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Sample records for corrosion inhibition performance

  1. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  2. A computational study on corrosion inhibition performances of novel quinoline derivatives against the corrosion of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, Şaban; Safi, Zaki S.; Kaya, Savaş; Işın, Dilara Özbakır; Guo, Lei; Kaya, Cemal

    2017-04-01

    In this computational study, the adsorption and corrosion inhibition properties of some novel quinoline derivatives namely, 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q1), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(p-tolyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q2), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile) (Q3) and 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-7-hydroxy-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q4) on the corrosion of iron were investigated using quantum chemical and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Quantum chemical calculations section of the study provides enough calculation and discussion on the relationship between corrosion inhibition and global reactivity descriptors such as EHOMO, ELUMO, HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔE), chemical hardness (η), softness (σ), electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), electrophilicity (ω), nucleophilicity (ɛ), electrons transferred from inhibitors to metal surface (ΔN), initial molecule-metal interaction energy (Δψ), total electronic energy (E), the energy change during electronic back-donation process (ΔEb-d). The adsorption behaviors of studied compounds on Fe (110) surface were investigated with the help of molecular dynamics simulation approach. The binding energies calculated on Fe (110) surface of mentioned quinoline derivatives followed the order: Q4 > Q3 > Q2 > Q1. It should be noted that the results obtained in the study are in good agreement with experimental inhibition efficiency results earlier reported.

  3. Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

  4. Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Triazole Derivatives on Copper-Nickel Alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, X.; Ma, A. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the performance of three triazole derivatives with different molecular structures as corrosion inhibitors for the copper-nickel alloy CuNi 90/10 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Inhibition behavior was systematically determined through electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, adsorption behavior and the inhibition mechanism were investigated via quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic simulation. Experimental results indicate that the three inhibitors with triazole rings and heteroatoms exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition capabilities on the copper-nickel alloy surface through physisorption and chemisorption. In particular, 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole showed the best inhibition capability according to the concentration ranges considered in the experiments. The results of quantum chemical calculation agreed with the experimental findings.

  5. Inhibitive Performance of a Rust Converter on Corrosion of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. D.; Cheng, Y. F.; Fan, W.; Vladimir, C.; Volha, V.; Alla, T.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a rust converter consisting of two steps of processing solutions was prepared to convert iron rust of the steel surface into a protective conversion film. The performance of the converter was evaluated in both neutral and acidic solutions by various electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and surface characterization. The effect of temperature was investigated. It was found that the rust converter is able to effectively convert the iron rust into a conversion film, serving as a barrier layer to block corrosive species from reaching the steel surface.

  6. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  7. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  8. Adsorption of alginate and albumin on aluminum coatings inhibits adhesion of Escherichia coli and enhances the anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jing; Chen, Xiuyong; Ren, Kun; Li, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal-sprayed aluminum coatings have been extensively used as protective layers against corrosion for steel structures in the marine environment. The corrosion usually deteriorates from marine biofouling, yet the mechanism of accelerated corrosion of the coatings remains elusive. As the first stage participating in biofouling process, adsorption of molecules plays critical roles in mediating formation of biofilm. Here, we report at molecular level the adsorption behaviors of albumin and marine polysaccharide on arc-sprayed aluminum coatings and their influence on adhesion of Escherichia coli. The adsorption of alginate and albumin was characterized by infrared spectra analyses and atomic force microscopic observation. The adsorption inhibits effectively adhesion of the bacteria. Further investigation indicates that alginate/albumin altered the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the coatings instead of impacting the survival of the bacteria to decline their adhesion. The conditioning layer composed of the molecules enhances anti-corrosion performances of the coatings.

  9. Complete corrosion inhibition through graphene defect passivation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Chang, Kai-Wen; Jhu, Jian Gang; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chen, Kuang Yao; Yang, Chang Chung; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2014-01-28

    Graphene is expected to enable superior corrosion protection due to its impermeability and chemical inertness. Previous reports, however, demonstrate limited corrosion inhibition and even corrosion enhancement of graphene on metal surfaces. To enable the reliable and complete passivation, the origin of the low inhibition efficiency of graphene was investigated. Combining electrochemical and morphological characterization techniques, nanometer-sized structural defects in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene were found to be the cause for the limited passivation effect. Extremely fast mass transport on the order of meters per second both across and parallel to graphene layers results in an inhibition efficiency of only ∼50% for Cu covered with up to three graphene layers. Through selective passivation of the defects by atomic layer deposition (ALD) an enhanced corrosion protection of more than 99% was achieved, which compares favorably with commercial corrosion protection methods.

  10. Corrosion Chemistry in Inhibited HDA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    PF 5 Inhibisol 1,1, 1-Trichloroethane Methcol 97% ethanol + 3% methanol Nujol Liquid Paraffin Kel-F Chlorotrifluoroethylene Polymer FEP Fluorinated...directly proportional to the corrosion rate. It is simple to show that if the corrosion process is under activation control as opposed to diffusion...surface; such a film retards the dissolution process and the metal can then be regarded as passive. The E vs log i curve shown in Figure 3.5

  11. Exploratory Development of Corrosion Inhibiting Primers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    melamine , were selected for further evaluation in primer systems as examples of soluble and insoluble corrosion inhibitors. Other routes to potential...guanidine dichromate gave relatively poor performance. Melamine dich- romate pigment was more generally effective in preventing corrosion than the common...dihpneyl- guanidine ....... ..................... ... 66 9.2.1.3) Preparation Of Melamine Dichromate (Compound #25). 66 vii TABLE OF CONTENTS

  12. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents.

  13. Corrosion inhibition for distillation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Baumert, Kenneth L.; Sagues, Alberto A.; Davis, Burtron H.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1985-01-01

    Tower material corrosion in an atmospheric or sub-atmospheric distillation tower in a coal liquefaction process is reduced or eliminated by subjecting chloride-containing tray contents to an appropriate ion-exchange resin to remove chloride from such tray contents materials.

  14. Density Functional Theory (DFT) modeling and Monte Carlo simulation assessment of inhibition performance of some carbohydrazide Schiff bases for steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obot, I. B.; Kaya, Savaş; Kaya, Cemal; Tüzün, Burak

    2016-06-01

    DFT and Monte Carlo simulation were performed on three Schiff bases namely, 4-(4-bromophenyl)-N‧-(4-methoxybenzylidene)thiazole-2-carbohydrazide (BMTC), 4-(4-bromophenyl)-N‧-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)thiazole-2-carbohydrazide (BDTC), 4-(4-bromophenyl)-N‧-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)thiazole-2-carbohydrazide (BHTC) recently studied as corrosion inhibitor for steel in acid medium. Electronic parameters relevant to their inhibition activity such as EHOMO, ELUMO, Energy gap (ΔE), hardness (η), softness (σ), the absolute electronegativity (χ), proton affinity (PA) and nucleophilicity (ω) etc., were computed and discussed. Monte Carlo simulations were applied to search for the most stable configuration and adsorption energies for the interaction of the inhibitors with Fe (110) surface. The theoretical data obtained are in most cases in agreement with experimental results.

  15. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  16. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  17. Adsorption and corrosion-inhibiting effect of Dacryodis edulis extract on low-carbon-steel corrosion in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Oguzie, E E; Enenebeaku, C K; Akalezi, C O; Okoro, S C; Ayuk, A A; Ejike, E N

    2010-09-01

    The inhibition of low-carbon-steel corrosion in 1M HCl and 0.5M H(2)SO(4) by extracts of Dacryodis edulis (DE) was investigated using gravimetric and electrochemical techniques. DE extract was found to inhibit the uniform and localized corrosion of carbon steel in the acidic media, affecting both the cathodic and anodic partial reactions. The corrosion process was inhibited by adsorption of the extracted organic matter onto the steel surface in a concentration-dependent manner and involved both protonated and molecular species. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to illustrate the process of adsorption of some specific components of the extract.

  18. Biofilms: strategies for metal corrosion inhibition employing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rongjun

    2007-10-01

    Corrosion causes dramatic economic loss. Currently widely used corrosion control strategies have disadvantages of being expensive, subject to environmental restrictions, and sometimes inefficient. Studies show that microbial corrosion inhibition is actually a common phenomenon. The present review summarizes recent progress in this novel strategy: corrosion control using beneficial bacteria biofilms. The possible mechanisms may involve: (1) removal of corrosive agents (such as oxygen) by bacterial physiological activities (e.g., aerobic respiration), (2) growth inhibition of corrosion-causing bacteria by antimicrobials generated within biofilms [e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) corrosion inhibition by gramicidin S-producing Bacillus brevis biofilm], (3) generation of protective layer by biofilms (e.g., Bacillus licheniformis biofilm produces on aluminum surface a sticky protective layer of gamma-polyglutamate). Successful utilization of this novel strategy relies on advances in study at the interface of corrosion engineering and biofilm biology.

  19. Corrosion inhibiting media for pressurized water reactor steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Panson, A.J.

    1988-08-16

    A method is described for inhibiting carbon steel corrosion in the secondary system of a nuclear steam generator comprising: providing a corrosion inhibiting quantity of boric acid in the secondary system water; and incorporating in the boric acid containing secondary system water, an activating amount of a polyhydric compound sufficient to increase the acid strength of the boric acid and improve the corrosion inhibiting characteristics thereof.

  20. Space Shuttle Corrosion Protection Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Cris E.

    2007-01-01

    The reusable Manned Space Shuttle has been flying into Space and returning to earth for more than 25 years. The launch pad environment can be corrosive to metallic substrates and the Space Shuttles are exposed to this environment when preparing for launch. The Orbiter has been in service well past its design life of 10 years or 100 missions. As part of the aging vehicle assessment one question under evaluation is how the thermal protection system and aging protective coatings are performing to insure structural integrity. The assessment of this cost resources and time. The information is invaluable when minimizing risk to the safety of Astronauts and Vehicle. This paper will outline a strategic sampling plan and some operational improvements made by the Orbiter Structures team and Corrosion Control Review Board.

  1. Bacterial Exopolysaccharides For Corrosion Inhibition on Metal Substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilms, composed of extra-cellular polymers secreted by bacteria, have been observed to both increase as well as decrease the rate of metal corrosion. Exopolysaccharides derived from Leuconostoc mesenteroides cultures have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substa...

  2. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  3. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  4. Corrosion inhibition of powder metallurgy Mg by fluoride treatments.

    PubMed

    Pereda, M D; Alonso, C; Burgos-Asperilla, L; del Valle, J A; Ruano, O A; Perez, P; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M A

    2010-05-01

    Pure Mg has been proposed as a potential degradable biomaterial to avoid both the disadvantages of non-degradable internal fixation implants and the use of alloying elements that may be toxic. However, it shows excessively high corrosion rate and insufficient yield strength. The effects of reinforcing Mg by a powder metallurgy (PM) route and the application of biocompatible corrosion inhibitors (immersion in 0.1 and 1M KF solution treatments, 0.1M FST and 1M FST, respectively) were analyzed in order to improve Mg mechanical and corrosion resistance, respectively. Open circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques (PT), scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to evaluate its corrosion behavior. SECM showed that the local current of attacked areas decreased during the F(-) treatments. The corrosion inhibitory action of 0.1M FST and 1M FST in phosphate buffered solution was assessed by PT and EIS. Under the experimental conditions assayed, 0.1M FST revealed better performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses of Mg(PM) with 0.1M FST showed the presence of KMgF(3) crystals on the surface while a MgF(2) film was detected for 1M FST. After fluoride inhibition treatments, promising results were observed for Mg(PM) as degradable metallic biomaterial due to its higher yield strength and lower initial corrosion rate than untreated Mg, as well as a progressive loss of the protective characteristics of the F(-)-containing film which ensures the gradual degradation process.

  5. Method for inhibiting corrosion in aqueous systems

    DOEpatents

    DeMonbrun, James R.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for inhibiting corrosion in aqueous systems containing components composed of aluminum, copper, iron, or alloys thereof. The method comprises (a) incorporating in the aqueous medium 2-10 ppm by weight of tolyltriazole; an effective amount of a biodegradable organic biocide; 500-1000 ppm by weight of sodium metasilicate; 500-2000 ppm by weight of sodium nitrite; and 500-2000 ppm by weight of sodium tetraborate, all of these concentrations being based on the weight of water in the system; and (b) maintaining the pH of the resulting system in the range of 7.5 to 8.0. The method permits longterm operation with very low corrosion rates and bacteria counts. All of the additives to the system are biodegradable, permitting the treated aqueous medium to be discharged to the environment without violating current regulations. The method has special application to solar systems in which an aqueous medium is circulated through aluminum-alloy heat exchangers.

  6. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  7. Corrosion inhibition performance of 2,5-bis(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole for carbon steel in HCl solution: Gravimetric, electrochemical and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouanis, M.; Tourabi, M.; Nyassi, A.; Zarrouk, A.; Jama, C.; Bentiss, F.

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in normal hydrochloric acid solution at 30 °C by 2,5-bis(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (DAPO) has been studied by weight loss measurements and electrochemical techniques (polarization and AC impedance). The experimental results showed that DAPO acted as an efficient inhibitor against the carbon steel corrosion in 1 M HCl, and its inhibition efficiency increased with the inhibitor concentration reaching a value up to 93% at 1 mM. Polarization studies showed that the DAPO was a mixed-type inhibitor. The adsorption of this 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivative on the carbon steel surface in 1 M HCl solution followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the corresponding value of the standard Gibbs free energy of adsorption (ΔG°ads) is associated to a chemisorption mechanism. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were carried out to characterize the chemical composition of the inhibitive film formed on the steel surface. The surfaces studies showed that the inhibitive layer is composed of an iron oxide/hydroxide mixture where DAPO molecules are incorporated. The cytotoxicity of DAPO was also determined using cell culture system.

  8. Application of hydrotalcites as corrosion-inhibiting pigments in organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajanam, Sudhakar P. V.

    High strength aluminum alloys typically used in the aerospace industry are provided with coatings for corrosion protection. One of the coating layers is the primer, containing corrosion inhibiting pigments. Conventionally chromate pigments have been used but they are carcinogenic; so there is a need to develop environment-friendly alternatives that can match the corrosion inhibition of chromates. In this study, the use of hydrotalcites as corrosion-inhibiting pigments in organic coatings has been explored. Hydrotalcites are anion clays with excellent ion-exchange capabilities, and for this reason they have been used in industry as anion scavengers. Vanadates are excellent inhibitors of Al alloy corrosion. A Zn-Al-decavanadate hydrotalcite (HT-V) was synthesized and its ion exchange properties characterized. From instrumental neutron activation studies, it was determined that inhibitor release was a small fraction of the total inhibitor in the pigment. However, this was sufficient to provide appreciable corrosion inhibition to Al alloys during potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, inhibitor release occurred even when these pigments were dispersed in epoxy resins and applied to Al alloys. A bare surface in close proximity to the coating was also inhibited from corrosion. Lastly, coatings containing the HT-V pigment performed well in a salt spray environment, protecting scribe corrosion up to 1000 h exposure. Blistering problems encountered during this test were overcome by silane additions to the coating, which improved adhesion and controlled blistering.

  9. Ozone inhibits corrosion in cooling towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, K. R.; Howe, R. D.; Humphrey, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially available corona discharge ozone generator, fitted onto industrial cooling tower, significantly reduces formation of scales (calcium carbonate) and corrosion. System also controls growth of algae and other microorganisms. Modification lowers cost and improves life of cooling system.

  10. Metalworking corrosion inhibition/drawing lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, H.F.; Wantling, S.J.

    1980-05-06

    A metalworking lubricant composition is disclosed which is effective as both a corrosion inhibitor and drawing lubricant and comprises a mineral oil and an additive combination of barium lanolate soap and barium sulfonate.

  11. Corrosion Inhibition in High Temperature Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-28

    resistant coatings is optional. Further 5 examples of high temperature corrosion-resistant coatings are the 6 " aluminides " and "silicides", which are...produced by diffusing 7 aluminum and silicon, respectively, into the surface of superalloys 8 or other substrates. Other metallic or ceramic coatings can... superalloys to form 9 nonprotective NaAlO 2 which causes catastrophic hot corrosion. High 10 temperature chromium-containing metals which rely on chromia

  12. Corrosion and inhibition of copper in different electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, A.; Kálmán, E.; Telegdi, J.; Pálinkás, G.; Dóra, G.

    The inhibition action of p-chlorobenzohydroxamic acid (p-Cl-BHA) and dibenzylsulphoxide (DBSO) on copper corrosion in 0.5 M NaCl at pH 6.5 and 0.1 M Na2SO4 at pH 3, respectively, were studied. The corrosion and inhibition processes were monitored by in-situ atomic force microscopy, and morphological changes on the electrode surface were registered. The p-Cl-BHA greatly enhanced the resistance of copper to pitting corrosion in an aqueous solution containing chloride ions. This effect is attributed to the formation of a continuous protective chemisorbed layer on the corroding metallic surface through which Cu2O will be stabilized. The DBSO, because of its adsorption and conversion to a more stable, less soluble sulphide compound, greatly hindered the copper corrosion in the sulphate-containing solutions.

  13. Corrosion inhibition property of polyester-groundnut shell biodegradable composite.

    PubMed

    Sounthari, P; Kiruthika, A; Saranya, J; Parameswari, K; Chitra, S

    2016-12-01

    The use of natural fibers as reinforcing materials in thermoplastics and thermoset matrix composites provide optimistic environmental profits with regard to ultimate disposability and better use of raw materials. The present work is focused on the corrosion inhibition property of a polymer matrix composite produced by the use of groundnut shell (GNS) waste. Polyester (PE) was synthesized by condensation polymerization of symmetrical 1,3,4-oxadiazole and pimelic acid using sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactant. The polyester-groundnut shell composite (PEGNS) was prepared by ultrasonication method. The synthesized polyester-groundnut shell composite was characterized by FT-IR, TGA and XRD analysis. The corrosion inhibitory effect of PEGNS on mild steel in 1M H2SO4 was investigated using gravimetric method, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization, atomic absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that PEGNS inhibited mild steel corrosion in acid solution and indicated that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The composite inhibited the corrosion of mild steel through adsorption following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Changes in the impedance parameters Rt, Cdl, Icorr, Ecorr, ba and bc suggested the adsorption of PEGNS onto the mild steel surface, leading to the formation of protective film.

  14. Fouling and the inhibition of salt corrosion. [hot corrosion of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fouling while retaining the beneficial effects of alkaline earth inhibitors on the hot corrosion of superalloys, the use of both additives and the intermittent application of the inhibitors were evaluated. Additions of alkaline earth compounds to combustion gases containing sodium sulfate were shown to inhibit hot corrosion. However, sulfate deposits can lead to turbine fouling in service. For that reason, dual additives and intermittant inhibitor applications were evaluated to reduce such deposit formation. Silicon in conjunction with varium showed some promise. Total deposition was apparently reduced while the inhibition of hot corrosion by barium was unimpaired. The intermittant application of the inhibitor was found to be more effective and controllable.

  15. Less-Toxic Coatings for Inhibiting Corrosion of Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran; Clarke, Eric; Eylem, Cahit; Maxey, Jason; Nelson, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Two recently invented families of conversion- coating processes have been found to be effective in reducing or preventing corrosion of aluminum alloys. These processes offer less-toxic alternatives to prior conversion-coating processes that are highly effective but have fallen out of favor because they generate chromate wastes, which are toxic and carcinogenic. Specimens subjected to these processes were found to perform well in standard salt-fog corrosion tests.

  16. Inhibition of heavy metal ion corrosion on aluminum in fresh water cooling systems using propylene glycol anti-freeze

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Corbett, R.; Krantz, B.

    1998-12-31

    Electronics cooling and environmental control systems are required in enclosed manned spaces such as the inside of spacecraft or submersibles. Because egress from such spaces may not be possible in a short time frame, coolant leaks must have minimum toxicity. For this reason, propylene glycol coolants are preferred over the traditional ethylene glycol coolants. Corrosion inhibitor formulations are well developed for ethylene glycol coolants, but there is concern that the inhibitor suite for propylene glycol systems may not be as mature. In particular, coolant systems with a mixture of aluminum and copper can develop heavy metal ion corrosion of the aluminum due to precipitation of copper ions from solution onto the aluminum. This type of accelerated corrosion of aluminum does not require electrical contact with copper, as is the case for galvanic corrosion, nor is significant coolant conductivity required for corrosion to occur. This paper presents a study of the ability of a commercial inhibited propylene glycol coolant to prevent heavy metal ion corrosion of aluminum when copper is also present in the coolant system. The inhibited propylene glycol`s performance is compared to that of reagent propylene glycol without inhibitors, a mature ethylene glycol inhibited coolant, and to tap water. The inhibitor suite in the inhibited propylene glycol was found to be as effective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion as that of the inhibited ethylene glycol coolant, while uninhibited reagent propylene glycol was ineffective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion.

  17. METHOD OF INHIBITING CORROSION IN URANYL SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Griess, J.C. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for treating a uranyl sulfate solution to inhibit the corrosiveness of the solution and elevate the phase separation temperature of the solution. Lithium sulfate is added to the solution in an amount ranging from 0.25 to 1.3 times the uranyl sulfate concentration. The corrosiveness of the solution with respect to stainless steel is substantially decreased by this means. This treatment also serves to raise the phase separation temperature of the solution (above 250 deg C), at which time the uranyl sulfate solution separates into two liquid phases of unequal uranium concentration and thus becomes unsuitable as nuclear reactor fuel.

  18. Density Functional Theory and Electrochemical Studies: Structure-Efficiency Relationship on Corrosion Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Mendoza, Rosa L; Gutiérrez-Moreno, Evelin; Guzmán-Percástegui, Edmundo; Aquino-Torres, Eliazar; Cruz-Borbolla, Julián; Rodríguez-Ávila, José A; Alvarado-Rodríguez, José G; Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Thangarasu, Pandiyan; Medina-Franco, José L

    2015-11-23

    The relationship between structure and corrosion inhibition of a series of 30 imidazol, benzimidazol, and pyridine derivatives has been established through the investigation of quantum descriptors calculated with PBE/6-311++G**. A quantitative structure-property relationship model was obtained by examination of these descriptors using a genetic functional approximation method based on a multiple linear regression analysis. Our results indicate that the efficiency of corrosion inhibitors is strongly associated with aromaticity, electron donor ability, and molecular volume descriptors. In order to calibrate and validate the proposed model, we performed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies on imidazole, 2-methylimidazole, benzimidazole, 2-chloromethylbenzimidazole, pyridine, and 2-aminopyridine compounds. The experimental values for efficiency of corrosion inhibition are in good agreement with the estimated values obtained by our model, thus confirming that our approach represents a promising and suitable tool to predict the inhibition of corrosion attributes of nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds. The adsorption behavior of imidazole or benzimidazole heterocyclic molecules on the Fe(110) surface was also studied to elucidate the inhibition mechanism; the aromaticity played an important role in the adsorbate-surface complex.

  19. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  20. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  1. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  2. Boric acid inhibition of steam generator materials corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wootten, M.J.; Wolfe, C.R.; Hermer, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In 1974, Westinghouse recommended a change from phosphate water chemistry control for nuclear steam generators to one in which no solids are intentionally added, called all volatile treatment (AVT). The reason for the recommended change in water chemistry control was the occurrence of phosphate thinning of the Alloy 600 heat transfer tubes in some operating plants. Since the change over to AVT, other types of corrosion from impurities in the water have been observed of the materials of construction of nuclear steam generators. Initially, several plants observed denting, which is caused by the corrosion of the carbon steel tube support plates. After 8 yr of usage as a denting inhibitor in nuclear plants, no detrimental effects have been identified as due to boric acid. It is believed that boric acid will inhibit denting-type corrosion and caustic attack of Alloy 600; however, it must be stressed that it is not a substitute for good chemistry practices and all levels and disciplines within the operating plant should recognize the importance of rigorous, long-term chemistry control.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of novel coatings for corrosion protection and hydrogen embrittlement inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, Anand

    The degradation of metallic materials under the effect of corrosion is a costly problem, which nearly every industry is confronted with. By using electrochemical plating, one can alter the characteristics of a surface so as to provide improved appearance, ability to withstand corrosive agents, resistance to abrasion, improved electrocatalytic properties or other desired properties or a combination of them. The primary goal of this dissertation is to use electrochemical deposition (electrolytic and electroless) as a surface modification technique to obtain corrosion resistant high performance electrode materials for different electrochemical applications. Metal hydride alloys, which reversibly absorb/desorb hydrogen, have been used in battery applications. The continuous decrease in the absorb/desorbing capacity of these alloys has been attributed to the corrosion of the alloy. Cobalt encapsulation (electroless) has been used as a surface modification method to obtain high performance AB5 type metal hydride alloy. The coated material has a higher capacity and longer cycle life compared to the bare alloy. Pulverization and alloy oxidation---two prime reasons for capacity fading of MH alloys have been studied in greater detail using unique electrochemical and physical characterization methods. The harmful effects of hydrogen permeation (ingress) and related stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can limit the use of metals and alloys in aqueous environments. In the present work, a new Zn-Ni-Cd plating process which offers a unique way of controlling and optimizing the Zn and Cd contents in the final deposit, has been developed. The Zn Ni-Cd alloy coatings has a more anodic corrosion potential than that of Cd but higher than the corrosion potential of iron. The coatings have superior corrosion resistance (10 times higher) and barrier properties than the conventional Cd coatings. Zn-Ni-Cd coatings also inhibit the hydrogen entry into the underlying steel. The kinetic

  4. Two new supramolecular metal diphosphonates: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and inhibiting effects on metallic corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholivand, Khodayar; Yaghoubi, Rouhollah; Farrokhi, Alireza; Khoddami, Shahram

    2016-11-01

    Two new divalent metal(II) aminodiphosphonates with layered structure, namely, Cu(H3L1)2·2H2O (1), [H4L1=methyl-N(CH2PO3H2)2] and Cd2(H2L2)4(2), [H4L2=n-propyl-N(CH2PO3H2)2] were synthesized and characterized. The Cu(II) ions in complex 1 are octahedrally coordinated by four oxygen atoms from two chelating ligands and two phosphonate oxygen atoms from two neighboring Cu(H3L1)2 units. The Cu(H3L1)2 units are interconnected by bridging phosphonate groups, forming a 2-D metal phosphonate layer. The structure of complex 2 contains two unique Cd(II) ions octahedrally-coordinated by six phosphonate oxygen atoms from four H2L2 diphosphonate anions. Corrosion inhibition performances of 1 and 2 were also compared with each other in order to study the effect of combinations of externally added Cd/H4L2 and Cu/H4L1 (1:1 ratio) on corrosion rates of carbon steel. It was found that at pH 3.0, Cd/H4L2 or Cu/H4L1 combinations do not have noticeable corrosion inhibition efficiency for carbon steel. In contrast, at pH 7.0, higher corrosion inhibition efficiency was achieved for Cd/H4L2. Physical characterizations such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to study the corrosion specimens and film material.

  5. Antimony tartrate corrosion inhibitive composition for coolant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Payerle, N.E.

    1987-08-11

    An automobile coolant concentrate is described comprising (a) a liquid polyhydric alcohol chosen from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol and mixtures thereof, and (b) corrosion inhibitors in a corrosion inhibitory amount with respect to corrosion of lead-containing solders, the corrosion inhibitors comprising (i) an alkali metal antimony tartrate, and (ii) an azole compound.

  6. Performance of Terminalia catappa on mild steel corrosion in HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Obi, Chukwunonso Ezekiel; Sonoiki, Oluwatobi Oluwasegun Oluwagbenga; Oni, Adeoluwa Barnabas; Alabi, Ayomide Samuel; Olarewaju, Abisola Ebunoluwa

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates Terminalia catappa leaf-extract performance on mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Electrochemical linear-sweep-voltametry (LSV) and gravimetric techniques were employed for assessing the mild steel corrosion in the HCl test-environment of immersion having different concentrations of the leaf-extract. Results showed that all the concentrations of the Terminalia catappa leaf-extract employed inhibited mild steel corrosion from the electrochemical (potentiodynamic) and the gravimetric considerations. Also, corrosion rate from LSV exhibited excellent correlation (R = 95.77%, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) = 91.72% and p-value = 0.02383) with linear function of the corrosion rate from gravimetric method, for the leaf-extract concentrations employed. From the experimental model, 6 g/L Terminalia catappa exhibited optimal inhibition efficiency, η = 78.07%, while 8 g/L Terminalia catappa was predicted as optimally effective, η = 75.41%, by the correlation fitting model, at inhibiting mild steel corrosion in the medium. However, adsorption isotherm modelling showed that the experimental gravimetric, experimental potentiodynamic and predicted potentiodynamic data exhibited agreements in following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. All the three data models indicated favourable adsorption and identified physisorption as the prevalent adsorption mechanism of Terminalia catappa leaf-extract on mild steel immersed in the 0.5 M HCl medium.

  7. Inhibition of steam-condensate corrosion of copper-based alloys by hydrazine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Breeze, G.A.; Berry, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    An experimental evaluation was made of the potential inhibiting effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of CDA 687 (aluminium brass), and CDA 706 (90 copper - 10 nickel) in a simulated steam condensate containing ammonia under deaerated and partially aerated conditions. It was found that hydrazine inhibited the corrosion of CDA 687 under deaerated conditions, but increased corrosion rates somewhat under partially aerated (1 ppM oxygen) conditions. Corrosion rates of CDA 706 were more than an order of magnitude lower than CDA 687 and were not measurably influenced by hydrazine.

  8. The long-term corrosion performance of Alloy 22 in heated brine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D. G.; Bryan, C. R.

    2015-02-13

    Long-term corrosion experiments have been performed on Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), in a series of heated brines formulated to represent evaporatively concentrated ground water, to evaluate the long-term corrosion performance of the material. These solutions included 0.5 M NaCl, in addition to two simulated concentrated ground water solutions. Under conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be passive, the corrosion rate was found to be vanishingly small (i.e., below the resolution of the weight-loss technique used to quantify corrosion in this study). However, under low pH conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be active, or more specifically, where the chromium oxide passive film was not thermodynamically stable, the corrosion rate was appreciable. Furthermore, under such conditions the corrosion rate was observed to be a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 72.9±1.8 kJ/mol. Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy analysis of the oxide layer revealed that, while sulfur was present within the oxide for all test conditions, no accumulation was observed at or near the metal/oxide interface. Furthermore, these observations confirm that inhibition of passive film formation via sulfur accumulation does not occur during the corrosion of Alloy 22.

  9. The long-term corrosion performance of Alloy 22 in heated brine solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Enos, D. G.; Bryan, C. R.

    2015-02-13

    Long-term corrosion experiments have been performed on Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), in a series of heated brines formulated to represent evaporatively concentrated ground water, to evaluate the long-term corrosion performance of the material. These solutions included 0.5 M NaCl, in addition to two simulated concentrated ground water solutions. Under conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be passive, the corrosion rate was found to be vanishingly small (i.e., below the resolution of the weight-loss technique used to quantify corrosion in this study). However, under low pH conditions where Alloy 22 was anticipated to be active, or more specifically, where themore » chromium oxide passive film was not thermodynamically stable, the corrosion rate was appreciable. Furthermore, under such conditions the corrosion rate was observed to be a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 72.9±1.8 kJ/mol. Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy analysis of the oxide layer revealed that, while sulfur was present within the oxide for all test conditions, no accumulation was observed at or near the metal/oxide interface. Furthermore, these observations confirm that inhibition of passive film formation via sulfur accumulation does not occur during the corrosion of Alloy 22.« less

  10. Durability and synergistic effects of KI on the acid corrosion inhibition of mild steel by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Arukalam, I O

    2014-11-04

    The performance of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) as safe corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in aerated 0.5M H2SO4 solution was appraised by weight loss, impedance and polarization measurements. Results indicate that HPMC functions as a good inhibitor in the studied environment and inhibition efficiency increased with increasing concentration of inhibitor and temperature. Time-dependent effect of the inhibition efficiency reveals that inhibition efficiency increased with time up to the fourth day after which it waned, but improved on addition of KI. The synergism parameter evaluated confirmed the synergistic effect of KI and HPMC. Impedance results clearly show that HPMC inhibited the corrosion reaction via adsorption onto the metal/solution interface following Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Polarization results indicate that HPMC acts as a mixed-type inhibitor with predominant cathodic effect. Theoretical study using density functional theory was employed to establish the correlation between the structure (molecular and electronic) and the inhibition efficiency.

  11. Corrosion performance of zinc coated steel in seawater environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuan; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Haichao; Sun, Huyuan; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    Considering the continuous exploitation of marine resources, it is very important to study the anticorrosion performance and durability of zinc coated streel (ZCS) because its increasing use as reinforcements in seawater. Tafel polarization curves and linear polarization curves combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to evaluate the corrosion performance of ZCS at Qingdao test station during long-term immersion in seawater. The results indicated that the corrosion rate of the ZCS increased obviously with immersion time in seawater. The corrosion products that formed on the zinc coated steel were loose and porous, and were mainly composed of Zn5(OH)8Cl2, Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2, and ZnO. Pitting corrosion occurred on the steel surface in neutral seawater, and the rate of ZCS corrosion decreased with increasing pH.

  12. Corrosion performance of zinc coated steel in seawater environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuan; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Haichao; Sun, Huyuan; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Considering the continuous exploitation of marine resources, it is very important to study the anticorrosion performance and durability of zinc coated streel (ZCS) because its increasing use as reinforcements in seawater. Tafel polarization curves and linear polarization curves combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to evaluate the corrosion performance of ZCS at Qingdao test station during long-term immersion in seawater. The results indicated that the corrosion rate of the ZCS increased obviously with immersion time in seawater. The corrosion products that formed on the zinc coated steel were loose and porous, and were mainly composed of Zn5(OH)8Cl2, Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2, and ZnO. Pitting corrosion occurred on the steel surface in neutral seawater, and the rate of ZCS corrosion decreased with increasing pH.

  13. Corrosion and corrosion inhibition of Al and some alloys in sulphate solutions containing halide ions investigated by an impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehim, Sayed S. Abdel; Hassan, Hamdi H.; Amin, Mohammed A.

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the results of impedance measurements on the corrosion behaviour of pure Al, (Al+6%Cu) and (Al+6%Si) alloys in Na 2SO 4 solutions in the absence and presence of NaCl, NaBr and NaI under the influence of various experimental variables at the open circuit potential (OCP). We find that in the absence of halide ions the rates of corrosion of the three Al samples are enhanced with increasing concentration, acidity, and alkalinity of the Na 2SO 4 solution and in the presence of halide ions. The corrosion resistance increases in the order Al<(Al+6%Cu)<(Al+6%Si). The aggressiveness of the halide ions towards the corrosion of Al and its two alloys increases in the order: I -
    corrosion inhibition of pure Al and its alloys in (0.5 M Na 2SO 4+0.2 M NaCl) solution (except NO 3-) are to inhibit the corrosion of the three samples to an extent depending on the nature of the inhibitor.

  14. Towards lightweight nanocomposite coatings for corrosion inhibition: Graphene, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured magnesium as case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert Vincent, III

    The field of nanocomposites is a burgeoning area of research due to the interest in the remarkable properties which can be achieved through their use in a variety of applications, including corrosion resistant coatings. Lightweighting is of increasing importance in the world today due to the ever growing push towards energy efficiency and the green movement and in recent years there has been a vast amount of research performed in the area of developing lightweight nanocomposites for corrosion inhibition. Many new composite materials have been developed through the use of newly developed nanomaterials (including carbonaceous and metallic constituents) and their specialized incorporation in the coating matrix materials. We start with a general review on the development of hybrid nanostructured composites for corrosion protection of base metals from a sustainability perspective in Chapter 1. This review demonstrates the ever swelling requirements for a paradigm shift in the way that we protect metals against corrosion due to the costs and environmental concerns that exist with currently used technology. In Chapter 2, we delve into the much required understanding of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to elucidate information about the electronic structure upon incorporation of nitrogen within the structure. For successful integration of the carbonaceous nanomaterials into a composite coating, a full swath of knowledge is necessary. Within this work we have shown that upon chemical defunctionalization of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide by means of hydrazine treatment, nitrogen is incorporated into the structure in the form of a pyrazole ring. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that by way of in situ polymerization, graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes can be incorporated within a polymer (polyetherimide, PEI) matrix. Two systems have been developed including graphene and

  15. Ion implantation for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloys in saline media

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M. ); Gonzales, A. ); Quintana, J. ); Lee, I.-S.; Buchanan, R.A. ); Burns, F.C.; Culbertson, R.J.; Levy, M. . Materials Technology Lab.); Treglio, J.R. (ISM

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ion implantation treatments on corrosion of 2014 and 1100 aluminum in saline media were investigated. Implanted ions were N, Si, Ti and Cr. Techniques included salt spray testing, electrochemical studies, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and profilometry. It was concluded that ion implantation of Cr is of potential practical benefit for corrosion inhibition of 2014 Al in salt environments. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Corrosion performance of alumina scales in coal gasification environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1997-02-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S and Cl as HCl. This paper examines the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys during exposure to O/S mixed-gas environments. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the pack-diffusion process, by the electrospark deposition process, or by weld overlay techniques.

  17. Corrosion inhibition of reinforcing steel by using acrylic latex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.X.; Lin, W.W.; Ceng, S.A.; Zhang, J.Q.

    1998-05-01

    Acrylic latex was introduced into steel-reinforcing steel concrete as concrete admixtures or rebar coatings in order to prevent corrosion of steel reinforcements. The results showed that applying the latex by both methods took effect in different ways, while the latter was more noticeable. The corrosion prevention mechanism and the surface state of the steel rebar were also explored, based on which suggestions for enhancing the corrosion-resistant ability were made.

  18. Mechanisms of corrosion inhibition of AA2024-T3 by vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannuzzi, Mariano

    This work presents studies on inhibition of Al alloy corrosion by vanadates. Vanadium speciation is very complicated and vital to the inhibition efficacy. Critical conditions for decavanadate polymerization from clear metavanadate solutions were investigated. Decavanadate only formed when metavanadate was added to solutions of pH 3 or less. It was not possible to change the pH of a metavanadate solution without forming decavanadates, creating an orange-colored electrolyte. According to 51V NMR, monovanadates were present only in clear metavanadate solutions; orange solutions always contained decavanadates and never contained monovanadates. Orange decavanadate solutions containing 0.5 M NaCl at pH 8.71 exhibited no significant inhibition of the oxygen reduction reaction and increasing decavanadate concentration was detrimental. In contrast, clear metavanadate solutions containing monovanadate exhibited strong inhibition of the oxygen reduction reaction, to a level similar to chromate. At a fixed pH, increased NaVO3 concentration in clear metavanadate solutions increased inhibition efficiency. Injection of decavanadate solution to the cathode side of a split cell or at controlled cathodic potential resulted in a current peak followed by a modest inhibition of the current. Integration of the current peaks suggested the formation of several monolayers of the reduced species, which could account for the poor corrosion performance. Morphology and kinetics of the attack at OCP were investigated by in situ AFM scratching. The results obtained by in situ AFM scratching confirmed the outstanding corrosion inhibition imparted by clear metavanadate solutions. Samples exposed to 0.1 M NaCl with no inhibitor developed a trench-like attack at the periphery of large Al-Cu-Fe-Mn-(Si) intermetallic phases after 18 minutes with a set point potential (SP) of 0.5 V. The same morphology was observed for scratched areas containing exclusively small S-phase particles. The presence of

  19. Mechanisms of Inhibition of Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, especially at temperatures above ambient. The presence of oxy-anions, especially nitrate, minimizes or eliminates the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to crevice corrosion. Other anions such as sulfate, carbonate and fluoride were also reported as inhibitors of crevice corrosion in Alloy 22. It is argued that the occurrence of crevice corrosion is due to the formation of hydrochloric acid solution in the creviced region. Inhibitors act by eliminating the occurrence of hydrochloric acid or by hampering its action. (author)

  20. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  1. Inhibition of the corrosion of steel in 1 M HCl by eugenol derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaieb, E.; Bouyanzer, A.; Hammouti, B.; Benkaddour, M.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of eugenol (Eug) and its derivative acetyleugenol (AcEug) extracted from the nail of giroflier on the corrosion of steel in molar hydrochloric acid has been studied using weight loss measurements, electrochemical polarisation and EIS methods. The naturally substances reduce the corrosion rate. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with acetyleugenol content to attain 91% at 0.1737 g/l. Eugenol compounds act as mixed type inhibitors. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behaviour of steel indicates that inhibition efficiency of the natural substance increases with the rise of temperature. The adsorption of natural product on the steel is found to follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  2. Inhibitive effects of palm kernel oil on carbon steel corrosion by alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, M. Y.; Othman, N. K.; Lazim, A. M.; Jalar, A.

