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Sample records for cortex reveals altered

  1. Prefrontal cortex shotgun proteome analysis reveals altered calcium homeostasis and immune system imbalance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Gattaz, Wagner F; Schmitt, Andrea; Rewerts, Christiane; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Turck, Christoph W

    2009-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease, likely to be caused by a combination of serial alterations in a number of genes and environmental factors. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's Area 46) is involved in schizophrenia and executes high-level functions such as working memory, differentiation of conflicting thoughts, determination of right and wrong concepts and attitudes, correct social behavior and personality expression. Global proteomic analysis of post-mortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from schizophrenia patients and non-schizophrenic individuals was performed using stable isotope labeling and shotgun proteomics. The analysis resulted in the identification of 1,261 proteins, 84 of which showed statistically significant differential expression, reinforcing previous data supporting the involvement of the immune system, calcium homeostasis, cytoskeleton assembly, and energy metabolism in schizophrenia. In addition a number of new potential markers were found that may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease.

  2. A Mouse Model of Visual Perceptual Learning Reveals Alterations in Neuronal Coding and Dendritic Spine Density in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xian; Hu, Xu; Li, Yue; Lou, Shihao; Ma, Xiao; An, Xu; Liu, Hui; Peng, Jing; Ma, Danyi; Zhou, Yifeng; Yang, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) can improve spatial vision in normally sighted and visually impaired individuals. Although previous studies of humans and large animals have explored the neural basis of VPL, elucidation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remains a challenge. Owing to the advantages of molecular genetic and optogenetic manipulations, the mouse is a promising model for providing a mechanistic understanding of VPL. Here, we thoroughly evaluated the effects and properties of VPL on spatial vision in C57BL/6J mice using a two-alternative, forced-choice visual water task. Briefly, the mice underwent prolonged training at near the individual threshold of contrast or spatial frequency (SF) for pattern discrimination or visual detection for 35 consecutive days. Following training, the contrast-threshold trained mice showed an 87% improvement in contrast sensitivity (CS) and a 55% gain in visual acuity (VA). Similarly, the SF-threshold trained mice exhibited comparable and long-lasting improvements in VA and significant gains in CS over a wide range of SFs. Furthermore, learning largely transferred across eyes and stimulus orientations. Interestingly, learning could transfer from a pattern discrimination task to a visual detection task, but not vice versa. We validated that this VPL fully restored VA in adult amblyopic mice and old mice. Taken together, these data indicate that mice, as a species, exhibit reliable VPL. Intrinsic signal optical imaging revealed that mice with perceptual training had higher cut-off SFs in primary visual cortex (V1) than those without perceptual training. Moreover, perceptual training induced an increase in the dendritic spine density in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of V1. These results indicated functional and structural alterations in V1 during VPL. Overall, our VPL mouse model will provide a platform for investigating the neurobiological basis of VPL. PMID:27014004

  3. Altered spontaneous activity of posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal gyrus are associated with a smoking cessation treatment outcome using varenicline revealed by regional homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shen, Zhujing; Huang, Peiyu; Qian, Wei; Yu, Xinfeng; Sun, Jianzhong; Yu, Hualiang; Yang, Yihong; Zhang, Minming

    2016-03-09

    Compared to nonsmokers, smokers exhibit a number of potentially important differences in regional brain function. However, little is known about the associations between the local spontaneous brain activity and smoking cessation treatment outcomes. In the present analysis, we aimed to evaluate whether the local features of spontaneous brain activity prior to the target quit date was associated with the smoking cessation outcomes. All the participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging scans and smoking-related behavioral assessments. After a 12-week treatment with varenicline, 23 smokers succeeded in quitting smoking and 32 failed. Smokers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning prior to an open label smoking cessation treatment trial. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to measure spontaneous brain activity, and whole-brain voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to detect brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between relapser and quitter groups. After controlling for potentially confounding factors including years of education, years smoked, cigarettes smoked per day and FTND score as covariates, compared to quitters, relapsers displayed significantly decreased ReHo in bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), as well as increased ReHo in left superior temporal gyrus (STG). These preliminary results suggest that regional brain function variables may be promising predictors of smoking relapse. This study provided novel insights into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying smoking relapse. A deeper understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms associated with relapse may result in novel pharmacological and behavioral interventions.

  4. Altered intrinsic connectivity of the auditory cortex in congenital amusia

    PubMed Central

    Fauvel, Baptiste; Groussard, Mathilde; Caclin, Anne; Albouy, Philippe; Platel, Hervé; Tillmann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Congenital amusia, a neurodevelopmental disorder of music perception and production, has been associated with abnormal anatomical and functional connectivity in a right frontotemporal pathway. To investigate whether spontaneous connectivity in brain networks involving the auditory cortex is altered in the amusic brain, we ran a seed-based connectivity analysis, contrasting at-rest functional MRI data of amusic and matched control participants. Our results reveal reduced frontotemporal connectivity in amusia during resting state, as well as an overconnectivity between the auditory cortex and the default mode network (DMN). The findings suggest that the auditory cortex is intrinsically more engaged toward internal processes and less available to external stimuli in amusics compared with controls. Beyond amusia, our findings provide new evidence for the link between cognitive deficits in pathology and abnormalities in the connectivity between sensory areas and the DMN at rest. PMID:27009161

  5. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions alter prefrontal cortex dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David J; Peterson, Todd C; Swain, Rodney A

    2014-01-28

    Anatomical tracing studies in primates have revealed neural tracts from the cerebellar dentate nuclei to prefrontal cortex, implicating a cerebellar role in nonmotor processes. Experiments in rats examining the functional role of this cerebellothalamocortical pathway have demonstrated the development of visuospatial and motivational deficits following lesions of the dentate nuclei, in the absence of motor impairment. These behavioral deficits possibly occur due to structural modifications of the cerebral cortex secondary to loss of cerebellar input. The current study characterized morphological alterations in prefrontal cortex important for visuospatial and motivational processes following bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions. Rats received either bilateral electrolytic cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions or sham surgery followed by a 30-day recovery. Randomly selected Golgi-impregnated neurons in prefrontal cortex were examined for analysis. Measures of branch length and spine density revealed no differences between lesioned and sham rats in either apical or basilar arbors; however, the proportion of immature to mature spines significantly decreased in lesioned rats as compared to sham controls, with reductions of 33% in the basilar arbor and 28% in the apical arbor. Although expected pruning of branches and spines did not occur, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cerebellar lesions influence prefrontal morphology and support the possibility that functional deficits following cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions are related to prefrontal morphological alteration.

  6. Electrocorticographic frequency alteration mapping for extraoperative localization of speech cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Melinda; Wisneski, Kimberly; Schalk, Gerwin; Sharma, Mohit; Roland, Jarod; Breshears, Jonathan; Gaona, Charles; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2010-02-01

    Electrocortical stimulation (ECS) has long been established for delineating eloquent cortex in extraoperative mapping. However, ECS is still coarse and inefficient in delineating regions of functional cortex and can be hampered by afterdischarges. Given these constraints, an adjunct approach to defining motor cortex is the use of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signal changes associated with active regions of cortex. The broad range of frequency oscillations are categorized into 2 main groups with respect to sensorimotor cortex: low-frequency bands (LFBs) and high-frequency bands (HFBs). The LFBs tend to show a power reduction, whereas the HFBs show power increases with cortical activation. These power changes associated with activated cortex could potentially provide a powerful tool in delineating areas of speech cortex. We explore ECoG signal alterations as they occur with activated region of speech cortex and its potential in clinical brain mapping applications. We evaluated 7 patients who underwent invasive monitoring for seizure localization. Each had extraoperative ECS mapping to identify speech cortex. Additionally, all subjects performed overt speech tasks with an auditory or a visual cue to identify associated frequency power changes in regard to location and degree of concordance with ECS results. Electrocorticographic frequency alteration mapping (EFAM) had an 83.9% sensitivity and a 40.4% specificity in identifying any language site when considering both frequency bands and both stimulus cues. Electrocorticographic frequency alteration mapping was more sensitive in identifying the Wernicke area (100%) than the Broca area (72.2%). The HFB is uniquely suited to identifying the Wernicke area, whereas a combination of the HFB and LFB is important for Broca localization. The concordance between stimulation and spectral power changes demonstrates the possible utility of EFAM as an adjunct method to improve the efficiency and resolution of identifying speech

  7. Proteomic analysis of membrane microdomain-associated proteins in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder reveals alterations in LAMP, STXBP1 and BASP1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Behan, A T; Byrne, C; Dunn, M J; Cagney, G; Cotter, D R

    2009-06-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlpfc) is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) and, within this region, abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission and synaptic function have been described. Proteins associated with these functions are enriched in membrane microdomains (MM). In the current study, we used two complementary proteomic methods, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by reverse phase-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS/MS) (gel separation liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)) to assess protein expression in MM in pooled samples of dlpfc from SCZ, BPD and control cases (n=10 per group) from the Stanley Foundation Brain series. We identified 16 proteins altered in one/both disorders using proteomic methods. We selected three proteins with roles in synaptic function (syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1), brain abundant membrane-attached signal protein 1 (BASP1) and limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP)) for validation by western blotting. This revealed significantly increased expression of these proteins in SCZ (STXBP1 (24% difference; P<0.001), BASP1 (40% difference; P<0.05) and LAMP (22% difference; P<0.01)) and BPD (STXBP1 (31% difference; P<0.001), BASP1 (23% difference; P<0.01) and LAMP (20% difference; P<0.01)) in the Stanley brain series (n=20 per group). Further validation in dlpfc from the Harvard brain subseries (n=10 per group) confirmed increased protein expression in SCZ of STXBP1 (18% difference; P<0.0001), BASP1 (14% difference; P<0.0001) but not LAMP (20% difference; P=0.14). No significant differences in STXBP1, BASP1 or LAMP protein expression in BPD dlpfc were observed. This study, through proteomic assessments of MM in dlpfc and validation in two brain series, strongly implicates LAMP, STXBP1 and BASP1 in SCZ and supports the

  8. Chapter 9--face sensorimotor cortex neuroplasticity associated with intraoral alterations.

    PubMed

    Avivi-Arber, Limor; Lee, Jye-Chang; Sessle, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    Loss of teeth or dental attrition is a common clinical occurrence associated with altered somatosensation and impaired oral motor behavior (e.g., mastication, deglutition, phonation). Oral rehabilitation aims at restoring these sensorimotor functions to improve patients' quality of life. Recent studies have implicated neuroplastic changes within the primary motor cortex (M1) in the control of limb motor behaviors following manipulations of sensory inputs to or motor outputs from the central nervous system as well as in learning and adaptation processes. However, limited data are available of the neuroplastic capabilities of face-M1 in relation to orofacial motor functions. The overall objective of our series of studies was to use intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and recordings of evoked muscle electromyographic activity to test if neuroplastic changes occur in the ICMS-defined motor representations of the tongue-protrusive (genioglossus, GG) and jaw-opening (anterior digastric, AD) muscles within the rat face-M1 and adjacent face primary somatosensory cortex (face-S1) following several different types of intraoral manipulations. We found that a change in diet consistency was not associated with statistically significant changes in AD and GG motor representations. However, incisor extraction resulted, one week later, in a significantly increased AD representation within the contralateral face-M1 and face-S1, and incisor trimming produced time-dependent changes in the AD motor representation. These novel findings underscore the neuroplastic capabilities of the face sensorimotor cortex and point to its possible role in adaptation to an altered peripheral state or altered sensorimotor behavior. Further insights into the neuroplastic capabilities of the face sensorimotor cortex promise to improve therapeutic strategies aimed at the restoration of oral functions, particularly in patients suffering from orofacial sensorimotor deficits or pain.

  9. Ketogenic diet alters dopaminergic activity in the mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Church, William H; Adams, Ryan E; Wyss, Livia S

    2014-06-13

    The present study was conducted to determine if the ketogenic diet altered basal levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice. The catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norephinephrine (NE) and the indolamine serotonin (5HT) were quantified postmortem in six different brain regions of adult mice fed a ketogenic diet for 3 weeks. The dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also measured. Tissue punches were collected bilaterally from the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior caudate-putamen, posterior caudate-putamen and the midbrain. Dopaminergic activity, as measured by the dopamine metabolites to dopamine content ratio - ([DOPAC]+[HVA])/[DA] - was significantly increased in the motor and somatosensory cortex regions of mice fed the ketogenic diet when compared to those same areas in brains of mice fed a normal diet. These results indicate that the ketogenic diet alters the activity of the meso-cortical dopaminergic system, which may contribute to the diet's therapeutic effect in reducing epileptic seizure activity.

  10. Placebo treatment can alter primary visual cortex activity and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schienle, A; Übel, S; Scharmüller, W

    2014-03-28

    Placebo treatment can alter brain activation in regions implicated in affective processing and cognitive control of emotions. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated whether a placebo can additionally modulate visual cortex activity and connectivity during affective picture perception. The participants underwent a retest design where they were presented with disgusting, fear-eliciting and neutral pictures both with, and without a placebo (inert pill presented with the suggestion that it can reduce disgust symptoms). The placebo provoked a strong decrease in experienced disgust. This was accompanied by a reduced activation of the primary visual cortex, which showed reduced interaction with the amygdala and the insula. Accordingly, placebos are able to affect basic perceptive processes. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Alters Valuation Signals in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Smith, David V.; Teng, Chieh Schen; Namburi, Praneeth; Chen, Vanessa W.; Huettel, Scott A.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Even a single night of total sleep deprivation (SD) can have dramatic effects on economic decision making. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that SD influences economic decisions by altering the valuation process. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we identified value signals related to the anticipation and the experience of monetary and social rewards (attractive female faces). We then derived decision value signals that were predictive of each participant’s willingness to exchange money for brief views of attractive faces in an independent market task. Strikingly, SD altered decision value signals in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) in proportion to the corresponding change in economic preferences. These changes in preference were independent of the effects of SD on attention and vigilance. Our results provide novel evidence that signals in VMPFC track the current state of the individual, and thus reflect not static but constructed preferences. PMID:22028686

  12. Proteome alterations of cortex and hippocampus tissues in mice subjected to vitamin A depletion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Zhao; Ji, Baohu; Zhu, Hui; Zhou, Kejun; Li, Yang; Yang, Jinglei; Sun, Liya; Wei, Zhiyun; He, Guang; Gao, Linghan; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2011-11-01

    Vitamin A regulates the development and maintenance of the central nervous system. Studies of vitamin A depletion (VAD) and mutations of retinoid receptors in rodents have revealed a dysfunction of motor and cognitive abilities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these behavioral changes are not well understood. In this study, VAD mice were examined and abnormal motor behavior related to psychosis symptoms was found. With the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometric (MS) technologies, 44 and 23 altered protein spots were identified in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively, in VAD mice. By Western blot, the up-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) and proteasome subunit beta type 2 (PSMB2) in the cortex and that of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DPYSL2) and PSMB2 in the hippocampus were observed in VAD mice. Bioinformatic analysis using DAVID revealed that altered proteins induced by VAD showed significant enrichment of (i) glycolysis, cytoskeleton, mitochondrion and glutamate metabolism in the cortex; and (ii) actin binding, dopamine receptor signaling and transmission of nerve impulse in the hippocampus. The up-regulations of DPYSL2, MAPK1 and PSMB2 may indicate the activated neuronal defensive mechanism in VAD brain regions, which may underlie the VAD-related psychosis behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered connectivity between prefrontal and sensorimotor cortex in conversion paralysis.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Floris P; Toni, Ivan; Roelofs, Karin

    2010-05-01

    Conversion paralysis (CP) is a frequent and impairing psychiatric disorder, affecting voluntary motor function. Yet, we have previously shown that the motor system of CP patients with a unilateral conversion paresis is recruited to a similar degree during imagined movements of the affected and unaffected limb. In contrast, imagery of movements with the affected limb results in larger prefrontal activation. It remains unclear how this hand-specific increased prefrontal activity relates to the reduced responsiveness of motor and somatosensory areas, a consistent and important feature of CP patients. In the current study, we investigated changes in the inter-regional coupling between prefrontal cortex (PFC) and sensorimotor regions when CP patients imagined movements involving either the affected or the unaffected hand. We found that there were distinct connectivity patterns for different parts of the PFC. While ventromedial PFC was not functionally connected to the motor system, we observed strong functional coupling between the dorsolateral PFC and various sensorimotor areas. Furthermore, this coupling was modulated by whether patients imagined movements of their affected or unaffected hand. Together, these results suggest that the reduced motor responsitivity observed in CP may be linked to altered dorsolateral prefrontal-motor connectivity.

  14. Stimulus context alters neural representations of faces in inferotemporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Noudoost, Behrad; Nategh, Neda; Clark, Kelsey; Esteky, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    One goal of our nervous system is to form predictions about the world around us to facilitate our responses to upcoming events. One basis for such predictions could be the recently encountered visual stimuli, or the recent statistics of the visual environment. We examined the effect of recently experienced stimulus statistics on the visual representation of face stimuli by recording the responses of face-responsive neurons in the final stage of visual object recognition, the inferotemporal (IT) cortex, during blocks in which the probability of seeing a particular face was either 100% or only 12%. During the block with only face images, ∼30% of IT neurons exhibit enhanced anticipatory activity before the evoked visual response. This anticipatory modulation is followed by greater activity, broader view tuning, more distributed processing, and more reliable responses of IT neurons to the face stimuli. These changes in the visual response were sufficient to improve the ability of IT neurons to represent a variable property of the predictable face images (viewing angle), as measured by the performance of a simple linear classifier. These results demonstrate that the recent statistics of the visual environment can facilitate processing of stimulus information in the population neuronal representation. Neurons in inferotemporal (IT) cortex anticipate the arrival of a predictable stimulus, and visual responses to an expected stimulus are more distributed throughout the population of IT neurons, providing an enhanced representation of second-order stimulus information (in this case, viewing angle). The findings reveal a potential neural basis for the behavioral benefits of contextual expectation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Chronic Stress Alters Neural Activity in Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Retrieval of Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Aaron A.; Walker, Adam G.; Southwood, Christopher J.; Farrell, Mollee R.; Lin, Grant L.; Rebec, George V.; Wellman, Cara L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress produces morphological changes in medial prefrontal cortex and disrupts a prefrontally mediated behavior, retrieval of extinction. To assess potential physiological correlates of these alterations, we compared neural activity in infralimbic and prelimbic cortex of unstressed versus stressed rats during fear conditioning and extinction. After implantation of microwire bundles into infralimbic or prelimbic cortex, rats were either unstressed or stressed via placement in a plastic restrainer (3 h/day for 1 week). Rats then underwent fear conditioning and extinction while activity of neurons in infralimbic or prelimbic cortex was recorded. Percent freezing and neural activity were assessed during all phases of training. Chronic stress enhanced freezing during acquisition of conditioned fear, and altered both prelimbic and infralimbic activity during this phase. Stress did not alter initial extinction or conditioned stimulus (CS)-related activity during this phase. However, stress impaired retrieval of extinction assessed 24 h later, and this was accompanied by alterations in neuronal activity in both prelimbic and infralimbic cortex. In prelimbic cortex, unstressed rats showed decreased activity in response to CS presentation, whereas stressed rats showed no change. In infralimbic cortex, neurons in unstressed rats exhibited increased firing in response to the CS, whereas stressed rats showed no increase in infralimbic firing during the tone. Finally, CS-related firing in infralimbic but not prelimbic cortex was correlated with extinction retrieval. Thus, the stress-induced alteration of neuronal activity in infralimbic cortex may be responsible for the stress-induced deficit in retrieval of extinction. PMID:21044660

  16. Speech training alters consonant and vowel responses in multiple auditory cortex fields.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Buell, Elizabeth P; Fink, Melyssa K; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Speech sounds evoke unique neural activity patterns in primary auditory cortex (A1). Extensive speech sound discrimination training alters A1 responses. While the neighboring auditory cortical fields each contain information about speech sound identity, each field processes speech sounds differently. We hypothesized that while all fields would exhibit training-induced plasticity following speech training, there would be unique differences in how each field changes. In this study, rats were trained to discriminate speech sounds by consonant or vowel in quiet and in varying levels of background speech-shaped noise. Local field potential and multiunit responses were recorded from four auditory cortex fields in rats that had received 10 weeks of speech discrimination training. Our results reveal that training alters speech evoked responses in each of the auditory fields tested. The neural response to consonants was significantly stronger in anterior auditory field (AAF) and A1 following speech training. The neural response to vowels following speech training was significantly weaker in ventral auditory field (VAF) and posterior auditory field (PAF). This differential plasticity of consonant and vowel sound responses may result from the greater paired pulse depression, expanded low frequency tuning, reduced frequency selectivity, and lower tone thresholds, which occurred across the four auditory fields. These findings suggest that alterations in the distributed processing of behaviorally relevant sounds may contribute to robust speech discrimination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Speech training alters consonant and vowel responses in multiple auditory cortex fields

