-CIT) and high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SERT imaging with [123I]beta-CIT-SPECT could therefore become a useful tool for diagnosis and therapy monitoring in depressed WD patients. PMID:12898347

  10. Chloride transport across placental microvillous membranes measured by fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Illsley, N.P.; Glaubensklee, C.; Davis, B.; Verkman, A.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Chloride transport across human placental microvillous vesicle membrane was investigated using the fluorescent probe SPQ (6-methoxy-N(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium). Chloride influx (J{sub Cl}) was calculated from the initial rate of quenching of intravesicular SPQ fluorescence by chloride. J{sub Cl} measured by SPQ fluorescence was not significantly different from J{sub Cl} measured by uptake of {sup 36}Cl; SPQ did not affect measurements of J{sub Cl}. J{sub Cl} was increased 51% by a 58-mV membrane potential. Voltage-stimulated J{sub Cl} showed a saturable dependence on chloride concentration with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 18 {plus minus} 5 mM and was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.13 {plus minus} 0.03 mM. The activation energy calculated for voltage-stimulated J{sub Cl} was 4.6 {plus minus} 0.6 kcal/mol. J{sub Cl} was also stimulated by a reduction in the external pH from 7.0 to 5.5 (internal pH = 70). pH-stimulated chloride influx was increased by trans-HCO{sub 3} and was inhibited by dihydro-4,4{prime}-diisothiocyano-2,2{prime}-disulfonic stilbene. Uptake of {sup 36}Cl into microvillous vesicles was stimulated by trans-Cl. pH-stimulated J{sub Cl} showed a saturable dependence on chloride with a K{sub d} of 38 {plus minus} 6 mM but was not affected by membrane potential. No evidence was found for Na- or K-coupled chloride cotransport. These findings demonstrate the presence of a saturable chloride conductance and an electroneutral chloride-bicarbonate exchanger in the placental microvillous membrane.

  11. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert E.; Dozier, Jeff; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  12. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Dozier, J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  13. Amplitude measurements in ambient noise correlations -- application to attenuation and site response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, D. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Lin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional ambient noise cross correlations between seismic stations have proven to be an effective means of extracting travel time information of surface waves. However, while the raw noise data is usually processed in a way which suppresses large amplitude earthquake events, it also distorts all relative amplitude information. Such information is the key to accurately retrieving attenuation and local site response measurements. Previous work using earthquake sources to track wave front propagation across the U.S. Array has been used to distinguish between effects on amplitude variation. Applying a similar approach to ambient noise studies offers potentially increased flexibility in such studies. We attempt a varied application of the methods which should preserve relative amplitudes in the Noise Correlation Function (NCF) across a given day or hour. Considering each station as a virtual source, a large number of travel time and relative amplitude maps can be constructed. By applying spatial differential operators to these maps, we track the effect of phase-front focusing and defocusing. By comparing amplitude variation for waves propagating in opposite directions, we attempt to independently infer the effects of seismic intrinsic attenuation and local site response. We have applied the approach on two datasets of vastly different scale. A dense array of single-component, broadband seismometers in Long Beach, CA (>4000 in an area around 100 sq-km) allows us to explore the higher frequency end of these measurements, up to 4Hz. In contrast, data collected over 4 years from the U.S. Array provide continental scale application, with useful periods of 8-30 seconds and depth sensitivities down to the uppermost mantle. We compare our results with previous studies based on earthquakes.

  14. Electrostatic and magnetic measurements of turbulence and transport in Extrap T2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Anders; Sallander, Eva

    1999-10-01

    Langmuir probe and magnetic pick-up coil measurements are used to study edge turbulence in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch. Magnetic fluctuations resonant outside the toroidal field reversal surface are observed where previously only fluctuations in the spectra of potential and electron density and temperature have been measured. Results are presented which imply that these fluctuations are coupled to and also correlated to the internally resonant tearing mode fluctuations. Evidence of coupling between low-frequency (<100 kHz) and high-frequency fluctuations is also presented. The normalized floating potential fluctuations are seen to increase with the edge electron temperature. This causes an increase of the potential and density fluctuation driven transport with the temperature which is faster than linear. These results, in combination, are consistent with a picture where internally resonant fluctuations couple to edge fluctuations through radial heat conduction from the stochastic core to the edge.

  15. Theoretical Correlations and Measured Correlations: Relating Recognition and Recall in Four Distributed Memory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahana, Michael J.; Rizzuto, Daniel S.; Schneider, Abraham R.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between item recognition and associative (cued) recall. Going beyond measures of performance on each task, the analysis focuses on the degree to which the contingency between successful recognition and successful recall of a studied item reflects the commonality of memory processes underlying the recognition and…

  16. Dimension of quantum phase space measured by photon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchs, Gerd; Glauber, Roy J.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2015-06-01

    We show that the different values 1, 2 and 3 of the normalized second-order correlation function {g}(2)(0) corresponding to a coherent state, a thermal state and a highly squeezed vacuum originate from the different dimensionality of these states in phase space. In particular, we derive an exact expression for {g}(2)(0) in terms of the ratio of the moments of the classical energy evaluated with the Wigner function of the quantum state of interest and corrections proportional to the reciprocal of powers of the average number of photons. In this way we establish a direct link between {g}(2)(0) and the shape of the state in phase space. Moreover, we illuminate this connection by demonstrating that in the semi-classical limit the familiar photon statistics of a thermal state arise from an area in phase space weighted by a two-dimensional Gaussian, whereas those of a highly squeezed state are governed by a line-integral of a one-dimensional Gaussian. We dedicate this article to Margarita and Vladimir Man’ko on the occasion of their birthdays. The topic of our contribution is deeply rooted in and motivated by their love for non-classical light, quantum mechanical phase space distribution functions and orthogonal polynomials. Indeed, through their articles, talks and most importantly by many stimulating discussions and intensive collaborations with us they have contributed much to our understanding of physics. Happy birthday to you both!

  17. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  18. Correlated measurements of mesospheric density and near infrared airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, G.; Pautet, D.; Faivre, M.; Keckhut, P.; Hauchecorne, A.

    A program aimed at simultaneously measuring the mesospheric density and the evolution with time of the near IR emission at the mesopause level was initiated in July 2000 and July 2001. The atmospheric density is measured along a vertical line using the Rayleigh scattering lidar located at Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP). The near IR emission, mainly due to OH, is measured along a slant path from the Pic de Château-Renard (Hautes-Alpes, altitude 2989 m). The field of view of the CCD camera encompasses an area located vertically above OHP. Rayleigh scattering by air molecules is much less efficient than fluorescence by alkaline atoms. Therefore, the lidar data could only be retrieved with a one-hour time resolution at altitudes of 65, 70, 72.5 and 75 km. The time resolution for the airglow intensity measurement was equal to three minutes. The temporal evolution over the 5-hour duration of the night appears as opposite in the density up to 75 km and in the near IR airglow. The airglow shows around 23h30 a minimum intensity about 28% lower than its maximum value. During the first part of the night the intensity decreases. During the second part, it increases. The increase during the second part cannot be explained by the evolution of the atmospheric chemical system. Given the variation in opposite phases of the air density and of the emission, it is suggested that the near IR airglow is a semi-direct tracer of the density variations at the mesopause level, the air molecules being effective quenchers of the excited OH radicals. The excitation and quenching rates will therefore be discussed. Two short movie films showing the airglow waves coming across the observation field of view will be presented.

  19. Ozone Measurements and a 3D Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Frith, Stacey; Steenrod, Steven; Polansky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    We have used our three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM) to calculate the expected reponse of stratospheric composition over the past 30 years to forcing by chlorine and bromine compounds, solar ultraviolet, and volcanic aerosols. The CTM uses off-line winds and temperatures fiom a 50-year run of the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). We compare the total column ozone and the ozone profile fiom the CTM output to a variety of data sources. These include a merged total ozone data set from TOMS and SBUV using the new version 8 algorithm. Total ozone fiom the CTM are compared to ground-station measurements of total ozone at specific locations. Ozone profiles are compared to satellite meausrements fiom SBUV, SAGE, and HALOE. Profiles are also compared to ozonesondes over several locations. The results of the comparisons are quantified by using a time-series statistical analysis to determine trends, solar cycle, and volcanic reponse in both the model and in the data. Initial results indicate that the model responds to forcings in a way that is similar to the observed atmospheric response. The model does seem to be more sensitive to the chlorine and bromine perturbation ihan is the data. Further details and comparisons wiii be discussed.

  20. Correlation of dose rate and spectral measurements in the Inner Van Allen Belt.

    PubMed

    Thede, A L; Radke, G E

    1968-01-01

    Dose rate measurements and the charged particle environment of the Inner Van Allen Belt have been correlated using recent data obtained from the radiation research satellite, OV3-4. Six tissue equivalent ionization chambers, constructed of a material which simulates the muscle tissue response to ionizing radiation, measured the dose rate behind various types and thicknesses of material. The specific shields used for several of the chambers were 0.192 g/cm2 aluminum, 0.797 g/cm2 Lucite and 4.485 g/cm2 brass. The proton and electron spectra were determined with an omnidirectional spectrometer using solid state detectors. The spectral measurements discussed here include geomagnetically trapped protons with energies in the range of 15 to 200 MeV. The proton spectra and dose rates are presented as profiles in terms of the McIlwain parameters of L (1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 earth radii) and the magnetic field B (0.050 to 0.250 gauss). The excellent agreement between the measured dose rate and the theoretically predicted dose rate based on the measured spectra provides justification for the radiation transport techniques now being employed to predict the doses to be encountered during future manned space missions. It was found, however, that a more adequate description of the proton fluxes for energies greater than 50 MeV will be necessary to predict dose rate accurately behind shields of 2.5 g/cm2 thickness or greater.

  1. A nu-space for ICS: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency (ν, nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for STICS that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins (α6- and αLβ2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and ICAM ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrinligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results. PMID:24223019

  2. In-flight surface-flow measurements on a subsonic transport high-lift flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Hardin, Jay D.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a multiphased program for subsonic transport high-lift flight research, flight tests were conducted on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) at the NASA Langley Research Center, to obtain detailed flow characteristics of the high-lift flap system for correlation with computational and wind-tunnel investigations. Pressure distributions, skin friction, and flow-visualization measurements were made on a triple-slotted flap system for a range of flap deflections, chord Reynolds numbers (10 to 21 million), and Mach numbers (0.16 to 0.36). Experimental test results are given for representative flap settings indicating flow separation on the fore-flap element for the largest flap deflection. Comparisons of the in-flight flow measurements were made with predictions from available viscous multielement computational methods modified with simple-sweep theory. Computational results overpredicted the experimentally measured pressures, particularly in the case involving separation of the fore lap, indicating the need for better modeling of confluent boundary layers and three-dimensional sweep effects.

  3. On the correlation between single-frequency impedance measurements and human skin permeability to water.

    PubMed

    White, Erick A; Horne, Alan; Runciman, Jill; Orazem, Mark E; Navidi, William C; Roper, Clive S; Bunge, Annette L

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively compare measurements of tritiated water permeability with impedance determined at either 100 or 1000 Hz using an LCR databridge on the same pieces of skin. A previously published expression based on a simple circuit of a parallel resistor and constant phase element (CPE) was used to relate (RPARA) measured at different frequencies to the DC resistance (RskinA) and the steady-state skin permeability of tritiated water (kp). Using this analysis, kp and (RPARA) data from three laboratories were shown to be consistent with each other, and kp and (RskinA) estimated from (RPARA) were linearly correlated. Compared with urea and mannitol, which are known to permeate skin through a polar pathway, the value of kp for water was found to be about two times larger than expected for transport through only the polar pathway, suggesting an approximately equal contribution from the lipophilic pathway. Equations relating kp to (RPARA) and (RskinA) were used to compare on a consistent basis proposed tests for identifying and excluding damaged skin from chemical absorption studies. The criterion of 20 kΩ cm2 for (RskinA) corresponds to a tritiated water permeability of 3.2×10(-3) cm/h, which should exclude damaged skin without screening undamaged but higher permeability skin samples from study.

  4. An ABC Transporter Mutation Is Correlated with Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Linda J.; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt–expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field. PMID:21187898

  5. Imaging of adult flatfoot: correlation of radiographic measurements with MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lamb, Joshua; Kung, Justin W; Yablon, Corrie M; Wu, Jim S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to determine whether radiographic foot measurements can predict injury of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) and the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch as diagnosed on MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS. After institutional review board approval, 100 consecutive patients with radiographic and MRI examinations performed within a 2-month period were enrolled. Thirty-one patients had PTT dysfunction clinically, and 69 patients had other causes of ankle pain. Talonavicular uncoverage angle, incongruency angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height, and talar tilt were calculated on standing foot or ankle radiographs. MRI was used to assess for abnormalities of the PTT (tenosynovitis, tendinosis, and tear) and supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch (spring ligament, deltoid ligament, and sinus tarsi). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests for categoric variables; the Student t test was used for continuous variables. RESULTS. There was a statistically significant association of PTT tear with abnormal talonavicular uncoverage angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, and cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height. PTT tendinosis and isolated tenosynovitis had a poor association with most radiologic measurements. If both calcaneal pitch and Meary angles were normal, no PTT tear was present. An abnormal calcaneal pitch angle had the best association with injury to the supporting medial longitudinal arch structures. CONCLUSION. Radiographic measurements, especially calcaneal pitch and Meary angles, can be useful in detecting PTT tears. Calcaneal pitch angle provides the best assessment of injury to the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch.

  6. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Rex E.; Flores, Ranee A.; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors (“Implementation” and “Learning”) were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific—r = 0.26 and Writing—r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  7. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Rex E; Flores, Ranee A; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors ("Implementation" and "Learning") were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific-r = 0.26 and Writing-r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination ability

  8. Physics-based agent to simulant correlations for vapor phase mass transport.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Varady, Mark J; Pearl, Thomas P; Fouse, Janet C; Riley, Patrick C; Mantooth, Brent A; Lalain, Teri A

    2013-12-15

    Chemical warfare agent simulants are often used as an agent surrogate to perform environmental testing, mitigating exposure hazards. This work specifically addresses the assessment of downwind agent vapor concentration resulting from an evaporating simulant droplet. A previously developed methodology was used to estimate the mass diffusivities of the chemical warfare agent simulants methyl salicylate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, di-ethyl malonate, and chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. Along with the diffusivity of the chemical warfare agent bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, the simulant diffusivities were used in an advection-diffusion model to predict the vapor concentrations downwind from an evaporating droplet of each chemical at various wind velocities and temperatures. The results demonstrate that the simulant-to-agent concentration ratio and the corresponding vapor pressure ratio are equivalent under certain conditions. Specifically, the relationship is valid within ranges of measurement locations relative to the evaporating droplet and observation times. The valid ranges depend on the relative transport properties of the agent and simulant, and whether vapor transport is diffusion or advection dominant.

  9. Measurement of the space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passechnik, V. I.; Anosov, A. A.; Barabanenkov, Yu. N.; Sel'Sky, A. G.

    2003-09-01

    The space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation pressure is measured for a stationary heated source (a narrow plasticine plate). The correlation dependence is obtained by the multiplication of two signals shifted in time with respect to each other and measured by two receivers. The dependence exhibits an oscillating behavior and changes sign when the source is displaced by half the spatial period of the correlation function.

  10. Measurement of steel plate perforation tests with digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, Theresa Elena; Reu, Phillip L.; Vangoethem, Douglas J.

    2009-03-01

    The results of a series of punch-through tests performed on steel plates are presented. The geometry consisted of circular plates with welded boundary condition penetrated by a conical shaped punch with either a radiused or flat cylindrical end. After initial failure, the conical portion of the punch was driven through the plate to exercise tearing mechanics. Tests were performed quasi-statically with a hydraulic actuator and dynamically using a high-capacity drop table. Deformation and strain were measured with a stereo DIC system. The quasi-static tests utilized a conventional direct-view DIC technique while the dynamic tests required development of an indirect-view technique using a mirror. Experimental details used to conduct the test series will be presented along with test results. Methods of assessing test-to-test repeatability will be discussed. DIC results will also be synchronized and compared with transducer data (displacement and strain).

  11. Surface Roughness Measurement on a Wing Aircraft by Speckle Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given. PMID:24013488

  12. Surface roughness measurement on a wing aircraft by speckle correlation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  13. Measurement of beauty production with {mu}{mu} correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Longhin, A.

    2005-10-06

    Beauty production with events in which two muons are observed in the final state has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 121 pb-1. A low pT threshold for muon identification, in combination with the large rapidity coverage of the ZEUS muon system, gives access to essentially the full phase space for beauty production. The dimuon selection suppresses backgrounds from charm and light flavor production. Separation of the sample into high and low-mass, isolated and non-isolated, like and unlike-sign muon pairs offers redundancy which is used to further constrain the backgrounds. A total cross section for beauty production at HERA is obtained and compared to QCD predictions.

  14. Local transport properties investigation by correlating hyperspectral and confocal luminescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hajje, G.; Ory, D.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Lombez, L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we develop a contactless optical characterization tool that quantifies and maps the trapping defects density within a thin film photovoltaic device. This is achieved by probing time-resolved photoluminescence and numerically reconstructing the experimental decays under several excitation conditions. The values of defects density in different Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells were extracted and linked to photovoltaic performances such as the open-circuit voltage. In the second part of the work, the authors established a micrometric map of the trapping defects density. This revealed areas within the thin film CIGS solar cell with low photovoltaic performance and high trapping defects density. This proves that the developed tool can be used to qualify and quantify the buffer layer/absorber interface properties. The final part of the work was dedicated to finding the origin of the spatial fluctuations of the thin film transport properties. To do so, we started by establishing a micrometric map of the absolute quasi-Fermi levels splitting within the same CIGS solar cell, using the hyperspectral imager. A correlation is obtained between the map of quasi-Fermi levels splitting of and the map of the trapping defects density. The latter is found to be the origin of the frequently observed spatial fluctuations of thin film materials properties.

  15. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatte, C.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.; Nussbaumer, E.; Emmons, L.; Conway, S.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hartley, J.; Benmergui, J.; Lin, J.

    2014-10-01

    confirms that transport is well implemented in the model. For C2H6, however, the lower wintertime concentration estimated by the model as compared to the FTIR observations highlight an underestimation of its emission. Results show that modelled and measured total columns are correlated (linear correlation coefficient r > 0.6 for all gases except for H2CO at Eureka and HCOOH at Thule), but suggest a~general underestimation of the concentrations in the model for all seven tropospheric species in the high Arctic.

  16. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatte, C.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.; Nussbaumer, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Conway, S.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hartley, J.; Benmergui, J.; Lin, J.

    2015-03-01

    their transport. Good agreement in winter confirms that transport is well implemented in the model. For C2H6, however, the lower wintertime concentration estimated by the model as compared to the FTIR observations highlights an underestimation of its emission. Results show that modeled and measured total columns are correlated (linear correlation coefficient r > 0.6 for all gases except for H2CO at Eureka and HCOOH at Thule), but suggest a general underestimation of the concentrations in the model for all seven tropospheric species in the high Arctic.

  17. Measuring and controlling the transport of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jason R.

    Despite the large body of literature describing the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, few analytical tools are commonly used for their purification and analysis. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic nanoparticles are appealing candidates for biomedical applications and analytical separations. Yet in the absence of methods for assessing and assuring their purity, the ultimate use of magnetic particles and heterostructures is likely to be limited. For magnetic nanoparticles, it is the use of an applied magnetic flux or field gradient that enables separations. Flow based techniques are combined with applied magnetic fields to give methods such as magnetic field flow fractionation and high gradient magnetic separation. Additional techniques have been explored for manipulating particles in microfluidic channels and in mesoporous membranes. This thesis further describes development of these and new analytical tools for separation and analysis of colloidal particles is critically important to enable the practical use of these, particularly for medicinal purposes. Measurement of transport of nanometer scale particles through porous media is important to begin to understand the potential environmental impacts of nanomaterials. Using a diffusion cell with two compartments separated by either a porous alumina or polycarbonate membrane as a model system, diffusive flux through mesoporous materials is examined. Experiments are performed as a function of particle size, pore diameter, and solvent, and the particle fluxes are monitored by the change in absorbance of the solution in the receiving cell. Using the measured extinction coefficient and change in absorbance of the solution as a function of time, the fluxes of 3, 8, and 14 nm diameter CoFe2O4 particles are determined as they are translocated across pores with diameters 30, 50, 100, and 200 nm in hexane and aqueous solutions. In general, flux decreases with increasing particle size and

  18. Model and measurement analysis of springtime transport and chemistry of the Pacific basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive chemical measurements from the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) Photochemistry Experiment 2c (MLOPEX 2c) (April 15 to May 15, 1992) field campaign are analyzed in relation to the photochemistry, transport, and physical losses in the Pacific basin utilizing an episodic chemical transport model christened HANK. The budgets of NOy and O3 are examined in particular, as are model-measurement discrepancies in the NOy budget. For the long-lived species the bias of the simulated means (measured minus simulated divided by measured) of CO, CH4, C2H6, C3H8, O3, and NOx is less than 20%. The bias of ln ([C3H8]/[C2H6]) is less than 4%, and the modeled and measured means of C3H8 are not significantly different. H2O2, CH3OOH, and radon agree within a standard deviation. The simulated concentrations of NOy, HNO3, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are high, while the short-lived hydrocarbons (C2H6 and C2H4) are low. Frequency distributions and species' cross correlations are also used to diagnose and evaluate the simulation. Sensitivities in the model formulation are discussed. The results indicate that the subtropics demarcate a transition between a regime characterized by Hadley cell transport to the south and one characterized by rapid isentropic mixing to the north. Vigorous photochemical processing occurs in the remote subtropical Pacific as PAN is converted to NOx, which in turn is converted to HNO3. This rapid photochemistry is related to the slope of the isentropic surfaces in the subtropics. It maintains elevated levels of NOx in the remote Pacific, reduced levels of HNO3/NOx, and increases the net ozone production. The model and measurements show that as air masses are processed photochemically (as measured by AGE) the relative concentrations of PAN and NOx decrease, as does PAN/NOy; corresponding increases occur in HNO3, HNO3/NOx, and HNO3/NOy. In both the model and measurements, H2O2, CH3OOH, and HNO3/NOx are tracers of photochemically processed air, while high

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7–0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7-0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on transport

  1. Psychological Correlates of Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Physical Activity among Chinese Children—Psychological Correlates of PA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Baranowski, Tom; Lau, Patrick W. C.; Chen, Tzu-An; Zhang, Shu-Ge

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations among psychological correlates and physical activity (PA) in Chinese children and to further examine whether these associations varied by different PA measures. PA self-efficacy, motivation, and preference were reported in 449 8–13-year-old Chinese children (252 males). Moderate- to vigorous- intensity PA (MVPA) was measured by the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) and with an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer. Correlations and hierarchical regressions were performed to explore their associations. The study psychological variables were all positively related to PAQ-C and objective MVPA (r: 0.22–0.63). The associations with PAQ-C were all substantially stronger than those with accelerometry. Beyond the explained variance accounted for by demographics and social desirability, the addition of the psychological correlates accounted for 45% of the variance of the PAQ-C score, while only 13% for accelerometry-based MVPA. The associations of specific variables with the PAQ-C score (age, PA self-efficacy, autonomous motivation and preference) were somewhat different from those associated with objective MVPA (PA self-efficacy, autonomous motivation, and negatively associated with female gender). This study demonstrated the importance of self-efficacy and autonomous motivation in association with PA and indicated the difference in level of their associations with different PA measures. PMID:27754396

  2. Correlation Reflectometry for Turbulence and Magnetic Field Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; R. Nazikian; and E. Valeo

    2002-07-09

    For the interpretation of correlation reflectometry data a fast two-dimensional full wave code has been developed in which realistic plasma geometries are used. Results of this code are compared with experiments and turbulence correlation lengths and fluctuation levels are extracted with statistical optics methods. It is shown that in general the measured reflectometer correlation length is not equal to the turbulence correlation length. The code is also used to study the possibility of O-X correlation reflectometry in FIRE for the determination of the local magnetic field strength. It was found that this is only possible at very low fluctuation levels.

  3. Tropospheric methane in northern Finland: seasonal variations, transport patterns and correlations with other trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Tuula; Hatakka, Juha; Lallo, Marko

    2007-04-01

    Methane mixing ratios have been continuously observed at Pallas, Finland since winter 2004. The seasonal variation in monthly means was ca. 40 ppb, showing largest mixing ratios in winter and also high values during late summer. Examination of back-trajectories showed that the air masses with elevated methane mixing ratios arrived from continental Eastern and Central Europe while low methane mixing ratios were connected with Atlantic and Arctic air masses. During summer, air masses with highest mixing ratios arrived from Northwestern Russia indicating wetland sources, while the influence of southern emissions became more significant in winter. Methane was positively correlated with carbon dioxide and negatively correlated with ozone in winter. The average slope of the selected wintertime background hourly mean mixing ratios was 7.0 +/- 1.2 ppb(CH4)/ppm(CO2). Nocturnal summertime low-altitude measurements above a local wetland source indicated slopes of about 10 +/- 1 ppb(CH4)/ppm(CO2). The different slopes reflect the differences in emission parameters.

  4. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness.

  5. Correlation Between Heterogeneous Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and Impacts on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2002-10-28

    In granular porous media, bacterial transport is often modeled using the advection-dispersion transport equation, modified to account for interactions between the bacteria and grain surfaces (attachment and detachment) using a linear kinetic reaction model. In this paper we examine the relationships among the parameters of the above model in the context of bacterial transport for bioaugmentation. In this context, we wish to quantify the distance to which significant concentrations of bacteria can be transported, as well as the uniformity with which they can be distributed within the subsurface. Because kinetic detachment rates (Kr) are typically much smaller than corresponding attachment rates (Kf), the attachment rate exerts primary control on the distance of bacterial transport. Hydraulic conductivity (K) also plays a significant role because of its direct relationship to the advective velocity and its typically high degree of spatial variability at field scales. Because Kf is related to the velocity, grain size, and porosity of the medium, as is K, we expect that there exists correlation between these two parameters. Previous investigators have assumed a form of correlation between Kf and ln(K) based in part on reparameterization of clean-bed filtration equations in terms of published relations between grain size, effective porosity, and ln(K). The hypotheses examined here are that (1) field-scale relationships between K and Kf can be developed by combining a number of theoretical and empirical results in the context of a heterogeneous aquifer flow model (following a similar approach to previous investigators with some extensions), and (2) correlation between K and Kf will enhance the distance of field-scale bacterial transport in granular aquifers. We test these hypotheses using detailed numerical models and observations of field-scale bacterial transport in a shallow sandy aquifer within the South Oyster Site near Oyster, Virginia, USA.

  6. Correlation between structural, magnetic and transport properties of Co2FeSi thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Hazra, Binoy; Manivel Raja, M.; Srinath, S.

    2016-02-01

    Co2FeSi thin films are grown on a Si (1 0 0) substrate using ultrahigh-vacuum magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperatures from 300 °C to 550 °C. The films are characterized using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance and temperature-dependent resistivity measurements. The films deposited at 450 °C (TS450) have better magnetic as well as structural properties with the minimum disorder. The temperature dependence of line-width (Δ H ) suggests two-magnon scattering is responsible for the line broadening. The correlation between the disorder and extrinsic broadening of the line-width is brought out clearly for the first time in Co2FeSi thin films. TS450 film has minimum Δ H (33 Oe) and Gilbert damping parameter (α  =  0.005) at room temperature making it ideal for spintronic applications.