    2013-11-01

    The behavior of carbon steel SAE 1045 in 1 M NaOH solution containing different concentrations of palm kernel oil (PKO) has been studied by weight loss and polarization measurement. Results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel in NaOH solution was considerably reduced in presence of such inhibitors. The inhibition efficiency increases when concentration of inhibitor increase. Maximum inhibition efficiency (≈ 96.67%) is obtained at PKO concentration 8 v/v %. This result revealed that palm kernel oil can act as a corrosion inhibitor in an alkaline medium. Corrosion rates of carbon steel decrease as the concentration of inhibitor is increased.

  3. C6H5NH2 effect on the corrosion inhibition of aluminium in 0.5 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Fademi, Ekundayo Oluwademilade Jacob; Oladipupo, Segun Isaac; Alabi, Ayomide Samuel; Ajibola, Omokolade Bamidele; Emelieze, Alex Nwabunor

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, C6H6NH2 (aniline) effect on the corrosion of aluminium in 0.5 M (i.e. mol/L) HCl medium was studied using gravimetric method by weight loss measurements and electrochemical technique of corrosion potential and potentiodynamic polarization by cyclic voltamery (CV) instrumentation. By these techniques, corrosion rate obtained from aluminium specimens, in 0.5 HCl test-solution having different concentrations of the hydrogen-containing C6H6NH2 chemical, were requisitely analysed. Results showed that the potentiodynamic corrosion rate excellently correlated (R = 98.94%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 97.89% and ANOVA p-value = 0.0314) with function of the gravimetric corrosion rate and C6H5NH2 concentration. Both experimental and correlated prediction models identified 0.043 mol/L C6H5NH2 with optimal inhibition efficiency performance η = 84.11% by the experimental or η = 81.15% by the predicted models. Fittings of experimental and correlated data showed the data models followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm from which favourable adsorption and prevalent physisorption were indicated as the C6H5NH2 corrosion-protection on aluminium metal in the 0.5 M HCl medium.

  4. Evaluation of corrosion in cracked high performance concrete exposed to a natural chloride environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Calvo, Herwing Zeth

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is the most serious maintenance concern facing the construction industry. Although several strategies, such as the use of corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) and supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) or the application of protective coatings either on the reinforcing steel or the concrete surface have been proposed to control this process, there are still several uncertainties about their effectiveness in cracked high performance concrete (HPC). In this research program, effects of corrosion in cracked HPC exposed to a chloride environment were evaluated. Three phases of investigation in the laboratory and in the field were developed. In the first phase, the effects of the addition of CIAs and SCMs on the compressive strength and certain durability properties of HPC were studied. In the second phase, the performance of CIAs alone or in combination with SCMs, a silane surface pre-treatment and five types of epoxy coated rebars in protecting steel in cracked HPC was evaluated. Finally, the third phase evaluated the effects of chloride-induced corrosion on the tensile properties of reinforcing bars in cracked HPC. Results demonstrated that the addition of CIAs alone or in combination with SCMs, was not detrimental to the HPC properties; in fact, their combination improved both the compressive strength and the durability properties of concrete. It also was found that HPC in its cracked state does not provide corrosion protection to the steel in a chloride environment even when CIAs and SCMs were used. Nevertheless, the combination of two or more corrosion mitigating strategies, selection of adequate water to cementitious materials ratio (w/cm), and an appropriate concrete cover were found to be relatively effective in controlling corrosion in cracked HPC, and thus effective in mitigating the effects of chloride-induced corrosion on the tensile properties of the steel.

  5. Temporary protection of metals against atmospheric corrosion by saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates. Mechanisms of inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Kapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.

    1998-12-31

    This work was devoted to the investigations of the ability of saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates to inhibit corrosion of mild steel and zinc in aerated aqueous solutions. Performances of inhibitors were shown to be dependent on their chain length, their concentration and the immersion duration. Both crystallographic parameters and solubilities of iron and zinc carboxylates were determined. Then potential-pH diagrams of iron and zinc in water were built taking the presence of metallic soaps into account. According to these diagrams, the passivation of metals was attributed to the growth of films containing metallic soaps. This model confirms that previously proposed for inhibition of copper and magnesium by the same carboxylates.

  6. Ph responsive capsules containing composite coatings for corrosion inhibition in metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Kiran Bhat

    Hexavalent chromes have been used as effective corrosion inhibitors due to their high inhibitor efficiency and low cost for the protection of several metal alloys. However, owing to their toxicity federal legislations restrict the use and distribution of these highly toxic materials. The need for an environmentally friendly yet effective alternative to the chrome based corrosion inhibitors has led to the investigation of rare earth metals as potential candidates. Cerium is one such rare earth metal that has received considerable attention as an alternative to hexavalent chromes. However, the high water solubility of some of the cerium salts makes it difficult for the incorporation of such salts in coatings. In this work, pH responsive microcapsules containing cerium salts were synthesized using an internally phase separated emulsion polymerization technique. Core shell microcapsule consisting of a water core containing dissolved cerium salts were synthesized. The synthesized capsules were characterized using characterization techniques such as Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The structure and morphology of the capsules were studied using electron microscopy techniques. The synthesized capsules were dispersed in 2K epoxy coatings and applied on aluminum alloy 2024 T-3 and cold rolled steel substrates. These coatings were exposed to salt spray (ASTM B117) and electrochemically evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentio-dynamic(PD) polarization, cyclic voltammetry(CV), open circuit potential(OCP) measurements. Localized corrosion assessment was also performed on the coated metal alloys using Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to understand the mechanism of corrosion inhibition using cerium encapsulated microcapsules.

  7. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  8. Correlation between electronic parameters and corrosion inhibition of benzothiazole derivatives- NMR parameters as important and neglected descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Forghani, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The relation between electronic properties and corrosion inhibitive performance of three benzothiazole derivatives 1,3-benzothiazol-2-amine (BTA), 6-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2-amine (MBTA) and 2-amino-1,3-benzthiazole-6-thiol (TBTA) has been investigated by density functional theory. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. The chemical shielding CS tensors were introduced as important and neglected descriptors to evaluate inhibitive efficiency of corrosion inhibitors. Nuclear independent chemical shift (NICS) components, as an aromaticity criterion, were also investigated as local descriptor. Polarizability and CS descriptors, as second rank tensors, show the best correlations with inhibition efficiencies of studied inhibitors.

  9. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by a copper-bearing 317L-Cu stainless steel and its corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Da; Xu, Dake; Yang, Chunguang; Chen, Jia; Shahzad, M Babar; Sun, Ziqing; Zhao, Jinlong; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the antibacterial performance, corrosion resistance and surface properties of antibacterial austenitic 317L-Cu stainless steel (317L-Cu SS). After 4.5wt% copper was added to 317L stainless steel (317L SS), the new alloy underwent solid solution and aging heat treatment. Fluorescent staining using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) revealed that the 317L-Cu SS showed strong antibacterial efficacy, achieving a 99% inhibition rate of sessile Staphylococcus aureus cells after 5days. The corrosion data obtained by potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that in comparison with 317L SS, the pitting potential and corrosion current density of 317L-Cu slightly decreased due to the addition of Cu. The 317L-Cu SS exhibited no cytotoxicity against zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The experimental results in this study demonstrated that the new alloy has potential applications in medical and daily uses.

  10. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  11. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  12. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  13. The corrosion inhibition of iron and aluminum by various naturally occurring biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hansen, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Biological polymers that exhibit a strong affinity for metal surfaces are increasingly becoming the focus of research toward the development of environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors. This paper deals with the use of various naturally occurring organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors for iron or aluminum. Among the organic molecules considered are catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores isolated from bacteria, the adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L, and caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. FTIR analysis, anodic polarization curves, and AC impedance measurements were used to determine the adsorption and effectiveness of the various organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors. Parabactin, a catecholate siderophore, was effective in inhibiting both the corrosion of iron in hydrochloric acid and the pitting of aluminum in 0.1 M sodium chloride. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel was also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  14. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; ...

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  15. High performance corrosion-resistant structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, F.B.; Ferry, B.N.; Beblo, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    A new corrosion-resistant structural steel named Duracorr was developed for low maintenance when compared to conventional structural steels. The new stainless steel is a dual phase composition between the established 12% Cr, ferritic T409 and martensitic T410 grades. Attractive combinations of hardness, strength, toughness, weldability and formability are derived from a microstructure that is a dual phase mixture of ferrite and martensite. The Duracorr composition, UNS S41003, provides for a microstructure of ferrite and austenite to be present throughout the hot rolling process. Cooling to room temperature causes transformation of the austenite to martensite. Subsequent tempering of the steel creates minimum mechanical properties of 275 MPa (40 ksi) yield strength and 455 MPa (66 ksi) tensile strength with room temperature longitudinal Charpy impact values typically greater than 34 J (25 ft-lbs).

  16. Corrosion Performance of Laser Posttreated Cold Sprayed Titanium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, T.; Hussain, T.; McCartney, D. G.; Shipway, P. H.

    2011-06-01

    The recent development of cold spray technology has made possible the deposition of highly reactive, oxygen sensitive materials, such as titanium, without significant chemical reaction of the powder, modification of particle microstructure and with minimal heating of the substrate. However, the presence of interconnected pathways (microscale porosity) within the deposit limits the performance of the metallic coating as an effective barrier to corrosion and substrate attack by corrosive media is usually inevitable. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of processing, including a postspray laser treatment, on the deposit microstructure and corrosion behavior. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) was deposited onto a carbon steel substrate, using a commercial cold spray system (CGTTM Kinetiks® 4000) with preheated nitrogen as both the main process gas and the powder carrier gas. Selected coatings were given a surface melting treatment using a commercial 2 kW CO2 laser (505 Trumpf DMD). The effect of postdeposition laser treatment on corrosion behavior was analyzed in terms of pore structure evolution and microstructural changes. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction were employed to examine the microstructural characteristics of the coatings. Their corrosion performance was investigated using electrochemical methods in 3.5 wt.% NaCl (ASTM G5-94 (2004)). As-sprayed titanium coatings could not provide favorable protection to the carbon steel substrate in the aerated NaCl solution, whereas the coatings with laser-treated surfaces provided barrier-like properties.

  17. What determines the inhibition effectiveness of ATA, BTAH, and BTAOH corrosion inhibitors on copper?

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton; Peljhan, Sebastijan; Finsgar, Matjaz; Milosev, Ingrid

    2010-11-24

    Three corrosion inhibitors for copper-3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA), benzotriazole (BTAH), and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (BTAOH)-were investigated by corrosion experiments and atomistic computer simulations. The trend of corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the three inhibitors on copper in near-neutral chloride solution is determined experimentally as BTAH ≳ ATA ≫ BTAOH. A careful analysis of the results of computer simulations based on density functional theory allowed to pinpoint the superior inhibiting action of BTAH and ATA as a result of their ability to form strong N-Cu chemical bonds in deprotonated form. While these bonds are not as strong as the Cl-Cu bonds, the presence of solvent favors the adsorption of inhibitor molecules onto the surface due to stronger solvation of the Cl(-) anions. Moreover, benzotriazole displays the largest affinity among the three inhibitors to form intermolecular aggregates, such as [BTA-Cu](n) polymeric complex. This is another factor contributing to the stability of the protective inhibitor film on the surface, thus making benzotriazole an outstanding corrosion inhibitor for copper. These findings cannot be anticipated on the basis of inhibitors' molecular electronic properties alone, thus emphasizing the importance of a rigorous modeling of the interactions between the components of the corrosion system in corrosion inhibition studies.

  18. Functionalization of Titanium Alloy Surface by Graphene Nanoplatelets and Metal Oxides: Corrosion Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Aarik, Lauri; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Niilisk, Ahti; Mändar, Hugo; Mäeorg, Uno; Simões, Alda; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Corrosion inhibition of metallic substrates is an important and crucial step for great economical as well as environmental savings. In this paper, we introduce an extra thin effective corrosion inhibitive material having layered structure designed for protection and functionalization of Ti Grade 5 alloy substrates. The coating consists of a first layer made of thin graphene nanoplatelets, on top of which a multilayer Al2O3 and TiO2 films is applied by low-temperature atomic layer deposition. The amorphous structure of the metal oxide films was confirmed by micro-Raman and X-ray diffraction analysis. Corrosion inhibition ability of the prepared coatings was analyzed by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic plot and by voltammetric analysis, in aqueous potassium bromide solution. The open circuit potential of the graphene-metal oxide coated substrate showed much passive nature than bare substrate or graphene coated or only metal oxide coated substrates. The localized corrosion potential of the graphene-metal oxide coated, only metal oxide coated, and bare substrates were found 5.5, 3.0, and 1.1 V, respectively. In addition, corrosion current density values of the graphene-metal oxide and only metal oxide coated substrates showed much more passive nature than the bare and graphene coated substrates. Long immersion test in the salt solution further clarified the effective corrosion inhibition of the graphene-metal oxide coated substrate. The analyzed results reflect that the graphene-metal oxide films can be used to prepare better and effective corrosion inhibition coatings for the Ti Grade 5 alloy to increase their lifetime.

  19. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  20. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in single- and multioxidant environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1998-06-22

    Iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to their strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures through the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Even though these intermetallics develop protective oxide scales in single-oxidant environments, the simultaneous presence of several reactants in the environment (typical of practical systems) can lead to development of oxide scales that are nonprotective and that undergo breakaway corrosion, or to nonoxide scales that are detrimental to the performance of the underlying alloy. This paper describes the corrosion performance of Fe-Al intermetallics in environments that contain sulfur, carbon, chlorine, and oxygen and that are typical of fossil energy systems. Emphasis is on mechanisms of scale development and breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, and approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics to improve their corrosion resistance.

  1. Properties of bacterial corrosion of stainless steel and its inhibition by protamine coating.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoshinobu; Yamada, Kaoru; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Tsuchido, Tetsuaki

    2007-03-01

    We investigated characteristics of the corrosion of stainless steel specimens by bacteria and the effects of using antimicrobial coating on the surface for inhibiting corrosion. Bacillus sp. 2-A and Staphylococcus sp. 2-1 cells adhered tightly to a stainless steel SUS304 specimen, formed a microcolony or biofilm, and had highly corrosive activities. Microbially influenced corrosion (MC) was observed under or around adhering cells. However, dead cells were markedly less active than viable cells not only in corroding the specimen but also in adhering to its surface. The culture supernatant was not able to induce the corrosion of SUS304 effectively. A protamine coating on the specimen killed bacterial cells only on its surface, interfered with cell adhesion, and inhibited MC. From these results, adhesion of viable cells to the surface of a SUS304 specimen led to the outbreak of MC. Protamine was also found to be an effective substance tested for protecting the specimen from both cell adhesion and surface MC. We suggest that a protamine coating can be applied as a convenient and inexpensive corrosion prevention method.

  2. On-demand release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from amorphous Al-Co-Ce alloys.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M A; Scully, J R

    2005-09-01

    Controlled release technologies are often used to supply chemicals or drugs at given rates. Release often occurs on contact with solution. However, some applications, such as corrosion protection, require containment of the active species in a reservoir and their slow release when needed. Conductive polymers have been used as reservoirs for corrosion inhibitors whose triggered release occurs by galvanic reduction or ion exchange. This work shows one of the first examples of pH-controlled release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from an amorphous metallic coating where the pH change that triggers release is a consequence of the onset of corrosion. This corrosion-inhibition strategy provides further corrosion protection beyond the traditional roles of barrier and sacrificial cathodic protection using a metal coating. For instance, zinc galvanizing provides sacrificial cathodic protection and acts as a barrier, but does not supply inhibitor ions. In the coating described here, protection of an underlying structural alloy exposed at coating defects is demonstrated by inhibitor ion release in addition to barrier function and sacrificial cathodic protection.

  3. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hermer, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied via crevice flushing, low power soaks, on-line, or using a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and how it should be correctly applied. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. This document has been prepared to be a comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. 49 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  5. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  6. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements.

    PubMed

    Nehm, F; Müller-Meskamp, L; Klumbies, H; Leo, K

    2015-12-01

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10(-5) g(H2O)/m(2)/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  7. The Inhibition of Vapor-Phase Corrosion. A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    hexamethylenetetramine (49) were found to provide good protection of ferrous metals, but these compounds attack amphoteric nonferrous metals such as zinc... hexamethylenetetramine (49) on iron, iron alloys, and aluminum in humid environments. They suggested that corrosion 1 iL protection is based upon the following... hexamethylenetetramine (49) and sodium nitrite at a molar ratio of 1:4. Binders used with this system included milk casein and gum arabic. These

  8. Corrosion inhibition in 2.0 M sulfuric acid solutions of high strength maraging steel by aminophenyl tetrazole as a corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.

    2014-02-01

    The corrosion of high strength maraging steel after varied immersion times in concentrated solution, 2.0 M, of sulfuric acid has been investigated. The work was also extended to study the effect of 5-(3-aminophenyl)-tetrazole (APTA) on the inhibition of the steel corrosion. The study has been carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) investigations. EIS spectra showed that the corrosion and polarization resistances decrease with increasing the immersion time of the steel before measurement and increase in the presence of APTA and the increase of its concentration. Polarization data agreed with the EIS measurements and indicated that the increase of immersion time increases the corrosion of steel by increasing its corrosion current and corrosion rate and lowering its polarization resistance. On the other hand, the addition of APTA and the increase of its concentration minimized the corrosion of steel through decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate and increasing the polarization resistance at all exposure test periods. SEM and EDX investigations confirmed that the inhibition of the maraging steel in the 2.0 M H2SO4 solutions is achieved via the adsorption of the APTA molecules onto the steel protecting its surface from being dissolved easily.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-01-01

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results. PMID:27515383

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B; Ebenso, Eno E

    2016-08-12

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results.

  11. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-08-01

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results.

  12. Corrosion inhibition by inorganic cationic inhibitors on the high strength alumunium alloy, 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukuri, Anusha

    The toxicity and carcinogenic nature of chromates has led to the investigation of environmentally friendly compounds that offer good corrosion resistance to AA 2024-T3. Among the candidate inhibitors are rare earth metal cationic (REM) and zinc compounds, which have received much of attention over the past two decades. A comparative study on the corrosion inhibition caused by rare earth metal cations, Ce3+, Pr3+, La3+ and Zn2+ cations on the alloy was done. Cathodic polarization showed that these inhibitor ions suppress the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to varying extents with Zn2+ providing the best inhibition. Pr3+ exhibited windows of concentration (100-300 ppm) in which the corrosion rate is minimum; similar to the Ce3+ cation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies showed that the mechanism of inhibition of the Pr3+ ion is also similar to that of the Ce3+ ion. Potentiodynamic polarization experiments after 30 min immersion time showed greatest suppression of oxygen reduction reaction in neutral chloride solutions (pH 7), which reached a maximum at a Zn2+ ion concentration of 5 mM. Anodic polarization experiments after 30 min immersion time, showed no anodic inhibition by the inhibitor in any concentration (0.1 mM - 10 mM) and at any pH. However, anodic polarization of samples immersed after longer immersion times (upto 4 days) in mildly acidic Zn2+ (pH 4) solutions showed significant reduction in anodic kinetics indicating that zinc also acts as a “slow anodic inhibitor”. In contrast to the polarization experiments, coupons exposed to inhibited acidic solutions at pH 4 showed complete suppression of dissolution of Al2CuMg particles compared to zinc-free solutions in the SEM studies. Samples exposed in pH 4 Zn2+-bearing solution exhibited highest polarization resistance which was also observed to increase with time. In deaerated solutions, the inhibition by Zn2+ at pH 4 is not observed as strongly. The ability to make the interfacial electrolyte

  13. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  14. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-05

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction.

  15. Organic-inorganic nanosystems designed for multiple metal corrosion inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockley, Robert

    This research focuses on the refinement and discovery of environmentally friendly coatings of metals with increased durability and longer lifetimes as the goal. In the pursuit of an ideal, such as environmentally friendly coatings or "green chemistry," there are many obstacles that must be overcome. This is particularly true in the case of protecting magnesium and its alloys. The relatively low open circuit potential of magnesium makes it highly susceptible to galvanic corrosion when in contact with other metals. It is also easily oxidized when exposed to air or humid conditions and forms a loose hydroxide/oxide layer (Mg(OH)2/MgO). However, for all of its problems, the advantages to using magnesium far outweigh the disadvantages; if and only if, its natural tendency to corrode can be adequately controlled. Magnesium has a high strength to weight ratio, similar to that of glass, making it ideal for a vast array of commercial applications. Magnesium has a high electromagnetic shielding effect (-52.34 dB at 2.45/ GHz for AZ31), making it applicable not only to aircraft instrumentation, but structure as well, due to its low density (d = 1.48 g/cm3). The list of applications for magnesium and its alloys is extensive. Our research has provided insights into the prevention of magnesium corrosion and the applications of "green chemistry" to a metal used across a multitude of industries. Specifically, excellent results were obtained for the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of LZ91 (magnesium alloy) which demonstrated an impedance of 1.0 x 1010 Ohms to 1.0 x 1011 Ohms. These results suggest our coatings display a pure capacitance behavior in the Bode plot. According to ASTM B117 testing (salt fog testing) the coating on LZ91 panels reached 120 hours, a period considered to be the equivalent of five years of real world conditions, without appreciable corrosion. The possible mechanism for this corrosion protection will also be discussed. These advancements are

  16. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with improved corrosion inhibition on 6061 aluminum alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Guo, Zheng; Shi, Tian; Yu, Jingui; Tang, Mingkai; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-07-01

    This work has developed a simple and low-cost method to render 6061 aluminum alloy surface superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion inhibition. The superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface has been fabricated by hydrochloric acid etching, potassium permanganate passivation and fluoroalkyl-silane modification. Meanwhile, the effect of the etching and passivation time on the wettability and corrosion inhibition of the fabricated surface has also been investigated. Results show that with the etching time of 6 min and passivation time of 180 min the fabricated micro/nano-scale terrace-like hierarchical structures accompanying with the nanoscale coral-like network bulge structures after being modified can result in superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA) of 155.7°. Moreover, an extremely weak adhesive force to droplets as well as an outstanding self-cleaning behavior of the superhydrophobic surface has also been proved. Finally, corrosion inhibition in seawater of the as-prepared aluminum alloy surface is characterized by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Evidently, the fabricated superhydrophobic surface attained an improved corrosion inhibition efficiency of 83.37% compared with the traditional two-step processing consisting of etching and modification, which will extend the further applications of aluminum alloy especially in marine engineering fields.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of tinplate cans in contact with tomato purée and protective (inhibiting) substances.

    PubMed

    Nincević Grassino, A; Grabarić, Z; Pezzani, A; Squitieri, G; Fasanaro, G; Impembo, M

    2009-11-01

    The dissolution of iron and tin from tinplate cans filled with tomato purée (pH 4.34) and dioctyl sebacate oil (DOS), essential onion oil (EOO) or potassium nitrate was studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), while nitrate was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximum values found in cans were up to 284 mg kg(-1) for tin and 513 mg kg(-1) for iron at elevated storage temperature. Results indicated that the addition of EOO to tomato purée prevents the corrosion process in the case of tin, where concentrations were lowered from 223 to 28 mg kg(-1) for cans with DOS oil and EOO at 20 degrees C, respectively (inhibition rate of 87%). On the other hand, the presence of EOO enhanced the corrosion process for iron increasing the concentration from 15 to 46 mg kg(-1) during 7 months of storage, although this value did not exceed maximum permitted value (50 mg kg(-1)). In cans with tomato purée and potassium nitrate, dissolution of tin started after 30 (36 degrees C) and 60 (20 degrees C) days of storage as a consequence of nitrate action, which act as a corrosion accelerator. Since the addition of EOO improves the taste of canned tomato purée, its potential use as a corrosion inhibitor would be of interest.

  18. Inhibition of Chloride Induced Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22 by Fluoride Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions under aggressive environmental conditions. The effect of the fluoride (F{sup -}) over the crevice corrosion induced by chloride ions is still not well established. The objective of the present work was to explore the crevice corrosion resistance of this alloy to different mixtures of fluorides and chlorides. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) tests were conducted in deaerated aqueous solutions of pure halide ions and also in different mixtures of chloride and fluoride at 90 C and pH 6. The range of chloride concentration [Cl{sup -}] was 0.001 M {le} [Cl{sup -}] {le} 1 M and the range of molar fluoride to chloride ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] was 0.1 {le} [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] {le} 10. Results showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion in all the pure chloride solutions but not in the pure fluoride solutions. Fluoride ions showed an inhibitor behavior only in mixtures with a molar ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] > 2. For mixtures with a molar ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] of 7 and 10 the inhibition of crevice corrosion was complete.

  19. Mechanism of acid corrosion inhibition using magnetic nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Jauhari, Smita; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition effect of magnetic nanofluid on carbon steel in acid solutions was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic and SEM measurement. The inhibition efficiency increases up to 95% and 75% for 51.7 mM concentration, respectively, in 1 M HCl and 1 M H2SO4 medium. The adsorption of nanoparticles to the steel surface forms a barrier between the metal and the aggressive environment, which is responsible for observed inhibition action. The adsorption of nanoparticles on steel surface is supported by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm and surface morphology scanned through SEM.

  20. Corrosion Inhibitive Evaluation of an Environmentally Friendly Water-Base Acrylic Terpolymer on Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azghandi, Mojtaba Vakili; Davoodi, Ali; Farzi, Gholam Ali; Kosari, Ali

    2013-12-01

    The corrosion inhibitive performance of an environmentally friendly water-base acrylic terpolymer [methyl methacrylate/Butyl Acrylate/Acrylic acid (ATP)] on mild steel in 1 M HCl was investigated by alternating current and direct current electrochemical techniques and the quantum chemical method. An efficiency of more than 97 pct was obtained with 0.8 mmol/L ATP. The increase in inhibitor concentration and immersion time has a positive effect, while the temperature influence is negligible on the inhibitor efficiency. The present terpolymer obeys the Langmuir isotherm, and thermodynamic calculation reveals a chemisorption type on the surface. Density functional calculations showed that the lone pairs of electrons of oxygen in the structure of three monomers are suitable sites to adsorb onto the metal surface. Finally, in the presence of ATP, a decrease in surface roughness and corrosion attacks was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy examinations, respectively.

  1. A DFT study of pyrazine derivatives and their Fe complexes in corrosion inhibition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Momeni, Mohammad Jafar; Manzetti, Sergio; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Obot, I. B.; Yousefvand, Mostafa; Morteza Mousavi-Khoshdel, S.

    2015-04-01

    The DFT/B3LYP calculations were applied to investigate the relationship between electronic properties and corrosion inhibition efficiency of three pyrazine derivatives, 2-methylpyrazine (MP), 2-aminopyrazine (AP) and 2-amino-5-bromopyrazine (ABP). To take into account the solution acidity in experimental conditions, all possible mono-protonated forms, that is protonation at N1, N4 and NH2 sites, as well as the non-protonated form were considered. The molecular orbital analysis showed a good correlation between EHOMO, ELUMO and ΔE (EHOMO - ELUMO) with inhibition efficiency of the three pyrazine derivatives. Four types of interactions between iron and pyrazine molecules, i.e. Fe-π, Fe-N1, Fe-N4 and Fe-NH2 were included in the calculations. As a new approach to this system, inhibition mechanism of the three pyrazine molecules has been discussed in detail based on these four types of interactions. It was found that all four interactions are energetically important. The flat pyrazine ring was substantially deformed followed by a Fe-π interaction. The calculated binding energy of ABP in all forms was found to be higher than two other pyrazines, which is consistent with experimentally observed highest corrosion inhibition efficiency. The lack of Fe-NH2 interaction for MP molecule seems to be the reason for its lower corrosion inhibition efficiency.

  2. Inhibition and promotion of copper corrosion by CTAB in a microreactor system.

    PubMed

    Murira, Caroline M; Punckt, Christian; Schniepp, Hannes C; Khusid, Boris; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2008-12-16

    We report on an optical microscopy technique for the analysis of corrosion kinetics of metal thin films in microreactor systems and use it to study the role of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant as a corrosion inhibitor in a copper-gold galvanic coplanar microsystem. A minimum in the dissolution rate of copper is observed when the surfactant concentration is approximately 0.8 mM. To explain why the inhibitory role of the surfactant does not extend to higher concentrations, we use zero resistance ammetry with separated half cells and show that while the surfactant inhibits cathodic reactions on gold, it also promotes the corrosion of copper because of the catalytic action of bromide counterions. These two competing processes lead to the observed minimum in the dissolution rate.

  3. Corrosion inhibition of aminated hydroxyl ethyl cellulose on mild steel in acidic condition.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Y; Meenakshi, S; Sairam Sundaram, C

    2016-10-05

    Aminated hydroxyethyl cellulose (AHEC) was synthesized, characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the corrosion inhibition of AHEC on mild steel in 1M HCl was studied using chemical and electrochemical studies. Results obtained in weight loss method showed that inhibition efficiency increased with increase in concentration of AHEC. The adsorption of the inhibitor on metal surface followed Frumkin isotherm. Polarization studies revealed that the AHEC inhibits through mixed mode. Thermodynamic parameters and activation energy were calculated and discussed. FTIR and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD) confirmed the adsorption of the inhibitor. The surface morphology was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  4. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  5. Corrosion of copper in aerated synthetic sea water solutions and its inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Sherif, El-Sayed M; Erasmus, R M; Comins, J D

    2007-05-15

    Corrosion of copper in aerated synthetic sea water (3.5% NaCl) solutions and its inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA) have been studied using electrochemical, gravimetric, and pH measurements, along with Raman spectroscopy. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the presence of ATA and the increase of its concentration suppress the corrosion process on the copper surface. This effect decreases cathodic, anodic, and corrosion (jcorr) currents and corrosion rates (Kcorr), while increasing polarization resistance (Rp), surface coverage (theta), and inhibition efficiency (IE%). Weight loss measurements indicated that the dissolution of copper and the accompanying change of pH decreased to a minimum even after 24 days immersion due to the presence of ATA and the increase of its concentration. Raman investigations revealed that the inhibition of copper corrosion is achieved by strong adsorption of ATA molecules onto the copper surface, preventing it from being corroded easily.

  6. Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel pipelines by some novel Schiff base compounds during acidizing treatment of oil wells studied by electrochemical and quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Lateef, Hany M.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Mohamed, Mounir A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Three novel Schiff bases compounds were prepared and their structures were characterized by X-ray, 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR, mass, UV-Vis, FT-IR, spectral data and elemental analyses. The corrosion inhibition of the investigated inhibitors towards carbon steel in 15% HCl was investigated by using electrochemical measurements (EIS, LPR corrosion rate and Tafel plots), SEM, EDX and quantum chemical methods. The results showed that, the inhibitors are efficient mixed type corrosion inhibitors, and their inhibition performance increased with the rise of inhibitor concentration and temperature. The adsorption of the inhibitors on steel surface was found to obey Langmuir's adsorption isotherm and chemisorption. Quantum chemical calculations provide good support to empirical results.

  7. Modeling corrosion inhibition efficacy of small organic molecules as non-toxic chromate alternatives using comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA).

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Breedon, Michael; Cole, Ivan S; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally many structural alloys are protected by primer coatings loaded with corrosion inhibiting additives. Strontium Chromate (or other chromates) have been shown to be extremely effectively inhibitors, and find extensive use in protective primer formulations. Unfortunately, hexavalent chromium which imbues these coatings with their corrosion inhibiting properties is also highly toxic, and their use is being increasingly restricted by legislation. In this work we explore a novel tridimensional Quantitative-Structure Property Relationship (3D-QSPR) approach, comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA), which was developed to recognize "high-performing" corrosion inhibitor candidates from the distributions of electronegativity, polarizability and van der Waals volume on the molecular surfaces of 28 small organic molecules. Multivariate statistical analysis identified five prototypes molecules, which are capable of explaining 71% of the variance within the inhibitor data set; whilst a further five molecules were also identified as archetypes, describing 75% of data variance. All active corrosion inhibitors, at a 80% threshold, were successfully recognized by the CoMSA model with adequate specificity and precision higher than 70% and 60%, respectively. The model was also capable of identifying structural patterns, that revealed reasonable starting points for where structural changes may augment corrosion inhibition efficacy. The presented methodology can be applied to other functional molecules and extended to cover structure-activity studies in a diverse range of areas such as drug design and novel material discovery.

  8. Inhibition of corrosion during autoclave sterilization of carbon steel dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, R L; Hurst, V

    1978-10-01

    Comparisons were made of several dip-applied corrosion inhibitors for protection of carbon steel dental instruments during autoclaving. Although none were totally effective, several provided significant corrosion inhibition. Sodium nitrite and one proprietary inhibitor were about equally effective and notably superior to the other inhibitors investigated. Because sodium nitrite is a food preservative that is relatively harmless when ingested in small quantities, whereas commercial inhibitors are of proprietary composition and unspecified toxicity, we prefer to use sodium nitrite for corrosion inhibition during autoclaving. Sodium nitritie is readily available from chemical suppliers and is generally much less expensive than most commercial inhibitors. Although the autoclave used in this investigation is typical of many used in clinical situations, minor variations in design, steam impurities, and other unknown factors might effect the results. Further research is needed to determine the corrosive effects of impurities in the steam supply, residual detergents, method of postautoclave drying, steam supply deoxygenation, pH, and possibly the use of oxygen scavengers within the autoclave.

  9. Hydroxyl carboxylate based non-phosphorus corrosion inhibition process for reclaimed water pipeline and downstream recirculating cooling water system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Dong; Hou, Deyin

    2016-01-01

    A combined process was developed to inhibit the corrosion both in the pipeline of reclaimed water supplies (PRWS) and in downstream recirculating cooling water systems (RCWS) using the reclaimed water as makeup. Hydroxyl carboxylate-based corrosion inhibitors (e.g., gluconate, citrate, tartrate) and zinc sulfate heptahydrate, which provided Zn(2+) as a synergistic corrosion inhibition additive, were added prior to the PRWS when the phosphate (which could be utilized as a corrosion inhibitor) content in the reclaimed water was below 1.7 mg/L, and no additional corrosion inhibitors were required for the downstream RCWS. Satisfactory corrosion inhibition was achieved even if the RCWS was operated under the condition of high numbers of concentration cycles. The corrosion inhibition requirement was also met by the appropriate combination of PO4(3-) and Zn(2+) when the phosphate content in the reclaimed water was more than 1.7 mg/L. The process integrated not only water reclamation and reuse, and the operation of a highly concentrated RCWS, but also the comprehensive utilization of phosphate in reclaimed water and the application of non-phosphorus corrosion inhibitors. The proposed process reduced the operating cost of the PRWS and the RCWS, and lowered the environmental hazard caused by the excessive discharge of phosphate. Furthermore, larger amounts of water resources could be conserved as a result.

  10. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-04-26

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, < 15 nm, making up about 70% of the goethite. The nanophase goethite is basically undetected by X-ray diffraction. In the presence of high time-of-wetness, >40%, or infrequent drying cycles (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina.

  11. Corrosion inhibition of rapidly solidified Mg-3% Zn-15% Al magnesium alloy with sodium carboxylates

    SciTech Connect

    Daloz, D.; Michot, G.; Rapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.

    1998-06-01

    The ability of sodium linear-saturated carboxylates to protect magnesium alloys against aqueous corrosion was characterized. Electrochemical measurements of polarization resistance and corrosion current showed the inhibition efficiency of these compounds is a function of their concentration and of the length of the aliphatic chain. In every case studied, the efficiency increased with immersion time. At pH 8, the best inhibiting behavior was observed with 0.05 M sodium undecanoate. The potential-pH diagram of magnesium in an aqueous solution containing undecanoate anions was generated based upon the solubility determined for magnesium undecanoate (Mg[CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 9}COO]{sub 2}). According to this diagram, the very low corrosion rate was suspected to result from formation of Mg(CH{sub 3}[CH{sub 2}]{sub 9}COO){sub 2}. Infrared spectrometry carried out on both the synthesized magnesium carboxylate and the product from the magnesium alloy surface after inhibitive treatment confirmed this hypothesis.

  12. Superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surface by electrodeposition on magnesium alloy substrate: Wettability and corrosion inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Shuyi; Wang, Yaming; Wang, Huiyuan; Gao, Ke; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2016-09-15

    Superamphiphobic (both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic) surfaces have attracted great interests in the fundamental research and practical application. This research successfully fabricated the superamphiphobic surfaces by combining the nickel plating process and modification with perfluorocaprylic acid. The cooperation of hierarchical micro-nano structures and perfluorocaprylic acid with low surface energy plays an important role in the formation of superamphiphobic surfaces. The contact angles of water/oil have reached up to 160.2±1°/152.4±1°, respectively. Contrast with bare substrate, the electrochemical measurements of superamphiphobic surfaces, not only the EIS measurement, but also potentiodynamic polarization curves, all revealed that, the surface corrosion inhibition was improved significantly. Moreover, superamphiphobic surfaces exhibited superior stability in the solutions with a large pH range, also could maintain excellent performance after storing for a long time in the air. This method is easy, feasible and effective, and could be used to fabricate large-area mutli-functional surface. Such a technique will develop a new approach to fabricate superamphiphobic surfaces on different engineering materials.

  13. Corrosion inhibition and adsorption behavior of methionine on mild steel in sulfuric acid and synergistic effect of iodide ion.

    PubMed

    Oguzie, E E; Li, Y; Wang, F H

    2007-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in sulfuric acid by methionine (MTI) was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The effect of KI additives on corrosion inhibition efficiency was also studied. The results reveal that MTI inhibited the corrosion reaction by adsorption onto the metal/solution interface. Inhibition efficiency increased with MTI concentration and synergistically increased in the presence of KI, with an optimum [KI]/[MTI] ratio of 5/5, due to stabilization of adsorbed MTI cations as revealed by AFM surface morphological images. Potentiodynamic polarization data suggest that the compound functioned via a mixed-inhibition mechanism. This observation was further corroborated by the fit of the experimental adsorption data to the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms. The inhibition mechanism has been discussed vis-à-vis the presence of both nitrogen and sulfur atoms in the MTI molecule.

  14. Mentha pulegium extract as a natural product for the inhibition of corrosion. Part I: electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Abdelkader; Khelifa, Abdellah; Boutoumi, Hocine; Hammouti, Belkheir

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Mentha pulegium extract (MPE) on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition efficiency of MPE was found to increase with the concentration and reached 88% at 33% (v/v). Polarisation measurements show that the natural extract acted as a mixed inhibitor. The remarkable inhibition efficiency of MPE was discussed in terms of blocking of electrode surface by adsorption of inhibitor molecules through active centres. The adsorption of MPE was found to accord with the Temkin isotherm.