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Rahebi, Kimiya C.; Buell, Elizabeth P.; Fink, Melyssa K.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Speech sounds evoke unique neural activity patterns in primary auditory cortex (A1). Extensive speech sound discrimination training alters A1 responses. While the neighboring auditory cortical fields each contain information about speech sound identity, each field processes speech sounds differently. We hypothesized that while all fields would exhibit training-induced plasticity following speech training, there would be unique differences in how each field changes. In this study, rats were trained to discriminate speech sounds by consonant or vowel in quiet and in varying levels of background speech-shaped noise. Local field potential and multiunit responses were recorded from four auditory cortex fields in rats that had received 10 weeks of speech discrimination training. Our results reveal that training alters speech evoked responses in each of the auditory fields tested. The neural response to consonants was significantly stronger in anterior auditory field (AAF) and A1 following speech training. The neural response to vowels following speech training was significantly weaker in ventral auditory field (VAF) and posterior auditory field (PAF). This differential plasticity of consonant and vowel sound responses may result from the greater paired pulse depression, expanded low frequency tuning, reduced frequency selectivity, and lower tone thresholds, which occurred across the four auditory fields. These findings suggest that alterations in the distributed processing of behaviorally relevant sounds may contribute to robust speech discrimination. PMID:25827927

  18. Habituation Reveals Fundamental Chromatic Mechanisms in Striate Cortex of Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Tailby, Chris; Solomon, Samuel G.; Dhruv, Neel T.; Lennie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged viewing of a chromatically modulated stimulus usually leads to changes in its appearance, and that of similar stimuli. These aftereffects of habituation have been thought to reflect the activity of two populations of neurons in visual cortex that have particular importance in color vision, one sensitive to red– green modulation, the other to blue–yellow, but they have not been identified. We show here, in recordings from macaque primary visual cortex (V1), that prolonged exposure to chromatic modulation reveals two fundamental mechanisms with distinctive chromatic signatures that match those of the mechanisms identified by perceptual observations. In nearly all neurons, these mechanisms contribute to both excitation and to regulatory gain controls, and as a result their habituation can have paradoxical effects on response. The mechanisms must be located near the input layers of V1, before their distinct chromatic signatures diffuse. Our observations suggest that the fundamental mechanisms do not give rise to two distinct L–M and S chromatic pathways. Rather, the mechanisms are better understood as stages in the elaboration of chromatic tuning, expressed in varying proportions in all cells in V1 (and beyond), and made accessible to physiological and perceptual investigation only through habituation. PMID:18234891

  19. Disrupting the right prefrontal cortex alters moral judgement.

    PubMed

    Tassy, Sébastien; Oullier, Olivier; Duclos, Yann; Coulon, Olivier; Mancini, Julien; Deruelle, Christine; Attarian, Sharam; Felician, Olivier; Wicker, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    Humans daily face social situations involving conflicts between competing moral decision. Despite a substantial amount of studies published over the past 10 years, the respective role of emotions and reason, their possible interaction, and their behavioural expression during moral evaluation remains an unresolved issue. A dualistic approach to moral evaluation proposes that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFc) controls emotional impulses. However, recent findings raise the possibility that the right DLPFc processes emotional information during moral decision making. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to transiently disrupt rDLPFc activity before measuring decision making in the context of moral dilemmas. Results reveal an increase of the probability of utilitarian responses during objective evaluation of moral dilemmas in the rTMS group (compared to a SHAM one). This suggests that the right DLPFc function not only participates to a rational cognitive control process, but also integrates emotions generated by contextual information appraisal, which are decisive for response selection in moral judgements. © The Author (2011). Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Respiratory, metabolic and cardiac functions are altered by disinhibition of subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sarah F; Cornish, Jennifer L; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is referred to as the visceral motor cortex; however, little is known about whether this region influences respiratory or metabolic outflows. The aim of this study was to describe simultaneous changes in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular functions evoked by disinhibition of the medial PFC (mPFC) and adjacent lateral septal nucleus (LSN). In urethane-anaesthetized rats, bicuculline methiodide was microinjected (2 mm; GABA-A receptor antagonist) into 90 sites in the mPFC at 0.72–4.00 mm from bregma. Phrenic nerve amplitude and frequency, arterial pressure, heart rate, splanchnic and lumbar sympathetic nerve activities (SNA), expired CO2, and core and brown adipose tissue temperatures were measured. Novel findings included disturbances to respiratory rhythm evoked from all subregions of the mPFC. Injections into the cingulate cortex evoked reductions in central respiratory function exclusively, whereas in ventral sites, particularly the infralimbic region, increases in respiratory drive and frequency, and metabolic and cardiac outflows were evoked. Disinhibition of sites in surrounding regions revealed that the LSN could evoke cardiovascular changes accompanied by distinct oscillations in SNA, as well as increases in respiratory amplitude. We show that activation of neurons within the mPFC and LSN influence respiratory, metabolic and cardiac outflows in a site-dependent manner. This study has implications with respect to the altered PFC neuronal activity seen in stress-related and mental health disorders, and suggests how basic physiological systems may be affected. PMID:24042503

  1. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  2. Enhancement of extinction learning attenuates ethanol-seeking behavior and alters plasticity in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gass, Justin T; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Kassab, Amanda S; Glen, William B; Olive, M Foster; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-05-28

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder in which relapse is often initiated by exposure to drug-related cues. The present study examined the effects of mGluR5 activation on extinction of ethanol-cue-maintained responding, relapse-like behavior, and neuronal plasticity. Rats were trained to self-administer ethanol and then exposed to extinction training during which they were administered either vehicle or the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) or CDPPB. CDPPB treatment reduced active lever responding during extinction, decreased the total number of extinction sessions required to meet criteria, and attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. CDPPB facilitation of extinction was blocked by the local infusion of the mGluR5 antagonist 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine into the infralimbic (IfL) cortex, but had no effect when infused into the prelimbic (PrL) cortex. Analysis of dendritic spines revealed alterations in structural plasticity, whereas electrophysiological recordings demonstrated differential alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PrL and IfL cortex. Extinction was associated with increased amplitude of evoked synaptic PrL and IfL NMDA currents but reduced amplitude of PrL AMPA currents. Treatment with CDPPB prevented the extinction-induced enhancement of NMDA currents in PrL without affecting NMDA currents in the IfL. Whereas CDPPB treatment did not alter the amplitude of PrL or IfL AMPA currents, it did promote the expression of IfL calcium-permeable GluR2-lacking receptors in both abstinence- and extinction-trained rats, but had no effect in ethanol-naive rats. These results confirm changes in the PrL and IfL cortex in glutamatergic neurotransmission during extinction learning and demonstrate that manipulation of mGluR5 facilitates extinction of ethanol cues in association with neuronal plasticity.

  3. Enhancement of Extinction Learning Attenuates Ethanol-Seeking Behavior and Alters Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Kassab, Amanda S.; Glen, William B.; Olive, M. Foster; Chandler, L. Judson

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder in which relapse is often initiated by exposure to drug-related cues. The present study examined the effects of mGluR5 activation on extinction of ethanol-cue-maintained responding, relapse-like behavior, and neuronal plasticity. Rats were trained to self-administer ethanol and then exposed to extinction training during which they were administered either vehicle or the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) or CDPPB. CDPPB treatment reduced active lever responding during extinction, decreased the total number of extinction sessions required to meet criteria, and attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. CDPPB facilitation of extinction was blocked by the local infusion of the mGluR5 antagonist 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine into the infralimbic (IfL) cortex, but had no effect when infused into the prelimbic (PrL) cortex. Analysis of dendritic spines revealed alterations in structural plasticity, whereas electrophysiological recordings demonstrated differential alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PrL and IfL cortex. Extinction was associated with increased amplitude of evoked synaptic PrL and IfL NMDA currents but reduced amplitude of PrL AMPA currents. Treatment with CDPPB prevented the extinction-induced enhancement of NMDA currents in PrL without affecting NMDA currents in the IfL. Whereas CDPPB treatment did not alter the amplitude of PrL or IfL AMPA currents, it did promote the expression of IfL calcium-permeable GluR2-lacking receptors in both abstinence- and extinction-trained rats, but had no effect in ethanol-naive rats. These results confirm changes in the PrL and IfL cortex in glutamatergic neurotransmission during extinction learning and demonstrate that manipulation of mGluR5 facilitates extinction of ethanol cues in association with neuronal plasticity. PMID:24872560

  4. Medial prefrontal cortex pathology in schizophrenia as revealed by convergent findings from multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pomarol-Clotet, E; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Salvador, R; Sarró, S; Gomar, J J; Vila, F; Ortiz-Gil, J; Iturria-Medina, Y; Capdevila, A; McKenna, P J

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have found evidence of altered brain structure and function in schizophrenia, but have had complex findings regarding the localization of abnormality. We applied multimodal imaging (voxel-based morphometry (VBM), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) combined with tractography) to 32 chronic schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. At a conservative threshold of P=0.01 corrected, structural and functional imaging revealed overlapping regions of abnormality in the medial frontal cortex. DTI found that white matter abnormality predominated in the anterior corpus callosum, and analysis of the anatomical connectivity of representative seed regions again implicated fibres projecting to the medial frontal cortex. There was also evidence of convergent abnormality in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, although here the laterality was less consistent across techniques. The medial frontal region identified by these three imaging techniques corresponds to the anterior midline node of the default mode network, a brain system which is believed to support internally directed thought, a state of watchfulness, and/or the maintenance of one's sense of self, and which is of considerable current interest in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:20065955

  5. Chronic alcohol exposure alters behavioral and synaptic plasticity of the rodent prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Sven; Mulholland, Patrick J; New, Natasha N; Gass, Justin T; Becker, Howard C; Chandler, L Judson

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we used a mouse model of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to examine how CIE alters the plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In acute slices obtained either immediately or 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure, voltage-clamp recording of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons revealed that CIE exposure resulted in an increase in the NMDA/AMPA current ratio. This increase appeared to result from a selective increase in the NMDA component of the EPSC. Consistent with this, Western blot analysis of the postsynaptic density fraction showed that while there was no change in expression of the AMPA GluR1 subunit, NMDA NR1 and NRB subunits were significantly increased in CIE exposed mice when examined immediately after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Unexpectedly, this increase in NR1 and NR2B was no longer observed after 1-week of withdrawal in spite of a persistent increase in synaptic NMDA currents. Analysis of spines on the basal dendrites of layer V neurons revealed that while the total density of spines was not altered, there was a selective increase in the density of mushroom-type spines following CIE exposure. Examination of NMDA-receptor mediated spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) showed that CIE exposure was associated with altered expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). Lastly, behavioral studies using an attentional set-shifting task that depends upon the mPFC for optimal performance revealed deficits in cognitive flexibility in CIE exposed mice when tested up to 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Taken together, these observations are consistent with those in human alcoholics showing protracted deficits in executive function, and suggest these deficits may be associated with alterations in synaptic plasticity in the mPFC.

  6. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Alters Behavioral and Synaptic Plasticity of the Rodent Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kroener, Sven; Mulholland, Patrick J.; New, Natasha N.; Gass, Justin T.; Becker, Howard C.; Chandler, L. Judson

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we used a mouse model of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to examine how CIE alters the plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In acute slices obtained either immediately or 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure, voltage-clamp recording of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons revealed that CIE exposure resulted in an increase in the NMDA/AMPA current ratio. This increase appeared to result from a selective increase in the NMDA component of the EPSC. Consistent with this, Western blot analysis of the postsynaptic density fraction showed that while there was no change in expression of the AMPA GluR1 subunit, NMDA NR1 and NRB subunits were significantly increased in CIE exposed mice when examined immediately after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Unexpectedly, this increase in NR1 and NR2B was no longer observed after 1-week of withdrawal in spite of a persistent increase in synaptic NMDA currents. Analysis of spines on the basal dendrites of layer V neurons revealed that while the total density of spines was not altered, there was a selective increase in the density of mushroom-type spines following CIE exposure. Examination of NMDA-receptor mediated spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) showed that CIE exposure was associated with altered expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). Lastly, behavioral studies using an attentional set-shifting task that depends upon the mPFC for optimal performance revealed deficits in cognitive flexibility in CIE exposed mice when tested up to 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Taken together, these observations are consistent with those in human alcoholics showing protracted deficits in executive function, and suggest these deficits may be associated with alterations in synaptic plasticity in the mPFC. PMID:22666364

  7. Altered Functional Connectivity of the Insular Cortex across Prefrontal Networks in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Cisler, Josh M.; Elton, Amanda; Kennedy, Ashley P.; Young, Jonathan; Smitherman, Sonet; James, George Andrew; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2013-01-01

    Interoception is theorized to be an important process mediating substance use disorders, and the insular cortex is recognized as a core neural region supporting interoception. The purpose of this study was to compare the integration of the insular cortex into prefrontal-related resting-state networks between individuals with cocaine dependence and healthy controls. 41 participants with cocaine dependence and 19 control participants underwent a resting-state 3T fMRI scan. Individuals with cocaine dependence demonstrated altered functional connectivity of the insular cortex, predominantly the right insular cortex, with all eight prefrontal-related resting-state networks identified through Independent Component Analysis (ICA). A conjunction analysis demonstrated that the right insular cortex was the neural region with the highest number of common group differences across the networks. There was no evidence that insular cortex connectivity commonly differed between groups for non-prefrontal-related networks. Further, seed-based functional connectivity analyses extended the network analyses and indicated that cocaine dependence was associated with greater connectivity of the right insula with the dorsomedial PFC, inferior frontal gyrus, and bilateral dlPFC. These data support the hypothesis that cocaine dependence is related to altered functional interactions of the insular cortex with prefrontal networks. The results suggest possible neural mechanisms by which the insular cortex and interoceptive information influence cognitive control and decision-making processes presumably mediated by prefrontal networks in the cocaine dependence process. PMID:23684980

  8. Callosal projections in rat somatosensory cortex are altered by early removal of afferent input.

    PubMed Central

    Koralek, K A; Killackey, H P

    1990-01-01

    During the first postnatal week, the distribution of callosal projection neurons in the rat somatosensory cortex changes from a uniform to a discontinuous pattern. To determine if this change is influenced by afferent inputs to the somatosensory cortex, the effect of both early unilateral infraorbital nerve section and unilateral removal of the dorsal thalamus on the distribution of callosal projections in rat somatosensory cortex was examined. One month after either of the above manipulations at birth, the tangential distribution of callosal projections in the somatosensory cortex was examined using the combined retrograde and anterograde transport of horseradish peroxidase. Both manipulations alter the distribution of callosal projection neurons and terminations in the somatosensory cortex. After infraorbital nerve section, the distribution of callosal projections is altered in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex. The abnormalities observed are consistent with the altered distribution of thalamocortical projections. In addition, consistent abnormalities were observed in the pattern of callosal projections of the second somatosensory area of both hemispheres. Most notably, they are absent in a portion of the region that contains the representation of the mystacial vibrissae and sinus hairs in this area. Thalamic ablation resulted in highly aberrant patterns of callosal projections in the somatosensory cortex on the operated side, where abnormal bands and clusters of callosal projections were observed in apparently random locations. These results are interpreted as evidence that both peripheral and central inputs influence the maturational changes in the distribution of callosal projection neurons. Images PMID:2304906

  9. Auditory cortex asymmetry, altered minicolumn spacing and absence of ageing effects in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chance, Steven A; Casanova, Manuel F; Switala, Andy E; Crow, Timothy J

    2008-12-01

    The superior temporal gyrus, which contains the auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, is the most consistently altered neocortical structure in schizophrenia (Shenton ME, Dickey CC, Frumin M, McCarley RW. A review of MRI findings in schizophrenia. Schizophr Res 2001; 49: 1-52). Auditory hallucinations are associated with abnormalities in this region and activation in Heschl's gyrus. Our review of 34 MRI and 5 post-mortem studies of planum temporale reveals that half of those measuring region size reported a change in schizophrenia, usually consistent with a reduction in the left hemisphere and a relative increase in the right hemisphere. Furthermore, female subjects are under-represented in the literature and insight from sex differences may be lost. Here we present evidence from post-mortem brain (N = 21 patients, compared with 17 previously reported controls) that normal age-associated changes in planum temporale are not found in schizophrenia. These age-associated differences are reported in an adult population (age range 29-90 years) and were not found in the primary auditory cortex of Heschl's gyrus, indicating that they are selective to the more plastic regions of association cortex involved in cognition. Areas and volumes of Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale and the separation of the minicolumns that are held to be the structural units of the cerebral cortex were assessed in patients. Minicolumn distribution in planum temporale and Heschl's gyrus was assessed on Nissl-stained sections by semi-automated microscope image analysis. The cortical surface area of planum temporale in the left hemisphere (usually asymmetrically larger) was positively correlated with its constituent minicolumn spacing in patients and controls. Surface area asymmetry of planum temporale was reduced in patients with schizophrenia by a reduction in the left hemisphere (F = 7.7, df 1,32, P < 0.01). The relationship between cortical asymmetry and the connecting

  10. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe; Saridis, George A; Gjedde, Albert; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI) revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occurred in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  11. Electrocorticography Reveals Enhanced Visual Cortex Responses to Visual Speech.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Inga M; Yoshor, Daniel; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Human speech contains both auditory and visual components, processed by their respective sensory cortices. We test a simple model in which task-relevant speech information is enhanced during cortical processing. Visual speech is most important when the auditory component is uninformative. Therefore, the model predicts that visual cortex responses should be enhanced to visual-only (V) speech compared with audiovisual (AV) speech. We recorded neuronal activity as patients perceived auditory-only (A), V, and AV speech. Visual cortex showed strong increases in high-gamma band power and strong decreases in alpha-band power to V and AV speech. Consistent with the model prediction, gamma-band increases and alpha-band decreases were stronger for V speech. The model predicts that the uninformative nature of the auditory component (not simply its absence) is the critical factor, a prediction we tested in a second experiment in which visual speech was paired with auditory white noise. As predicted, visual speech with auditory noise showed enhanced visual cortex responses relative to AV speech. An examination of the anatomical locus of the effects showed that all visual areas, including primary visual cortex, showed enhanced responses. Visual cortex responses to speech are enhanced under circumstances when visual information is most important for comprehension.

  12. Altering risky decision-making: Influence of impulsivity on the neuromodulation of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Lee, Tatia M C

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) subserves complex cognitive abilities, including risky decision-making; the modulation of this brain area is shown to alter the way people take risks. Yet, neuromodulation of the PFC in relation to risk-taking behavior remains relatively less well-studied. Moreover, the psychological variables that influence such neuromodulation remain poorly understood. To address these issues, 16 participants took part in 3 experimental sessions on separate days. They received: (i) left anodal-right cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS); (ii) left cathodal-right anodal stimulation; or (iii) sham stimulation while they completed two risk-taking tasks. They also measured on several cognitive-affective abilities and personality traits. It was revealed that left cathodal-right anodal stimulation led to significantly reduced risk-taking under a context of haste. The reduction of risk-taking (relative to sham) correlated with state and trait impulsivity, such that the effect was larger in more impulsive individuals. For these individuals, the tDCS effect size was considered to be large (generalized partial η(2) > .17). The effect of prefrontal-neuromodulation in reducing risk-taking was influenced by baseline impulsivity, reflecting a state-dependent effect of neuromodulation on the PFC. The results of this study carry important insights into the use of neuromodulation to alter higher cognition.

  13. Altered Value Coding in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Mamerow, Loreen; Lei, Xu; Fang, Lei; Mata, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous work suggests that aging is associated with changes in risk taking but less is known about their underlying neural basis, such as the potential age differences in the neural processing of value and risk. The goal of the present study was to investigate adult age differences in functional neural responses in a naturalistic risk-taking task. Twenty-six young adults and 27 healthy older adults completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Young and older adults showed similar overt risk-taking behavior. Group comparison of neural activity in response to risky vs. control stimuli revealed similar patterns of activation in the bilateral striatum, anterior insula (AI) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Group comparison of parametrically modulated activity in response to continued pumping similarly revealed comparable results for both age groups in the AI and, potentially, the striatum, yet differences emerged for regional activity in the vmPFC. At whole brain level, insular, striatal and vmPFC activation was predictive of behavioral risk taking for young but not older adults. The current results are interpreted and discussed as preserved neural tracking of risk and reward in the AI and striatum, respectively, but altered value coding in the vmPFC in the two age groups. The latter finding points toward older adults exhibiting differential vmPFC-related integration and value coding. Furthermore, neural activation holds differential predictive validity for behavioral risk taking in young and older adults. PMID:27630561

  14. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  15. Novel domain formation reveals proto-architecture in inferotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Srihasam, Krishna; Vincent, Justin L.; Livingstone, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Primate inferotemporal cortex is subdivided into domains for biologically important categories, like faces, bodies, and scenes, as well as domains for culturally entrained categories, like text or buildings. These domains are in stereotyped locations in most humans and monkeys. To ask what determines the location of such domains, we intensively trained 7 juvenile monkeys to recognize 3 distinct sets of shapes. After training, the monkeys developed regions that were selectively responsive to each trained set. The location of each specialization was similar across monkeys, despite differences in training order. This indicates that the location of training effects does not depend on function or expertise, but rather some kind of proto-organization. We explore the possibility that this proto-organization is retinotopic or shape-based. PMID:25362472

  16. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  17. From Blame to Punishment: Disrupting Prefrontal Cortex Activity Reveals Norm Enforcement Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Buckholtz, Joshua W; Martin, Justin W; Treadway, Michael T; Jan, Katherine; Zald, David H; Jones, Owen; Marois, René

    2015-09-23

    The social welfare provided by cooperation depends on the enforcement of social norms. Determining blameworthiness and assigning a deserved punishment are two cognitive cornerstones of norm enforcement. Although prior work has implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in norm-based judgments, the relative contribution of this region to blameworthiness and punishment decisions remains poorly understood. Here, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and fMRI to determine the specific role of DLPFC function in norm-enforcement behavior. DLPFC rTMS reduced punishment for wrongful acts without affecting blameworthiness ratings, and fMRI revealed punishment-selective DLPFC recruitment, suggesting that these two facets of norm-based decision making are neurobiologically dissociable. Finally, we show that DLPFC rTMS affects punishment decision making by altering the integration of information about culpability and harm. Together, these findings reveal a selective, causal role for DLPFC in norm enforcement: representational integration of the distinct information streams used to make punishment decisions.