  7. Experiment to measure fast ion transport by magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiwisch, Adam; Heidbrink, William; Boehmer, Heinz; McWilliams, Roger; Carter, Troy; Gekelman, Walter; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Vincena, Steve

    2013-10-01

    Fast ion transport in a linear magnetic field is studied at the upgraded Large Plasma Device. Recent developments allow for the generation of turbulent magnetic flux ropes, produced by a hot LaB6 cathode situated in the main chamber.1 A large-gyroradius, energetic lithium ion beam (300 <= Efast /Ti <= 1000) is passed through the turbulent region and collected by a collimated analyzer downstream, yielding a detailed plane profile of the fast ion distribution.2 Magnetic fluctuations, density, and temperature profiles are also obtained via probes. Enhanced fast-ion transport is clearly observed in the form of beam broadening. Early analysis shows broadband ion saturation current and magnetic fluctuations attributed to the flux ropes. A follow up experiment is currently under way to address whether the increased transport is primarily attributed to magnetic fields, associated electric fields, or increased Coulomb scattering.

  8. Site-resolved measurement of the spin-correlation function in the Fermi-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Maxwell F; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie S; Ji, Geoffrey; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus

    2016-09-16

    Exotic phases of matter can emerge from strong correlations in quantum many-body systems. Quantum gas microscopy affords the opportunity to study these correlations with unprecedented detail. Here, we report site-resolved observations of antiferromagnetic correlations in a two-dimensional, Hubbard-regime optical lattice and demonstrate the ability to measure the spin-correlation function over any distance. We measure the in situ distributions of the particle density and magnetic correlations, extract thermodynamic quantities from comparisons to theory, and observe statistically significant correlations over three lattice sites. The temperatures that we reach approach the limits of available numerical simulations. The direct access to many-body physics at the single-particle level demonstrated by our results will further our understanding of how the interplay of motion and magnetism gives rise to new states of matter. PMID:27634527

  9. Measuring Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlations of pions in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, James Lewis, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This dissertation examines how particle detectors extract information about correlations due to the Hanbury Brow- Twiss (HBT) effect for identical pions from the collision debris of a high-energy collision between two heavy nuclei. The basic ingredients of HBT correlations are: the exchange symmetry (antisymmetry) of the wave function for identical bosons (fermions) at the detectors, single- particle state noise, and wave coherence. We analyze how the wave packet nature of pions created in a high-energy collision affects the form of HBT correlations of like- pions, how gaseous ionization chambers used in high- energy physics to measure pion momenta detect the momentum correlations, and we determine the effect the length and time scales involved in detecting HBT have on measurements of the correlations. We also investigate the effect of pion emission delay times and the effect of an extended distribution of elementary pion radiators on HBT correlation measurements. The results of our investigation show that pairs of pion wave packets must arrive at each detector together, within a time window determined by the atomic ionization time, in order for the momentum correlations of like-pion pairs to be observed. We find that measurements of the HBT correlation for pions are not appreciably affected either by the time scales important for detecting pion correlations or delays in pion emission times much shorter than the ionization time scale of tracking detectors. Using a simple model of pion production, we show that the effective relative momentum scale of the pair correlation function depends on both the overall source size and lifetime and those of the elementary pion radiators. Finally, we have developed a simple framework (by way of examining the HBT effect for pions as detected by wire chamber detectors) from elementary quantum mechanics for computing measurements of correlations among particles produced in high-energy physics experiments.

  10. Correlation measurements as a probe of fluctuations and dynamics of optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gregory Thomas

    Correlation functions are a powerful tool for characterizing the statistical properties of light. They provide information about the fluctuation properties of the electromagnetic field. In addition, features of correlation functions can distinguish between fluctuations that are classical or quantum mechanical in origin. This thesis details measurements of correlation functions of the optical fields emitted from a noise- driven laser and from a cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) system. The two-time intensity correlation of the light from a noise driven diode laser was measured and found to agree with a classical model for the laser response to noise. The dependence of the intensity correlation on the spectral shape of the noise and on the operating current of the laser was also investigated. The intensity correlation function was measured in two independent ways. Intensity correlation measurements were used to probe the dynamical properties of a cavity QED source, a collection of atoms coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field defined by an optical cavity. The transmitted light exhibits nonclassical features in the intensity correlation that arise from the strong coupling between the atoms and the quantized field. The size of the nonclassical correlations are found to be in good agreement with a model that takes into account the experimental conditions. To directly observe the underlying electromagnetic field fluctuations in the cavity QED system, a novel technique is implemented to correlate a record of a homodyne photocurrent with a photon detection. This conditional measurement allows the observation of the time resolved quantum fluctuations of the amplitude of the squeezed electromagnetic wave emitted from the cavity QED system. The Fourier transform of the normalized field correlation multiplied by the source flux yields the spectrum of squeezing. This shows a reduction of the fluctuations below the standard quantum limit at the atom

  11. Gamma radiation affects active electrolyte transport by rabbit ileum. II. Correlation of alanine and theophylline response with morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter-Smith, P.J.

    1989-03-01

    The response of ileal segments isolated from rabbits to an actively transported amino acid and a secretagogue was evaluated following exposure to 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The ability of ileal segments to respond to the actively transported amino acid, alanine, was not significantly diminished until 96 h postexposure. Decreased responsiveness to the secretagogue, theophylline, occurred earlier at 72 h. These effects did not appear to be accounted for by decreased food intake of irradiated animals alone. Examination of intestinal morphological changes with respect to these changes in electrolyte transport revealed that decreased amino acid transport coincides with loss of intestinal villi. Although a morphological correlate of decreased secretory response was not as striking as that for absorption, the theophylline response appeared to decline concomitant with the appearance of increased mitotic activity in the intestinal crypts. The results of this study indicate that, following a dose of 10 Gy, the inability of these tissues to respond to amino acids is due to a loss of mature villus absorptive cells subsequent to denudation of the intestinal mucosa. There appeared to be little impairment of cell membrane transport processes for alanine. In contrast, the decreased secretory response could not be correlated with the disappearance of any one cell type and perhaps results from increased proliferation in the crypts at the expense of differentiation.

  12. Gamma-radiation affects active electrolyte transport by rabbit ileum. 2. Correlation of alanine and theophylline response with morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter-Smith, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The response of ileal segments isolated from rabbits to an actively transported amino acid and a secretagogue was evaluated following exposure to 10-Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The ability of ileal segments to respond to the actively transported amino acid, alanine, was not significantly diminished until 96 h postexposure. Decreased responsiveness to the secretagogue, theophylline, occurred earlier at 72 h. These effects did not appear to be accounted for by decreased food intake of irradiated animals alone. Examination of intestinal morphological changes with respect to these changes in electrolyte transport revealed that decreased amino acid transport coincides with loss of intestinal villi. Although a morphological correlate of decreased secretory response was not as striking as that for absorption, the theophylline response appeared to decline concomitant with the appearance of increased mitotic activity in the intestinal crypts. The result of this study indicate that, following a dose of 10 Gy, the inability of these tissues to respond to amino acids is due to a loss of mature villus absorptive cells subsequent to denudation of the intestinal mucosa. There appeared to be little impairment of cell membrane transport processes for alanine. In contrast, the decreased secretory response could not be correlated with the disappearance of any one cell type and perhaps results from increased proliferation in the crypts at the expense of differentiation.

  13. Correlation Attenuation Due to Measurement Error: A New Approach Using the Bootstrap Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Veprinsky, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Issues with correlation attenuation due to measurement error are well documented. More than a century ago, Spearman proposed a correction for attenuation. However, this correction has seen very little use since it can potentially inflate the true correlation beyond one. In addition, very little confidence interval (CI) research has been done for…

  14. Correlation Between Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and its Effect on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Dong, Hailiang; Xie, YuLong

    2007-06-01

    It has been widely observed in field experiments that the apparent rate of bacterial attachment, particularly as parameterized by the collision efficiency in filtration-based models, decreases with transport distance (i.e., exhibits scale-dependency). This effect has previously been attributed to microbial heterogeneity; that is, variability in cell-surface properties within a single monoclonal population. We demonstrate that this effect could also be interpreted as a field-scale manifestation of local-scale correlation between physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity variability) and reaction heterogeneity (attachment rate coefficient variability). A field-scale model of bacterial transport developed for the South Oyster field research site located near Oyster, Virginia, and observations from field experiments performed at that site, are used as the basis for this study. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of bacterial transport were performed under four alternative scenarios: 1) homogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) and attachment rate coefficient (Kf), 2) heterogeneous K, homogeneous Kf, 3) heterogeneous K and Kf with local correlation based on empirical and theoretical relationships, and 4) heterogeneous K and Kf without local correlation. The results of the 3D simulations were analyzed using 1D model approximations following conventional methods of field data analysis. An apparent decrease with transport distance of effective collision efficiency was observed only in the case where the local properties were both heterogeneous and correlated. This effect was observed despite the fact that the local collision efficiency was specified as a constant in the 3D model, and can therefore be interpreted as a scale effect associated with the local correlated heterogeneity as manifested at the field scale.

  15. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  16. The application of vision measurement in aerodynamic testing combined with speckle correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Zhang, Jin-guo; Zhang, Ye-hua; Wang, Wei; Ma, Hong-qiang; Zhang, Shang-bin; Feng, Jia-bo

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a combination of visual measurement technique of speckle correlation method in aerodynamic test application. Modal analysis of aerodynamic testing and deformation measurement is often very important but very difficult to achieve, fortunately, the development of modern optical measurement techniques made it possible. First, we conduct the modal analysis on an airfoil model and its deformation analysis under certain conditions. Then, the above technique was used to verify it. The results of the aerodynamic test and finite element analysis agree well, The novel of the new method is combining the speckle correlation and the model deformation in the aerodynamic testing. This method using the speckle correlation to process the data, combining sub-pixel correlation can make the results achieve very high precision and realized the real planar measuring. This non-contact full-field optical metrology shows a lot of abstracting potentials in aerodynamic test applications.

  17. Field methods to measure surface displacement and strain with the Video Image Correlation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Horton, Charles M.; Mcneill, Stephen R.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop methods and application procedures to measure displacement and strain fields during the structural testing of aerospace components using paint speckle in conjunction with the Video Image Correlation (VIC) system.

  18. Identification of Noise Sources in High Speed Jets via Correlation Measurements: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James (Technical Monitor); Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Significant advancement has been made in the last few years to identify noise sources in high speed jets via direct correlation measurements. In this technique turbulent fluctuations in the flow are correlated with far field acoustics signatures. In the 1970 s there was a surge of work using mostly intrusive probes, and a few using Laser Doppler Velocimetry, to measure turbulent fluctuations. The later experiments established "shear noise" as the primary source for the shallow angle noise. Various interpretations and criticisms from this time are described in the review. Recent progress in the molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique has provided a completely non-intrusive means of measuring density and velocity fluctuations. This has brought a renewed interest on correlation measurements. We have performed five different sets of experiments in single stream jets of different Mach number, temperature ratio and nozzle configurations. The present paper tries to summarize the correlation data from these works.

  19. Variation and pearson correlation coefficients of warner-bratzler shear force measurements within broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of texture properties related to tenderness at different locations within deboned broiler breast fillets have been used to validate techniques for texture analysis and establish correlations between different texture evaluation methods. However, it has been demonstrated that meat text...

  20. Correlation and agreement: overview and clarification of competing concepts and measures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyuan; Tang, Wan; Chen, Guanqin; Lu, Yin; Feng, Changyong; Tu, Xin M

    2016-04-25

    Agreement and correlation are widely-used concepts that assess the association between variables. Although similar and related, they represent completely different notions of association. Assessing agreement between variables assumes that the variables measure the same construct, while correlation of variables can be assessed for variables that measure completely different constructs. This conceptual difference requires the use of different statistical methods, and when assessing agreement or correlation, the statistical method may vary depending on the distribution of the data and the interest of the investigator. For example, the Pearson correlation, a popular measure of correlation between continuous variables, is only informative when applied to variables that have linear relationships; it may be non-informative or even misleading when applied to variables that are not linearly related. Likewise, the intraclass correlation, a popular measure of agreement between continuous variables, may not provide sufficient information for investigators if the nature of poor agreement is of interest. This report reviews the concepts of agreement and correlation and discusses differences in the application of several commonly used measures. PMID:27605869

  1. Correlation and agreement: overview and clarification of competing concepts and measures

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Jinyuan; TANG, Wan; CHEN, Guanqin; LU, Yin; FENG, Changyong; TU, Xin M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Agreement and correlation are widely-used concepts that assess the association between variables. Although similar and related, they represent completely different notions of association. Assessing agreement between variables assumes that the variables measure the same construct, while correlation of variables can be assessed for variables that measure completely different constructs. This conceptual difference requires the use of different statistical methods, and when assessing agreement or correlation, the statistical method may vary depending on the distribution of the data and the interest of the investigator. For example, the Pearson correlation, a popular measure of correlation between continuous variables, is only informative when applied to variables that have linear relationships; it may be non-informative or even misleading when applied to variables that are not linearly related. Likewise, the intraclass correlation, a popular measure of agreement between continuous variables, may not provide sufficient information for investigators if the nature of poor agreement is of interest. This report reviews the concepts of agreement and correlation and discusses differences in the application of several commonly used measures.

  2. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, G. S.; Shukla, S.; Obreza, T. A.; Harris, W. G.

    2014-08-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils, especially those that are sandy, is adversely impacting P-limited ecosystems like Florida's Everglades. A more developed understanding of P and water management strategies and their effects on P leaching is needed to achieve reductions in subsurface P losses, especially from intensively managed dual cropping systems under plastic mulch in shallow water regions. We compared the effects of conservation P and water management strategies with traditional practices on P transport to groundwater. A 3-year experiment was conducted on hydrologically isolated plots with plastic-mulched successive cropping systems to compare high (HEI) and soil test based recommended (REI) external input (water and fertilizer P) systems with traditional sub-irrigation (seepage), and REI with a potential water conservation subsurface drip irrigation system (REI-SD) with regard to groundwater P concentrations above and below the low conductivity spodic horizon (Bh). The REI treatments had higher available storage for rainfall and P than HEI. Use of both REI systems (REI = 2098 μg/L and REI-SD = 2048 μg/L) reduced groundwater P concentrations above the Bh horizon by 33% compared to HEI (3090 μg/L), and results were significant at the 0.05 level. Although the subsurface drip system saved water, it did not offer any groundwater quality (P) benefit. Mixing and dilution of influent P below the low conductivity Bh horizon between treatments and with the regional groundwater system resulted in no significant differences in groundwater P concentration below the Bh horizon. Groundwater P concentrations from this study were higher than reported elsewhere due to low soil P storage capacity (SPSC), high hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils, and a high water table beneath crop beds. The HEI system leached more P due to ferilizer P in excess of SPSC and used higher irrigation volumes compared with REI systems. Despite a 40% difference in the average

  3. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, G S; Shukla, S; Obreza, T A; Harris, W G

    2014-08-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils, especially those that are sandy, is adversely impacting P-limited ecosystems like Florida's Everglades. A more developed understanding of P and water management strategies and their effects on P leaching is needed to achieve reductions in subsurface P losses, especially from intensively managed dual cropping systems under plastic mulch in shallow water regions. We compared the effects of conservation P and water management strategies with traditional practices on P transport to groundwater. A 3-year experiment was conducted on hydrologically isolated plots with plastic-mulched successive cropping systems to compare high (HEI) and soil test based recommended (REI) external input (water and fertilizer P) systems with traditional sub-irrigation (seepage), and REI with a potential water conservation subsurface drip irrigation system (REI-SD) with regard to groundwater P concentrations above and below the low conductivity spodic horizon (Bh). The REI treatments had higher available storage for rainfall and P than HEI. Use of both REI systems (REI=2098μg/L and REI-SD=2048μg/L) reduced groundwater P concentrations above the Bh horizon by 33% compared to HEI (3090μg/L), and results were significant at the 0.05 level. Although the subsurface drip system saved water, it did not offer any groundwater quality (P) benefit. Mixing and dilution of influent P below the low conductivity Bh horizon between treatments and with the regional groundwater system resulted in no significant differences in groundwater P concentration below the Bh horizon. Groundwater P concentrations from this study were higher than reported elsewhere due to low soil P storage capacity (SPSC), high hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils, and a high water table beneath crop beds. The HEI system leached more P due to ferilizer P in excess of SPSC and used higher irrigation volumes compared with REI systems. Despite a 40% difference in the average amount of

  4. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, G S; Shukla, S; Obreza, T A; Harris, W G

    2014-08-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils, especially those that are sandy, is adversely impacting P-limited ecosystems like Florida's Everglades. A more developed understanding of P and water management strategies and their effects on P leaching is needed to achieve reductions in subsurface P losses, especially from intensively managed dual cropping systems under plastic mulch in shallow water regions. We compared the effects of conservation P and water management strategies with traditional practices on P transport to groundwater. A 3-year experiment was conducted on hydrologically isolated plots with plastic-mulched successive cropping systems to compare high (HEI) and soil test based recommended (REI) external input (water and fertilizer P) systems with traditional sub-irrigation (seepage), and REI with a potential water conservation subsurface drip irrigation system (REI-SD) with regard to groundwater P concentrations above and below the low conductivity spodic horizon (Bh). The REI treatments had higher available storage for rainfall and P than HEI. Use of both REI systems (REI=2098μg/L and REI-SD=2048μg/L) reduced groundwater P concentrations above the Bh horizon by 33% compared to HEI (3090μg/L), and results were significant at the 0.05 level. Although the subsurface drip system saved water, it did not offer any groundwater quality (P) benefit. Mixing and dilution of influent P below the low conductivity Bh horizon between treatments and with the regional groundwater system resulted in no significant differences in groundwater P concentration below the Bh horizon. Groundwater P concentrations from this study were higher than reported elsewhere due to low soil P storage capacity (SPSC), high hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils, and a high water table beneath crop beds. The HEI system leached more P due to ferilizer P in excess of SPSC and used higher irrigation volumes compared with REI systems. Despite a 40% difference in the average amount of

  5. Nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relations for one- and two-particle correlation functions in steady-state quantum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, H.; Dash, L. K.

    2014-04-14

    We study the non-equilibrium (NE) fluctuation-dissipation (FD) relations in the context of quantum thermoelectric transport through a two-terminal nanodevice in the steady-state. The FD relations for the one- and two-particle correlation functions are derived for a model of the central region consisting of a single electron level. Explicit expressions for the FD relations of the Green's functions (one-particle correlations) are provided. The FD relations for the current-current and charge-charge (two-particle) correlations are calculated numerically. We use self-consistent NE Green's functions calculations to treat the system in the absence and in the presence of interaction (electron-phonon) in the central region. We show that, for this model, there is no single universal FD theorem for the NE steady state. There are different FD relations for each different class of problems. We find that the FD relations for the one-particle correlation function are strongly dependent on both the NE conditions and the interactions, while the FD relations of the current-current correlation function are much less dependent on the interaction. The latter property suggests interesting applications for single-molecule and other nanoscale transport experiments.

  6. Femtosecond x rays link melting of charge-density wave correlations and light-enhanced coherent transport in YBa2Cu3O6.6

    DOE PAGES

    Först, M.; Frano, A.; Kaiser, S.; Mankowsky, R.; Hunt, C. R.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Loew, T.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In this study, we use femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction to measure the optically stimulated ultrafast changes of charge density wave correlations in underdoped YBa₂Cu₃O₆.₆. We find that when coherent interlayer transport is enhanced by optical excitation of the apical oxygen distortions, at least 50% of the in-plane charge density wave order is melted. These results indicate that charge ordering and superconductivity may be competing up to the charge ordering transition temperature, with the latter becoming a hidden phase that is accessible only by nonlinear phonon excitation.

  7. A robust measure of correlation between two genes on a microarray

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Johanna; Mitani, Aya; Hicks, Leanne; VanKoten, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Background The underlying goal of microarray experiments is to identify gene expression patterns across different experimental conditions. Genes that are contained in a particular pathway or that respond similarly to experimental conditions could be co-expressed and show similar patterns of expression on a microarray. Using any of a variety of clustering methods or gene network analyses we can partition genes of interest into groups, clusters, or modules based on measures of similarity. Typically, Pearson correlation is used to measure distance (or similarity) before implementing a clustering algorithm. Pearson correlation is quite susceptible to outliers, however, an unfortunate characteristic when dealing with microarray data (well known to be typically quite noisy.) Results We propose a resistant similarity metric based on Tukey's biweight estimate of multivariate scale and location. The resistant metric is simply the correlation obtained from a resistant covariance matrix of scale. We give results which demonstrate that our correlation metric is much more resistant than the Pearson correlation while being more efficient than other nonparametric measures of correlation (e.g., Spearman correlation.) Additionally, our method gives a systematic gene flagging procedure which is useful when dealing with large amounts of noisy data. Conclusion When dealing with microarray data, which are known to be quite noisy, robust methods should be used. Specifically, robust distances, including the biweight correlation, should be used in clustering and gene network analysis. PMID:17592643

  8. Utilizing Turbidity and Measurements of Suspended Sediment Concentrations to Better Understand Sediment Transport within Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, T. M.; Napieralski, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Rouge River watershed in Southeast Michigan is an urban watershed, which has been exposed to more than 100 years of anthropogenic activities related to industrialization and urbanization. This urbanization has degraded water quality by increasing erosion and altering the transport mechanism and chemistry of bed and suspended sediments. This study aims to explore the relationship between development within the Lower Rouge watershed and watershed hydrology through an examination of USGS discharge data, stream water quality and suspended sediment loads during storm and base flow. Two YSI dataloggers are used to continuously measure water quality parameters during baseflow and storm events (varying hydrologic conditions), including: turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, salinity, total dissolved solids, and temperature. Depth-integrated sediment samples are collected and analyzed for sediment concentration using Imhoff cones and filtration methods. Correlations between discharge weighted continuous turbidity measurements and discharge weighted suspended sediment samples are used to estimate sediment loads; essentially, turbidity readings and measured sediment concentrations form a near-linear relationship. In addition, sediment samples are analyzed for inorganic heavy metal contaminants common to Southeast Michigan to characterize both suspended sediments and sediments frequently deposited on adjacent floodplains. These metals (i.e. Lead, Copper, Chromium, Nickle) are commonly known as the “Michigan Metals” and represent indicator species of mobilized and deposited contaminants associated with urbanization and industrialization. The results will provide a baseline for better understanding the transport and fate of contaminated sediments within the Rouge watershed, as well as guide ongoing development and management practices along the Rouge River.

  9. Geometric measure of quantum correlation: The influence of the asymmetry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qinsheng; Ding, Changchun; Wu, Shaoyi; Lai, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The quantum correlation in open quantum systems is of fundamental and practical importance for quantum information processing and controllable nanometer devices. And the properties of quantum correlation can be influenced by the information flow between systems and environments. In this study, we investigated the geometric measure discord of quantum correlation of a two qubits system, interacting with two independent and intrinsic interacting spin-environments, respectively. Based on the asymmetry environments with comparable parameters, the different properties of the geometric measure of entanglement and quantum discord are displayed and discussed for initial Bell states.

  10. Anxiety symptoms and functional impairment: A systematic review of the correlation between the two measures.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Patrick E; Monfort, Samuel S; Kashdan, Todd B; Blalock, Dan V; Calton, Jenna M

    2016-04-01

    Researchers and clinicians assume a strong, positive correlation between anxiety symptoms and functional impairment. That assumption may be well-justified since diagnostic criteria typically include functional impairment. Still, the relationship remains largely unavailable in any systematic review. Our aim with this paper was to provide empirical evidence for this assumed relationship and to document the observed correlations between anxiety symptom measures and functional impairment measures. Correlations existed for symptoms of six anxiety disorders (Panic Disorder, Agoraphobia, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) across four functional domains (global, social, occupational, and physical). Overall, the mean of 497 correlations across all disorders and functional domains was modest (r=.34); since the variability between disorders and functional domains tended to be rather large, we explored these correlations further. We presented these results and the potential explanations for unexpected findings along with the clinical and research implications. PMID:26953005

  11. A method for the measurement and analysis of ride vibrations of transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catherines, J. J.; Clevenson, S. A.; Scholl, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    The measurement and recording of ride vibrations which affect passenger comfort in transportation systems and the subsequent data-reduction methods necessary for interpreting the data present exceptional instrumentation requirements and necessitate the use of computers for specialized analysis techniques. A method is presented for both measuring and analyzing ride vibrations of the type encountered in ground and air transportation systems. A portable system for measuring and recording low-frequency, low-amplitude accelerations and specialized data-reduction procedures are described. Sample vibration measurements in the form of statistical parameters representative of typical transportation systems are also presented to demonstrate the utility of the techniques.

  12. Multi-level examination of correlates of active transportation to school among youth living within 1 mile of their school

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Active transportation to school is a method by which youth can build physical activity into their daily routines. We examined correlates of active transportation to school at both individual- (characteristics of the individual and family) and area- (school and neighborhood) levels amongst youth living within 1 mile (1.6 km) of their school. Methods Using the 2009/10 Canadian Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) survey, we selected records of students (n = 3 997) from 161 schools that resided in an urban setting and lived within 1 mile from their school. Student records were compiled from: (1) individual-level HBSC student questionnaires; (2) area-level administrator (school) questionnaires; and (3) area-level geographic information system data sources. The outcome, active transportation to school, was determined via a questionnaire item describing the method of transportation that individual students normally use to get to school. Analyses focused on factors at multiple levels that potentially contribute to student decisions to engage in active transportation. Multi-level logistic regression analyses were employed. Results Approximately 18% of the variance in active transportation was accounted for at the area-level. Several individual and family characteristics were associated with engagement in active transportation to school including female gender (RR vs. males = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.80-0.91), having ≥2 cars in the household (RR vs. no cars = 0.87, 0.74-0.97), and family socioeconomic status (RR for ‘not well off’ vs. ‘very well off’ = 1.14, 1.01-1.26). Neighborhood characteristics most strongly related to active transportation were: the length of roads in the 1 km buffer (RR in quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 = 1.23, 1.00-1.42), the amount of litter in the neighborhood (RR for ‘major problem’ vs. ‘no problem’ = 1.47, 1.16-1.57), and relatively hot climates (RR in quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 = 1.33 CI

  13. Field-measured drag area is a key correlate of level cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Peterman, James E; Lim, Allen C; Ignatz, Ryan I; Edwards, Andrew G; Byrnes, William C

    2015-01-01

    Drag area (Ad ) is a primary factor determining aerodynamic resistance during level cycling and is therefore a key determinant of level time trial performance. However, Ad has traditionally been difficult to measure. Our purpose was to determine the value of adding field-measured Ad as a correlate of level cycling time trial performance. In the field, 19 male cyclists performed a level (22.1 km) time trial. Separately, field-determined Ad and rolling resistance were calculated for subjects along with projected frontal area assessed directly (AP ) and indirectly (Est AP ). Also, a graded exercise test was performed to determine [Formula: see text] peak, lactate threshold (LT), and economy. [Formula: see text] peak ([Formula: see text]) and power at LT were significantly correlated to power measured during the time trial (r = 0.83 and 0.69, respectively) but were not significantly correlated to performance time (r = - 0.42 and -0.45). The correlation with performance time improved significantly (p < 0.05) when these variables were normalized to Ad . Of note, Ad alone was better correlated to performance time (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) than any combination of non-normalized physiological measure. The best correlate with performance time was field-measured power output during the time trial normalized to Ad (r = - 0.92). AP only accounted for 54% of the variability in Ad . Accordingly, the correlation to performance time was significantly lower using power normalized to AP (r = - 0.75) or Est AP (r = - 0.71). In conclusion, unless normalized to Ad , level time trial performance in the field was not highly correlated to common laboratory measures. Furthermore, our field-measured Ad is easy to determine and was the single best predictor of level time trial performance.