  15. Synergistic Inhibition Effect of Zinc Acetylacetonate and Benzothiazole in Epoxy Coating on the Corrosion of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoozadeh, S. M.; Mahdavian, M.

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of zinc acetylacetonate (ZAA) and benzothiazole (BTH) mixture was evaluated for mild steel in 3.5% NaCl solution. To this end, ZAA:BTH mixtures ranged from 6:1 to 1:6 mol ratios were examined by weight loss and open circuit potential to obtain optimal mole ratio. The optimal mixture of ZAA:BTH at 1:5 mol ratio showed a significant corrosion inhibition efficiency proved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization studies. The addition of the optimal mixture of ZAA:BTH to epoxy coating showed a considerable increase of corrosion protection evaluated by salt spray exposure.

  16. Understanding corrosion inhibition with van der Waals DFT methods: the case of benzotriazole.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion of materials is an undesirable and costly process affecting many areas of technology and everyday life. As such, considerable effort has gone into understanding and preventing it. Organic molecule based coatings can in certain circumstances act as effective corrosion inhibitors. Although they have been used to great effect for more than sixty years, how they function at the atomic-level is still a matter of debate. In this work, computer simulation approaches based on density functional theory are used to investigate benzotriazole (BTAH), one of the most widely used and studied corrosion inhibitors for copper. In particular, the structures formed by protonated and deprotonated BTAH molecules on Cu(111) have been determined and linked to their inhibiting properties. It is found that hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interactions and steric repulsions all contribute in shaping how BTAH molecules adsorb, with flat-lying structures preferred at low coverage and upright configurations preferred at high coverage. The interaction of the dehydrogenated benzotriazole molecule (BTA) with the copper surface is instead dominated by strong chemisorption via the azole moiety with the aid of copper adatoms. Structures of dimers or chains are found to be the most stable structures at all coverages, in good agreement with scanning tunnelling microscopy results. Benzotriazole thus shows a complex phase behaviour in which van der Waals forces play an important role and which depends on coverage and on its protonation state and all of these factors feasibly contribute to its effectiveness as a corrosion inhibitor.

  17. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nehm, F. Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K.

    2015-12-15

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10{sup −5} g(H{sub 2}O)/m{sup 2}/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  18. The application of ion-exchanged clay as corrosion inhibiting pigments in organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrisanti, Santi

    High strength aluminum alloys are used in aerospace industry and are normally coated to prevent corrosion. The corrosion protection of the coatings is mainly provided by pigmented-primer layer. Strontium chromate pigments are widely used, but they are toxic and carcinogenic. The objective of the current study is to develop and characterize the ion exchange compounds bentonite and hydrotalcite as corrosion inhibiting pigments. These compounds were synthesized with different cations and anions, and were used either alone or in mixtures as particulate additive in organic coatings. In coating applications as well as bulk solution, the inhibitor release mechanism is based on ion exchange. To evaluate corrosion inhibition, pigments extract solutions were used in potentiodynamic polarization as well as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments on bare aluminum alloy 2024-T3. Cathodic polarization showed that zinc- and cerium-containing filtrate solutions modestly inhibited cathodic current density. These solutions also decreased the extent of pitting damage formed on the surface, as compared to uninhibited 0.5 M NaCl solution. Pigments were also added as primer additives, and painted on AA2024-T3. The coated panels were then subjected to salt spray exposure testing. The possibility of sensing inhibitor exhaustion by means of X-ray diffraction interrogation of the pigment in a coating is demonstrated and discussed on cerium bentonite-pigmented coatings. Although cerium bentonite-pigmented coatings did not show behavior indicative of self-healing, the combination of bentonite and hydrotalcite that released Ce3+, Zn 2+, and PO43- showed potent scribe protection even after 3000 h exposure in salt spray. Promising self-healing was also demonstrated by pigments that consisted of decavanadate-hydrotalcite and zinc pyrovanadate, as indicated by a shiny scribed area after 1000h exposure in salt spray. When these pigments are used, blistering is minimized.

  19. Review of Corrosion Inhibition in High Level Radioactive Waste Tanks in the DOE Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2004-03-08

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The waste tanks store supernatant liquid salts, consisting primarily of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium hydroxide, and sludge. An assessment of the potential degradation mechanisms of the high level waste (HLW) tanks determined that nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking were the two most significant degradation mechanisms. Controls on the solution chemistry (minimum nitrite and hydroxide concentrations) are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the tanks. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Addison, Owen; Baker, Stephen J; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4–7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo. PMID:25634122

  1. Studies on the Inhibition of Mild Steel Corrosion by Rauvolfia serpentina in Acid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothi Raja, P.; Sethuraman, M. G.

    2010-07-01

    Alkaloid extract of Rauvolfia serpentina was tested as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 using weight loss method at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313, and 323 K, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. It is evident from the results of this study that R. serpentina effectively inhibits the corrosion in both the acids through adsorption process following Tempkin adsorption isotherm. The protection efficiency increased with increase in inhibitor concentration and temperature. Free energy of adsorption calculated from the temperature studies also revealed the chemisorption. The mixed mode of action exhibited by the inhibitor was confirmed by the polarization studies while SEM analysis substantiated the formation of protective layer over the mild steel surface.

  2. Hydroxide nanoparticles for deacidification and concomitant inhibition of iron-gall ink corrosion of paper.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Giovanna; Giorgi, Rodorico; Toccafondi, Nicola; Katzur, Verena; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-12-21

    This Article reports an investigation on the use of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in alcohols to inhibit two different and synergistic degradation processes usually affecting historically valuable manuscripts and, more generally, paper documents. We show that the preservation of paper from acid hydrolysis and oxidative ink corrosion can be achieved by stabilizing the final pH of deacidified paper around 6.5 to 7.5. Reactive magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution, obtained by using a novel synthetic procedure, are very efficient in controlling paper's pH to avoid further degradation of cellulose from acid hydrolysis, oxidative ink corrosion, or both. The deacidification and antioxidant actions of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles are compared with magnesium oxide particles present in one of the best mass deacidification methods (Bookkeeper).

  3. Inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols for corrosion and freeze protection in water-based HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roo, A.M. de; Lee, B.W.

    1997-12-31

    Industrially inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols are used extensively to provide protection against equipment damage due to corrosion and freezing. This paper will describe the proper use of these glycols, including system preparation, fluid installation, and fluid maintenance. The impact of the use of these glycols on the operation of the system is discussed along with methods for overcoming any declines in heat transfer. From this discussion, it will become clear why automotive antifreeze formulations should not be used in heating, ventilating, and airconditioning (HVAC) systems. Also included are data on the physical properties of aqueous solutions of ethylene and propylene glycol, the concept of burst vs. freeze protection, typical results of corrosion tests, and methods to use to monitor the fluid for each application.

  4. [Influence of EPS on silicate corrosion inhibition for copper pipe in soft water].

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin

    2008-10-01

    The effects of sodium alginate on silicate corrosion inhibition for copper pipe in simulated soft water were investigated. The results showed that more soluble copper release was occurred when low concentration sodium alginate was in presence. The 1 a aged copper pipe released more soluble copper than the 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe. The sequence of concentration of soluble copper release was c 1 a > c 3 a, > c 10 a. However, compared to the low concentration sodium alginate, soluble copper released from the 1 a aged copper pipe increased, and the 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe were inverse when high level sodium alginate was in presence. These phenomena showed that the effect of silicate corrosion inhibition decreased when extracellular polymer substances was dissolved in soft water. Under the conditions of pH 7.5 and sodium alginate 16 mg/L, soluble copper release tend was gradually increase-decrease-gradually run-up which due to the absorption of sodium alginate on the surface of copper surface and the complex interaction between sodium alginate, silicate and copper ions. When the initial pH value was low, compared to the system of no sodium alginate, the soluble copper release distinctly increased in the presence of sodium alginate. The amount of soluble copper released from 1 a copper pipe is higher than that from 3 a and 10 a aged copper pipe, which due to the different components of copper corrosion by-products on the surface of different aged copper pipes and the different solubility of different corrosion by-products.

  5. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Han Byul; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Chen Guang; Paik, Jeom Kee

    2014-09-01

    In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR), Common Structural Rules (CSR), and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH) are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS), and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM). To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  6. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificial environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.

  7. Corrosion Inhibition by Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl) A. Gray leaves extract for 304 SS in hydrochloric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdausi, S.; Kurniawan, F.

    2016-04-01

    The inhibition effect of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl) A. Gray leaves extract on the corrosion phenomena of 304 SS in 1 M HCl has been studied by polarization potentiodynamic. The powder of T. diversifolia was extracted by demineralized water which was cultivated in East Java, Indonesia. The extract was characterized by FTIR spectrophotometer. The presence of T. diversifolia can inhibit the corrosion rate of 304 SS. The efficiency inhibition value of 2 g/L T. diversifolia leaves extract reached up to 77.27% at room temperature.

  8. A study of corrosion inhibition of steel AISI-SAE 1020 in CO2-brine using surfactant Tween 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedeño, M. L.; L, E. Vera; Pineda T, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Surfactant inhibitors also called active surface agents are molecules composed of a polar hydrophilic group and a non-polar hydrophobic group, with characteristics of adsorption on metal surfaces, high efficiency of inhibiting, low price, low toxicity and easy production. In this work, the corrosion inhibition was study by CO2 steel AISI-SAE 1020 with the addition of 0.01M Tween 80 surfactant to a brine solution (3% NaCl). Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization testing investigated the phenomenon. The results revealed that the surfactant studied acts as an excellent corrosion inhibitor and inhibition efficiency (E%) increases with increasing fluid velocity. The morphology of the steel surface after exposure to the solution of 3% NaCl with and without surfactant indicates the inhibition phenomenon is due to the adsorption of the surfactant molecules, which insulate the surface of the corrosive medium and reduces the attack surficial.

  9. Fabrication of Slippery Lubricant-Infused Porous Surface for Inhibition of Microbially Influenced Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Dun; Lu, Zhou; Sun, Shimei

    2016-01-20

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) accelerates the failure of metal in a marine environment. In this research, slippery lubricant-infused porous surface (SLIPS) was designed on aluminum, and its great potential for inhibiting MIC induced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was demonstrated in a simulated marine environment. The inhibition mechanism of SLIPS to MIC was proposed based on its effective roles in the suppression of SRB settlement and isolation effect to corrosive metabolites. The liquid-like property is demonstrated to be the major contributor to the suppression effect of SLIPS to SRB settlement. The effects of environmental factors (static and dynamic conditions) and lubricant type to SRB settlement over SLIPS were also investigated. It was indicated that the as-fabricated SLIPS can inhibit the SRB settlement in both static and dynamic marine conditions, and lubricant type presents a negligible effect on the SRB settlement. These results will provide a series of foundational data for the future practical application of SLIPS in the marine environment, and also a lubricant selecting instruction to construct SLIPS for MIC control.

  10. Inhibition effect of phosphorus-based chemicals on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanhui; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) could supply a viable alternative water resource for cooling water systems. Inorganic salts in the concentrated cooling water pose a great challenge to corrosion control chemicals. In this study, the inhibition effect of 1-hydroxy ethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) and 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated MWW was investigated by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition effect increased with increasing concentration of inhibitors. The corrosion rates of carbon steel were 1.5, 0.8, 0.2 and 0.5 mm a(-1) for blank, HEDP, ATMP and PBTCA samples at 50 mg L(-1), respectively. The phosphorus-based chemicals could adsorb onto the surface of the carbon steel electrode, form a coat of protective film and then protect the carbon steel from corrosion in the test solution.

  11. Effect of molecular structure of aniline-formaldehyde copolymers on corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Nie, Mengyan; Wang, Xiutong; Zhu, Yukun; Shi, Fuhua; Yu, Jianqiang; Hou, Baorong

    2015-05-30

    Aniline-formaldehyde copolymers with different molecular structures have been prepared and investigated for the purpose of corrosion control of mild steel in hydrochloric acid. The copolymers were synthesized by a condensation polymerization process with different ratios of aniline to formaldehyde in acidic precursor solutions. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of as-synthesized copolymers for Q235 mild steel was investigated in 1.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid solution by weight loss measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. All the results demonstrate that as-prepared aniline-formaldehyde copolymers are efficient mixed-type corrosion inhibitors for mild steels in hydrochloric acid. The corrosion inhibition mechanism is discussed in terms of the role of molecular structure on adsorption of the copolymers onto the steel surface in acid solution.

  12. Inhibiting pitting corrosion in carbon steel exposed to dilute radioactive waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Dilute caustic high-level radioactive waste slurries can induce pitting corrosion in carbon steel. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were conducted in simulated and actual waste solutions to determine minimum concentrations of sodium nitrate which inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 class 1 steel exposed to these solutions. Susceptibility to pitting was assessed through microscopic inspection of specimens and inspection of polarization scans. Long-term coupon immersion tests were conducted to verify the nitrite concentrations established by the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests. The minimum effective nitrite concentration is expressed as a function of the waste nitrate concentration and temperature.

  13. Corrosion inhibition mechanisms of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by selected non-chromate inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garrity, Omar A.

    The pursuit to find a chromate-alternative has led to the development of several chromate-free aerospace primers and coating systems that offer good protection. However, fundamental understanding of the functionality of the chromate-free pigments that are embedded within these coating systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to understand the fundamental mechanism of corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by molybdate (MoO 42-), silicate (SiO32-), and praseodymium (Pr3+) with the goal of developing the kind of understanding that was accomplished for chromate. Furthermore, since most inhibiting conversion coatings and pigments act by releasing soluble species into the local environment, it was of interest to understand the mechanism of inhibition in aqueous 0.1 M NaCl solution. The mechanism of inhibition of AA2024-T3 by the select non-chromate inhibitors was investigated using various electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Naturally aerated polarization curves showed that molybdate provided mixed inhibition in near-neutral pH and at a threshold concentration of 0.1 M. The largest effect was a 250 mV increase in the breakdown potential associated with pitting and a 350 mV decrease in the open-circuit potential (OCP). In addition, electrochemical impedance indicated that the corrosion inhibition mechanism is oxygen-dependent owing to the protection afforded by Mo(VI) species. It was proposed that the corrosion inhibition of AA2024-T3 by molybdate may occur following a two-step process whereby molybdate is rapidly reduced to MoO.(OH)2 over the intermetallic particles and is subsequently oxidized to intermediate molybdenum oxides (e.g. Mo4O11) in the presence of oxygen which is reduced. This in turn may lead to a local acidification, promoting the condensation and polymerization of molybdate species in solution to form polymolybdate species (Mo7O24 6- and Mo8O264-). Furthermore, S-phase particle dissolution is decreased

  14. Sol-gel hybrid films based on organosilane and montmorillonite for corrosion inhibition of AA2024.

    PubMed

    Dalmoro, V; dos Santos, J H Z; Armelin, E; Alemán, C; Azambuja, D S

    2014-07-15

    The present work reports the production of films on AA2024-T3 composed of vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS)/tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) with incorporation of montmorillonite (sodium montmorillonite and montmorillonite modified with quaternary ammonium salt, abbreviated Na and 30B, respectively), generated by the sol-gel process. According to FT-IR analyses the incorporation of montmorillonite does not affect silica network. Electrochemical characterization was performed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement in 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl solution. Results indicate that montmorillonite incorporation improves the corrosion protection compared to the non-modified system. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs reveal that high concentrations of montmorillonite provide agglomerations on the metallic surface, which is in detriment of the anticorrosive performance. The VTMS/TEOS/30B films with the lowest concentration (22 mg L(-1)) of embedded clay provide the highest corrosion protection.

  15. Electric power plants: protective coatings and corrosion inhibition. January, 1966-September, 1981 (citations from the Metals Abstracts data base). Report for Jan 66-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Protective coatings for power plants are discussed. Corrosion protection by means of applied coatings or the use of electrochemical inhibition is featured. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of corrosion on the strength of materials used in various types of power plants, and includes stress corrosion cracking and erosion protection. The effects of cyclic loading and thermal expansion of heat exchanger tubes on corrosion are also included. (Contains 162 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  16. Synergistic of a coumarin derivative with potassium iodide on the corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy in 1.0 M H2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Ying, Lim Chai; Musa, Ahmed Y.

    2014-05-01

    Synergistic effects of the addition of KI on the corrosion inhibitive performance of a coumarin derivative on an aluminum alloy in 1.0 M H2SO4 at different temperatures were studied using various electrochemical measurements. Density functional theory was used to calculate the quantum chemical parameters of the coumarin derivative. The experimental results showed that the coumarin derivative is considered as a mixedtype inhibitor. The corrosion potential values were almost unchanged upon the addition of PBBC to the acidic solution. The inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration and increases further in the presence of 6.02 mM KI but decreases significantly at higher temperature. The adsorption of PBBC obeyed the Langmuir isotherm, and being chemically adsorbed at lower temperatures, while physical adsorption is favoured at higher temperature. The theoretical results indicated that the coumarin derivative was adsorbed onto the surface of Al2024 through the sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen atoms.

  17. Studies on the Inhibitive Effect of Datura Stramonium Extract on the Acid Corrosion of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan

    The extract of Datura stramonium has been studied as a possible source of green inhibitor for corrosion of mild steel (MS) in HCl and H2SO4 media at different temperatures. The anticorrosion effect was evaluated by conventional weight loss studies, electrochemical studies viz., Tafel polarization, ac impedance, and SEM studies. The studies reveal that the plant extract acts as a good inhibitor in both the acid media and better in H2SO4 medium. Tafel polarization method indicate that the plant extract behaves as a mixed mode inhibitor. Double layer capacitance and charge transfer resistance values derived from Nyquist plots obtained from ac impedance studies give supporting evidence for the anticorrosive effect. The inhibitive effect may be attributed to the adsorption of the inhibitor on the surface of MS, following Temkin adsorption isotherm. Increase of inhibition efficiency with increase of temperature along with Ea values serve as a proof for chemisorption. SEM studies provide the confirmatory evidence for the protection of MS by the green inhibitor. The study reveals the potential of D. stramonium for combating corrosion which may be due to the adsorption of alkaloids and other phytoconstituents.

  18. Inhibition of microbial concrete corrosion by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans with functionalised zeolite-A coating.

    PubMed

    Haile, Tesfaalem; Nakhla, George

    2009-01-01

    The inhibition of the corrosive action of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on concrete specimens coated by functionalised zeolite-A containing 14% zinc and 5% silver by weight was studied. Uncoated concrete specimens, epoxy-coated concrete specimens (EP), and functionalised zeolite-A coated concrete specimens with epoxy to zeolite weight ratios of 3:1 (Z1), 2:2 (Z2) and 1:3 (Z3) were studied. Specimens were characterised by x-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy for the identification of corrosion products and morphological changes. Biomass growth at the conclusion of the 32-day experiments was 4, 179 and 193 mg volatile suspended solids g(-1) sulphur for the uncoated, EP and Z1 specimens, whereas that of Z2 and Z3 were negligible. In the uncoated, EP and Z1 specimens, sulphate production rates were 0.83, 9.1 and 8.8 mM SO(4)(2-) day(-1) and the specific growth rates, mu, were 0.14, 0.57 and 0.47 day(-1), respectively. The corresponding values for Z2 and Z3 were negligible due to their bacterial inhibition characteristics.

  19. Investigation of the Corrosion Inhibition of CTAB and SDS on Carbon Steel Using an Experimental Design Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Farzin; Wang, Jiamei; Zhang, Lefu

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) on carbon steel was investigated in sodium chloride solutions. Using an experimental design strategy pH, chloride concentration, SDS/CTAB concentrations, and temperature were optimized by conducting only 30 experiments. The optimum value of each factor was obtained from the designed matrix of the experiments based on the lowest log I corr value calculated for each experimental condition. The 3D surface plots of the electrochemical response (log I corr) against each factor were constructed. The optimum conditions in which the lowest log I corr can be achieved were found as follows: pH 12, [Cl-] ≈ 1 M, [SDS] ≈ 200 ppm, [CTAB] ≈ 20 ppm, and T ≈ 10 °C.

  20. Computational study of some triazole derivatives (un- and protonated forms) and their copper complexes in corrosion inhibition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ibrahimi, Brahim; Soumoue, Aziza; Jmiai, Aziz; Bourzi, Hassan; Oukhrib, Rachid; El Mouaden, Khadija; El Issami, Souad; Bazzi, Lahcen

    2016-12-01

    Three triazoles compounds used as corrosion inhibitors for copper in acidic medium, namely: 1,2,4 triazole (TR), 3-amino 1,2,4 triazole (3 ATR) and 3,5-diamino 1,2,4 triazole (3,5 DATR) have been studied theoretically in aim to investigate the correlation between its molecular reactivity indicators and the corresponding inhibition efficiency. All quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method were performed with and without solvent effect. In the present paper, not only the neutral inhibitors has been studied, but also the first and the second protonation forms. A good correlation between theoretical and experimental data has been obtained both in gas and aqueous phases, notably for unprotonated inhibitors. Also, the interaction energy between inhibitors and copper has been calculated.

  1. Synergistic inhibition effect of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and Tween-80 on the corrosion of brass in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramji, Karpagavalli; Cairns, Darran R.; Rajeswari, S.

    2008-05-01

    The corrosion inhibition of brass in 0.2 M NaCl in the presence of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) has been investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma analysis. Analysis of the results revealed that the addition of MBT and Tween-80 inhibits the corrosion of brass in 0.2 M NaCl. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements showed that MBT acts as a mixed-type inhibitor and Tween-80 as an anodic inhibitor. Corrosion inhibition occurs through adsorption of the inhibitor on brass surface without modifying the corrosion mechanism. The adsorption of MBT and Tween-80 both follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Potentiodynamic polarization results suggested that the mixture of MBT and Tween-80 acts as a mixed-type inhibitor. Inhibition efficiency of 79.0 and 62.5% were obtained in the presence of optimum concentration of MBT and Tween-80, respectively. The addition of the mixture of MBT and Tween-80 enhanced the inhibition efficiency to 94.0% and showed a synergism of inhibition. XPS analysis indicated that MBT adsorbed on brass surface along with Tween-80 in the presence of the mixture of MBT and Tween-80. The results of solution analysis using ICP showed that the mixture of MBT and Tween-80 effectively controlled the dezincification of brass.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies on the corrosion inhibition of copper by two indazole derivatives in 3.0% NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Yujie; Zhang, Shengtao; Xu, Shenying; Li, Wenpo

    2016-06-15

    Corrosion experiments and theoretical calculations were performed to investigate the inhibition mechanism of indazole (IA) and 5-aminoindazole (AIA) for copper in NaCl solution. The results obtained from weight loss and electrochemical experiments are in good agreement, and reveal that these compounds are high-efficiency inhibitors with inhibition efficiency order: AIA>IA, which was further confirmed by field emission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM) observation. Besides, the quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that both studied inhibitors are adsorbed strongly on the copper surface in parallel mode. The adsorption of these molecules on copper substrate was found to obey Langmuir isotherm.

  3. Quantum chemical study of the inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 by some antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk O; Ibok, Udo J; Ebenso, Eno E; El Nemr, Ahmed; El Ashry, El Sayed H

    2009-09-01

    The inhibition efficiency of some antibiotics against mild steel corrosion was studied using weight loss and quantum chemical techniques. Values of inhibition efficiency obtained from weight loss measurements correlated strongly with theoretical values obtained through semi empirical calculations. High correlation coefficients were also obtained between inhibition efficiency of the antibiotics and some quantum chemical parameters, including frontier orbital (E (HOMO) and E (LUMO)), dipole moment, log P, TNC and LSER parameters (critical volume and dipolar-polarisability factor), which indicated that these parameters affect the inhibition efficiency of the compounds. It was also found that quantitative structure activity relation can be used to adequately predict the inhibition effectiveness of these compounds.

  4. Electric power plants: protective coatings and corrosion inhibition. January, 1970-September, 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for Jan 70-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Protective coatings for power plants are discussed. Corrosion protection by means of applied coatings or the use of electrochemical inhibition is featured. Particular emphasis is placed on heat transfer problems associated with the formation of boiler scale on heat exchanger surfaces. Boiler water treatment for the inhibition of corrosion and the formation of deposits are also included, as is the removal of sulfur compounds to reduce high temperature sulfidation corrosion. (Contains 134 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Adsorption and corrosion inhibition effect of Schiff base molecules on the mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: a combined experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2015-02-28

    Corrosion inhibition performance of 2-(2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)phenol (L(1)), 2-(5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)phenol (L(2)) and 2-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzylideneamino)phenol (L(3)) on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel surface in a 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution is investigated by sophisticated analytical methods like potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and weight loss measurements. Polarization studies showed that all the compounds are mixed type (cathodic and anodic) inhibitors and the inhibition efficiency (η%) increased with increasing inhibitor concentration. The inhibition actions of these Schiff base molecules are discussed in view of blocking the electrode surface by means of adsorption of the inhibitor molecule obeying the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the metal surfaces confirmed the existence of an adsorbed film. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation have been used to determine the relationship between molecular configuration and their inhibition efficiencies. The order of inhibition performance obtained from experimental results is successfully verified by DFT and MD simulation.

  6. Investigating inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion by Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Inyang, Michael Anietie; Okeniyi, Elizabeth Toyin; Nwaokorie, Ikechi Thaddeus; Adidi, Emmanuel Amanogho; Owoeye, Taiwo Felicia; Nwakudu, Kelechukwu Chinedu; Akinlabu, Deborah Kehinde; Gabriel, Olanrewaju Oyewale; Taiwo, Olugbenga Samson; Awotoye, Olufisayo Adebola

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion (MIC) of metals by Tectona grandis based Fe (iron) Nanoparticle material was investigated. For this, extract was obtained from the leaf of Tectona grandis and this was employed as precursor for synthesizing the Fe-nanoparticle material. From this, the synthesized plant extract based nanoparticle material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM+EDS) instrument. The developed Fe bio-nanoparticle material was then employed for sensitivity and/or resistance study application against different strains of microbes that are known to induce microbiologically-influenced-corrosion, in metallic materials, and for this, microbial growth inhibition effect was compared with that from a commercial antibiotic employed as control. Results showed that the Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle exhibited good inhibition effects on the growth of many of the MIC inducing microbes investigated. Sensitivity measures of zone of inhibition against the growth of MIC inducing microbial strains either outperformed or compares well with that obtained from the commercial antibiotic control, in the study. These results indicate positive prospect on the suitability of Fe bio-nanoparticle for corrosion inhibition applications for the protection of metals against microbiological corrosion influencing environment.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of an effective organic/inorganic hybrid green corrosion inhibitive complex based on zinc acetate/Urtica Dioica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, E.; Naderi, Reza; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2017-02-01

    This study aims at synthesis and characterization of an effective corrosion inhibitive complex based on zinc acetate/Urtica Dioica (ZnA-U.D) for corrosion protection of mild steel in chloride solution. The chemical structure and morphology of the complex were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-vis, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion protection performance of the mild steel samples dipped in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions with and without ZnA-U.D extract was investigated by visual observations, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization test. Results revealed that the ZnA successfully chelated with organic inhibitive compounds (i.e Quercetin, Quinic acid, Caffeic acid, Hystamine and Serotonin) present in the U.D extract. The electrochemical measurements revealed the effective inhibition action of ZnA-U.D complex in the sodium chloride solution on the mild steel. The synergistic effect between Zn2+ and organic compounds present in the U.D extract resulted in protective film deposition on the steel surface, which was proved by SEM and XPS analyses.

  8. External corrosion of line pipe -- A summary of research activities performed since 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, T.R.; Wilmott, M.J.; Sutherby, R.L.; Worthington, R.G.

    1995-11-01

    External corrosion is a major threat to the integrity of gas transmission systems. This paper reviews corrosion and environmental cracking problems and their control based on more than twelve years of field and laboratory research work performed by a major Canadian gas transmission company. To protect against corrosion the company uses a dual system consisting of protective coatings and cathodic protection. Either of these systems operating properly can provide the protection necessary to prevent leaks and ruptures in line pipe. In some situations however coatings can fail in such a way as to shield a corrosion cell on the pipe surface under degraded coating from cathodic protection. Where the protective systems are thwarted, a variety of corrosion and cracking scenarios can lead to leaks and ruptures. These scenarios will be identified and assessed in terms of where they occur as well as their frequency and seriousness.

  9. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on corrosion inhibition of nickel coated 316 stainless steel and correlation with nano-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    The influence of implantation of N+ with 20 keV energy and different fluences in the range of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 in the nickel coated type 316 stainless steel (SS) on the corrosion inhibition of SS in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution is investigated. The highest available N+ fluence showed highest corrosion inhibition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed formation of nickel nitride phases that enhanced by increasing the N+ fluence. Surface morphology was studied by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion test, respectively. AFM results showed that by increasing N+ fluence surface of the sample becomes smoother that may be the result of heat accumulation during implantation causing higher rate of diffusion in the sample.

  10. Corrosion inhibition properties of graphene oxide on mild steel in 3.5% NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandh Senthilvasan, Prem; Rangarajan, Murali

    2016-09-01

    In this work the corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 3.5% Sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at ambient conditions by Graphene Oxide (GO) has been studied. Graphene oxide was prepared by Modified Hummers Method and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of mild steel has been studied in the absence and presence of GO coatings by Tafel polarization and impedance analyses. The modified electrode has 44.8mV potential shift in the cathodic direction and reduction in current by 41.9 μA (61%). This indicates the strong protection offered by graphene oxide film. The obtained impedance spectra also clearly show that the charge transfer resistance of graphene oxide film is much higher than that of the uncoated steel electrode, demonstrating the strong protection offered by graphene oxide films for mild steel.

  11. The performance analysis of distributed Brillouin corrosion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2013-12-27

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage.

  12. The Performance Analysis of Distributed Brillouin Corrosion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2014-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  13. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou; Rink, David L.

    2017-02-01

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 °C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 °C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate were also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.

  14. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in acidic media using newly synthesized heterocyclic organic molecules: Correlation between inhibition efficiency and chemical structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ouici, H. B. Guendouzi, A.; Benali, O.

    2015-03-30

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 5% HCl solutions by some new synthesized organic compounds namely 3-(2-methoxyphenyl) 5-mercapto-1. 2. 4-triazole (2-MMT), 3-(3-methoxyphenyl) 5-mercapto-1. 2. 4-triazole (3-MMT) and 3-(2-hydroxyphenyl) 5-mercapto-1. 2. 4-triazole (2-HMT) was investigated using weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. These measurements reveal that the inhibition efficiency obtained by these compounds increased by increasing their concentration. The inhibition efficiency follows the order 2-MMT >3-MMT >2-HMT. Polarization studies show that these compounds are of the mixed type but dominantly act as a cathodic inhibitors for mild steel in 5% HCl solutions. These inhibitors function through adsorption following Langmuir isotherm. Activation energy and Gibbs free energy for adsorption of inhibitors are calculated. Molecular modeling has been conducted to correlate the corrosion inhibition properties with the calculated quantum chemical parameters.

  15. Corrosion inhibition of Eleusine aegyptiaca and Croton rottleri leaf extracts on cast iron surface in 1 M HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy; Poonkuzhali, Kaliyaperumal; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and corrosion inhibition activities of Eleusine aegyptiaca (E. aegyptiaca) and Croton rottleri (C. rottleri) leaf extracts on cast iron corrosion in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution were studied first time by weight loss and electrochemical techniques viz., Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results obtained from the weight loss and electrochemical methods showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with inhibitor concentrations. It was found that the extracts acted as mixed-type inhibitors. The addition of halide additives (KCl, KBr, and KI) on the inhibition efficiency has also been investigated. The adsorption of the inhibitors on cast iron surface both in the presence and absence of halides follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The inhibiting nature of the inhibitors was supported by FT-IR, UV-vis, Wide-angle X-ray diffraction and SEM methods.

  16. INHIBITION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of A537 tank steel was investigated in a series of environments designed to simulate the chemistry of legacy nuclear weapons production waste. Tests consisted of both slow strain rate tests using tensile specimens and constant load tests using compact tension specimens. Based on the tests conducted, nitrite was found to be a strong SCC inhibitor. Based on the test performed and the tank waste chemistry changes that are predicted to occur over time, the risk for SCC appears to be decreasing since the concentration of nitrate will decrease and nitrite will increase.

  17. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria using gramicidin-S-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rongjun; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-11-01

    A gramicidin-S-producing Bacillus brevis 18-3 biofilm was shown to reduce corrosion rates of mild steel by inhibiting both the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfosporosinus orientis and the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SP-6. When L. discophora SP-6 was introduced along with D. orientis to a non-antimicrobial-producing biofilm control, Paenibacillus polymyxa ATCC 10401, a corrosive synergy was created and mild steel coupons underwent more severe corrosion than when only D. orientis was present, showing a 2.3-fold increase via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a 1.8-fold difference via mass-loss measurements. However, when a gramicidin-S-producing, protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm was established on mild steel, the metal coupons were protected against the simultaneous attack of D. orientis and L. discophora SP-6. EIS data showed that the protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm decreased the corrosion rate about 20-fold compared with the non-gramicidin-producing P. polymyxa ATCC 10401 biofilm control. The mass loss for the protected mild steel coupons was also significantly lower than that for the unprotected ones (4-fold decrease). Scanning electron microscope images corroborated the corrosion inhibition by the gramicidin-S-producing B. brevis biofilm on mild steel by showing that the metal surface remained untarnished, i.e., the polishing grooves were still visible after exposure to the simultaneous attack of the sulfate-reducing bacterium and the iron-oxidizing bacterium.

  18. Use of mechanistic carbon corrosion model to predict performance loss in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanushkodi, S. R.; Kundu, S.; Fowler, M. W.; Pritzker, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    A membrane electrode assembly is subjected to carbon corrosion accelerated stress tests (ASTs) involving the application of square-wave voltage cycles with different upper limits to measure the resulting loss in the mass of the carbon support at the cathode catalyst layer (CL) and the associated degradation in performance. Carbon loss is determined from the amount of CO2 evolved during degradation, while the performance loss is measured from the reduction in the cell voltage at 1.5 A cm-2 relative to the performance obtained in its beginning-of-life state. A kinetic model for carbon corrosion describing the rate of evolution of CO2 is shown to accurately predict the carbon loss measured during the various carbon corrosion ASTs in this study. A plot of the performance losses from the various carbon corrosion ASTs versus the corresponding carbon losses reveals that all the data demonstrate consistent degradation regardless of the AST conditions, and these result can be fitted with an exponential function termed the 'fingerprint' expression. By combining the carbon corrosion model and fingerprint expression, both the carbon loss and performance loss of a cathode CL during a carbon corrosion AST can be accurately predicted based only on knowledge of the waveform of the input voltage.

  19. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  20. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through

  1. Influence of temperature on corrosion inhibition for carbon steel by rice straw extract in HCl solution: Synergistic effect of cationic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, Rabiahtul; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-01

    The corrosion inhibitive effects of rice straw extract (RSE) for carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution was investigated. Weight loss method and potentiodynamic polarization was used to study the inhibition efficiency of cationic surfactant, benzalkonium chloride (BKC) additives into rice straw extract corrosion inhibitor. Inhibition efficiency was determined by comparing the inhibition efficiency in the absence and presence of additives. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was found to increase with surfactant concentration and decreased with increasing temperature which is due to the fact that, the rate of carbon steel corrosion was higher than the rate of adsorption of inhibitor molecules. The inhibiting action of the rice straw extract was considerably enhanced by the addition of cationic surfactant. The results obtained from weight loss analysis are in direct agreement with tafel polarization studies. Tafel polarization data indicated that a combination of RSE and BKC acts as a mixed - type inhibitor.

  2. Inhibitive effect of Xylopia ferruginea extract on the corrosion of mild steel in 1M HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Rahim, Afidah Abdul; Osman, Hasnah; Awang, Khalijah

    2011-08-01

    The alkaloid content of the leaves and stem bark of Xylopia ferruginea plant was isolated and tested for its anticorrosion potential on mild steel corrosion in a hydrochloric acid medium by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) analysis. The experimental results reveal the effective anticorrosion potential of the plant extract. The mixed mode of action exhibited by the plant extract is evidenced from the polarization study. SEM images proof the formation of a protective layer over the mild steel surface, and this is supported by the FTIR study. The possible mode of the corrosion inhibition mechanism has also been discussed.

  3. Electrophoretic deposition of colloidal particles on Mg with cytocompatibility, antibacterial performance, and corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiadi; Zhu, Ye; Meng, Long; Chen, Peng; Shi, Tiantian; Liu, Xiaoya; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) has recently received increasing attention due to its unique biological performance, including cytocompatibility, antibacterial and biodegradable properties. However, rapid corrosion in physiological environment and potential toxicity limits its clinical applications. To improve the corrosion resistance meanwhile not compromise other excellent performance, self-assembled colloidal particles were deposited onto magnesium surfaces in ethanol by a simple and effective electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The fabricated functional nanostructured coatings were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical test, pH value, and Mg ion concentration data show that the corrosion resistance of Mg samples is enhanced appreciably after surface treatment. In vitro cellular response and antibacterial capability of the modified Mg substrates are performed. Significantly increased cell adhesion and viability are observed from the coated Mg samples, and the amounts of adherent bacteria on the treated Mg surfaces diminish remarkably compared to the bare Mg. Furthermore, the bare and coated Mg samples were implanted in New Zealand white rabbits for 12 weeks to examine the in vivo long-term corrosion performance and in situ inflammation behavior. The experiment results confirmed that compared with bare Mg substrate the corrosion and foreign-body reactions of the coated Mg samples were suppressed. The above results suggested that our coatings, which effectively enhance the biocompatibility, antimicrobial properties, and corrosion resistance of Mg substrate, provide a simple and practical strategy to expedite clinical acceptance of biodegradableMg and its alloys.

  4. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  5. Performance evaluation of pectin as ecofriendly corrosion inhibitor for X60 pipeline steel in acid medium: experimental and theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Umoren, Saviour A; Obot, Ime B; Madhankumar, A; Gasem, Zuhair M

    2015-06-25

    The corrosion inhibition effect of pectin (a biopolymer) for X60 pipeline steel in HCl medium was investigated using weight loss, electrochemical, water contact angle measurements, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results obtained show that pectin acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel. Inhibition efficiency increased with increase in pectin concentration and temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that pectin could be classified as a mixed-type corrosion inhibitor with predominant control of the cathodic reaction. The effective corrosion inhibition potential of pectin could be related to the adsorption of pectin molecules at the metal/solution interface which is found to accord with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and a protective film formation. Quantum chemical calculations provided insights into the active sites and reactivity parameters governing pectin activity as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel.

  6. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  7. Inhibition of cold rolled steel corrosion by Tween-20 in sulfuric acid: weight loss, electrochemical and AFM approaches.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guannan; Li, Xianghong

    2005-09-01

    The inhibiting action of a nonionic surfactant of Tween-20 on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 0.5-7.0 M sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) was studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) provided the surface conditions. The results show that inhibition efficiency increases with the inhibitor concentration, while it decreases with the sulfuric acid concentration. The adsorption of inhibitor on the cold rolled steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. Effect of immersion time was studied and discussed. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of cold rolled steel was also studied at four temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 degrees C, the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption free energy, and adsorption entropy were calculated. The results revealed that the adsorption was physisorption mechanism. A kinetic study of cold rolled steel in uninhibited and inhibited acid was also discussed. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, rate constant, and reaction constant were calculated for the reactions of corrosion. The inhibition effect is satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic models. Polarization curves show that Tween-20 is a cathodic-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid. The results obtained from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization are in good agreement, and the Tween-20 inhibition action could also be evidenced by surface AFM images.