  18. Task alters category representations in prefrontal but not high-level visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bugatus, Lior; Weiner, Kevin S; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-04-04

    A central question in neuroscience is how cognitive tasks affect category representations across the human brain. Regions in lateral occipito-temporal cortex (LOTC), ventral temporal cortex (VTC), and ventro-lateral prefrontal cortex (VLFPC) constitute the extended "what" pathway, which is considered instrumental for visual category processing. However, it is unknown (1) whether distributed responses across LOTC, VTC, and VLPC explicitly represent category, task, or some combination of both, and (2) in what way representations across these subdivisions of the extended 'what' pathway may differ. To fill these gaps in knowledge, we scanned 12 participants using fMRI to test the effect of category and task on distributed responses across LOTC, VTC, and VLPFC. Results reveal that task and category modulate responses in both high-level visual regions, as well as prefrontal cortex. However, we found fundamentally different types of representations across the brain. Distributed responses in high-level visual regions are more strongly driven by category than task, and exhibit task-independent category representations. In contrast, distributed responses in prefrontal cortex are more strongly driven by task than category, and contain task-dependent category representations. Together, these findings of differential representations across the brain support a new idea that LOTC and VTC maintain stable and separable category representations allowing efficient processing of visual information, while prefrontal cortex contains flexible representations in which separable category information may emerge only when relevant to the task.

  19. Extinction reveals that primary sensory cortex predicts reinforcement outcome.

    PubMed

    Bieszczad, Kasia M; Weinberger, Norman M

    2012-02-01

    Primary sensory cortices are traditionally regarded as stimulus analysers. However, studies of associative learning-induced plasticity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) indicate involvement in learning, memory and other cognitive processes. For example, the area of representation of a tone becomes larger for stronger auditory memories and the magnitude of area gain is proportional to the degree that a tone becomes behaviorally important. Here, we used extinction to investigate whether 'behavioral importance' specifically reflects a sound's ability to predict reinforcement (reward or punishment) vs. to predict any significant change in the meaning of a sound. If the former, then extinction should reverse area gains as the signal no longer predicts reinforcement. Rats (n = 11) were trained to bar-press to a signal tone (5.0 kHz) for water-rewards, to induce signal-specific area gains in A1. After subsequent withdrawal of reward, A1 was mapped to determine representational areas. Signal-specific area gains, estimated from a previously established brain-behavior quantitative function, were reversed, supporting the 'reinforcement prediction' hypothesis. Area loss was specific to the signal tone vs. test tones, further indicating that withdrawal of reinforcement, rather than unreinforced tone presentation per se, was responsible for area loss. Importantly, the amount of area loss was correlated with the amount of extinction (r = 0.82, P < 0.01). These findings show that primary sensory cortical representation can encode behavioral importance as a signal's value to predict reinforcement, and that the number of cells tuned to a stimulus can dictate its ability to command behavior.

  20. Extinction reveals that primary sensory cortex predicts reinforcement outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bieszczad, Kasia M.; Weinberger, Norman M.

    2011-01-01

    Primary sensory cortices are traditionally regarded as stimulus analyzers. However, studies of associative learning-induced plasticity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) indicate involvement in learning, memory and other cognitive processes. For example, the area of representation of a tone becomes larger for stronger auditory memories and the magnitude of area gain is proportional to the degree that a tone becomes behaviorally important. Here, we used extinction to investigate whether “behavioral importance” specifically reflects a sound’s ability to predict reinforcement (reward or punishment) vs. to predict any significant change in the meaning of a sound. If the former, then extinction should reverse area gains as the signal no longer predicts reinforcement. Rats (n = 11) were trained to bar-press to a signal tone (5.0 kHz) for water-rewards, to induce signal-specific area gains in A1. After subsequent withdrawal of reward, A1 was mapped to determine representational areas. Signal-specific area gains — estimated from a previously established brain–behavior quantitative function — were reversed, supporting the “reinforcement prediction” hypothesis. Area loss was specific to the signal tone vs. test tones, further indicating that withdrawal of reinforcement, rather than unreinforced tone presentation per se, was responsible for area loss. Importantly, the amount of area loss was correlated with the amount of extinction (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). These findings show that primary sensory cortical representation can encode behavioral importance as a signal’s value to predict reinforcement, and that the number of cells tuned to a stimulus can dictate its ability to command behavior. PMID:22304434

  1. Alteration of Rat Fetal Cerebral Cortex Development after Prenatal Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain. PMID:24642964

  2. Alteration of rat fetal cerebral cortex development after prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain.

  3. Dynamic of neurochemical alterations in striatum, hippocampus and cortex after the 6-OHDA mesostriatal lesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Gui, Xue-Hong; Xue, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Li-Ping; Fang, Ruo-Ming; Ke, Xue-Hong; Li, Ling; Fang, Yong-Qi

    2014-08-01

    Immediate neurochemical alterations produced by 6-OHDA could explain the general toxic pattern in the central nervous system. However, no evidences describe the effects of 6-OHDA on early changes of neurotransmitters in rats' striatum, cortex and hippocampus. In our study, unilateral 6-OHDA injection into medial forebrain bundle (MFB) was used in rats, then five neurotransmitters were analyzed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Results showed that 6-OHDA injection caused a sharp decline of striatal dopamine (DA) levels in the first 12h followed by a further reduction between 12 and 48 h. However, striatal levels of homovanillic acid (HVA) were stable in the first 12h and showed a marked reduction between 12 and 24h. Striatal levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) decreased linearly for 72 h, whereas levels of norepinephrine (NE) showed a slight reduction in the first 48 h, and returned back to normal afterwards. Striatal HVA/DA ratio increased significantly in the first 12h, but 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio showed a sharp increase between 12 and 72 h. Besides, neurochemical alterations were also found in hippocampus and cortex, and the correlations of neurotransmitters were analyzed. Our study indicated that NE system had little influence in the early phase of 6-OHDA injection, moreover, early neurochemical alterations were involved with striatum, hippocampus and cortex.

  4. Alterations of interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex of mice during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Eto, Risa; Abe, Manami; Kimoto, Hiroki; Imaoka, Eri; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the postnatal alterations of neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive neurons, parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive interneurons, and neurotrophic factors in the mouse striatum and frontal cortex using immunohistochemistry. NeuN, PV, nNOS, nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity were measured in 1-, 2-, 4- and 8-week-old mice. Total number of NeuN-positive neurons was unchanged in the mouse striatum and frontal cortex from 1 up to 8 weeks of age. In contrast, a significant decrease in the number of PV-positive interneurons was observed in the striatum and frontal cortex of 1-, 2- and 4-week-old mice. Furthermore, a significant increase of nNOS-positive interneurons was found in the striatum and frontal cortex of 1- and/or 2-week-old mice. NGF-positive neurons were unchanged in the mouse striatum from 1 up to 8 weeks of age. In the frontal cortex, a significant increase in the number of NGF-positive neurons was observed only in 1-week-old mice. In contrast, a significant increase in the number of NGF-positive glia 1 cells was found in the striatum and frontal cortex of 4-week-old mice. Our double-labeled immunostaining showed that nNOS immunoreactivity was not found in PV-immunopositive interneurons. Furthermore, BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in both nNOS-positive and PV-positive interneurons in the striatum of 1- or 2-week-old mice. These results show that the maturation of nNOS-immunopositive interneurons precedes the maturation of PV-immunopositive interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex during postnatal development. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the expression of BDNF may play some role in the maturation of interneurons in the striatum and frontal cortex during postnatal development. Moreover, our findings suggest that the expression of NGF in glia cells may play some role in the maturation of glial cells and PV-positive interneurons

  5. Altered Markers of Tonic Inhibition in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Subjects With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Avilés, Jaime G.; Curley, Allison A.; Hashimoto, Takanori; Morrow, A. Leslie; Ramsey, Amy J.; O’Donnell, Patricio; Volk, David W.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cognitive impairments in schizophrenia are associated with lower expression of markers of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis in the prefrontal cortex. The effects of GABA are mediated by GABAA receptors that mediate either phasic or tonic inhibition. The authors assessed the expression of GABAA receptor α4 and δ subunits, which coassemble to form receptors mediating tonic inhibition, in schizophrenia. Method The authors used in situ hybridization to quantify expression patterns of GABAA receptor α4 and δ subunits in pre-frontal cortex from 23 matched pairs of schizophrenia and comparison subjects. Results Levels of δ mRNA were significantly lower in schizophrenia subjects regardless of medication use, whereas α4 mRNA levels were lower only in subjects with schizophrenia receiving certain medications at the time of death. To understand the nature of this unexpected dissociation between α 4 and δ subunit expression in schizophrenia, the authors used similar methods to quantify α4 and δ mRNA levels in multiple animal models. During postnatal development of monkey prefrontal cortex, levels of α4 mRNA decreased, whereas δ mRNA levels increased. In addition, δ mRNA levels, but not α4 mRNA levels, were lower in the medial frontal cortex of mice with a genetic deletion of the GABAA receptor α1 subunit, and neither δ nor α4 mRNA levels were altered in rodent models of altered excitatory neurotransmission. Conclusions Since GABAA receptor α1 subunits also have lower mRNA levels in schizophrenia, show increased expression with age in monkey prefrontal cortex, and can coassemble with δ subunits to form functional GABAA receptors, lower δ mRNA levels in schizophrenia might reflect a reduced number of α1βxδ GABAA receptors that could contribute to deficient tonic inhibition and prefrontal cortical dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:19289452

  6. Altered gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guillozet-Bongaarts, A L; Hyde, T M; Dalley, R A; Hawrylycz, M J; Henry, A; Hof, P R; Hohmann, J; Jones, A R; Kuan, C L; Royall, J; Shen, E; Swanson, B; Zeng, H; Kleinman, J E

    2014-04-01

    The underlying pathology of schizophrenia (SZ) is likely as heterogeneous as its symptomatology. A variety of cortical and subcortical regions, including the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in its pathology, and a number of genes have been identified as risk factors for disease development. We used in situ hybridization (ISH) to examine the expression of 58 genes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, comprised of Brodmann areas 9 and 46) from 19 individuals with a premorbid diagnosis of SZ and 33 control individuals. Genes were selected based on: (1) previous identification as risk factors for SZ; (2) cell type markers or (3) laminar markers. Cell density and staining intensity were compared in the DLPFC, as well as separately in Brodmann areas 9 and 46. The expression patterns of a variety of genes, many of which are associated with the GABAergic system, were altered in SZ when compared with controls. Additional genes, including C8orf79 and NR4A2, showed alterations in cell density or staining intensity between the groups, highlighting the need for additional studies. Alterations were, with only a few exceptions, limited to Brodmann area 9, suggesting regional specificity of pathology in the DLPFC. Our results agree with previous studies on the GABAergic involvement in SZ, and suggest that areas 9 and 46 may be differentially affected in the disease. This study also highlights additional genes that may be altered in SZ, and indicates that these potentially interesting genes can be identified by ISH and high-throughput image analysis techniques.

  7. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function.

  8. Context–Specific Social Behavior is Altered by Orbitofrontal Cortex Lesions in Adult Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Babineau, Brooke A.; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Machado, Christopher J.; Toscano, Jessica E.; Mason, William A.; Amaral, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Although the orbitofrontal cortex has been implicated in important aspects of social behavior, few studies have evaluated semi-naturalistic social behavior in nonhuman primates after discrete lesions of this cortical area. In the present report, we evaluated the behavior of adult rhesus monkeys during dyadic social interactions with novel animals following discrete lesions of the orbitofrontal cortex. In a constrained condition, in which animals could engage in only restricted social behaviors, there were no significant differences in social behavior between the lesion group and the sham-operated control group. When the experimental animals could freely interact with partner animals, however, lesioned animals differed from control animals in terms of social interest and fear-related behaviors. These alterations were contingent on the partner with which they interacted. The lesioned animals, when compared to the control animals, had a significantly greater propensity to approach some but not all of their social partners. They also grimaced more towards the partner animal that they did not approach. Behavioral alterations were more apparent during the initial interactions between animals. We discuss these findings in relation to the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in context dependent modulation of social behavior. PMID:21256192

  9. Altered glial gene expression, density, and architecture in the visual cortex upon retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Ashley; Sucic, Joseph F; Hillsburg, Dylan; Cyr, Lindsay; Johnson, Catherine; Polanco, Anthony; Figuereo, Joe; Cabine, Kenneth; Russo, Nickole; Sturtevant, Ann; Jarvinen, Michael K

    2011-11-08

    Genes encoding the proteins of cytoskeletal intermediate filaments (IF) are tightly regulated, and they are important for establishing neural connections. However, it remains uncertain to what extent neurological disease alters IF gene expression or impacts cells that express IFs. In this study, we determined the onset of visual deficits in a mouse model of progressive retinal degeneration (Pde6b(-) mice; Pde6b(+) mice have normal vision) by observing murine responses to a visual task throughout development, from postnatal day (PND) 21 to adult (N=174 reliable observations). Using Q-PCR, we evaluated whether expression of the genes encoding two Type III IF proteins, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin was altered in the visual cortex before, during, and after the onset of visual deficits. Using immunohistochemical techniques, we investigated the impact of vision loss on the density and morphology of astrocytes that expressed GFAP and vimentin in the visual cortex. We found that Pde6b(-) mice displayed 1) evidence of blindness at PND 49, with visual deficits detected at PND 35, 2) reduced GFAP mRNA expression in the visual cortex between PND 28 and PND 49, and 3) an increased ratio of vimentin:GFAP-labeled astrocytes at PND 49 with reduced GFAP cell body area. Together, these findings demonstrate that retinal degeneration modifies cellular and molecular indices of glial plasticity in a visual system with drastically reduced visual input. The functional consequences of these structural changes remain uncertain.

  10. Reversible Deactivation of Motor Cortex Reveals Functional Connectivity with Posterior Parietal Cortex in the Prosimian Galago (Otolemur garnettii)

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Miller, Daniel J.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the functional macrocircuitry of frontoparietal networks in the neocortex of prosimian primates (Otolemur garnettii) using a microfluidic thermal regulator to reversibly deactivate selected regions of motor cortex (M1). During deactivation of either forelimb or mouth/face movement domains within M1, we used long-train intracortical microstimulation techniques to evoke movements from the rostral division of posterior parietal cortex (PPCr). We found that deactivation of M1 movement domains in most instances abolished movements evoked in PPCr. The most common effect of deactivating M1 was to abolish evoked movements in a homotopic domain in PPCr. For example, deactivating M1 forelimb lift domains resulted in loss of evoked movement in forelimb domains in PPCr. However, at some sites, we also observed heterotopic effects; deactivating a specific domain in M1 (e.g., forelimb lift) resulted in loss of evoked movement in a different movement domain in PPCr (e.g., hand-to-mouth or eye-blink). At most sites examined in PPCr, rewarming M1 resulted in a reestablishment of the baseline movement at the same amplitude as that observed before cooling. However, at some sites, reactivation did not result in a return to baseline movement or to the full amplitude of the baseline movement. We discuss our findings in the context of frontoparietal circuits and how they may subserve a repertoire of ecologically relevant behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) of primates integrates sensory information used to guide movements. Different modules within PPC and motor cortex (M1) appear to control various motor behaviors (e.g., reaching, defense, and feeding). How these modules work together may vary across species and may explain differences in dexterity and even the capacity for tool use. We investigated the functional connectivity of these modules in galagos, a prosimian primate with relatively simple frontoparietal circuitry. By deactivating a

  11. Running Induces Widespread Structural Alterations in the Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Khalil, David; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity enhances hippocampal function but its effects on neuronal structure remain relatively unexplored outside of the dentate gyrus. Using Golgi impregnation and the lipophilic tracer DiI, we show that long-term voluntary running increases the density of dendritic spines in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of adult rats. Exercise was associated with increased dendritic spine density not only in granule neurons of the dentate gyrus, but also in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and in layer III pyramidal neurons of the entorhinal cortex. In the CA1 region, changes in dendritic spine density are accompanied by changes in dendritic arborization and alterations in the morphology of individual spines. These findings suggest that physical activity exerts pervasive effects on neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and one of its afferent populations. These structural changes may contribute to running-induced changes in cognitive function. PMID:17636549

  12. Sex differences in learned fear expression and extinction involve altered gamma oscillations in medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Georgina E; Halliday, David M; Mason, Rob; Bredy, Timothy W; Stevenson, Carl W

    2016-11-01

    Sex differences in learned fear expression and extinction involve the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We recently demonstrated that enhanced learned fear expression during auditory fear extinction and its recall is linked to persistent theta activation in the prelimbic (PL) but not infralimbic (IL) cortex of female rats. Emerging evidence indicates that gamma oscillations in mPFC are also implicated in the expression and extinction of learned fear. Therefore we re-examined our in vivo electrophysiology data and found that females showed persistent PL gamma activation during extinction and a failure of IL gamma activation during extinction recall. Altered prefrontal gamma oscillations thus accompany sex differences in learned fear expression and its extinction. These findings are relevant for understanding the neural basis of post-traumatic stress disorder, which is more prevalent in women and involves impaired extinction and mPFC dysfunction.

  13. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  14. Altered SPECT 123I-iomazenil Binding in the Cingulate Cortex of Children with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Rieko; Matsuoka, Michiko; Chiba, Hiromi; Ozono, Shuichi; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Kaida, Hayato; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kakuma, Tatsuki; Croarkin, Paul E.; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that anxiety plays a key role in the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN) in children. The purpose of this study was to examine cortical GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding before and after treatment in children beginning intensive AN treatment. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements using 123I-iomazenil, which binds to GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptors, was performed in 26 participants with AN who were enrolled in a multimodal treatment program. Sixteen of the 26 participants underwent a repeat SPECT scan immediately before discharge at conclusion of the intensive treatment program. Eating behavior and mood disturbances were assessed using Eating Attitudes Test with 26 items (EAT-26) and the short form of the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Clinical outcome scores were evaluated after a 1-year period. We examined association between relative iomazenil-binding activity in cortical regions of interest and psychometric profiles and determined which psychometric profiles show interaction effects with brain regions. Further, we determined if binding activity could predict clinical outcome and treatment changes. Higher EAT-26 scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Higher POMS subscale scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the left frontal, parietal cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). “Depression–Dejection” and “Confusion” POMS subscale scores, and total POMS score showed interaction effects with brain regions in iomazenil-binding activity. Decreased binding in the anterior cingulate cortex and left parietal cortex was associated with poor clinical outcomes. Relative binding increases throughout the PCC and occipital gyrus were observed after weight gain in children with AN. These findings suggest that cortical GABAergic receptor binding is altered

  15. Correlates of perceptual awareness in human primary auditory cortex revealed by an informational masking experiment.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Katrin; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2012-05-15

    The presence of an auditory event may remain undetected in crowded environments, even when it is well above the sensory threshold. This effect, commonly known as informational masking, allows for isolating neural activity related to perceptual awareness, by comparing repetitions of the same physical stimulus where the target is either detected or not. Evidence from magnetoencephalography (MEG) suggests that auditory-cortex activity in the latency range 50-250 ms is closely coupled with perceptual awareness. Here, BOLD fMRI and MEG were combined to investigate at which stage in the auditory cortex neural correlates of conscious auditory perception can be observed. Participants were asked to indicate the perception of a regularly repeating target tone, embedded within a random multi-tone masking background. Results revealed widespread activation within the auditory cortex for detected target tones, which was delayed but otherwise similar to the activation of an unmasked control stimulus. The contrast of detected versus undetected targets revealed activity confined to medial Heschl's gyrus, where the primary auditory cortex is located. These results suggest that activity related to conscious perception involves the primary auditory cortex and is not restricted to activity in secondary areas.

  16. Multimodal MRI Imaging of Apoptosis-Triggered Microstructural Alterations in the Postnatal Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Volodymyr; van de Looij, Yohan; Mihhailova, Jevgenia; Salmon, Patrick; Hüppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2017-02-03

    Prematurely born children often develop neurodevelopmental delay that has been correlated with reduced growth and microstructural alterations in the cerebral cortex. Much research has focused on apoptotic neuronal cell death as a key neuropathological features following preterm brain injuries. How scattered apoptotic death of neurons may contribute to microstructural alterations remains unknown. The present study investigated in a rat model the effects of targeted neuronal apoptosis on cortical microstructure using in vivo MRI imaging combined with neuronal reconstruction and histological analysis. We describe that mild, targeted death of layer IV neurons in the developing rat cortex induces MRI-defined metabolic and microstructural alterations including increased cortical fractional anisotropy. Delayed architectural modifications in cortical gray matter and myelin abnormalities in the subcortical white matter such as hypomyelination and microglia activation follow the acute phase of neuronal death and axonal degeneration. These results establish the link between mild cortical apoptosis and MRI-defined microstructure changes that are reminiscent to those previously observed in preterm babies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Early maternal hypothyroxinemia alters histogenesis and cerebral cortex cytoarchitecture of the progeny.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Autric, Rosalía; Ausó, Eva; García-Velasco, José Victor; Arufe, María del Carmen; Escobar del Rey, Francisco; Berbel, Pere; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella

    2003-04-01

    Epidemiological studies from both iodine-sufficient and -deficient human populations strongly suggest that early maternal hypothyroxinemia (i.e., low circulating free thyroxine before onset of fetal thyroid function at midgestation) increases the risk of neurodevelopmental deficits of the fetus, whether or not the mother is clinically hypothyroid. Rat dams on a low iodine intake are hypothyroxinemic without being clinically hypothyroid because, as occurs in pregnant women, their circulating 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine level is usually normal. We studied cell migration and cytoarchitecture in the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus of the 40-day-old progeny of the iodine-deficient dams and found a significant proportion of cells at locations that were aberrant or inappropriate with respect to their birth date. Most of these cells were neurons, as assessed by single- and double-label immunostaining. The cytoarchitecture of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus was also affected, layering was blurred, and, in the cortex, normal barrels were not formed. We believe that this is the first direct evidence of an alteration in fetal brain histogenesis and cytoarchitecture that could only be related to early maternal hypothyroxinemia. This condition may be 150-200 times more common than congenital hypothyroidism and ought to be prevented both by mass screening of free thyroxine in early pregnancy and by early iodine supplementation to avoid iodine deficiency, however mild.