  14. Lower bounds on the violation of the monogamy inequality for quantum correlation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Asutosh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    In multiparty quantum systems, the monogamy inequality proposes an upper bound on the distribution of bipartite quantum correlation between a single party and each of the remaining parties in the system, in terms of the amount of quantum correlation shared by that party with the rest of the system taken as a whole. However, it is well known that not all quantum correlation measures universally satisfy the monogamy inequality. In this work, we aim at determining the nontrivial value by which the monogamy inequality can be violated by a quantum correlation measure. Using an information-theoretic complementarity relation between the normalized purity and quantum correlation in any given multiparty state, we obtain a nontrivial lower bound on the negative monogamy score for the quantum correlation measure. In particular, for the three-qubit states the lower bound is equal to the negative von Neumann entropy of the single qubit reduced density matrix. We analytically examine the tightness of the derived lower bound for certain n -qubit quantum states. Further, we report numerical results of the same for monogamy violating correlation measures using Haar uniformly generated three-qubit states.

  15. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Viet V; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. The estimability results showed that the experiment under unsaturated flow conditions contained more information content for estimating four transport parameters than under the saturated one. In addition, whatever the experimental conditions for all three PAHs the fraction of sites with instantaneous sorption, f, was highly correlated with the adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd. The very strong correlation between the two parameters f and Kd suggests that they should not be simultaneously calibrated. Transport parameters were optimized using HYDRUS-1D software with different scenarios based on the estimability analysis results. The optimization results were not always reliable, especially in the case of the experiment under saturated flow conditions because of its low information content. In addition, the estimation of transport parameters became very uncertain if two parameters f and Kd were optimized simultaneously. The findings of the current work can suggest some

  16. Statistical model for the correlation length of snow derived from SnowMicroPen measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The SnowMicroPen (SMP) allows to retrieve mechanical parameters from the snowpack. However, remote sensing applications rely on structural parameters of snow such as the correlation length. Due to the complexity of the physical connection between structural and mechanical parameters we derived a statistical model for the correlation length from SMP measurements. To this end we have analyzed snow samples of many different snow classes and densities by micro computer-tomography (CT) and SMP. We correlated the SMP-derived structural element length with the CT-derived correlation length and validated the model using field data taken during the NoSREx - III campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. Further, we employ the statistical model to estimate the specific surface area from combined SMP and density measurement from natural snow profiles. We compare this SSA estimate to independent SSA measurements by near-infrared photography and discuss potential and limitation of the method.

  17. Statistical model for the correlation length of snow derived from Snow-Micro-Pen measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Snow-Micro-Pen (SMP) allows to retrieve various mechanical parameters from the snowpack. However, remote sensing applications rely on structural parameters of snow such as the correlation length. In the absence of a sound physical connection between structural and mechanical parameters we derive a statistical model for the correlation length from SMP measurements. To this end we have analyzed 22 snow samples of various snow types by computer tomography (CT) and SMP. We correlate the SMP-derived structural element length with the CT-derived correlation length. For validation we employ the statistical model to estimate the specific surface area from combined SMP and density measurement from natural snow profiles. We compare this SSA estimate to independent SSA measurements by Near-Infrared-Photography and discuss potentials and limitations of the method.

  18. Maximum key-profile correlation (MKC) as a measure of tonal structure in music.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, A H

    1994-09-01

    Tonal structure is musical organization on the basis of pitch, in which pitches vary in importance and rate of occurrence according to their relationship to a tonal center. Experiment 1 evaluated the maximum key-profile correlation (MKC), a product of Krumhansl and Schmuckler's key-finding algorithm (Krumhansl, 1990), as a measure of tonal structure. The MKC is the maximum correlation coefficient between the pitch class distribution in a musical sample and key profiles, which indicate the stability of pitches with respect to particular tonal centers. The MKC values of melodies correlated strongly with listeners' ratings of tonal structure. To measure the influence of the temporal order of pitches on perceived tonal structure, three measures (fifth span, semitone span, and pitch contour) taken from previous studies of melody perception were also correlated with tonal structure ratings. None of the temporal measures correlated as strongly or as consistently with tonal structure ratings as did the MKC, and nor did combining them with the MKC improve prediction of tonal structure ratings. In Experiment 2, the MKC did not correlate with recognition memory of melodies. However, melodies with very low MKC values were recognized less accurately than melodies with very high MKC values. Although it does not incorporate temporal, rhythmic, or harmonic factors that may influence perceived tonal structure, the MKC can be interpreted as a measure of tonal structure, at least for brief melodies. PMID:7971133

  19. Positive illusions: positively correlated with subjective well-being, negatively correlated with a measure of personal growth.

    PubMed

    Brookings, Jeffrey B; Serratelli, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    Psychologists have long debated the benefits and costs of self-deceptive enhancement or positive illusions. Accurate perception of reality is central to the definitions of mental health proposed by many personality and clinical psychologists, but Taylor and Brown have suggested that having positive illusions is associated with increased happiness and satisfaction with life. One explanation for the conflicting assertions is that mental health, broadly defined, includes both subjective well-being and personal growth, distinguishable factors which are differentially related to positive illusions. For this study, 81 college students completed measures of positive illusions (Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding Self-deceptive Positivity and How I See Myself Questionnaire), subjective well-being (Satisfaction With Life Scale and Existential Anxiety Scale), and moral reasoning (Defining Issues Test) as an index of personal growth. As predicted, positive illusion composite scores were positively correlated with scores on the subjective well-being composite (r=.40) but negatively correlated with Defining Issues Test scores (r=-.25). The quadratic relationship between these measures of positive illusion and subjective well-being composites was not significant, indicating no support for an "optimal margin of illusion."

  20. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  1. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport. PMID:26066398

  2. Phosphate utilization efficiency correlates with expression of low-affinity phosphate transporters and noncoding RNA, IPS1, in barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun Y; Shirley, Neil; Genc, Yusuf; Shi, Bujun; Langridge, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Genetic variation in phosphorus (P) efficiency exists among wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes, but the underlying mechanisms for the variation remain elusive. High- and low-affinity phosphate (Pi) PHT1 transporters play an indispensable role in P acquisition and remobilization. However, little is known about genetic variation in PHT1 gene expression and association with P acquisition efficiency (PAE) and P utilization efficiency (PUE). Here, we present quantitative analyses of transcript levels of high- and low-affinity PHT1 Pi transporters in four barley genotypes differing in PAE. The results showed that there was no clear pattern in the expression of four paralogs of the high-affinity Pi transporter HvPHT1;1 among the four barley genotypes, but the expression of a low-affinity Pi transporter, HvPHT1;6, and its close homolog HvHPT1;3 was correlated with the genotypes differing in PUE. Interestingly, the expression of HvPHT1;6 and HvPHT1;3 was correlated with the expression of HvIPS1 (for P starvation inducible; noncoding RNA) but not with HvIPS2, suggesting that HvIPS1 plays a distinct role in the regulation of the low-affinity Pi transporters. In addition, high PUE was found to be associated with high root-shoot ratios in low-P conditions, indicating that high carbohydrate partitioning into roots occurs simultaneously with high PUE. However, high PUE accompanying high carbon partitioning into roots could result in low PAE. Therefore, the optimization of PUE through the modification of low-affinity Pi transporter expression may assist further improvement of PAE for low-input agriculture systems.

  3. Thermal Transport Characteristics of Human Skin Measured In Vivo Using Ultrathin Conformal Arrays of Thermal Sensors and Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R. Chad; Pielak, Rafal M.; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions. PMID:25658947

  4. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    PubMed

    Webb, R Chad; Pielak, Rafal M; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions. PMID:25658947

  5. Quantification of Fugitive Methane Emissions with Spatially Correlated Measurements Collected with Novel Plume Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tracy; Rella, Chris; Crosson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of fugitive methane emissions from unconventional natural gas (i.e. shale gas, tight sand gas, etc.) production, processing, and transport is essential for scientists, policy-makers, and the energy industry, because methane has a global warming potential of at least 21 times that of carbon dioxide over a span of 100 years [1]. Therefore, fugitive emissions reduce any environmental benefits to using natural gas instead of traditional fossil fuels [2]. Current measurement techniques involve first locating all the possible leaks and then measuring the emission of each leak. This technique is a painstaking and slow process that cannot be scaled up to the large size of the natural gas industry in which there are at least half a million natural gas wells in the United States alone [3]. An alternative method is to calculate the emission of a plume through dispersion modeling. This method is a scalable approach since all the individual leaks within a natural gas facility can be aggregated into a single plume measurement. However, plume dispersion modeling requires additional knowledge of the distance to the source, atmospheric turbulence, and local topography, and it is a mathematically intensive process. Therefore, there is a need for an instrument capable of simple, rapid, and accurate measurements of fugitive methane emissions on a per well head scale. We will present the "plume camera" instrument, which simultaneously measures methane at different spatial points or pixels. The spatial correlation between methane measurements provides spatial information of the plume, and in addition to the wind measurement collected with a sonic anemometer, the flux can be determined. Unlike the plume dispersion model, this approach does not require knowledge of the distance to the source and atmospheric conditions. Moreover, the instrument can fit inside a standard car such that emission measurements can be performed on a per well head basis. In a controlled experiment

  6. Molybdate transport in a chemically complex aquifer: Field measurements compared with solute-transport model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Molybdate was included in the injectate to study the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on its aqueous distribution and to evaluate the reliability of laboratory experiments for identifying and quantifying reactions that control the transport of reactive solutes in groundwater. Transport of molybdate in this aquifer was controlled by adsorption. The amount adsorbed varied with aqueous chemistry that changed with depth as freshwater recharge mixed with a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. Molybdate adsorption was strongest near the water table where pH (5.7) and the concentration of the competing solutes phosphate (2.3 micromolar) and sulfate (86 micromolar) were low. Adsorption of molybdate decreased with depth as pH increased to 6.5, phosphate increased to 40 micromolar, and sulfate increased to 340 micromolar. A one-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model and a two-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model were used to simulate adsorption. Reactions and equilibrium constants for both models were determined in laboratory experiments and used in the reactive-transport model PHAST to simulate the two-dimensional transport of molybdate during the tracer test. No geochemical parameters were adjusted in the simulation to improve the fit between model and field data. Both models simulated the travel distance of the molybdate cloud to within 10% during the 2-year tracer test; however, the two-site diffuse-layer model more accurately simulated the molybdate concentration distribution within the cloud.

  7. Thermoelectric Transport Measurements of Graphene on hBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Junxi; Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Guohong; Lai, Xinyuan; Zebarjadi, Mona; Andrei, Eva Y.

    The unique electronic transport properties of graphene, arising from massless charge carriers whose sign and density can be tuned by gating, have been studied extensively. Much less work was devoted to graphene's thermal properties. Unlike electrical transport which depends on total carrier density, the thermopower is determined by the net charge transferred and not by the carrier density. This leads to profound differences between the two phenomena. For example, when the Fermi level is close to the Dirac point (DP) where electron-hole (e-h) puddles are populated symmetrically, the electron and hole contributions to the thermopower cancel out. In contrast, their contributions to the electrical current add up. We studied the thermoelectric properties of high quality graphene supported on an hBN substrate, where the e-h puddle regime is significantly reduced compared to that on SiO2 substrates, which allows closer access to the DP. At room temperature we find that the maximum Seebeck coefficient close to the DP reaches up to twice the values on SiO2 substrates. Upon cooling down to 77K it decreases in a non-linear fashion with temperature. We will discuss possible origins of this behavior. Work Supported by DOE-FG02-99ER45742, NSF DMR 1207108 and FA9550-14-1-0316.

  8. Variation of bedload transport threshold in two Alpine mountain streams inferred from geophone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Weninger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Geophone measurements are a surrogate technique to monitor bedload transport in mountain streams. The two mountain streams Fischbach and the Ruetz in Western Austria are fed by glacial meltwater and feature regular bedload transport during the summer months. In spring 2008 the so-called Swiss plate geophone system was installed in the two streams. The sites are operated by the Tyrolean water power company (TIWAG), and discharge data are available as well. The geophone sensors record the motion of bedload particles transported over a steel plate mounted flush with the channel bed. Calibration measurements of the geophone system were performed by TIWAG, and they show an approximately linear relation between number of impulses and bedload mass transported over the sensors. For the period 2008 to 2013, the variation in bedload transport with shear stress was analyzed using an exponential form of the Meyer-Peter & Müller equation proposed by Chen (2002). If the dimensionless threshold shear stress at initiation of motion, i.e. the Shields number, is back-calculated from the measured bedload transport rates, the temporal variability in bedload transport efficiency can be reasonably well described by postulating a corresponding temporal variability in the Shields number. The geophone measurements were also used to qualitatively assess the grain size distribution of the transported particles. It is hypothesized that an increase in the Shields number is associated with a coarsening of the surface grain size distribution of the bed material upstream of the measuring site.

  9. Personality Correlates of Self-Report, Role-Playing, and In Vivo Measures of Assertiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Undergraduates completed self-report inventories of assertiveness, participated in behavior role-playing tasks and in vivo measures of assertiveness, and completed the Personality Research Form E (PRF-E). Of 22 PRF-E scales, 11 had at least one significant correlation with assertiveness measures. Some composites of PRF-E scales were related to…

  10. Correlation of quality measurements to visible-near infrared spectra of pasteurized egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A twelve week study was conducted on the egg albumen from both pasteurized and non-pasteurized shell eggs using visible-near infrared spectroscopy. Correlation of the chemical changes detected in the spectra to the measurement of Haugh units (measure of interior egg quality) was carried out using ch...

  11. Chemometric correlation of shelf life, quality measurements, and visible-near infrared spectra of pasteurized eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A twelve week study was conducted on the egg albumen from both pasteurized and non-pasteurized shell eggs using visible-near infrared spectroscopy. Correlation of the chemical changes detected in the spectra to the measurement of Haugh units (measure of interior egg quality) was carried out using pr...

  12. Facilities for the Performance of Fano Effect Measurements as a Probe of Electron Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Yu, S.W.; Chung, B.W.; Morton, S.A.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.

    2007-07-01

    Fano Effect measurements are the key to direct observation of the Kondo or spin shielding intrinsic to models of electron correlation. The Fano Effect is the observation of spin polarized photoelectron emission from nonmagnetic materials, under chirally selective excitation, such as circularly polarized photons. Below are described three spectrometers, with which Fano Effects measurements have been made. (authors)

  13. Measurements of Spin Correlation in $t\\bar{t}$ Events at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Kenneth; /Nebraska U.

    2011-09-01

    Two recent measurements by the D0 Collaboration of spin correlation in t{bar t} production using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron p{bar p} collider data are presented. Both rely on the dilepton final state of t{bar t}. One measurement relies on full reconstruction of the top quark kinematics, and the other makes use of leading-order matrix elements to characterize the kinematics. The latter measurement is the first ever to have sufficient analyzing power to exclude the no-correlation hypothesis.

  14. Shear Strength Correlations for Kaolin/Water Slurries: A Comparison of Recent Measurements with Historical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Carolyn A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Russell, Renee L.

    2010-01-20

    This report documents testing funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation and performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with Fauske and Associates, LLC (FAI) to determine the behavior of vessel spanning bubbles. The shear strengths of four samples of kaolin/water mixtures obtained by PNNL from FAI were measured and are reported here. The measured shear strengths of these samples were then used to determine how the Rassat correlation fit these new measurements or if a new correlation was needed. These results were then compared with previously reported data.

  15. Sand transport measurements in Chioggia inlet, Venice lagoon: Theory versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Monique M.; Amos, Carl L.; Umgiesser, Georg; Ferrarin, Christian; Zaggia, Luca; Thompson, Charlotte E. L.; Are, Daniele

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents results of recent measurements of sand transport made in Chioggia inlet as part of an extensive monitoring programme in the Venetian inlets. Measurements were made in order: (1) to define a relationship between sand transport magnitude and tidal flow; (2) to derive the thresholds for sand transport; (3) to identify the dominant modes of transport; (4) to evaluate the concentration profiles of sand within the benthic boundary layer; (5) to compare bedload transport observations with model predictions using existent bedload formulae; and (6) to produce yearly estimates of bedload transport across the inlet. The vertical distribution of sand in the water column was sampled using modified Helley-Smith bedload samplers at three sites. Transport was found to vary according to the flow and bed grain size, with considerable temporal and spatial variability. A difference of up to three orders of magnitude in transport was observed through the inlet, with higher transport rates measured on the seaward part. The dominant mode of transport in the central inlet was suspension, while bedload was dominant in the mouths. The measured profiles of sand concentration varied with the tidal stage and seabed grain size according to the Rouse parameter ( R). R was high at the inlet mouths (1< R<2), indicative of a well-developed bedload layer. The inverse movability number ( W s/ U*) was also higher at these sites and appeared to be grain size dependant. Formulae for bedload transport were tested against field data; stochastic methods such as Einstein-Brown, Engelund-Hansen and Van Rijn produce the best fits. The coupled model SHYFEM-Sedtrans05 appears to simulate well observed transport for most conditions of flow. Long-term bedload predictions indicate a dominant export of sand, with a yearly average of 4500 m 3.

  16. [Does the subjective assessment of roughness correlate with a computer-aided measurement of irregularity index?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Iven, C; Jessen, M; Schwemmle, C

    2006-02-01

    For routine clinical purposes dysphonic voices are assessed using the GRBAS scale or analogues. An objective measurement often includes jitter measurements. Here we raised the question of whether roughness estimates correlate with a computer-aided measurement of the vocal fold cycle irregularity in 78 patients who read a standard text ("Nordwind und Sonne"). The samples were evaluated by 19 speech and voice therapy students according to the degree of roughness. The irregularity index was calculated according to the procedures suggested by Fourcin. Data were subjected to correlation analysis. A significant correlation was found between the irregularity index and the subjective roughness scaling. These data indicate that objective measurements of vibratory cycle irregularity during text reading can be used for clinical purposes in addition to subjective roughness scaling. PMID:15868131

  17. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  18. [Does the subjective assessment of roughness correlate with a computer-aided measurement of irregularity index?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Iven, C; Jessen, M; Schwemmle, C

    2006-02-01

    For routine clinical purposes dysphonic voices are assessed using the GRBAS scale or analogues. An objective measurement often includes jitter measurements. Here we raised the question of whether roughness estimates correlate with a computer-aided measurement of the vocal fold cycle irregularity in 78 patients who read a standard text ("Nordwind und Sonne"). The samples were evaluated by 19 speech and voice therapy students according to the degree of roughness. The irregularity index was calculated according to the procedures suggested by Fourcin. Data were subjected to correlation analysis. A significant correlation was found between the irregularity index and the subjective roughness scaling. These data indicate that objective measurements of vibratory cycle irregularity during text reading can be used for clinical purposes in addition to subjective roughness scaling.

  19. 3D displacement field measurement with correlation based on the micro-geometrical surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubaker-Isheil, Halima; Serri, Jérôme; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2011-07-01

    Image correlation methods are widely used in experimental mechanics to obtain displacement field measurements. Currently, these methods are applied using digital images of the initial and deformed surfaces sprayed with black or white paint. Speckle patterns are then captured and the correlation is performed with a high degree of accuracy to an order of 0.01 pixels. In 3D, however, stereo-correlation leads to a lower degree of accuracy. Correlation techniques are based on the search for a sub-image (or pattern) displacement field. The work presented in this paper introduces a new correlation-based approach for 3D displacement field measurement that uses an additional 3D laser scanner and a CMM (Coordinate Measurement Machine). Unlike most existing methods that require the presence of markers on the observed object (such as black speckle, grids or random patterns), this approach relies solely on micro-geometrical surface textures such as waviness, roughness and aperiodic random defects. The latter are assumed to remain sufficiently small thus providing an adequate estimate of the particle displacement. The proposed approach can be used in a wide range of applications such as sheet metal forming with large strains. The method proceeds by first obtaining cloud points using the 3D laser scanner mounted on a CMM. These points are used to create 2D maps that are then correlated. In this respect, various criteria have been investigated for creating maps consisting of patterns, which facilitate the correlation procedure. Once the maps are created, the correlation between both configurations (initial and moved) is carried out using traditional methods developed for field measurements. Measurement validation was conducted using experiments in 2D and 3D with good results for rigid displacements in 2D, 3D and 2D rotations.

  20. Distribution of Bell-inequality violation versus multiparty-quantum-correlation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kunal; Das, Tamoghna; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-06-01

    Violation of a Bell inequality guarantees the existence of quantum correlations in a shared quantum state. A pure bipartite quantum state, having nonvanishing quantum correlation, always violates a Bell inequality. Such correspondence is absent for multipartite pure quantum states in the case of multipartite correlation function Bell inequalities with two settings at each site. We establish a connection between the monogamy of Bell-inequality violation and multiparty quantum correlations for shared multisite quantum states. We believe that the relation is generic, as it is true for a number of different multisite measures that are defined from radically different perspectives. Precisely, we quantify the multisite-quantum-correlation content in the states by generalized geometric measure, a genuine multisite entanglement measure, as well as three monogamy-based multiparty-quantum-correlation measures, viz., 3-tangle, quantum-discord score, and quantum-work-deficit score. We find that generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states and another single-parameter family of states, which we refer to as the special Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, have the status of extremal states in such relations.

  1. Measurement of Turbulence Decorrelation during Transport Barrier Evolution in a High Temperature Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; K. Shinohara; G.J. Kramer; E. Valeo; K. Hill; T.S. Hahm; G. Rewoldt; S. Ide; Y. Koide; Y. Oyama; H. Shirai; W. Tang

    2005-03-29

    A low power polychromatic beam of microwaves is used to diagnose the behavior of turbulent fluctuations in the core of the JT-60U tokamak during the evolution of the internal transport barrier. A continuous reduction in the size of turbulent structures is observed concomitant with the reduction of the density scale length during the evolution of the internal transport barrier. The density correlation length decreases to the order of the ion gyroradius, in contrast to the much longer scale lengths observed earlier in the discharge, while the density fluctuation level remain similar to the level before transport barrier formation.

  2. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  3. Integral measurements of mass transport and heat content in the Strait of Gibraltar from acoustic transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, Uwe; Worcester, Peter F.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Tiemann, Christopher O.; Baschek, Burkard

    Three 2 kHz acoustic transceivers were deployed on either side of the eastern entrance of the Strait of Gibraltar during April-May 1996 to determine the feasibility of using acoustic methods to make routine, rapidly repeated, horizontally integrated measurements of flow and temperature in straits. Reciprocal transmissions between the transceivers were used to test the feasibility of using traditional ray differential travel times to monitor the component of flow along the acoustic paths. Transmissions directly across the Strait were used to test the feasibility of using horizontal arrival angle fluctuations and acoustic intensity scintillations to monitor the flow perpendicular to the acoustic path. The geometry was selected to provide ray paths that only sample the lower-layer Mediterranean water, so that the feasibility of monitoring the Mediterranean outflow using the various methods could be evaluated. The acoustic scintillation method did not yield useful current estimates, but the experimental parameters were not optimized for this approach. Since the low-frequency variability in log-amplitude was found to be highly correlated at receivers 228 m apart, it is possible that acoustic scintillation measurements using different receiver spacings and more rapid sampling might yield better results. The horizontal deflection method gave encouraging results at the time of neap tides, but less so during spring tides. For this approach, both theoretical estimates and measured phase differences between the horizontally separated receivers suggest that internal-wave-induced horizontal arrival angle fluctuations may fundamentally limit the precision with which arrival angles can be measured. Further work is needed to determine if a smaller horizontal spacing and higher signal-to-noise ratios would yield better results. Reciprocal travel time measurements diagonally across the Strait performed the best of the three methods, giving absolute flow estimates consistent with

  4. Factorization of event-plane correlations over transverse momentum in relativistic heavy ion collisions in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kai; Yi, Li; Liu, Feng; Wang, Fuqiang

    2016-08-01

    Momentum-space azimuthal harmonic event planes (EP) are constructed from final-state midrapidity particles binned in transverse momentum (pT) in √{sN N}=200 GeV Au+Au collisions in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The EP correlations between pT bins, corrected by EP resolutions, are smaller than unity. This indicates that the EP's decorrelate over pT in AMPT, qualitatively consistent with data and hydrodynamic calculations. It is further found that the EP correlations approximately factorize into single pT-bin EP correlations to a common plane. This common plane appears to be the momentum-space EP integrated over all pT, not the configuration-space participant plane (PP).

  5. Air transport flight parameter measurements program - Concepts and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. J.; Crabill, N. L.

    1980-01-01

    A program is described in which statistical flight loads and operating practice data for both narrow- and wide-body airline transport aircraft, intended primarily for use by manufacturers in updating design criteria, are obtained from existing, on-board digital flight data recorders. Procedures for editing and processing the data are explained, and differences between these and past NACA/NASA analog data are discussed. One major such difference is the automatic bandpass filtering of normal acceleration data to separate high-frequency gust response from low-frequency maneuver response. Plans and preliminary efforts for the development of an on-board data processing system, able to derive statistical aircraft operating parameters directly from real-time data, are also reviewed.

  6. Electronic measurement of strain effects on spin transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Tinkey, Holly; Appelbaum, Ian

    Spin transport in silicon is limited by the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism, which is driven by scattering between degenerate conduction band valleys. Mechanical strain along a valley axis partially breaks this degeneracy, and will ultimately quench intervalley spin relaxation for transitions between states on orthogonal axes. Using a custom-designed and constructed strain probe, we study the effects of uniaxial compressive strain along the < 100 > direction on ballistic tunnel junction devices used to inject spin-polarized electrons into silicon. The effects of strain-induced valley splitting will be presented and compared to our theoretical model. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N000141410317, the National Science Foundation under Contract No. ECCS-1231855, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and the Maryland NanoCenter.

  7. Correlation between processing conditions, microstructure and charge transport in half-Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makongo, Julien P.A.; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Misra, Dinesh K.; Uher, Ctirad; Poudeu, Pierre F.P.

    2013-05-01

    Five bulk samples of n-type Zr₀.₂₅Hf₀.₇₅NiSn₀.₉₇₅Sb₀.₀₂₅ half-Heusler (HH) alloy were fabricated by reacting elemental powders via (1) high temperature solid state (SS) reaction and (2) mechanical alloying (MA), followed by densification using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and/or hot pressing (HP). A portion of the sample obtained by SS reaction was mechanically alloyed before consolidation by hot pressing (SS–MA–HP). X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that all SS specimen (SS–SPS, SS–HP, SS–MA–HP) are single phase HH alloys, whereas the MA sample (MA–SPS) contains metallic nanoprecipitates. Electronic and thermal transport measurements showed that the embedded nanoprecipitates induce a drastic increase in the carrier concentration (n), a large decrease in the Seebeck coefficient (S) and a marginal decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity (κl) of the MA–SPS sample leading to lower ZT values when compared to the SS–HP samples. Constant values of S are observed for the SS series regardless of the processing method. However, a strong dependence of the carrier mobility (μ), electrical conductivity (σ) and κl on the processing and consolidation method is observed. For instance, mechanical alloying introduces additional structural defects which enhance electron and phonon scattering leading to moderately low values of μ and large reduction in κl. This results in a net 20% enhancement in the figure of merit (ZT=0.6 at 775 K). HH specimen of the same nominal composition with higher ZT is anticipated from a combination of SS reaction, MA and SPS (SS–MA–SPS). - Graphical abstract: In half-Heusler alloys, thermopower values are insensitive to processing method, whereas carrier mobility (μ), electrical conductivity (σ), and κl strongly dependent on the microstructure which in turn is altered by the synthesis, processing and

  8. Using measurement-induced disturbance to characterize correlations as classical or quantum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Shunlong

    2008-02-15

    In contrast to the seminal entanglement-separability paradigm widely used in quantum information theory, we introduce a quantum-classical dichotomy in order to classify and quantify statistical correlations in bipartite states. This is based on the idea that while in the classical description of nature measurements can be carried out without disturbance, in the quantum description, generic measurements often disturb the system and the disturbance can be exploited to quantify the quantumness of correlations therein. It turns out that certain separable states still possess correlations of a quantum nature and indicates that quantum correlations are more general than entanglement. The results are illustrated in the Werner states and the isotropic states, and are applied to quantify the quantum advantage of the model of quantum computation proposed by Knill and Laflamme [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 5672 (1998)].