  8. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  9. Adsorption and inhibitive properties of a Schiff base for the corrosion control of carbon steel in saline water.

    PubMed

    Samide, Adriana; Tutunaru, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    A Schiff base, namely N-(2-hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazide (HBTC), was investigated as inhibitor for carbon steel in saline water (SW) using electrochemical measurements such as: potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The morphology of the surfaces before and after corrosion was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results showed that HBTC acts as corrosion inhibitor in SW by suppressing simultaneously the cathodic and anodic processes via adsorption on the surface which followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm; the polarization resistance (R(p)) and inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with each HBTC concentration increase. SEM/EDS analysis showed at this stage that the main product of corrosion is a non-stoichiometric amorphous Fe(3+) oxyhydroxide, consisting of a mixture of Fe(3+) oxyhydroxides, α-FeOOH and/or γ-FeOOH, α-FeOOH/γ-FeOOH and Fe(OH)(3).

  10. The Effect of Surface Morphology on Corrosion Performance of SS 316 LVM Biomedical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloei, Alisina; Guo, Mengnan; Rotermund, Harm H.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, in order to investigate the relationship between surface roughness and the corrosion resistance of the SS 316 LVM wires, samples have been prepared with different surface roughness by using different grits of SiC papers. In order to simulate the environment of implanted biomedical devices, a three-electrode electrochemical cell with 0.9% (by mass) NaCl solution has been used to test the corrosion resistance of the samples by potentiodynamic method and anodic polarization tests. SEM, EDS, and XPS have been performed to analyze the surfaces appearance and chemical elements on the surface before and after the corrosion. AFM was also used to get 3D images of the surface and to show the change in roughness of the samples after corrosion testing. Background-subtracted contrast-enhanced microscopy has been performed in situ to detect the pitting process happening on the surface of stainless steel samples. It was concluded that a relatively smoother surface can result in higher corrosion resistance and larger potential of stable pitting, whereas a rougher surface can easily go into stable pitting with lower pitting potentials. Rougher surfaces also showed a shorter time for the formation of stable pits. Microscopy observations illustrated more corrosion on rougher surfaces, and EDS showed more chloride ion remained on these surfaces.

  11. The effect of triphenylphosphane on corrosion inhibition of benzotriazole at Ag electrode monitored by SERS in nonaqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ya-Xian; Yang, Feng-Zhu; Morag, Clark-Heptinstall; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Ren-Ao; Yao, Jian-Lin

    2013-03-15

    The corrosion inhibition behavior of benzotriazole (BTAH) on Ag electrodes and the influence of triphenylphosphane (pph(3)) were investigated by electrochemical method, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and direct electrochemical synthesis of surface complexes in nonaqueous solution. The results indicated that the BTA(-) ion was coordinated to the Ag surface to form a highly cross-linked surface polymer complex of [Ag(BTA)](n), which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. The introduction of a neutral ligand of pph(3) blocked the surface coordination processes of BTAH with the Ag electrode. It resulted in a decrease of inhibition efficiency to Ag surface. The ligand of pph(3) played a negative role on the corrosion inhibition of BTAH to the Ag electrode. The SERS results were well consistent with the cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves measurements. For modeling, two different surface complexes were prepared in acetonitrile with and without pph(3) by direct electrochemical synthesis. A polymer-like complex of [Ag(BTA)](n) attached to the Ag surface was obtained in the absence of pph(3), which suppressed the dissolution and oxidation of Ag effectively. A new binuclear compound, Ag(2)(BTA)(2)(pph(3))(4), was produced in acetonitrile with pph(3) and the final coordination process occurred in solution leading to difficulties in forming a compact surface film, thus decreasing the corrosion inhibition efficiency of BTAH. The role of pph(3) and the mechanism were proposed.

  12. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  13. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  14. Effect of mixed alloy combinations on fretting corrosion performance of spinal screw and rod implants.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sachin A; Singh, Vaneet; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2016-04-01

    Spinal implants are made from a variety of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. However, the medical device community has raised concern about mixing dissimilar metals in an implant because of fear of inducing corrosion. There is a lack of systematic studies on the effects of mixing metals on performance of spinal implants, especially in fretting corrosion conditions. Hence, the goal was to determine whether mixing stainless steel (SS316L), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt chromium (CoCrMo) alloy components in a spinal implant leads to any increased risk of corrosion degradation. Spinal constructs consisting of single assembly screw-connector-rod components were tested using a novel short-term cyclic fretting corrosion test method. A total of 17 alloy component combinations (comprised of SS316L, Ti6Al4V-anodized and CoCrMo alloy for rod, screws and connectors) were tested under three anatomic orientations. Spinal constructs having all SS316L were most susceptible to fretting-initiated crevice corrosion attack and showed higher average fretting currents (∼25 - 30 µA), whereas constructs containing all Ti6Al4V components were less susceptible to fretting corrosion with average fretting currents in the range of 1 - 6 µA. Mixed groups showed evidence of fretting corrosion but they were not as severe as all SS316L group. SEM results showed evidence of severe corrosion attack in constructs having SS316L components. There also did not appear to be any galvanic effects of combining alloys together. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  15. Study of the synergistic effect of 2-methoxy-4-formylphenol and sodium molybdenum oxide on the corrosion inhibition of 3CR12 ferritic steel in dilute sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    The synergistic effect of the corrosion inhibition properties of 2-methoxy-4-formylphenol and sodium molybdenum oxide on the electrochemical property of 3CR12 ferritic stainless steel in 2M H2SO4 acid solution was assessed through coupon analysis, potentiodynamic polarization technique, IR spectroscopy and micro-analytical technique. Experimental data showed the combined admixture effectively inhibited the steel corrosion at the concentrations analyzed with a maximum inhibition efficiency of 94.47% and 89.71% from coupon analysis and potentiodynamic polarization due to the electrochemical action and inhibition of the steel by the ionized molecules of the inhibiting compound which influenced the mechanism of the redox reactions responsible to corrosion and surface deterioration. Results from corrosion thermodynamic calculations showed chemisorption adsorption mechanism. Infrared spectroscopic images exposed the functional groups of the molecules involved for the corrosion inhibition reaction. Micro-analytical images showed sharp contrast in surface morphology between the inhibited and corroded test specimens under study. Cracks, intergranular and pitting corrosion in addition to severe surface deterioration was observed in the uninhibited samples. Inhibitor adsorption fits the Langmuir isotherm model.

  16. Corrosion inhibition in lithium bromide absorption fluid for advanced and current absorption cycle machines

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.K.; Mekhjian, M.S.; Sandor, G.R.; Nakada, N.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a novel corrosion inhibitor that exhibits improved protection of carbon steel over the inhibitors currently in practice. This inhibitor, formulated in 65 wt% lithium bromide solution, offers excellent corrosion protection to carbon steel. Corrosion rates were determined using autoclave coupon testing. The corrosion rate in the 300 F to 450 F range was found to be low (1 to 4 mils per year), and the product also showed very low hydrogen generation (0.03 mg/in.{sup 2} of carbon steel per week). The metal was protected with a stable and adherent film.

  17. Adsorption and Quantum Chemical Studies on the Inhibition Potentials of Some Thiosemicarbazides for the Corrosion of Mild Steel in Acidic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Ebenso, Eno E.; Isabirye, David A.; Eddy, Nnabuk O.

    2010-01-01

    Three thiosemicarbazides, namely 2-(2-aminophenyl)-N phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (AP4PT), N,2-diphenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (D4PT) and 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-N-phenyl hydrazinecarbothioamide (HP4PT), were investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in H2SO4 solution using gravimetric and gasometric methods. The results revealed that they all inhibit corrosion and their % inhibition efficiencies (%IE) follow the order: AP4PT > HP4PT > D4PT. The %IE obtained from the gravimetric and gasometric experiments were in good agreement. The thermodynamic parameters obtained support a physical adsorption mechanism and the adsorption followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Some quantum chemical parameters were calculated using different methods and correlated with the experimental %IE. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was used on a composite index of some quantum chemical parameters to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. The results showed that the %IE were closely related to some of the quantum chemical parameters, but with varying degrees. The calculated/theoretical %IE of the molecules were found to be close to their experimental %IE. The local reactivity has been studied through the Fukui and condensed softness indices in order to predict both the reactive centers and to know the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks. PMID:20640164

  18. Adsorption and quantum chemical studies on the inhibition potentials of some thiosemicarbazides for the corrosion of mild steel in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Ebenso, Eno E; Isabirye, David A; Eddy, Nnabuk O

    2010-06-15

    Three thiosemicarbazides, namely 2-(2-aminophenyl)-N phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (AP4PT), N,2-diphenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (D4PT) and 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-N-phenyl hydrazinecarbothioamide (HP4PT), were investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in H(2)SO(4) solution using gravimetric and gasometric methods. The results revealed that they all inhibit corrosion and their % inhibition efficiencies (%IE) follow the order: AP4PT > HP4PT > D4PT. The %IE obtained from the gravimetric and gasometric experiments were in good agreement. The thermodynamic parameters obtained support a physical adsorption mechanism and the adsorption followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Some quantum chemical parameters were calculated using different methods and correlated with the experimental %IE. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was used on a composite index of some quantum chemical parameters to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. The results showed that the %IE were closely related to some of the quantum chemical parameters, but with varying degrees. The calculated/theoretical %IE of the molecules were found to be close to their experimental %IE. The local reactivity has been studied through the Fukui and condensed softness indices in order to predict both the reactive centers and to know the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks.

  19. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  20. Corrosion Inhibition on SAE 1010 Steel by Nanoscale Exopolysaccharides Coatings Determined by Electrochemical and Surface Characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plating, painting and the application of enamel are the most common anti-corrosion treatments. They are effective by providing a barrier of corrosion resistant material between the damaging environment and the structural material. Coatings start failing rapidly if scratched or damaged because a co...

  1. Assessment of high performance concrete containing fly ash and calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor as a mean to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-García, P.; Jiménez-Quero, V.; López-Calvo, H.

    2015-01-01

    This research analyses the effectiveness of the water-to-cement ratio (w/c), fly ash and a calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in high performance concrete. The interactive effect between the inhibitor and fly ash was evaluated because the occurrence of a negative effect when both ingredients are added together in a concrete mixture has been reported. All the concrete mixtures studied in this investigation had 8.2% of silica fume. Twenty seven prismatic concrete specimens were fabricated with dimensions of 55 × 230 × 300 mm each containing two steel rods embedded for the purpose of corrosion monitoring. The specimens were exposed to a simulated marine environment with two daily cycles of wetting and drying for one year. To evaluate the deterioration of the specimens corrosion potentials and linear polarization resistance tests were carried out. The results indicate that the use of a low w/c, the addition of fly ash and the addition of the corrosion inhibitor contributed to the reduction of the corrosion of steel in the concrete specimens. The results further suggest that the combination of fly ash and corrosion inhibitor does not promote the deterioration of the concrete matrix.

  2. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution

    PubMed Central

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  3. High-Temperature Performance of Ferritic Steels in Fireside Corrosion Regimes: Temperature and Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Hussain, T.; Simms, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports high temperature resistance of ferritic steels in fireside corrosion regime in terms of temperature and deposits aggressiveness. Four candidate power plant steels: 15Mo3, T22, T23 and T91 were exposed under simulated air-fired combustion environment for 1000 h. The tests were conducted at 600, 650 and 700 °C according to deposit-recoat test method. Post-exposed samples were examined via dimensional metrology (the main route to quantify metal loss), and mass change data were recorded to perform the study of kinetic behavior at elevated temperatures. Microstructural investigations using ESEM-EDX were performed in order to investigate corrosion degradation and thickness of the scales. The ranking of the steels from most to the least damage was 15Mo3 > T22 > T23 > T91 in all three temperatures. The highest rate of corrosion in all temperatures occurred under the screening deposit.

  4. High-Temperature Performance of Ferritic Steels in Fireside Corrosion Regimes: Temperature and Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Hussain, T.; Simms, N. J.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports high temperature resistance of ferritic steels in fireside corrosion regime in terms of temperature and deposits aggressiveness. Four candidate power plant steels: 15Mo3, T22, T23 and T91 were exposed under simulated air-fired combustion environment for 1000 h. The tests were conducted at 600, 650 and 700 °C according to deposit-recoat test method. Post-exposed samples were examined via dimensional metrology (the main route to quantify metal loss), and mass change data were recorded to perform the study of kinetic behavior at elevated temperatures. Microstructural investigations using ESEM-EDX were performed in order to investigate corrosion degradation and thickness of the scales. The ranking of the steels from most to the least damage was 15Mo3 > T22 > T23 > T91 in all three temperatures. The highest rate of corrosion in all temperatures occurred under the screening deposit.

  5. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Johnson, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  6. Electrochemical synthesis of polythiophene on nickel coated mild steel and corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tüken, T.; Yazıcı, B.; Erbil, M.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical polymerization of polythiophene (PTh) was investigated on nickel coated mild steel (MS) electrode, in LiClO 4 containing acetonitrile medium (ACN-LiClO 4). Nickel layer (1 μm thick) was deposited galvanostatically, from a proper bath solution. Then, the synthesis of PTh film was achieved in 0.1 M thiophene containing ACN-LiClO 4, by using cyclic voltammetry technique. The corrosion performances of nickel coated samples with and without polymer top coats were investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution, by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves. The nickel coating behaved like a physical barrier and provided some protection to MS against corrosion. But its barrier property diminished significantly with time and failed to protect MS. It was shown that PTh top coat improved the barrier efficiency remarkably, and excellent protection efficiency was obtained against MS corrosion, for considerable exposure time in such aggressive environment.

  7. Discharge and Corrosion Performance of AP65 Magnesium Alloy in Simulated Seawater: Effect of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naiguang; Wang, Richu; Peng, Chaoqun; Peng, Bing; Feng, Yan; Hu, Chengwang

    2014-12-01

    The discharge and corrosion performance of AP65 magnesium alloy in simulated seawater with different temperatures is investigated by electrochemical techniques and corrosion morphology observation. The results indicate that AP65 alloy can hardly be activated at a large current density in the 0 °C simulated seawater, whereas the activation time is shortened, and the potential exhibits a significantly negative shift in the 35 °C simulated seawater. However, the increase in temperature promotes the localized corrosion and thus is detrimental to the anode efficiency of AP65 alloy. Moreover, the effect of seawater temperature and current density on the surface morphology of AP65 alloy during the discharge process is also analyzed.

  8. Dual active ionic liquids and organic salts for inhibition of microbially influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Seter, Marianne; Thomson, Melanie J; Stoimenovski, Jelena; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria

    2012-06-18

    We describe a series of novel compounds designed to combat the bacterial growth that leads to microbially induced corrosion on steel in the marine environment. A synergistic effect of the ionic components in these dual active organic salts is demonstrated.

  9. Design of nanocoatings by in situ phosphatizing reagent catalyzed polysilsesquioxane for corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion on metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Kimberly B.

    When a metal reacts with oxygen and water, a redox reaction happens, which will cause corrosion. Current surface pretreatment for inhibiting corrosion on metal alloys is a phosphate conversion bath. The phosphate conversion bath will generate a phosphate-chromate layer to adhere strongly to a metal substrate. However, it is toxic and unfriendly to the environment. Our group proposed an innovative coating that contains a phosphate component (ISPR-In-situ Phosphatizing Reagent) within a protective coating. The ISPR coating will form a bound phosphate layer on the metal surface acting as the corrosion barrier and enhancing adhesion into the metal surface; moreover, it is low in cost and non-toxic. Within this dissertation, there are four projects that investigate design of ISPR nanocoatings for the use of corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion. Surface modification and adjusting concentrations of materials with the different formulations are explored. The first project focuses on the adhesion enhancement of a coating created by modifying the surface of an aluminum panel. Secondly, the next project will discuss and present the use of three rare earth element formulations as a replacement for phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy, AZ61. The third project is the design of a nanocoating by using heat dissipating materials to fill in small vacant spaces in the ISPR network coating on various metal alloys. The last project, studies the strategic selection of incorporating metal components into ISPR network by the reduction potential values on several different alloys. Many methods of analysis are used; SEM, TEM, ASTM B117, ASTM D1308, ASTM D3359, EIS, and thickness probe. It was found that the addition of ISPR in the nanocoatings dramatically improves the vitality of metal alloys and these results will be presented during this dissertation.

  10. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  11. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  12. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  13. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a novel eco-friendly corrosion inhibition for mild steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Binti Kassim, Fatin A; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-22

    The acid corrosion inhibition process of mild steel in 1 M HCl by azelaic acid dihydrazide has been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM). Azelaic acid dihydrazide was synthesized, and its chemical structure was elucidated and confirmed using spectroscopic techniques (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy). Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate that azelaic acid dihydrazide is a mixed-type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiency increases with increased inhibitor concentration and reaches its maximum of 93% at 5 × 10(-3) M. The adsorption of the inhibitor on a mild steel surface obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The effect of te perature on corrosion behavior in the presence of 5 × 10(-3) M inhibitor was studied in the temperature range of 30-60 °C. The results indicated that inhibition efficiencies were enhanced with an increase in concentration of inhibitor and decreased with a rise in temperature. To inspect the surface morphology of inhibitor film on the mild steel surface, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used before and after immersion in 1.0 M HCl.

  15. Corrosion inhibition of steam generator tubesheet by Alloy 690 cladding in secondary side environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho; Shim, Hee Sang

    2013-11-01

    Denting is a phenomenon that a steam generator tube is distorted by a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tube support and tubesheet materials adjacent to the tube. Although denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable concern in the crevice region of the top of tubesheet. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material was cladded onto the surface of an SA508 tubesheet to a thickness of about 9 mm. The corrosion rates of the original SA508 tubesheet and the Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and alkaline simulated environments. Using Alloy 690 cladding, the corrosion rate of the tubesheet within a magnetite sludge pile decreased by a factor of 680 in 0.1 M NiCl2 solution at 300 °C, and by a factor of 58 in 2 M NaOH solution at 315 °C. This means that denting can drastically be prevented by cladding the secondary tubesheet surface with corrosion resistant materials.

  16. One-step fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic surface by electrodeposition on magnesium alloy and its corrosion inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Xue, Jingze; Luo, Dan; Wang, Huiyuan; Gong, Xu; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    A facile, rapid and one-step electrodeposition process has been employed to construct a superhydrophobic surface with micro/nano scale structure on a Mg-Sn-Zn (TZ51) alloy, which is expected to be applied as a biodegradable biomedical implant materials. By changing the electrodeposition time, the maximum contact angle of the droplet was observed as high as 160.4°±0.7°. The characteristics of the as-prepared surface were conducted by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Besides, the anti-corrosion performance of the coatings in stimulated body fluid (SBF) solution were investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results demonstrated that the anti-corrosion property of superhydrophobic surface was greatly improved. This method show beneficial effects on the wettability and corrosion behavior, and therefore provides a efficient route to mitigate the undesirable rapid corrosion of magnesium alloy in favor of application for clinical field.

  17. Corrosion inhibition of cobalt with a thin film of Cu-BTA

    SciTech Connect

    Brusic, V.; Frankel, G.S.; Schrott, A.G.; Petersen, T.A. . IBM Research Division); Rush, B.M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Electrochemical techniques, ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to evaluate the use of benzotriazole, alone or in combination with boric acid/borate buffer and dilute copper sulfate for the protection of cobalt. The data indicate that in slightly alkaline solutions benzotriazole is a strong inhibitor for cobalt corrosion, whereas in water and neutral solutions it produces a barely measurable effect. In the presence of benzotriazole and Cu[sup +2] ions, spontaneous reduction of copper ions leads to the formation of a thin film of Cu-BTA on the cobalt surface. This film acts as a corrosion protector that is better than benzotriazole, with a significant reduction of the corrosion rate even during subsequent exposure to solutions without inhibitors.

  18. Electrodeposition, Morphology, Composition, and Corrosion Performance of Zn-Mn Coatings from a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fashu, S.; Gu, C. D.; Zhang, J. L.; Zheng, H.; Wang, X. L.; Tu, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Different Zn-Mn coatings were successfully electrodeposited on copper substrates from deep eutectic solvent-based electrolytes containing boric acid as an additive. The main objective of this work was to optimize the Zn/Mn ratios and morphologies of the as-electrodeposited Zn-Mn films in order to obtain better corrosion protection performance coatings. The electrodeposition behaviors of Zn-Mn alloys as studied by cyclic voltammetry showed that with increase in electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, Zn(II) ion reduction occurs at higher overpotentials while Mn reduction occurs at lower overpotentials, and this in turn enhances Mn incorporation into the deposit. Characterization results showed that the electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration significantly affects the Mn content, crystal structure, surface morphology, and corrosion performance of the deposits. With increase in electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, the alloy Mn increased and the grain morphology was refined. The crystal structure of Zn-Mn deposits consists of Zn and hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn at low electrodeposition potentials and low electrolyte Mn(II) content. However, at high electrodeposition potentials and electrolyte Mn(II) contents, the crystal structure was only composed of hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn. Corrosion measurements show that all the Zn-Mn samples have a passivating behavior and exhibits higher corrosion resistances when compared to those from aqueous solutions. Thus, optimum electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration were determined producing compact Zn-Mn films with the best corrosion resistance.

  19. Corrosion behavior and inhibitive effects on organotin compounds on nickel in formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.; Singh, V.B. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-07-01

    Corrosion behavior of nickel (Ni) in different compositions of formic acid (HCOOH) at 30C was studied using the potentiostatic polarization method. The shape of the polarization curve was evaluated, and the corrosion current density, critical current density, and passive current density were determined. HCOOH solution of different composition were aggressive for the anodic dissolution of Ni, except for 20 and 30 mol/O HCOOH, in which feeble passitivity was observed. The organometallic compounds dibutyltin dichloride, phenyltin trichloride, diphenyltin dichloride, and triphenyltin chloride ([C[sub 6]H[sub 5

  20. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by 1,4,6-trimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile and synergistic effect of halide ion in 0.5 M H2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourya, Punita; Singh, Praveen; Rastogi, R. B.; Singh, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of iodide ions on inhibitive performance of 1,4,6-trimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile (TODPCN) on mild steel (MS) corrosion in 0.5 M H2SO4 was studied using gravimetric and electrochemical measurements. TODPCN inhibits the corrosion of MS to the extent of 62.3% at its lowest concentration (0.5 mM) and its inhibition efficiency (η) further increases on increasing concentration at 298 K. The adsorption of TODPCN on MS was found to follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The value of η increased on the addition of 2.0 mM KI. The value of synergism parameter being more than unity indicates that the enhanced η value in the presence of iodide ions is only due to synergism. Thus, a cooperative mechanism of inhibition exists between the iodide anion and TODPCN cations. The increase in surface coverage in the presence of KI indicates that iodide ions enhance the adsorption of TODPCN. The surface morphology of corroded/inhibited MS was studied by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of inhibited MS surface was carried out to determine the composition of the adsorbed film. Some quantum chemical parameters and the Mulliken charge densities for TODPCN calculated by density functional theory provided further insight into the mechanism of inhibition.

  1. Synergistic effects between sodium tripolyphosphate and zinc sulfate in corrosion inhibition for copper in neutral tap water

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Siow, K.S.; Teo, W.K.; Tan, K.L.; Hsieh, A.K.

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion inhibition behavior of sodium tripolyphosphate (Na{sub 5}P{sub 3}O{sub 10}, or TPP) and zinc sulfate and the synergistic effects between them were studied for copper in neutral simulated tap water using electrochemical methods, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Zn{sup 2+} alone showed few inhibiting effects on copper corrosion. The film formed in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} was porous and composed mainly of cuprous oxide, which was similar in morphology and composition to films formed in the absence of the inhibitor. In the presence of TPP, a smooth and compact film, believed to be of Cu(II)-TPP compounds, formed on the copper surface. More protective films were formed in solutions containing TPP and Zn{sup 2+} as a blend. High zinc content (15% to 19%) was detected by XPS. Synergistic effects of TPP and Zn{sup 2+} were believed to result from formation of Zn(II)-TPP compounds that incorporated in the films, with Cu(II)-TPP in the upper layer and Cu{sub 2}O in the inner layer. The zinc compounds increased the anodic diffusion resistance of copper ions in the films and enhanced polarization of the cathodic reduction of dissolved oxygen.

  2. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  3. Performance of laser glazed Zr02 TBCs in cyclic oxidation and corrosion burner test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of laser glazed zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated in cyclic oxidation and cyclic corrosion tests. Plasma sprayed zirconia coatings of two thicknesses were partially melted with a CO2 laser. The power density of the focused laser beam was varied from 35 to 75 W/sq mm, while the scanning speed was about 80 cm per minute. In cyclic oxidation tests, the specimens were heated in a burner rig for 6 minutes and cooled for 3 minutes. It is indicated that the laser treated samples have the same life as the untreated ones. However, in corrosion tests, in which the burner rig flame contained 100 PPM sodium fuel equivalent, the laser treated samples exhibit nearly a fourfold life improvement over that of the reference samples vary. In both tests, the lives of the samples inversely with the thickness of the laser melted layer of zirconia.

  4. Development, Processing, and Testing of High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant HVOF Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Wong, F; Haslam, J; Estill, J; Branagan, D; Yang, N; Blue, C

    2003-08-26

    New amorphous-metal and ceramic coatings applied by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process may reduce the waste package materials cost of the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository by over $4 billion (cost reduction of 27 to 42%). Two critical requirements that have been determined from design analysis are protection in brines that may evolve from the evaporative concentration of pore waters and protection for waste package welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Our efforts are directed towards producing and evaluating these high-performance coatings for the development of lower cost waste packages, and will leverage a cost-effective collaboration with DARPA for applications involving marine corrosion.

  5. Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

  6. Inhibition Effects of a Synthesized Novel 4-Aminoantipyrine Derivative on the Corrosion of Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Solution together with Quantum Chemical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Junaedi, Sutiana; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Kadihum, Abdulhadi; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    1,5-Dimethyl-4-((2-methylbenzylidene)amino)-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-one (DMPO) was synthesized to be evaluated as a corrosion inhibitor. The corrosion inhibitory effects of DMPO on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM). The results showed that DMPO inhibited mild steel corrosion in acid solution and indicated that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration. Changes in the impedance parameters suggested an adsorption of DMPO onto the mild steel surface, leading to the formation of protective films. The novel synthesized corrosion inhibitor was characterized using UV-Vis, FT-IR and NMR spectral analyses. Electronic properties such as highest occupied molecular orbital energy, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (EHOMO and ELUMO, respectively) and dipole moment (μ) were calculated and discussed. The results showed that the corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with an increase in the EHOMO values but with a decrease in the ELUMO value. PMID:23736696

  7. Inhibition effects of a synthesized novel 4-aminoantipyrine derivative on the corrosion of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution together with quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Junaedi, Sutiana; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadihum, Abdulhadi; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-06-04

    1,5-Dimethyl-4-((2-methylbenzylidene)amino)-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-one (DMPO) was synthesized to be evaluated as a corrosion inhibitor. The corrosion inhibitory effects of DMPO on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM). The results showed that DMPO inhibited mild steel corrosion in acid solution and indicated that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration. Changes in the impedance parameters suggested an adsorption of DMPO onto the mild steel surface, leading to the formation of protective films. The novel synthesized corrosion inhibitor was characterized using UV-Vis, FT-IR and NMR spectral analyses. Electronic properties such as highest occupied molecular orbital energy, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (EHOMO and ELUMO, respectively) and dipole moment (μ) were calculated and discussed. The results showed that the corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with an increase in the EHOMO values but with a decrease in the ELUMO value.

  8. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy to the study of tannins inhibition of iron and steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; de Obaldía, J.; Rodríguez, M. V.

    2011-11-01

    The inhibitory effect of tannins was investigated using, among others, potentiodynamic polarizations and Mössbauer spectroscopy. These techniques confirmed that the nature, pH and concentration of tannic solution are of upmost importance in the inhibitory properties of the solutions. It is observed that at low tannin concentration or pH, both, hydrolizable and condensed tannins, effectively inhibit iron corrosion, due to the redox properties of tannins. At pH ≈ 0, Mössbauer spectra of the frozen aqueous solutions of iron(III) with the tannin solutions showed that iron is in the form of a monomeric species [Fe(H2O)6]3 + , without coordination with the functional hydroxyl groups of the tannins. The suspended material consisted of amorphous ferric oxide and oxyhydroxides, though with quebracho tannin partly resulted in complex formation and in an iron (II) species from a redox process. Other tannins, such as chestnut hydrolysable tannins, do not complex iron at this low pH. Tannins react at high concentrations or pH (3 and 5) to form insoluble blue-black amorphous complexes of mono-and bis-type tannate complexes, with a relative amount of the bis-ferric tannate generally increasing with pH. Some Fe2 + in the form of hydrated polymeric ferrous tannate could be obtained. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also formed. The latter two phases do not provide corrosion protection. Tannin solutions at natural pH react with electrodeposited iron films (approx. 6 μm) to obtain products consisting only on the catecholate mono-complex of ferric tannate. Some aspects of the mechanism of tannins protection against corrosion are discussed.

  9. An evaluation of the corrosion performance of magnesium-yttrium and yttrium-magnesium nonequilibrium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidersbach, Krista Lynn

    1998-11-01

    In an effort to develop a corrosion-resistant light-weight metallic alloy, magnetron co-sputter deposition and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) have been employed to deposit binary magnesium-yttrium and yttrium-magnesium alloys. Yttrium was selected because it has been shown to significantly alter the passive film of magnesium and has been used in several commercially available alloys. The binary alloys, employed in this study, were evaluated for film structure, electrochemical performance and passive film composition and structure. The film's morphology was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Morphologies of the sputtered alloys ranged from zones 1 to zone T. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used as a quick check for the presence of secondary phases that are detrimental to corrosion behavior. Although secondary phases were present, MgY particles, they did not affect the corrosion performance of the alloys. Electrochemical testing included potentiodynamic polarization, potentiostatic long term testing, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. All studies were performed using a standard three electrode technique in one of two solutions; pH 12 buffered solution containing 0.1M NaCl and 0.05M Nasb2Bsb4Osb7 with varied chloride concentration up to 3.5sp{w}/sb{o} NaCl (pH 9.2). Corrosion rates for all four alloys were a minimum of two orders of magnitude lower than either pure Mg or pure Y. The chemical composition of the air-formed oxides, the passive formed upon immersion in the pH 12 buffered solution with no applied potential, and the passive films formed by potentiostatic polarization in the same solution were characterized using XPS. The internal structure of these surface films was identified using transmission electron microscopy. Results from XPS indicated that a bi-layer oxide-hydroxide film was present on the surface of all the sputtered alloys. The inner layer of the film was found to be Ysb2Osb3. The outer layer was a mixture

  10. Impact of makeup water system performance on PWR steam generator corrosion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.J.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Smith, L.A.

    1985-06-01

    The objectives of this project were to review makeup system design and performance and assess the possible relation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator corrosion to makeup water impurity ingress at fresh water sites. Project results indicated that makeup water transport of most ionic impurities can be expected to have a significant impact on secondary cycle chemistry only if condenser inleakage and other sources of impurities are maintained at very low levels. Since makeup water oxygen control techniques at most study plants were not consistent with state-of-the-art technology, oxygen input to the cycle via makeup can be significant. Leakage of colloidal silica and organics through makeup water systems can be expected to control blowdown silica levels and organic levels throughout the cycle at many plants. Attempts to correlate makeup water quality to steam generator corrosion observations were unsuccessful since (1) other impurity sources were significant compared to makeup at most study plants, (2) many variables are involved in the corrosion process, and (3) in the case of IGA, the variables have not been clearly established. However, in some situations makeup water can be a significant source of contaminants suspected to lead to both IGA and denting.

  11. QSAR, DFT and quantum chemical studies on the inhibition potentials of some carbozones for the corrosion of mild steel in HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk O; Ita, Benedict I

    2011-02-01

    Experimental aspects of the inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel in HCl solutions by some carbozones were studied using gravimetric, thermometric and gasometric methods, while a theoretical study was carried out using density functional theory, a quantitative structure-activity relation, and quantum chemical principles. The results obtained indicated that the studied carbozones are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in HCl. The inhibition efficiencies of the studied carbozones were found to increase with increasing concentration of the respective inhibitor. A strong correlation was found between the average inhibition efficiency and some quantum chemical parameters, and also between the experimental and theoretical inhibition efficiencies (obtained from the quantitative structure-activity relation).

  12. Benzimidazole ligands in the corrosion inhibition for carbon steel in acid medium: DFT study of its interaction on Fe30 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ochoa, E.; Guzmán-Jiménez, S. J.; Hernández, J. Guadalupe; Pandiyan, Thangarasu; Vásquez-Pérez, José M.; Cruz-Borbolla, Julián

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition of N,N‧-bis(benzimidazole-2-yl-methyl)amine (L1) and N, N‧-bis(benzimidazole-2-yl-methyl)hydroxyethylamine (L2) was analyzed by electrochemical and theoretical methods. The data show that ligands form an adsorption layer over an iron surface, obeying the Langmuir isotherm (Δ Gads° of -32.96 kJ mol-1); the value are higher than -20 kJ mol-1 but less than -40 kJ mol-1, belonging to a conversion stage of physical adsorption to chemical adsorption or a comprehensive adsorption. This is consistent with fractal dimension of the electrode surface, estimated by an impedance depression angle of a semicircle that the surface is homogeneously covered by the formation of an inhibitor film. Furthermore, the electronic parameters of the ligands were analyzed by DFT, showing that L1 and L2 possesses corrosion inhibition properties that give up its p orbital electron density through its HOMO orbital to the metal LUMO to form an adsorption layer, and this has been proved theoretically by the interaction of ligands with Fe30. In addition, we have collected corrosion inhibition data for around 70 organic compounds reported in the literature, and the inhibition data plotted against different inhibitors, showing that amine ligands are good corrosion inhibitors.

  13. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-09-02

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms.

  14. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  15. CO sub 2 induced inhibition of the localized corrosion of aluminum, Al-0. 5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu in dilute HF solution

    SciTech Connect

    Scully, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science); Peebles, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study presents work on corrosion of aluminum, Al-.5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu. Electrochemical tests were performed in dilute HF solutions both with and without CO{sub 2} sparging. It is suggested that CO{sub 2} or its reaction products interact with the passive film so that exposure of Cu in the oxide-solution interface is minimized. CO{sub 2} is investigated as a corrosion inhibitor. 4 refs. (JDL)

  16. First increment of second specimen results to performance assessment-long term corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this correspondence, we report the 6 month corrosion data of corrosion resistant alloys (alloys 825, C22 & C4, and Ti Gr 12 & Ti Gr 16, and Inconel 625) and one year data of corrosion-allowance materials (A387 Gr22, A516 Gr55 and A27 Gr70-40), intermediate resistance alloys (Monel 400 and CDA 715) and corrosion resistant materials (alloys C22 and 625 only).

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies on the inhibition potentials of aromatic oxaldehydes for the corrosion of mild steel in 0.1 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk Okon; Ita, Benedict I

    2011-04-01

    Experimental aspect of the inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel by oxaldehydes was carried out using gravimetric, gasometric and thermometric methods while the theoretical studies were carried out using quantum chemical principle and quantitative structure activity relation (QSAR) approaches. The results obtained indicated that the studied oxaldehydes are good inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in HCl solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitors on mild steel surface is spontaneous, exothermic and is consistent with the assumptions of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Excellent correlations were found between the calculated quantum chemical parameters and experimental inhibition efficiencies of the studied compounds. Correlations between theoretical and experimental inhibition efficiencies (for the different Hamiltonians, namely, PM6, PM3, AM1, RM1 and MNDO) were very close to unity. Condensed Fukui function and condensed softness have been used to determine the sites for electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks on each of the inhibitors.

  18. Chem I Supplement: Corrosion: A Waste of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article, intended for secondary school chemistry students, discusses the corrosion of metals. The discussion includes: (1) thermodynamic aspects of corrosion; (2) electrochemical aspects of corrosion; and (3) inhibition of corrosion processes. (HM)

  19. Corrosion performance of structural alloys for oxy-fuel combustion systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy is intensely promoting research and development of oxyfuel combustion systems that employ oxygen, instead of air, for burning the fuel. The resulting flue gas primarily consists of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} that facilitates sequestration of CO{sub 2}, thereby leading to reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. Also, as the oxidant is bereft of N{sub 2}, NO{sub x} emissions are minimized to a great extent from the exhaust gas. Studies at NETL have indicated that oxy-fuel combustion can increase efficiency in the power plants from the current 30-35% to 50-60%. However, the presence of H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2} and trace constituents like nitrogen and sulfur in the environment at the operating temperatures and pressures can have adverse effects on the corrosion and mechanical properties of structural alloys. Thus, there is a critical need to evaluate the response of structural and turbine materials in simulated H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2} environments in an effort to select materials that have adequate high temperature mechanical properties and environmental performance. During the past year, a program was initiated to evaluate the corrosion performance of structural alloys in CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-steam environments at elevated temperatures. Materials selected for the study include intermediate-chromium ferritic steels, Fe-Cr-Ni heat-resistant alloys, and nickelbased superalloys. Coupon specimens of several of the alloys were exposed to pure CO{sub 2} at temperatures between 650 and 850C for times up to 1450 h. The corrosion tests in CO{sub 2}-50% steam environment was conducted at temperatures between 650 and 850C for times up to 1250 h. The steam for the experiment was generated by pumping distilled water and converting it to steam in the preheat portion of the furnace, ahead of the specimen exposure location. Preliminary results will be presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, and microstructural

  20. Long-Term Anti-Corrosion Performance of a Conducting Polymer-Based Coating System for Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tongyan; Yu, Qifeng

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of a two-layer coating system was evaluated by two accelerated corrosion tests, i.e., the ASTM B117 Salt spray test and the ASTM D5894 Cyclic salt fog/UV exposure test, and a series of surface analyses. The coating system was developed for protecting structural steels from corrosion, including a functional primer made of intrinsically conducting polymer (ICP) and a protective topcoat. The standard pull-off test per ASTM D4541 was employed for characterizing the adhesion of the coating systems to substrate, aided by visual examination of the surface deterioration of the samples. The ICP-based systems demonstrated superior long-term anti-corrosion capacity when a polyurethane topcoat is used. The ICP-based primer made of a waterborne epoxy gave poorer anti-corrosion performance than the ICP-based primer made of regular non-waterborne epoxy, which can be attributed to the lower adhesion the waterborne epoxy demonstrated to the substrate surface. The zinc-rich control systems showed good anti-corrosion durability; however, they may produce excessive oxidative products of zinc to cause coating delamination. Based on the test results, the two-layer coating system consisting of an ICP-based primer and a polyurethane topcoat outperforms the conventional zinc-rich coating systems for corrosion protection of steels.