  18. Early maternal hypothyroxinemia alters histogenesis and cerebral cortex cytoarchitecture of the progeny

    PubMed Central

    Lavado-Autric, Rosalía; Ausó, Eva; García-Velasco, José Victor; del Carmen Arufe, María; Escobar del Rey, Francisco; Berbel, Pere; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies from both iodine-sufficient and -deficient human populations strongly suggest that early maternal hypothyroxinemia (i.e., low circulating free thyroxine before onset of fetal thyroid function at midgestation) increases the risk of neurodevelopmental deficits of the fetus, whether or not the mother is clinically hypothyroid. Rat dams on a low iodine intake are hypothyroxinemic without being clinically hypothyroid because, as occurs in pregnant women, their circulating 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine level is usually normal. We studied cell migration and cytoarchitecture in the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus of the 40-day-old progeny of the iodine-deficient dams and found a significant proportion of cells at locations that were aberrant or inappropriate with respect to their birth date. Most of these cells were neurons, as assessed by single- and double-label immunostaining. The cytoarchitecture of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus was also affected, layering was blurred, and, in the cortex, normal barrels were not formed. We believe that this is the first direct evidence of an alteration in fetal brain histogenesis and cytoarchitecture that could only be related to early maternal hypothyroxinemia. This condition may be 150–200 times more common than congenital hypothyroidism and ought to be prevented both by mass screening of free thyroxine in early pregnancy and by early iodine supplementation to avoid iodine deficiency, however mild. PMID:12671057

  19. Interactions between behaviorally relevant rhythms and synaptic plasticity alter coding in the piriform cortex

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how neural and behavioral timescales interact to influence cortical activity and stimulus coding is an important issue in sensory neuroscience. In air-breathing animals, voluntary changes in respiratory frequency alter the temporal patterning olfactory input. In the olfactory bulb, these behavioral timescales are reflected in the temporal properties of mitral/tufted (M/T) cell spike trains. As the odor information contained in these spike trains is relayed from the bulb to the cortex, interactions between presynaptic spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity dictate how stimulus features are represented in cortical spike trains. Here we demonstrate how the timescales associated with respiratory frequency, spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity interact to shape cortical responses. Specifically, we quantified the timescales of short-term synaptic facilitation and depression at excitatory synapses between bulbar M/T cells and cortical neurons in slices of mouse olfactory cortex. We then used these results to generate simulated M/T population synaptic currents that were injected into real cortical neurons. M/T population inputs were modulated at frequencies consistent with passive respiration or active sniffing. We show how the differential recruitment of short-term plasticity at breathing versus sniffing frequencies alters cortical spike responses. For inputs at sniffing frequencies, cortical neurons linearly encoded increases in presynaptic firing rates with increased phase locked, firing rates. In contrast, at passive breathing frequencies, cortical responses saturated with changes in presynaptic rate. Our results suggest that changes in respiratory behavior can gate the transfer of stimulus information between the olfactory bulb and cortex. PMID:22553016

  20. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain.

    PubMed

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Adam D; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region-specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development.

  1. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  2. Altered structure and function in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shariq A; Keaser, Michael L; Meiller, Timothy F; Seminowicz, David A

    2014-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a debilitating, idiopathic chronic pain condition. For many BMS patients, burning oral pain begins in late morning and becomes more intense throughout the day, peaking by late afternoon or evening. We investigated brain gray matter volume (GMV) with voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and functional connectivity in resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in a tightly screened, homogeneous sample of 9 female, postmenopausal/perimenopausal BMS patients and 9 matched healthy control subjects. Patients underwent 2 scanning sessions in the same day: in the morning, when ongoing pain/burning was low, and in the afternoon, when pain/burning was significantly higher. Patients had increased GMV and lower FA in the hippocampus (Hc), and decreased GMV in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). rsfMRI revealed altered connectivity patterns in different states of pain/burning, with increased connectivity between mPFC (a node in the default mode network) and anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex, ventromedial PFC, and bilateral Hc/amygdala in the afternoon compared with the morning session. Furthermore, mPFC-Hc connectivity was higher in BMS patients than control subjects for the afternoon but not the morning session. mPFC-Hc connectivity was related to Beck depression inventory scores both between groups and between burning states within patients, suggesting that depression and anxiety partially explain pain-related brain dysfunction in BMS. Overall, we provide multiple lines of evidence supporting aberrant structure and function in the mPFC and Hc, and implicate a circuit involving the mPFC and Hc in regulating mood and depressive symptoms in BMS.

  3. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  4. Widespread alterations in the synaptic proteome of the adolescent cerebral cortex following prenatal immune activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Györffy, Balázs A; Gulyássy, Péter; Gellén, Barbara; Völgyi, Katalin; Madarasi, Dóra; Kis, Viktor; Ozohanics, Olivér; Papp, Ildikó; Kovács, Péter; Lubec, Gert; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kardos, József; Drahos, László; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin A

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have revealed associations between pre- and perinatal immune activation and the development of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Accordingly, neuroimmune crosstalk has a considerably large impact on brain development during early ontogenesis. While a plethora of heterogeneous abnormalities have already been described in established maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent and primate animal models, which highly correlate to those found in human diseases, the underlying molecular background remains obscure. In the current study, we describe the long-term effects of MIA on the neocortical pre- and postsynaptic proteome of adolescent rat offspring in detail. Molecular differences were revealed in sub-synaptic fractions, which were first thoroughly characterized using independent methods. The widespread proteomic examination of cortical samples from offspring exposed to maternal lipopolysaccharide administration at embryonic day 13.5 was conducted via combinations of different gel-based proteomic techniques and tandem mass spectrometry. Our experimentally validated proteomic data revealed more pre- than postsynaptic protein level changes in the offspring. The results propose the relevance of altered synaptic vesicle recycling, cytoskeletal structure and energy metabolism in the presynaptic region in addition to alterations in vesicle trafficking, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction in the postsynaptic compartment in MIA offspring. Differing levels of the prominent signaling regulator molecule calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the postsynapse was validated and identified specifically in the prefrontal cortex. Finally, several potential common molecular regulators of these altered proteins, which are already known to be implicated in schizophrenia and ASD, were identified and assessed. In summary, unexpectedly widespread changes in the synaptic molecular machinery in MIA rats were demonstrated which

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex alters P50 gating.

    PubMed

    Terada, Hidenori; Kurayama, Taichi; Nakazawa, Ken; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-08-18

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been reported to modify cortical function by inducing alterations in the underlying brain function. P50auditory evoked potentials, as assessed using a paired auditory stimulus (S1 and S2) paradigm, are thought to reflect a sensory gating process in which the functional involvement of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is suggested. P50 sensory gating has also been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and anxiety-related disorders. Here we investigated whether the tDCS over the DLPFC could modulate the cortical function leading to alteration of the P50 sensory gating. P50 gating indices (the S2/S1 ratio and S1-S2 difference) were measured during the tDCS (current 1.0 mA, duration 15 min) over the DLPFC with different conditions (anodal, cathodal and sham). Ten male healthy volunteers were studied on separate days in a single blinded paradigm. We observed that the cathodaltDCS significantly altered the mean P50 gating indices compared to the other two conditions. Our results suggest that sensory gating could be modulated by cathodaltDCS on the left DLPFC but not by anodal/sham tDCS.

  6. Developmental alterations in noxious-evoked EEG activity recorded from rat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, I M; Greenspon, C M; Hathway, G J

    2015-10-01

    Primary somatosensory cortex (S1) contains a nociceptive map that localizes potential tissue damage on the body and encodes stimulus intensity. An objective and specific biomarker of pain however is currently lacking and is urgently required for use in non-verbal clinical populations as well as in the validation of pre-clinical pain models. Here we describe studies to see if the responses of the S1 in juvenile rats are different to those in the adult. We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) responses from S1 of lightly-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at either postnatal day 21 or postnatal day 40 during the presentation of noxious (55 °C) or innocuous (30 °C) thermal stimuli applied to the plantar surface of the left hindpaw. The total EEG power across the recording period was the same in both ages after stimulation but the frequency distribution was significantly affected by age. Noxious heat evoked a significant increase in theta band (4-8 Hz) activity in adults only (P<0.0001 compared to baseline; P<0.0001 compared to juveniles). There were no significant differences in EEG responses to innocuous thermal stimuli. These data show that there are significant alterations in the processing of nociceptive inputs within the maturing cortex and that cortical theta activity is involved only in the adult cortical response to noxious stimulation.

  7. Neonatal isolation augments social dominance by altering actin dynamics in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Hirobumi; Miyazaki, Tomoyuki; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Takase, Kenkichi; Jitsuki, Susumu; Nakajima, Waki; Koide, Mayu; Yamamoto, Naoko; Komiya, Kasane; Suyama, Kumiko; Sano, Akane; Taguchi, Akiko; Takahashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Social separation early in life can lead to the development of impaired interpersonal relationships and profound social disorders. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we found that isolation of neonatal rats induced glucocorticoid-dependent social dominance over nonisolated control rats in juveniles from the same litter. Furthermore, neonatal isolation inactivated the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin in the juvenile medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Isolation-induced inactivation of ADF/cofilin increased stable actin fractions at dendritic spines in the juvenile mPFC, decreasing glutamate synaptic AMPA receptors. Expression of constitutively active ADF/cofilin in the mPFC rescued the effect of isolation on social dominance. Thus, neonatal isolation affects spines in the mPFC by reducing actin dynamics, leading to altered social behavior later in life. PMID:27791080

  8. Genetic tracing reveals a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhihua; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Snapper, Scott; Buck, Linda B.

    2001-11-01

    The olfactory system translates myriad chemical structures into diverse odour perceptions. To gain insight into how this is accomplished, we prepared mice that coexpressed a transneuronal tracer with only one of about 1,000 different odorant receptors. The tracer travelled from nasal neurons expressing that receptor to the olfactory bulb and then to the olfactory cortex, allowing visualization of cortical neurons that receive input from a particular odorant receptor. These studies revealed a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex in which signals from a particular receptor are targeted to specific clusters of neurons. Inputs from different receptors overlap spatially and could be combined in single neurons, potentially allowing for an integration of the components of an odorant's combinatorial receptor code. Signals from the same receptor are targeted to multiple olfactory cortical areas, permitting the parallel, and perhaps differential, processing of inputs from a single receptor before delivery to the neocortex and limbic system.

  9. Learning alters theta amplitude, theta-gamma coupling and neuronal synchronization in inferotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background How oscillatory brain rhythms alone, or in combination, influence cortical information processing to support learning has yet to be fully established. Local field potential and multi-unit neuronal activity recordings were made from 64-electrode arrays in the inferotemporal cortex of conscious sheep during and after visual discrimination learning of face or object pairs. A neural network model has been developed to simulate and aid functional interpretation of learning-evoked changes. Results Following learning the amplitude of theta (4-8 Hz), but not gamma (30-70 Hz) oscillations was increased, as was the ratio of theta to gamma. Over 75% of electrodes showed significant coupling between theta phase and gamma amplitude (theta-nested gamma). The strength of this coupling was also increased following learning and this was not simply a consequence of increased theta amplitude. Actual discrimination performance was significantly correlated with theta and theta-gamma coupling changes. Neuronal activity was phase-locked with theta but learning had no effect on firing rates or the magnitude or latencies of visual evoked potentials during stimuli. The neural network model developed showed that a combination of fast and slow inhibitory interneurons could generate theta-nested gamma. By increasing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitivity in the model similar changes were produced as in inferotemporal cortex after learning. The model showed that these changes could potentiate the firing of downstream neurons by a temporal desynchronization of excitatory neuron output without increasing the firing frequencies of the latter. This desynchronization effect was confirmed in IT neuronal activity following learning and its magnitude was correlated with discrimination performance. Conclusions Face discrimination learning produces significant increases in both theta amplitude and the strength of theta-gamma coupling in the inferotemporal cortex which are correlated with

  10. Alterations in GABA-related transcriptome in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, T; Arion, D; Unger, T; Maldonado-Avilés, JG; Morris, HM; Volk, DW; Mirnics, K; Lewis, DA

    2010-01-01

    In subjects with schizophrenia, impairments in working memory are associated with dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This dysfunction appears to be due, at least in part, to abnormalities in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory circuitry. To test the hypothesis that altered GABA-mediated circuitry in the DLPFC of subjects with schizophrenia reflects expression changes of genes that encode selective presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABA neurotransmission, we conducted a systematic expression analysis of GABA-related transcripts in the DLPFC of 14 pairs of schizophrenia and age-, sex- and post-mortem interval-matched control subjects using a customized DNA microarray with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Subjects with schizophrenia exhibited expression deficits in GABA-related transcripts encoding (1) presynaptic regulators of GABA neurotransmission (67 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and GABA transporter 1), (2) neuropeptides (somatostatin (SST), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK)) and (3) GABAA receptor subunits (α1, α4, β3, γ2 and δ). Real-time qPCR and/or in situ hybridization confirmed the deficits for six representative transcripts tested in the same pairs and in an extended cohort, respectively. In contrast, GAD67, SST and α1 subunit mRNA levels, as assessed by in situ hybridization, were not altered in the DLPFC of monkeys chronically exposed to antipsychotic medications. These findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with alterations in inhibitory inputs from SST/NPY-containing and CCK-containing subpopulations of GABA neurons and in the signaling via certain GABAA receptors that mediate synaptic (phasic) or extrasynaptic (tonic) inhibition. In concert with previous findings, these data suggest that working memory dysfunction in schizophrenia is mediated by altered GABA neurotransmission in certain DLPFC microcircuits. PMID:17471287

  11. Alterations in GABA-related transcriptome in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Arion, D; Unger, T; Maldonado-Avilés, J G; Morris, H M; Volk, D W; Mirnics, K; Lewis, D A

    2008-02-01

    In subjects with schizophrenia, impairments in working memory are associated with dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This dysfunction appears to be due, at least in part, to abnormalities in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory circuitry. To test the hypothesis that altered GABA-mediated circuitry in the DLPFC of subjects with schizophrenia reflects expression changes of genes that encode selective presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABA neurotransmission, we conducted a systematic expression analysis of GABA-related transcripts in the DLPFC of 14 pairs of schizophrenia and age-, sex- and post-mortem interval-matched control subjects using a customized DNA microarray with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Subjects with schizophrenia exhibited expression deficits in GABA-related transcripts encoding (1) presynaptic regulators of GABA neurotransmission (67 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(67)) and GABA transporter 1), (2) neuropeptides (somatostatin (SST), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK)) and (3) GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha1, alpha4, beta3, gamma2 and delta). Real-time qPCR and/or in situ hybridization confirmed the deficits for six representative transcripts tested in the same pairs and in an extended cohort, respectively. In contrast, GAD(67), SST and alpha1 subunit mRNA levels, as assessed by in situ hybridization, were not altered in the DLPFC of monkeys chronically exposed to antipsychotic medications. These findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with alterations in inhibitory inputs from SST/NPY-containing and CCK-containing subpopulations of GABA neurons and in the signaling via certain GABA(A) receptors that mediate synaptic (phasic) or extrasynaptic (tonic) inhibition. In concert with previous findings, these data suggest that working memory dysfunction in schizophrenia is mediated by altered GABA neurotransmission in certain DLPFC microcircuits.

  12. Altered Dopamine Modulation of Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex of Cocaine-Sensitized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kroener, Sven; Lavin, Antonieta

    2010-01-01

    A functionally hypoactive prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to contribute to decreased cognitive inhibitory control over drug-seeking behavior in cocaine addicts. Alterations in PFC dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission are involved in the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine, and repeated exposure to cocaine decreases DA D2 receptor (D2R) function in the PFC. We used recordings in PFC slices from adult rats to investigate how repeated cocaine treatment followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal affects DA modulation of GABA transmission and interneuron firing. In agreement with previous results in drug-naïve animals we found that in saline-treated control animals DA (20 μM) modulated evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a biphasic, time- and receptor-dependent manner. Activation of D2Rs transiently reduced, whereas D1 receptor activation persistently increased the amplitude of eIPSCs. In cocaine-sensitized animals the D2R-dependent modulation of eIPSCs was abolished and the time course of DA effects was altered. In both saline- and cocaine-treated animals the effects of DA on eIPSCs were paralleled by distinct changes in spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs). In cocaine-treated animals the alterations in DA modulation of eIPSCs and sIPSCs correlated with a lack of D2R-specific reduction in action potential-independent GABA release, which might normally oppose D1-dependent increases in GABA transmission. Recordings from interneurons furthermore show that D2R activation can increase current-evoked spike firing in saline, but not in cocaine-treated animals. Altered DA regulation of inhibition during cocaine withdrawal could disturb normal cortical processing and contribute to a hypoactive PFC. PMID:20664581

  13. Altered dopamine modulation of inhibition in the prefrontal cortex of cocaine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Sven; Lavin, Antonieta

    2010-10-01

    A functionally hypoactive prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to contribute to decreased cognitive inhibitory control over drug-seeking behavior in cocaine addicts. Alterations in PFC dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission are involved in the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine, and repeated exposure to cocaine decreases DA D2 receptor (D2R) function in the PFC. We used recordings in PFC slices from adult rats to investigate how repeated cocaine treatment followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal affects DA modulation of GABA transmission and interneuron firing. In agreement with previous results in drug-naïve animals we found that in saline-treated control animals DA (20 μM) modulated evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a biphasic, time- and receptor-dependent manner. Activation of D2Rs transiently reduced, whereas D1 receptor activation persistently increased the amplitude of eIPSCs. In cocaine-sensitized animals the D2R-dependent modulation of eIPSCs was abolished and the time course of DA effects was altered. In both saline- and cocaine-treated animals the effects of DA on eIPSCs were paralleled by distinct changes in spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs). In cocaine-treated animals the alterations in DA modulation of eIPSCs and sIPSCs correlated with a lack of D2R-specific reduction in action potential-independent GABA release, which might normally oppose D1-dependent increases in GABA transmission. Recordings from interneurons furthermore show that D2R activation can increase current-evoked spike firing in saline, but not in cocaine-treated animals. Altered DA regulation of inhibition during cocaine withdrawal could disturb normal cortical processing and contribute to a hypoactive PFC.

  14. Large-Scale Meta-Analysis of Human Medial Frontal Cortex Reveals Tripartite Functional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Luke J.; Banich, Marie T.; Wager, Tor D.; Yarkoni, Tal

    2016-01-01

    The functional organization of human medial frontal cortex (MFC) is a subject of intense study. Using fMRI, the MFC has been associated with diverse psychological processes, including motor function, cognitive control, affect, and social cognition. However, there have been few large-scale efforts to comprehensively map specific psychological functions to subregions of medial frontal anatomy. Here we applied a meta-analytic data-driven approach to nearly 10,000 fMRI studies to identify putatively separable regions of MFC and determine which psychological states preferentially recruit their activation. We identified regions at several spatial scales on the basis of meta-analytic coactivation, revealing three broad functional zones along a rostrocaudal axis composed of 2–4 smaller subregions each. Multivariate classification analyses aimed at identifying the psychological functions most strongly predictive of activity in each region revealed a tripartite division within MFC, with each zone displaying a relatively distinct functional signature. The posterior zone was associated preferentially with motor function, the middle zone with cognitive control, pain, and affect, and the anterior with reward, social processing, and episodic memory. Within each zone, the more fine-grained subregions showed distinct, but subtler, variations in psychological function. These results provide hypotheses about the functional organization of medial prefrontal cortex that can be tested explicitly in future studies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activation of medial frontal cortex in fMRI studies is associated with a wide range of psychological states ranging from cognitive control to pain. However, this high rate of activation makes it challenging to determine how these various processes are topologically organized across medial frontal anatomy. We conducted a meta-analysis across nearly 10,000 studies to comprehensively map psychological states to discrete subregions in medial frontal cortex

  15. Altered GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in human Angelman syndrome cortex.

    PubMed

    Roden, William H; Peugh, Lindsey D; Jansen, Laura A

    2010-10-15

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is most frequently caused by deletion of the maternally derived chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which includes not only the causative UBE3A gene, but also the beta(3)-alpha(5)-gamma(3) GABA(A) receptor subunit gene cluster. GABAergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to contribute to the occurrence of epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral impairments in this condition. In the present study, analysis of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology was performed in cerebral cortex from four subjects with Angelman syndrome and compared to that from control tissue. The membrane fraction of frozen postmortem neocortical tissue was isolated and subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. The ratios of beta(3)/beta(2) and alpha(5)/alpha(1) subunit protein expression in Angelman syndrome cortex were significantly decreased when compared with controls. An additional membrane fraction was injected into Xenopus oocytes, resulting in incorporation of the brain membrane vesicles with their associated receptors into the oocyte cellular membrane. Two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis of GABA(A) receptor currents was then performed. Studies of GABA(A) receptor pharmacology in Angelman syndrome cortex revealed increased current enhancement by the alpha(1)-selective benzodiazepine-site agonist zolpidem and by the barbiturate phenobarbital, while sensitivity to current inhibition by zinc was decreased. GABA(A) receptor affinity and modulation by neurosteroids were unchanged. This shift in GABA(A) receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in Angelman syndrome is consistent with impaired extrasynaptic but intact to augmented synaptic cortical GABAergic inhibition, which could contribute to the epileptic, behavioral, and cognitive phenotypes of the disorder.