  9. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  10. Transmission Efficiency Measurements and Correlations with Physical Characteristics of the Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Mitchell, A. M.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from helicopter transmission efficiency tests were compared to physical properties of the eleven lubricants used in those tests. The tests were conducted with the OH-58 helicopter main rotor transmission. Efficiencies ranged from 98.3 to 98.8 percent. The data was examined for correlation of physical properties with efficiency. There was a reasonable correlation of efficiency with absolute viscosity if the viscosity was first corrected for temperature and pressure in the lubricated contact. Between lubricants, efficiency did not correlate well with viscosity at atmospheric pressure. Between lubricants, efficiency did not correlate well with calculated lubricant film forming capacity. Bench type sliding friction and wear measurements could not be correlated to transmission efficiency and component wear.

  11. Intracranial hemorrhage during aeromedical transport and correlation with high altitude adaptations in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kouliev, Timur; Richardson, Airron; Glushak, Cai

    2012-01-01

    Aeromedical transport is challenging not only because of limitations of equipment, unfamiliar surroundings, and challenging environmental conditions, but also due to difficulty in developing methodologies for research and data collection. To our knowledge, neurological changes at the oxygen tensions of a pressurized cabin have not been systematically studied. Here we report a case of intracranial hemorrhage during aeromedical transport and review the body's cardiovascular and respiratory adaptation to decreased ambient oxygen tension. Previous experience with high altitude cerebral edema serves as guidance for mitigating the effects of vasogenic edema in patients at risk of neurological events who travel by air. Review of this case and relevant altitude-related physiological changes may be grounds for more conservative recommendations on aeromedical transport after an acute neurological event. PMID:27147866

  12. Validation of bed-load transport measurements with time-sequenced bathymetric data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in bathymetric data acquisition have made it possible to adopt a new, expedient method for measuring bed load transport in rivers. The method consists of comparing time sequenced bathymetric data sets and utilizing a simple mass conservation relation for bed load transport. Assuming a tri...

  13. Measuring of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. A correlation of the optical measurements with colony forming units

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; Said-Fernández, Salvador; de León, Mario Bermúdez

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of colony forming units (cfu), turbidity, and optical density at 600 nm (OD600) measurements were used to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. Turbidity and OD600 measurements displayed similar growth curves, while cfu quantification showed a continuous growth curve. We determined the cfu equivalents to McFarland and OD600 units. PMID:24159318

  14. Transport and torque magnetometry measurements on CeAuSb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lishan; Yelland, Edward; Bruin, Jan; Sakai, Hide; Sheikin, Ilya; MacKenzie, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The tetragonal crystal CeAuSb2 has a layered structure and orders antiferromagnetically at T ~ 6K. Under a c-axis magnetic field, the Neel temperature is gradually suppressed to zero at a possible field-tuned quantum critical point at about 6 T. Within this antiferromagnetic phase, between the QCP and about 2.8 T, there is an additional, novel phase. We report transport measurements on pure single crystals of CeAuSb2, in fields of up to 35 T and from room temperature down to 100 mK. We also report torque magnetometry measurements. Unlike a recent report, we find single, sharp transitions into the novel phase. We discuss the nature of the novel phase. The work presented is supported by TOPNES(Topological Protection and Non-Equilibrium States in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems research programme), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, UK) and Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids(Dresden, Germany) etc.

  15. Single-particle correlated time-of-flight velocimeter for remote wind-speed measurement.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, K G; She, C Y

    1977-11-01

    A new technique of single-particle correlation for wind-speed measurement by determining aerosol time of flight is discussed. Using this technique, single-ended remote measurement of atmospheric wind speeds has been demonstrated at ranges up to 100 m under natural aerosol conditions with less than 0.2-W continuous-wave laser power with a measurement time of approximately 1 sec.

  16. Spatial Correlation of Solar-Wind Turbulence from Two-Point Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Milano, L. J.; Dasso, S.; Weygand, J. M.; Smith, C. W.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Interplanetary turbulence, the best studied case of low frequency plasma turbulence, is the only directly quantified instance of astrophysical turbulence. Here, magnetic field correlation analysis, using for the first time only proper two-point, single time measurements, provides a key step in unraveling the space-time structure of interplanetary turbulence. Simultaneous magnetic field data from the Wind, ACE, and Cluster spacecraft are analyzed to determine the correlation (outer) scale, and the Taylor microscale near Earth's orbit.

  17. Measurement of the Correlation and Coherence Lengths in Boundary Layer Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Wall pressure data acquired during flight tests at several flight conditions are analyzed and the correlation and coherence lengths of the data reported. It is shown how the frequency bandwidth of the analysis biases the correlation length and how the convection of the flow acts to reduce the coherence length. Coherence lengths measured in the streamwise direction appear much longer than would be expected based on classical results for flow over a flat plat.

  18. Correlation of combustor acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion chamber acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements are correlated with operating conditions and chamber geometries over a wide range. The variables include considerations of chamber design (can, annular, and reverse-flow annular) and size, number of fuel nozzles, burner staging and fuel split, airflow and heat release rates, and chamber inlet pressure and temperature levels. The correlated data include those obtained with combustion component development rigs as well as engines.

  19. A lower bound on the number of cosmic ray events required to measure source catalogue correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, Marco; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Wissel, Stephanie

    2016-10-01

    Recent analyses of cosmic ray arrival directions have resulted in evidence for a positive correlation with active galactic nuclei positions that has weak significance against an isotropic source distribution. In this paper, we explore the sample size needed to measure a highly statistically significant correlation to a parent source catalogue. We compare several scenarios for the directional scattering of ultra-high energy cosmic rays given our current knowledge of the galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields. We find significant correlations are possible for a sample of >1000 cosmic ray protons with energies above 60 EeV.

  20. The negativity of Wigner function as a measure of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyouri, F.; El Baz, M.; Hassouni, Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study comparatively the behaviors of Wigner function and quantum correlations for two quasi-Werner states formed with two general bipartite superposed coherent states. We show that the Wigner function can be used to detect and quantify the quantum correlations. However, we show that it is in fact not sensitive to all kinds of quantum correlations but only to entanglement. Then, we analyze the measure of non-classicality of quantum states based on the volume occupied by the negative part of the Wigner function.

  1. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization.

  2. 3D topography measurements on correlation cells—a new approach to forensic ballistics identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, John; Chu, Wei; Tong, Mingsi; Soons, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) topography measurements on correlation cells, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the ‘NIST Ballistics Identification System (NBIS)’ aimed at accurate ballistics identifications and fast ballistics evidence searches. The 3D topographies are divided into arrays of correlation cells to identify ‘valid correlation areas’ and eliminate ‘invalid correlation areas’ from the matching and identification procedure. A ‘congruent matching cells’ (CMC)’ method using three types of identification parameters of the paired correlation cells (cross correlation function maximum CCFmax, spatial registration position in x-y and registration angle θ) is used for high accuracy ballistics identifications. ‘Synchronous processing’ is proposed for correlating multiple cell pairs at the same time to increase the correlation speed. The proposed NBIS can be used for correlations of both geometrical topographies and optical intensity images. All the correlation parameters and algorithms are in the public domain and subject to open tests. An error rate reporting procedure has been developed that can greatly add to the scientific support for the firearm and toolmark identification specialty, and give confidence to the trier of fact in court proceedings. The NBIS is engineered to employ transparent identification parameters and criteria, statistical models and correlation algorithms. In this way, interoperability between different ballistics identification systems can be more easily achieved. This interoperability will make the NBIS suitable for ballistics identifications and evidence searches with large national databases, such as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network in the United States.

  3. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  4. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  5. Photographic Measurements Partially Correlate to Nasal Function and Appearance among Adult Cleft Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keijser, Klara; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) affects nasal function and appearance. There is a lack of objective measurements to evaluate these features. This study analyzes whether objective measurements on photographs correlate with nasal function and/or appearance among adults treated for UCLP. Methods: All patients with UCLP born from 1960 to 1987 treated at the Uppsala University Hospital were invited (n = 109). Participation rate was 68% (n = 74); mean follow-up was 35 years. An age-matched control group (n = 61) underwent the same tests. Nostril area, nasal tip deviation angle, and width of the nostril were measured on photographs and were compared with functional tests and with appearance as assessed by self-assessment questionnaire, professional panel, or laymen panel. Results: The photographically measured nostril area correlated with nasal volume (acoustic rhinometry) among UCLP patients, both cleft side and noncleft side, and controls (0.331, P = 0.005; 0.338, P = 0.004; and 0.420, P < 0.001, respectively). For the patients’ noncleft side and controls, the area correlated inversely with airflow resistance at inspiration (noncleft side: −0.245, P = 0.043; controls: −0.226, P = 0.013). Laymen assessment of nasal appearance correlated with width ratio of the patients (0.27, P = 0.022) and with nasal tip deviation angle and area ratio of the controls (0.26, P = 0.041, and 0.31, P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusions: Photographic measurements correlate partially with both functional tests of the nose and panel ratings of appearance. No correlation was found with self-assessment of appearance. Evaluation of photographs needs to be combined with patient-reported outcome measures to be a valuable endpoint of nasal appearance. PMID:27579244

  6. Development of an Instrument Performance Simulation Capability for an Infrared Correlation Radiometer for Troposheric Carbon Monoxide Measurements From Geo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OsowskiNeil, Doreen; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Boldt, John; Edwards, David

    2010-01-01

    We present the progress toward an analytical performance model of a 2.3 micron infrared correlation radiometer (IRCRg) prototype subsystem for a future geostationary space-borne instrument. The prototype is designed specifically to measure carbon monoxide (CO) from geostationary orbit. NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission, one of the United States Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey missions, specifies the use of infrared correlation radiometry to measure CO in two spectral regions for this mission. GEO-CAPE will use the robust IRCR measurement technique at geostationary orbit, nearly 50 times farther away than the Terra/MOPITT orbit, to determine hourly changes in CO across a continental domain. The abundance of CO in Earth's troposphere directly affects the concentration of hydroxyl, which regulates the lifetimes of many tropospheric pollutants. In addition, CO is a precursor to ozone formation; CO is used as a tracer to study the transport of global and regional pollutants; and CO is used as an indicator of both natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources and sinks. We have structured our development project to enable rapid evaluation of future spaceborne instrument designs. The project is part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. We describe the architecture of the performance model and the planned evaluation of the performance model using laboratory test data.

  7. Isoprene concentrations over Russia: ground-based measurements and chemistry-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezina, Elena; Konovalov, Igor; Berezin, Evgeny; Skorokhod, Andrey; Elansky, Nikolay; Belikov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Near-surface isoprene concentration was measured over Russia using the proton mass spectrometry method (PTR-MS) in TROICA (TRanscontinental Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) experiments along the Trans-Siberian railway from 21.06.08 to 04.08.08 (TROICA-12) and from 08.10.09 to 23.10.09 (TROICA-13). The highest isoprene concentration is observed in the Far East (up to 3 ppb) due to the emissions from the major isoprene source - deciduous forests. The TROICA measurements were compared to the corresponding simulations performed with the CHIMERE chemistry transport model (CTM) using the MEGAN biogenic emission inventory. Simulated and measured isoprene concentrations are highly correlated (r = 0.8), but the simulated isoprene concentration is about 4-6 times higher than the measured one. The selection of daytime and background (from isoprene/benzene ratios) isoprene concentrations don't significantly increase the experimental values; moreover, even the isoprene concentration corrected for atmospheric photochemical losses (that is, the near-source concentration) is found to be 1.5 times lower than the simulated data. Therefore, the systematic discrepancy between the measurements and simulations could not be unambiguously attributed to the representativity error. The weak exponential dependence of summer isoprene concentration on temperature both for the model (R2 = 0.3) and for the experimental data (R2 = 0.4) is observed. However, a much stronger linear correlation (r ~ 0.9) is found between the isoprene concentration and temperature in Russian regions separated according to the type of vegetation. The differences between the simulated and experimental dependences of isoprene concentration on temperature are not statistically significant. The above results prompt the conclusion that the parameterization of isoprene emissions in the CHIMERE CTM is qualitatively adequate, but the isoprene emission factors applicable for Russian forest are likely

  8. Strain induced modulation of the correlated transport in epitaxial Sm0.5Nd0.5NiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Gardner, H. J.; Chen, X. G.; Singh, V. R.; Hong, X.

    2015-04-01

    We report a study of the effect of epitaxial strain on the correlated transport properties of 2-40 nm Sm0.5Nd0.5NiO3 (SNNO) films grown on different substrates. The metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature TMI of the SNNO films increases with increasing tensile strain. While films on (0 0 1) LaAlO3 and (1 1 0) NdGaO3 substrates exhibit a sharp MIT and thermal hysteresis in the cooling-heating cycle, signaling a first-order transition, films on (0 0 1) SrTiO3 show a broad, second-order MIT. Hall effect measurements reveal hole-type charge carriers and thermally activated temperature dependence of the carrier density below TMI. The corresponding activation energy is ˜80 meV for films on LaAlO3 and NdGaO3, and is suppressed to 25 meV for films on SrTiO3. The carrier mobility in the metallic state and variable range hopping (VRH) transport at a low temperature point significantly enhanced electron localization in SNNO on STO, which we believe is not simply driven by extrinsic effects such as oxygen vacancies, but rather is an intrinsic characteristic for films subject to tensile strain due to the elongated Ni-O bond and hence enhanced dynamic Jahn-Teller distortion. In ultrathin films above the electrical dead layer thickness (2-3 nm), we observe a more than 100 K increase of TMI for films on LaAlO3, which has been correlated with a crossover from 3D to 2D transport as revealed from VRH. We attribute the distinct transport characteristics to strain induced modulation of various energy scales associated with the Ni-O-Ni bond angle and Ni-O bond length, which collectively determine the delocalization bandwidth of the system.

  9. Discrimination between spin-dependent charge transport and spin-dependent recombination in π-conjugated polymers by correlated current and electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavand, Marzieh; Baird, Douglas; van Schooten, Kipp; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent processes play a crucial role in organic electronic devices. Spin coherence can give rise to spin mixing due to a number of processes such as hyperfine coupling, and leads to a range of magnetic field effects. However, it is not straightforward to differentiate between pure single-carrier spin-dependent transport processes which control the current and therefore the electroluminescence, and spin-dependent electron-hole recombination which determines the electroluminescence yield and in turn modulates the current. We therefore investigate the correlation between the dynamics of spin-dependent electric current and spin-dependent electroluminescence in two derivatives of the conjugated polymer poly(phenylene-vinylene) using simultaneously measured pulsed electrically detected (pEDMR) and optically detected (pODMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This experimental approach requires careful analysis of the transient response functions under optical and electrical detection. At room temperature and under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, a correlation of the pEDMR and the pODMR signals is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the recombination currents involve spin-dependent electronic transitions. This observation is inconsistent with the hypothesis that these signals are caused by spin-dependent charge-carrier transport. These results therefore provide no evidence that supports earlier claims that spin-dependent transport plays a role for room-temperature magnetoresistance effects. At low temperatures, however, the correlation between pEDMR and pODMR is weakened, demonstrating that more than one spin-dependent process influences the optoelectronic materials' properties. This conclusion is consistent with prior studies of half-field resonances that were attributed to spin-dependent triplet exciton recombination, which becomes significant at low temperatures when the triplet lifetime increases.

  10. Transport and localization in a topological phononic lattice with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Lee, Ching Hua

    2016-10-01

    Recently proposed classical analogs of topological insulators in phononic lattices have the advantage of much more accessible experimental realization compared to conventional materials. Drawn to their potential practical structural applications, we investigate how disorder, which is generically nonnegligible in macroscopic realization, can attenuate the topologically protected edge (TPE) modes that constitute robust transmitting channels at zero disorder. We simulate the transmission of phonon modes in a quasi-one-dimensional classical lattice waveguide with mass disorder and show that the TPE mode transmission remains highly robust (Ξ ˜1 ) in the presence of uncorrelated disorder but diminishes when disorder is spatially correlated. This reduction in transmittance is attributed to the Anderson localization of states within the mass disorder domains. By contrast, non-TPE channels exhibit qualitatively different behavior, with spatial correlation in the mass disorder leading to significant transmittance reduction (enhancement) at low (high) frequencies. Our results demonstrate how TPE modes drastically modify the effect of spatial correlation on mode localization.

  11. Volatility and correlation-based systemic risk measures in the US market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitarese, Jamil

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the problem of how to use simple systemic risk measures to assess portfolio risk characteristics. Using three simple examples taken from previous literature, one based on raw and partial correlations, another based on the eigenvalue decomposition of the covariance matrix and the last one based on an eigenvalue entropy, a Granger-causation analysis revealed some of them are not always a good measure of risk in the S&P 500 and in the VIX. The measures selected do not Granger-cause the VIX index in all windows selected; therefore, in the sense of risk as volatility, the indicators are not always suitable. Nevertheless, their results towards returns are similar to previous works that accept them. A deeper analysis has shown that any symmetric measure based on eigenvalue decomposition of correlation matrices, however, is not useful as a measure of "correlation" risk. The empirical counterpart analysis of this proposition stated that negative correlations are usually small and, therefore, do not heavily distort the behavior of the indicator.

  12. Bi-photon spectral correlation measurements from a silicon nanowire in the quantum and classical regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jizan, Iman; Helt, L. G.; Xiong, Chunle; Collins, Matthew J.; Choi, Duk-Yong; Joon Chae, Chang; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Clark, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    The growing requirement for photon pairs with specific spectral correlations in quantum optics experiments has created a demand for fast, high resolution and accurate source characterisation. A promising tool for such characterisation uses classical stimulated processes, in which an additional seed laser stimulates photon generation yielding much higher count rates, as recently demonstrated for a χ(2) integrated source in A. Eckstein et al. Laser Photon. Rev. 8, L76 (2014). In this work we extend these results to χ(3) integrated sources, directly measuring for the first time the relation between spectral correlation measurements via stimulated and spontaneous four wave mixing in an integrated optical waveguide, a silicon nanowire. We directly confirm the speed-up due to higher count rates and demonstrate that this allows additional resolution to be gained when compared to traditional coincidence measurements without any increase in measurement time. As the pump pulse duration can influence the degree of spectral correlation, all of our measurements are taken for two different pump pulse widths. This allows us to confirm that the classical stimulated process correctly captures the degree of spectral correlation regardless of pump pulse duration, and cements its place as an essential characterisation method for the development of future quantum integrated devices. PMID:26218609

  13. Correlation between near infrared spectroscopy and electrical techniques in measuring skin moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, M.; Sabbri, A. R. M.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F.

    2014-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique serves as an important tool for the measurement of moisture content of skin owing to the advantages it has over the other techniques. The purpose of the study is to develop a correlation between NIR spectrometer with electrical conventional techniques for skin moisture measurement. A non-invasive measurement of moisture content of skin was performed on different part of human face and hand under control environment (temperature 21 ± 1 °C, relative humidity 45 ± 5 %). Ten healthy volunteers age between 21-25 (male and female) participated in this study. The moisture content of skin was measured using DermaLab® USB Moisture Module, Scalar Moisture Checker and NIR spectroscopy (NIRQuest). Higher correlation was observed between NIRQuest and Dermalab moisture probe with a coefficient of determination (R2) above 70 % for all the subjects. However, the value of R2 between NIRQuest and Moisture Checker was observed to be lower with the R2 values ranges from 51.6 to 94.4 %. The correlation of NIR spectroscopy technique successfully developed for measuring moisture content of the skin. The analysis of this correlation can help to establish novel instruments based on an optical system in clinical used especially in the dermatology field.

  14. A chondrodysplasia family produced by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene: Genotype/phenotype correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Superti-Furga, A.; Steinmann, B.; Gitzelmann, R.; Rossi, A.

    1996-05-03

    Achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG-1B), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO-2), and diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) are recessively inherited chondrodysplasia of decreasing severity caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene on chromosome 5. In these conditions, sulfate transport across the cell membrane is impaired which results in insufficient sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans and thus in an abnormally low sulfate content of cartilage. The severity of the phenotype correlates well with the predicted effect of the underlying DTDST mutations: homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for stop codons or transmembrane domain substitutions mostly result in achondrogenesis type 1B, while other structural or regulatory mutations usually result in one of the less severe phenotypes. The chondrodysplasia arising at the DTDST locus constitute a bone dysplasia family with recessive inheritance. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. A chondrodysplasia family produced by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene: genotype/phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, A; Rossi, A; Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1996-05-01

    Achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG-1B), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO-2), and diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) are recessively inherited chondrodysplasias of decreasing severity caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene on chromosome 5. In these conditions, sulfate transport across the cell membrane is impaired which results in insufficient sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans and thus in an abnormally low sulfate content of cartilage. The severity of the phenotype correlates well with the predicted effect of the underlying DTDST mutations: homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for stop codons or transmembrane domain substitutions mostly result in achondrogenesis type 1B, while other structural or regulatory mutations usually result in one of the less severe phenotypes. The chondrodysplasias arising at the DTDST locus constitute a bone dysplasia family with recessive inheritance. PMID:8723100

  16. Field-measured drag area is a key correlate of level cycling time trial performance

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, James E.; Lim, Allen C.; Ignatz, Ryan I.; Edwards, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Drag area (Ad) is a primary factor determining aerodynamic resistance during level cycling and is therefore a key determinant of level time trial performance. However, Ad has traditionally been difficult to measure. Our purpose was to determine the value of adding field-measured Ad as a correlate of level cycling time trial performance. In the field, 19 male cyclists performed a level (22.1 km) time trial. Separately, field-determined Ad and rolling resistance were calculated for subjects along with projected frontal area assessed directly (AP) and indirectly (Est AP). Also, a graded exercise test was performed to determine \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$\\end{document}V˙O2 peak, lactate threshold (LT), and economy. \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$\\end{document}V˙O2 peak (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mathrm{l}~\\min ^{-1}$\\end{document}lmin−1) and power at LT were significantly correlated to power measured during the time trial (r = 0.83 and 0.69, respectively) but were not significantly correlated to performance time (r = − 0.42 and −0.45). The correlation with performance time improved significantly (p < 0.05) when these variables were normalized to Ad. Of note, Ad alone was better correlated to performance time (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) than any combination of non-normalized physiological

  17. Correlation of Foot Posture Index With Plantar Pressure and Radiographic Measurements in Pediatric Flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Su; Jeong, Jin Ook; Kwon, Na Yeon; Jeong, Sang Mi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the Foot Posture Index (FPI) (including talar head palpation, curvature at the lateral malleoli, inversion/eversion of the calcaneus, talonavicular bulging, congruence of the medical longitudinal arch, and abduction/adduction of the forefoot on the rare foot), plantar pressure distribution, and pediatric flatfoot radiographic findings. Methods Nineteen children with flatfoot (age, 9.32±2.67 years) were included as the study group. Eight segments of plantar pressure were measured with the GaitView platform pressure pad and the FPI was measured in children. The four angles were measured on foot radiographs. We analyzed the correlation between the FPI, plantar pressure characteristics, and the radiographic angles in children with flatfoot. Results The ratio of hallux segment pressure and the second through fifth toe segment pressure was correlated with the FPI (r=0.385, p=0.017). The FPI was correlated with the lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (r=0.422, p=0.008) and calcaneal pitch (r=-0.411, p=0.01). Conclusion Our results show a correlation between the FPI and plantar pressure. The FPI and pediatric flatfoot radiography are useful tools to evaluate pediatric flatfoot. PMID:25750866

  18. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  19. Measuring the cortical correlation structure of spontaneous oscillatory activity with EEG and MEG.

    PubMed

    Siems, Marcus; Pape, Anna-Antonia; Hipp, Joerg F; Siegel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Power correlations of orthogonalized signals have recently been introduced for MEG as a powerful tool to non-invasively investigate functional connectivity in the human brain. Little is known about the applicability of this approach to EEG, and how compatible the results are between EEG and MEG. To address this, we systematically compared power correlations of simultaneously recorded and source co-registered 64-channel EEG and 275-channel MEG in resting human subjects. For both modalities, connectivity peaked at around 16 Hz. For this frequency range, seed-based correlation maps showed comparable patterns across modalities, with generally more distinct patterns for MEG. A brain-wide pattern correlation analysis also revealed maximum similarity around 16 Hz. Correcting for different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) across frequencies and modalities revealed pattern correlation between modalities close to one across a broad frequency range from 1 to 32 Hz and only slightly smaller for higher frequencies. The decrease above 32 Hz likely reflected higher susceptibility to muscle artifacts for EEG than for MEG. Our results show that power correlation of orthogonalized signals is feasible for studying functional connectivity with 64-channel EEG. Furthermore, besides differences in SNR, for frequencies from about 8 to 32 Hz, EEG and MEG measure the same correlation patterns across the entire brain.

  20. Large range rotation distortion measurement for remote sensing images based on volume holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Tian; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2012-10-01

    Volume holographic optical correlator can compute the correlation results between images at a super-high speed. In the application of remote imaging processing such as scene matching, 6,000 template images have been angularly multiplexed in the photorefractive crystal and the 6,000 parallel processing channels are achieved. In order to detect the correlation pattern of images precisely and distinguishingly, an on-off pixel inverted technology of images is proposed. It can fully use the CCD's linear range for detection and expand the normalized correlation value differences as the target image rotates. Due to the natural characteristics of the remote sensing images, the statistical formulas between the rotation distortions and the correlation results can be estimated. The rotation distortion components can be estimated by curve fitting method with the data of correlation results. The intensities of the correlation spots are related to the distortion between the two images. The rotation distortion could be derived from the intensities in the post processing procedure. With 18 rotations of the input image and sending them into the volume holographic system, the detection of the rotation variation in the range of 180° can be fulfilled. So the large range rotation distortion detection is firstly realized. It offers a fast, large range rotation measurement method for image distortions.

  1. Correlations between the disintegration of melt and the measured impulses in steam explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, G.; Linca, A.; Schindler, M.

    1995-09-01

    To find our correlations in steam explosions (melt water interactions) between the measured impulses and the disintegration of the melt, experiments were performed in three configurations i.e. stratified, entrapment and jet experiments. Linear correlations were detected between the impulse and the total surface of the fragments. Theoretical considerations point out that a linear correlation assumes superheating of a water layer around the fragments of a constant thickness during the fragmentation process to a constant temperature (here the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water was assumed) and a constant expansion velocity of the steam in the main expansion time. The correlation constant does not depend on melt temperature and trigger pressure, but it depends on the configuration of the experiment or of a scenario of an accident. Further research is required concerning the correlation constant. For analysing steam explosion accidents the explosivity is introduced. The explosivity is a mass specific impulse. The explosivity is linear correlated with the degree of fragmentation. Knowing the degree of fragmentation with proper correlation constant the explosivity can be calculated and from the explosivity combined with the total mass of fragments the impulse is obtained which can be used to an estimation of the maximum force.

  2. Measurements of air pollution emission factors for marine transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alföldy, B.; Balzani Lööv, J.; Lagler, F.; Mellqvist, J.; Berg, N.; Beecken, J.; Weststrate, H.; Duyzer, J.; Bencs, L.; Horemans, B.; Cavalli, F.; Putaud, J.-P.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Pintér Csordás, A.; Van Grieken, R.; Borowiak, A.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical composition of the plumes of seagoing ships was investigated during a two weeks long measurement campaign in the port of Rotterdam, Hoek van Holland, The Netherlands, in September 2009. Altogether, 497 ships were monitored and a statistical evaluation of emission factors (g kg-1 fuel) was provided. The concerned main atmospheric components were SO2, NO2, NOx and the aerosol particle number. In addition, the elemental and water-soluble ionic composition of the emitted particulate matter was determined. Emission factors were expressed as a function of ship type, power and crankshaft rotational speed. The average SO2 emission factor was found to be roughly half of what is allowed in sulphur emission control areas (16 vs. 30 g kg-1 fuel), and exceedances of this limit were rarely registered. A significant linear relationship was observed between the SO2 and particle number emission factor. The intercept of the regression line, 0.5 × 1016 (kg fuel)-1, gives the average number of particles formed during the burning of 1 kg zero sulphur content fuel, while the slope, 2 × 1018, provides the average number of particles formed with 1 kg sulphur burnt with the fuel. Water-soluble ionic composition analysis of the aerosol samples from the plumes showed that ~144 g of particulate sulphate was emitted from 1 kg sulphur burnt with the fuel. The mass median diameter of sulphate particles estimated from the measurements was ~42 nm.