  1. Quantum chemical assessment of benzimidazole derivatives as corrosion inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of well-known inhibitors are organic compounds containing multiple bonds and heteroatoms, such as O, N or S, which allow adsorption onto the metal surface. These compounds can adsorb onto the metal surface and block active surface sites, reducing the rate of corrosion. Results A comparative theoretical study of three benzimidazole isomers, benzimidazole (BI), 2-methylbenzimidazole (2-CH3-BI), and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-SH-BI), as corrosion inhibitors was performed using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional basis set. Conclusions Nitro and amino groups were selected for investigation as substituents of the three corrosion inhibitors. Nitration of the corrosion inhibitor molecules led to a decrease in inhibition efficiency, while reduction of the nitro group led to an increase in inhibition efficiency. These aminobenzimidazole isomers represent a significant improvement in the inhibition efficiency of corrosion inhibitor molecules. PMID:24674343

  2. Conceptual DFT Descriptors of Amino Acids with Potential Corrosion Inhibition Properties Calculated with the Latest Minnesota Density Functionals

    PubMed Central

    Frau, Juan; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides have the potential to perform as corrosion inhibitors. The chemical reactivity descriptors that arise from Conceptual DFT for the twenty natural amino acids have been calculated by using the latest Minnesota family of density functionals. In order to verify the validity of the calculation of the descriptors directly from the HOMO and LUMO, a comparison has been performed with those obtained through ΔSCF results. Moreover, the active sites for nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks have been identified through Fukui function indices, the dual descriptor Δf(r) and the electrophilic and nucleophilic Parr functions. The results could be of interest as a starting point for the study of large peptides where the calculation of the radical cation and anion of each system may be computationally harder and costly. PMID:28361050

  3. Conceptual DFT Descriptors of Amino Acids with Potential Corrosion Inhibition Properties Calculated with the Latest Minnesota Density Functionals.

    PubMed

    Frau, Juan; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides have the potential to perform as corrosion inhibitors. The chemical reactivity descriptors that arise from Conceptual DFT for the twenty natural amino acids have been calculated by using the latest Minnesota family of density functionals. In order to verify the validity of the calculation of the descriptors directly from the HOMO and LUMO, a comparison has been performed with those obtained through ΔSCF results. Moreover, the active sites for nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks have been identified through Fukui function indices, the dual descriptor Δf(r) and the electrophilic and nucleophilic Parr functions. The results could be of interest as a starting point for the study of large peptides where the calculation of the radical cation and anion of each system may be computationally harder and costly.

  4. Inhibition of Brass Corrosion by 2-Mercapto-1-methylimidazole in Weakly Alkaline Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Milan B.; Antonijevic, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of brass and anticorrosion effect of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (2-MMI) in weakly alkaline solution with and without presence of chloride ions was investigated using electrochemical techniques in addition to SEM-EDS analysis. Results show that inhibition efficiency depended on inhibitor concentration and immersion time of brass electrode in inhibitor solution. Inhibition mechanism of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole includes adsorption of inhibitor on active sites on electrode surface which was confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis of the brass. Adsorption of the 2-MMI in sodium tetraborate solution obeys Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm, while in the presence of chloride, ions adsorption of inhibitor obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  5. Letdown valve material performance against corrosion and erosion in brown coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, N.; Makino, E.; Tamura, M.

    1999-07-01

    Severe erosion occurred on the trim of letdown valves used as pressure reduction in brown coal direct liquefaction 50t/d pilot plant. Corrosion which is caused by elution of cobalt as binder is recognized on the eroded trim made by tungsten carbide (WC). A little erosion and no corrosion are recognized on the trim made by tungsten carbide containing a bit of chromium. The elution of cobalt seems to be caused by the acid corrosion because cobalt has no corrosive resistance against acid and the erosion of tungsten carbide is concluded to be corrosive wear. Therefore, the addition of chromium which takes a role to strengthen electrochemically cobalt bonding phase is effective to provide tungsten carbide with corrosive resistant behavior against acid corrosive circumstance under brown coal liquefaction process.

  6. PAINT ADHESION AND CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF CHROMIUM-FREE PRETREATMENTS OF 55% AL-ZN-COATED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adhesion and corrosion performances for several pretreatments of 55% Al-Zn-coated steels which were coil-coated with polyester paint systems were determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate new, silane-based metal pretreatments and to compare their performance wit...

  7. New corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether for mild steel in 1 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinyu; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xia, Shuwei; Shan, Mingli; Li, Xia; Yu, Liangmin; Tang, Qunwei

    2016-05-01

    Pursuit of good inhibition performance has been a persistent objective for advanced inhibitor industry. Here we demonstrate the experimental realization of a new corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether (AAME) from N-Methylol acrylamide (N-MAM) for mild steel in 1 M HCl. The resultant adsorption films have inhibition efficiency as high as 96.2%. Moreover, a theoretical investigation is also launched to demonstrate the potential mechanism behind the promising corrosion behaviors. This work represents a significant step forward, as it demonstrates how to make scalable AAME inhibitors as well as to enhance inhibition performances for high-efficiency and cost-effective corrosion inhibition platforms.

  8. Adsorption and inhibitive properties of a new synthesized guanidine derivative on corrosion of copper in 0.5 M H 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, K. F.

    2008-12-01

    The inhibiting action of N-(5,6-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-[1,2,4] triazin-3-yl)-guanidine (NTG) on the corrosion of copper in 0.5 M sulphuric acid was studied. NTG was synthesized and studied as an inhibitor for corrosion of copper. Results of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance (EIS) measurements consistently identify NTG as a good copper corrosion inhibitor. Potentiodynamic polarization studies clearly showed that NTG is a cathodic-type inhibitor for copper in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 solutions. Data obtained from EIS were analyzed to model the corrosion inhibition process through an equivalent circuit. The adsorptive behaviour of NTG on copper in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 was also investigated. The copper/NTG/solvent interfaces were simulated and the charges on NTG molecule as well as its structural parameters were calculated in presence of solvent effects. Adsorption of NTG on the surface of copper is found to obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  9. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid by 2,5-bis(2-aminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole

    SciTech Connect

    Bentiss, F.; Lagrenee, M.; Traisnel, M.; Hornez, J.C.

    1999-10-01

    The inhibition effect of a new class of organic inhibitors (e.g., 2,5-bis(2-aminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole [2-APOX]) on the corrosion of mild steel in molar hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated. The inhibitor was synthesized and its inhibiting action on the corrosion was studied through weight loss and various electrochemical techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization studies clearly revealed the fact that 2-APOX is a mixed-type inhibitor. Changes in impedance parameters (charge-transfer resistance [R{sub t}] and double-layer capacitance [C{sub dl}]) were indicative of adsorption of 2-APOX on the metal surface, leading to the formation of a protective film that grew with increasing exposure time. The 2-APOX appeared to function through the general adsorption mode following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel in 1 M NCl with addition of 80 mg/L of 2-APOX was studied in the temperature range from 25 C to 60 C. The associated activation corrosion and free adsorption energies were determined. This inhibitor is considered a noncytotoxic substance.

  10. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 by prestrain

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Kearns, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Tests of precracked and as-notched compact tension specimens were conducted in 3600C hydrogenated water to determine the effect of prestrain on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Alloy X-750 in the HTH, AH and HOA heat treated conditions. Prestraining is defined as the intentional application of an initial load (or strain) that is higher than the final test load. Prestrain was varied from 10% to 40% (i.e., the initial to final load ratios ranged from 1.1 to 1.4). Other variables included notch root radius, stress level and irradiation. Specimens were bolt-loaded to maintain essentially constant displacement conditions during the course of the test. The frequent heat up and cooldown cycles that were necessary for periodic inspections provided an opportunity to evaluate the effect of test variables on rapid low temperature crack propagation to which this alloy is subject. For Condition HTH, application of 20% to 40% prestrain either eliminates or significantly retards SCC initiation in as-notched specimens and the onset of crack growth in precracked specimens. In addition, this procedure reduces the propensity for low temperature crack growth during cooldown. Similar results were observed for precracked HOA specimens. Application of 20% prestrain also retards SCC in as-notched and precracked AH specimens, but the effects are not as great as in Condition HTH. Prestraining at the 10% level was found to produce an inconsistent benefit. In-reactor SCC testing shows that prestrain greatly improves the in-flux and out-of-flux SCC resistance of Condition HTH material. No SCC was observed in precracked specimens prestrained 30%, whereas extensive cracking was observed in their nonprestrain counterparts.

  11. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  12. Inhibition of copper corrosion by the formation of Schiff base self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Han, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Shi-Liang; Chen, Zhencheng

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-((2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide) methylene) benzoic acid (HD2) (denoted as HD2-SAMs) were formed on copper surface. The SAMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Polarization curve and weight loss methods indicated that the highest inhibition efficiency was 93.9% for CO2-saturated simulative oilfield water at a self-assembled time of 3 h. Potential-time curve, electrochemical impedance tests showed that HD2-SAMs on copper surface exhibited excellent inhibition effect at 30 °C. The adsorption behavior of HD2-SAMs on the copper surface followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which was indicative of typically chemical adsorption. Quantum chemistry calculation showed that O and N atoms can interact with Cu atoms by coordination bonds which were the mainly active area of the adsorption of HD2 molecules.

  13. Robust Slippery Coating with Superior Corrosion Resistance and Anti-Icing Performance for AZ31B Mg Alloy Protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialei; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2017-03-29

    Biomimetic slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) are developed as a potential alternative to superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) to resolve the issues of poor durability in corrosion protection and susceptibility to frosting. Herein, we fabricated a double-layered SLIPS coating on the AZ31 Mg alloy for corrosion protection and anti-icing application. The porous top layer was infused by lubricant, and the compact underlayer was utilized as a corrosion barrier. The water-repellent SLIPS coating exhibits a small sliding angle and durable corrosion resistance compared with the SHS coating. Moreover, the SLIPS coating delivers durable anti-icing performance for the Mg alloy substrate, which is obviously superior to the SHS coating. Multiple barriers in the SLIPS coating, including the infused water-repellent lubricant, the self-assembled monolayers coated porous top layer, and the compact layered double hydroxide-carbonate composite underlayer, are suggested as being responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance and anti-icing performance. The robust double-layered SLIPS coating should be of great importance to expanding the potential applications of light metals and their alloys.

  14. Synergistic effect of tartaric acid with 2,6-diaminopyridine on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 0.5 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Yujie; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengtao; Li, Wenpo; Yu, Shanshan; Tan, Jianhong

    2016-09-15

    The inhibitive ability of 2,6-diaminopyridine, tartaric acid and their synergistic effect towards mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution was evaluated at various concentrations using potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and weight loss experiments. Corresponding surfaces of mild steel were examined by atomic force microscope (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The experimental results are in good agreement and reveal a favorable synergistic effect of 2,6-diaminopyridine with tartaric acid, which could protect mild steel from corrosion effectively. Besides, quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation were used to clarify the inhibition mechanism of the synergistic effect.

  15. Synergistic effect of tartaric acid with 2,6-diaminopyridine on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 0.5 M HCl

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Yujie; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengtao; Li, Wenpo; Yu, Shanshan; Tan, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitive ability of 2,6-diaminopyridine, tartaric acid and their synergistic effect towards mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution was evaluated at various concentrations using potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and weight loss experiments. Corresponding surfaces of mild steel were examined by atomic force microscope (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The experimental results are in good agreement and reveal a favorable synergistic effect of 2,6-diaminopyridine with tartaric acid, which could protect mild steel from corrosion effectively. Besides, quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation were used to clarify the inhibition mechanism of the synergistic effect. PMID:27628901

  16. Synergistic effect of tartaric acid with 2,6-diaminopyridine on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 0.5 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yujie; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengtao; Li, Wenpo; Yu, Shanshan; Tan, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    The inhibitive ability of 2,6-diaminopyridine, tartaric acid and their synergistic effect towards mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution was evaluated at various concentrations using potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and weight loss experiments. Corresponding surfaces of mild steel were examined by atomic force microscope (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The experimental results are in good agreement and reveal a favorable synergistic effect of 2,6-diaminopyridine with tartaric acid, which could protect mild steel from corrosion effectively. Besides, quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation were used to clarify the inhibition mechanism of the synergistic effect.

  17. Adsorption and corrosion inhibition behavior of hydroxyethyl cellulose and synergistic surfactants additives for carbon steel in 1M HCl.

    PubMed

    Mobin, Mohammad; Rizvi, Marziya

    2017-01-20

    The inhibitory effect of hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) on A1020 carbon steel corrosion in 1M HCl solution was evaluated at different concentrations and temperatures using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantum chemical analysis. Inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increase in concentration of HEC but decreased with increasing temperature. Inhibitory effect of HEC mixed with minimal concentration of surfactants, triton X 100 (TX), cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was also evaluated. HEC gets adsorbed onto the mild steel surface via mixed type adsorption. Ea, ΔH, ΔS and ΔG⁰ads, the thermodynamic and activation parameters, were calculated and discussed. Adsorption of inhibitor on the steel/solution interface follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. EIS suggests formation of protective layer over the carbon steel surface. Results of different experimental techniques pertaining to the inhibitory effect of HEC and HEC mixed with surfactants are in good agreement with theoretical quantum chemical investigation.

  18. Effect of Some Oxadiazole Derivatives on the Corrosion Inhibition of Brass in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Raj, X.; Rajendran, N.

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behavior of brass in natural seawater in the absence and presence of oxadiazole derivatives, namely 2,5-bis-(4-aminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (BAPOD), 2,5-bis-(4-bromophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (BBPOD), 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (DPOD), and 2,5-bis-(4-nitrophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (BNPOD) has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The inhibition efficiency of the inhibitors was also evaluated at different temperatures. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increase in concentration of the inhibitors but decrease with rise in temperature for all the inhibitors except BNPOD. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP-AES) analysis confirmed that dezincification was minimized to a greater extent in the presence of the inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) observations of the brass surface confirmed the existence of an adsorbed film.

  19. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A

    2017-02-03

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance.

  20. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance. PMID:28157233

  1. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance.

  2. Factors affecting the corrosivity of pulping liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlewood, Patrick Evan

    Increased equipment failures and the resultant increase in unplanned downtime as the result of process optimization programs continue to plague pulp mills. The failures are a result of a lack of understanding of corrosion in the different pulping liquors, specifically the parameters responsible for its adjustment such as the role and identification of inorganic and organic species. The current work investigates the role of inorganic species, namely sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, on liquor corrosivity at a range of process conditions beyond those currently experienced in literature. The role of sulfur species, in the activation of corrosion and the ability of hydroxide to passivate carbon steel A516-Gr70, is evaluated with gravimetric and electrochemical methods. The impact of wood chip weathering on process corrosion was also evaluated. Results were used to identify black liquor components, depending on the wood species, which play a significant role in the activation and inhibition of corrosion for carbon steel A516-Gr70 process equipment. Further, the effect of black liquor oxidation on liquor corrosivity was evaluated. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance of selected materials provided information on classes of materials that may be reliably used in aggressive pulping environments.

  3. Extended Performance Assessment in Accelerated Corrosion and Adhesion of CARC Prepared Aluminum Alloy 5059-H131 for Three Different Pretreatment Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    9540P Cyclic Accelerated Corrosion Analysis of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219 , 5083, and 7075 Using DoD Paint Systems...PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT IN ACCELERATED CORROSION AND ADHESION OF CARC PREPARED ALUMINUM ALLOY 5059-H131 FOR THREE DIFFERENT PRETREATMENT METHODS Brian E...whether or not the alloy differences will warrant modifications to current pretreatment processes. Keywords: Corrosion , Aluminum , 5059-H131, Cyclic

  4. Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. B.; Li, H. F.; Zheng, Y. F.; Wei, S. C.; Li, M.

    2010-06-01

    The corrosion properties of two Zr-based bulk metallic glass, Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 (LM1) and Zr44Ti11Cu10Ni10Be25 (LM1b) were investigated by electrochemical measurements in simulated body fluid with pH value 7.4. With much lower current density and higher impedance values, as well as higher pitting potential, LM1b showed superior corrosion resistance to LM1. Under identical sample preparation and testing conditions, the difference in corrosion performance is found to relate closely to their surface wettability difference, as contact angle tests showed that LM1b is more hydrophobic than LM1. The excess free volume was measured and found having a close correlation with the wettability or the surface energy.

  5. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-09-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  6. Quantum chemical studies on the inhibition potentials of some Penicillin compounds for the corrosion of mild steel in 0.1 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk Okon; Ebenso, Eno E

    2010-07-01

    Inhibitive and adsorption properties of Penicillin G, Amoxicillin and Penicillin V potassium were studied using gravimetric, gasometric and quantum chemical methods. The results obtained indicate that these compounds are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in HCl solution. The adsorption of the inhibitors on mild steel surface is spontaneous, exothermic and supports the mechanism of physical adsorption. From DFT results, the sites for nucleophilic attacks in the inhibitors are the carboxylic acid functional group while the sites for electrophilic attacks are in the phenyl ring. There was a strong correlation between theoretical and experimental inhibition efficiencies.

  7. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors Containing Microparticles for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Calle, Luz M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the results obtained from experiments designed to evaluate the release properties, as well as the corrosion inhibition effectiveness, of several encapsulated corrosion inhibitors. Microencapsulation has been used in the development of environmentally friendly multifunctional smart coatings. This technique enables the incorporation of autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition and self-healing functionalities into many commercially available coating systems. Select environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic and inorganic pH-sensitive microparticles and their release in basic solutions was studied. The release rate results showed that the encapsulation can be tailored from fast, for immediate corrosion protection, to slow, which will provide continued long-term corrosion protection. The incorporation of several corrosion inhibitor release profiles into a coating provides effective corrosion protection properties. To investigate the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the encapsulated inhibitors, electrochemical techniques were used to obtain corrosion potential, polarization curve and polarization resistance data. These measurements were performed using the free as well as the encapsulated inhibitors singly or in combinations. Results from these electrochemical tests will be compared to those obtained from weight loss and other accelerated corrosion experiments.

  8. Corrosion process and structural performance of a 17 year old reinforced concrete beam stored in chloride environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, T. Castel, A. Francois, R.

    2007-11-15

    The long-term corrosion process of reinforced concrete beams is studied in this paper. The reinforced concrete elements were stored in a chloride environment for 17years under service loading in order to be representative of real structural conditions. At different stages, cracking maps were drawn, total chloride contents were measured and mechanical tests were performed. Results show that the bending cracks and their width do not influence significantly the service life of the structure. The chloride threshold at the reinforcement depth, used by standards as a single parameter to predict the end of the initiation period, is a necessary but not a sufficient parameter to define service life. The steel-concrete interface condition is also a determinant parameter. The bleeding of concrete is an important cause of interface de-bonding which leads to an early corrosion propagation of the reinforcements. The structural performance under service load (i.e.: stiffness in flexure) is mostly affected by the corrosion of the tension reinforcement (steel cross-section and the steel-concrete bond reduction). Limit-state service life design based on structural performance reduction in terms of serviceability shows that the propagation period of the corrosion process is an important part of the reinforced concrete service life.

  9. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  10. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Potential on the In Vitro Corrosion Performance of Biomedical Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, M. İbrahim; Karahan, İsmail H.; Yücel, Yasin; Golden, Teresa D.

    2016-10-01

    CoCrMo biomedical alloys were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer to improve biocompatibility and in vitro corrosion performance. A fast electrodeposition process was completed in 5 minutes for the hydroxyapatite coating. Effect of the solution temperature and applied potential on the in vitro corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings was modeled by response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design (CCD). A 5-level-2-factor experimental plan designed by CCD was used; the experimental plan contained 13 coating experiments with a temperature range from 283 K to 347 K (10 °C to 74 °C) and potential range from -1.2 to -1.9 V. Corrosion potential ( E corr) of the coatings in a simulated body fluid solution was chosen as response for the model. Predicted and experimental values fitted well with an R 2 value of 0.9481. Response surface plots of the impedance and polarization resistance ( R P) were investigated. Optimized parameters for electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite were determined by RSM as solution temperature of 305.48 K (32.33 °C) and potential of -1.55 V. Hydroxyapatite coatings fabricated at optimized parameters showed excellent crystal formation and high in vitro corrosion resistance.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

  12. Corrosion and mechanical performance of AZ91 exposed to simulated inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Emily K; Der, Stephanie; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, including Mg-9%Al-1%Zn (AZ91), are biodegradable metals with potential use as temporary orthopedic implants. Invasive orthopedic procedures can provoke an inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment near the implant. This study assessed the influence of inflammation on both the corrosion and mechanical properties of AZ91. The AZ91 samples in the inflammatory protocol were immersed for three days in a complex biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM culture media) that contained serum proteins (FBS), 150 mM of H2O2, and was titrated to a pH of 5. The control protocol immersed AZ91 samples in the same biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM & FBS) but without H2O2 and the acid titration. After 3 days all samples were switched into fresh AMEM & FBS for an additional 3-day immersion. During the initial immersion, inflammatory protocol samples showed increased corrosion rate determined by mass loss testing, increased Mg and Al ion released to solution, and a completely corroded surface morphology as compared to the control protocol. Although corrosion in both protocols slowed once the test electrolyte solution was replaced at 3 days, the samples originally exposed to the simulated inflammatory conditions continued to display enhanced corrosion rates as compared to the control protocol. These lingering effects may indicate the initial inflammatory corrosion processes modified components of the surface oxide and corrosion film or initiated aggressive localized processes that subsequently left the interface more vulnerable to continued enhanced corrosion. The electrochemical properties of the interfaces were also evaluated by EIS, which found that the corrosion characteristics of the AZ91 samples were potentially influenced by the role of intermediate adsorption layer processes. The increased corrosion observed for the inflammatory protocol did not affect the flexural mechanical properties of the AZ91

  13. Corrosion Characterization of Iron-Based High-Performance Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Aprigliano, L F; Yang, N; Perepezko, J H; Beardsley, M B

    2005-03-21

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. One of these compositions, SAM1651, is discussed in detail to illustrate the promise of this general class of materials.

  14. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun; Chen, Cheng-fu; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-02-01

    Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  15. Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by Coatings With Advanced Properties and Enhanced Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    Sim6es, D. E. Tallman, G. P. Bierwagen, "Electrochemical Behaviour of a Mg-Rich Primer in the Protection of Al Alloys ," Corrosion Science 48 (2006...December 20, 200 Final Report July 1, 2004-June 30, 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by...Prof. Dennis E. Tallman: A) New Scanning Probe Studies of Novel Cr-free Active Coatings B) Examination of the Influence of Surface Preparation of Al

  16. Experimental and theoretical study for corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution by some new hydrazine carbodithioic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, K. F.

    2006-04-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solutions by some new hydrazine carbodithioic acid derivatives namely N'-furan-2-yl-methylene-hydrazine carbodithioic acid (A), N'-(4-dimethylamino-benzylidene)-hydrazine carbodithioic acid (B) and N'-(3-nitro-benzylidene)-hydrazine carbodithioic (C) was studied using chemical (weight loss) and electrochemical (potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS) measurements. These measurements show that the inhibition efficiency obtained by these compounds increased by increasing their concentration. The inhibition efficiency follow the order C > B > A. Polarization studies show that these compounds act as mixed type inhibitors in 0.5 M HCl solutions. These inhibitors function through adsorption following Langmuir isotherm. The electronic properties of these inhibitors, obtained using PM3 semi-empirical self-consistence field method, have been correlated with their experimental efficiencies using non-linear regression method.

  17. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  18. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Sung, Dahye; Lee, Junghoon; Kim, Yonghwan; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-12-01

    A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu2O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a novel eco-friendly corrosion inhibition for mild steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Binti Kassim, Fatin A.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    The acid corrosion inhibition process of mild steel in 1 M HCl by azelaic acid dihydrazide has been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM). Azelaic acid dihydrazide was synthesized, and its chemical structure was elucidated and confirmed using spectroscopic techniques (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy). Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate that azelaic acid dihydrazide is a mixed-type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiency increases with increased inhibitor concentration and reaches its maximum of 93% at 5 × 10-3 M. The adsorption of the inhibitor on a mild steel surface obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm. The effect of temperature on corrosion behavior in the presence of 5 × 10-3 M inhibitor was studied in the temperature range of 30-60 °C. The results indicated that inhibition efficiencies were enhanced with an increase in concentration of inhibitor and decreased with a rise in temperature. To inspect the surface morphology of inhibitor film on the mild steel surface, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used before and after immersion in 1.0 M HCl.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a novel eco-friendly corrosion inhibition for mild steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Binti Kassim, Fatin A.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    The acid corrosion inhibition process of mild steel in 1 M HCl by azelaic acid dihydrazide has been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM). Azelaic acid dihydrazide was synthesized, and its chemical structure was elucidated and confirmed using spectroscopic techniques (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy). Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate that azelaic acid dihydrazide is a mixed-type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiency increases with increased inhibitor concentration and reaches its maximum of 93% at 5 × 10−3 M. The adsorption of the inhibitor on a mild steel surface obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm. The effect of temperature on corrosion behavior in the presence of 5 × 10−3 M inhibitor was studied in the temperature range of 30–60 °C. The results indicated that inhibition efficiencies were enhanced with an increase in concentration of inhibitor and decreased with a rise in temperature. To inspect the surface morphology of inhibitor film on the mild steel surface, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used before and after immersion in 1.0 M HCl. PMID:26795066

  1. Wear-corrosion performance of Si-DLC coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Gu; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Yang, Seok-Jo

    2008-07-01

    Si-incorporated diamond-like carbon (Si-DLC) coatings ranging from 0 to 2 at % Si were deposited on Ti-alloy substrate by means of radio frequency plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (r.f. PACVD) technique, using a mixture of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and silane (SiH(4)) as the reaction gas. The synergy in wear and corrosion of Si-DLC coatings was investigated by tribological and electrochemical techniques. The electrolyte used in this test to simulate the corrosive environment of body fluid was a 0.89 wt % NaCl solution of pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. This study provides quantitative data for the assessment of the effect of Si incorporation on the synergistic effect between wear and corrosion in the simulated body fluid environment. In conclusion, tribological and electrochemical measurements showed that the Si-DLC films could improve wear-corrosion resistance in the simulated body fluid environment owing to the lower friction coefficient, corrosion rate, delamination area, and water uptake.

  2. Development of a performance test protocol for corrosion prevention compounds for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Feng

    In the application of corrosion prevention compounds (CPCs), two prime challenges are the lack of a means of performance evaluation and the understanding of the critical properties for the effective protection. This research attempted to investigate those key properties and their influence on CPCs' performance. One result was the development of a suite of test methods to assess performance and key properties. CPCs' performance on AA7075-T6 was assessed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Excellent protection was exhibited by CPC-coated surfaces with interfacial impedances above 0.1 Mohms-cm2 or double layer capacitances below 7.6 x 10-8 F/cm 2. In addition, a prediction method was demonstrated based on impedance parameters that showed the feasibility of using data from less than 50 days of exposure to predict the performance after 180 days of exposure. CPCs provided protection mainly through the formation and maintenance of barrier film. The failure of CPCs is mainly driven by the defects present in the film and at the film/substrate interface. The free energies for the water displacement process indicated that all CPCs could displace water from both pristine and mildly corroded surfaces. However, severely corroded surfaces were found to be more compatible with water so that CPCs cannot displace water from such surfaces. Wicking rates were determined in-situ using fiber optic sensors assembled into simulated lap joints. All tested CPCs demonstrated the ability to wick into occluded regions albeit at varied rates. The wicking rates were substantially smaller when water was present in the occluded regions. The gap of the joint had a strong effect on the wicking kinetics of water and CPCs. For vertically-oriented samples, wicking was slower in tight lap structures and increased with increasing gap to a maximum and then decreased with further increases in gap. No maximum was observed for horizontally-oriented crevices. A simulation of the wicking

  3. DOE-DARPA High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM), Annual HPCRM Team Meeting & Technical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Brown, B; Bayles, B; Lemieux, T; Choi, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Branagan, D; Blue, C; Peter, B; Beardsley, B; Graeve, O; Aprigliano, L; Yang, N; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-21

    The overall goal is to develop high-performance corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous-metal coatings for prolonged trouble-free use in very aggressive environments: seawater & hot geothermal brines. The specific technical objectives are: (1) Synthesize Fe-based amorphous-metal coating with corrosion resistance comparable/superior to Ni-based Alloy C-22; (2) Establish processing parameter windows for applying and controlling coating attributes (porosity, density, bonding); (3) Assess possible cost savings through substitution of Fe-based material for more expensive Ni-based Alloy C-22; (4) Demonstrate practical fabrication processes; (5) Produce quality materials and data with complete traceability for nuclear applications; and (6) Develop, validate and calibrate computational models to enable life prediction and process design.

  4. Fatigue performance of blade steel T552 in a corrosive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoušek, J.; Hřeben, S.; Špirit, Z.; Strejcius, J.; Kasl, J.

    2017-02-01

    This contribution is based on an experimental programme which deals with the issue of blade steel T552 corrosion fatigue damage. The specimens were taken from a reference material delivered for blade production and tested in a corrosion cell under pre-stress of 300 MPa. A chloride solution of 35 ppm was chosen as the environment at a temperature of 80 °C. Such an environment can be considered as the limit state that should not occur during the operating regime. The results are summarized and compared with experiments conducted at another workplace.

  5. Inhibition of corrosion of Al 6061, aluminum, and an aluminum-copper alloy in chloride-free aqueous media. Part 2: Behavior in basic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kharafi, F.M.; Badawy, W.A.

    1998-05-01

    Electrochemical characteristics of Al 6061 (UNS A96061), Al and an Al-Cu alloy were investigated in aqueous solutions. Inhibition of the corrosion processes in basic solutions was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. Among a series of inhibitors, molybdate (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and dichromates (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}) were found effective in passivating the metal or alloy surface. The high inhibition action of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} was traced and discussed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the different electrode materials revealed the presence of Cu peaks on the Al-Cu alloy surface. Immersion of the different electrodes in basic solutions containing the same concentration of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}, MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) anions did not show characteristic peaks of Cr, Mo, or S, which meant the surface layer consisted mainly of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Depth profiling experiments up to 6.0-nm thickness showed the Cu peaks of the Al-Cu alloy appeared after etching and that Mo was incorporated in the surface film. The presence of Cu on the Al-Cu surface initiated flawed regions, identified by scanning electron microscopy, which were responsible for increased corrosion rates of this alloy. Effectiveness of the dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor for these materials resulted from its powerful oxidizing properties, which led to formation of a stable passive film.

  6. Low cost corrosion damage mitigation and improved fatigue performance of low plasticity burnished 7075-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevéy, Paul S.; Cammett, John

    2001-10-01

    Low plasticity burnishing (LPB) has been investigated as a surface enhancement process and corrosion mitigation method for aging aircraft structural applications. Compressive residual stresses reaching the alloy yield strength and extending to a depth of 1.25 mm (0.050 in.) deeper than typical corrosion damage is achievable. Excellent surface finish can be achieved with no detectable metallurgical damage to surface and subsurface material. Salt fog exposures of 100 and 500 h reduced the fatigue strength at 2×106 cycles by 50%. The LPB of the corroded surface, without removal of the corrosion product or pitted material, restored the 2×106 fatigue strength to greater than that of the original machined surface. The fatigue strength of the corroded material in the finite life regime (104 to 106 cycles) after LPB was 140 MPa (20 ksi) higher than the original uncorroded alloy and increased the life by an order of magnitude. Ease of adaptation to computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools allows LPB processing at costs and speeds comparable to machining operations. Low plasticity burnishing offers a promising new technology for mitigation of corrosion damage and improved fatigue life of aircraft structural components with significant cost and time savings over current practices.

  7. Corrosion inhibition of copper in aqueous chloride solution by 1H-1,2,3-triazole and 1,2,4-triazole and their combinations: electrochemical, Raman and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Ofoegbu, Stanley Udochukwu; Galvão, Tiago L P; Gomes, José R B; Tedim, João; Nogueira, Helena I S; Ferreira, M G S; Zheludkevich, M L

    2017-02-22

    Triazoles are well-known organic corrosion inhibitors of copper. 1H-1,2,3-Triazole and 1,2,4-triazole, two very simple molecules with the only difference being the positions of the nitrogen atoms in the triazole ring, were studied in this work as corrosion inhibitors of copper in 50 mM NaCl solution using a set of electrochemical and analytical techniques. The results of electrochemical tests indicate that 1H-1,2,3-triazole exhibited superior inhibitor properties but could not suppress anodic copper dissolution at moderate anodic potentials (>+300 mV SCE), while 1,2,4-triazole, although it exhibited higher anodic currents, suppressed anodic copper dissolution at very anodic potentials. Density functional theory calculations were also performed to interpret the measured data and trends observed in the electrochemical studies. The computational studies considered either the inhibitors isolated in the gaseous phase or adsorbed onto Cu(111) surface models. From the calculations, the mechanisms of the inhibitive effects of both triazoles were established and plausible mechanisms of formation of the protective films on the Cu surface were proposed. The results of this study hold positive implications for research in the areas of catalysis, and copper content control in water purification systems.

  8. Effect of Cr content on the corrosion performance of low-Cr alloy steel in a CO2 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lining; Wang, Bei; Zhu, Jinyang; Li, Wei; Zheng, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Low-Cr alloy steel demonstrates lower corrosion rate than does C steel in a high-temperature and high-pressure CO2-containing environment. This study aimed to clarify the role of the Cr content in mitigating corrosion and reports the performance of 1%Cr, 2%Cr, 3%Cr, 4%Cr, 5%Cr, and 6.5%Cr steels. The results show that low-Cr alloy steel in CO2 at 80 °C and 0.8 MPa possesses spontaneous prepassivation characteristics when the Cr content is 3% or higher. Furthermore, the formation and peel-off of a prepassivation film on 3%Cr-6.5%Cr steels surfaces during polarization demonstrate that adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate can cause protective layer. The main component of prepassivation film on 3%Cr steel is Cr(OH)3. Thus, the role of Cr is revealed. An adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate causes the formation of protective Cr(OH)3 layer, which helps low-Cr steel to possess prepassivation characteristics. Prepassivation is the reason why low-Cr steel has a lower corrosion rate than C steel.

  9. Corrosion of steel in simulated nuclear waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    1993-12-01

    Processing of inhibited nuclear waste to forms for long-term storage will cause waste tank environments to have dynamic conditions. During processing compositional changes in the waste may produce a corrosive environment for the plain carbon steel tanks. Large concentrations of nitrates which corrode steel are contained in the waste. Nitrite and hydroxides are added to inhibit any corrosion. Concentration changes of nitrate and nitrite were investigated to identify corrosion regimes that may occur during processing. Corrosion testing was performed with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance. Test samples were plain carbon steel which was similar to the material of construction of the waste tanks. The corrosion morphology of test samples was investigated by visual evaluation and scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis was also performed using energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion mechanism changed as a function of the nitrate concentration. As the nitrate concentration was increased the steel transitioned from a passive state to general attack, and finally pitting and crevice corrosion. The nitrate anion appeared to destabilize the surface oxide. Nitrite countered the oxide breakdown, although the exact mechanism was not determined.

  10. Treatment Prevents Corrosion in Steel and Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, to protect rebar from corrosion, NASA developed an electromigration technique that sends corrosion-inhibiting ions into rebar to prevent rust, corrosion, and separation from the surrounding concrete. Kennedy Space Center worked with Surtreat Holding LLC, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a company that had developed a chemical option to fight structural corrosion, combining Surtreat's TPS-II anti-corrosive solution and electromigration. Kennedy's materials scientists reviewed the applicability of the chemical treatment to the electromigration process and determined that it was an effective and environmentally friendly match. Ten years later, NASA is still using this approach to fight concrete corrosion, and it has also developed a new technology that will further advance these efforts-a liquid galvanic coating applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete to protect the embedded rebar from corrosion. Surtreat licensed this new coating technology and put it to use at the U.S. Army Naha Port, in Okinawa, Japan. The new coating prevents corrosion of steel in concrete in several applications, including highway and bridge infrastructures, piers and docks, concrete balconies and ceilings, parking garages, cooling towers, and pipelines. A natural compliment to the new coating, Surtreat's Total Performance System provides diagnostic testing and site analysis to identify the scope of problems for each project, manufactures and prescribes site-specific solutions, controls material application, and verifies performance through follow-up testing and analysis.

  11. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies on the corrosion inhibition potentials of some purines for aluminum in 0.1 M HCl

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nnabuk O.; Momoh-Yahaya, H.; Oguzie, Emeka E.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental aspect of the corrosion inhibition potential of adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and, hypoxanthine (HYP) was carried out using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods while the theoretical aspect of the work was carried out by calculations of semi-empirical parameters (for AM1, MNDO, CNDO, PM3 and RM1 Hamiltonians), Fukui functions and inhibitor–metal interaction energies. Results obtained from the experimental studies were in good agreement and indicated that adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and hypoxanthine (HYP) are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of aluminum in solutions of HCl. Data obtained from electrochemical experiment revealed that the studied purines functioned by adsorption on the aluminum/HCl interface and inhibited the cathodic half reaction to a greater extent and anodic half reaction to a lesser extent. The adsorption of the purines on the metal surface was found to be exothermic and spontaneous. Deviation of the adsorption characteristics of the studied purines from the Langmuir adsorption model was compensated by the fitness of Flory Huggins and El Awardy et al. adsorption models. Quantum chemical studies revealed that the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the studied purines are functions of some quantum chemical parameters including total energy of the molecules (TE), energy gap (EL–H), electronic energy of the molecule (EE), dipole moment and core–core repulsion energy (CCR). Fukui functions analysis through DFT and MP2 theories indicated slight complications and unphysical results. However, results obtained from calculated Huckel charges, molecular orbital and interaction energies, the adsorption of the inhibitors proceeded through the imine nitrogen (N5) in GU, emanine nitrogen (N7) in AD and the pyridine nitrogen (N5) in HPY. PMID:25750754

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies on the corrosion inhibition potentials of some purines for aluminum in 0.1 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk O; Momoh-Yahaya, H; Oguzie, Emeka E

    2015-03-01

    Experimental aspect of the corrosion inhibition potential of adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and, hypoxanthine (HYP) was carried out using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods while the theoretical aspect of the work was carried out by calculations of semi-empirical parameters (for AM1, MNDO, CNDO, PM3 and RM1 Hamiltonians), Fukui functions and inhibitor-metal interaction energies. Results obtained from the experimental studies were in good agreement and indicated that adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and hypoxanthine (HYP) are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of aluminum in solutions of HCl. Data obtained from electrochemical experiment revealed that the studied purines functioned by adsorption on the aluminum/HCl interface and inhibited the cathodic half reaction to a greater extent and anodic half reaction to a lesser extent. The adsorption of the purines on the metal surface was found to be exothermic and spontaneous. Deviation of the adsorption characteristics of the studied purines from the Langmuir adsorption model was compensated by the fitness of Flory Huggins and El Awardy et al. adsorption models. Quantum chemical studies revealed that the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the studied purines are functions of some quantum chemical parameters including total energy of the molecules (TE), energy gap (E L-H), electronic energy of the molecule (EE), dipole moment and core-core repulsion energy (CCR). Fukui functions analysis through DFT and MP2 theories indicated slight complications and unphysical results. However, results obtained from calculated Huckel charges, molecular orbital and interaction energies, the adsorption of the inhibitors proceeded through the imine nitrogen (N5) in GU, emanine nitrogen (N7) in AD and the pyridine nitrogen (N5) in HPY.

  14. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS.

  15. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  16. Quantitative structure activity relationships of some pyridine derivatives as corrosion inhibitors of steel in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    El Ashry, El Sayed H; El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa

    2012-03-01

    Quantum chemical calculations using the density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G DFT) and semi-empirical AM1 methods were performed on ten pyridine derivatives used as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium to determine the relationship between molecular structure and their inhibition efficiencies. Quantum chemical parameters such as total negative charge (TNC) on the molecule, energy of highest occupied molecular orbital (E (HOMO)), energy of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E (LUMO)) and dipole moment (μ) as well as linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (Vi) and dipolar-polarization (π) were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency of ten pyridine derivatives. A possible correlation between corrosion inhibition efficiencies and structural properties was searched to reduce the number of compounds to be selected for testing from a library of compounds. It was found that theoretical data support the experimental results. The results were used to predict the corrosion inhibition of 24 related pyridine derivatives.