  16. Altered GABAA Receptor Subunit Expression and Pharmacology in Human Angelman Syndrome Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roden, William H.; Peugh, Lindsey D.; Jansen, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is most frequently caused by deletion of the maternally-derived chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which includes not only the causative UBE3A gene, but also the β3-α5-γ3 GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster. GABAergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to contribute to the occurrence of epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral impairments in this condition. In the present study, analysis of GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology was performed in cerebral cortex from four subjects with Angelman syndrome and compared to that from control tissue. The membrane fraction of frozen postmortem neocortical tissue was isolated and subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. The ratios of β3/β2 and α5/α1 subunit protein expression in Angelman syndrome cortex were significantly decreased when compared with controls. An additional membrane fraction was injected into Xenopus oocytes, resulting in incorporation of the brain membrane vesicles with their associated receptors into the oocyte cellular membrane. Two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of GABAA receptor currents was then performed. Studies of GABAA receptor pharmacology in Angelman syndrome cortex revealed increased current enhancement by the α1-selective benzodiazepine site agonist zolpidem and by the barbiturate phenobarbital, while sensitivity to current inhibition by zinc was decreased. GABAA receptor affinity and modulation by neurosteroids were unchanged. This shift in GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in Angelman syndrome is consistent with impaired extrasynaptic but intact to augmented synaptic cortical GABAergic inhibition, which could contribute to the epileptic, behavioral, and cognitive phenotypes of the disorder. PMID:20692323

  17. TRPV1-Dependent and -Independent Alterations in the Limbic Cortex of Neuropathic Mice: Impact on Glial Caspases and Pain Perception

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Catia; Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Siniscalco, Dario; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Marabese, Ida; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; Imperatore, Roberta; Palazzo, Enza; de Novellis, Vito; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, caspases are activated in the limbic cortex. We investigated the role of TRPV1 channels and glial caspases in the mouse prelimbic and infralimbic (PL-IL) cortex after spared nerve injury (SNI). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blots, and immunfluorescence showed overexpression of several caspases in the PL-IL cortex 7 days postinjury. Caspase-3 release and upregulation of AMPA receptors in microglia, caspase-1 and IL-1β release in astrocytes, and upregulation of Il-1 receptor-1, TRPV1, and VGluT1 in glutamatergic neurons, were also observed. Of these alterations, only those in astrocytes persisted in SNI Trpv1−/− mice. A pan-caspase inhibitor, injected into the PL-IL cortex, reduced mechanical allodynia, this effect being reduced but not abolished in Trpv1−/− mice. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo following electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala or application of pressure on the hind paw, showed increased excitatory pyramidal neuron activity in the SNI PL-IL cortex, which also contained higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Intra-PL-IL cortex injection of mGluR5 and NMDA receptor antagonists and AMPA exacerbated, whereas TRPV1 and AMPA receptor antagonists and a CB1 agonist inhibited, allodynia. We suggest that SNI triggers both TRPV1-dependent and independent glutamate- and caspase-mediated cross-talk among IL-PL cortex neurons and glia, which either participates or counteracts pain. PMID:22139792

  18. Volumetric alterations in the heteromodal association cortex in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Poustka, L; Vomstein, K; Haffner, J; Parzer, P; Stieltjes, B; Henze, R

    2015-02-01

    We investigated if alterations in higher-order association areas related to schizophrenia, namely the heteromodal association cortex (HASC), are also observable in subjects with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A group of 18 children with ASD and 18 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The examination comprised an analysis of group differences in gray matter (GM) volume, surface area (SA) and hemispheric lateralization. Differences in GM volumes in children with ASD and HC were detected in frontal and parietal areas related to the HASC. No HASC structure that showed changes in GM volume exhibited differences in SA. Alterations in hemispheric lateralization between ASD and HC are seen in a frontal area of the HASC. Our results indicate that changes in HASC areas are not restricted to schizophrenia, but extend to other psychiatric disorders, namely ASD. The lacking group differences in SA indicate that changes in GM volume are possibly evoked by other variables than SA in children with ASD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain alters synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Sui, Li; Song, Xiao-Jin; Ren, Jie; Ju, Li-Hua; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ouabain, a specific Na-K-ATPase inhibitor, in rats mimics the manic phenotypes of bipolar disorder and thus has been proposed as one of the best animal models of mania. Bipolar mania has been known to be associated with dysfunctions of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a brain area critically involved in mental functions; however, the exact mechanism underlying these dysfunctions is not yet clear. The present study investigated synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity, and dopamine release in Sprague-Dawley rat mPFC following ICV administration of ouabain (5 μl of 1 mM ouabain). The electrophysiological results demonstrated that ouabain depressed the short- and the long-term synaptic plasticity, represented by paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, respectively, in the mPFC. These ouabain-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity can be prevented by pre-treatment with lithium (intraperitoneal injection of 47.5 mg/kg lithium, twice a day, 7 days), which acts as an effective mood stabilizer in preventing mania. The electrochemical results demonstrated that ICV administration of ouabain enhanced dopamine release in the mPFC, which did not be affected by pre-treatment with lithium. These findings suggested that alterations in synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in the mPFC might underlie the dysfunctions of mPFC accompanied with ouabain administration-induced bipolar mania.

  20. Crack cocaine inhalation induces schizophrenia-like symptoms and molecular alterations in mice prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Areal, Lorena Bianchine; Herlinger, Alice Laschuk; Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Pires, Rita Gomes Wanderley

    2017-03-06

    Crack cocaine (crack) addiction represents a major social and health burden, especially seeing as users are more prone to engage in criminal and violent acts. Crack users show a higher prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities - particularly antisocial personality disorders - when compared to powder cocaine users. They also develop cognitive deficits related mainly to executive functions, including working memory. It is noteworthy that stimulant drugs can induce psychotic states, which appear to mimic some symptoms of schizophrenia among users. Social withdraw and executive function deficits are, respectively, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia mediated by reduced dopamine (DA) tone in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of patients. That could be explained by an increased expression of D2R short isoform (D2S) in the PFC of such patients and/or by hypofunctioning NMDA receptors in this region. Reduced DA tone has already been described in the PFC of mice exposed to crack smoke. Therefore, it is possible that behavioral alterations presented by crack users result from molecular and biochemical neuronal alterations akin to schizophrenia. Accordingly, we found that upon crack inhalation mice have shown decreased social interaction and working memory deficits analogous to schizophrenia's symptoms, along with increased D2S/D2L expression ratio and decreased expression of NR1, NR2A and NR2B NMDA receptor subunits in the PFC. Herein we propose two possible mechanisms to explain the reduced DA tone in the PFC elicited by crack consumption in mice, bringing also the first direct evidence that crack use may result in schizophrenia-like neurochemical, molecular and behavioral alterations.

  1. COMT val158met polymorphism and molecular alterations in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: Differences in controls and in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Abhay A; Jha, Manish; Birchfield, Thomas; Mukherjee, Shibani; Gleason, Kelly; Abdisalaam, Salim; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Tamminga, Carol A; Ghose, Subroto

    2016-05-01

    The single nucleotide val158met polymorphism in catechol o-methyltransferase (COMT) influences prefrontal cortex function. Working memory, dependent on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), has been repeatedly shown to be influenced by this COMT polymorphism. The high activity COMT val isoform is associated with lower synaptic dopamine levels. Altered synaptic dopamine levels are expected to lead to molecular adaptations within the synapse and within DLPFC neural circuitry. In this human post mortem study using high quality DLPFC tissue, we first examined the influence of the COMT val158met polymorphism on markers of dopamine neurotransmission, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits and glutamatic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), all known to be critical to DLPFC circuitry and function. Next, we compared target gene expression profiles in a cohort of control and schizophrenia cases, each characterized by COMT genotype. We find that the COMT val allele in control subjects is associated with significant upregulation of GluN2A and GAD67 mRNA levels compared to met carriers. Comparisons between control and schizophrenia groups reveal that GluN2A, GAD67 and DRD2 are differentially regulated between diagnostic groups in a genotype specific manner. Chronic antipsychotic treatment in rodents did not explain these differences. These data demonstrate an association between COMTval158met genotype and gene expression profile in the DLPFC of controls, possibly adaptations to maintain DLPFC function. In schizophrenia val homozygotes, these adaptations are not seen and could reflect pathophysiologic mechanisms related to the known poorer performance of these subjects on DLPFC-dependent tasks. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Multivariate pattern analysis of the human medial temporal lobe revealed representationally categorical cortex and representationally agnostic hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Derek J.; Stark, Craig E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary theories of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) suggest that there are functional differences between the MTL cortex and the hippocampus. High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate pattern analysis were utilized to study whether MTL subregions could classify categories of images, with the hypothesis that the hippocampus would be less representationally categorical than the MTL cortex. Results revealed significant classification accuracy for faces versus objects and faces versus scenes in MTL cortical regions—parahippocampal cortex and perirhinal cortex—with little evidence for category discrimination in the hippocampus. MTL cortical regions showed significantly greater classification accuracy than the hippocampus. The hippocampus showed significant classification accuracy for images compared to a non-mnemonic baseline task, suggesting that it responded to the images. Classification accuracy in a region of interest encompassing retrosplenial cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex posterior to retrosplenial cortex (RSC/PCC), showed a similar pattern of results to parahippocampal cortex, supporting the hypothesis that these regions are functionally related. The results suggest that parahippocampal cortex, perirhinal cortex, and RSC/PCC are representationally categorical and the hippocampus is more representationally agnostic, which is concordant with the hypothesis of the role of the hippocampus in pattern separation. PMID:24976498

  3. Developmental alcohol exposure impairs synaptic plasticity without overtly altering microglial function in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elissa L; Lutz, Nina M; Hogan, Victoria A; Lamantia, Cassandra E; McMurray, Helene R; Myers, Jason R; Ashton, John M; Majewska, Ania K

    2017-09-14

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), caused by gestational ethanol (EtOH) exposure, is one of the most common causes of non-heritable and life-long mental disability worldwide, with no standard treatment or therapy available. While EtOH exposure can alter the function of both neurons and glia, it is still unclear how EtOH influences brain development to cause deficits in sensory and cognitive processing later in life. Microglia play an important role in shaping synaptic function and plasticity during neural circuit development and have been shown to mount an acute immunological response to EtOH exposure in certain brain regions. Therefore, we hypothesized that microglial roles in the healthy brain could be permanently altered by early EtOH exposure leading to deficits in experience-dependent plasticity. We used a mouse model of human third trimester high binge EtOH exposure, administering EtOH twice daily by subcutaneous injections from postnatal day 4 through postnatal day 9 (P4-:P9). Using a monocular deprivation model to assess ocular dominance plasticity, we found an EtOH-induced deficit in this type of visually driven experience-dependent plasticity. However, using a combination of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and in vivo two-photon microscopy to assay microglial morphology and dynamics, as well as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and RNA-seq to examine the microglial transcriptome, we found no evidence of microglial dysfunction in early adolescence. We also found no evidence of microglial activation in visual cortex acutely after early ethanol exposure, possibly because we also did not observe EtOH-induced neuronal cell death in this brain region. We conclude that early EtOH exposure caused a deficit in experience-dependent synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex that was independent of changes in microglial phenotype or function. This demonstrates that neural plasticity can remain impaired by developmental ethanol exposure even in

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals a noncategorical representation of hue in early visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Persichetti, Andrew S.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Butt, Omar H.; Brainard, David H.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2015-01-01

    Color names divide the fine-grained gamut of color percepts into discrete categories. A categorical transition must occur somewhere between the initial encoding of the continuous spectrum of light by the cones and the verbal report of the name of a color stimulus. Here, we used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation experiment to examine the representation of hue in the early visual cortex. Our stimuli varied in hue between blue and green. We found in the early visual areas (V1, V2/3, and hV4) a smoothly increasing recovery from adaptation with increasing hue distance between adjacent stimuli during both passive viewing (Experiment 1) and active categorization (Experiment 2). We examined the form of the adaptation effect and found no evidence that a categorical representation mediates the release from adaptation for stimuli that cross the blue–green color boundary. Examination of the direct effect of stimulus hue on the fMRI response did, however, reveal an enhanced response to stimuli near the blue–green category border. This was largest in hV4 and when subjects were engaged in active categorization of the stimulus hue. In contrast with a recent report from another laboratory (Bird, Berens, Horner, & Franklin, 2014), we found no evidence for a categorical representation of color in the middle frontal gyrus. A post hoc whole-brain analysis, however, revealed several regions in the frontal cortex with a categorical effect in the adaptation response. Overall, our results support the idea that the representation of color in the early visual cortex is primarily fine grained and does not reflect color categories. PMID:26024465

  5. Where does TMS Stimulate the Motor Cortex? Combining Electrophysiological Measurements and Realistic Field Estimates to Reveal the Affected Cortex Position.

    PubMed

    Bungert, Andreas; Antunes, André; Espenhahn, Svenja; Thielscher, Axel

    2016-09-24

    Much of our knowledge on the physiological mechanisms of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) stems from studies which targeted the human motor cortex. However, it is still unclear which part of the motor cortex is predominantly affected by TMS. Considering that the motor cortex consists of functionally and histologically distinct subareas, this also renders the hypotheses on the physiological TMS effects uncertain. We use the finite element method (FEM) and magnetic resonance image-based individual head models to get realistic estimates of the electric field induced by TMS. The field changes in different subparts of the motor cortex are compared with electrophysiological threshold changes of 2 hand muscles when systematically varying the coil orientation in measurements. We demonstrate that TMS stimulates the region around the gyral crown and that the maximal electric field strength in this region is significantly related to the electrophysiological response. Our study is one of the most extensive comparisons between FEM-based field calculations and physiological TMS effects so far, being based on data for 2 hand muscles in 9 subjects. The results help to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms of TMS. They also pave the way for a systematic exploration of realistic field estimates for dosage control in TMS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Structural and functional alterations to rat medial prefrontal cortex following chronic restraint stress and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Deena S.; Pavlides, Constantine; Hunter, Richard G.; Bloss, Erik B.; Hof, Patrick R.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic stress has been shown in animal models to result in altered dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). It has been hypothesized that the stress-induced dendritic retractions and spine loss lead to disrupted connectivity that results in stress-induced functional impairment of mPFC. While these alterations were initially viewed as a neurodegenerative event, it has recently been established that stress induced dendritic alterations are reversible if animals are given time to recover from chronic stress. However, whether spine growth accompanies dendritic extension remains to be demonstrated. It is also not known if recovery-phase dendritic extension allows for re-establishment of functional capacity. The goal of this study, therefore, was to characterize the structural and functional effects of chronic stress and recovery on the infralimbic (IL) region of the rat mPFC. We compared neuronal morphology of layer V IL pyramidal neurons from animals subjected to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) to those that experienced CRS followed by a 21 day recovery period. Layer V pyramidal cell functional capacity was assessed by intra-IL long-term potentiation (LTP) both in the absence and presence of SKF38393, a dopamine receptor partial agonist and a known PFC LTP modulator. We found that stress-induced IL apical dendritic retraction and spine loss co-occur with receptor-mediated impairments to catecholaminergic facilitation of synaptic plasticity. We also found that while post-stress recovery did not reverse distal dendritic retraction, it did result in over-extension of proximal dendritic neuroarchitecture and spine growth as well as a full reversal of CRS-induced impairments to catecholaminergic-mediated synaptic plasticity. Our results support the hypothesis that disease-related PFC dysfunction is a consequence of network disruption secondary to altered structural and functional plasticity and that circuitry

  7. Subanaesthetic Ketamine Treatment Alters Prefrontal Cortex Connectivity With Thalamus and Ascending Subcortical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Neil; Morris, Brian J.; Pratt, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute treatment with subanaesthetic doses of NMDA receptor antagonists, such as ketamine, provides a translational model with relevance to many of the symptoms of schizophrenia. Previous studies have focused specifically on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) because this region is implicated in many of the functional deficits associated with this disorder and shows reduced activity (hypofrontality) in schizophrenia patients. Chronic NMDA antagonist treatment in rodents can also induce hypofrontality, although paradoxically acute NMDA receptor antagonist administration induces metabolic hyperfrontality. Methods: In this study, we use 2-deoxyglucose imaging data in mice to characterize acute ketamine-induced alterations in regional functional connectivity, a deeper analysis of the consequences of acute NMDA receptor hypofunction. Results: We show that acute ketamine treatment increases PFC metabolic activity while reducing metabolic activity in the dorsal reticular thalamic nucleus (dRT). This is associated with abnormal functional connectivity between the PFC and multiple thalamic nuclei, including the dRT, mediodorsal (MDthal), and anteroventral (AVthal) thalamus. In addition, we show that acute NMDA receptor blockade alters the functional connectivity of the serotonergic (dorsal raphe [DR]), noradrenergic (locus coeruleus [LC]), and cholinergic (vertical limb of the diagonal band of broca [VDB]) systems. Conclusions: Together with other emerging data, these findings suggest that the reticular nucleus of the thalamus, along with the diffusely projecting subcortical aminergic/cholinergic systems, represent a primary site of action for ketamine in reproducing the diverse symptoms of schizophrenia. Our results also demonstrate the added scientific insight gained by characterizing the functional connectivity of discrete brain regions from brain imaging data gained in a preclinical context. PMID:22114100

  8. Sensory Deprivation during Early Postnatal Period Alters the Density of Interneurons in the Mouse Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Suemitsu, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Okamoto, Motoi

    2015-01-01

    Early loss of one sensory system can cause improved function of other sensory systems. However, both the time course and neuronal mechanism of cross-modal plasticity remain elusive. Recent study using functional MRI in humans suggests a role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in cross-modal plasticity. Since this phenomenon is assumed to be associated with altered GABAergic inhibition in the PFC, we have tested the hypothesis that early postnatal sensory deprivation causes the changes of inhibitory neuronal circuit in different regions of the PFC of the mice. We determined the effects of sensory deprivation from birth to postnatal day 28 (P28) or P58 on the density of parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB), and calretinin (CR) neurons in the prelimbic, infralimbic, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices. The density of PV and CB neurons was significantly increased in layer 5/6 (L5/6). Moreover, the density of CR neurons was higher in L2/3 in sensory deprived mice compared to intact mice. These changes were more prominent at P56 than at P28. These results suggest that long-term sensory deprivation causes the changes of intracortical inhibitory networks in the PFC and the changes of inhibitory networks in the PFC may contribute to cross-modal plasticity.

  9. Ageing alters the supramolecular architecture of OxPhos complexes in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Monika; Rommelspacher, Hans; Sugawa, Michiru D; Dencher, Norbert A

    2010-08-01

    Activity and stability of life-supporting proteins are determined not only by their abundance and by post-translational modifications, but also by specific protein-protein interactions. This holds true both for signal-transduction and energy-converting cascades. For vital processes such as life-span control and senescence, to date predominantly age-dependent alterations in abundance and to lesser extent in post-translational modifications of proteins are examined to elucidate the cause of ageing at the molecular level. In mitochondria of rat cortex, we quantified profound changes in the proportion of supramolecular assemblies (supercomplexes) of the respiratory chain complexes I, III(2), IV as well as of the MF(o)F(1) ATP synthase (complex V) by 2D-native/SDS electrophoresis and fluorescent staining. Complex I was present solely in supercomplexes and those lacking complex IV were least stable in aged animals (2.4-fold decline). The ATP synthase was confirmed as a prominent target of age-associated degradation by an overall decline in abundance of 1.5-fold for the monomer and an 2.8-fold increase of unbound F(1). Oligomerisation of the ATP synthase increases during ageing and might modulate the cristae architecture. These data could explain the link between ageing and respiratory control as well as ROS generation.