  3. Limitations of signal averaging due to temporal correlation in laser remote-sensing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menyuk, N.; Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser remote sensing involves the measurement of laser-beam transmission through the atmosphere and is subject to uncertainties caused by strong fluctuations due primarily to speckle, glint, and atmospheric-turbulence effects. These uncertainties are generally reduced by taking average values of increasing numbers of measurements. An experiment was carried out to directly measure the effect of signal averaging on back-scattered laser return signals from a diffusely reflecting target using a direct-detection differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) system. The improvement in accuracy obtained by averaging over increasing numbers of data points was found to be smaller than that predicted for independent measurements. The experimental results are shown to be in excellent agreement with a theoretical analysis which considers the effect of temporal correlation. The analysis indicates that small but long-term temporal correlation severely limits the improvement available through signal averaging.

  4. The development of inhibitory saccadic trajectory deviations correlates with measures of antisaccadic inhibition.

    PubMed

    West, Greg L; Lippé, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Chronological age is related positively to a participant's ability to inhibit distracting information. Inhibition can be measured using the trajectory deviation of a saccade. Saccadic curvature away from distracting visual information is controlled through top-down inhibition mediated by the frontal eye fields. In the present study, we aimed to further test the saccadic trajectory deviation paradigm's sensitivity to the development of frontal inhibitory procuresses by comparing its measure of saccadic inhibition with that of a widely used paradigm, namely, the antisaccade task. We show that the later 'inhibition' phase of the trajectory deviation function correlated strongly with the measure of antisaccadic inhibition obtained in the same individuals. As expected, the earlier 'capture' phase of the trajectory deviation function, which does not represent the involvement of frontal structures, did not correlate with antisaccadic inhibition. Further, both measures of frontal inhibition increased with chronological age.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray microtomographic measurement of water transport in wood-fibre reinforced composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, Arttu; Harjupatana, Tero; Kataja, Markku; Fortino, Stefania; Immonen, Kirsi

    2016-07-01

    Natural fibre composites are prone to absorb moisture from the environment which may lead to dimensional changes, mold growth, degradation of mechanical properties or other adverse effects. In this work we develop a method for direct non-intrusive measurement of local moisture content inside a material sample. The method is based on X-ray microtomography, digital image correlation and image analysis. As a first application of the method we study axial transport of water in a cylindrical polylactic acid/birch pulp composite material sample with one end exposed to water. Based on the results, the method seems to give plausible estimates of water content profiles inside the cylindrical sample. The results may be used, e.g., in developing and validating models of moisture transport in biocomposites.

  6. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-15

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  7. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-01

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  8. Cluster-based statistics for brain connectivity in correlation with behavioral measures.

    PubMed

    Han, Cheol E; Yoo, Sang Wook; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Graph theoretical approaches have successfully revealed abnormality in brain connectivity, in particular, for contrasting patients from healthy controls. Besides the group comparison analysis, a correlational study is also challenging. In studies with patients, for example, finding brain connections that indeed deepen specific symptoms is interesting. The correlational study is also beneficial since it does not require controls, which are often difficult to find, especially for old-age patients with cognitive impairment where controls could also have cognitive deficits due to normal ageing. However, one of the major difficulties in such correlational studies is too conservative multiple comparison correction. In this paper, we propose a novel method for identifying brain connections that are correlated with a specific cognitive behavior by employing cluster-based statistics, which is less conservative than other methods, such as Bonferroni correction, false discovery rate procedure, and extreme statistics. Our method is based on the insight that multiple brain connections, rather than a single connection, are responsible for abnormal behaviors. Given brain connectivity data, we first compute a partial correlation coefficient between every edge and the behavioral measure. Then we group together neighboring connections with strong correlation into clusters and calculate their maximum sizes. This procedure is repeated for randomly permuted assignments of behavioral measures. Significance levels of the identified sub-networks are estimated from the null distribution of the cluster sizes. This method is independent of network construction methods: either structural or functional network can be used in association with any behavioral measures. We further demonstrated the efficacy of our method using patients with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. We identified sub-networks that are correlated with the disease severity by exploiting diffusion tensor imaging

  9. Eigenspine: computing the correlation between measures describing vertebral pose for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Daniel; Lundström, Claes; Knutsson, Hans

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the concept of eigenspine, a concept applicable for determining the correlation between pair-wise combinations of measures useful for describing the three-dimensional spinal deformities associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The proposed data analysis scheme is based upon the use of principal component analysis (PCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA). PCA is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the data space, thereby providing a regularization of the measurements, and CCA is employed to determine the linear dependence between pair-wise combinations of different measures. The usefulness of the eigenspine concept is demonstrated by analyzing the position and the rotation of all lumbar and thoracic vertebrae as obtained from 46 patients suffering from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The analysis showed that the strongest linear relationship is found between the lateral displacement and the coronal rotation of the vertebrae, and that a somewhat weaker but still strong correlation is found between the coronal rotation and the axial rotation of the vertebrae. These results are well in-line with the general understanding of idiopathic scoliosis. Noteworthy though is that the correlation between the anterior-posterior displacement and the sagittal rotation was not as strong as expected and that the obtained results further indicate the need for including the axial vertebral rotation as a measure when characterizing different types of idiopathic scoliosis. Apart from analyzing pair-wise correlations between different measures, the method is believed to be suitable for finding a maximally descriptive low-dimensional combination of measures describing spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis.

  10. Spectral correlation measurements at the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference dip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, T.; Marsili, F.; Verma, V. B.; Shalm, L. K.; Shaw, M.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an efficient tool capable of measuring the spectral correlations between photons emerging from a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. We show that for our spectrally factorizable spontaneous down-conversion source, the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference visibility decreases as the photons' frequency spread is increased to a maximum of 165 nm. Unfiltered, we obtained a visibility of 92.0 %±0.2 %. The maximum visibility was 97 %±0.2 % after applying filtering. We show that the tool can be useful for the study of spectral correlations that impair high-visibility and high-fidelity multisource interference applications. The nature of this tool also allows for arbitrary post-selective spectral filtering and high-rate multiphoton spectral correlation measurements.

  11. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  12. Sound Source Identification Through Flow Density Measurement and Correlation With Far Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Sound sources in the plumes of unheated round jets, in the Mach number range 0.6 to 1.8, were investigated experimentally using "casuality" approach, where air density fluctuations in the plumes were correlated with the far field noise. The air density was measured using a newly developed Molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique, which did not require any seeding. The reference at the end provides a detailed description of the measurement technique.

  13. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for non-invasive, micro-vascular cerebral blood flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses the temporal fluctuations of near-infrared (NIR) light to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. Here, we provide a brief history of DCS applications in brain with an emphasis on the underlying physical ideas, common instrumentation and validation. Then we describe recent clinical research that employs DCS-measured CBF as a biomarker of patient well-being, and as an indicator of hemodynamic and metabolic response to functional stimuli. PMID:23770408

  14. Measuring the growth of matter fluctuations with third-order galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, K.; Bel, J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Castander, F. J.

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of the linear growth factor D at different redshifts z are key to distinguish among cosmological models. One can estimate the derivative dD(z)/dln (1 + z) from redshift space measurements of the 3D anisotropic galaxy two-point correlation ξ(z), but the degeneracy of its transverse (or projected) component with galaxy bias b, i.e. ξ⊥(z) ∝ D2(z)b2(z), introduces large errors in the growth measurement. Here, we present a comparison between two methods which breaks this degeneracy by combining second- and third-order statistics. One uses the shape of the reduced three-point correlation and the other a combination of third-order one- and two-point cumulants. These methods use the fact that, for Gaussian initial conditions and scales larger than 20 h-1 Mpc, the reduced third-order matter correlations are independent of redshift (and therefore of the growth factor), while the third-order galaxy correlations depend on b. We use matter and halo catalogues from the MICE-GC simulation to test how well we can recover b(z) and therefore D(z) with these methods in 3D real space. We also present a new approach, which enables us to measure D directly from the redshift evolution of the second- and third-order galaxy correlations without the need of modelling matter correlations. For haloes with masses lower than 1014 h-1 M⊙, we find 10 per cent deviations between the different estimates of D, which are comparable to current observational errors. At higher masses, we find larger differences that can probably be attributed to the breakdown of the bias model and non-Poissonian shot noise.

  15. CORRELATIONS OF PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES WITH OUTDOOR AIR MEASUREMENT: A REVIEW OF RECENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have found a correlation between daily mortality and particle concentrations in outdoor air as measured at a central monitoring station. These studies have been the central reason for the U.S. EPA to propose new tighter particle standards. However, perso...

  16. Validation and retrieval of IASI measurements with IASI-balloon correlative measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payan, Sébastien; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Pondrom, Marc; Té, Yao; Jeseck, Pascal; Bureau, Jérôme; Pépin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Because of the increase of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and pollutants in the atmosphere since pre-industrial times and their impact on the environment (ozone hole, air quality, acid rains, greenhouse effect), in situ and remote-sensing measurements of atmospheric composition are carried out by a wide variety of instruments, using different measurement principles and different platforms (ground, aircrafts, balloons, satellites). The IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) instrument, consisting of a nadir-looking thermal infrared Fourier transform spectrometer, which was launched onboard the MetOp-A platform on 19th October 2006, is dedicated to operational meteorology. However, IASI spectra have demonstrated a huge potential for retrieving trace gases such as ozone (O3), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and many others. In this framework the LPMAA (Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire pour l'Atmosphère et l'Astrophysique) developed a balloon-borne Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer called IASI-balloon to record high resolution (0.1 cm-1 apodised) spectra of the atmosphere / surface system in the nadir looking geometry. Several flight of this balloon experiments have been performed allowing to provided a large number of thermal emission nadir looking FTIR spectra in the 650 - 3000 cm-1 region, recorded from float at about 35 km altitude. We retrieved profiles and/or columns of H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO and CH4. For a flight performed from Teresina, Brazil, the spectra recorded during the balloon flight are in good coincidence with IASI-MetOp measurements. We used this set of data to test the impact on the retrieval of a new cloud simulation module in our retrieval algorithm LARA (LPMA retrieval Atmospheric Algorithm). The results will be presented here.

  17. Correlation between microstructure and charge transport in poly(2,5-dimethoxy- p -phenylenevinylene) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M.; Tuladhar, S. M.; Nelson, J.; Maher, R. C.; Campoy-Quiles, M.; Choulis, S. A.; Mairy, M.; Bradley, D. D. C.; Etchegoin, P. G.; Tregidgo, C.; Suhling, K.; Richards, D. R.; Massiot, P.; Nielsen, C. B.; Steinke, J. H. G.

    2007-11-01

    We report a study of thin films of poly(2,5-dimethoxy- p -phenylenevinylene) (PDMeOPV) prepared by a precursor route. Conversion at two different temperatures, namely, 120 and 185°C , produces partially and fully converted films. We study the structural, optical, and charge transport characteristics of these samples in order to relate transport properties to microstructure. Micro-Raman mapping and photoluminescence (PL) imaging reveal the existence of coarse, depth-averaged domains of around 50μm in lateral extent, with more pronounced contrast for conversion at the higher temperature. The contrast in both micro-Raman and PL maps can be attributed to fluctuations in film density. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of the films indicate that the average film density is approximately 15% higher for conversion at the higher temperature. Time-of-flight photocurrent transients, recorded here in PDMeOPV films, are typically dispersive but yield hole mobilities in excess of 10-4cm2/Vs at modest applied fields (˜1.2×105V/cm) in the fully converted films. To our knowledge, these are amongst the highest reported mobility values for a poly( p -phenylenevinylene) derivative. Fully converted films, while yielding higher hole mobilities, exhibit a stronger dependence on electric field than partially converted ones. The higher mobility can be attributed to the almost complete conversion of the flexible saturated subunits within precursor chains to conjugated vinylene moieties at elevated temperature. This results in a correspondingly higher packing density, an improvement in intrachain transport, and a reduction in the smallest interchain hopping distance. We suggest that the stronger electric field dependence is due to the increasing influence of intermolecular electrostatic interactions with decreasing interchain separation. We propose that a greater proportion of chains in the fully converted films packs in a three-dimensional, interdigitated arrangement similar to that

  18. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  19. Correlations between measures of dynamic balance in individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Vistamehr, Arian; Kautz, Steven A; Bowden, Mark G; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-02-01

    Mediolateral balance control during walking is a challenging task in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. To detect and treat dynamic balance disorders, it is important to assess balance using reliable methods. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), margin-of-stability (MoS), and peak-to-peak range of angular-momentum (H) are some of the most commonly used measures to assess dynamic balance and fall risk in clinical and laboratory settings. However, it is not clear if these measures lead to similar conclusions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess dynamic balance in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals using BBS, DGI, MoS and the range of H and determine if these measure are correlated. BBS and DGI were collected from 19 individuals post-stroke. Additionally, kinematic and kinetic data were collected while the same individuals walked at their self-selected speed. MoS and the range of H were calculated in the mediolateral direction for each participant. Correlation analyses revealed moderate associations between all measures. Overall, a higher range of angular-momentum was associated with a higher MoS, wider step width and lower BBS and DGI scores, indicating poor balance control. Further, only the MoS from the paretic foot placement, but not the nonparetic foot, correlated with the other balance measures. Although moderate correlations existed between all the balance measures, these findings do not necessarily advocate the use of a single measure as each test may assess different constructs of dynamic balance. These findings have important implications for the use and interpretation of dynamic balance assessments. PMID:26795124

  20. Correlations between measures of dynamic balance in individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Vistamehr, Arian; Kautz, Steven A; Bowden, Mark G; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-02-01

    Mediolateral balance control during walking is a challenging task in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. To detect and treat dynamic balance disorders, it is important to assess balance using reliable methods. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), margin-of-stability (MoS), and peak-to-peak range of angular-momentum (H) are some of the most commonly used measures to assess dynamic balance and fall risk in clinical and laboratory settings. However, it is not clear if these measures lead to similar conclusions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess dynamic balance in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals using BBS, DGI, MoS and the range of H and determine if these measure are correlated. BBS and DGI were collected from 19 individuals post-stroke. Additionally, kinematic and kinetic data were collected while the same individuals walked at their self-selected speed. MoS and the range of H were calculated in the mediolateral direction for each participant. Correlation analyses revealed moderate associations between all measures. Overall, a higher range of angular-momentum was associated with a higher MoS, wider step width and lower BBS and DGI scores, indicating poor balance control. Further, only the MoS from the paretic foot placement, but not the nonparetic foot, correlated with the other balance measures. Although moderate correlations existed between all the balance measures, these findings do not necessarily advocate the use of a single measure as each test may assess different constructs of dynamic balance. These findings have important implications for the use and interpretation of dynamic balance assessments.

  1. A correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic and the importance of multifield fluctuation measurements for testing nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Doyle, E. J.; Gourdain, P. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Wang, G.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2008-10-15

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been used to measure local, turbulent fluctuations of the electron temperature in the core of DIII-D plasmas. This paper describes the hardware and testing of the CECE diagnostic and highlights the importance of measurements of multifield fluctuation profiles for the testing and validation of nonlinear gyrokinetic codes. The process of testing and validating such codes is critical for extrapolation to next-step fusion devices. For the first time, the radial profiles of electron temperature and density fluctuations are compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The CECE diagnostic at DIII-D uses correlation radiometry to measure the rms amplitude and spectrum of the electron temperature fluctuations. Gaussian optics are used to produce a poloidal spot size with w{sub o}{approx}1.75 cm in the plasma. The intermediate frequency filters and the natural linewidth of the EC emission determine the radial resolution of the CECE diagnostic, which can be less than 1 cm. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are k{sub {theta}}{<=}1.8 cm{sup -1} and k{sub r}{<=}4 cm{sup -1}, relevant for studies of long-wavelength turbulence associated with the trapped electron mode and the ion temperature gradient mode. In neutral beam heated L-mode plasmas, core electron temperature fluctuations in the region 0.5measured simultaneously with beam emission spectroscopy. After incorporating 'synthetic diagnostics' to effectively filter the code output, the simulations reproduce the characteristics of the turbulence and transport at one radial location r/a=0.5, but not at a second location, r/a=0.75. These results illustrate that measurements of the profiles of multiple fluctuating fields can provide a significant constraint on the turbulence models employed by the code.

  2. A correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic and the importance of multifield fluctuation measurements for testing nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

    PubMed

    White, A E; Schmitz, L; Peebles, W A; Carter, T A; Rhodes, T L; Doyle, E J; Gourdain, P A; Hillesheim, J C; Wang, G; Holland, C; Tynan, G R; Austin, M E; McKee, G R; Shafer, M W; Burrell, K H; Candy, J; DeBoo, J C; Prater, R; Staebler, G M; Waltz, R E; Makowski, M A

    2008-10-01

    A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been used to measure local, turbulent fluctuations of the electron temperature in the core of DIII-D plasmas. This paper describes the hardware and testing of the CECE diagnostic and highlights the importance of measurements of multifield fluctuation profiles for the testing and validation of nonlinear gyrokinetic codes. The process of testing and validating such codes is critical for extrapolation to next-step fusion devices. For the first time, the radial profiles of electron temperature and density fluctuations are compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The CECE diagnostic at DIII-D uses correlation radiometry to measure the rms amplitude and spectrum of the electron temperature fluctuations. Gaussian optics are used to produce a poloidal spot size with w(o) approximately 1.75 cm in the plasma. The intermediate frequency filters and the natural linewidth of the EC emission determine the radial resolution of the CECE diagnostic, which can be less than 1 cm. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are k(theta) < or = 1.8 cm(-1) and k(r) < or = 4 cm(-1), relevant for studies of long-wavelength turbulence associated with the trapped electron mode and the ion temperature gradient mode. In neutral beam heated L-mode plasmas, core electron temperature fluctuations in the region 0.5 < r/a < 0.9, increase with radius from approximately 0.5% to approximately 2%, similar to density fluctuations that are measured simultaneously with beam emission spectroscopy. After incorporating "synthetic diagnostics" to effectively filter the code output, the simulations reproduce the characteristics of the turbulence and transport at one radial location r/a = 0.5, but not at a second location, r/a = 0.75. These results illustrate that measurements of the profiles of multiple fluctuating fields can provide a significant constraint on the turbulence models employed by the code.

  3. Correlation Between MHD-Activity, Energetic Particle Behaviour and Anomalous Transport Phenomena in WENDELSTEIN 7-AS

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, A.; Anton, M.; Geiger, J.; Goerner, C.; Jaenicke, R.; Konrad, C.; Penningsfeld, F.P.; Rust, N.; Teo, C.Y.; Spong, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    Energy and particle transport in W7-AS exhibits a resonance like dependence on the edge rotational transform (iota) as long as the magnetic shear is relatively weak (low beta, no significant net toroidal currents). MHD modes at resonant surfaces may cause enhanced radial transport depending on the magnitude and radial extent of the magnetic perturbations. In many cases discharges in W7-AS are very quiescent, or in case of mode activity, often no influence on energy and particle confinement is found. In the high beta regime ((beta)

  4. Correlating Thin-Film Radical Density with Charge Transport in Open-Shell Conducting Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Martha; Jergens, Elizabeth; Boudouris, Bryan

    Within the class of radical polymers, stable open-shell species serve as the medium for charge transport by undergoing oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions. The kinetics of these reactions are rapid enough that they are not considered rate-limiting in the electronic interactions of these materials. Rather, the proximity of these radical sites is paramount as a synthetic handle. Unfortunately, controlling the density of radicals has proven challenging in radical polymer systems. Often radical functionality is imparted to a polymer, rather than polymerizing a radical-containing monomer unit. This can prove troublesome as longer reaction times, in the interest of higher radical functionality, can lead to the elimination of radicals. Thus, the consequential altering of the radical electronic interactions is not well understood. We have synthesized a series of polynorbornene-based radical monomers at controlled radical loadings such that the radical density was preserved from monomer to polymer synthesis. As such, we attribute any change in the macroscopic transport properties to a change in the spacing between radical sites. These results elucidate the role of radical site distribution on the electronic performance of nitroxide-based radical polymers.

  5. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  6. Joint measurement of lensing-galaxy correlations using SPT and DES SV data

    DOE PAGES

    Baxter, E. J.

    2016-07-04

    We measure the correlation of galaxy lensing and cosmic microwave background lensing with a set of galaxies expected to trace the matter density field. The measurements are performed using pre-survey Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification optical imaging data and millimeter-wave data from the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. The two lensing-galaxy correlations are jointly fit to extract constraints on cosmological parameters, constraints on the redshift distribution of the lens galaxies, and constraints on the absolute shear calibration of DES galaxy lensing measurements. We show that an attractive feature of these fits is that they are fairly insensitive to the clustering bias of the galaxies used as matter tracers. The measurement presented in this work confirms that DES and SPT data are consistent with each other and with the currently favoredmore » $$\\Lambda$$CDM cosmological model. In conclusion, it also demonstrates that joint lensing-galaxy correlation measurement considered here contains a wealth of information that can be extracted using current and future surveys.« less

  7. Geometric measures of quantum correlations: characterization, quantification, and comparison by distances and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roga, W.; Spehner, D.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate and compare three distinguished geometric measures of bipartite quantum correlations that have been recently introduced in the literature: the geometric discord, the measurement-induced geometric discord, and the discord of response, each one defined according to three contractive distances on the set of quantum states, namely the trace, Bures, and Hellinger distances. We establish a set of exact algebraic relations and inequalities between the different measures. In particular, we show that the geometric discord and the discord of response based on the Hellinger distance are easy to compute analytically for all quantum states whenever the reference subsystem is a qubit. These two measures thus provide the first instance of discords that are simultaneously fully computable, reliable (since they satisfy all the basic Axioms that must be obeyed by a proper measure of quantum correlations), and operationally viable (in terms of state distinguishability). We apply the general mathematical structure to determine the closest classical-quantum state of a given state and the maximally quantum-correlated states at fixed global state purity according to the different distances, as well as a necessary condition for a channel to be quantumness breaking.

  8. Joint measurement of lensing-galaxy correlations using SPT and DES SV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, E.; Clampitt, J.; Giannantonio, T.; Dodelson, S.; Jain, B.; Huterer, D.; Bleem, L.; Crawford, T.; Efstathiou, G.; Fosalba, P.; Kirk, D.; Kwan, J.; Sánchez, C.; Story, K.; Troxel, M. A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benson, B.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carlstrom, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Chown, R.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Holder, G.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nord, B.; Omori, Y.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Stark, A.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-10-01

    We measure the correlation of galaxy lensing and cosmic microwave background lensing with a set of galaxies expected to trace the matter density field. The measurements are performed using pre-survey Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification optical imaging data and millimetre-wave data from the 2500 sq. deg. South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. The two lensing-galaxy correlations are jointly fit to extract constraints on cosmological parameters, constraints on the redshift distribution of the lens galaxies, and constraints on the absolute shear calibration of DES galaxy-lensing measurements. We show that an attractive feature of these fits is that they are fairly insensitive to the clustering bias of the galaxies used as matter tracers. The measurement presented in this work confirms that DES and SPT data are consistent with each other and with the currently favoured Λ cold dark matter cosmological model. It also demonstrates that joint lensing-galaxy correlation measurement considered here contains a wealth of information that can be extracted using current and future surveys.

  9. Contrast Responsivity in MT+ Correlates with Phonological Awareness and Reading Measures in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shachar, Michal; Dougherty, Robert F.; Deutsch, Gayle K.; Wandell, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    There are several independent sets of findings concerning the neural basis of reading. One set demonstrates a powerful relationship between phonological processing and reading skills. Another set reveals a relationship between visual responses in the motion pathways and reading skills. It is widely assumed that these two findings are unrelated. We tested the hypothesis that phonological awareness is related to motion responsivity in children’s MT+. We measured BOLD signals to drifting gratings as a function of contrast. Subjects were 35 children ages 7–12y with a wide range of reading skills. Contrast responsivity in MT+, but not V1, was correlated with phonological awareness and to a lesser extent with two other measures of reading. No correlation was found between MT+ signals and rapid naming, age or general IQ measures. These results establish an important link between visual and phonological processing in children and suggest that MT+ responsivity is a marker for healthy reading development. PMID:17689981

  10. Tensor Correlations Measured in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    SciTech Connect

    Baghdasaryan, H; Weinstein, L B; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, K P; Amarian, M; Anghinolfi, M; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Boltmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hyde, C E; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nepali, C; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tedeschi, D J; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-11-01

    We have measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction at an incident energy of 4.7 GeV over a wide kinematic range. We identified spectator correlated pp and pn nucleon pairs by using kinematic cuts and measured their relative and total momentum distributions. This is the first measurement of the ratio of pp to pn pairs as a function of pair total momentum ptot. For pair relative momenta between 0.3 and 0.5 GeV/c, the ratio is very small at low ptot and rises to approximately 0.5 at large ptot. This shows the dominance of tensor over central correlations at this relative momentum.

  11. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    Since the beginning of the nuclear age, there has been a strong demand for the development of efficient technologies for the detection of ionizing radiation. According to the United States' Department of Energy, the accurate assessment of fissile materials is essential in achieving the nonproliferation goals of enhancing safety and security of nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear energy facilities. Nuclear materials can be characterized by the measurement of prompt and delayed neutrons and gamma rays emitted in spontaneous or induced fission reactions and neutrons emitted in fission reactions are the distinctive signatures of nuclear materials. Today, the most widely used neutron detection technologies rely on thermal neutron capture reactions using a moderating material to cause the neutron to lose its energy prior to the detection event. This is necessary because as the fission event occurs, neutrons are emitted carrying high amounts of energy, typically on the order of mega electron volts (MeV). These energetic particles are classified as "fast" neutrons. For detecting the thermal neutrons, the Helium-3 (3He) gas-filled counters are arguably the most widely used technology of neutron detection. 3He counters have been the scientific standard for the nuclear engineering community for several decades, and have earned their place as a reliable technique for the detection of neutrons. However, 3He gas-filled counters have several disadvantages. First, gas-filled counters are not rigid and are sensitive to vibrations. Secondly, gas-filled counters are prone to the count rate limitations due to the physical processes of charge multiplication and transport in the gas medium in the electric field. Lastly, 3He gas-filled counters suffer from a supply shortage of the 3He isotope. As it is stated in [3], this shortage is created by the new demand for Helium-3 due to the deployment of neutron detectors at the borders after the 9/11 attack to help secure the nation against smuggled

  12. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; Sherwin, Blake D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Charbonnier, Aldée; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Erben, Thomas; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hincks, Adam D.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Makler, Martin; Miller, Lance; Moodley, Kavilan; Moraes, Bruno; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Shan, Huanyuan; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Taylor, James E.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Welker, Charlotte; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 σ , which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ˜0.9 . With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematic biases in weak lensing measurements.

  13. Measurement and correlation of friction characteristic of flow through foam matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.F.; Wu, W.T.; Chiu, W.C.; Hsieh, W.H.