  17. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  18. Comparison of corrosion performance of grade 316 and grade 347H stainless steels in molten nitrate salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, M. C.; Goods, S. H.; Bradshaw, R. W.

    2016-05-01

    Stainless steel samples machined from SA-312 TP316 and SA-213 TP347H pipe were exposed to a molten nitrate salt environment at 600°C (1112°F) for up to 3000 hours in order to generate corrosion rates for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) facilities. Descaled weight loss measurements were made at 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours, with optical and scanning electron microscopy being performed on samples at the longest exposure time. The 316 and 347H alloys exhibited metal losses of 4.4 and 4.8 um respectively at 3000 hours. A linear fit to the data sets yielded annualized metal loss rates of 8.4 and 8.8 um/yr. The oxides were relatively uniform in thickness and multilayered. The inner layer consisted of a (Fe, Cr)-spinel with appreciable amounts of Mn while the outer layer was an oxide composed of only Fe. No pitting, intergranular attack, or other localized attack was found, despite the presence of a sensitized microstructure in both alloys and chloride impurity in the salt mixture. The observations presented here indicate that the two alloys perform quite comparably with respect to molten salt-induced corrosion and in that regard; either would be expected to perform satisfactorily in the intended application.

  19. Application of FT-Raman spectroscopy to the study of the benzotriazole inhibition of acid copper corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, G. A.; Schweinsberg, D. P.; Fredericks, P. M.

    1994-10-01

    The initial stages of the corrosion protection of copper surfaces by benzotriazole in sulfuric acid solution are investigated using FT-Raman SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Spectra are measured in the presence of ppm levels of inhibitor on a copper surface in situ. The dependence of the adsorbate spectra on the electrode potential, solution pH, oxidation/reduction cycles and time is observed. Good spectra are obtained from copper electrodes prepared using in situ oxidation/reduction cycling in low pH sulfate solutions free from chloride at negative potentials.

  20. Research Opportunities in Corrosion Science for Long-Term Prediction of Materials Performance: A Report of the DOE Workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”.

    SciTech Connect

    Payer, Joe H.; Scully, John R.

    2003-07-29

    The report summarizes the findings of a U.S. Department of Energy workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”. The workshop was held on July 29-30, 2003 in Bethesda, MD, and was co-sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The workshop focus was corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of materials performance in hostile environments, with special focus on relevance to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The culmination of the workshop is this report that identifies both generic and Yucca Mountain Project-specific research opportunities in basic and applied topic areas. The research opportunities would be realized well after the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s initial construction-authorization licensing process. At the workshop, twenty-three invited scientists deliberated on basic and applied science opportunities in corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of damage accumulation by corrosive processes that affect materials performance.

  1. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  2. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  3. Performance Evaluation of CPCs Using Corrosion Sensors - Laboratory and Field Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-04

    Testing ( AET ) chamber for 31 days  Temperature: 30 °C  Relative Humidity: 6 hrs @ 50 % and 6 hrs @ 90 %  Salt spray: 15 sec every other day...Results - Summary CPC Threshold % area corroded Recovery during wet part of cycle Recovery during dry part of cycle First visual sign of...CPC G – 4 pins 20 % No No 2 days 5 days February 4, 2009 14 Army Corrosion Summit, 2009 Clearwater Beach, FL Ranking of CPCs – Visual and Impedance

  4. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  5. The Effect of Post-Heat Treatment on Microstructure of 316L Cold-Sprayed Coatings and Their Corrosion Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikici, B.; Yilmazer, H.; Ozdemir, I.; Isik, M.

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of process gases and post-heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of 316L cold-sprayed coatings on Al5052 substrates have been investigated in this study. The stainless steel coatings were subjected to heat treatment at four different temperatures (250, 500, 750, and 1000 °C) to study the effect of heat treatment. In addition, the corrosion performances of the coatings at different process temperatures have been compared using the potentiodynamic scanning technique. Microstructural characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results of present study showed that cold-sprayed stainless steel coatings processed with helium exhibited higher corrosion resistance than those of coatings sprayed with nitrogen process gas. This could partially be attributed to the reduction in porosity level (4.9%) and improvement of particle-particle bonding. In addition, evaluation of the mechanical and microstructural properties of the coatings demonstrated that subsequent heat treatment has major influence on the deposited layers sprayed with He process gas.

  6. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  7. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  8. Decyl glucoside as a corrosion inhibitor for magnesium-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this research, the effects of decyl glucoside (DG) on the corrosion inhibition and battery performance of Mg-air battery have been investigated. Chemical and electrochemical techniques have been used to evaluate the corrosion rate and inhibitor efficiency. Mg surface has been characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A significant reduction in the corrosion rate of Mg in battery electrolyte (3.5% NaCl solution) has been observed in the presence of DG surfactant. Maximum inhibition efficiency (>94%) is achieved at critical micelle concentration of DG surfactant (CMC = 2.5 mM). The presence of DG surfactant increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Physisorption mechanism has been suggested for the inhibition action of DG surfactant. The Mg-air battery containing DG surfactant offers higher operating voltage, discharge capacity and anodic utilization than in its absence.

  9. The effects of elevated pain inhibition on endurance exercise performance

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Gordon; Keegan, Richard J.; Thompson, Kevin G.; Cathcart, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Background The ergogenic effects of analgesic substances suggest that pain perception is an important regulator of work-rate during fatiguing exercise. Recent research has shown that endogenous inhibitory responses, which act to attenuate nociceptive input and reduce perceived pain, can be increased following transcranial direct current stimulation of the hand motor cortex. Using high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS; 2 mA, 20 min), the current study aimed to examine the effects of elevated pain inhibitory capacity on endurance exercise performance. It was hypothesised that HD-tDCS would enhance the efficiency of the endogenous pain inhibitory response and improve endurance exercise performance. Methods Twelve healthy males between 18 and 40 years of age (M = 24.42 ± 3.85) were recruited for participation. Endogenous pain inhibitory capacity and exercise performance were assessed before and after both active and sham (placebo) stimulation. The conditioned pain modulation protocol was used for the measurement of pain inhibition. Exercise performance assessment consisted of both maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and submaximal muscular endurance performance trials using isometric contractions of the non-dominant leg extensors. Results Active HD-tDCS (pre-tDCS, −.32 ± 1.33 kg; post-tDCS, −1.23 ± 1.21 kg) significantly increased pain inhibitory responses relative to the effects of sham HD-tDCS (pre-tDCS, −.91 ± .92 kg; post-tDCS, −.26 ± .92 kg; p = .046). Irrespective of condition, peak MVC force and muscular endurance was reduced from pre- to post-stimulation. HD-tDCS did not significantly influence this reduction in maximal force (active: pre-tDCS, 264.89 ± 66.87 Nm; post-tDCS, 236.33 ± 66.51 Nm; sham: pre-tDCS, 249.25 ± 88.56 Nm; post-tDCS, 239.63 ± 67.53 Nm) or muscular endurance (active: pre-tDCS, 104.65 ± 42.36 s; post-tDCS, 93.07 ± 33.73 s; sham: pre-tDCS, 123.42 ± 72.48 s; post-tDCS, 100.27 ± 44

  10. Characterisation of Al corrosion and its impact on the mechanical performance of composite cement wasteforms by the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, L. M.; Ojovan, M. I.

    2008-04-01

    In this study acoustic emission (AE) non-destructive method was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated Al waste. AE waves generated as a result of Al corrosion in small-size blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement wasteforms were recorded and analysed. The basic principles of the conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis were combined to establish a relationship between recorded AE signals and different interactions between the Al and the encapsulating cement matrix. The AE technique was shown as a potential and valuable tool for a new area of application related to monitoring and inspection of the mechanical stability of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated metallic wastes such as Al.

  11. Inhibition de la corrosion d'acier au carbone en milieu H3PO4 2M par des composés organiques de type ``triazine''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkouch, K.; Aouniti, A.; Hammouti, B.; Kertit, S.

    1999-05-01

    The effect of addition of some triazine compounds on the corrosion behaviour of steel in 2M H3PO4 has been studied by weight loss and electrochemical polarisation methods. Both methods showed that the dissolution rate was dependent on the chemical properties and concentration of the product. From comparison of results, it was found that 6-azathymine (T6) is the best inhibitor and its inhibition efficiency reaches a maximum value of 86% at 10-3 M. Polarisation measurements indicated that T6 acts as cathodic inhibitor by merely blocking the reaction sites without changing the mechanism of the hydrogen evolution reaction. It was found that T6 was adsorbed on steel surface according to a Langmuir isotherm model. The effect of temperature indicated that inhibition efficiency of T6 is dependent on the temperature in the range 25-50 circC. L'effet de l'addition de certains composés organiques de type triazine sur la corrosion d'un acier en milieu H3PO4 2M a été étudié à l'aide des méthodes électrochimiques et gravimétriques. Les résultats obtenus ont montré que la vitesse de dissolution de l'acier dépend de la structure moléculaire et de la concentration du produit. La comparaison des efficacités inhibitrices montre que le 6-azathymine (T6) est le meilleur inhibiteur de la série des triazines testés. L'efficacité inhibitrice du T6 atteint une valeur maximale de 86 % à 10-3 M. L'allure des courbes de polarisation indique que le T6 agit essentiellement comme inhibiteur de type cathodique par adsorption à la surface de l'acier selon le modèle de l'isotherme de Langmuir. L'efficacité inhibitrice du T6 dépend de la température dans le domaine allant de 25 à 50 circC.

  12. Systematic Microstructural and Corrosion Performance Evaluation of CK-3MCuN and CN-3MN High Molybdenum Stainless Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    C.D. Lundin; S. Wen; W. Liu; G. Zhou

    2001-10-01

    High molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are widely accepted for their high strength, excellent weldability, and good corrosion resistance over a wide range of temperatures in highly oxidizing aqueous and gaseous media in chemical processing and other environments. With their desirable performance, high molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are increasingly applied in industry in a similar manner as wrought materials. In general, cast and wrought stainless and high alloy steels are anticipated to possess equivalent resistance to corrosive media, and they are frequently used in conjunction with each other. However, alloying element segregation usually is more evident in castings than in wrought counterparts. Segregation of alloying elements can lead to the formation of secondary phases, such as sigma. Mechanical properties and especially the corrosion resistance of castings may be affected by the secondary phases. In addition, improper heat treatment procedures c an also lead to the formation of carbides and secondary phases in high alloy and austenitic stainless steels.

  13. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of Carbonitriding Layers on Cast Iron by Plasma Electrolytic Carbonitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hua; Lv, Guo-Hua; Chen, Huan; Wang, Xin-Quan; Zhang, Gu-Ling; Yang, Si-Ze

    2009-08-01

    The surface carbonitriding of cast iron is investigated in an aqueous solution of acetamide and glycerin. Microstructure, chemical and phase composition and corrosion performance of the carbonitriding layers are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction, as well as potentiodynamic polarization testing. X-ray diffraction results show that the carbonitriding coatings are composed of martensite, austenite(γ-Fe), Fe2C, Fe3C, Fe5C2, FeN and in-Fe2-3N. After the plasma electrolytic carbonitriding treatment the corrosion resistance of cast iron is clearly improved compared to the substrate, and the coatings produced at 350 V for 30s give the best corrosion resistance.

  14. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  15. Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel type AISI 304 by Mn coating and subsequent annealing with flow of nitrogen at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi; Habibi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    This work reports the enhancement of stainless steel corrosion resistance coated with Mn and post-annealed with flow of nitrogen at different annealing temperatures. Crystallographic variation of the samples by annealing temperature is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while their surface morphology and surface roughness was obtained by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses before and after corrosion test respectively. Elemental analysis of samples after corrosion test was investigated by energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) analysis. The corrosion behaviour of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.6 M NaCl solution. A critical annealing temperature is found at which the highest corrosion resistance can be achieved. Correlation between corrosion resistance, structural and surface morphology results is obtained.

  16. Lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors selectively inhibit/deactivate cellulase performance.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Sizwe I; den Haan, Riaan; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we monitored the inhibition and deactivation effects of various compounds associated with lignocellulosic hydrolysates on individual and combinations of cellulases. Tannic acid representing polymeric lignin residues strongly inhibited cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH1) and β-glucosidase 1 (BGL1), but had a moderate inhibitory effect on endoglucanase 2 (EG2). Individual monomeric lignin residues had little or no inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes. However, coniferyl aldehyde and syringaldehyde substantially decreased the activity of CBH1 and deactivated BGL1. Acetic and formic acids also showed strong inhibition of BGL1 but not CBH1 and EG2, whereas tannic, acetic and formic acid strongly inhibited a combination of CBH1 and EG2 during Avicel hydrolysis. Diminishing enzymatic hydrolysis is largely a function of inhibitor concentration and the enzyme-inhibitor relationship, rather than contact time during the hydrolysis process (i.e. deactivation). This suggests that decreased rates of hydrolysis during the enzymatic depolymerisation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates may be imparted by other factors related to substrate crystallinity and accessibility.

  17. Analysis of electrochemical noise (ECN) data in time and frequency domain for comparison corrosion inhibition of some azole compounds on Cu in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Arman, S. Y.; Mehdipour, M.; Markhali, B. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion inhibition properties of two similar heterocyclic compounds namely benzotriazole (BTA) and benzothiazole (BNS) inhibitors on copper in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution were studied by electrochemical techniques as well as surface analysis. The results showed that corrosion inhibition of copper largely depends on the molecular structure and concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of DC trend on the interpretation of electrochemical noise (ECN) results in time domain was evaluated by moving average removal (MAR) method. Accordingly, the impact of square and Hanning window functions as drift removal methods in frequency domain was studied. After DC trend removal, a good trend was observed between electrochemical noise (ECN) data and the results obtained from EIS and potentiodynamic polarization. Furthermore, the shot noise theory in frequency domain was applied to approach the charge of each electrochemical event (q) from the potential and current noise signals.

  18. Investigation of the inhibiting action of O-, S- and N-dithiocarbamato(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)cobalt(III) complexes on the corrosion of iron in HClO 4 acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić-Samardžija, K.; Khaled, K. F.; Hackerman, N.

    2005-02-01

    The inhibiting properties of four macrocyclic cobalt(III) complexes of the general formula [Co III(Rdtc)cyclam](ClO 4) 2, where cyclam and Rdtc- refer to 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and morpholine-, thiomorpholine-, piperazine-, N-methylpiperazine-dithiocarbamates, respectively, has been studied on the corrosion of iron in aerated 0.1 M HClO 4 solutions by potentiodynamic polarization (dc) technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac). Inhibitor efficiency for the corrosion of iron is found to be better for cobalt complexes then for related amino-ligands. The impedance increases with inhibitor concentration. Polarization curves indicate that the inhibitors are predominantly mixed-type. Better protection by the complex inhibitors was obtained with longer immersion time. The best fit for inhibitors adsorption is obtained using the Langmuir isotherm model. Molecular modeling calculations were used to correlate structural properties of the complex species and their inhibition efficiency.

  19. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  20. Reducing uncertainties affecting the assessment of the long-term corrosion behavior of spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Fanghänel, Thomas; Rondinella, Vincenzo V; Glatz, Jean-Paul; Wiss, Thierry; Wegen, Detlef H; Gouder, Thomas; Carbol, Paul; Serrano-Purroy, Daniel; Papaioannou, Dimitrios

    2013-04-01

    Reducing the uncertainties associated with extrapolation to very long term of corrosion data obtainable from laboratory tests on a relatively young spent nuclear fuel is a formidable challenge. In a geologic repository, spent nuclear fuel may come in contact with water tens or hundreds of thousands of years after repository closure. The corrosion behavior will depend on the fuel properties and on the conditions characterizing the near field surrounding the spent fuel at the time of water contact. This paper summarizes the main conclusions drawn from multiyear experimental campaigns performed at JRC-ITU to study corrosion behavior and radionuclide release from spent light water reactor fuel. The radionuclide release from the central region of a fuel pellet is higher than that from the radial periphery, in spite of the higher burnup and the corresponding structural modifications occurring at the pellet rim during irradiation. Studies on the extent and time boundaries of the radiolytic enhancement of the spent fuel corrosion rate indicate that after tens or hundreds of thousands of years have elapsed, very small or no contribution to the enhanced corrosion rate has to be expected from α radiolysis. A beneficial effect inhibiting spent fuel corrosion due to the hydrogen overpressure generated in the near field by iron corrosion is confirmed. The results obtained so far point toward a benign picture describing spent fuel corrosion in a deep geologic repository. More work is ongoing to further reduce uncertainties and to obtain a full description of the expected corrosion behavior of spent fuel.

  1. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  2. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  3. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  4. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  5. EVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bill W. Bogan; Wendy R. Sullivan; Kristine M. H. Cruz; Kristine L. Lowe; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-04-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing of pepper extracts resulted in preliminary data indicating that some pepper extracts inhibit the growth of some corrosion-associated microorganisms. This quarter additional tests were performed to more specifically investigate the ability of three pepper extracts to inhibit the growth, and to influence the metal corrosion caused by two microbial species: Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Comomonas denitrificans. All three pepper extracts rapidly killed Desulfovibrio vulgaris, but did not appear to inhibit Comomonas denitrificans. While corrosion rates were at control levels in experiments with Desulfovibrio vulgaris that received pepper extract, corrosion rates were increased in the presence of Comomonas denitrificans plus pepper extract. Further testing with a wider range of pure bacterial cultures, and more importantly, with mixed bacterial cultures should be performed to determine the potential effectiveness of pepper extracts to inhibit MIC.

  6. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  7. Effect of B-Mo-W Complex Inhibitor on Corrosion of Mild Steel in 55% LiBr Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jielan; Liang, Chenghao; Huang, Naibao

    2015-11-01

    The inhibition effects of B-Mo-W complex inhibitor on corrosion of mild steel in 55% LiBr solution were investigated using weight-loss method, electrochemistry tests, SEM, EDX, and XRD. The ingredients of B-Mo-W complex inhibitor included organic phosphonic acid B, Na2MoO4, and Na2WO4. The results revealed that B-Mo-W complex inhibitor was capable of inhibiting the corrosion of mild steel in 55% LiBr solution, exhibiting high inhibition efficiencies around 97.7%. B-Mo-W complex inhibitor promoted the formation of a protective passive film composed of Fe, Mo, W, and O elements. The passive film decreased the corrosion rate, improved the electrochemistry performance, and enhanced anti-corrosion ability of mild steel.

  8. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  9. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  10. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Rostami, M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  11. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  12. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  13. Cadmium Alternative Coating Corrosion Performance on Steel; Non-Cr+6 Primer Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Air Warfare Center - Aircraft Division,AIR 4.3.4,22347 Cedar Point Road,Patuxent River,MD,20670 8 . PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Surface Finishing and Repair...unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Outline • NAVAIR Test

  14. Prestressed concrete pipe corrosion research: A summary of a decade of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.; Mathew, I.; Sheng, Q.

    1996-11-01

    Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) is used in water and waste water systems that serve virtually every major city in North America. Although not required in most conditions, various methods area available to effectively provide corrosion resistance. Recommendations for corrosion control in various environments are provided by several associations, manufacturers, and corrosion engineering firms. They include supplemental coatings, latex addition to mortar, and cathodic protection. The data, results, and reasoning to support the recommendations are often not available in the literature. This paper provides a summary of research performed during the past decade on mortar coating and prestressing wire. It includes information on reduction of chloride penetration by mortar mix design and addition of latex, chloride diffusion through the mortar coating, chloride content required to cause corrosion of the prestressing wire, inhibition of corrosion by lubricants present on prestressing wire, practicality of using organically-coated prestressing wire, inhibition of corrosion by lubricants present on prestressing wire, practicality of using organically-coated prestressing wire, corrosion prevention properties of steel in mortar subjected to stray current, usefulness of potential monitoring techniques, supplemental protection using barrier coatings, cathodic protection requirements, and hydrogen embrittlement concerns.

  15. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction.

  17. Combinatorial materials research applied to the development of new surface coatings X: a high-throughput electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method for screening organic coatings for corrosion inhibition.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Bahr, James; Chisholm, Bret J; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhigang; Balbyshev, Séva N; Bonitz, Verena; Bierwagen, Gordon P

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a high-throughput electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (HT-EIS) method for rapid and quantitative evaluation of corrosion protective coatings. A 12-element, spatially addressable electrochemical platform was designed, fabricated, and validated. This platform was interfaced to a commercial EIS instrument through an automated electronic switching unit. The HT-EIS system enables four parallel EIS measurements to be run simultaneously, which significantly reduces characterization time compared to that of serial EIS measurements using a multiplexer. The performance of the HT-EIS system was validated using a series of model systems, including a Randles equivalent circuit, an electrochemical reaction (Ti/K4FeCN6, K3FeCN6), a highly uniform polymer film, and several polymer coatings. The results of the validation studies showed that the HT-EIS system enables a major reduction in characterization time and provides high quality data comparable to data obtained with conventional, single-cell EIS measurement systems.

  18. Effects of initial iron corrosion rate on long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers: column experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    suk O, Jin; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2009-01-26

    Column experiments and numerical simulation were conducted to test the hypothesis that iron material having a high corrosion rate is not beneficial for the long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) because of faster passivation of iron and greater porosity loss close to the influent face of the PRBs. Four iron materials (Connelly, Gotthart-Maier, Peerless, and ISPAT) were used for the column experiments, and the changes in reactivity toward cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) degradation in the presence of dissolved CaCO3 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the difference in distribution of the accumulated precipitates, resulting from differences in iron corrosion rate, caused a difference in the migration rate of the cis-DCE profiles and a significant difference in the pattern of passivation, indicating a faster passivation in the region close to the influent end for the material having a higher corrosion rate. For the numerical simulation, the accumulation of secondary minerals and reactivity loss of iron were coupled using an empirically-derived relationship that was incorporated into a multi-component reactive transport model. The simulation results provided a reasonable representation of the evolution of iron reactivity toward cis-DCE treatment and the changes in geochemical conditions for each material, consistent with the observed data. The simulations for long-term performance were also conducted to further test the hypothesis and predict the differences in performance over a period of 40 years under typical groundwater conditions. The predictions showed that the cases of higher iron corrosion rates had earlier cis-DCE breakthrough and more reduction in porosity starting from near the influent face, due to more accumulation of carbonate minerals in that region. Therefore, both the experimental and simulation results appear to support the hypothesis and suggest that reactivity changes of iron materials resulting from

  19. ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II; William Bogan

    2004-01-31

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter included the fractionation of extracts prepared from several varieties of pepper plants, and using several solvents, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A preliminary determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts ability to inhibit biofilm formation was also performed. The analysis of multiple extracts of pepper plants and fractions of extracts of pepper plants obtained by HPLC illustrated that these extracts and fractions are extremely complex mixtures of chemicals. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the chemical constituents of these extracts and fractions to the greatest degree possible. Analysis of the chemical composition of various extracts of pepper plants has illustrated the complexity of the chemical mixtures present, and while additional work will be performed to further characterize the extracts to identify bioactive compounds the focus of efforts should now shift to an evaluation of the ability of extracts to inhibit corrosion in mixed culture biofilms, and in pure cultures of bacterial types which are known or believed to be important in corrosion.

  20. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What`s All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  1. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  2. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  3. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  4. Eco-Friendly Inhibitors for Copper Corrosion in Nitric Acid: Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savita; Mourya, Punita; Chaubey, Namrata; Singh, V. K.; Singh, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The inhibitive performance of Vitex negundo, Adhatoda vasica, and Saraka asoka leaf extracts on corrosion of copper in 3M HNO3 solution was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that these extracts act as efficient and predominantly cathodic mixed inhibitor. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that the adsorption of these inhibitors on copper surface was spontaneous, controlled by physiochemical processes and occurred according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. AFM examination of copper surface confirmed that the inhibitor prevented corrosion by forming protective layer on its surface. The correlation between inhibitive effect and molecular structure was ascertained by density functional theory data.

  5. Elucidation of the Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Catechin Monomers from Commercial Green Tea Extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrizal, S.; Rahim, Afidah A.; Saad, Bahruddin; Bothi Raja, P.; Shah, Affaizza M.; Yahya, S.

    2012-04-01

    The inhibitive action of commercial green tea extracts on mild steel (MS) in a 1.0 M hydrochloric acid solution was investigated by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis showed conclusively that of the eight catechin monomers and caffeine found in the original extracts, only four components were responsible for the inhibition of MS. The decreasing adsorption capacity of monomers on MS is related to the stereochemistry of molecules and the number of phenolic groups, and it is as follows: epigallocatechin gallate > epicatechin gallate > epigallocatechin > epicatechin. Adsorption of green tea extract constituent was found to follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the calculated Gibb's free energy values indicated the physisorption of inhibitor over MS surface. Physisorption was supported well by the potential zero charge (PZC) and molecular surface energy-level calculations.

  6. Encapsulated Multifunction Corrosion Inhibitive Primer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    Optimization of Microcapsule Preparation ...................... 162 24 Optimized Procedure for Polyurea Microencapsulation ................... 166 25... microcapsules , which suggests that a nearly quantitative yield of microencapsulated inhibitor was achieved. The burst ratio is defined as the conductivity after...effectiveness of the microencapsulation approach in achieving sustained release. 4. Loading Determination of Polyurea Microcapsules In studies relating

  7. Exopolysaccharide hydrogels for corrosion inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exopolysaccharide production by micro-organisms have several industrial applications in food, pharmaceuticals, or other industries. Lactic acid bacteria such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM) are endemic to the environment and produce extracellular polymeric glucans such as dextran. Dextrans cause s...

  8. New and Green Multi-component Scaling and Corrosion Inhibitor for the Cooling Water of Central Air Conditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maodong; Dai, Chenlin; Yang, Bo; Qiao, Yue; Zhu, Zhiping

    2016-12-01

    A green multi-component inhibitor was developed in this study to obtain suitable scale and corrosion inhibitor for the cooling water treatment of central air conditioners. The inhibitor formulation consisted of hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride/Tween-80/sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate/tolyltriazole (named 4-HTSA). Weight loss test and electrochemical method were used to investigate the corrosion inhibition performance of 4-HTSA on A3 carbon steel and T2 red copper in synthetic cooling water, and the scale inhibition performance of 4-HTSA was studied by the calcium carbonate precipitation method. The influence of parameters, such as pH, temperature, scaling and corrosive ion, on 4-HTSA was researched. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction were used for examination of the scale, and corrosion coupons were analyzed by SEM/energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Results showed that 4-HTSA had excellent scale and corrosion inhibition performance and wide tolerance to pH, temperature and the concentration of scaling and corrosive ion. Polarization curves indicated that 4-HTSA was anodic inhibitor.

  9. New and Green Multi-component Scaling and Corrosion Inhibitor for the Cooling Water of Central Air Conditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maodong; Dai, Chenlin; Yang, Bo; Qiao, Yue; Zhu, Zhiping

    2017-02-01

    A green multi-component inhibitor was developed in this study to obtain suitable scale and corrosion inhibitor for the cooling water treatment of central air conditioners. The inhibitor formulation consisted of hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride/Tween-80/sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate/tolyltriazole (named 4-HTSA). Weight loss test and electrochemical method were used to investigate the corrosion inhibition performance of 4-HTSA on A3 carbon steel and T2 red copper in synthetic cooling water, and the scale inhibition performance of 4-HTSA was studied by the calcium carbonate precipitation method. The influence of parameters, such as pH, temperature, scaling and corrosive ion, on 4-HTSA was researched. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction were used for examination of the scale, and corrosion coupons were analyzed by SEM/energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Results showed that 4-HTSA had excellent scale and corrosion inhibition performance and wide tolerance to pH, temperature and the concentration of scaling and corrosive ion. Polarization curves indicated that 4-HTSA was anodic inhibitor.

  10. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  11. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  12. The Role of Shifting, Updating, and Inhibition in Prospective Memory Performance in Young and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzspahn, Katharina M.; Stahl, Christoph; Zeintl, Melanie; Kaller, Christoph P.; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory performance shows a decline in late adulthood. The present article examines the role of 3 main executive function facets (i.e., shifting, updating, and inhibition) as possible developmental mechanisms associated with these age effects. One hundred seventy-five young and 110 older adults performed a battery of cognitive tests…

  13. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  14. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  15. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  16. Biobased polymers for corrosion protection of metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anticorrosive biobased polymers were developed in our lab. We isolated an exopolysaccharide produced by a microbe that, when coated on metal substrates, exhibited unique corrosion inhibition. Corrosion is a worldwide problem and impacts the economy, jeopardizes human health and safety, and impedes t...

  17. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  18. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  19. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  20. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  1. Production of carbon nano-tubes via CCVD method and their corrosion protection performance in epoxy based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, M. A.; Ghauri, F. A.; Awan, M. S.; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, R.

    2016-08-01

    Good yield of carbon products was obtained by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique using 100-500mg of ferrocene catalyst at temperature of 900 °C and acetylene flow rate of 150-200cc/min. The effects of amount of ferrocene, temperature and hydrocarbons precursors on the yield of carbon nanomaterial's was calculated and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) andenergy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Good yield of carbon nanomaterials primarily consisted of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanoparticles was obtained. CNTs obtained after purification were dispersed in epoxy resin to produce composite coatings which were coated on stainless steel 316L. The coated stainless steel samples’ corrosion behavior was studied using open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that epoxy coating containing 4 wt. % of CNTs offered improved corrosion resistance to stainless steel.

  2. Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahvash, F.; Eissa, S.; Bordjiba, T.; Tavares, A. C.; Szkopek, T.; Siaj, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

  3. Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, F; Eissa, S; Bordjiba, T; Tavares, A C; Szkopek, T; Siaj, M

    2017-02-13

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

  4. Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper

    PubMed Central

    Mahvash, F.; Eissa, S.; Bordjiba, T.; Tavares, A. C.; Szkopek, T.; Siaj, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating. PMID:28191822

  5. Tall oil fatty acid anhydrides as corrosion inhibitor intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, E.R.; Parker, J.E. III

    1995-12-01

    Electrochemical corrosion of carbon steel tubulars in producing oil wells causes lost production and necessitates costly repairs. Corrosive environments exists where hydrocarbons and an aqueous phase are being extracted from producing wells. Tubing life has been extended four fold with the development of organic corrosion inhibitors and concentric configuration treatment. Anhydrides derived from tall oil fatty acids offer enhanced corrosion inhibition properties as compared to traditional dimer/trimer acids. The chemistry of this intermediate and its use in corrosion inhibition for down hole applications, as well as the synthesis of novel oil and water-soluble derivatives will be discussed.

  6. Improved mechanical performance and delayed corrosion phenomena in biodegradable Mg-Zn-Ca alloys through Pd-alloying.

    PubMed

    González, S; Pellicer, E; Fornell, J; Blanquer, A; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Solsona, P; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Nogués, C; Sort, J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of partial substitution of Mg by Pd on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Mg(72-x)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(x) (x=0, 2 and 6 at.%) alloys, synthesized by copper mould casting, is investigated. While the Mg(72)Zn(23)Ca(5) alloy is mainly amorphous, the addition of Pd decreases the glass-forming ability, thus favouring the formation of crystalline phases. From a mechanical viewpoint, the hardness increases with the addition of Pd, from 2.71 GPa for x=0 to 3.9 GPa for x=6, mainly due to the formation of high-strength phases. In turn, the wear resistance is maximized for an intermediate Pd content (i.e., Mg(70)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(2)). Corrosion tests in a simulated body fluid (Hank's solution) indicate that Pd causes a shift in the corrosion potential towards more positive values, thus delaying the biodegradability of this alloy. Moreover, since the cytotoxic studies with mouse preosteoblasts do not show dead cells after culturing for 27 h, these alloys are potential candidates to be used as biomaterials.

  7. Electrochemical synthesis of polyaniline on mild steel in acetonitrile-LiClO 4 and corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tüken, T.; Özyılmaz, A. T.; Yazıcı, B.; Erbil, M.

    2004-09-01

    Polyaniline film could not be obtained on mild steel by direct electrooxidation of aniline in LiClO 4 containing acetonitrile medium (ACN-LiClO 4), because sufficient passivity of the surface could not be provided. This non-passivated metal undergoes intense dissolution, in potential region at which the monomer oxidation happens and this event prevents the formation of stable polymer film on the surface. Therefore, the electrode surface was coated with very thin polyaniline (PANi), polypyrrole (PPy) primer coatings, in monomer containing aqueous oxalic acid solution, and then the synthesis of top PANi film was achieved in aniline containing ACN-LiClO 4 successfully. The corrosion behavior of PANi/PANi and PPy/PANi coated MS samples were investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution, properly. For this aim, anodic polarization curves and open circuit potential-time ( Eocp- t) variation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were used. It was shown that PPy/PANi coating could provide much better protection for longer periods than PANi/PANi coating against the corrosion of MS. This behavior was explained with better barrier property of PPy/PANi. After 240 h of immersion time in corrosive test solution, the protection efficiency value was 97.0%, for PPy/PANi coated electrode.

  8. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  9. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  10. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  11. Prediction aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency using artificial neural network (ANN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Sh; Kalhor, E. G.; Nabavi, S. R.; Alamiparvin, L.; Pogaku, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, activity of some Schiff bases as aluminum corrosion inhibitor was investigated using artificial neural network (ANN). Hence, corrosion inhibition efficiency of Schiff bases (in any type) were gathered from different references. Then these molecules were drawn and optimized in Hyperchem software. Molecular descriptors generating and descriptors selection were fulfilled by Dragon software and principal component analysis (PCA) method, respectively. These structural descriptors along with environmental descriptors (ambient temperature, time of exposure, pH and the concentration of inhibitor) were used as input variables. Furthermore, aluminum corrosion inhibition efficiency was used as output variable. Experimental data were split into three sets: training set (for model building) and test set (for model validation) and simulation (for general model). Modeling was performed by Multiple linear regression (MLR) methods and artificial neural network (ANN). The results obtained in linear models showed poor correlation between experimental and theoretical data. However nonlinear model presented satisfactory results. Higher correlation coefficient of ANN (R > 0.9) revealed that ANN can be successfully applied for prediction of aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency of Schiff bases in different environmental conditions.

  12. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  13. Analyzing the revolution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) performance and sludge characteristics under zinc inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Guo, Qiong; Wang, Jiao-Jiao; Wang, Hui-Zhong; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the short- and long-term effects of Zn(II) on the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) performance and sludge characteristics were evaluated. The anammox activity decreased with increasing Zn(II) concentration and pre-exposure time in short-term tests. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Zn(II) was found to be 25.0 mg L(-1). The 24 and 48-h pre-exposure time was a restricted factor impacting the anammox activity, and washing the inhibited sludge with buffer solution only worked under 0 and 24-h pre-exposure time. The anammox sludge could tolerate 5 mg L(-1) Zn(II) but was suppressed at 8 mg L(-1). The inhibited performance could be remitted, as the combination strategies were applied, and after the short term of recovery period, the inhibited sludge characteristics were remitted to the normal.

  14. Modelling on corrosion inhibitor kinetics in carbon steel pipe used in oil industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasmi, A. N.; Nuraini, N.; Wahyuningrum, D.; Sumarti, N.; Bunjali, B.

    2014-02-01

    A model to explain the kinetics of corrosion inhibitor is proposed here. The model is based on Transition State Theory. Our model has many similarities with Michelis-Menten Kinetics. The kinetics difference between uninhibited corrosion and inhibited corrosion is presented. Our model showed the inhibitor could suppress the corrosion rate.

  15. Cognitive performance and BMI in childhood: Shared genetic influences between reaction time but not response inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work is to understand whether shared genetic influences can explain the associationbetween obesity and cognitive performance, including slower and more variable reaction times(RTs) and worse response inhibition. RT on a four-choice RT task and the go/no-go task, and commission errors...

  16. Application of carbohydrate polymers as corrosion inhibitors for metal substrates in different media: A review.

    PubMed

    Umoren, Saviour A; Eduok, Ubong M

    2016-04-20

    Naturally occurring polysaccharides are biopolymers existing as products of biochemical processes in living systems. A wide variety of them have been employed for various material applications; as binders, coatings, drug delivery, corrosion inhibitors etc. This review describes the application of some green and benign carbohydrate biopolymers and their derivatives for inhibition of metal corrosion. Their modes and mechanisms of protection have also been described as directly related to their macromolecular weights, chemical composition and their unique molecular and electronic structures. For instance, cellulose and chitosan possess free amine and hydroxyl groups capable of metal ion chelation and their lone pairs of electrons are readily utilized for coordinate bonding at the metal/solution interface. Some of the carbohydrate polymers reviewed in this work are either pure or modified forms; their grafted systems and nanoparticle composites with multitude potentials for metal protection applications have also been highlighted. Few inhibitors grafted to introduce more compact structures with polar groups capable of increasing the total energy of the surface have also been mentioned. Exudate gums, carboxymethyl and hydroxyethyl cellulose, starch, pectin and pectates, substituted/modified chitosans, carrageenan, dextrin/cyclodextrins and alginates have been elaborately reviewed, including the effects of halide additives on their anticorrosion performances. Aspects of computational/theoretical approach to corrosion monitoring have been recommended for future studies. This non-experimental approach to corrosion could foster a better understanding of the corrosion inhibition processes by correlating actual inhibition mechanisms with molecular structures of these carbohydrate polymers.

  17. Corrosion and bioactivity performance of graphene oxide coating on TiNb shape memory alloys in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Saud, Safaa N; Hosseinian S, Raheleh; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Yaghoubidoust, F; Iqbal, N; Hamzah, E; Ooi, C H Raymond

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the microstructure, corrosion, and bioactivity of graphene oxide (GO) coating on the laser-modified and -unmodified surfaces of TiNb shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated. The surface morphology and chemical composition was examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface modification was carried out via a femtosecond laser with the aim to increase the surface roughness, and thus increase the adhesion property. FE-SEM analysis of the laser-treated Ti-30at.% Nb revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the Ti-30at.% Nb surface after being surface modified via a femtosecond laser. Furthermore, the thickness of GO was increased from 35μm to 45μm after the surface was modified. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies revealed that both the GO and laser/GO-coated samples exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the uncoated TiNb SMA sample. However, the laser/GO-coated sample presented the highest corrosion resistance in SBF at 37°C. In addition, during soaking in the simulated body fluid (SBF), both the GO and laser/GO coating improved the formation of apatite layer. Based on the bioactivity results, the GO coating exhibited a remarkable antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria compared with the uncoated. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Ti-30at.% Nb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications.

  18. Preparation of K-doped TiO2 nanostructures by wet corrosion and their sunlight-driven photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Eunhye; Jin, Saera; Kim, Jiyoon; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Kwang-Won; Hong, Jongin

    2016-08-01

    K-doped TiO2 nanowire networks were prepared by the corrosion reaction of Ti nanoparticles in an alkaline (potassium hydroxide: KOH) solution. The prepared nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Their sunlight-driven photocatalytic activity was also investigated with differently charged dye molecules, such as methylene blue, rhodamine B and methyl orange. The adsorption of the dye molecules on the photocatalyst surface would play a critical role in their selective photodegradation under sunlight illumination.