  10. Altered Function of Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Adolescents with Peer Verbal Abuse History

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Won; Choi, Jeewook; Lee, Jong-Sun; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Ko Woon; Kim, Dongchan; Park, HyunWook

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies showing the association of exposure to peer (PeVA) and parental verbal abuse in childhood with structural alterations in the young adult brain suggest functional changes in adolescence. In this functional MRI study, we investigated the effects of exposure to PeVA, during elementary and middle school periods, on brain response to emotional words, in high school students. Methods An emotional Stroop task consisting of swear, negative, positive, and neutral words was performed during functional MRI scan for 23 subjects who were divided into low- and high exposure groups to PeVA. Results High-PeVA group had a higher depression score, greater left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) activity, and higher left VLPFC-left hippocampus connectivity in swear word conditions. The VLPFC activity and left VLPFC-left hippocampus connectivity was negatively related to the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. Conclusion These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that exposure to PeVA, during childhood, is an aversive stimulus associated with meaningful functional change in emotional regulation network, showing hypersensitivity to swear words, at middle adolescence. PMID:28845171

  11. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered neuronal responses to muscle stretch

    PubMed Central

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; Turner, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Exaggeration of the long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is a characteristic neurophysiologic feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity. To explore one frequently-hypothesized mechanism, we studied the effects of fast muscle stretches on neuronal activity in the macaque primary motor cortex (M1) before and after the induction of parkinsonism by unilateral administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We compared results from the general population of M1 neurons and two antidromically-identified subpopulations: distant-projecting pyramidal-tract type neurons (PTNs) and intra-telecenphalic-type corticostriatal neurons (CSNs). Rapid rotations of elbow or wrist joints evoked short-latency responses in 62% of arm-related M1 neurons. As in PD, the late electromyographic responses that constitute the LLSR were enhanced following MPTP. This was accompanied by a shortening of M1 neuronal response latencies and a degradation of directional selectivity, but surprisingly, no increase in single unit response magnitudes. The results suggest that parkinsonism alters the timing and specificity of M1 responses to muscle stretch. Observation of an exaggerated LLSR with no change in the magnitude of proprioceptive responses in M1 is consistent with the idea that the increase in LLSR gain that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity is localized to the spinal cord. PMID:24324412

  12. Exposure to caregiver maltreatment alters expression levels of epigenetic regulators in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Blaze, Jennifer; Roth, Tania L

    2013-01-01

    Quality of maternal care experienced during infancy is a key factor that can confer vulnerability or resilience to psychiatric disorders later in life. Research continues to indicate that early-life experiences can affect developmental trajectories through epigenetic alterations capable of affecting gene regulation and neural plasticity. Previously, our lab has shown that experiences within an adverse caregiving environment (i.e. maltreatment) produce aberrant DNA methylation patterns at various gene loci in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of developing and adult rats. This study aimed to determine whether caregiver maltreatment likewise affects expression levels of several genes important in regulating DNA methylation patterns (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, MeCP2, Gadd45b, and Hdac1). While we observed minimal changes in gene expression within the mPFC of developing rats, we observed expression changes for all genes in adult animals. Specifically, exposure to maltreatment produced a significant decrease in mRNA levels of all epigenetic regulators in adult males and a significant decrease in Gadd45b in adult females. Our results here provide further empirical support for the long-term and sex-specific epigenetic consequences of caregiver maltreatment on the mPFC. PMID:24120634

  13. Asynchronous inputs alter excitability, spike timing, and topography in primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pritesh K.; Moucha, Raluca; Engineer, Navzer D.; Rathbun, Daniel L.; Vazquez, Jessica; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Correlation-based synaptic plasticity provides a potential cellular mechanism for learning and memory. Studies in the visual and somatosensory systems have shown that behavioral and surgical manipulation of sensory inputs leads to changes in cortical organization that are consistent with the operation of these learning rules. In this study, we examine how the organization of primary auditory cortex (A1) is altered by tones designed to decrease the average input correlation across the frequency map. After one month of separately pairing nucleus basalis stimulation with 2 and 14 kHz tones, a greater proportion of A1 neurons responded to frequencies below 2 kHz and above 14 kHz. Despite the expanded representation of these tones, cortical excitability was specifically reduced in the high and low frequency regions of A1, as evidenced by increased neural thresholds and decreased response strength. In contrast, in the frequency region between the two paired tones, driven rates were unaffected and spontaneous firing rate was increased. Neural response latencies were increased across the frequency map when nucleus basalis stimulation was associated with asynchronous activation of the high and low frequency regions of A1. This set of changes did not occur when pulsed noise bursts were paired with nucleus basalis stimulation. These results are consistent with earlier observations that sensory input statistics can shape cortical map organization and spike timing. PMID:15855025

  14. Alteration of transcriptional networks in the entorhinal cortex after maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Sharon L; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Cairns, Murray J

    2016-08-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabinoid exposure (ACE) have both been identified as major environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We examined the effects of these two risk factors alone, and in combination, on gene expression during late adolescence. Pregnant rats were exposed to the viral infection mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day (GD) 15. Adolescent offspring received daily injections of the cannabinoid HU210 for 14days starting on postnatal day (PND) 35. Gene expression was examined in the left entorhinal cortex (EC) using mRNA microarrays. We found prenatal treatment with poly I:C alone, or HU210 alone, produced relatively minor changes in gene expression. However, following combined treatments, offspring displayed significant changes in transcription. This dramatic and persistent alteration of transcriptional networks enriched with genes involved in neurotransmission, cellular signalling and schizophrenia, was associated with a corresponding perturbation in the expression of small non-coding microRNA (miRNA). These results suggest that a combination of environmental exposures during development leads to significant genomic remodeling that disrupts maturation of the EC and its associated circuitry with important implications as the potential antecedents of memory and learning deficits in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Diabetes alters myelin lipid profile in rat cerebral cortex: Protective effects of dihydroprogesterone.

    PubMed

    Cermenati, Gaia; Giatti, Silvia; Audano, Matteo; Pesaresi, Marzia; Spezzano, Roberto; Caruso, Donatella; Mitro, Nico; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2017-04-01

    Due to the emerging association of diabetes with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative events, the evaluation of the effects of this pathology on the brain function has now a high priority in biomedical research. In particular, the effects of diabetes on myelin compartment have been poorly taken into consideration. To this purpose, we performed a deep lipidomic analysis of cortical myelin in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. In male rats three months of diabetes induced an extensive alterations in levels of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines (the main species present in myelin membranes), plasmalogens as well as phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines. In addition, the levels of cholesterol and myelin basic protein were also decreased. Because these lipids exert important functional and structural roles in the myelin compartment, our data indicate that cerebral cortex myelin is severely compromised in diabetic status. Treatment for one-month with a metabolite of progesterone, dihydroprogesterone, restored the lipid and protein myelin profiles to the levels observed in non-diabetic animals. These data suggest the potential of therapeutic efficacy of DHP to restore myelin in the diabetic brain.

  16. Sensory Deprivation during Early Postnatal Period Alters the Density of Interneurons in the Mouse Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Suemitsu, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Okamoto, Motoi

    2015-01-01

    Early loss of one sensory system can cause improved function of other sensory systems. However, both the time course and neuronal mechanism of cross-modal plasticity remain elusive. Recent study using functional MRI in humans suggests a role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in cross-modal plasticity. Since this phenomenon is assumed to be associated with altered GABAergic inhibition in the PFC, we have tested the hypothesis that early postnatal sensory deprivation causes the changes of inhibitory neuronal circuit in different regions of the PFC of the mice. We determined the effects of sensory deprivation from birth to postnatal day 28 (P28) or P58 on the density of parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB), and calretinin (CR) neurons in the prelimbic, infralimbic, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices. The density of PV and CB neurons was significantly increased in layer 5/6 (L5/6). Moreover, the density of CR neurons was higher in L2/3 in sensory deprived mice compared to intact mice. These changes were more prominent at P56 than at P28. These results suggest that long-term sensory deprivation causes the changes of intracortical inhibitory networks in the PFC and the changes of inhibitory networks in the PFC may contribute to cross-modal plasticity. PMID:26161272

  17. Converging models of schizophrenia - Network alterations of prefrontal cortex underlying cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Gamo, Nao J; Hikida, Takatoshi; Kim, Sun-Hong; Murai, Toshiya; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Sawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) and its connections with other brain areas are crucial for cognitive function. Cognitive impairments are one of the core symptoms associated with schizophrenia, and manifest even before the onset of the disorder. Altered neural networks involving PFC contribute to cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. Both genetic and environmental risk factors affect the development of the local circuitry within PFC as well as development of broader brain networks, and make the system vulnerable to further insults during adolescence, leading to the onset of the disorder in young adulthood. Since spared cognitive functions correlate with functional outcome and prognosis, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments will have important implications for novel therapeutics for schizophrenia focusing on cognitive functions. Multidisciplinary approaches, from basic neuroscience to clinical studies, are required to link molecules, circuitry, networks, and behavioral phenotypes. Close interactions among such fields by sharing a common language on connectomes, behavioral readouts, and other concepts are crucial for this goal. PMID:26408506

  18. Esophageal Acid Stimulation Alters Insular Cortex Functional Connectivity in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siwiec, Robert M.; Babaei, Arash; Kern, Mark; Samuel, Erica A.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background The insula plays a significant role in the interoceptive processing of visceral stimuli. We have previously shown that GERD patients have increased insular cortex activity during esophageal stimulation, suggesting a sensitized esophago-cortical neuraxis. However, information regarding the functional connectivity (FC) of the insula during visceral stimulation is lacking. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the FC of insular subregions during esophageal acid stimulation. Methods Functional imaging data was obtained from 12 GERD patients and 14 healthy subjects during four steady state conditions: (1) presence of transnasal esophageal catheter (pre-infusion); (2) neutral solution; (3) acid infusion; (4) presence of transnasal esophageal catheter following infusions (post-infusion). The insula was parcellated into 6 regions of interest (ROI). FC maps between each insular ROI and interoceptive regions were created. Differences in FC between GERD patients and healthy subjects were determined across the 4 study conditions. Key Results All GERD patients experienced heartburn during and after esophageal acidification. Significant differences between GERD patients and healthy subjects were seen in: (1) insula-thalamic FC (neutral solution infusion, acid infusion, post-infusion); (2) insula-amygdala FC (acid infusion, post-infusion); (3) insula-hippocampus and insula-cingulate FC (post-infusion). Conclusions & Inferences Esophageal stimulation in GERD patients revealed significant insular cortex FC differences with regions involved in viscerosensation and interoception. The results of our study provide further evidence that the insula, located at the transition of afferent physiologic information to human feelings, is essential for both visceral homeostasis and the experience of heartburn in GERD patients. PMID:25367277

  19. Altered anatomical network in early blindness revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-09-28

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. Diffusion MRI studies have revealed the efficient small-world properties and modular structure of the anatomical network in normal subjects. However, no previous study has used diffusion MRI to reveal changes in the brain anatomical network in early blindness. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 17 early blind subjects and 17 age- and gender-matched sighted controls. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions using deterministic tractography. Compared with controls, early blind subjects showed a decreased degree of connectivity, a reduced global efficiency, and an increased characteristic path length in their brain anatomical network, especially in the visual cortex. Moreover, we revealed some regions with motor or somatosensory function have increased connections with other brain regions in the early blind, which suggested experience-dependent compensatory plasticity. This study is the first to show alterations in the topological properties of the anatomical network in early blindness. From the results, we suggest that analyzing the brain's anatomical network obtained using diffusion MRI data provides new insights into the understanding of the brain's re-organization in the specific population with early visual deprivation.

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Alters Phase Synchrony of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Facilitates Decision Making in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bing; Wang, Jun; Shahed, Mahadi; Jelfs, Beth; Chan, Rosa H. M.; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can enhance memory and cognitive functions in both rats and humans. Studies have shown that VNS influenced decision-making in epileptic patients. However, the sites of action involved in the cognitive-enhancement are poorly understood. By employing a conscious rat model equipped with vagus nerve cuff electrode, we assess the role of chronic VNS on decision-making in rat gambling task (RGT). Simultaneous multichannel-recordings offer an ideal setup to test the hypothesis that VNS may induce alterations of in both spike-field-coherence and synchronization of theta oscillations across brain areas in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Daily VNS, administered immediately following training sessions of RGT, caused an increase in ‘good decision-maker’ rats. Neural spikes in the ACC became synchronized with the ongoing theta oscillations of local field potential (LFP) in BLA following VNS. Moreover, cross-correlation analysis revealed synchronization between the ACC and BLA. Our results provide specific evidence that VNS facilitates decision-making and unveils several important roles for VNS in regulating LFP and spike phases, as well as enhancing spike-phase coherence between key brain areas involved in cognitive performance. These data may serve to provide fundamental notions regarding neurophysiological biomarkers for therapeutic VNS in cognitive impairment. PMID:27731403

  1. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity.

  2. Alterations in cortical thickness and neuronal density in the frontal cortex of Albert Einstein.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B; Harvey, T

    1996-06-07

    Neuronal density, neuron size, and the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortical surface area were measured in the right pre-frontal cortex of Albert Einstein and five elderly control subjects. Measurement of neuronal density used the optical dissector technique on celloidin-embedded cresyl violet-stained sections. The neurons counted provided a systematic random sample for the measurement of cell body cross-sectional area. Einstein's cortex did not differ from the control subjects in the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortex or in mean neuronal size. Because Einstein's cortex was thinner than the controls he had a greater neuronal density.

  3. Acute ethanol alters multiple histone modifications at model gene promoters in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Finegersh, Andrey; Homanics, Gregg E

    2014-07-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure alters gene expression in the cerebral cortex (CCx); however, mechanisms of EtOH-induced gene regulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that EtOH regulates gene expression by differentially altering histone modifications at gene promoters that are up- and down-regulated by EtOH. Such epigenetic mechanisms may ultimately contribute to EtOH-induced neuro-adaptations that underlie tolerance, dependence, and EtOH-use disorders. Eight-week-old, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with 3 g/kg EtOH (intraperitoneally) or saline and sacrificed 6 hours after injection; the CCx and hippocampus (HC) were immediately removed and flash frozen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to study the association of model gene promoters with histone modifications. Western blot was used to detect global changes in the histone modifications studied. We also used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array to identify changes in expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes. In CCx, acute EtOH decreased expression of Gad1, Hdac2, and Hdac11, which was associated with decreased histone acetylation at the Gad1 and Hdac2 promoters; we also identified increased expression of Mt1, Mt2, Egr1, which was associated with increased H3K4me3 levels at the Mt2 promoter and decreased H3K27me3 levels at the Mt1 promoter. We identified an increase in global levels of H3K4me3 in CCx as well as a global increase in H3K9ac and H3K14ac in HC. The PCR array identified decreased expression of Csrp2 bp, Hdac2, and Hdac11 as well as increased expression of Kat2b in CCx. Acute EtOH induces chromatin remodeling at model up- and down-regulated genes in CCx. Different patterns of histone modifications at these gene promoters indicate that EtOH may be acting through multiple histone-modifying enzymes to alter gene expression; in particular, differential expression of Kat2b, Hdac2, Hdac11, and Csrp2 bp in CCx may mediate EtOH-induced chromatin remodeling. Additional studies are necessary to

  4. Awake fMRI reveals a specialized region in dog temporal cortex for face processing

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Cook, Peter; Weiller, Samuel K.; Berns, Helen P.; Spivak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Recent behavioral evidence suggests that dogs, like humans and monkeys, are capable of visual face recognition. But do dogs also exhibit specialized cortical face regions similar to humans and monkeys? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in six dogs trained to remain motionless during scanning without restraint or sedation, we found a region in the canine temporal lobe that responded significantly more to movies of human faces than to movies of everyday objects. Next, using a new stimulus set to investigate face selectivity in this predefined candidate dog face area, we found that this region responded similarly to images of human faces and dog faces, yet significantly more to both human and dog faces than to images of objects. Such face selectivity was not found in dog primary visual cortex. Taken together, these findings: (1) provide the first evidence for a face-selective region in the temporal cortex of dogs, which cannot be explained by simple low-level visual feature extraction; (2) reveal that neural machinery dedicated to face processing is not unique to primates; and (3) may help explain dogs’ exquisite sensitivity to human social cues. PMID:26290784

  5. Single Cell Analysis Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity of Neural Progenitors in the Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew B.; Wang, Peter P.; Atabay, Kutay D.; Murphy, Elisabeth A.; Doan, Ryan N.; Hecht, Jonathan; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex depends for its normal development and size on a precisely controlled balance between self-renewal and differentiation of diverse neural progenitor cells. Specialized progenitors that are common in humans, but virtually absent in rodents, called ‘outer radial glia’ (ORG), have been suggested to be crucial to the evolutionary expansion of the human cortex. We combined progenitor subtype-specific sorting with transcriptome-wide RNA-sequencing to identify genes enriched in human ORG, which included targets of the transcription factor Neurogenin and previously uncharacterized, evolutionarily dynamic long noncoding RNAs. We show that activating the Neurogenin pathway in ferret progenitors promotes delamination and outward migration. Finally, single-cell transcriptional profiling in human, ferret, and mouse revealed more cells co-expressing proneural Neurogenin targets in human compared to other species, suggesting greater neuronal lineage commitment and differentiation of self-renewing progenitors. Thus, we find that the abundance of human ORG is paralleled by increased transcriptional heterogeneity of cortical progenitors. PMID:25734491

  6. Layer-specific chromatin accessibility landscapes reveal regulatory networks in adult mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lucas T; Yao, Zizhen; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Zeng, Hongkui; Tasic, Bosiljka

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cortex is a laminar structure, with each layer composed of a characteristic set of cell types with different morphological, electrophysiological, and connectional properties. Here, we define chromatin accessibility landscapes of major, layer-specific excitatory classes of neurons, and compare them to each other and to inhibitory cortical neurons using the Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq). We identify a large number of layer-specific accessible sites, and significant association with genes that are expressed in specific cortical layers. Integration of these data with layer-specific transcriptomic profiles and transcription factor binding motifs enabled us to construct a regulatory network revealing potential key layer-specific regulators, including Cux1/2, Foxp2, Nfia, Pou3f2, and Rorb. This dataset is a valuable resource for identifying candidate layer-specific cis-regulatory elements in adult mouse cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21883.001 PMID:28112643

  7. Unilateral suppression of pharyngeal motor cortex to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals functional asymmetry in the hemispheric projections to human swallowing.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Satish; Verin, Eric; Singh, Salil; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Thompson, David G; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2007-12-01

    Inhibitory patterns of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) were applied to pharyngeal motor cortex in order to establish its role in modulating swallowing activity and provide evidence for functionally relevant hemispheric asymmetry. Healthy volunteers underwent single pulse TMS before and for 60 min after differing intensities of 1 Hz rTMS (n = 9, 6 male, 3 female, mean age 34 +/- 3 years) or theta burst stimulation (TBS) (n = 9, 6 male, 3 female, mean age 37 +/- 4 years). Electromyographic responses recorded from pharynx and hand were used as a measure of cortico-motor pathway excitability. Swallowing behaviour was then examined with a reaction time protocol, before and for up to 60 min after the most effective inhibitory protocol (1 Hz) applied to each hemisphere. Interventions were conducted on separate days and compared to sham using ANOVA. Only high intensity 1 Hz rTMS consistently suppressed pharyngeal motor cortex immediately and for up to 45 min (-34 +/- 7%, P < or = 0.001). Adjacent hand and contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex showed no change in response (-15 +/- 12%, P = 0.14 and 15 +/- 12%, P = 0.45, respectively). When used to unilaterally disrupt each hemisphere, rTMS to pharyngeal motor cortex with the stronger responses altered normal (-12 +/- 3%, P < or = 0.001) and fast (-9 +/- 4%, P < or = 0.009) swallow times, not seen following rTMS to the contralateral cortex or after sham. Thus, suppression of pharyngeal motor cortex to rTMS is intensity and frequency dependent, which when applied to each hemisphere reveals functionally relevant asymmetry in the motor control of human swallowing.

  8. The Iron Supplementation Dose for Perinatal Iron Deficiency Differentially Alters the Neurochemistry of Frontal Cortex and Hippocampus in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Tkac, Ivan; Unger, Erica L.; Ennis, Kathleen; Hurst, Amy; Schallert, Timothy; Connor, James; Felt, Barbara; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term prefrontal cortex and hippocampus-based cognitive deficits are the sequelae of perinatal iron deficiency, despite iron supplementation starting in the newborn period. Whether high dose iron supplementation prevents these deficits is not known. Methods Perinatal iron deficiency was induced in rat pups using low-iron (3 mg/kg diet) diet during gestation until postnatal day (P) 8. Iron was supplemented using standard (40 mg/kg diet) or 10-fold higher (400 mg/kg diet) iron-containing diet until P21. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampal neurochemistry was determined using in vivo 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 9.4 tesla on P90. Results Both iron supplementation doses corrected anemia and brain iron deficiency by P21. The neurochemical profile of the prefrontal cortex in both supplementation groups was comparable to the control group. In the hippocampus, standard-dose iron supplementation resulted in lower N-acetylaspartate and phosphoethanolamine, and higher N-acetylaspartylglutamate and glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine concentrations. High-dose iron supplementation resulted in lower phosphoethanolamine and higher glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine concentrations. Conclusions The iron supplementation dose for perinatal iron deficiency differentially alters the neurochemical profile of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in adulthood. The neurochemical changes suggest altered glutamatergic neurotransmission, hypomyelination and abnormal phospholipid metabolism in the formerly iron-deficient hippocampus. PMID:23095980

  9. GABA and GABA receptors alterations in the primary visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Bi, Ai-Ling; Xu, Chao-Li; Ye, Xiang; Chen, Mei-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Jun-Guo; Jiang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Bi, Hong-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Until recently most researches on myopia mechanisms have mainly been focused on the eye ball and few investigations were explored on the upper visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. The roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the retinal and in the upper visual pathway are inter-correlated. As the retinal glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABA, and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors increased during the concave lens induced myopia formation, however, whether GABA alterations also occurred in the visual cortex during the concave lens induction is still unknown. In the present study, using HPLC, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Real-Time Quantitative-PCR (RT-PCR) methods, we observed the changing trends of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA receptors in the visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic guinea pigs. Similar to the changing patterns of retinal GABA, the concentrations of GAD, GABA and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors in the visual cortex also increased. These results indicate that the exploration on myopia mechanisms should possibly be investigated on the whole visual pathway and the detailed significance of cortical GABA alterations needs further investigation.