    2006-03-01

    A correlation of friction characteristic was developed based on the measured pressure drop of air through foam matrixes. The pressure drops of seven types of aluminum foams with different porosities and pore densities were measured. The Reynolds number based on the equivalent spherical diameter of the foam ranged from 32.05 to 1289.32. The range of porosity was 0.87-0.958. A empirical equation was developed to correlate the dimensionless pressure drop with the dimensionless flow velocity for all seven types of aluminum foams. The empirical correlation agreed well with experimental data. According to the empirical correlation and the measured data, the pressure drop introduced by foam matrixes was much lower than that by granular matrixes at the same Reynolds number. The relationship between the friction factor and Re of foam matrixes follows the trend of granular matrixes and can be classified into three regimes: Re<30, f{sub k}{proportional_to}(1-{epsilon})/Re; 30300, the value of f{sub k} approaches 0.22. (author)

  14. Measurements of the two-point correlation function in the ion phase-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiff, Fred; Diallo, Ahmed; Uzun, Ilker

    2006-04-01

    We report measurements of the ion two-point correlation function in a magnetized plasma cylinder. Using a single frequency laser and two movable light-collection systems we measure the space, time, and particle velocity dependence of the two-point correlation function on the axis of a weakly- collisional magnetized plasma in a plasma cylinder where the main source of fluctuations is dissipative drift instability. Due to convection of waves out of the plasma volume, the collective fluctuations remain at low amplitude. In addition to the well known drift instability, we observe other collective effects in the two-point correlation that are anomalous. A kinetic component to the fluctuations, which exhibits a particle velocity dependent phase velocity, suggests plasma nonlinearity at low amplitude. Very quiet plasma discharges are made using a customized inductively coupled plasma source that operates continuously at low power (5W). Singly ionized Argon plasmas are produced with Te 2eV and Ti 0.1eV at a density near 10^9: cm-3 . Each particle species exhibits a nearly Maxwellian velocity distribution function and the drift instabilities are at a relative density fluctuation of near 10%. The plasma discharge is stabilized and large data sets are taken to obtain 58 db of dynamic range on the correlation measurement.

  15. Spur decay of the solvated electron in picosecond radiolysis measured with time-correlated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, D.M.; Cook, A.R.; Mudaliar, M.; Jonah, C.D.

    2000-03-02

    Spur decay kinetics of the hydrated electron following picosecond pulse radiolysis of water have been measured using a time-correlated transient absorption technique with an asynchronous mode-locked laser. The 11 ns time window afforded by this signal-averaging technique is ideal to match up with more conventional transient absorption measurements taken to microsecond time scales. The precise data recorded in this study require a revision downward of the time zero solvated electron yield to approximately 4.0 per 100 eV of energy absorbed, to match the best available scavenger product measurements.

  16. Assessing Long-Term Wind Conditions by Combining Different Measure-Correlate-Predict Algorithms: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Messac, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper significantly advances the hybrid measure-correlate-predict (MCP) methodology, enabling it to account for variations of both wind speed and direction. The advanced hybrid MCP method uses the recorded data of multiple reference stations to estimate the long-term wind condition at a target wind plant site. The results show that the accuracy of the hybrid MCP method is highly sensitive to the combination of the individual MCP algorithms and reference stations. It was also found that the best combination of MCP algorithms varies based on the length of the correlation period.

  17. Unequivocal differentiation of coherent and chaotic light through interferometric photon correlation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, A; Abram, I; Braive, R; Sagnes, I; Robert-Philip, I; Beveratos, A

    2013-04-19

    We present a novel experimental technique that can differentiate unequivocally between chaotic light and coherent light with amplitude fluctuations, and thus permits us to characterize unambiguously the output of a laser. This technique consists of measuring the second-order intensity cross correlation at the outputs of an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. It is applied to a chaotic light source and to the output of a semiconductor nanolaser whose "standard" intensity correlation function above threshold displays values compatible with a mixture of coherent and chaotic light. Our experimental results demonstrate that the output of such lasers is not partially chaotic but is indeed a coherent state with amplitude fluctuations.

  18. Research on the measurement of bubble velocity based on cross-correlation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; He, Junhua; Chen, Liangyi

    2006-06-01

    Cross-correlation algorithm is based on information theory and stochastic process theory. It has been widely used in many research fields, such as, medical ultrasound, ocean engineering, signal detection, modal parameters under ambient excitation, etc., but its applications in research of bubble curtains are seldom seen in domestic released periodicals, so our work is attempting to use cross-correlation algorithm. Through computing the velocity vector of bubble curtains, the bubble movement character can be known, i.e. the details of the bubble curtains can also be known. After comparing the differences between it and Doppler method, the cross-correlation algorithm has been applied to the measurement of bubble curtains parameters from a new aspect. The He-Ne laser and high-speed CCD camera are used to acquire the images of dancing bubbles, the velocities of bubbles are computed from image post-processed. Through improving conventional cross-correlation algorithm commonly used for analysis of flow field, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) has been used to implement the cross-correlation algorithm rapidly. In order to enhance the computing accuracy, Gaussian curve fitting is used to modify the correlation peak location and the fitting equations are listed, so the bubbles displacement with subpixel accuracy is obtained. Noises are stochastically added from hardware when acquiring images and the cross-correlation algorithm may also introduce errors. The character of velocity vectors result can be entirely wrong with ambient vectors, so they must be corrected. In order to calibrate the cross-correlation algorithm, images with universal displacement are used to validate its feasibility and reliability. The algorithm is applied to the computation of parameters in bubble curtains, yielding the vector graph of bubble motion. The algorithm is expected to be a valuable tool in acquiring the real-time velocity information in bubble curtains.

  19. Tunable spin transport in CrAs: Role of correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioncel, L.; Katsnelson, M. I.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.; Lichtenstein, A. I.

    2005-02-01

    Correlation effects on the electronic structure of half-metallic CrAs in zinc-blende structure are studied for different substrate lattice constants. Depending on the substrate the spectral weight of the nonquasiparticle states might be tuned from a well-developed value in the case of an InAs substrate to an almost negligible contribution for the GaAs one. A piezoelectric material that would allow a change in the substrate lattice parameters opens the possibility for practical investigations of the switchable (tunable) nonquasiparticle states. Since the latter are important for the tunneling magnetoresistance and related phenomena, it creates new opportunities in spintronics.

  20. Direct measurement of chiral structure and transport in single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Taoran; Lin, Letian; Qin, Lu-Chang; Washburn, Sean

    2016-11-01

    Electrical devices based on suspended multi-wall carbon nanotubes were constructed and studied. The chiral structure of each shell in a particular nanotube was determined using nanobeam electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. The transport properties of the carbon nanotube were also measured. The nanotube device length was short enough that the transport was nearly ballistic, and multiple subbands contributed to the conductance. Thermal excitation of carriers significantly affected nanotube resistance at room temperature.

  1. Direct measurement of chiral structure and transport in single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Taoran; Lin, Letian; Qin, Lu-Chang; Washburn, Sean

    2016-11-30

    Electrical devices based on suspended multi-wall carbon nanotubes were constructed and studied. The chiral structure of each shell in a particular nanotube was determined using nanobeam electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. The transport properties of the carbon nanotube were also measured. The nanotube device length was short enough that the transport was nearly ballistic, and multiple subbands contributed to the conductance. Thermal excitation of carriers significantly affected nanotube resistance at room temperature. PMID:27633072

  2. Direct measurement of chiral structure and transport in single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Taoran; Lin, Letian; Qin, Lu-Chang; Washburn, Sean

    2016-11-30

    Electrical devices based on suspended multi-wall carbon nanotubes were constructed and studied. The chiral structure of each shell in a particular nanotube was determined using nanobeam electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. The transport properties of the carbon nanotube were also measured. The nanotube device length was short enough that the transport was nearly ballistic, and multiple subbands contributed to the conductance. Thermal excitation of carriers significantly affected nanotube resistance at room temperature.

  3. Recovering refractive index correlation function from measurement of tissue scattering phase function (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeremy D.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous methods have been developed to quantify the light scattering properties of tissue. These properties are of interest in diagnostic and screening applications due to sensitivity to changes in tissue ultrastructure and changes associated with disease such as cancer. Tissue is considered a weak scatterer because that the mean free path is much larger than the correlation length. When this is the case, all scattering properties can be calculated from the refractive index correlation function Bn(r). Direct measurement of Bn(r) is challenging because it requires refractive index measurement at high resolution over a large tissue volume. Instead, a model is usually assumed. One particularly useful model, the Whittle-Matern function includes several realistic function types such as mass fractal and exponential. Optical scattering properties for weakly scattering media can be determined analytically from Bn(r) by applying the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) or Born Approximation, and so measured scattering properties are used to fit parameters of the model function. Direct measurement of Bn(r) would provide confirmation that the function is a good representation of tissue or help in identifying the length scale at which changes occur. The RGD approximation relates the scattering phase function to the refractive index correlation function through a Fourier transform. This can be inverted without approximation, so goniometric measurement of the scattering can be converted to Bn(r). However, geometric constraints of the measurement of the phase function, angular resolution, and wavelength result in a band limited measurement of Bn(r). These limits are discussed and example measurements are described.

  4. Prescriptions for measuring and transporting local angular momenta in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Nichols, David A.; Stein, Leo C.; Vines, Justin

    2016-05-01

    For observers in curved spacetimes, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincaré transformations from an observer's tangent space to itself can be naturally interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We present an operational procedure by which observers can measure such quantities using only information about the spacetime curvature at their location. When applied by observers near spacelike or null infinity in stationary, vacuum, asymptotically flat spacetimes, there is a sense in which the procedure yields the well-defined linear and angular momenta of the spacetime. We also describe a general method by which observers can transport local linear and angular momenta from one point to another, which improves previous prescriptions. This transport is not path independent in general, but becomes path independent for the measured momenta in the same limiting regime. The transport prescription is defined in terms of differential equations, but it can also be interpreted as parallel transport in a particular direct-sum vector bundle. Using the curvature of the connection on this bundle, we compute and discuss the holonomy of the transport law. We anticipate that these measurement and transport definitions may ultimately prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs charges of asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  5. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  6. Nitrite transport in chloroplast inner envelope vesicles. I. Direct measurement of proton-linked transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shingles, R.; Roh, M.H.; McCarty, R.E.

    1996-11-01

    Chloroplast inner envelope membrane vesicles that are loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorophore, pyranine, show rapid internal acidification when nitrite is added. Acidification is dependent upon {Delta}pH, with the inside of vesicles being alkaline with respect to the outside. The rate of vesicle acidification was directly proportional to the concentration of nitrite that was added and the imposed pH difference across the membrane. In contrast, added nitrate had no effect on vesicle acidification. Nitrite also caused acidification of asolectin vesicles that were prepared by extrusion were approximately the same size, allowing them to be compared when the final extent of acidification, measured after the pH gradient had collapsed, was similar. The rate of nitrite-dependent acidification was similar in these two preparations at any single nitrite concentration. These results indicate that nitrite movement occurs by rapid diffusion across membranes as nitrous acid, and this movement is dependent on a proton gradient across the lipid bilayer. Under conditions approximating these in vivo, the rate of diffusion of nitrous acid far exceeds that of nitrite reduction within chloroplasts. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Correlation of elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements for fluorocarbon type 2 ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    A minimum films thickness correlation applicable to heavily loaded elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was formulated from experimental data obtained by an X-ray transmission technique. The correlation, based on data generated with fluorocarbon, type II ester, and polyphenyl ether lubricants, extends a previous analysis developed from data for a synthetic paraffinic oil. The resulting correlation represents the data of the four lubricants reasonably well over a large range of operating conditions. Contained within the derived relation is a factor to account for the high-load dependence displayed by the measurements beyond that which is provided for by the theory. Thermal corrections applied to a commonly used film thickness formula showed little improvement to the general disagreement that exists between theory and test. Choice of contact geometry and material are judged to have a relatively mild influence on the form of the semiempirical model.

  8. The determination of correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements in Iranian adults.

    PubMed

    Mahakizadeh, S; Moghani-Ghoroghi, F; Moshkdanian, Gh; Mokhtari, T; Hassanzadeh, G

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of stature is an important issue, which is significantly considered in forensic anthropology. It will be difficult to predict the identification of an individual when only some parts of dead body are discovered following disasters or criminal events. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between stature and upper limb and hand length in Iranian adults to generate regression formulae for stature estimation. Three anthropometric measurements; Stature, Upper Limb Length (ULL) and Hand Length (HL) were taken on subjects, comprising 142 male students (18-25 years) using standard measuring instruments. The data were analysed using SPSS 16. Then linear regression models were used to estimate stature. The results indicated a positive correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements. The correlation coefficient with upper limb length was r = 0.89 & p = 0.0001 and with hand length was r = 0.78 & p = 0.0001. In conclusion, we found a strong correlation between stature and upper limb and hand length. The regression analysis also showed that the Upper Limb Length give better prediction of stature compared to Hand length measurements. PMID:26795396

  9. Only Behavioral But Not Self-Report Measures of Speech Perception Correlate with Cognitive Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Antje; Henshaw, Helen; Ferguson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Good speech perception and communication skills in everyday life are crucial for participation and well-being, and are therefore an overarching aim of auditory rehabilitation. Both behavioral and self-report measures can be used to assess these skills. However, correlations between behavioral and self-report speech perception measures are often low. One possible explanation is that there is a mismatch between the specific situations used in the assessment of these skills in each method, and a more careful matching across situations might improve consistency of results. The role that cognition plays in specific speech situations may also be important for understanding communication, as speech perception tests vary in their cognitive demands. In this study, the role of executive function, working memory (WM) and attention in behavioral and self-report measures of speech perception was investigated. Thirty existing hearing aid users with mild-to-moderate hearing loss aged between 50 and 74 years completed a behavioral test battery with speech perception tests ranging from phoneme discrimination in modulated noise (easy) to words in multi-talker babble (medium) and keyword perception in a carrier sentence against a distractor voice (difficult). In addition, a self-report measure of aided communication, residual disability from the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile, was obtained. Correlations between speech perception tests and self-report measures were higher when specific speech situations across both were matched. Cognition correlated with behavioral speech perception test results but not with self-report. Only the most difficult speech perception test, keyword perception in a carrier sentence with a competing distractor voice, engaged executive functions in addition to WM. In conclusion, any relationship between behavioral and self-report speech perception is not mediated by a shared correlation with cognition. PMID:27242564

  10. Quantum Measurement of Spin Correlations in a Symmetric Many-Body State ∖ f 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaee, Ezad; Kalev, Amir; Deutsch, Ivan; Cquic Team

    2016-05-01

    Continuous (nonprojective) measurement on a quantum system has been employed previously for fast, robust, and high-fidelity quantum state tomography (QST) on qudits. We expand this protocol to many-body systems in order to perform QST on the reduced one-body and two-body density matrices of a symmetric many-body state of multiple qubits. Such QST will characterize the spin correlations in the system. In this protocol, a continuous measurement is done collectively on many copies of the reduced state at the same time, and therefore, while it is weakly perturbative on each copy, yields high signal-to-noise. Simultaneously, we subject the system to an external collective control in order to generate an informationally complete measurement record. We characterize the information-gain measurement disturbance tradeoff in terms of parameters in the problem (number of qubits, control parameters, shot-noise bandwidth, and the measurement strength). Support from NSF is acknowledged.

  11. Experimental multiscale measurements for the mechanical identification of a cortical bone by digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Manh-Tu; Allain, Jean-Marc; Gharbi, Hakim; Desceliers, Christophe; Soize, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The implementation of the experimental methodology by optical measurements of mechanical fields, the development of a test bench, the specimen preparation, the experimental measurements, and the digital image correlation (DIC) method, have already been the object of research in the context of biological materials. Nevertheless, in the framework of the experimental identification of a mesoscopic stochastic model of the random apparent elasticity field, measurements of one specimen is required at both the macroscopic scale and the mesoscopic scale under one single loading. The nature of the cortical bone induces some difficulties, as no single speckled pattern technique is available for simultaneously obtaining the displacement at the macroscopic scale and at the mesoscopic scale. In this paper, we present a multiscale experimental methodology based on (i) an experimental protocol for one specimen of a cortical bone, (ii) its measuring bench, (iii) optical field measurements by DIC method, (iv) the experimental results, and (v) the multiscale experimental identification by solving a statistical inverse problem.

  12. Unified Measurement System with Suction Control for Gas Transport Parameters in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Rouf, M. A.; Hamamoto, S.; Sakaki, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2010-12-01

    Pore geometric parameters including pore size distribution, total and air-filled porosities, pore tortuosity and connectivity strongly influence air flow in porous media, and, thus, characterize gas transport parameters such as gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka. In this study, the gas transport parameters were measured for porous media with varying textures under repeated drying and wetting cycles using a newly-developed measurement system, and the hysteretic behaviors in the gas transport parameters were examined. A unified measurement system with suction control (UMS_SC) was developed for measuring soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters sequentially under drying and wetting cycles. It consisted of a porous plate, diffusion chamber, sample ring (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height), tensiometer, soil moisture sensor, oxygen electrodes and air pressure gauges. Soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters (gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka) for differently textured materials including sand, molten slag , and a mixture material of MS and volcanic ash soil were measured under repeated drying and wetting cycles. The measurement for each porous material was initiated from a full saturation and suction head was increased/decreased in steps in the drainage/wetting cycles. Moreover, independent measurements of Dp and ka were carried out for repacked air-dried samples using a cylindrical mold (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height) in order to obtain the Dp and ka values at a full dry condition. The newly-developed UMS_SC performed well for the applied suction head less than 50 cm of water with corresponding saturation of roughly 0.3-0.5. The gas transport parameters were well measured at each suction head level under repeated drying and wetting cycles, and the measured gas transport parameters including the independent measurements were verified by literature data as well as

  13. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z˜1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to ˜4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise (˜1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  14. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-15

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z{approx}1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to {approx}4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise ({approx}1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  15. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  16. Cross-correlation measurement of quantum shot noise using homemade transimpedance amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hashisaka, Masayuki Ota, Tomoaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Muraki, Koji

    2014-05-15

    We report a cross-correlation measurement system, based on a new approach, which can be used to measure shot noise in a mesoscopic conductor at milliKelvin temperatures. In contrast to other measurement systems in which high-speed low-noise voltage amplifiers are commonly used, our system employs homemade transimpedance amplifiers (TAs). The low input impedance of the TAs significantly reduces the crosstalk caused by unavoidable parasitic capacitance between wires. The TAs are designed to have a flat gain over a frequency band from 2 kHz to 1 MHz. Low-noise performance is attained by installing the TAs at a 4 K stage of a dilution refrigerator. Our system thus fulfills the technical requirements for cross-correlation measurements: low noise floor, high frequency band, and negligible crosstalk between two signal lines. Using our system, shot noise generated at a quantum point contact embedded in a quantum Hall system is measured. The good agreement between the obtained shot-noise data and theoretical predictions demonstrates the accuracy of the measurements.

  17. A novel measure to determine viewing priority and its neural correlates in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Marsman, Jan-Bernard C; Cornelissen, Frans W; Dorr, Michael; Vig, Eleonora; Barth, Erhardt; Renken, Remco J

    2016-01-01

    A key property of human visual behavior is the very frequent movement of our eyes to potentially relevant information in the environment. Observers thus continuously have to prioritize information for directing their eyes to. Research in this field has been hampered by a lack of appropriate measures and tools. Here, we propose and validate a novel measure of priority that takes advantage of the variability in the natural viewing behavior of individual observers. In short, our measure assumes that priority is low when observers' gaze behavior is inconsistent and high when it is very consistent. We calculated priority for gaze data obtained during an experiment in which participants viewed dynamic natural scenes while we simultaneously recorded their gaze position and brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our priority measure shows only limited correlation with various saliency, surprise, and motion measures, indicating it is assessing a distinct property of visual behavior. Finally, we correlated our priority measure with the BOLD signal, thereby revealing activity in a select number of human occipital and parietal areas. This suggests the presence of a cortical network involved in computing and representing viewing priority. We conclude that our new analysis method allows for empirically establishing the priority of events in near-natural vision paradigms. PMID:27058271

  18. Effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-digital image correlation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Shi, Wentao; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    In laboratory and especially non-laboratory stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) applications, the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the cameras used in the system may change slightly due to the camera warm-up effect and possible variations in ambient temperature. Because these camera parameters are generally calibrated once prior to measurements and considered to be unaltered during the whole measurement period, the changes in these parameters unavoidably induce displacement/strain errors. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements is investigated experimentally. To quantify the errors associated with camera or ambient temperature changes, surface displacements and strains of a stationary optical quartz glass plate with near-zero thermal expansion were continuously measured using a regular stereo-DIC system. The results confirm that (1) temperature variations in the cameras and ambient environment have a considerable influence on the displacements and strains measured by stereo-DIC due to the slightly altered extrinsic and intrinsic camera parameters; and (2) the corresponding displacement and strain errors correlate with temperature changes. For the specific stereo-DIC configuration used in this work, the temperature-induced strain errors were estimated to be approximately 30-50 με/°C. To minimize the adverse effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements, two simple but effective solutions are suggested.

  19. In-vessel fluid flow measurements using thermocouples cross-correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    NguyenLe, Q.

    1998-05-08

    Fluid flow rate in high temperature and pressure vessels can be difficult to measure due to the associated harsh environment, inaccessible locations and pressure boundary integrity concerns. However, by using quick response miniature thermocouples to measure the naturally occurring temperature variations within the flow, the fluid velocity can be inferred from the transit time analysis. This flow measurement technique has other advantages such as the flow profile is not significantly disturbed, no additional flow restrictions introduced and the system fiction factor is not increased. Furthermore, since the measured flow rate is generally unaffected by the global system dynamics, such as heat increases or losses, as well as changes in the flow regimes, the location of the thermocouple pairs is extremely flexible. Due to the mentioned advantages, the thermocouple cross-correlation flow measurement method has been developed for use at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Currently, thermocouple cross-correlation technique is used to measure the Reactor Pressure Vessel downcomer fluid velocity and the suppression pool in-vessel natural circulation velocity.

  20. Application of Control charts and isotope correlations to spent fuel measurements at FCF.

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, R. D.; Soltys, I.; Yacout, A. M.

    1999-07-26

    The material control and accountancy system for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) initially uses calculated values for the mass flows of irradiated EBR-II driver fuel to be processed in the electrorefiner. These calculated values are continually verified by measurements performed by the Analytical Laboratory (AL) on samples from the fuel element chopper retained for each chopper batch. Measured values include U and Pu masses, U and Pu isotopic fractions, and burnup (via La and Tc). When the measured data become available, it is necessary to determine if the measured and calculated data are consistent. This verification involves accessing two databases and performing standard statistical analyses to produce control charts for these measurements. These procedures can now be invoked via a Web interface providing: a timely and efficient control of these measurements, a user-friendly interface, off-site remote access to the data, and a convenient means of studying correlations among the data. This paper will present the architecture of the interface and a description of the control procedures, as well as examples of the control charts and correlations.

  1. Optical and transport properties correlation driven by amorphous/crystalline disorder in InP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H; Gouveia, R C; Carrocine, S C; Souza, L D; Rodrigues, A D; Teodoro, M D; Marques, G E; Leite, E R; Chiquito, A J

    2016-11-30

    Indium phosphide nanowires with a single crystalline zinc-blend core and polycrystalline/amorphous shell were grown from a reliable route without the use of hazardous precursors. The nanowires are composed by a crystalline core covered by a polycrystalline shell, presenting typical lengths larger than 10 μm and diameters of 80-90 nm. Raman spectra taken from as-grown nanowires exhibited asymmetric line shapes with broadening towards higher wave numbers which can be attributed to phonon localization effects. It was found that optical phonons in the nanowires are localized in regions with average size of 3 nm, which seems to have the same order of magnitude of grain sizes in the polycrystalline shell. Regardless of the fact that the nanowires exhibit a crystalline core, any considerable degree of disorder can lead to a localized behaviour of carriers. In consequence, the variable range hopping was observed as the main transport instead of the usual thermal excitation mechanisms. Furthermore the hopping length was ten times smaller than nanowire cross-sections, confirming that the nanostructures do behave as a 3D system. Accordingly, the V-shape observed in PL spectra clearly demonstrates a very strong influence of the potential fluctuations on the exciton optical recombination. Such fluctuations can still be observed at low temperature regime, confirming that the amorphous/polycrystalline shell of the nanowires affects the exciton recombination in every laser power regime tested. PMID:27662434

  2. Optical and transport properties correlation driven by amorphous/crystalline disorder in InP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H; Gouveia, R C; Carrocine, S C; Souza, L D; Rodrigues, A D; Teodoro, M D; Marques, G E; Leite, E R; Chiquito, A J

    2016-11-30

    Indium phosphide nanowires with a single crystalline zinc-blend core and polycrystalline/amorphous shell were grown from a reliable route without the use of hazardous precursors. The nanowires are composed by a crystalline core covered by a polycrystalline shell, presenting typical lengths larger than 10 μm and diameters of 80-90 nm. Raman spectra taken from as-grown nanowires exhibited asymmetric line shapes with broadening towards higher wave numbers which can be attributed to phonon localization effects. It was found that optical phonons in the nanowires are localized in regions with average size of 3 nm, which seems to have the same order of magnitude of grain sizes in the polycrystalline shell. Regardless of the fact that the nanowires exhibit a crystalline core, any considerable degree of disorder can lead to a localized behaviour of carriers. In consequence, the variable range hopping was observed as the main transport instead of the usual thermal excitation mechanisms. Furthermore the hopping length was ten times smaller than nanowire cross-sections, confirming that the nanostructures do behave as a 3D system. Accordingly, the V-shape observed in PL spectra clearly demonstrates a very strong influence of the potential fluctuations on the exciton optical recombination. Such fluctuations can still be observed at low temperature regime, confirming that the amorphous/polycrystalline shell of the nanowires affects the exciton recombination in every laser power regime tested.

  3. Optical and transport properties correlation driven by amorphous/crystalline disorder in InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H.; Gouveia, R. C.; Carrocine, S. C.; Souza, L. D.; Rodrigues, A. D.; Teodoro, M. D.; Marques, G. E.; Leite, E. R.; Chiquito, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    Indium phosphide nanowires with a single crystalline zinc-blend core and polycrystalline/amorphous shell were grown from a reliable route without the use of hazardous precursors. The nanowires are composed by a crystalline core covered by a polycrystalline shell, presenting typical lengths larger than 10 μm and diameters of 80-90 nm. Raman spectra taken from as-grown nanowires exhibited asymmetric line shapes with broadening towards higher wave numbers which can be attributed to phonon localization effects. It was found that optical phonons in the nanowires are localized in regions with average size of 3 nm, which seems to have the same order of magnitude of grain sizes in the polycrystalline shell. Regardless of the fact that the nanowires exhibit a crystalline core, any considerable degree of disorder can lead to a localized behaviour of carriers. In consequence, the variable range hopping was observed as the main transport instead of the usual thermal excitation mechanisms. Furthermore the hopping length was ten times smaller than nanowire cross-sections, confirming that the nanostructures do behave as a 3D system. Accordingly, the V-shape observed in PL spectra clearly demonstrates a very strong influence of the potential fluctuations on the exciton optical recombination. Such fluctuations can still be observed at low temperature regime, confirming that the amorphous/polycrystalline shell of the nanowires affects the exciton recombination in every laser power regime tested.