  19. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifnabi, A.; Fathi, M. H.; Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol-gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  20. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  1. Polydopamine as a promising candidate for the design of high performance and corrosion-tolerant polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hongtao; Del Frari, Doriane; Martin, Arnaud; Didierjean, Joffrey; Ball, Vincent; Michel, Marc; Ahrach, Hicham Ibn El

    2016-03-01

    Carbon materials such as carbon black or nanotubes suffer from degradation when subjected to harsh conditions occurring in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) electrode. Hence, nowadays it is more and more important to search for alternative support materials. The present work shows the results for the incorporation of alternative materials into PEMFCs electrode architectures. Commercially available Multi-Walled NanoTubes (MWNTs) are used as a support for Pt nanoparticles in combination with Polydopamine (PDA). The role of MWNTs is to confer a high electronic conductivity and help to form a porous network. On the other side the role of polydopamine is both to promote the proton conductivity similarly to ionomers such as Nafion and to protect the MWNTs against corrosion. The fuel cell polarization test shows a maximum power density of 780 mW cm-2 and a Pt utilization of 6051 mW mg(Pt)-1. The Pt utilization reached in this work is almost three times higher than for Pt/MWNTs electrodes containing the same Pt loading. Beside this, it is also shown for the first time that PDA serves as protective layer against carbon corrosion.

  2. Evaluation of the Corrosivity of Dust Deposited on Waste Packages at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bryan; R. Jarek; T. Wolery; D. Shields; M. Sutton; E. Hardin; D. Barr

    2005-03-01

    Potentially corrosive brines may form by deliquescence of salt minerals in dust deposited on the surface of waste packages at Yucca Mountain during operations and the pre-closure ventilation period. Evaluation of measured atmospheric and underground dust compositions by thermodynamic modeling and experimental studies of brine deliquescence indicates that brines are likely to form, but will be nitrate-rich and non-corrosive. Processes that modify the brines following deliquescence are beneficial with respect to corrosion. Acid degassing (HCI, HNO{sub 3}) will potentially dry out brines, but kinetic limitations will limit the effect to increasing the passivity of the brines by raising the pH and increasing the NO{sub 3}/CI ratio. Interactions with silicate minerals in the dust buffer brine pH to neutral values, and may also cause dryout. Predicted dust quantities and maximum deliquescent brine volumes on the waste package surface are small, and physical isolation of salt minerals in the dust may inhibit formation of eutectic brines, further decreasing deliquescence brine volumes. Should corrosive brines form, capillary forces will tend to retain brine in the dust. If brines do contact the WP surface, small droplet or film dimensions do not support development of diffusive gradients and separate anodic-cathodic regions necessary for initiation of localized corrosion. Finally, should localized corrosion initiate, corrosion product buildup will eventually stifle corrosion, by limiting oxygen access to the metal surface, by capillary retention of brine in corrosion product porosity, or by consumption of brine components, principally chloride. Thus, dust deliquescence is of low consequence with respect to repository performance.

  3. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  4. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  5. Corrosion Control Anniston Army Depot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-09

    parts. • Anodize, Chrome, and Black Oxide (et.al.) • Substrate Prep and CARC paint. Stowage • Climate controlled storage (limited). • Weather...resistant (rain, uv) stowage . • Right Material – Right Time In Process Actions Bldgs 129 and 114 • Installation of new cleaning technologies for small... Rack Dehydration Prep Area CARC Application Flash-Off Oven De-mask and Anti- Corrosion App. Planned Future Actions Survey • Perform a corrosion survey

  6. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont...IATA member airlines at $100 million based on 1976 operations. Thus the numbers are large, but detailed analyses on specific aircraft types, in known...demonstrate this in any quantitative way with accurate figures. Better information is required on the cost of corrosion, together with analyses of the

  7. Hot and Hypoxic Environments Inhibit Simulated Soccer Performance and Exacerbate Performance Decrements When Combined

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Jeffrey W. F.; Chrismas, Bryna C. R.; Akubat, Ibrahim; Dascombe, Ben; Abt, Grant; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The effects of heat and/or hypoxia have been well-documented in match-play data. However, large match-to-match variation for key physical performance measures makes environmental inferences difficult to ascertain from soccer match-play. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the hot (HOT), hypoxic (HYP), and hot-hypoxic (HH) mediated-decrements during a non-motorized treadmill based soccer-specific simulation. Twelve male University soccer players completed three familiarization sessions and four randomized crossover experimental trials of the intermittent Soccer Performance Test (iSPT) in normoxic-temperate (CON: 18°C 50% rH), HOT (30°C; 50% rH), HYP (1000 m; 18°C 50% rH), and HH (1000 m; 30°C; 50% rH). Physical performance and its performance decrements, body temperatures (rectal, skin, and estimated muscle temperature), heart rate (HR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2), perceived exertion, thermal sensation (TS), body mass changes, blood lactate, and plasma volume were all measured. Performance decrements were similar in HOT and HYP [Total Distance (−4%), High-speed distance (~−8%), and variable run distance (~−12%) covered] and exacerbated in HH [total distance (−9%), high-speed distance (−15%), and variable run distance (−15%)] compared to CON. Peak sprint speed, was 4% greater in HOT compared with CON and HYP and 7% greater in HH. Sprint distance covered was unchanged (p > 0.05) in HOT and HYP and only decreased in HH (−8%) compared with CON. Body mass (−2%), temperatures (+2–5%), and TS (+18%) were altered in HOT. Furthermore, SaO2 (−8%) and HR (+3%) were changed in HYP. Similar changes in body mass and temperatures, HR, TS, and SaO2 were evident in HH to HOT and HYP, however, blood lactate (p < 0.001) and plasma volume (p < 0.001) were only significantly altered in HH. Perceived exertion was elevated (p < 0.05) by 7% in all conditions compared with CON. Regression analysis identified that absolute TS and absolute

  8. Hot and Hypoxic Environments Inhibit Simulated Soccer Performance and Exacerbate Performance Decrements When Combined.

    PubMed

    Aldous, Jeffrey W F; Chrismas, Bryna C R; Akubat, Ibrahim; Dascombe, Ben; Abt, Grant; Taylor, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The effects of heat and/or hypoxia have been well-documented in match-play data. However, large match-to-match variation for key physical performance measures makes environmental inferences difficult to ascertain from soccer match-play. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the hot (HOT), hypoxic (HYP), and hot-hypoxic (HH) mediated-decrements during a non-motorized treadmill based soccer-specific simulation. Twelve male University soccer players completed three familiarization sessions and four randomized crossover experimental trials of the intermittent Soccer Performance Test (iSPT) in normoxic-temperate (CON: 18°C 50% rH), HOT (30°C; 50% rH), HYP (1000 m; 18°C 50% rH), and HH (1000 m; 30°C; 50% rH). Physical performance and its performance decrements, body temperatures (rectal, skin, and estimated muscle temperature), heart rate (HR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2), perceived exertion, thermal sensation (TS), body mass changes, blood lactate, and plasma volume were all measured. Performance decrements were similar in HOT and HYP [Total Distance (-4%), High-speed distance (~-8%), and variable run distance (~-12%) covered] and exacerbated in HH [total distance (-9%), high-speed distance (-15%), and variable run distance (-15%)] compared to CON. Peak sprint speed, was 4% greater in HOT compared with CON and HYP and 7% greater in HH. Sprint distance covered was unchanged (p > 0.05) in HOT and HYP and only decreased in HH (-8%) compared with CON. Body mass (-2%), temperatures (+2-5%), and TS (+18%) were altered in HOT. Furthermore, SaO2 (-8%) and HR (+3%) were changed in HYP. Similar changes in body mass and temperatures, HR, TS, and SaO2 were evident in HH to HOT and HYP, however, blood lactate (p < 0.001) and plasma volume (p < 0.001) were only significantly altered in HH. Perceived exertion was elevated (p < 0.05) by 7% in all conditions compared with CON. Regression analysis identified that absolute TS and absolute rise in skin and

  9. Shadow corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.

    2004-07-01

    An electrochemical mechanism, based on energetically favored complimentary reduction and oxidation reactions, operating in conjunction with radiolysis is proposed for explaining the shadow corrosion phenomenon observed under BWR conditions. The electrochemical reaction on platinum and nickel alloys (Inconel and X-750) is the oxidation of H 2O 2 to produce a localized enhancement in the concentrations of HO 2 and O 2. Energy level of the conduction band of ZrO 2 matches well with that for the reduction of HO 2 and O 2 regenerating H 2O 2. This reduction of the powerful oxidants, stimulates electron emission in ZrO 2 which then is balanced by increased oxidation of zirconium to generate additional electrons and hence also anion vacancies. A coupling between Zircaloy and platinum or nickel alloy is provided by H + transport, the source for initiating shadow corrosion, to Zircaloy-2 (Zircaloy-2 negative relative to platinum or the nickel alloy) in the gap between the materials. An enhanced localized corrosion of Zircaloy-2 occurs, its incidence dependent upon the transport of HO 2, O 2, H + and H 2O 2 in the coolant in the gap.

  10. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  11. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1M HCl by D-glucose derivatives of dihydropyrido [2,3-d:6,5-d′] dipyrimidine-2, 4, 6, 8(1H,3H, 5H,7H)-tetraone

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Chandrabhan; Quraishi, M. A.; Kluza, K.; Makowska-Janusik, M.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2017-01-01

    D-glucose derivatives of dihydropyrido-[2,3-d:6,5-d′]-dipyrimidine-2, 4, 6, 8(1H,3H, 5H,7H)-tetraone (GPHs) have been synthesized and investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 1M HCl solution using gravimetric, electrochemical, surface, quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The order of inhibition efficiencies is GPH-3 > GPH-2 > GPH-1. The results further showed that the inhibitor molecules with electron releasing (-OH, -OCH3) substituents exhibit higher efficiency than the parent molecule without any substituents. Polarization study suggests that the studied compounds are mixed-type but exhibited predominantly cathodic inhibitive effect. The adsorption of these compounds on mild steel surface obeyed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. SEM, EDX and AFM analyses were used to confirm the inhibitive actions of the molecules on mild steel surface. Quantum chemical (QC) calculations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations studies were undertaken to further corroborate the experimental results. PMID:28317849

  12. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1M HCl by D-glucose derivatives of dihydropyrido [2,3-d:6,5-d‧] dipyrimidine-2, 4, 6, 8(1H,3H, 5H,7H)-tetraone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Chandrabhan; Quraishi, M. A.; Kluza, K.; Makowska-Janusik, M.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2017-03-01

    D-glucose derivatives of dihydropyrido-[2,3-d:6,5-d‧]-dipyrimidine-2, 4, 6, 8(1H,3H, 5H,7H)-tetraone (GPHs) have been synthesized and investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 1M HCl solution using gravimetric, electrochemical, surface, quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The order of inhibition efficiencies is GPH-3 > GPH-2 > GPH-1. The results further showed that the inhibitor molecules with electron releasing (-OH, -OCH3) substituents exhibit higher efficiency than the parent molecule without any substituents. Polarization study suggests that the studied compounds are mixed-type but exhibited predominantly cathodic inhibitive effect. The adsorption of these compounds on mild steel surface obeyed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. SEM, EDX and AFM analyses were used to confirm the inhibitive actions of the molecules on mild steel surface. Quantum chemical (QC) calculations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations studies were undertaken to further corroborate the experimental results.

  13. Application of a quartz crystal microbalance to the study of copper corrosion in acid solution inhibited by triazole-iodide protective films

    SciTech Connect

    Jope, D.; Sell, J.; Pickering, H.W.; Weil, K.G.

    1995-07-01

    When one uses one side of a quartz crystal microbalance as the working electrode in electrochemical experiments, mass changes can be monitored continuously with a sensitivity of a few nanograms per square centimeter. In this study the working electrode consisted of electrolytically deposited copper, exposed to 0.1M sodium sulfate at pH 3, open to the atmosphere and in some cases containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Upon addition of one of the inhibitors, benzotriazole (BTA), tolyltriazole (TTA), carboxy-benzotriazole (CBT), or these inhibitors plus potassium iodide, the rate of frequency change decreases markedly. After removal of the inhibitors from the corrosive medium by fast solution exchange there is a marked continuing protective effect of the inhibitor films in the cases of BTA + KI and TTA + KI with the latter being the most stable and protective of all of the films. The results were qualitatively the same in the more corrosive solution containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  14. Corrosion profile in a gas sweetening plant

    SciTech Connect

    Case, R.; Viloria, A.; Luciani, B.

    1998-12-31

    A study was performed to assess the corrosion rate in a gas sweetening plant using electrochemical methods. The tests were performed by using samples of the amine in service. Coupons made of A-106 carbon steel were tested, as this material is typically used in most vessels. The variables studied included the actual temperature of different plant units at both rich and lean amine conditions, and the degree of CO{sub 2} saturation. The results show an increase of the uniform corrosion rate with temperature, which reflects the effect of heat stable salts in the corrosivity of the amine ovrrheated. Also, from the analysis of the potentiodynamic carves at different conditions, the risk for Alkaline Stress Corrosion Cracking (ASCC) was assessed. The association of this risk with actual plant conditions shows which vessels are susceptible to both amine corrosion and ASCC which allowed to develop a corrosion profile for both the lean and rich amine parts of the circuit,

  15. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  16. Conjoint corrosion and wear in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1999-04-01

    When considering titanium alloys for orthopaedic applications it is important to examine the conjoint action of corrosion and wear. In this study we investigate the corrosion and wear behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), bovine albumin solutions in PBS and 10% foetal calf serum solutions in PBS. The tests were performed under four different conditions to evaluate the influence of wear on the corrosion and corrosion on the wear behaviour as follows: corrosion without wear, wear-accelerated corrosion, wear in a non-corrosive environment and wear in a corrosive environment. The corrosion behaviour was investigated using cyclic polarisation studies to measure the ability of the surface to repassivate following breakdown of the passive layer. The properties of the repassivated layer were evaluated by measuring changes in the surface hardness of the alloys. The amount of wear that had occurred was assessed from weight changes and measurement of the depth of the wear scar. It was found that in the presence of wear without corrosion the wear behaviour of Ti-13Nb-13Zr was greater than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V and that in the presence of proteins the wear of all three alloys is reduced. In the presence of corrosion without wear Ti-13Nb-13Zr was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-7Nb which was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-4V without proteins whereas in the presence of protein the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb was reduced and that of Ti-6Al-4V increased. In the presence of corrosion and wear the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is higher than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V in PBS but in the presence of proteins the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb are very similar but higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V. The wear of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is lower than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-6Al-4V with or without the presence of proteins in a corrosive environment. Therefore the overall

  17. The role of crack tip strain rate in the stress corrosion cracking of high strength steels in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, R. M.; Atrens, A.; Smith, I. O.

    1989-05-01

    Creep tests have been performed on fracture mechanics specimens of as-quenched 4340 and 3.5NiCrMoV rotor steel to confirm the importance of crack tip strain rate in causing stress corrosion cracking. By allowing creep in a noncracking environment, dry air for the high strength steels tested, cracking did not occur when water, the corrosive solution, was later added to the system. Thus, it is possible to inhibit stress corrosion in spite of conditions otherwise conducive to crack growth. Conditions necessary to restart cracking were also tested. The importance of this result in terms of the mechanism of stress corrosion and difficulties in measuring KISCC is discussed.

  18. Recent Developments on Microencapsulation for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Jolley, Scott T.; Surma, Jan M.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition through corrosion controlled release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release when mechanical damage occurs.While proof-of-concept results have been reported previously, more recent efforts have been concentrated in technical developments to improve coating compatibility, synthesis procedure scalability, as well as fine tuning the release property of encapsulated active agents.

  19. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  20. Stress-enhanced corrosion of boiler tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Esmacher, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    Five case histories are presented on the effect of residual stresses (from fabrication or welding) on the waterside corrosion performance of carbon steel boiler tubing. Specifically, cases are reviewed in which tube swaging or tube bending operations (producing high forming stresses in deformed zones) resulted in the formation of stress-enhanced corrosion cells. In addition, the phenomenon of accelerated corrosion in welded support zones, membrane-welded panel sections, and weld-repaired areas is discussed.

  1. DRL performance of spontaneously hypertensive rats: dissociation of timing and inhibition of responses.

    PubMed

    Orduña, Vladimir; Valencia-Torres, Lourdes; Bouzas, Arturo

    2009-07-19

    In this experiment, we used a differential reinforcement of low rates (DRL) schedule to evaluate the performance of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar (WIS) rats, with the goal of dissociating the processes of timing and inhibition of responses through the use of two quantitative models: the peak deviation analysis and the temporal regulation model. The subjects were divided in two groups; the first group was exposed to 70 sessions under a DRL 10s schedule. SHR rats showed an apparent temporary deficit in the inhibition of responses process; however, no differences among strains were observed in terms of the timing process. The second group of rats was exposed to 30 sessions in DRL 10s schedule, before receiving three doses (2 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg) of methylphenidate. The results obtained through both models were consistent and indicated that at higher drug doses, the performance of all three strains of rats deteriorated. The impulsivity exhibited by SHR during acquisition supports the idea of these rats as an adequate animal model of ADHD. In contrast, evidence against this relies on the normal temporal processing found and in the worsening effect that methylphenidate produced in the process of inhibition of responses. These mixed results suggest the necessity of exploring timing behavior of other animal models in order to find a reliable animal model of ADHD.

  2. Corrosion Damage Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.

    2002-11-30

    Corrosion damage can lead to reduced operational lifetimes. Often this damage is not as obvious as general corrosion but takes the form of pits, intergranular corrosion, crevice corrosion and hydrogen absorption. These types of corrosion damage lead to stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and corrosion fatigue. A critical step in defining a corrosion damage function is determining the relationship between the corrosion damage, the resulting crack propagation mechanism and component lifetimes. The sequence of events is often some localized corrosion event such as pitting, transition of the pit to a planar crack, propagation of this short crack, transition of the short crack to long crack conditions and continued propagation through Stage I, II, and III of the long crack SCC regimes. A description of critical corrosion damage processes and examples of the transition to long crack SCC conditions will be discussed.

  3. USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Budiansky; F. Bocher; H. Cong; M.F. Hurley; J.R. Scully

    2006-02-23

    The use of multi-coupled electrode arrays in various corrosion applications is discussed with the main goal of advancing the understanding of various corrosion phenomena. Both close packed and far spaced electrode configurations are discussed. Far spaced electrode arrays are optimized for high throughput experiments capable of elucidating the effects of various variables on corrosion properties. For instance the effects of a statistical distribution of flaws on corrosion properties can be examined. Close packed arrays enable unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the behavior of local anodes and cathodes. Interactions between corrosion sites can trigger or inhibit corrosion phenomena and affect corrosion damage evolution.

  4. A physical corrosion model for bioabsorbable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-05-01

    Absorbable metal stents (AMSs) are an emerging technology in the treatment of heart disease. Computational modelling of AMS performance will facilitate the development of this technology. In this study a physical corrosion model is developed for AMSs based on the finite element method and adaptive meshing. The model addresses a gap between currently available phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs and physical corrosion models that have been developed for more simple geometries than those of a stent. The model developed in this study captures the changing surface of a corroding three-dimensional AMS structure for the case of diffusion-controlled corrosion. Comparisons are made between model predictions and those of previously developed phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs in terms of predicted device geometry and mechanical performance during corrosion. Relationships between alloy solubility and diffusivity in the corrosion environment and device performance during corrosion are also investigated.

  5. In vitro assessments on bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of TiN coating on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy synthesized by multi-arc ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiangyu; Fan, Ailan; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin

    2012-07-01

    TiN coating was synthesized on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface by multi-arc ion plating (MIP) technique. Surface morphology, cross sectional microstructure, elemental distributions and phase compositions of the obtained coating were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope (OM), glow discharge optical emission spectroscope (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of Ti6Al4V and the TiN coating were assessed via in vitro bacterial adhesion tests and corrosion experiments, respectively. The results indicated that continuous and compact coating which was built up by pure TiN with a typical columnar crystal structure has reached a thickness of 1.5 μm. This TiN coating could significantly reduce the bacterial adhesion and enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V substrate.

  6. CORROSION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1999-10-01

    corrosion resistance alone. Strength and creep tests were not performed. Based only their corrosion resistance, Alloys RA310 and TP310 were shown to be the best suited to resist chlorine in a combustion environment. These alloys produced protective chromium oxide layers, displayed more general rather than localized corrosion, and their additives did not react to provide conduits for further corrosion.

  7. Corrosion degradation mechanisms in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the historical aspects related to the development of coiled tubing for oilfield drilling, logging, workover and production operations. It focuses on the metallurgical and process variables of coiled tubing and their interrelationship with aspects of the downhole service environment and the resultant corrosion performance. Special emphasis is placed on (1) operating conditions that can lead to excessive corrosion and/or cracking damage and corrosion fatigue and (2) metallurgical and processing parameters which can be controlled to maximize coiled tubing resistance to corrosion degradation.

  8. Controlling Corrosion in Defence Equipment - Technical Meeting,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    corrosion of Ni/Al bronze in neutral solution, (2) the inhibited corrosion of mild steel in sulphuric acid, (3) comparison and ranking of a number of... electropolish : alkaline clean: pumice scrub: anodic etch: chromium plate. It must be remembered that mild steel is not being used, but a low alloy steel ...Wolsley shows no such damage. After all they are both made - from similar steels and both have been exposed to the two essential ingredients required

  9. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    . Researchers at NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC are developing a smart, environmentally friendly coating system for early corrosion detection, inhibition, and self healing of mechanical damage without external intervention. This smart coating will detect and respond actively to corrosion and mechanical damage such as abrasion and scratches, in a functional and predictable manner, and will be capable of adapting its properties dynamically. This coating is being developed using corrosion sensitive microcapsules that deliver the contents of their core (corrosion inhibiting compounds, corrosion indicators, and self healing agents) on demand when corrosion or mechanical damage to the coating occurs.

  10. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  11. Reduced graphene oxide induces cytotoxicity and inhibits photosynthetic performance of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Du, Shaoting; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Ranran; Lu, Qi; Liu, Lin; Bao, Xiaowei; Liu, Huijun

    2016-12-01

    Increased use of graphene materials might ultimately lead to their release into the environment. However, only a few studies have investigated the impact of graphene-based materials on green plants. In this study, the impact of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on the microalgae Scenedesmus obliquus was evaluated to determine its phytotoxicity. Treatment with RGO suppressed the growth of the microalgae. The 72-h IC50 values of RGO evaluated using the logistic and Gompertz models were 148 and 151 mg L(-1), respectively. RGO significantly inhibited Chl a and Chl a/b levels in the algal cells. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis showed that RGO significantly down-regulated photosystem II activity. The mechanism of how RGO inhibited algal growth and photosynthetic performance was determined by analyzing the alterations in ultrastructural morphology. RGO adhered to the algal cell surface as a semitranslucent coating. Cell wall damage and membrane integrity loss occurred in the treated cells. Moreover, nuclear chromatin clumping and starch grain number increase were noted. These changes might be attributed to the increase in malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species levels, which might have exceeded the scavenging ability of antioxidant enzymes (including peroxidase and superoxide dismutase). RGO impaired the extra- and intra-cellular morphology and increased oxidative stress and thus inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis.

  12. Performance and ERP components in the equiprobable go/no-go task: Inhibition in children.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M

    2015-09-01

    The equiprobable go/no-go task lacks the dominant go imperative found in the usual go/no-go task, and hence we previously regarded it as involving little inhibition. However, children have relative difficulty with this task, and demonstrate large frontal no-go N2s. We investigated whether this child N2 plays an inhibitory role, using performance measures to illuminate the link between N2 and inhibition. Forty children aged 8 to 13 were presented with four stimulus blocks each containing 75 go and 75 no-go tone stimuli in random order. A temporal PCA with unrestricted varimax rotation quantified the mean go and no-go ERP component amplitudes. Most identified components were differentially enhanced to go or no-go as in adults, supporting a previously proposed differential processing schema. Between subjects, larger frontocentral no-go N2bs were associated with fewer commission errors. Hence, the no-go N2b in this paradigm can be interpreted as an individual marker of inhibition in children.

  13. Laser surface processing of Ti6Al4V in gaseous nitrogen: corrosion performance in physiological solution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghuvir; Chowdhury, S Ghosh; Tiwari, S K; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2008-03-01

    Laser surface processing was carried out in gaseous nitrogen atmosphere at ambient temperature. The laser scan speed was varied (50-150 cm/min) at constant power of 1500 watts and resulting changes such as microstructural evolution, hardness, and electrochemical response of modified surface in Ringer's physiological solution at varying pH were studied. Increase in laser scanning speed was found to reduce the thickness of alloyed zone from 258 to 87 microm. The microstructure of laser-modified surface contains dendrites grown perpendicular to the laser traverse direction, beneath which basket weave structure of acicular alpha (martensite) was prevalent. Hardness at the top surface of laser-processed at 50 cm/min was approximately 1137 kg/mm2 that reduced with increase in the laser scan speed (577 kg/mm2 at 150 cm/min). Laser surface processing shifted the corrosion potential of Ti6Al4V towards noble side as compared to untreated alloy; the maximum shift by approximately 494 mV was recorded in pH approximately 9 solution. Passivation after laser surface modification was improved as currents were at least 1/3 of the untreated Ti6Al4V in passive region. While the pitting potential of untreated material was found to increase from 1.84 V for 4.0 pH to >2.5 V for 9.0 pH, the pitting potential after laser treatment was observed to drop from maximum of 74% for 4.0 pH (at 100 cm/min) to maximum of 42% for 9.0 pH (at 150 cm/min).

  14. A pharmaceutical product as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Samide, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    A pharmaceutical product, Trimethoprim (TMP), IUPAC name: 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine was investigated, as inhibitor to prevent carbon steel corrosion in acidic environments. The study was performed using weight loss and electrochemical measurements, in temperatures ranging between 25-55°C. The surface morphology before and after corrosion of carbon steel in 1.0 M HCl solution in the presence and absence of TMP was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with the increasing of the inhibitor concentration, reaching a maximum value of 92% at 25°C and 0.9 mM TMP, and decreased with increasing temperature. The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion by TMP can be attributed to the adsorption ability of inhibitor molecules onto the reactive sites of the metal surface. The adsorption is spontaneous and it is best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for the corrosion process in the absence and presence of TMP was evaluated from Arrhenius equation, to elucidate its inhibitive properties.

  15. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  16. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  17. An update of corrosion inhibitors for mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E.; Lohry, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a continuation of corrosion studies on the effectiveness of commercial and newly-developed corrosion inhibitors for use with mild steel exposed to urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) solution. This paper provides updated information on five newly-developed corrosion inhibitors. Tests were conducted with mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution containing each corrosion inhibitor at ambient temperature and under static conditions. Real-time corrosion of the test specimens was monitored using AC impedance techniques. Corrosion performance of the inhibitors was evaluated based on comparison of the corrosion rate of specimens exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution with and without a corrosion inhibitor.

  18. Prevention of corrosion with polyaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDiarmid, Alan G. (Inventor); Ahmad, Naseer (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the corrosion inhibition of a metal or metal alloy substrate surface are provided wherein the substrate surface is coated with a polyaniline film. The polyaniline film coating is applied by contacting the substrate surface with a solution of polyaniline. The polyaniline is dissolved in an appropriate organic solvent and the solvent is allowed to evaporate from the substrate surface yielding the polyaniline film coating.

  19. Investigation of some green compounds as corrosion and scale inhibitors for cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. )

    1999-05-01

    The performance of an open-recirculating cooling system, an important component in most industries, is affected by corrosion and scale formation. Numerous additives have been used in the past for the control of corrosion and scale formation. Effects of the naturally occurring compounds azadirachta indica (leaves), punica granatum (shell), and momordica charantia (fruits), on corrosion of mild steel in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) were assessed using weight loss, electrochemical polarization, and impedance techniques. Extracts of the compounds exhibited excellent inhibition efficiencies comparable to that of hydroxyethylidine diphosphonic acid (HEDP), the most preferred cooling water inhibitor. The compounds were found effective under static and flowing conditions. Extracts were quite effective in retarding formation of scales, and the maximum antiscaling efficiency was exhibited by the extract of azadirachta indica (98%). The blowdown of the cooling system possessed color and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Concentrations of these parameters were reduced by an adsorption process using activated carbon as an adsorbent.

  20. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  1. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  2. Corrosion-Resistant Roof with Integrated Photovoltaic Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    system as attached to a metal-panel roof that is protected with a high-performance, corrosion -resistant coating . 1.3 Approach A severely corroded...fluoride (PVF) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) can pro- vide excellent corrosion protection in corrosive environments such as KMC. Sustainable...systems on the corrosion resistance of coated metal roofing systems is not known. Potential corro- sion mechanisms include moisture trapped between the

  3. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  4. Smart Coating for Corrosion Indication and Prevention: Recent Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Hintze, Paul; Calle, Luz M.; Buhrow, Jerry; Curran, Jerry; Muehlberg, A. J.; Gelling, V. J.; Webster, D. C.; Croll, S. G.; Contu, F.; Taylor, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The authors are developing a smart coating system based on pH-triggered release microcapsules. These microcapsules can be incorporated into various coating systems for corrosion detection, protection and self-repair of mechanical coating damage. This paper will present the results from progress made to date in the controlled release properties of these microcapsules as well as in their corrosion indication and corrosion inhibition function.

  5. Hot Corrosion Performance of AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa and AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa Coatings Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Nailiang; Hu, Hengfa; Liu, Yang; Song, Xiu

    2016-04-01

    AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa and AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa coatings were deposited on 316L stainless steel substrate using atmospheric plasma spraying, respectively, in order to improve the oxidation and corrosion resistance. The hot corrosion performance of the coatings at 700 and 900 °C were studied, and the detailed microstructures and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that both coatings are structurally featured by slatted layers, consisting of amorphous phase, Cr2O3, Ni3Al, and Al2O3. The hot corrosion resistance of AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating is better than that of AlO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating. This improvement is attributed to lower porosity and more compact Cr2O3 in AlO-CrO/NiCoCrAlYTa coating which performs better than Al2O3 in blocking further inward progress of corrosion and oxidization.

  6. Environmentally Friendly Coating Technology for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Jolley, Scott T.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Gillis, Mathew; Blanton, Michael; Hanna, Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry.

  7. Hydrazino-methoxy-1,3,5-triazine Derivatives' Excellent Corrosion Organic Inhibitors of Steel in Acidic Chloride Solution.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Osman, Sameh M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Mahdy, Gamal A

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of 2-hydrazino-4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-tirazine (DMeHT), 2,4-dihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT), and 2,4,6-tridydrazino-1,3,5-triaizne (TH₃) on steel corrosion in acidic media was examined using electrochemical techniques. The results showed 2,4-Ddihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT) gave the best corrosion protection performance among the other hydrazino derivatives even at a low concentration of 25 ppm (95%). The number of hydrazino groups play an important role in the corrosion inhibition, where the two hydrazine groups increased the electrostatic interactions between the protonated tested compounds, the negatively charged steel surface resulted from the adsorption of the chloride anions, and the presence of the methoxy group made the compound more reliable for formation of film protection on the surface of steel through the lone pair of oxygen atoms. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggested that the corrosion process of steel in presence of the hydrazino-s-triazine derivatives (TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT) were being controlled by the charge transfer reaction. Polarization curves indicated that the examined TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT behaved as mixed type inhibitors.

  8. Amine corrosion inhibitor successful in tests at Mobil's Paulsboro refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-03

    Mobil Oil Corp. has successfully completed a test of an amine unit corrosion inhibition system at its 100,000-b/d refinery in Paulsboro, NJ. The system, the Amine Guard ST system is used to inhibit corrosion of diethanolamine (DEA) sweetening units that treat process streams from the fluid catalytic cracker (FCC), a hydrodesulfurization unit (HDU), and lube oil dewaxing (LDW) units at the refinery. Use of the corrosion-inhibition system has allowed an increase in the DEA concentration to 55 wt %, a reduction of the DEA circulation rate by 40%, and a reduction in regeneration steam of 35%.

  9. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  10. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic

  11. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  12. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  13. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, B. P.; Calle, L. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Johnsey, M. N.; Montgomery, E. L.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Surma, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center's Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods. Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed. The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  14. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete. PMID:26989590

  15. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S 11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete.

  16. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe2O4-SiO2) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozlou, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Baradaran, Z.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe2O4 and NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  17. Chemical Species in the Vapor Phase of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks: Potential Impacts on Waste Tank Corrosion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2010-09-22

    The presence of corrosive and inhibiting chemicals on the tank walls in the vapor space, arising from the waste supernatant, dictate the type and degree of corrosion that occurs there. An understanding of how waste chemicals are transported to the walls and the affect on vapor species from changing supernatant chemistry (e.g., pH, etc.), are basic to the evaluation of risks and impacts of waste changes on vapor space corrosion (VSC). In order to address these issues the expert panel workshop on double-shell tank (DST) vapor space corrosion testing (RPP-RPT-31129) participants made several recommendations on the future data and modeling needs in the area of DST corrosion. In particular, the drying of vapor phase condensates or supernatants can form salt or other deposits at the carbon steel interface resulting in a chemical composition at the near surface substantially different from that observed directly in the condensates or the supernatants. As a result, over the past three years chemical modeling and experimental studies have been performed on DST supernatants and condensates to predict the changes in chemical composition that might occur as condensates or supernatants equilibrate with the vapor space species and dry at the carbon steel surface. The experimental studies included research on both the chemical changes that occurred as the supernatants dried as well as research on how these chemical changes impact the corrosion of tank steels. The chemical modeling and associated experimental studies were performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the research on tank steel corrosion at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This report presents a summary of the research conducted at PNNL with special emphasis on the most recent studies conducted in FY10. An overall summary of the project results as well as their broader implications for vapor space corrosion of the DST’s is given at the end of this report.

  18. Crevice corrosion of nickel superalloy in deaerated chloride/sulphate solution at 90°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón Ortiz, M.; Carranza, R. M.; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Alloy 22 is a nickel base alloy highly resistant to all forms of corrosion. It was designed to resist to most aggressive environments for industrial applications. Electrochemical studies such as Potentiodynamic-Galvanostatic-Potentiostatic (PD-GS-PD) tests and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations were performed to determine the corrosion behaviour of alloy 22 (N06022). The effect of sulphate ion in chloride containing solutions at 90°C, were studied in this work under aggressive conditions where this material might be susceptible to crevice corrosion. The electrolyte solution, which consisted of 0.1M and 1M NaCl and different sulphate concentrations. It was observed that there were complete inhibitions of crevice corrosion for R crit =[SO4 =]/[Cl-]=1 in the 0.1mol/L NaCl solutions and R crit =2 in the 1mol/L NaCl solutions. The corrosion rate obtained was about 0.1μm/year at 24 hours of immersion.

  19. TESTING VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID-AIR INTERFACE CORROSION IN SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTS OF HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELLED TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2013-05-30

    Electrochemical coupon testing were performed on 6 Hanford tank solution simulants and corresponding condensate simulants to evaluate the susceptibility of vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. Additionally, partial-immersion coupon testing were performed on the 6 tank solution simulants to compliment the accelerated electrochemical testing. Overall, the testing suggests that the SY-102 high nitrate solution is the most aggressive of the six solution simulants evaluated. Alternatively, the most passive solution, based on both electrochemical testing and coupon testing, was AY-102 solution. The presence of ammonium nitrate in the simulants at the lowest concentration tested (0.001 M) had no significant effect. At higher concentrations (0.5 M), ammonium nitrate appears to deter localized corrosion, suggesting a beneficial effect of the presence of the ammonium ion. The results of this research suggest that there is a threshold concentration of ammonium ions leading to inhibition of corrosion, thereby suggesting the need for further experimentation to identify the threshold.

  20. Surface modification for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-06-01

    The raw gas environments that arise from coal gasification have chemical compositions that are low in pO{sub 2} and moderate-to-high in pS{sub 2}. Metallic materials for service in such an environment undergo predominantly sulfidation attack at temperatures of 400 to 700{degree}C. Modification of alloy compositions in bulk can alter the scaling processes and lead to improvements in corrosion resistance, but the benefits can only be attained at temperatures much higher than the service temperatures of the components. Modification of surfaces of structural components by several of the coating techniques examined in this study showed substantial benefit in corrosion resistance when tested in simulated coal gasification environments. The paper presents several examples of surface modification and their corrosion performance.

  1. Biodegradation of corrosion inhibitors and their influence on petroleum product pipeline.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Palaniswamy, Narayanan; Rajendran, Annamalai

    2007-01-01

    The present study enlightens the role of Bacillus cereus ACE4 on biodegradation of commercial corrosion inhibitors (CCI) and the corrosion process on API 5LX steel. Bacillus cereus ACE4, a dominant facultative aerobic species was identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, which was isolated from the corrosion products of refined diesel-transporting pipeline in North West India. The effect of CCI on the growth of bacterium and its corrosion inhibition efficiency were investigated. Corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by rotating cage test and the nature of biodegradation of corrosion inhibitors was also analyzed. This isolate has the capacity to degrade the aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon present in the corrosion inhibitors. The degraded products of corrosion inhibitors and bacterial activity determine the electrochemical behavior of API 5LX steel.

  2. Intentional and Reactive Inhibition during Spoken-Word Stroop Task Performance in People with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pompon, Rebecca Hunting; McNeil, Malcolm R.; Spencer, Kristie A.; Kendall, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The integrity of selective attention in people with aphasia (PWA) is currently unknown. Selective attention is essential for everyday communication, and inhibition is an important part of selective attention. This study explored components of inhibition--both intentional and reactive inhibition--during spoken-word production in PWA and in…

  3. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  4. Corrosion behavior of several metals in ethylene glycol-base heat-transfer fluids under conditions encountered in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, copper, and iron in inhibited ethylene glycol-ASTM corrosive water solutions was evaluated in a laboratory loop under isothermal and heat-flux conditions for 1000 h at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K, in static autoclave tests at 450/sup 0/K for 500 h, and by potentiodynamic polarization measurements at temperatures between 298 and 348/sup 0/K. The effect of time, temperature, and ethylene glycol concentration of the heat-transfer fluid on the extent of inhibitor depletion was determined from analyses of the reserve alkalinity, pH, and inhibitor content of the solutions. The performance of an electrochemical sensor as a monitor of fluid quality was also evaluated. A heat flux of 0.4 to 1.0 kW/m/sup 2/ did not have a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of the various materials at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K. The corrosion rates of aluminum, copper, and iron in the 50 volume percent inhibited ethylene glycol-corrosive water solution decreased as a function of time during the 1000-h test. At 413/sup 0/K, the corrosion rate of copper was considerably higher than that of iron or aluminum at low flow velocity. Significant degradation of the fluid quality, as indicated by the measurement of the pH, reserve alkalinity, and inhibitor concentrations, occurred after several hundred hours at temperatures of approx. 450/sup 0/K.

  5. Detergent and corrosion inhibitor and motor fuel composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, B.J.; Herbstman, S.; Levin, M.

    1983-09-13

    As a detergent and corrosion inhibiting fuel additive, the product is claimed resulting from reaction of trimellitic anhydride and a N- C/sub 10/-C/sub 25/-hydrocarbyl-1,3-diaminopropane and a fuel composition containing same.

  6. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  7. Corrosion: ASM metals handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The handbook covers forms of corrosion, testing and evaluation, corrosion-resistant design, and various protection methods. 20 sections covering specific metals and alloys, heat treatments, protective coatings, anodic and cathodic protection, and design considerations. A final section discusses corrosion problems in 20 major industries, as well as the prevention and protection methods used.

  8. Review of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) applied to corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabbutt, S.; Picton, P.; Shaw, P.; Black, S.