  10. Structural and Functional Alterations in Right Dorsomedial Prefrontal and Left Insular Cortex Co-Localize in Adolescents with Aggressive Behaviour: An ALE Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raschle, Nora Maria; Menks, Willeke Martine; Fehlbaum, Lynn Valérie; Tshomba, Ebongo; Stadler, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour (AB) is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities in processes subserving emotion processing and regulation. However, most neuroimaging studies on AB to date only contain relatively small sample sizes. To objectively investigate the consistency of previous structural and functional research in adolescent AB, we performed a systematic literature review and two coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses on eight VBM and nine functional neuroimaging studies in a total of 783 participants (408 [224AB/184 controls] and 375 [215 AB/160 controls] for structural and functional analysis respectively). We found 19 structural and eight functional foci of significant alterations in adolescents with AB, mainly located within the emotion processing and regulation network (including orbitofrontal, dorsomedial prefrontal and limbic cortex). A subsequent conjunction analysis revealed that functional and structural alterations co-localize in right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and left insula. Our results are in line with meta-analytic work as well as structural, functional and connectivity findings to date, all of which make a strong point for the involvement of a network of brain areas responsible for emotion processing and regulation, which is disrupted in AB. Increased knowledge about the behavioural and neuronal underpinnings of AB is crucial for the development of novel and implementation of existing treatment strategies. Longitudinal research studies will have to show whether the observed alterations are a result or primary cause of the phenotypic characteristics in AB. PMID:26339798

  11. Structural and Functional Alterations in Right Dorsomedial Prefrontal and Left Insular Cortex Co-Localize in Adolescents with Aggressive Behaviour: An ALE Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Nora Maria; Menks, Willeke Martine; Fehlbaum, Lynn Valérie; Tshomba, Ebongo; Stadler, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour (AB) is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities in processes subserving emotion processing and regulation. However, most neuroimaging studies on AB to date only contain relatively small sample sizes. To objectively investigate the consistency of previous structural and functional research in adolescent AB, we performed a systematic literature review and two coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses on eight VBM and nine functional neuroimaging studies in a total of 783 participants (408 [224AB/184 controls] and 375 [215 AB/160 controls] for structural and functional analysis respectively). We found 19 structural and eight functional foci of significant alterations in adolescents with AB, mainly located within the emotion processing and regulation network (including orbitofrontal, dorsomedial prefrontal and limbic cortex). A subsequent conjunction analysis revealed that functional and structural alterations co-localize in right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and left insula. Our results are in line with meta-analytic work as well as structural, functional and connectivity findings to date, all of which make a strong point for the involvement of a network of brain areas responsible for emotion processing and regulation, which is disrupted in AB. Increased knowledge about the behavioural and neuronal underpinnings of AB is crucial for the development of novel and implementation of existing treatment strategies. Longitudinal research studies will have to show whether the observed alterations are a result or primary cause of the phenotypic characteristics in AB.

  12. Molecularly Defined Circuitry Reveals Input-Output Segregation in Deep Layers of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sürmeli, Gülşen; Marcu, Daniel Cosmin; McClure, Christina; Garden, Derek L F; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-12-02

    Deep layers of the medial entorhinal cortex are considered to relay signals from the hippocampus to other brain structures, but pathways for routing of signals to and from the deep layers are not well established. Delineating these pathways is important for a circuit level understanding of spatial cognition and memory. We find that neurons in layers 5a and 5b have distinct molecular identities, defined by the transcription factors Etv1 and Ctip2, and divergent targets, with extensive intratelencephalic projections originating in layer 5a, but not 5b. This segregation of outputs is mirrored by the organization of glutamatergic input from stellate cells in layer 2 and from the hippocampus, with both preferentially targeting layer 5b over 5a. Our results suggest a molecular and anatomical organization of input-output computations in deep layers of the MEC, reveal precise translaminar microcircuitry, and identify molecularly defined pathways for spatial signals to influence computation in deep layers.

  13. Natural grouping of neural responses reveals spatially segregated clusters in prearcuate cortex.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Roozbeh; Cueva, Christopher J; Reppas, John B; Peixoto, Diogo; Ryu, Stephen I; Newsome, William T

    2015-03-18

    A fundamental challenge in studying the frontal lobe is to parcellate this cortex into "natural" functional modules despite the absence of topographic maps, which are so helpful in primary sensory areas. Here we show that unsupervised clustering algorithms, applied to 96-channel array recordings from prearcuate gyrus, reveal spatially segregated subnetworks that remain stable across behavioral contexts. Looking for natural groupings of neurons based on response similarities, we discovered that the recorded area includes at least two spatially segregated subnetworks that differentially represent behavioral choice and reaction time. Importantly, these subnetworks are detectable during different behavioral states and, surprisingly, are defined better by "common noise" than task-evoked responses. Our parcellation process works well on "spontaneous" neural activity, and thus bears strong resemblance to the identification of "resting-state" networks in fMRI data sets. Our results demonstrate a powerful new tool for identifying cortical subnetworks by objective classification of simultaneously recorded electrophysiological activity.

  14. Repeated phencyclidine administration alters glutamate release and decreases GABA markers in the prefrontal cortex of rats

    PubMed Central

    Amitai, Nurith; Kuczenski, Ronald; Behrens, M. Margarita; Markou, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration induces cognitive disruptions resembling those seen in schizophrenia. Alterations in glutamate transmission and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been implicated in these PCP-induced deficits, as well as in cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. PCP-induced cognitive deficits are reversed by chronic treatment with the atypical antipsychotic clozapine in rats. We investigated the effects of a single injection vs. repeated administration of PCP on glutamate levels in the PFC using in vivo microdialysis. Furthermore, we examined how these PCP regimens affect GABA neuronal markers in the PFC. Finally, we investigated the effects of clozapine on disruptions in glutamate levels and GABA neuronal markers induced by repeated PCP administration. Acute PCP administration (2 mg/kg) increased extracellular PFC glutamate; this increase appeared blunted, but was not eliminated, after repeated PCP pretreatment. PCP administration also strongly decreased levels of parvalbumin and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (two markers of GABA function) in the PFC, an effect that was maintained after a 10 day drug-free washout period and unaltered by the resumption of repeated PCP injections. All of the observed PCP effects were attenuated by chronic treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic that has partial effectiveness on cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that abnormal cortical glutamate transmission, possibly driven by pathological changes in GABA function in parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons, may underlie some of the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. A better understanding of glutamate and GABA dysregulation in schizophrenia may uncover new treatment targets for schizophrenia-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:21238466

  15. Speech training alters tone frequency tuning in rat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Perez, Claudia A; Carraway, Ryan S; Chang, Kevin Q; Roland, Jarod L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2013-10-24

    Previous studies in both humans and animals have documented improved performance following discrimination training. This enhanced performance is often associated with cortical response changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term speech training on multiple tasks can improve primary auditory cortex (A1) responses compared to rats trained on a single speech discrimination task or experimentally naïve rats. Specifically, we compared the percent of A1 responding to trained sounds, the responses to both trained and untrained sounds, receptive field properties of A1 neurons, and the neural discrimination of pairs of speech sounds in speech trained and naïve rats. Speech training led to accurate discrimination of consonant and vowel sounds, but did not enhance A1 response strength or the neural discrimination of these sounds. Speech training altered tone responses in rats trained on six speech discrimination tasks but not in rats trained on a single speech discrimination task. Extensive speech training resulted in broader frequency tuning, shorter onset latencies, a decreased driven response to tones, and caused a shift in the frequency map to favor tones in the range where speech sounds are the loudest. Both the number of trained tasks and the number of days of training strongly predict the percent of A1 responding to a low frequency tone. Rats trained on a single speech discrimination task performed less accurately than rats trained on multiple tasks and did not exhibit A1 response changes. Our results indicate that extensive speech training can reorganize the A1 frequency map, which may have downstream consequences on speech sound processing.

  16. Speech training alters tone frequency tuning in rat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Perez, Claudia A; Carraway, Ryan S; Chang, Kevin Q; Roland, Jarod L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in both humans and animals have documented improved performance following discrimination training. This enhanced performance is often associated with cortical response changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term speech training on multiple tasks can improve primary auditory cortex (A1) responses compared to rats trained on a single speech discrimination task or experimentally naïve rats. Specifically, we compared the percent of A1 responding to trained sounds, the responses to both trained and untrained sounds, receptive field properties of A1 neurons, and the neural discrimination of pairs of speech sounds in speech trained and naïve rats. Speech training led to accurate discrimination of consonant and vowel sounds, but did not enhance A1 response strength or the neural discrimination of these sounds. Speech training altered tone responses in rats trained on six speech discrimination tasks but not in rats trained on a single speech discrimination task. Extensive speech training resulted in broader frequency tuning, shorter onset latencies, a decreased driven response to tones, and caused a shift in the frequency map to favor tones in the range where speech sounds are the loudest. Both the number of trained tasks and the number of days of training strongly predict the percent of A1 responding to a low frequency tone. Rats trained on a single speech discrimination task performed less accurately than rats trained on multiple tasks and did not exhibit A1 response changes. Our results indicate that extensive speech training can reorganize the A1 frequency map, which may have downstream consequences on speech sound processing. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Speech training alters tone frequency tuning in rat primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Perez, Claudia A.; Carraway, Ryan S.; Chang, Kevin Q.; Roland, Jarod L.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in both humans and animals have documented improved performance following discrimination training. This enhanced performance is often associated with cortical response changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term speech training on multiple tasks can improve primary auditory cortex (A1) responses compared to rats trained on a single speech discrimination task or experimentally naïve rats. Specifically, we compared the percent of A1 responding to trained sounds, the responses to both trained and untrained sounds, receptive field properties of A1 neurons, and the neural discrimination of pairs of speech sounds in speech trained and naïve rats. Speech training led to accurate discrimination of consonant and vowel sounds, but did not enhance A1 response strength or the neural discrimination of these sounds. Speech training altered tone responses in rats trained on six speech discrimination tasks but not in rats trained on a single speech discrimination task. Extensive speech training resulted in broader frequency tuning, shorter onset latencies, a decreased driven response to tones, and caused a shift in the frequency map to favor tones in the range where speech sounds are the loudest. Both the number of trained tasks and the number of days of training strongly predict the percent of A1 responding to a low frequency tone. Rats trained on a single speech discrimination task performed less accurately than rats trained on multiple tasks and did not exhibit A1 response changes. Our results indicate that extensive speech training can reorganize the A1 frequency map, which may have downstream consequences on speech sound processing. PMID:24344364

  18. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the calcium dynamics of cultured entorhinal cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fen-Lan; Yang, Nian; He, Chao; Li, Hong-Li; Li, Chao; Chen, Fang; Xiong, Jia-Xiang; Hu, Zhi-An; Zhang, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure affects neuronal dendritic spine density and NMDAR and AMPAR subunit expressions in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Although calcium signaling has a critical role in control of EC neuronal functions, however, it is still unclear whether the ELF-EMF exposure affects the EC neuronal calcium homeostasis. In the present study, using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging, we record the whole-cell inward currents that contain the voltage-gated calcium currents and show that ELF-EMF (50Hz, 1mT or 3mT, lasting 24h) exposure does not influence these currents. Next, we specifically isolate the high-voltage activated (HVA) and low-voltage activated (LVA) calcium channels-induced currents. Similarly, the activation and inactivation characteristics of these membrane calcium channels are also not influenced by ELF-EMF. Importantly, ELF-EMF exposure reduces the maximum amplitude of the high-K(+)-evoked calcium elevation in EC neurons, which is abolished by thapsigargin, a Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, to empty the intracellular calcium stores of EC neurons. Together, these findings indicate that ELF-EMF exposure specifically influences the intracellular calcium dynamics of cultural EC neurons via a calcium channel-independent mechanism.

  19. MEG auditory evoked fields suggest altered structural/functional asymmetry in primary but not secondary auditory cortex in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reite, Martin; Teale, Peter; Rojas, Donald C; Reite, Erik; Asherin, Ryan; Hernandez, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Objective physiological indices independently characterizing affective and schizophreniform psychoses would contribute to our understanding of the nature of their relationships. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)-based metrics of altered structural/functional asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus have previously been found to characterize schizophrenia at the level of both the primary auditory (AI) and the secondary auditory (AII) cortex. This study examines these markers in patients with bipolar disorder, with the goal of improved understanding of the patterns of brain asymmetry that may independently characterize affective and schizophreniform psychosis. Methods We studied 17 euthymic bipolar subjects and 17 matched controls. Auditory evoked fields were generated by both 40 Hz auditory stimuli eliciting steady state gamma band (SSR), activating the AI cortex, and discrete 1 kHz tone pips, activating the AII cortex. MEG was recorded from the hemisphere contralateral to the ear stimulated using a 37-channel MEG system. Source location estimates were calculated in both left and right hemispheres. Neuroanatomical location estimates for medial Heschl’s gyri were determined from magnetic resonance images for correlation with MEG source locations. Results Bipolar subjects failed to demonstrate normal laterality of SSR AI responses, indicating altered patterns of asymmetry at the level of AI cortex, but demonstrated normal asymmetry of AII responses (right anterior to left). Medial Heschl’s gyri centroids were similarly lateralized in both groups, however (right anterior to left), dissociating function from structure in the AI cortex in the bipolar group. Conclusions The findings are compatible with altered functional/structural relationships, including diminished left-right hemisphere asymmetry of the AI, but not the AII cortex in bipolar disorder. In schizophrenia, both the AI and AII cortices exhibit such derangements; thus, the findings support both

  20. MEG auditory evoked fields suggest altered structural/functional asymmetry in primary but not secondary auditory cortex in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Reite, Martin; Teale, Peter; Rojas, Donald C; Reite, Erik; Asherin, Ryan; Hernandez, Olivia

    2009-06-01

    Objective physiological indices independently characterizing affective and schizophreniform psychoses would contribute to our understanding of the nature of their relationships. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)-based metrics of altered structural/functional asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus have previously been found to characterize schizophrenia at the level of both the primary auditory (AI) and the secondary auditory (AII) cortex. This study examines these markers in patients with bipolar disorder, with the goal of improved understanding of the patterns of brain asymmetry that may independently characterize affective and schizophreniform psychosis. We studied 17 euthymic bipolar subjects and 17 matched controls. Auditory evoked fields were generated by both 40 Hz auditory stimuli eliciting steady state gamma band (SSR), activating the AI cortex, and discrete 1 kHz tone pips, activating the AII cortex. MEG was recorded from the hemisphere contralateral to the ear stimulated using a 37-channel MEG system. Source location estimates were calculated in both left and right hemispheres. Neuroanatomical location estimates for medial Heschl's gyri were determined from magnetic resonance images for correlation with MEG source locations. Bipolar subjects failed to demonstrate normal laterality of SSR AI responses, indicating altered patterns of asymmetry at the level of AI cortex, but demonstrated normal asymmetry of AII responses (right anterior to left). Medial Heschl's gyri centroids were similarly lateralized in both groups, however (right anterior to left), dissociating function from structure in the AI cortex in the bipolar group. The findings are compatible with altered functional/structural relationships, including diminished left-right hemisphere asymmetry of the AI, but not the AII cortex in bipolar disorder. In schizophrenia, both the AI and AII cortices exhibit such derangements; thus, the findings support both shared and nonshared features of auditory

  1. Altered structural and functional connectivity between the bilateral primary motor cortex in unilateral subcortical stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuang-Shi; Ning, Yan-Zhe; Fu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Han, Xiao; Cui, Fang-Yuan; Ren, Yi; Zou, Yi-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A large number of functional imaging studies have focused on the understanding of motor-related neural activities after ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge is still limited in the structural and functional changes of the interhemispheric connections of the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1s) and their potential influence on motor function recovery following stroke. Twenty-four stroke patients with right hemispheric subcortical infarcts and 25 control subjects were recruited to undergo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Structural impairments between the bilateral M1s were measured by fractional anisotropy. Functional changes of the bilateral M1s were assessed via M1-M1 resting-state functional connectivity. Task-evoked activation analysis was applied to identify the roles of the bilateral hemispheres in motor function recovery. Compared with control subjects, unilateral subcortical stroke patients revealed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity between the bilateral M1s. Stroke patients also revealed higher activations in multiple brain regions in both hemispheres and that more regions were located in the contralesional hemisphere. This study increased our understanding of the structural and functional alterations between the bilateral M1s that occur in unilateral subcortical stroke and provided further evidence for the compensatory role played by the contralesional hemisphere for these alterations during motor function recovery. PMID:27495109

  2. Altering expectancy dampens neural response to aversive taste in primary taste cortex.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Jack B; Dixon, Gregory E; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros; Short, Sarah J; Cohen, Jonathan D; Smith, Edward E; Kosslyn, Stephen M; Rose, Robert M; Davidson, Richard J

    2006-03-01

    The primary taste cortex consists of the insula and operculum. Previous work has indicated that neurons in the primary taste cortex respond solely to sensory input from taste receptors and lingual somatosensory receptors. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show here that expectancy modulates these neural responses in humans. When subjects were led to believe that a highly aversive bitter taste would be less distasteful than it actually was, they reported it to be less aversive than when they had accurate information about the taste and, moreover, the primary taste cortex was less strongly activated. In addition, the activation of the right insula and operculum tracked online ratings of the aversiveness for each taste. Such expectancy-driven modulation of primary sensory cortex may affect perceptions of external events.

  3. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling Reveals Differential Functional Connectivity of the Medial and Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L.; Glahn, David C.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Laird, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  4. Cannabis use and brain structural alterations of the cingulate cortex in early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Charlotte; Walter, Anna; Studerus, Erich; Bugra, Hilal; Tamagni, Corinne; Röthlisberger, Michel; Borgwardt, Stefan; Aston, Jacqueline; Riecher-Rössler, Anita

    2013-11-30

    As cannabis use is more frequent in patients with psychosis than in the general population and is known to be a risk factor for psychosis, the question arises whether cannabis contributes to recently detected brain volume reductions in schizophrenic psychoses. This study is the first to investigate how cannabis use is related to the cingulum volume, a brain region involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, in a sample of both at-risk mental state (ARMS) and first episode psychosis (FEP) subjects. A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of manually traced cingulum in 23 FEP and 37 ARMS subjects was performed. Cannabis use was assessed with the Basel Interview for Psychosis. By using repeated measures analyses of covariance, we investigated whether current cannabis use is associated with the cingulum volume, correcting for age, gender, alcohol consumption, whole brain volume and antipsychotic medication. There was a significant three-way interaction between region (anterior/posterior cingulum), hemisphere (left/right cingulum) and cannabis use (yes/no). Post-hoc analyses revealed that this was due to a significant negative effect of cannabis use on the volume of the posterior cingulum which was independent of the hemisphere and diagnostic group and all other covariates we controlled for. In the anterior cingulum, we found a significant negative effect only for the left hemisphere, which was again independent of the diagnostic group. Overall, we found negative associations of current cannabis use with grey matter volume of the cingulate cortex, a region rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors. As this finding has not been consistently found in healthy controls, it might suggest that both ARMS and FEP subjects are particularly sensitive to exogenous activation of these receptors. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations of muscarinic and GABA receptor binding in the posterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Newell, Kelly A; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Jew, Stephen Kum; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2007-01-30

    The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a key component of the limbic system, has been implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia because of its sensitivity to NMDA receptor antagonists. Recent studies have shown that the PCC is dysfunctional in schizophrenia, and it is now suspected to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Studies also suggest that there are abnormalities in muscarinic and GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Therefore, in the present study we used quantitative autoradiography to investigate the binding of [(3)H]pirenzepine, [(3)H]AF-DX 384 and [(3)H]muscimol, which respectively label M1/4 and M2/4 muscarinic and GABA(A) receptors, in the PCC of schizophrenia and control subjects matched for age and post-mortem interval. The present study found that [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was significantly decreased in the superficial (-24%, p=0.002) and deep (-35%, p<0.001) layers of the PCC in the schizophrenia group as compared with the control group. In contrast, a dramatic increase in [(3)H]muscimol binding was observed in the superficial (+112%, p=0.001) and deep layers (+100%, p=0.017) of the PCC in the schizophrenia group. No difference was observed for [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding between the schizophrenia and control groups. The authors found a significant inverse correlation between [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in the deep cortical layers and [(3)H]muscimol binding in the superficial layers (rho=-0.732, p=0.003). In addition, negative correlations were also found between age and [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in both superficial and deep cortical layers (rho=-0.669 p=0.049 and rho=-0.778, p=0.014), and between age of schizophrenia onset and [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding (rho=-0.798, p=0.018). These results for the first time demonstrated the status of M1/M4, M2/M4 and GABA(A) receptors in the PCC in schizophrenia. Whilst the exact mechanism causing these alterations is not yet known, a possible increased acetylcholine and down regulated

  6. Multivariate pattern analysis of the human medial temporal lobe revealed representationally categorical cortex and representationally agnostic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Derek J; Stark, Craig E L

    2014-11-01

    Contemporary theories of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) suggest that there are functional differences between the MTL cortex and the hippocampus. High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate pattern analysis were utilized to study whether MTL subregions could classify categories of images, with the hypothesis that the hippocampus would be less representationally categorical than the MTL cortex. Results revealed significant classification accuracy for faces versus objects and faces versus scenes in MTL cortical regions-parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and perirhinal cortex (PRC)-with little evidence for category discrimination in the hippocampus. MTL cortical regions showed significantly greater classification accuracy than the hippocampus. The hippocampus showed significant classification accuracy for images compared to a nonmnemonic baseline task, suggesting that it responded to the images. Classification accuracy in a region of interest encompassing retrosplenial cortex (RSC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) posterior to RSC, showed a similar pattern of results to PHC, supporting the hypothesis that these regions are functionally related. The results suggest that PHC, PRC, and RSC/PCC are representationally categorical and the hippocampus is more representationally agnostic, which is concordant with the hypothesis of the role of the hippocampus in pattern separation.