  4. Measuring Head Kinematics in Football: Correlation Between the Head Impact Telemetry System and Hybrid III Headform

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Chu, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, advances in technology have enabled researchers to evaluate concussion biomechanics through measurement of head impacts sustained during play using two primary methods: (1) laboratory reconstruction of open-field head contact, and (2) instrumented helmets. The purpose of this study was to correlate measures of head kinematics recorded by the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System (Simbex, NH) with those obtained from a Hybrid III (HIII) anthropometric headform under conditions that mimicked impacts occurring in the NFL. Linear regression analysis was performed to correlate peak linear acceleration, peak rotational acceleration, Gadd Severity Index (GSI), and Head Injury Criterion (HIC15) obtained from the instrumented helmet and HIII. The average absolute location error between instrumented helmet impact location and the direction of HIII head linear acceleration were also calculated. The HIT System overestimated Hybrid III peak linear acceleration by 0.9% and underestimated peak rotational acceleration by 6.1% for impact sites and velocities previously identified by the NFL as occurring during play. Acceleration measures for all impacts were correlated; however, linear was higher (r2 = 0.903) than rotational (r2 = 0.528) primarily due to lower HIT System rotational acceleration estimates at the frontal facemask test site. Severity measures GSI and HIC were also found to be correlated, albeit less than peak linear acceleration, with the overall difference between the two systems being less than 6.1% for either measure. Mean absolute impact location difference between systems was 31.2 ± 46.3° (approximately 0.038 ± 0.050 m), which was less than the diameter of the impactor surface in the test. In instances of severe helmet deflection (2.54–7.62 cm off the head), the instrumented helmet accurately measured impact location but overpre-dicted all severity metrics recorded by the HIII. Results from this study indicate that measurements from the

  5. Measuring head kinematics in football: correlation between the head impact telemetry system and Hybrid III headform.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Chu, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, advances in technology have enabled researchers to evaluate concussion biomechanics through measurement of head impacts sustained during play using two primary methods: (1) laboratory reconstruction of open-field head contact, and (2) instrumented helmets. The purpose of this study was to correlate measures of head kinematics recorded by the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System (Simbex, NH) with those obtained from a Hybrid III (HIII) anthropometric headform under conditions that mimicked impacts occurring in the NFL. Linear regression analysis was performed to correlate peak linear acceleration, peak rotational acceleration, Gadd Severity Index (GSI), and Head Injury Criterion (HIC(15)) obtained from the instrumented helmet and HIII. The average absolute location error between instrumented helmet impact location and the direction of HIII head linear acceleration were also calculated. The HIT System overestimated Hybrid III peak linear acceleration by 0.9% and underestimated peak rotational acceleration by 6.1% for impact sites and velocities previously identified by the NFL as occurring during play. Acceleration measures for all impacts were correlated; however, linear was higher (r(2) = 0.903) than rotational (r(2) = 0.528) primarily due to lower HIT System rotational acceleration estimates at the frontal facemask test site. Severity measures GSI and HIC were also found to be correlated, albeit less than peak linear acceleration, with the overall difference between the two systems being less than 6.1% for either measure. Mean absolute impact location difference between systems was 31.2 ± 46.3° (approximately 0.038 ± 0.050 m), which was less than the diameter of the impactor surface in the test. In instances of severe helmet deflection (2.54-7.62 cm off the head), the instrumented helmet accurately measured impact location but overpredicted all severity metrics recorded by the HIII. Results from this study indicate that measurements from the

  6. Development of backsheet tests and measurements to improve correlation of accelerated exposures to fielded modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Thomas C.; Gambogi, William J.; Kopchick, James G.; Amspacher, Lucas; Peacock, R. Scott; Foltz, Benjamin; Stika, Katherine M.; Bradley, Alexander Z.; Hamzavy, Babak; Yu, Bao-Ling; Garreau-iles, Lucie; Fu, Oakland; Hu, Hongjie; Trout, T. John

    2015-09-01

    Matching accelerated test results to field observations is an important objective in the photovoltaic industry. We continue to develop test methods to strengthen correlations. We have previously reported good correlation of FTIR spectra between accelerated tests and field measurements. The availability of portable FTIR spectrometers has made measurement in the field convenient and reliable. Recently, nano-indentation has shown promise to correlate changes in backsheet mechanical properties. A precisely shaped stylus is pressed into a sample, load vs displacement recorded and mechanical properties of interest calculated in a nondestructive test. This test can be done on full size modules, allowing area variations in mechanical properties to be recorded. Finally, we will discuss optical profilometry. In this technique a white light interferogram of a surface is Fourier transformed to produce a three-dimensional image. Height differences from 1 nm to 5 mm can be detected over an area of a few cm. This technique can be used on minimodules, and is useful to determine crack and defect dimensions. Results will be presented correlating accelerated tests with fielded modules covering spectroscopic, mechanical, and morphological changes.

  7. Detecting and quantifying temporal correlations in stochastic resonance via information theory measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, O. A.; Masoller, C.

    2009-05-01

    We show that Information Theory quantifiers are suitable tools for detecting and for quantifying noise-induced temporal correlations in stochastic resonance phenomena. We use the Bandt & Pompe (BP) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 174102 (2002)] to define a probability distribution, P, that fully characterizes temporal correlations. The BP method is based on a comparison of neighboring values, and here is applied to the temporal sequence of residence-time intervals generated by the paradigmatic model of a Brownian particle in a sinusoidally modulated bistable potential. The probability distribution P generated via the BP method has associated a normalized Shannon entropy, H[P], and a statistical complexity measure, C[P], which is defined as proposed by Rosso et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 154102 (2007)]. The statistical complexity quantifies not only randomness but also the presence of correlational structures, the two extreme circumstances of maximum knowledge (“perfect order") and maximum ignorance (“complete randomness") being regarded an “trivial", and in consequence, having complexity C = 0. We show that both, H and C, display resonant features as a function of the noise intensity, i.e., for an optimal level of noise the entropy displays a minimum and the complexity, a maximum. This resonant behavior indicates noise-enhanced temporal correlations in the sequence of residence-time intervals. The methodology proposed here has great potential for the precise detection of subtle signatures of noise-induced temporal correlations in real-world complex signals.

  8. Lipid Droplets Purified from Drosophila Embryos as an Endogenous Handle for Precise Motor Transport Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Tobias F.; Longoria, Rafael A.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Shubeita, George T.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins are responsible for long-range transport of vesicles and organelles. Recent works have elucidated the richness of the transport complex, with multiple teams of similar and dissimilar motors and their cofactors attached to individual cargoes. The interaction among these different proteins, and with the microtubules along which they translocate, results in the intricate patterns of cargo transport observed in cells. High-precision and high-bandwidth measurements are required to capture the dynamics of these interactions, yet the crowdedness in the cell necessitates performing such measurements in vitro. Here, we show that endogenous cargoes, lipid droplets purified from Drosophila embryos, can be used to perform high-precision and high-bandwidth optical trapping experiments to study motor regulation in vitro. Purified droplets have constituents of the endogenous transport complex attached to them and exhibit long-range motility. A novel method to determine the quality of the droplets for high-resolution measurements in an optical trap showed that they compare well with plastic beads in terms of roundness, homogeneity, position sensitivity, and trapping stiffness. Using high-resolution and high-bandwidth position measurements, we demonstrate that we can follow the series of binding and unbinding events that lead to the onset of active transport. PMID:24010661

  9. Aerosol transport of biomass burning to the Bolivian Andean region from remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Ramirez, Daniel; Whiteman, David; Andrade, Marcos; Gasso, Santiago; Stein, Ariel; Torres, Omar; Eck, Tom; Velarde, Fernando; Aliaga, Diego

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the analysis of columnar aerosol optical and microphysical properties obtained by the AERONET network in the region of Bolivia and its border with Brazil. Through the long record AERONET measurements we focus in the transport of biomass-burning aerosol from the Amazon basin (stations at Rio Branco, Cuiba, Ji Parana and Santa Cruz) to the Andean Altiplano (altitude above 3000 m a.s.l. at the station in the city of La Paz). Also, measurements from the space-sensors MODIS and OMI are used to understand spatial distribution. The main results is the high impact in the aerosol load during the months of August, September and August with mean values of aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (AOD) at the low lands of ≈ 0.60 ± 0.60 and Angstrom exponent (α(440-870)) of ≈ 1.52 ± 0.38. Satellite measurements also follow very similar patterns. Also, that season is characterized by some extreme events that can reach AOD of up to 6.0. Those events are cloud-screened by MODIS but not by OMI sensor, which is attributed to different pixel resolutions. The biomass-burning is clearly transport to the Andean region where higher values of AOD (~ 0.12 ± 0.06 versus 0.09 ± 0.04 in the no biomass-burning season) and α(440-870) (~ 0.95 ± 0.30 versus 0.84 ± 0.3 in the no biomass-burning season). However, the intensity of the biomass-burning season varies between different years. Analysis of precipitation anomalies using TRNM satellites indicates a strong correlation with AOD, which suggest that on dry years there is less vegetation to burn and so less aerosol load. The opposite is found for positive anomalies of precipitation. In the transport of biomass burning larger values of the effective radius (reff) are observed in La Paz (reff = 0.26 ± 0.10 μm) than in the low lands (reff = 0.63 ± 0.24 μm), which has been explained by aerosol aging processes. Moreover, although the spectral dependence is similar, single scattering albedo (SSA) is larger in the low lands

  10. Comparison of POAM III ozone measurements with correlative aircraft and balloon data during SOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpe, Jerry D.; Fromm, Mike; Hoppel, Karl; Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Randall, Cora E.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas; Burris, John; Twigg, Laurence; Richard, Erik C.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Boesch, Hartmut; Fitzenberger, Richard; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre

    2003-03-01

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument operated continuously during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) mission, making approximately 1400 ozone profile measurements at high latitudes both inside and outside the Arctic polar vortex. The wealth of ozone measurements obtained from a variety of instruments and platforms during SOLVE provided a unique opportunity to compare correlative measurements with the POAM III data set. In this paper, we validate the POAM III version 3.0 ozone against measurements from seven different instruments that operated as part of the combined SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. These include the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) and the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) instruments on the DC-8, the dual-beam UV-Absorption Ozone Photometer on the ER-2, the MkIV Interferometer balloon instrument, the Laboratoire de Physique Molèculaire et Applications and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPMA/DOAS) balloon gondola, the JPL in situ ozone instrument on the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon platform, and the Système D'Analyze par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) balloon sonde. The resulting comparisons show a remarkable degree of consistency despite the very different measurement techniques inherent in the data sets and thus provide a strong validation of the POAM III version 3.0 ozone. This is particularly true in the primary 14-30 km region, where there are significant overlaps with all seven instruments. At these altitudes, POAM III agrees with all the data sets to within 7-10% with no detectable bias. The observed differences are within the combined errors of POAM III and the correlative measurements. Above 30 km, only a handful of SOLVE correlative measurements exist and the comparisons are highly variable. Therefore, the results are inconclusive. Below 14 km, the SOLVE comparisons also show

  11. Comparison of POAM III ozone measurements with correlative aircraft and balloon data during SOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpe, Jerry D.; Fromm, Mike; Hoppel, Karl; Bevilacqua, Richard M.; Randall, Cora E.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas; Burris, John; Twigg, Laurence; Richard, Erik C.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Boesch, Hartmut; Fitzenberger, Richard; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre

    2002-03-01

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument operated continuously during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) mission, making approximately 1400 ozone profile measurements at high latitudes both inside and outside the Arctic polar vortex. The wealth of ozone measurements obtained from a variety of instruments and platforms during SOLVE provided a unique opportunity to compare correlative measurements with the POAM III data set. In this paper, we validate the POAM III version 3.0 ozone against measurements from seven different instruments that operated as part of the combined SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. These include the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) and the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) instruments on the DC-8, the dual-beam UV-Absorption Ozone Photometer on the ER-2, the MkIV Interferometer balloon instrument, the Laboratoire de Physique Molèculaire et Applications and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPMA/DOAS) balloon gondola, the JPL in situ ozone instrument on the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon platform, and the Système D'Analyze par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) balloon sonde. The resulting comparisons show a remarkable degree of consistency despite the very different measurement techniques inherent in the data sets and thus provide a strong validation of the POAM III version 3.0 ozone. This is particularly true in the primary 14-30 km region, where there are significant overlaps with all seven instruments. At these altitudes, POAM III agrees with all the data sets to within 7-10% with no detectable bias. The observed differences are within the combined errors of POAM III and the correlative measurements. Above 30 km, only a handful of SOLVE correlative measurements exist and the comparisons are highly variable. Therefore, the results are inconclusive. Below 14 km, the SOLVE comparisons also show

  12. Estimation of dc transport dynamics in strongly correlated (La,Pr,Ca)MnO{sub 3} film using an insulator-metal composite model for terahertz conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V. A.; Hattori, A. N.; Nakamura, T.; Fujiwara, K.; Tanaka, H.; Nagai, M.; Ashida, M.

    2014-07-14

    Temperature-dependent conductivities at dc and terahertz (THz) frequency region (σ{sub THz}(ω,T)) were obtained for a strongly correlated (La{sub 0.275}Pr{sub 0.35}Ca{sub 0.375})MnO{sub 3} (LPCMO) film using THz time domain spectroscopy. A composite model that describes σ{sub THz}(ω,T) for LPCMO through the insulator-metal transition (IMT) was established by incorporating Austin-Mott model characterizing the hopping of localized electrons and Drude model explaining the behavior of free electrons. This model enables us to reliably investigate the dc transport dynamics from THz conductivity measurement, i.e., simultaneously evaluate the dc conductivity and the competing composition of metal and insulator phases through the IMT, reflecting the changes in microscopic conductivity of these phases.

  13. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S. J.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  14. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H. X.; Heemink, A. W.; Segers, A. J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-08-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs to be run with Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) such as plume height and mass eruption rate as input, and with data assimilation techniques to continuously improve the initial conditions of the forecast. Reliable and accurate ash measurements are crucial for providing a successful ash clouds advice. In this paper, simulated aircraft-based measurements, as one type of volcanic ash measurements, will be assimilated into a transport model to identify the potential benefit of this kind of observations in an assimilation system. The results show assimilating aircraft-based measurements can significantly improve the state of ash clouds, and further providing an improved forecast as aviation advice. We also show that for advice of aeroplane flying level, aircraft-based measurements should be preferably taken from this level to obtain the best performance on it. Furthermore it is shown that in order to make an acceptable advice for aviation decision makers, accurate knowledge about uncertainties of ESPs and measurements is of great importance.

  15. Density-of-states effective mass and scattering parameter measurements by transport phenomena in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.; Kaydanov, V. I.

    2000-02-01

    A novel machine has been developed to measure transport coefficients in the temperature range of 50-350 K of thin films deposited on electrically insulating substrates. The measured coefficients—resistivity, Hall, Seebeck, and Nernst—are applied to solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation to give information about the film's density-of-states effective mass, the Fermi energy level, and an energy-dependent scattering parameter. The machine is designed to eliminate or compensate for simultaneously occurring transport phenomena that would interfere with the desired measured quantity, while allowing for all four coefficients to be measured on the same sample. An average density-of-states effective mass value of 0.29±0.04me was measured on the transparent conductive oxide, cadmium stannate (CTO), over a carrier concentration range of 2-7×1020cm-3. This effective mass value matched previous results obtained by optical and thermoelectric modeling. The measured scattering parameter indicates that neutral impurities or a mixture of scattering mechanisms may inhibit the transport of carriers in CTO.

  16. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on a truss-type aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Schuster, L. S.; Carter, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    A test structure representing a portion of a hypersonic vehicle was instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples. This test structure was then subjected to laboratory heating representative of supersonic and hypersonic flight conditions. A finite element computer model of this structure was developed using several types of elements with the NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) computer program. Temperature inputs from the test were used to generate predicted model thermal stresses and these were correlated with the test measurements.

  17. Atmospheric correlation-time measurements and effects on coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    The time for which the backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles remains coherent was studied by using a pulsed TEA CO2 lidar with coherent detection. Experimental results are compared with predictions by using model pulse shapes appropriate for TEA CO2 laser transmitters. The correlation time of the backscatter return signal is important in studies of atmospheric turbulence and its effects on optical propagation and backscatter. Techniques for its measurement are discussed and evaluated.

  18. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for measurement of cerebral blood flow: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Erin M.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Grant, P. Ellen; Yodh, Arjun G.; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is an emerging optical modality used to measure cortical cerebral blood flow. This outlook presents a brief overview of the technology, summarizing the advantages and limitations of the method, and describing its recent applications to animal, adult, and infant cohorts. At last, the paper highlights future applications where DCS may play a pivotal role individualizing patient management and enhancing our understanding of neurovascular coupling, activation, and brain development. PMID:25593978

  19. Identification of scalp EEG circadian variation using a novel correlation sum measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidi Zandi, Ali; Boudreau, Philippe; Boivin, Diane B.; Dumont, Guy A.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. In this paper, we propose a novel method to determine the circadian variation of scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in both individual and group levels using a correlation sum measure, quantifying self-similarity of the EEG relative energy across waking epochs. Approach. We analysed EEG recordings from central-parietal and occipito-parietal montages in nine healthy subjects undergoing a 72 h ultradian sleep-wake cycle protocol. Each waking epoch (˜1 s) of every nap opportunity was decomposed using the wavelet packet transform, and the relative energy for that epoch was calculated in the desired frequency band using the corresponding wavelet coefficients. Then, the resulting set of energy values was resampled randomly to generate different subsets with equal number of elements. The correlation sum of each subset was then calculated over a range of distance thresholds, and the average over all subsets was computed. This average value was finally scaled for each nap opportunity and considered as a new circadian measure. Main results. According to the evaluation results, a clear circadian rhythm was identified in some EEG frequency ranges, particularly in 4-8 Hz and 10-12 Hz. The correlation sum measure not only was able to disclose the circadian rhythm on the group data but also revealed significant circadian variations in most individual cases, as opposed to previous studies only reporting the circadian rhythms on a population of subjects. Compared to a naive measure based on the EEG absolute energy in the frequency band of interest, the proposed measure showed a clear superiority using both individual and group data. Results also suggested that the acrophase (i.e., the peak) of the circadian rhythm in 10-12 Hz occurs close to the core body temperature minimum. Significance. These results confirm the potential usefulness of the proposed EEG-based measure as a non-invasive circadian marker.

  20. J-GFT NMR for precise measurement of mutually correlated nuclear spin-spin couplings.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Hanudatta S; Garcia, Erwin; Shen, Yang; Szyperski, Thomas

    2007-01-24

    G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) NMR spectroscopy is presented for accurate and precise measurement of chemical shifts and nuclear spin-spin couplings correlated according to spin system. The new approach, named "J-GFT NMR", is based on a largely extended GFT NMR formalism and promises to have a broad impact on projection NMR spectroscopy. Specifically, constant-time J-GFT (6,2)D (HA-CA-CO)-N-HN was implemented for simultaneous measurement of five mutually correlated NMR parameters, that is, 15N backbone chemical shifts and the four one-bond spin-spin couplings 13Calpha-1Halpha, 13Calpha-13C', 15N-13C', and 15N-1HNu. The experiment was applied for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in an 8 kDa protein Z-domain aligned with Pf1 phages. Comparison with RDC values extracted from conventional NMR experiments reveals that RDCs are measured with high precision and accuracy, which is attributable to the facts that (i) the use of constant time evolution ensures that signals do not broaden whenever multiple RDCs are jointly measured in a single dimension and (ii) RDCs are multiply encoded in the multiplets arising from the joint sampling. This corresponds to measuring the couplings multiple times in a statistically independent manner. A key feature of J-GFT NMR, i.e., the correlation of couplings according to spin systems without reference to sequential resonance assignments, promises to be particularly valuable for rapid identification of backbone conformation and classification of protein fold families on the basis of statistical analysis of dipolar couplings.

  1. Spin transport and precession in graphene measured by nonlocal and three-terminal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dankert, André Kamalakar, Mutta Venkata; Bergsten, Johan; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the spin transport and precession in graphene by using the Hanle effect in nonlocal and three-terminal measurement geometries. Identical spin lifetimes, spin diffusion lengths, and spin polarizations are observed in graphene devices for both techniques over a wide range of temperatures. The magnitude of the spin signals is well explained by spin transport models. These observations rules out any signal enhancements or additional scattering mechanisms at the interfaces for both geometries. This validates the applicability of both the measurement methods for graphene based spintronics devices and their reliable extractions of spin parameters.

  2. Measurement of the transport spin polarization of FeV using point-contact Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, William; Osofsky, Mike; Bussman, Konrad; Parker, David S; Cheng, L

    2013-01-01

    The Fe1 xVx alloy system exhibits the lowest known Gilbert relaxation rate of any ferromagnetic metal or binary alloy with G1 435MHz at x1 427% V. Low relaxation rates are of particular interest in modern spin electronic applications involving spin torque. The transport spin polarization of a series of sputtered epitaxial Fe1 xVx samples was measured using point contact Andreev reflection. Values of the transport spin polarization agree well with those measured for pure Fe and are independent of composition. The results indicate that the substitution of up to 50% of V for Fe does not reduce the spin polarization in the alloy.

  3. Correlations between heterozygosity and measures of genetic similarity: implications for understanding mate choice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S C; Hale, M L; Petrie, M

    2006-03-01

    There is currently considerable interest in testing the effects of genetic compatibility and heterozygosity on animal mate preferences. Evidence for either effect is rapidly accumulating, although results are not always clear-cut. However, correlations between mating preferences and either genetic similarity or heterozygosity are usually tested independently, and the possibility that similarity and heterozygosity may be confounded has rarely been taken into account. Here we show that measures of genetic similarity (allele sharing, relatedness) may be correlated with heterozygosity, using data from 441 human individuals genotyped at major loci in the major histocompatibility complex, and 281 peafowl (Pavo cristatus) individuals genotyped at 13 microsatellite loci. We show that average levels of allele sharing and relatedness are each significantly associated with heterozygosity in both humans and peafowl, that these relationships are influenced by the level of polymorphism, and that these similarity measures may correlate with heterozygosity in qualitatively different ways. We discuss the implications of these inter-relationships for interpretation of mate choice studies. It has recently become apparent that mating preferences for 'good genes' and 'compatible genes' may introduce discordant choice amongst individuals, since the optimal mate for one trait may not be optimal for the other, and our results are consistent with this idea. The inter-relationship between these measures of genetic quality also carries implications for the way in which mate choice studies are designed and interpreted, and generates predictions that can be tested in future research.

  4. Measuring electrophysiological connectivity by power envelope correlation: a technical review on MEG methods.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, George C; Barratt, Eleanor L; Hunt, Benjamin A E; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Brookes, Matthew J

    2015-11-01

    The human brain can be divided into multiple areas, each responsible for different aspects of behaviour. Healthy brain function relies upon efficient connectivity between these areas and, in recent years, neuroimaging has been revolutionised by an ability to estimate this connectivity. In this paper we discuss measurement of network connectivity using magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique capable of imaging electrophysiological brain activity with good (~5 mm) spatial resolution and excellent (~1 ms) temporal resolution. The rich information content of MEG facilitates many disparate measures of connectivity between spatially separate regions and in this paper we discuss a single metric known as power envelope correlation. We review in detail the methodology required to measure power envelope correlation including (i) projection of MEG data into source space, (ii) removing confounds introduced by the MEG inverse problem and (iii) estimation of connectivity itself. In this way, we aim to provide researchers with a description of the key steps required to assess envelope based functional networks, which are thought to represent an intrinsic mode of coupling in the human brain. We highlight the principal findings of the techniques discussed, and furthermore, we show evidence that this method can probe how the brain forms and dissolves multiple transient networks on a rapid timescale in order to support current processing demand. Overall, power envelope correlation offers a unique and verifiable means to gain novel insights into network coordination and is proving to be of significant value in elucidating the neural dynamics of the human connectome in health and disease.

  5. Correlations between heterozygosity and measures of genetic similarity: implications for understanding mate choice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S C; Hale, M L; Petrie, M

    2006-03-01

    There is currently considerable interest in testing the effects of genetic compatibility and heterozygosity on animal mate preferences. Evidence for either effect is rapidly accumulating, although results are not always clear-cut. However, correlations between mating preferences and either genetic similarity or heterozygosity are usually tested independently, and the possibility that similarity and heterozygosity may be confounded has rarely been taken into account. Here we show that measures of genetic similarity (allele sharing, relatedness) may be correlated with heterozygosity, using data from 441 human individuals genotyped at major loci in the major histocompatibility complex, and 281 peafowl (Pavo cristatus) individuals genotyped at 13 microsatellite loci. We show that average levels of allele sharing and relatedness are each significantly associated with heterozygosity in both humans and peafowl, that these relationships are influenced by the level of polymorphism, and that these similarity measures may correlate with heterozygosity in qualitatively different ways. We discuss the implications of these inter-relationships for interpretation of mate choice studies. It has recently become apparent that mating preferences for 'good genes' and 'compatible genes' may introduce discordant choice amongst individuals, since the optimal mate for one trait may not be optimal for the other, and our results are consistent with this idea. The inter-relationship between these measures of genetic quality also carries implications for the way in which mate choice studies are designed and interpreted, and generates predictions that can be tested in future research. PMID:16599932

  6. Measurements of n-p correlations in the reaction of relativistic neon with uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, K.; Schimmerling, W.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Crowe, K. M.; Bistirlich, J.; Bowman, H.; Hashimoto, O.; Murphy, D. L.; Ridout, J.; Sullivan, J. P.; Yoo, E.; McDonald, W. J.; Salomon, M.; Xu, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    We report a preliminary measurement of coincident neutron-proton pairs emitted at 45 degrees in the interaction of 400, 530, and 650 MeV/A neon beams incident on uranium. Charged particles were identified by time of flight and momentum, as determined in a magnetic spectrometer. Neutral particles were detected using a thick plastic scintillator, and their time of flight was measured between an entrance scintillator, triggered by a charged particle, and the neutron detector. The scatter plots and contour plots of neutron momentum vs. proton momentum appear to show a slight correlation ridge above an uncorrelated background. The projections of this plane on the n-p momentum difference axis are essentially flat, showing a one standard deviation enhancement for each of the three beams energies. At each beam energy, the calculated momentum correlation function for the neutron-proton pairs is enhanced near zero neutron-proton momentum difference by approximately one standard deviation over the expected value for no correlation. This enhancement is expected to occur as a consequence of the attractive final state interaction between the neutron and proton (i.e., virtual or "singlet" deuterons). The implications of these measurements are discussed.

  7. Measuring electrophysiological connectivity by power envelope correlation: a technical review on MEG methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, George C.; Barratt, Eleanor L.; Hunt, Benjamin A. E.; Tewarie, Prejaas K.; Brookes, Matthew J.

    2015-11-01

    The human brain can be divided into multiple areas, each responsible for different aspects of behaviour. Healthy brain function relies upon efficient connectivity between these areas and, in recent years, neuroimaging has been revolutionised by an ability to estimate this connectivity. In this paper we discuss measurement of network connectivity using magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique capable of imaging electrophysiological brain activity with good (~5 mm) spatial resolution and excellent (~1 ms) temporal resolution. The rich information content of MEG facilitates many disparate measures of connectivity between spatially separate regions and in this paper we discuss a single metric known as power envelope correlation. We review in detail the methodology required to measure power envelope correlation including (i) projection of MEG data into source space, (ii) removing confounds introduced by the MEG inverse problem and (iii) estimation of connectivity itself. In this way, we aim to provide researchers with a description of the key steps required to assess envelope based functional networks, which are thought to represent an intrinsic mode of coupling in the human brain. We highlight the principal findings of the techniques discussed, and furthermore, we show evidence that this method can probe how the brain forms and dissolves multiple transient networks on a rapid timescale in order to support current processing demand. Overall, power envelope correlation offers a unique and verifiable means to gain novel insights into network coordination and is proving to be of significant value in elucidating the neural dynamics of the human connectome in health and disease.

  8. Measuring two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations with PHOBOS@RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.; Barton, D.; Carroll, A.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present results of a simulation of the measurement of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations in central Au-Au collisions with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. This measurement is expected to yield information on the relevant time and distance scales in these collisions. As the space-time scale is directly connected with the equation of state governing the evolution of the particle source, this information will be essential in understanding the physics of nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies. The authors demonstrate that the PHOBOS detector has sufficient resolution and acceptance to distinguish a variety of physics scenarios.

  9. Measuring two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations with PHOBOS@RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.; Barton, D.; Carroll, A.

    1995-12-31

    We present results of a simulation of the measurement of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations in central Au-Au collisions with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. This measurement is expected to yield information on the relevant time and distance scales in these collisions. As the space-time scale is directly connected with the equation of state governing the evolution of the particle source, this information will be essential in understanding the physics of nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies. We demonstrate that the PHOBOS detector has sufficient resolution and acceptance to distinguish a variety of physics scenarios.