    2012-05-01

    The assessment of corrosion within an engineering system often forms an important aspect of condition monitoring but it is a parameter that is inherently difficult to measure and predict. The electrochemical nature of the corrosion process allows precise measurements to be made. Advances in instruments, techniques and software have resulted in devices that can gather data and perform various analysis routines that provide parameters to identify corrosion type and corrosion rate. Although corrosion rates are important they are only useful where general or uniform corrosion dominates. However, pitting, inter-granular corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (stress corrosion) are examples of corrosion mechanisms that can be dangerous and virtually invisible to the naked eye. Electrochemical noise (EN) monitoring is a very useful technique for detecting these types of corrosion and it is the only non-invasive electrochemical corrosion monitoring technique commonly available. Modern instrumentation is extremely sensitive to changes in the system and new experimental configurations for gathering EN data have been proven. In this paper the identification of localised corrosion by different data analysis routines has been reviewed. In particular the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analysis to corrosion data is of key interest. In most instances data needs to be used with conventional theory to obtain meaningful information and relies on expert interpretation. Recently work has been carried out using artificial neural networks to investigate various types of corrosion data in attempts to predict corrosion behaviour with some success. This work aims to extend this earlier work to identify reliable electrochemical indicators of localised corrosion onset and propagation stages.

  9. Research on a new type of fiber Bragg grating based corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Song, Shide; Wang, Xiaona; Zhou, Weijie; Zhang, Zuocai

    2015-08-01

    Investigations of the corrosion of rebars in concrete structures are widely studied because of the serious damage to concrete caused by rebar corrosion. The rebar corrosion products in reinforced concrete take up 2~6 times the volume of the rebar. Based on this principle, a new type of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) corrosion sensor is proposed in this paper, which consists of two sensors, an FBG corrosion measurement sensor to measure the expansion strain caused by rebar corrosion, and a temperature compensation sensor to eliminate the cross-sensitivity of FBG corrosion sensor. The corrosion rate is derived by the wavelength shift of FBG corrosion sensor, so rebar corrosion can be monitored and assessed by the FBG wavelength shift. A customized rebar with epoxy fixing groove is designed to install a corrosion sensor on its surface and an embedded temperature compensation sensor. The corrosion sensor is embedded in cement mortar and subsequently casted in concrete. The performance of the corrosion sensor is studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that the new type of corrosion sensor has advantage of relatively large measurement range of corrosion rate. The corrosion sensor is suitable to monitor slightly and moderately corroded rebars.

  10. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  11. Predicting concrete corrosion of sewers using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is often a major failure mechanism for concrete sewers and under such circumstances the sewer service life is largely determined by the progression of microbially induced concrete corrosion. The modelling of sewer processes has become possible due to the improved understanding of in-sewer transformation. Recent systematic studies about the correlation between the corrosion processes and sewer environment factors should be utilized to improve the prediction capability of service life by sewer models. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach for modelling the concrete corrosion processes in sewers. The approach included predicting the time for the corrosion to initiate and then predicting the corrosion rate after the initiation period. The ANN model was trained and validated with long-term (4.5 years) corrosion data obtained in laboratory corrosion chambers, and further verified with field measurements in real sewers across Australia. The trained model estimated the corrosion initiation time and corrosion rates very close to those measured in Australian sewers. The ANN model performed better than a multiple regression model also developed on the same dataset. Additionally, the ANN model can serve as a prediction framework for sewer service life, which can be progressively improved and expanded by including corrosion rates measured in different sewer conditions. Furthermore, the proposed methodology holds promise to facilitate the construction of analytical models associated with corrosion processes of concrete sewers.

  12. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer

    2005-03-10

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

  13. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  14. Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Stansbury, E.E.

    1991-10-01

    An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

  15. Corrosion resistance of porous NiTi biomedical alloy in simulated body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioudi, F.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Pavlidou, E.; Skolianos, S.; Michailidis, N.

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion performance of two porous NiTi in physiological and Hank’s solutions was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Electric models simulating the corrosion mechanism at early stages of immersion were proposed, accounting for both microstructural observations and electrochemical results. Results indicate that both porous samples were susceptible to localized corrosion. The porosity increase (from 7% to 18%) resulted in larger and wider pore openings, thus favoring the corrosion resistance of 18% porous NiTi. Strengthening of corrosion resistance was observed in Hank’s solution. The pore morphology and micro-galvanic corrosion phenomena were determining factors affecting the corrosion resistance.

  16. Thin Metal Films as Corrosion Indicators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-03-01

    used during the preceding two years were replaced by quart glass jars with gasket sealed lids. All electric lead- in entrances were sealed with beeswax ...rinse, and the excess lanolin could be seen to dissolve quite rapidly. Apparently, however, a corrosion inhibiting layer of lanolin remained. At the 40

  17. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. The Influence of Zn Content on the Corrosion and Wear Performance of Mg-Zn-Ca Alloy in Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Liu, Debao; Zhao, Yue; Jin, Feng; Chen, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Mg-Zn-Ca alloy has been attracting increasing attention as a potential biodegradable implant material. In this paper, Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca and Mg-4Zn-0.2Ca alloys were prepared by means of vacuum melting and subsequent hot extrusion process. The influences of Zn content on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion and wear behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) were studied. The results show that with increased Zn content, the grain size and corrosion resistance were decreased, while the mechanical strength and wear resistance were increased, under both dry sliding and SBF-lubricated conditions. For the same Mg-Zn-Ca alloy, the wear loss rate under SBF lubrication was higher than dry sliding condition, indicating a strong corrosion-assisted wear effect of SBF to the Mg-Zn-Ca alloy.

  19. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  20. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  1. Silica nanocontainers for active corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Maia, Frederico; Tedim, João; Lisenkov, Aleksey D; Salak, Andrei N; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L; Ferreira, Mário G S

    2012-02-21

    Novel self-healing protective coatings with nanocontainers of corrosion inhibitors open new opportunities for long-term anticorrosion protection of different metallic materials. In this paper a new type of functional nanoreservoir based on silica nanocapsules (SiNC) synthesized and loaded with corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) in a one-stage process is reported for the first time. Unlike conventional mesoporous silica nanoparticles, SiNC possess an empty core and shell with gradual mesoporosity, arising from the particular conditions of the synthetic route adopted, which confers significant loading capacity and allows prolonged and stimuli-triggered release of the inhibiting species. The kinetics of inhibitor release was studied at different pH values and concentrations of NaCl. The results show a clear dependence of the release profiles on corrosion relevant triggers such as pH and Cl(-) concentration. When SiNC loaded with MBT are dispersed in NaCl solution, there is a significant decrease of the corrosion activity on aluminium alloy 2024. More importantly, when SiNC-MBT is added to a conventional water-based coating formulation, the modified coating hampers corrosion activity at the metal interface, better than in the case of direct addition of corrosion inhibitor. Furthermore, self-healing is observed before and after artificially inflicting defects in the modified coatings. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in new generation of active protective coatings.

  2. Silica nanocontainers for active corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Frederico; Tedim, João; Lisenkov, Aleksey D.; Salak, Andrei N.; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L.; Ferreira, Mário G. S.

    2012-02-01

    Novel self-healing protective coatings with nanocontainers of corrosion inhibitors open new opportunities for long-term anticorrosion protection of different metallic materials. In this paper a new type of functional nanoreservoir based on silica nanocapsules (SiNC) synthesized and loaded with corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) in a one-stage process is reported for the first time. Unlike conventional mesoporous silica nanoparticles, SiNC possess an empty core and shell with gradual mesoporosity, arising from the particular conditions of the synthetic route adopted, which confers significant loading capacity and allows prolonged and stimuli-triggered release of the inhibiting species. The kinetics of inhibitor release was studied at different pH values and concentrations of NaCl. The results show a clear dependence of the release profiles on corrosion relevant triggers such as pH and Cl- concentration. When SiNC loaded with MBT are dispersed in NaCl solution, there is a significant decrease of the corrosion activity on aluminium alloy 2024. More importantly, when SiNC-MBT is added to a conventional water-based coating formulation, the modified coating hampers corrosion activity at the metal interface, better than in the case of direct addition of corrosion inhibitor. Furthermore, self-healing is observed before and after artificially inflicting defects in the modified coatings. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in new generation of active protective coatings.

  3. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    the performance assessment for the SDA. The corrosion on the carbon steel, beryllium, and aluminum were more evident with a clear difference in corrosion performance between the 4-ft and 10-ft levels. Notable surface corrosion products were evident as well as numerous pit initiation sites. Since the corrosion of the beryllium and aluminum is characterized by pitting, the geometrical character of the corrosion becomes more significant than the general corrosion rate. Both pitting factor and weight loss data should be used together. For six-year exposure, the maximum carbon steel corrosion rate was 0.3643 MPY while the maximum beryllium corrosion rate was 0.3282 MPY and the maximum aluminum corrosion rate was 0.0030 MPY.

  4. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  5. High-Strength Bolt Corrosion Fatigue Life Model and Application

    PubMed Central

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life. PMID:25152916

  6. High-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life model and application.

    PubMed

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life.

  7. Control of metallic corrosion through microbiological route.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, S; Ponmariappan, S; Mohanan, S; Palaniswamy, N; Palaniappan, R; Rengaswamy, N S

    2003-09-01

    Involvement of biofilm or microorganisms in corrosion processes is widely acknowledged. Although majority of the studies on microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) have concentrated on aerobic/anaerobic bacteria. There are numerous aerobic bacteria, which could hinder the corrosion process. The microbiologically produced exopolymers provide the structural frame work for the biofilm. These polymers combine with dissolved metal ions and form organometallic complexes. Generally heterotrophic bacteria contribute to three major processes: (i) synthesis of polymers (ii) accumulation of reserve materials like poly-beta-hydroxy butrate (iii) production of high molecular weight extracellular polysaccharides. Poly-beta-hydroxy butyrate is a polymer of D(-)beta-hydroxy butrate and has a molecular weight between 60,000 and 2,50,000. Some extracellular polymers also have higher molecular weights. It seems that higher molecular weight polymer acts as biocoating. In the present review, role of biochemistry on corrosion inhibition and possibilities of corrosion inhibition by various microbes are discussed. The role of bacteria on current demand during cathodic protection is also debated. In addition, some of the significant contributions made by CECRI in this promising area are highlighted.

  8. Corrosion protection of metals by silane surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Danqing

    2005-07-01

    The need for toxic chromate replacements in metal-finishing industries has prompted an intensive search for replacement technologies in recent years. Among the replacements that have been proposed, those that are based upon the use of organofunctional silanes rank very high in terms of performance, broad applicability as well as ease of application. This dissertation presents a four-part work: (1) structural characterization of silane films on metals, (2) mechanism studies of silane-treated metal systems, (3) development of water-based silane systems, and (4) measurements of other properties of silane films. In part 1, silane films, i.e., bis-[triethoxysilylpropyl]tetrasulfide (bis-sulfur silane) and bis-[trimethoxysilylpropyl]amine (bis-amino silane) were deposited on AA 2024-T3 and were characterized mainly using reflection-absorption Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-RA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. In part 2, the mechanistic study of corrosion protection of AA 2024-T3 by bis-sulfur silane film was carried out. In summation, the following two factors play critical roles in the corrosion protection of AA 2024-T3: (1) the formation of a highly crosslinked interfacial layer, and (2) high water resistance of silane films. The former inhibits corrosion in the following two ways: (1) blocking favorable sites for water adsorption by the formation of AlOSi bonds at the interface which effectively reduces the tendency of aqueous corrosion; and (2) bonding tightly to the metal and thus restricting transportation of the existing corrosion products away from their original sites which hinders pit growth. It should be noted that a high density of AlOSi bonds can be obtained employing bis-silanes rather than mono-silanes. A high water resistance makes water penetration difficult in silane films. This is essential for preventing AlOSi bonds from hydrolysis. In part 3, test results for newly-developed water-based silane systems were

  9. Technical note: Tall oil fatty acid anhydrides as corrosion inhibitor intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, E.R.; Parker, J.E. III

    1997-01-01

    Anhydrides derived from tall oil fatty acids offer enhanced corrosion inhibition properties compared to traditional dimer/trimer acids. The chemistry of this intermediate, its use in corrosion inhibition for downhole applications, and the synthesis of novel oil- and water-soluble derivatives were studied.

  10. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  11. Effect of Cr/C Ratio on Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of Cr3C2-NiCr Composite Fabricated by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Deyuan; Liu, Dun; He, Chunlin; Bennett, Peter; Chen, Lie; Yang, Qibiao; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different Cr/C ratios on the microstructure, microhardness, and corrosion resistance of Ni-based laser clad hardfacings, reinforced by in situ synthesized chromium carbide particles. Cr3C2-NiCr composites have been laser processed with graphite/Cr/Ni powder blends with varying Cr/C ratios. Following phase analysis (x-ray diffraction) and microstructure investigation (scanning electron microscopy; energy dispersive x-ray analysis; transmission electron microscopy), the solidification of laser melt pool is discussed, and the corrosion resistances are examined. Several different zones (planar, dendritic, eutectic and re-melt zone) were formed in these samples, and the thicknesses and shapes of these zones vary with the change of Cr/C ratio. The sizes and types of carbides and the content of reserved graphite in the composites change as the Cr/C ratio varies. With the content of carbides (especially Cr3C2) grows, the microhardness is improved. The corrosive resistance of the composites to 0.2M H2SO4 aqueous solution decreases as the Cr/C ratio reduces owing to not only the decreasing Cr content in the NiCr matrix but also the galvanic corrosion formed within the carbide and graphite containing Ni matrix.

  12. Measurable and Influential Parameters That Influence Corrosion Performance Differences between Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Coating Material Combinations and Model Parent Material Combinations Derived from Epoxy-Amine Matrix Materials.

    PubMed

    Curtzwiler, Greg W; Williams, Eric B; Maples, Austin L; Wand, Steven W; Rawlins, James W

    2017-02-22

    Protective coatings are often erroneously thought of as perfect environmental barriers for metal substrates; however, a host of corrosion inducing environmental contaminants permeate through defect-free coatings. Carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanofillers with unique mechanical, electrical, and polymer interaction properties with well-established yet, for practical reasons, often unrealized potential. The research objective was to quantify and understand the influential effects and relationships between low concentration levels of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) dispersed into epoxy-amine matrix materials and the different water hydrogen bonding interactions on corrosion rates of steel substrates. We hypothesize that when water directly hydrogen bonds with polymer, substrate and/or MWCNTS, the localized water's capacity to transfer environmental contaminants through the coating, i.e., to and from the substrate, diminishes due to a reduced potential to contribute to the formation of water hydration shells and therefore aid in diminishing the corrosion rate. We measured the absolute pre-exposure water content, and monitored to delineate between the ratio and shifting ratio of in situ free versus bound water hydrogen bonding interactions at the coating/air interface using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in a 5% NaCl fog environment in an attempt to correlate these differences with experimental corrosion rates. Free water content was reduced from ∼20% to <1% of the total water concentration when 1.0 wt % MWCNTs was dispersed into the parent polymer network. Concurrently, the bound water content was measured to shift from ∼2% to >80% with the same MWCNT concentration. The MWCNT bound water resulted in 25% less corrosion for the same steel substrates albeit the measured water vapor diffusivity was the same for each material combination evaluated. Interestingly, the measured pre-exposure bound water content was predictive of which material would corrode slowest and

  13. Thermal control system corrosion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Mucha, Phillip E.

    1990-01-01

    During the development of an expert system for autonomous control of the Space Station Thermal Control System (TCS), the thermal performance of the Brassboard TCS began to gradually degrade. This degradation was due to filter clogging by metallic residue. A study was initiated to determine the source of the residue and the basic cause of the corrosion. The investigation focused on the TCS design, materials compatibility, Ames operating and maintenance procedures, and chemical analysis of the residue and of the anhydrous ammonia used as the principal refrigerant. It was concluded that the corrosion mechanisms involved two processes: the reaction of water alone with large, untreated aluminum parts in a high pH environment and the presence of chlorides and chloride salts. These salts will attack the aluminum oxide layer and may enable galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the more noble stainless steel and other metallic elements present. Recommendations are made for modifications to the system design, the materials used, and the operating and maintenance procedures, which should largely prevent the recurrence of these corrosion mechanisms.

  14. Working Memory, Inhibition, and Fluid Intelligence as Predictors of Performance on Tower of Hanoi and London Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, N.A.; Davalos, D.B.; DeLosh, E.L.; Davis, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of working memory, inhibition, and fluid intelligence to performance on the Tower of Hanoi (TOH) and Tower of London (TOL) were examined in 85 undergraduate participants. All three factors accounted for significant variance on the TOH, but only fluid intelligence accounted for significant variance on the TOL. When the…

  15. The Buffering Effects of Rejection-Inhibiting Attentional Training on Social and Performance Threat among Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandeneau, Stephane D.; Baldwin, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns about social rejection can be disruptive in an academic context. We set out to train a positive cognitive habit that would buffer against social and performance threat thereby making students less vulnerable and more resilient to rejection. Participants from adult education centers (n=150) were first trained to inhibit rejection using a…

  16. The role of switching, inhibition and working memory in older adults' performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Gamboz, Nadia; Borella, Erika; Brandimonte, Maria A

    2009-05-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is considered a typical executive test. However, several interesting questions are still open as to the specific executive processes underlying this task. In the present study, we explored how local and global switching, inhibition and working memory, assessed through the Number-Letter, the Stop Signal and the Reading Span tasks, relate to older adults' performance in the WCST. Results showed that older adults' performance variability in the number of perseverative errors was predicted by the local switch component of the Number-Letter task. Results also showed age-related differences in inhibition, working memory and global switching, while local switching resulted largely spared in aging. This study provides evidence that switching abilities may contribute to performance of older adults in the WCST. It also provides initial evidence suggesting that switching processes, associated with local switch costs, are involved in performance on the WCST, at least in older adults.

  17. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is {approx} 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status.

  18. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-29

    METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR...EQUILIBRIA AND OXIDE SOLUTION RELATIONS IN MOLTEN SALTS ............................................. 2 IV. METHODS FOR DETERMINING SOLUBILITIES

  19. Dynamic Multivariate Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    include the development of a test chamber, modified to include the synergistic effects of UV and ozone and the exposure of bare and coated samples to yield...prediction of performance lifetime based upon a relatively short timeframe accelerated test. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Corrosion, ozone , ultraviolet...modified to include the synergistic effects of UV and ozone and the exposure of bare and coated samples to yield an accelerated corrosion test. This test

  20. ENVIROMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Paterek; Gemma Husmillo; Amrutha Daram; Vesna Trbovic

    2003-10-31

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter includes the application of the method of fractionation of the extracts by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts' ability to inhibit biofilm formation. We initiated the delivery system for these new biocides in the test cell and in mixtures of foam components and biocides/anti-biofilms. A total of 51 fractions collected by HPLC from crude extracts that were obtained from three varieties of Capsicum sp. (Serrano, Habanero, Chile de Arbol) were subjected to growth inhibition tests against two SRB strains, D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans. Five fractions showed growth inhibition against both strains while seven inhibited D. desulfuricans only. The crude extracts did not show growth inhibition on both strains but were proven to be potent in preventing the formation of biofilm. Growth inhibition tests of the same set of crude extracts against Comamonas denitrificans did not show positive results. The fractions will be subjected to biofilm inhibition and dissociation assay as well. The delivery system to be evaluated first was foam. The ''foam pig'' components of surfactants and water were tested with the biocide addition. The first chemical and physical parameters to be tested were pH and surfactants. Tests using the fractionated pepper extracts are progressing rapidly. Gas chromatographic analysis on a number of fractions is underway

  1. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  2. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  3. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  4. Effect of silty sand in formation water on CO2 corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Dou, Juanjuan; Lu, Songle; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qinghe

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in CO2 aqueous environment containing silty sand was investigated using corrosion mass loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy diffraction spectrum (EDS), and various electrochemical measurements. The results show that the corrosion rate of carbon steel was obviously reduced due to the existence of silty sand. Silty sand promoted the rapid heterogeneous nucleation of corrosion product FeCO3 and simultaneously decreased its grains growth. Silty sand mixed with corrosion product to form the outer layer of corrosion scale with high compactness, blocking the transport of ferrous ions and leading to the formation of the inner layer of corrosion scale without silty sand. The existence of silty sand in the outer layer of corrosion scale inhibited anodic and cathodic currents.

  5. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  6. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-06-17

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface.

  7. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  8. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  9. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface.

  10. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential.

  11. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

    2007-11-16

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

  12. Effectiveness of FRP in Reducing Corrosion in a Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Indoor Controls vs Wrapped Specimens Cracked 15 Effect on Corrosion Rate 16 Role of Layers - CFRP 17 Role of Layers - GFRP 18 Unwrapped Controls 19...Concluding Remarks FRP slows down the corrosion rate Performance of CFRP and GFRP are comparable 36 Linear polarization correctly predicts trends Performance

  13. Prevention and Control in Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    ferric acid mix’ 1 showed at the moment the best performance. 3. CORROSION PROTECTION Many factors have to be taken into account in order to carry out...nickel metavanadate 7 , Phosphoric Sulfuric Acid anodizingŜ, etc.) have already given promising results. A non-toxic trivalent chromium conversion...coating formed applying dilute solutions of basic chromic sulfate plus hexafluorozirconate has been already successfully proposed’ 9; it appears at the

  14. Dynamics of corrosion rates associated with nitrite or nitrate mediated control of souring under biological conditions simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rempel, C L; Evitts, R W; Nemati, M

    2006-10-01

    Representative microbial cultures from an oil reservoir and electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic scan and linear polarization were used to investigate the time dependent corrosion rate associated with control of biogenic sulphide production through addition of nitrite, nitrate and a combination of nitrate-reducing, sulphide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) and nitrate. The addition of nitrate alone did not prevent the biogenic production of sulphide but the produced sulphide was eventually oxidized and removed from the system. The addition of nitrate and NR-SOB had a similar effect on oxidation and removal of sulphide present in the system. However, as the addition of nitrate and NR-SOB was performed towards the end of sulphide production phase, the assessment of immediate impact was not possible. The addition of nitrite inhibited the biogenic production of sulphide immediately and led to removal of sulphide through nitrite mediated chemical oxidation of sulphide. The real time corrosion rate measurement revealed that in all three cases an acceleration in the corrosion rate occurred during the oxidation and removal of sulphide. Amendments of nitrate and NR-SOB or nitrate alone both gave rise to localized corrosion in the form of pits, with the maximum observed corrosion rates of 0.72 and 1.4 mm year(-1), respectively. The addition of nitrite also accelerated the corrosion rate but the maximum corrosion rate observed following nitrite addition was 0.3 mm year(-1). Furthermore, in the presence of nitrite the extent of pitting was not as high as those observed with other control methods.

  15. MgF2-coated porous magnesium/alumina scaffolds with improved strength, corrosion resistance, and biological performance for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Ho; Jang, Tae-Sik; Kim, Sung Won; Park, Hui-Sun; Song, Juha; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Jung, Kyung-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Do

    2016-05-01

    Porous magnesium (Mg) has recently emerged as a promising biodegradable alternative to biometal for bone ingrowth; however, its low mechanical properties and high corrosion rate in biological environments remain problematic. In this study, porous magnesium was implemented in a scaffold that closely mimics the mechanical properties of human bones with a controlled degradation rate and shows good biocompatibility to match the regeneration rate of bone tissue at the affected site. The alumina-reinforced Mg scaffold was produced by spark plasma sintering and coated with magnesium fluoride (MgF2) using a hydrofluoric acid solution to regulate the corrosion rate under physiological conditions. Sodium chloride granules (NaCl), acting as space holders, were leached out to achieve porous samples (60%) presenting an average pore size of 240 μm with complete pore interconnectivity. When the alumina content increased from 0 to 5 vol%, compressive strength and stiffness rose considerably from 9.5 to 13.8 MPa and from 0.24 to 0.40 GPa, respectively. Moreover, the biological response evaluated by in vitro cell test and blood test of the MgF2-coated porous Mg composite was enhanced with better corrosion resistance compared with that of uncoated counterparts. Consequently, MgF2-coated porous Mg/alumina composites may be applied in load-bearing biodegradable implants.

  16. Exploratory Development of Corrosion Inhibiting Primers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    electropriming wedge test panels of 7075-T6 bare over 21 U ,■-. - - ■ -’•-’ ■ ’- ■"• irt «in«, i r...Even the latent sulfur from heating fuels used in some manufacturing plants can and do sulfonate the aluminum oxide surface preparation and provides...Alloys Sealing Compound. Temperature-Realetant, Integral Fuel Tanke and Fuel Cell Cavities, High Adhesion Cloth, Glaee, Plnlahed, for Polyester

  17. Stress corrosion crack inhibiting method for titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, T. R.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of oxyanions to liquid solvents in excess of the number of chloride, bromide, or iodide ions present prevents cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys under exposure to aqueous and other solvent environments. The molar concentration of oxyanion is set from 10 to 100 times higher than concentration of halide ions.

  18. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    SciTech Connect

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  19. Evaluation of the Corrosivity of Dust Deposited on Waste Packages at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bryan; R. Jarek; T. Wolery; D. Shields; M. Sutton; E. Hardin; D. Barr

    2005-03-18

    Small amounts of dust will be deposited on the surfaces of waste packages in drifts at Yucca Mountain during the operational and the preclosure ventilation periods. Salts present in the dust will deliquesce as the waste packages cool and relative humidity in the drifts increases. In this paper, we evaluate the potential for brines formed by dust deliquescence to initiate and sustain localized corrosion that results in failure of the waste package outer barrier and early failure of the waste package. These arguments have been used to show that dust deliquescence-induced localized or crevice corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) is of low consequence with respect to repository performance. Measured atmospheric and underground dust compositions are the basis of thermodynamic modeling and experimental studies to evaluate the likelihood of brine formation and persistence, the volume of brines that may form, and the relative corrosivity of the initial deliquescent brines and of brines modified by processes on the waste package surface. In addition, we evaluate several mechanisms that could inhibit or stifle localized corrosion should it initiate. The dust compositions considered include both tunnel dust samples from Yucca Mountain, National Airfall Deposition Program rainout data, and collected windblown dust samples. Also considered is sublimation of ammonium salts, a process that could affect dust composition prior to deliquescence. Ammonium chlorides, nitrates, and even sulfates sublimate readily into ammonia and acid gases, and will be lost from the surface of the waste package prior to deliquescence.

  20. Corrosion Behaviour of A380 Aluminiun Alloy by Semi-Solid Rheocasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forn, A.; Rupérez, E.; Baile, M. T.; Campillo, M.; Menargues, S.; Espinosa, I.

    2007-04-01

    A comparative study was performed on the corrosion behavior of a component of A380 aluminium alloy obtained by Semi-Solid Rheocasting (SSR). The effect of heat treatments T5 and T6 on corrosion resistance was compared with components without heat treatment by SSR processes. Corrosion studies were performed using an acetic acid salt spray test, impedance measurements and polarization curves using a 3,5%Na Cl test solution. The corrosion progress is described by micrographic analysis.

  1. Corrosion Behaviour of A380 Aluminiun Alloy by Semi-Solid Rheocasting

    SciTech Connect

    Forn, A.; Ruperez, E.; Baile, M. T.; Campillo, M.; Menargues, S.; Espinosa, I.

    2007-04-07

    A comparative study was performed on the corrosion behavior of a component of A380 aluminium alloy obtained by Semi-Solid Rheocasting (SSR). The effect of heat treatments T5 and T6 on corrosion resistance was compared with components without heat treatment by SSR processes. Corrosion studies were performed using an acetic acid salt spray test, impedance measurements and polarization curves using a 3,5%Na Cl test solution. The corrosion progress is described by micrographic analysis.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine L. Lowe; Bill W. Bogan; Wendy R. Sullivan; Kristine Mila H. Cruz; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-07-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed with mixed bacterial cultures obtained from natural gas pipelines. Treatment with the pepper extracts affected the growth and metabolic activity of the microbial consortia. Specifically, the growth and metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria was inhibited. The demonstration that pepper extracts can inhibit the growth and metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria in mixed cultures is a significant observation validating a key hypothesis of the project. Future tests to determine the effects of pepper extracts on mature/established biofilms will be performed next.

  3. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  4. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  5. A Theoretical Study of Carbohydrates as Corrosion Inhibitors of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Salim M.; Ali-Shattle, Elbashir E.; Ali, Nozha M.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose against the iron corrosion is investigated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31 G level (d) to search the relation between the molecular structure and corrosion inhibition. The electronic properties such as the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the energy of lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO), the energy gap (LUMO-HOMO), quantum chemical parameters such as hardness, softness, the fraction of the electron transferred, and the electrophilicity index are reported. The inhibition efficiency of the investigated carbohydrates follows the trend: maltose

  6. Bonding-Compatible Corrosion Inhibitor for Rinsing Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, C. R.; Wurth, L. A.; Radar, A.

    2005-01-01

    A corrosion-inhibiting mixture of compounds has been developed for addition to the water used to rinse metal parts that have been cleaned with aqueous solutions in preparation for adhesive bonding of the metals to rubber and rubber-like materials. Prior to the development of this corrosion inhibitor, the parts (made, variously, of D6AC steel and 7075-T73 aluminum) were rinsed by deionized water, which caused corrosion in some places on the steel parts especially in such occluded places as sealing surfaces and threaded blind holes. An integral part of the particular cleaning process is the deposition of a thin layer of silicates and silane primers that increase the strength of the adhesive bond. The corrosion inhibitor is formulated, not only to inhibit corrosion of both D6AC steel and 7075- T73 aluminum, but also to either increase or at least not reduce the strength of the adhesive bond to be formed subsequently. The corrosion inhibitor is a mixture of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate. The sodium silicate functions as both a corrosion inhibitor and a bond-strength promoter in association with the silane primers. The sodium tetraborate buffers the rinse solution at the optimum pH and functions as a secondary corrosion inhibitor for the steel. For a given application, the concentrations of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate must be chosen in a compromise among the needs to inhibit corrosion of steel, inhibit corrosion of aluminum, and minimize cosmetic staining of both steel and aluminum. Concentrations of sodium silicate in excess of 150 parts of silicon per million parts of solution (ppm Si) have been determined to enhance inhibition of corrosion; unfortunately, because of the alkalinity of sodium silicate, even a small concentration can raise the pH of the rinse solution to such a level that aluminum becomes corroded despite the inhibiting effect. The pH of a solution that contains a high concentration of sodium silicate can be decreased by adding

  7. An evaluation of microbial growth and corrosion of 316L SS in glycol/seawater mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; Ray, Richard I; Lowe, Kristine L; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2003-04-01

    Glycol/seawater mixtures containing > 50% glycol inhibit corrosion of 316L stainless steel and do not support bacterial growth. The results indicate bacteria are able to use low concentrations of glycol (10%) as a growth medium, but bacterial growth decreased with increasing glycol concentration. Pitting potential, determined by anodic polarization, was used to evaluate susceptibility of 316L SS to corrosion in seawater-contaminated glycol. Mixture containing a minimum concentration of 50% propylene glycol-based coolant inhibited pitting corrosion. A slightly higher minimum concentration (55%) was needed for corrosion protection in ethylene glycol mixtures.

  8. An evaluation of microbial growth and corrosion of 316L SS in glycol/seawater mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason S.; Ray, Richard I.; Lowe, Kristine L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J.

    2003-01-01

    Glycol/seawater mixtures containing > 50% glycol inhibit corrosion of 316L stainless steel and do not support bacterial growth. The results indicate bacteria are able to use low concentrations of glycol (10%) as a growth medium, but bacterial growth decreased with increasing glycol concentration. Pitting potential, determined by anodic polarization, was used to evaluate susceptibility of 316L SS to corrosion in seawater-contaminated glycol. Mixture containing a minimum concentration of 50% propylene glycol-based coolant inhibited pitting corrosion. A slightly higher minimum concentration (55%) was needed for corrosion protection in ethylene glycol mixtures.

  9. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Water-soluble inhibitor on microbiologically influenced corrosion in diesel pipeline.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, N; Maruthamuthu, S; Palaniswamy, N

    2006-12-01

    The effect of water-soluble corrosion inhibitor on the growth of bacteria and its corrosion inhibition efficiency were investigated. Corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by rotating cage test and flow loop techniques. The nature of biodegradation of corrosion inhibitor was also analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Gas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The bacterial isolates (Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus cereus ACE4) have the capacity to degrade the aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon present in the corrosion inhibitor. The degraded products of corrosion inhibitor and bacterial activity determine the electrochemical behaviour of API 5LX steel. The influence of bacterial activity on degradation of corrosion inhibitor and its influence on corrosion of API 5LX have been evaluated by employing weight loss techniques and electrochemical studies. The main finding of this paper is that the water-soluble corrosion inhibitor is consumed by the microbial action, which contributes to the decrease in inhibitor efficiency. The present study also emphasis the importance of evaluation of water-soluble corrosion inhibitor in stagnant model (flow loop test) and discusses the demerits of the water-soluble corrosion inhibitors in petroleum product pipeline.

  11. Corrosion behavior of a particulate metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.; Brunella, M.F.; Candiani, S.

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of a particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composite (MMC) with an Al 6061-T6 (UNS A96061, Al-Mg-Si) matrix and 10 vol% alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles was studied. The material was tested in different extrusion and forging conditions. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out in aerated and deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions with concentrations from 0.06 N up to saturation to study pitting corrosion initiation. Three-month immersion tests were performed in aerated solutions. Results showed pitting corrosion initiated in aerated solutions, even for the lower chloride concentration. No significant influence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on corrosion susceptibility of the matrix was observed. However, corrosion attacks occurred preferentially in the vicinity of the reinforcing particles. Extrusion or forging treatment did not affect corrosion behavior of the composite material significantly.

  12. A time-release technique for corrosion prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, C.M.; Corsaw, M.J.T.

    1998-08-01

    Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed an anti-corrosion system that is activated automatically where and when it is needed. Porous fibers are filled with calcium nitrite and coated with a salt-sensitive substance to control the response. The release of the corrosion inhibitor chemical is at the portion of the reinforcing bar in danger of corrosion when conditions would allow corrosion to initiate. In a series of tests with concrete samples containing either no protection or the conventional freely mixed calcium nitrite, this system performed well in that it delayed the onset of corrosion by at least three weeks in the laboratory specimens and reduced the amount of total corrosion by more than half.

  13. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  14. Effects of cholinesterase inhibiting sage (Salvia officinalis) on mood, anxiety and performance on a psychological stressor battery.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O; Pace, Sonia; Haskell, Crystal; Okello, Edward J; Milne, Anthea; Scholey, Andrew B

    2006-04-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) has previously been shown both to possess in vitro cholinesterase inhibiting properties, and to enhance mnemonic performance and improve mood in healthy young participants. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 30 healthy participants attended the laboratory on three separate days, 7 days apart, receiving a different treatment in counterbalanced order on each occasion (placebo, 300, 600 mg dried sage leaf). On each day mood was assessed predose and at 1 and 4 h postdose. Each mood assessment comprised completion of Bond-Lader mood scales and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 20 min performance of the Defined Intensity Stress Simulator (DISS) computerized multitasking battery. In a concomitant investigation, an extract of the sage leaf exhibited dose-dependent, in vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and, to a greater extent, butyrylcholinesterase. Both doses of sage led to improved ratings of mood in the absence of the stressor (that is, in pre-DISS mood scores) postdose, with the lower dose reducing anxiety and the higher dose increasing 'alertness', 'calmness' and 'contentedness' on the Bond-Lader mood scales. The reduced anxiety effect following the lower dose was, however, abolished by performing the DISS, with the same dose also being associated with a reduction of alertness during performance. Task performance on the DISS battery was improved for the higher dose at both postdose sessions, but reduced for the lower dose at the later testing session. The results confirm previous observations of the cholinesterase inhibiting properties of S. officinalis, and improved mood and cognitive performance following the administration of single doses to healthy young participants.

  15. Materials Evaluation. Part II. Development of Corrosion Inhibitors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    and Identify by block number) A borax -nitrite based inhibitor has been developed for incorporation into the Air Force Rinse Facility at MacDill Air...Block 20 inhibitors has been tested and a borax -nitrite based formulation developed which inhibits the corrosion of several ferrous and nonferrous...alternatives to chromates, one such alternative being a borax -nitrite based inhibitor. The value of borax nitrite as a corrosion inhibitor has long been

  16. New Developments in Mitigation of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-12

    reported for carbon steel,m aluminum 2024, a- nd copper . 9 The mechanisms most frequently cited for corrosion inhibition by biofilms are as follows: (1... copper and aluminum. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 52:787-790. 10. Eashwar M, Maruthamuthu S. 1995. Mechanisms of biologically produced...C. 1998. The effects of desulphated seawater injection on microbiological hydrogen sulphide generation and implication for corrosion control

  17. Speed and Lateral Inhibition of Stimulus Processing Contribute to Individual Differences in Stroop-Task Performance.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Vedder, Anneke; Brown, Stephen B R E; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    The Stroop task is a popular neuropsychological test that measures executive control. Strong Stroop interference is commonly interpreted in neuropsychology as a diagnostic marker of impairment in executive control, possibly reflecting executive dysfunction. However, popular models of the Stroop task indicate that several other aspects of color and word processing may also account for individual differences in the Stroop task, independent of executive control. Here we use new approaches to investigate the degree to which individual differences in Stroop interference correlate with the relative processing speed of word and color stimuli, and the lateral inhibition between visual stimuli. We conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral experiment to measure (1) how quickly an individual's brain processes words and colors presented in isolation (P3 latency), and (2) the strength of an individual's lateral inhibition between visual representations with a visual illusion. Both measures explained at least 40% of the variance in Stroop interference across individuals. As these measures were obtained in contexts not requiring any executive control, we conclude that the Stroop effect also measures an individual's pre-set way of processing visual features such as words and colors. This study highlights the important contributions of stimulus processing speed and lateral inhibition to individual differences in Stroop interference, and challenges the general view that the Stroop task primarily assesses executive control.

  18. Speed and Lateral Inhibition of Stimulus Processing Contribute to Individual Differences in Stroop-Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Marnix; Vedder, Anneke; Brown, Stephen B. R. E.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    The Stroop task is a popular neuropsychological test that measures executive control. Strong Stroop interference is commonly interpreted in neuropsychology as a diagnostic marker of impairment in executive control, possibly reflecting executive dysfunction. However, popular models of the Stroop task indicate that several other aspects of color and word processing may also account for individual differences in the Stroop task, independent of executive control. Here we use new approaches to investigate the degree to which individual differences in Stroop interference correlate with the relative processing speed of word and color stimuli, and the lateral inhibition between visual stimuli. We conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral experiment to measure (1) how quickly an individual’s brain processes words and colors presented in isolation (P3 latency), and (2) the strength of an individual’s lateral inhibition between visual representations with a visual illusion. Both measures explained at least 40% of the variance in Stroop interference across individuals. As these measures were obtained in contexts not requiring any executive control, we conclude that the Stroop effect also measures an individual’s pre-set way of processing visual features such as words and colors. This study highlights the important contributions of stimulus processing speed and lateral inhibition to individual differences in Stroop interference, and challenges the general view that the Stroop task primarily assesses executive control. PMID:27313555

  19. Effect of tritium on corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Oyaidzu, M.; Isobe, K.; Hayashi, T.

    2015-03-15

    The effects of tritium on the corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric solution have been investigated in the present study. Electrochemical experiments have been carried our for pure chromium. At first, the concentration dependence of sulfuric acid solution on anodic polarization behavior of chromium was experimented, resulting in that 0.01 N one was found appropriate. The dependence of both dissolved oxygen and tritium concentration on anodic behavior of chromium were performed. It was found from that the self-passivation of chromium induced by dissolved oxygen was inhibited in tritiated solution resulting in the enhancement of the corrosion. As a consequence it is highly likely that the elution of chromium by highly oxidative radiolysis products would explain the passivation inhibitory effect of SUS304 stainless steel observed in tritiated solutions.

  20. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year.