  10. Correlation of subjective slipperiness judgements with quantitative COF (Coefficient Of Friction) measurements for structural steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purswell, Jerry L.; Schlegel, Robert E.

    1988-06-01

    When there is no simple or accurate procedure for measuring the coefficient of friction (COF) at a job site, workers and/or supervisors involved must make subjective judgments about the slipperiness of the walking and climbing surfaces and in turn decide whether the surface presents a safe or an unsafe condition for work. This project was designed to determine whether these subjective judgment calls did in fact agree with the COF measurements obtained using a mechanical device. It was noted that the coatings chosen for study were subject to a polishing factor by the boot soles during the trials, causing the COF values to become lower as the trials continued. Poor correlation was obtained between subjective ratings of slipperiness and the COF values measured before the trials began. A relatively high correlation was obtained between subjective ratings and the COF values measured after the trials had been completed. A difference was noted in the subjective ratings for the effects of water on a coating for column climbing, but not for walking a beam, suggesting the effects of water on a coating are related to the type of task being performed in steel erection. An increase in the measured COF was noted for all of the coatings when they were wet as compared to the dry condition. The importance of clean shoe soles was clearly demonstrated.

  11. Measurement of two-point two-velocity correlation functions in the ion phase-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiff, Fred

    2008-11-01

    Using two single frequency tunable lasers we generalize the technique used previously to measure two-point correlation functions to allow two different selected velocities as well. A steady-state singly-ionized Argon plasma with density 10^9 cm-3, electron temperature of 2 eV, and ion temperature of 0.1 eV in a uniformly magnetized plasma cylinder is produced using a CW radio-frequency source. The plasma column is 10 cm in diameter and the main chamber is 200 cm in length. The measurements concern the low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations that occur naturally near the electron drift frequency driven by the radial electron temperature gradient. Two independent LIF systems, with detection systems on movable carriages, are scanned using computer-controlled stepper motors. One system involves a Argon-ion pumped single-frequency dye laser at 611nm with detection at 461 nm. The second system uses a single-frequency tunable diode laser at 668nm with detection at 443nm. By looking at cross-correlation between the two detection systems it is a measurement of is realized. We will describe the tests and validations used to rule out instrumental effects on the measurement and compare the results to previous measurements of made using a single laser beam.

  12. Measuring epistasis in fitness landscapes: The correlation of fitness effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Schmiegelt, Benjamin; Weinreich, Daniel; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Tajima, Fumio; Achaz, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Genotypic fitness landscapes are constructed by assessing the fitness of all possible combinations of a given number of mutations. In the last years, several experimental fitness landscapes have been completely resolved. As fitness landscapes are high-dimensional, simple measures of their structure are used as statistics in empirical applications. Epistasis is one of the most relevant features of fitness landscapes. Here we propose a new natural measure of the amount of epistasis based on the correlation of fitness effects of mutations. This measure has a natural interpretation, captures well the interaction between mutations and can be obtained analytically for most landscape models. We discuss how this measure is related to previous measures of epistasis (number of peaks, roughness/slope, fraction of sign epistasis, Fourier-Walsh spectrum) and how it can be easily extended to landscapes with missing data or with fitness ranks only. Furthermore, the dependence of the correlation of fitness effects on mutational distance contains interesting information about the patterns of epistasis. This dependence can be used to uncover the amount and nature of epistatic interactions in a landscape or to discriminate between different landscape models.

  13. Measuring epistasis in fitness landscapes: The correlation of fitness effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Schmiegelt, Benjamin; Weinreich, Daniel; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Tajima, Fumio; Achaz, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Genotypic fitness landscapes are constructed by assessing the fitness of all possible combinations of a given number of mutations. In the last years, several experimental fitness landscapes have been completely resolved. As fitness landscapes are high-dimensional, simple measures of their structure are used as statistics in empirical applications. Epistasis is one of the most relevant features of fitness landscapes. Here we propose a new natural measure of the amount of epistasis based on the correlation of fitness effects of mutations. This measure has a natural interpretation, captures well the interaction between mutations and can be obtained analytically for most landscape models. We discuss how this measure is related to previous measures of epistasis (number of peaks, roughness/slope, fraction of sign epistasis, Fourier-Walsh spectrum) and how it can be easily extended to landscapes with missing data or with fitness ranks only. Furthermore, the dependence of the correlation of fitness effects on mutational distance contains interesting information about the patterns of epistasis. This dependence can be used to uncover the amount and nature of epistatic interactions in a landscape or to discriminate between different landscape models. PMID:26854875

  14. Facilities for the performance of Fano measurements as a probe of electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Chung, B.W.; Morton, S.A.; Waddill, G.D.

    2008-10-30

    Fano Effect measurements are the key to direct observation of the Kondo or spin shielding intrinsic to models of electron correlation. The Fano Effect is the observation of spin polarized photoelectron emission from NONMAGNETIC materials, under chirally selective excitation, such as circularly polarized photons. Below are described three spectrometers, with which Fano Effects measurements have been made. The key measurements are based upon spin-resolving and photon-dichroic photoelectron spectroscopy. True spin-resolution is achieved by the use of a Mini-Mott detection scheme. The photon-dichroic measurements include the variants x-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism angular distributions (XMCDAD and XMLDAD). Both a multichannel, energy dispersive collection scheme as well as the spin-detecting Mini-Mott apparatus are used in data collection.

  15. Measurement of bedload transport in sand-bed rivers: a look at two indirect sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Robert R.; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    Sand-bed rivers present unique challenges to accurate measurement of the bedload transport rate using the traditional direct sampling methods of direct traps (for example the Helley-Smith bedload sampler). The two major issues are: 1) over sampling of sand transport caused by “mining” of sand due to the flow disturbance induced by the presence of the sampler and 2) clogging of the mesh bag with sand particles reducing the hydraulic efficiency of the sampler. Indirect measurement methods hold promise in that unlike direct methods, no transport-altering flow disturbance near the bed occurs. The bedform velocimetry method utilizes a measure of the bedform geometry and the speed of bedform translation to estimate the bedload transport through mass balance. The bedform velocimetry method is readily applied for the estimation of bedload transport in large sand-bed rivers so long as prominent bedforms are present and the streamflow discharge is steady for long enough to provide sufficient bedform translation between the successive bathymetric data sets. Bedform velocimetry in small sandbed rivers is often problematic due to rapid variation within the hydrograph. The bottom-track bias feature of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has been utilized to accurately estimate the virtual velocities of sand-bed rivers. Coupling measurement of the virtual velocity with an accurate determination of the active depth of the streambed sediment movement is another method to measure bedload transport, which will be termed the “virtual velocity” method. Much research remains to develop methods and determine accuracy of the virtual velocity method in small sand-bed rivers.

  16. Correlation of Beam Transport Characteristics and Mass Resolving Power to Analyzing Magnet Pole Piece Wear in Axcelis HE Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ron; Schuur, John; Tysinger, Randy

    2008-11-01

    An investigation into odd analyzing magnet tuning behavior on an Axcelis HE ion implanter revealed a correlation to excessive wear on the analyzer magnet pole pieces. Though the lifetime is generally quite good, the pole pieces are internal to the beamline design and are exposed to and sputtered by the ion beam during mass analysis. This erosion of the pole piece surfaces affects beam focus and transport, especially for lower current ion beams. Eventually, automatic beam set-up fails altogether as the system is unable to locate the correct amu peak. It is important to understand and correct any deficiencies in pole piece condition as long-term neglect will eventually lead to process errors. Data is presented to illustrate good and bad pole piece condition and a method is suggested for non-invasive testing.

  17. Suspended solids transport: an analysis based on turbidity measurements and event based fully calibrated hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, J G; Veldkamp, R G; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    Modelling suspended solids transport is a key issue for predicting the pollution load discharged by CSOs. Nonetheless, there is still much debate on the main drivers for suspended solids transport and on the modelling approach to be adopted. Current sewer models provide suspended solids transport models. These models, however, rely upon erosion-deposition criteria developed in fluvial environments, therewith oversimplifying the sewer sediment characteristics. Consequently, the performance of these models is poor from a theoretical point of view. To get an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variations in suspended solids transport, a measuring network was installed in the sewer system of Loenen in conjunction with a hydraulic measuring network from June through December 2001. During the measuring period, 15 storm events rendered high-quality data on both the hydraulics and the turbidity. For each storm event, a hydrodynamic model was calibrated using the Clemens' method. The conclusion of the paper is that modelling of suspended solids transport has been and will be one of the challenges in the field of urban drainage modelling. A direct relation of either shear stress or flow velocity with turbidity could not be found, likely because of the time varying characteristics of the suspended solids.

  18. Magnification-temperature correlation: The dark side of integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LoVerde, Marilena; Hui, Lam; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2007-02-15

    Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, which involve cross-correlating the microwave background anisotropies with the foreground large-scale structure (e.g. traced by galaxies/quasars), have proven to be an interesting probe of dark energy. We show that magnification bias, which is the inevitable modulation of the foreground number counts by gravitational lensing, alters both the scale dependence and amplitude of the observed ISW signal. This is true especially at high redshifts because (1) the intrinsic galaxy-temperature signal diminishes greatly back in the matter-dominated era, (2) the lensing efficiency increases with redshift and (3) the number count slope generally steepens with redshift in a magnitude limited sample. At z > or approx. 2, the magnification-temperature correlation dominates over the intrinsic galaxy-temperature correlation and causes the observed ISW signal to increase with redshift, despite dark energy subdominance--a result of the fact that magnification probes structures all the way from the observer to the sources. Ignoring magnification bias therefore can lead to (significantly) erroneous conclusions about dark energy. While the lensing modulation opens up an interesting high z window for ISW measurements, high redshift measurements are not expected to add much new information to low redshift ones if dark energy is indeed the cosmological constant. This is because lensing introduces significant covariance across redshifts. The most compelling reasons for pursuing high redshift ISW measurements are to look for potential surprises such as early dark energy domination or signatures of modified gravity. We conclude with a discussion of existing measurements, the highest redshift of which is at the margin of being sensitive to the magnification effect. We also develop a formalism which might be of more general interest: to predict biases in estimating parameters when certain physical effects are ignored in interpreting observations.

  19. 7Li MR measures of blood lithium--correlation with chemical analysis data.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Emily; Luterbach, Katie; Rzepka, Elzbieta; Ramaprasad, Subbaraya

    2004-01-01

    Lithium is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of manic-depressive illness. A narrow therapeutic range of lithium (0.4-1.2 meq/l) requires constant monitoring of these levels to avoid neurotoxicity and overdose. It is general practice to measure plasma lithium levels as a guide to monitor the therapy. Efforts to predict the concentration of Li at its active sites in the brain have led to the use of red blood cells (RBCs) because they are similar to neuronal cells. Thus RBC lithium is a very relevant clinical parameter for monitoring therapy and to observe the changes at intracellular levels under varying treatment conditions. A measure of both plasma and RBC lithium may be of significant value to physicians and researchers as lithium profile for RBCs correlate more closely with the brain lithium than plasma lithium. Although methods to measure lithium in blood such as atomic absorption or flame photometry exist, a complete quantitation of both plasma and RBC lithium requires a tedious physical separation of the two components prior to chemical analysis. On the other hand, lithium MR technique, via the use of shift reagents, can provide both plasma and RBC lithium in a single study. Here we have performed a correlation study of lithium results obtained from MR with the vitros dry-slide method on blood samples from rats treated with lithium. The results show a high degree of correlation between the two methods. Additionally, the MR measurements made on dilute samples of blood indicate that small blood samples with lithium concentration in the neighborhood of 0.08 meq/l can be measured with high accuracy and reproducibility needed for clinical purposes.

  20. Linking criteria for incipient motion to field-based measures of bed load transport capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitlick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Early studies of sediment transport, such as those of Gilbert (1914) and Shields (1936), laid the groundwork for countless other studies of bed load entrainment and transport. Gilbert and Shields emphasized somewhat different aspects of sediment transport in their writing, but they had similar objectives in experimenting with conditions that affect both incipient motion and bed load transport capacity. The problem of predicting incipient motion is thus inextricably linked to the problem of predicting bed load transport capacity. In this talk I will discuss field-based approaches for evaluating incipient motion at channel-length scales ranging from a few km to many 10s of km. In the best-case scenario, where time and equipment are available to sample the bed load, the most robust approach for determining incipient motion is to extrapolate from measurements taken over a range of flows, and find the shear stress corresponding to a low but measureable transport rate. Alternatively, if channel properties (width, depth, slope and grain size) can be measured at a sufficient number of locations (say, more than 20), the reference shear stress can be estimated by assuming it scales with the channel-forming (bankfull) shear stress. Another new approach, which makes use of repeat aerial LiDAR and records of daily discharge, is to develop a two-parameter sediment rating curve that produces the same sediment flux for a time series of daily flows as the sediment flux estimated from topographic differencing. Last, in situations where a qualitative (yes/no) assessment of sediment motion is sufficient (e.g. during a reservoir release), longitudinal variations in bed load transport intensity can be detected with acoustical sensors- hydrophones- mounted on a kayak or boat equipped with a global positioning system (GPS). Pros and cons of these different approaches will also be discussed.

  1. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  2. Transport properties and Kondo correlations in nanostructures: Time-dependent DMRG method applied to quantum dots coupled to Wilson chains

    SciTech Connect

    Dias Da Silva, Luis G; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Feiguin, Adrian E; Busser, C. A.; Martins, G. B.; Anda, E. V.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2008-01-01

    We apply the adaptive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group method tDMRG to the study of transport properties of quantum-dot systems connected to metallic leads. Finite-size effects make the usual tDMRG description of the Kondo regime a numerically demanding task. We show that such effects can be attenuated by describing the leads by Wilson chains, in which the hopping matrix elements decay exponentially away from the impurity tn n/2. For a given system size and in the linear-response regime, results for 1 show several improvements over the undamped =1 case: perfect conductance is obtained deeper in the strongly interacting regime and current plateaus remain well defined for longer time scales. Similar improvements were obtained in the finite-bias regime up to bias voltages of the order of the Kondo temperature. These results show that with the proposed modification, the tDMRG characterization of Kondo correlations in the transport properties can be substantially improved, while it turns out to be sufficient to work with much smaller system sizes. We discuss the numerical cost of this approach with respect to the necessary system sizes and the entanglement growth during the time evolution.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils of Beijing and Tianjin region: vertical distribution, correlation with TOC and transport mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Fengpeng; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wan, Yunyang; Lu, Song; Wang, Liang; Bu, Qingwei

    2009-01-01

    The contents and distribution of 20 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) were investigated in 16 soil profiles of Beijing and Tianjin region. Transport of high molecular weight PAHs (HMWPAHs) and the correlation between total organic carbon (TOC) and their concentrations were also discussed. The results indicated that highly contaminated sites were located at urban or wastewater irrigation areas and pollutants mainly accumulated in topsoil (< 40 cm), with a sharp content decrease at the vertical boundary of 30-40 cm. Total PAHs/HAHs concentrations in soils from Tianjin were markedly greater than those from Beijing. Even the contents at bottoms of soil profiles in Tianjin were higher than those in topsoils of Beijing soil profile. HMWPAHs dominated the PAH profiles, exhibiting a uniform distribution of pyrogenic origin between topsoils and deep layers. Furthermore, the percentages of HMWPAHs remained relative constant with the depth of soil profiles, which were consistent with the distribution of particulate matter-associated PAHs in the local atmospheric environments. Therefore, HMWPAHs transport with particulates might be the predominant source found in soil profiles. PMID:20108671

  4. The oligomeric state and stability of the mannitol transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Hink, Mark; Krasnikov, Victor; van den Bogaart, Geert; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Numerous membrane proteins function as oligomers both at the structural and functional levels. The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EnzymeIImtl, is a member of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. During the transport cycle, mannitol is phosphorylated and released into the cytoplasm as mannitol-1-phosphate. Several studies have shown that EIImtl functions as an oligomeric species. However, the oligomerization number and stability of the oligomeric complex during different steps of the catalytic cycle, e.g., substrate binding and/or phosphorylation of the carrier, is still under discussion. In this paper, we have addressed the oligomeric state and stability of EIImtl using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. A functional double-cysteine mutant was site-specifically labeled with either Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 633. The subunit exchange of these two batches of proteins was followed in time during different steps of the catalytic cycle. The most important conclusions are that (1) in a detergent-solubilized state, EIImtl is functional as a very stable dimer; (2) the stability of the complex can be manipulated by changing the intermicellar attractive forces between PEG-based detergent micelles; (3) substrate binding destabilizes the complex whereas phosphorylation increases the stability; and (4) substrate binding to the phosphorylated species partly antagonizes the stabilizing effect. PMID:16823033

  5. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF.

  6. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF. PMID:27239479

  7. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF. PMID:27239479

  8. Multiple Scattering Correlation Measurements in Fluid/particle Suspensions: Application to Particle Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorri-Nowkoorani, Farhad

    1995-01-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to examine different parameters such as transmission, back-scattering, off angle detection, polarization, and different ranges of optical thickness (low to high), in dynamic light scattering measurements from multiple scattering fluid/particle suspensions. In addition, the validity of correlation transfer (CT) theory was investigated and a methodology was provided for finding micron size spherical particle diameter. The experiment has been setup using an Argon-Ion laser, PMT, goiniometer, mirrors, lenses, and beam splitter. Solutions of 0.3 m latex particles mixed with water have been used as the test samples. The measurements have been compared to CT theory using exact and approximate numerical solutions. Findings and conclusions. It was found that the two-dimensional correlation function decays slower as compared to the one-dimensional situation. The correlation function decays faster as effective optical thickness increases. Polarization affects the back-scattering correlation function decay rate for all optical thicknesses, while it may be unimportant for transmission at high optical thicknesses. Transition from single scattering to multiple scattering appears to begin around an optical thickness of 0.05. In addition, the correlation function appears relatively insensitive to off angle detection for effective optical thicknesses of 3 or greater transmission and 1.5 or greater for back -scattering. However, for smaller optical thicknesses, the correlation function appears to be dependent on detection angle. The CT theory has demonstrated promise as a model to bridge the gap from single scattering to multiple scattering correlation. A methodology is proposed herein to allow the determination of particle size using data to match CT predictions, as long as two index of refraction changes at the boundaries and a realistic single scattering phase function are considered in the numerical results. A method of

  9. Frequency analysis and data correlation for beam displacement measurements based on the ISTIMES campaign in Montagnole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordebo, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Dumoulin, J.; Perrone, A.; Pignatti, S.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Time-frequency analysis is an interdisciplinary subject, which originates from mathematics, signal analysis and physics (Grochenig, 2001). From a signal theoretical and mathematical point of view the primary purpose has been to understand how signals, operators and other mathematical objects can be understood simultaneously in the time and frequency variables, which correspond to the phase space variables in physics (Grochenig, 2001; Claasen, 1980). Perhaps the most popular time-frequency representations are the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and the Wigner distribution (Grochenig, 2001). Their common feature is to localize a function before taking the Fourier transform, thereby obtaining a time-frequency representation. Here, we employ the classical Kaiser window (Kaiser and Schafer, 1980) which is well known in spectrum analysis, since it provides a flexible approach to control the frequency resolution as well as the amplitude dynamics (sidelobe rejection) for a given measurement interval (or resolution) in time. In this contribution, we employ frequency analysis and data correlation for beam displacement measurements based on the ISTIMES campaign (Proto et al., 2010) conducted at the rock fall test center in Montagnole, France, on October 14, 2010. Several test cases are considered based on direct and indirect impact from a steel sphere dropped on a reinforced concrete beam. Several measurement technologies were used to measure the deformation of the beam based on IRT (InfraRed Thermography), GBSAR (Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar), and ODM (Optical Diode Measurements). A time-frequency analysis was used to analyze the evolution of the resonance frequencies of the beam. A short-time cross-correlation followed by Fourier transformation was used to integrate data based on two different signal sources (sensor technologies). The results were compared to a frequency analysis based on video data and image processing to yield a high-accuracy reference

  10. Correlation between structure and electrical transport in ion-irradiated graphene grown on Cu foils

    SciTech Connect

    Buchowicz, G.; Stone, P.R.; Robinson, J.T.; Cress, C.D.; Beeman, J.W.; Dubon, O.D.

    2010-11-04

    Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and supported on SiO2 and sapphire substrates was studied following controlled introduction of defects induced by 35 keV carbon ion irradiation. Changes in Raman spectra following fluences ranging from 1012 cm-2 to 1015 cm-2 indicate that the structure of graphene evolves from a highly-ordered layer, to a patchwork of disordered domains, to an essentially amorphous film. These structural changes result in a dramatic decrease in the Hall mobility by orders of magnitude while, remarkably, the Hall concentration remains almost unchanged, suggesting that the Fermi level is pinned at a hole concentration near 1x1013 cm-2. A model for scattering by resonant scatterers is in good agreement with mobility measurements up to an ion fluence of 1x1014 cm-2.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF 21 cm BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS AT z {approx} 0.8 IN CROSS-CORRELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E. R.; Calin, L.-M.; Pen, U.-L.; Shaw, J. R.; Banavar, N.; Bandura, K.; Blake, C.; Chang, T.-C.; Liao, Y.-W.; Chen, X.; Li, Y.-C.; Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Voytek, T. C.

    2013-01-20

    In this Letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling {approx}41 deg. sq. and 190 hr of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains {Omega}{sub HI} b{sub HI} r = [0.43 {+-} 0.07(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, where {Omega}{sub HI} is the neutral hydrogen (H I) fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b{sub HI} is the H I bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z {approx} 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  12. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Duan, X. R.; Chen, W.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Z. T.; Xu, M.; Song, X. M.; Cheng, J.; Ke, R.; Nie, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Liu, Yong; the HL-2A Team

    2015-10-01

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ``1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''.

  13. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  14. Correlation between x-ray reflectivity measurements and surface roughness of AXAF coated witness samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Anna M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; van Speybroeck, Leon P.; Yip, P. W.; Drehman, A. J.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    1996-07-01

    One of the specifications used to polish the AXAF witness samples was that the rms surface roughness be measured by optical profilometry. This specification was chosen based on the cost of polishing and the necessity to keep scatter to a minimum. However, it is not necessarily the best indication of the expected performance of the soft x-ray reflectivity of the surfaces. In particular, the reflectivity data from the AXAF flight optic witness samples indicate sample to sample differences of a few percent which do not correlate with the optical profilometry results for these samples. Further investigations were carried out to measure rms surface roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The differences shown by AFM surface roughness measurements correlates to differences found in reflectivity for these same samples. One-dimensional power spectral density data is presented from both AFM and WYKO measurements along with the reflectivity results at 8 keV for the AXAF witness samples. The results indicate that to obtain accurate prediction of x-ray performance it is necessary to look at the scanning probe metrology data provided by the AFM, in addition to the optical profilometry data.

  15. Spectrophotometric Measurements of Phytochrome in vivo and Their Correlation with Photomorphogenic Responses of Phaseolus 12

    PubMed Central

    Klein, W. H.; Edwards, J. L.; Shropshire, W.

    1967-01-01

    Direct in vivo measurements of phytochrome have been made in Phaseolus vulgaris by 2-filter difference spectrophotometry (Ratiospect). All measurements were made at 730 versus 800 nm and it is assumed that the Δ (ΔOD) is directly proportional to the PFR concentration of phytochrome present. Dose response curves were determined for both physiological and spectrophotometric responses for red induction and far-red photoinactivation. For induction, saturation occurs at 100 mj/cm2 and for inactivation at 30 mj/cm2. The rate of hook opening and the physiological response measured 20 hours after induction are both shown to be directly proportional to the initial amount of PFR present spectrophotometrically. The sensitivity of the tissue correlates well with the absolute amount of phytochrome present, the inner portion of the hook having the maximum concentration of 0.042 Δ (ΔOD)/g fresh weight. If the total reversible phytochrome concentration is reduced by exposure to red light and allowing PFR to decay out of the system the remaining sensitivity of the tissue is shown to be directly correlated with the amount of PR remaining in the tissue. PFR disappears rapidly in the dark at 25°, and is not detectable after 6 hours. There is no indication that PFR reverts in the system to PR. At 4°, PFR does not disappear measurably up to 1 hour and is nearly totally reversible to PR. Images PMID:16656503

  16. Measuring two phase flow parameters using impedance cross-correlation flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamedsalih, Y.; Lucas, G.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an impedance cross correlation flow meter which can be used in solids-water pipe flows to measure the local solids volume fraction distribution and the local solids velocity distribution. The system is composed of two arrays of electrodes, separated by an axial distance of 50 mm and each array contains eights electrodes mounted over the internal circumference of the pipe carrying the flow. Furthermore every electrode in each array can be selected to be either"excitation", "measurement" or "earth". Changing the electrode configuration leads to a change in the electric field, and hence in the region of the flow cross section which is interrogated. The local flow velocity in the interrogated region is obtained by cross correlation between the two electrode arrays. Additionally, the local solids volume fraction can be obtained from the mean mixture conductivity in the region under interrogation. The system is being integrated with a microcontroller to measure the velocity distribution of the solids and the volume fraction distribution of the solids in order to create a portable flow meter capable of measuring the multi-phase flow parameters without the need of a PC to control it. Integration of the product of the local solids volume fraction and the local solids velocity in the flow cross section enables the solids volumetric flow rate to be determined.

  17. Changes in airborne bacteria during a tropical burning season are correlated with satellite aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, F., III

    Agricultural burning in the tropics generates vast quantities of smoke that can blanket entire countries and attenuate photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Thick smoke also reduces the solar ultraviolet-B wavelengths that synthesize vitamin-D precur- sors in vertebrates and suppress many viruses and non-pigmented bacteria. As many pathogenic bacteria are non-pigmented, the latter finding may explain some of the in- creases in respiratory and other diseases that occur during episodes of severe aerosol loading. At Alta Floresta, Brazil, during the 1997 burning season, the correlation (r^2) of UV-B measured at the surface with the ratio of non-pigmented to total airborne bacteria colony forming units (CFUs) was 0.83. The correlation of the aerosol index measured from orbit by TOMS with the ratio of non-pigmented to total airborne bac- teria CFUs was 0.71. These findings suggest the application of satellite measurements of optical depth as a first approximation epidemiological tool for remote regions that have seasonally smokey skies. Further comparisons are warranted of surface measure- ments of airborne bacteria, UV-B and PAR with TOMS and MODIS observations of optical depth during severe air pollution events.

  18. Measurement of electron spin transport in graphene on 6H-silicon carbide(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Joseph

    The focus of this thesis is to demonstrate the potential of wafer scale graphene spintronics. Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp 2-bonded carbon atoms that has high carrier mobilities, making it a desirable material for future nanoscale electronic devices. The vision of spintronics is to utilize the spin of the electron to produce novel high-speed low power consuming devices. Materials with long spin relaxation times and spin diffusion lengths are needed to realize these goals. Graphene is an ideal material as it meets these requirements and is amenable to planar device geometries. In this thesis, spin transport in wafer scale epitaxial graphene grown on the silicon face of silicon carbide is demonstrated. Non-local Hanle spin precession measurement devices were fabricated using graphene with and without a hafnium oxide interface layer between the ferromagnetic metal and graphene. The structural properties of the devices were investigated with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The electrical properties of the graphene were measured utilizing Hall transport measurements. The magnetic properties of the contacts were investigated with vibrating sample magnetometery. The processes developed to fabricate the Hanle measurement devices are presented as well. A custom Hanle measurement setup was developed and utilized for the Hanle spin precession measurements. Spin precession is observed in the epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide, with improved spin transport properties with the utilization of a hafnium oxide barrier between the ferromagnetic contacts and graphene. The charge transport and spin transport properties are compared to determine the relevant spin relaxation mechanism in the devices. These results demonstrate that graphene has great potential for wafer scale production of future spintronic devices.

  19. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices.

  20. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices. PMID:26906476