  7. Prenatal stress alters the behavior and dendritic morphology of the medial orbitofrontal cortex in mouse offspring during lactation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Cristian; Pascual, Rodrigo; Bustamante, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown that prenatal stress alters neuronal dendritic development in the prefrontal cortex, together with behavioral disturbances (anxiety). Nevertheless, neither whether these alterations are present during the lactation period, nor whether such findings may reflect the onset of anxiety disorders observed in childhood and adulthood has been studied. The central aim of the present study was to determine the effects of prenatal stress on the neuronal development and behavior of mice offspring during lactation (postnatal days 14 and 21). We studied 24 CF-1 male mice, grouped as follows: (i) control P14 (n=6), (ii) stressed P14 (n=6), (iii) control P21 (n=6) and (iv) stressed P21 (n=6). On the corresponding days, animals were evaluated with the open field test and sacrificed. Their brains were then stained in Golgi-Cox solution for 30 days. The morphological analysis dealt with the study of 96 pyramidal neurons. The results showed, first, that prenatal stress resulted in a significant (i) decrease in the apical dendritic length of pyramidal neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex at postnatal day 14, (ii) increase in the apical dendritic length of pyramidal neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex at postnatal day 21, and (iii) reduction in exploratory behavior at postnatal day 14 and 21.

  8. Glutamate binding is altered in hippocampus and cortex of Wistar rats after pilocarpine-induced Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Mortari, Márcia Renata; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira

    2007-08-31

    Several evidences have pointed to biochemical alterations in some brain structures after experimental Status Epilepticus (SE). Thus, the effects of pilocarpine-induced SE on the glutamate binding in the hippocampus and cortex of Wistar rats were evaluated. Groups of animals were submitted to a 3h SE induced by intrahippocampal microinjection of pilocarpine, which was interrupted by the administration of sodium thiopental. Two weeks later the animals were sacrificed and had their cerebral cortices and hippocampi removed in order to perform the binding experiments. The results show that the pilocarpine-induced SE provoked an increase in 2.5-fold in the B(max) values for glutamate binding in the cortex, but not in the hippocampus. Moreover, we observed a 4-fold increase for the Kd values in the hippocampus and a 2-fold increase in the cortex. These findings might indicate that the epileptogenesis involves alterations in the glutamate receptors that are not restricted to the limbic system. Moreover, changes in these receptors are not exclusively of number, but rather involve the affinity for their ligands.

  9. Recognition alters the spatial pattern of FMRI activation in early retinotopic cortex.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, P-J; Vul, E; Kanwisher, N

    2010-03-01

    Early retinotopic cortex has traditionally been viewed as containing a veridical representation of the low-level properties of the image, not imbued by high-level interpretation and meaning. Yet several recent results indicate that neural representations in early retinotopic cortex reflect not just the sensory properties of the image, but also the perceived size and brightness of image regions. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging pattern analyses to ask whether the representation of an object in early retinotopic cortex changes when the object is recognized compared with when the same stimulus is presented but not recognized. Our data confirmed this hypothesis: the pattern of response in early retinotopic visual cortex to a two-tone "Mooney" image of an object was more similar to the response to the full grayscale photo version of the same image when observers knew what the two-tone image represented than when they did not. Further, in a second experiment, high-level interpretations actually overrode bottom-up stimulus information, such that the pattern of response in early retinotopic cortex to an identified two-tone image was more similar to the response to the photographic version of that stimulus than it was to the response to the identical two-tone image when it was not identified. Our findings are consistent with prior results indicating that perceived size and brightness affect representations in early retinotopic visual cortex and, further, show that even higher-level information--knowledge of object identity--also affects the representation of an object in early retinotopic cortex.

  10. [Retinotopic representations of human visual cortex revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-ting; Tang, Wei-jun; Qian, Jiang; Sun, Xing-huai

    2007-12-01

    To establish a set of methodological standard of retinotopic mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to discuss anatomical features of functionally delineated V1/V2 boundary based on retinotopic criteria. Three adults aged 25-30 (1 male and 2 females), right-handed, without contraindications of MRI were studied. Visual acuity was 20/20 or corrected to 20/20. Visual stimuli subtended a field of view of approximately 12 degrees, consisted of high contrast, achromatic and drifting checkerboards. Two types of stimuli were used: the rotating wedge, either clockwise or counterclockwise, to map the polar angle and the annular ring, either contracting or expanding, to map eccentricity. MRI parameters: GE signa VH/i 3.0T scanner. Functional data: GRE-EPI sequence, 20 slices lay perpendicular to the calcarine sulcus, TR: 2 s, TE: 40 ms, FA: 90 degrees, Phase: 128, FOV: 19 cm, matrix: 64x64, slice: 3 mm, gap: 0, resolution: 2.9 mmx2.9 mmx3.0 mm. Anatomical data was obtained using 3D-SPGR sequence to acquire high resolution. Data was analyzed using AFNI. In order to avoid the disadvantages of restricted view due to highly convoluted occipital cortex, cortical surface was unfolded and then cut and flattened. Functional data was presented to this flattened surface and subsequently analyzed. By using the phase-encoded visual stimuli, retinotopic organizations were exactly revealed both in the eccentricity and polar angle dimensions. Eccentricity maps showed that foveal representation lay in the occipital poles and the representation appeared further anterior as eccentricity increased. Polar angle maps showed that early retinotopically organized areas had either a mirror or non-mirror image representation of visual field. Boundaries of different visual areas were manually delineated based on retinotopic criteria called visual field sign, and the functionally delineated V1/V2 boundary located on the crests of gyrus. Phase-encoded stimuli is validated to be an

  11. Functional organization of motor cortex of adult macaque monkeys is altered by sensory loss in infancy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Jain, Neeraj; Collins, Christine E; Lyon, David C; Kaas, Jon H

    2010-02-16

    When somatosensory cortex (S1) is deprived of some of its inputs after section of ascending afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, it reorganizes to overrepresent the surviving inputs. As somatosensory cortex provides guiding sensory information to motor cortex, such sensory loss and representational reorganization could affect the development of the motor map in primary motor cortex (M1), especially if the sensory loss occurs early in development. To address this possibility, the dorsal columns of the spinal cord were sectioned between cervical levels (C3-5) 3-12 days after birth in five macaque monkeys. After 3-5 years of maturation (young adults), we determined how movements were represented in M1 contralateral to the lesion by using microelectrodes to electrically stimulate sites in M1 to evoke movements. Although the details of the motor maps in these five monkeys varied, the forelimb motor maps were abnormal. The representations of digit movements were reduced and abnormally arranged. Current levels for evoking movements from the forelimb region of M1 were in the normal range, but the lowest mean stimulation thresholds were for wrist or elbow instead of digit movements. Incomplete lesions and bilateral lesions produced fewer abnormalities. The results suggest that the development of normal motor cortex maps in M1 depends on sensory feedback from somatosensory maps.

  12. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Aaron A; Clark, Benjamin J; Demecha, Alexis J; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M; McNaughton, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas.

  13. Alterations of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juanita; Karadayian, Analia G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been known to affect various behavioral parameters in experimental animals, even several hours after ethanol (EtOH) is absent from blood circulation, in the period known as hangover. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute ethanol hangover on motor performance in association with the brain cortex energetic metabolism. Evaluation of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during alcohol hangover was performed in mice 6 hours after a high ethanol dose (hangover onset). Animals were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Ethanol hangover group showed a bad motor performance compared with control animals (p < .05). Oxygen uptake in brain cortex mitochondria from hangover animals showed a 34% decrease in the respiratory control rate as compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complex activities were decreased being the complex I-III the less affected by the hangover condition; complex II-III was markedly decreased by ethanol hangover showing 50% less activity than controls. Complex IV was 42% decreased as compared with control animals. Hydrogen peroxide production was 51% increased in brain cortex mitochondria from the hangover group, as compared with the control animals. Quantification of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential indicated that ethanol injected animals presented 17% less ability to maintain the polarized condition as compared with controls. These results indicate that a clear decrease in proton motive force occurs in brain cortex mitochondria during hangover conditions. We can conclude that a decreased motor performance observed in the hangover group of animals could be associated with brain cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting impairment of its energetic metabolism.

  14. Functionally independent columns of rat somatosensory barrel cortex revealed with voltage-sensitive dye imaging.

    PubMed

    Petersen, C C; Sakmann, B

    2001-11-01

    Whisker movement is somatotopically represented in rodent neocortex by electrical activity in clearly defined barrels, which can be visualized in living brain slices. The functional architecture of this part of the cortex can thus be mapped in vitro with respect to its physiological input and compared with its anatomical architecture. The spatial extent of excitation was measured at high temporal resolution by imaging optical signals from voltage-sensitive dye evoked by stimulation of individual barrels in layer 4. The optical signals correlated closely with subthreshold EPSPs recorded simultaneously from excitatory neurons in layer 4 and layer 2/3, respectively. Excitation was initially (<2 msec) limited to the stimulated barrel and subsequently (>3 msec) spread in a columnar manner into layer 2/3 and then subsided in both layers after approximately 50 msec. The lateral extent of the response was limited to the cortical column defined structurally by the barrel in layer 4. Two experimental interventions increased the spread of excitation. First, blocking GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition caused excitation to spread laterally throughout wide regions of layer 2/3 and layer 5 but not into neighboring barrels, suggesting that the local excitatory connections within layer 4 are restricted to single barrels and that inhibitory neurons control spread in supragranular and infragranular layers. Second, NMDA receptor-dependent increase of the spread of excitation was induced by pairing repetitive stimulation of a barrel column with coincident stimulation of layer 2/3 in a neighboring column. Such plasticity in the spatial extent of excitation in a barrel column could underlie changes in cortical map structure induced by alterations of sensory experience.

  15. Natural grouping of neural responses reveals spatially segregated clusters in prearcuate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Roozbeh; Cueva, Christopher J.; Reppas, John B.; Peixoto, Diogo; Ryu, Stephen I.; Newsome, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A fundamental challenge in studying the frontal lobe is to parcellate this cortex into ‘natural’ functional modules despite the absence of topographic maps, which are so helpful in primary sensory areas. Here we show that unsupervised clustering algorithms, applied to 96-channel array recordings from prearcuate gyrus, reveal spatially segregated sub-networks that remain stable across behavioral contexts. Looking for natural groupings of neurons based on response similarities, we discovered that the recorded area includes at least two spatially segregated sub-networks that differentially represent behavioral choice and reaction time. Importantly, these sub-networks are detectable during different behavioral states, and surprisingly, are defined better by ‘common noise’ than task-evoked responses. Our parcellation process works well on ‘spontaneous’ neural activity, and thus bears strong resemblance to the identification of ‘resting state’ networks in fMRI datasets. Our results demonstrate a powerful new tool for identifying cortical sub-networks by objective classification of simultaneously recorded electrophysiological activity. PMID:25728571

  16. Spatiotemporal receptive fields of barrel cortex revealed by reverse correlation of synaptic input.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Alejandro; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A; Merel, Josh; Paninski, Liam; Miller, Kenneth D; Bruno, Randy M

    2014-06-01

    Of all of the sensory areas, barrel cortex is among the best understood in terms of circuitry, yet least understood in terms of sensory function. We combined intracellular recording in rats with a multi-directional, multi-whisker stimulator system to estimate receptive fields by reverse correlation of stimuli to synaptic inputs. Spatiotemporal receptive fields were identified orders of magnitude faster than by conventional spike-based approaches, even for neurons with little spiking activity. Given a suitable stimulus representation, a linear model captured the stimulus-response relationship for all neurons with high accuracy. In contrast with conventional single-whisker stimuli, complex stimuli revealed markedly sharpened receptive fields, largely as a result of adaptation. This phenomenon allowed the surround to facilitate rather than to suppress responses to the principal whisker. Optimized stimuli enhanced firing in layers 4-6, but not in layers 2/3, which remained sparsely active. Surround facilitation through adaptation may be required for discriminating complex shapes and textures during natural sensing.

  17. Multivariate synaptic and behavioral profiling reveals new developmental endophenotypes in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Iafrati, Jillian; Malvache, Arnaud; Gonzalez Campo, Cecilia; Orejarena, M. Juliana; Lassalle, Olivier; Bouamrane, Lamine; Chavis, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    The postnatal maturation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) represents a period of increased vulnerability to risk factors and emergence of neuropsychiatric disorders. To disambiguate the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to these disorders, we revisited the endophenotype approach from a developmental viewpoint. The extracellular matrix protein reelin which contributes to cellular and network plasticity, is a risk factor for several psychiatric diseases. We mapped the aggregate effect of the RELN risk allele on postnatal development of PFC functions by cross-sectional synaptic and behavioral analysis of reelin-haploinsufficient mice. Multivariate analysis of bootstrapped datasets revealed subgroups of phenotypic traits specific to each maturational epoch. The preeminence of synaptic AMPA/NMDA receptor content to pre-weaning and juvenile endophenotypes shifts to long-term potentiation and memory renewal during adolescence followed by NMDA-GluN2B synaptic content in adulthood. Strikingly, multivariate analysis shows that pharmacological rehabilitation of reelin haploinsufficient dysfunctions is mediated through induction of new endophenotypes rather than reversion to wild-type traits. By delineating previously unknown developmental endophenotypic sequences, we conceived a promising general strategy to disambiguate the molecular underpinnings of complex psychiatric disorders and for the rational design of pharmacotherapies in these disorders. PMID:27765946

  18. Neural assemblies revealed by inferred connectivity-based models of prefrontal cortex recordings.

    PubMed

    Tavoni, G; Cocco, S; Monasson, R

    2016-12-01

    We present two graphical model-based approaches to analyse the distribution of neural activities in the prefrontal cortex of behaving rats. The first method aims at identifying cell assemblies, groups of synchronously activating neurons possibly representing the units of neural coding and memory. A graphical (Ising) model distribution of snapshots of the neural activities, with an effective connectivity matrix reproducing the correlation statistics, is inferred from multi-electrode recordings, and then simulated in the presence of a virtual external drive, favoring high activity (multi-neuron) configurations. As the drive increases groups of neurons may activate together, and reveal the existence of cell assemblies. The identified groups are then showed to strongly coactivate in the neural spiking data and to be highly specific of the inferred connectivity network, which offers a sparse representation of the correlation pattern across neural cells. The second method relies on the inference of a Generalized Linear Model, in which spiking events are integrated over time by neurons through an effective connectivity matrix. The functional connectivity matrices inferred with the two approaches are compared. Sampling of the inferred GLM distribution allows us to study the spatio-temporal patterns of activation of neurons within the identified cell assemblies, particularly their activation order: the prevalence of one order with respect to the others is weak and reflects the neuron average firing rates and the strength of the largest effective connections. Other properties of the identified cell assemblies (spatial distribution of coactivation events and firing rates of coactivating neurons) are discussed.

  19. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  20. Feedforward and quick recurrent processes in early visual cortex revealed by TMS?

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-07-02

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to occipital cortex to abolish (conscious) perception of visual stimuli. TMS research has revealed several time windows of masking relative to visual stimulus onset, most consistently a time window around 100ms post-stimulus. However, the exact nature of visual processing in this 'classical' time window, e.g. whether it represents the feedforward processing of the visual information, or rather a feedback projection from higher visual areas, remains unclear. Here, we used TMS to mask in the same participants two types of stimuli of different complexities (orientation Gratings and Faces) over different time windows. Interestingly, the masking functions were not the same for both stimulus types. We found an earlier peak masking latency for orientation stimuli, and a slower recovery for Faces. In a second, follow-up experiment, we superimposed both types of stimuli to create one composite stimulus set. Depending on the instruction, participants could then perform orientation or face discrimination tasks on the exact same stimuli. In addition, for each participant, stimuli were calibrated to equate task difficulties. The peak masking latency was now identical for both tasks, but the masking function revealed again a slower recovery during the face discrimination task, suggesting top-down (recurrent) effects in the second half of the masking function. Hence, rather than this masking window reflecting either feedforward or feedback processing, the early part of what is traditionally considered one masking window may reflect feedforward processing, while the latter part may already reflect recurrent processing. These findings shed new light on recurrent models of vision and related theoretical accounts of visual awareness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization is associated with alterations to the proteome of the prefrontal cortex: implications for the maintenance of psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Travis A; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Franklin, Jane L; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2015-01-02

    Repeat administration of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine, produces a progressive increase in locomotor activity (behavioral sensitization) in rodents that is believed to represent the underlying neurochemical changes driving psychoses. Alterations to the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are suggested to mediate the etiology and maintenance of these behavioral changes. As such, the aim of the current study was to investigate changes to protein expression in the PFC in male rats sensitized to methamphetamine using quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics. A methamphetamine challenge resulted in a significant sensitized locomotor response in methamphetamine pretreated animals compared to saline controls. Proteomic analysis revealed 96 proteins that were differentially expressed in the PFC of methamphetamine treated rats, with 20% of these being previously implicated in the neurobiology of schizophrenia in the PFC. We identified multiple biological functions in the PFC that appear to be commonly altered across methamphetamine-induced sensitization and schizophrenia, and these include synaptic regulation, protein phosphatase signaling, mitochondrial function, and alterations to the inhibitory GABAergic network. These changes could inform how alterations to the PFC could underlie the cognitive and behavioral dysfunction commonly seen across psychoses and places such biological changes as potential mediators in the maintenance of psychosis vulnerability.

  2. Voltage-sensitive dyes reveal a modular organization in monkey striate cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, Gary G.; Salama, Guy

    1986-06-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes allow neuronal activity to be studied by non-invasive optical techniques. They provide an attractive means of investigating striate cortex, where important response properties are organized in two dimensions. In the present study, patterns of ocular dominance and orientation selectivity were obtained repeatedly from the same patch of cortex using the dye merocyanine oxazolone, together with current image-processing techniques. The patterns observed agree with most established features of monkey striate cortex and suggest a new unit of cortical organization; one that is modular in structure and which appears to link the organization of orientation selectivity with that of ocular dominance.

  3. Alterations in visual cortical activation and connectivity with prefrontal cortex during working memory updating in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Le, Thang M; Borghi, John A; Kujawa, Autumn J; Klein, Daniel N; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2017-01-01

    alterations in activity patterns of the visual association areas, their connectivity with the prefrontal cortex, and their relationship with core clinical characteristics. These results highlight the role of information updating deficits in the cognitive control and symptomatology of depression.

  4. Altered somatosensory barrel cortex refinement in the developing brain of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Moroto, M; Nishimura, A; Morimoto, M; Isoda, K; Morita, T; Yoshida, M; Morioka, S; Tozawa, T; Hasegawa, T; Chiyonobu, T; Yoshimoto, K; Hosoi, H

    2013-11-06

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. In previous studies, monoaminergic dysfunctions have been detected in patients with RTT and in a murine model of RTT, the Mecp2-null mouse. Therefore, the pathogenesis of RTT is thought to involve impairments in the monoaminergic systems. However, there have been limited data showing that the impairment of monoamines leads to early symptoms during development. We used histochemistry to study the somatosensory barrel cortex in the B6.129P2(C)-Mecp2(tm1.1Bird) mouse model of RTT. The barrel cortex is widely used to investigate neuronal development and its regulation by various neurotransmitters including 5-HT. 5-HT levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC), and serotonin transporter (SERT) and 5-HT1B receptor mRNAs were measured in the somatosensory cortex, thalamus and striatum on postnatal days (P) 10, P20 and P40. Mecp2-null mice (Mecp2-/y) had significantly smaller barrel fields than age-matched wild-type controls (Mecp2+/y) on P10 and P40, but the topographic map was accurately formed. Levels of 5-HT, and SERT and 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression in the somatosensory cortex did not differ significantly between the Mecp2-null and wild-type mice on P10. However, thalamic 5-HT was reduced in Mecp2-null mice. Our data indicate that a lack of MeCP2 may disturb the refinement of the barrel cortex in the early postnatal period. Our findings suggest that a decrease in thalamic 5-HT might be involved in this phenomenon.

  5. Renal Medulla is More Sensitive to Cisplatin than Cortex Revealed by Untargeted Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Chen, Jia-Qing; Huang, Wan-Qiu; Li, Wei; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Zun-Jian; Xu, Feng-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity has long been the most severe and life-threatening side-effect of cisplatin, whose anticancer effect is therefore restricted. Previous pathological studies have shown that both renal cortex and medulla could be injured by cisplatin. Our TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling) assay results further uncovered that medulla subjected more severe injury than cortex. In order to depict the underlying metabolic mechanism of spatial difference in response to cisplatin, in the present study, mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics approach was applied to profile renal cortex and medulla metabolites of rat after receiving a single dose of cisplatin (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg). Eventually, 53 and 55 differential metabolites in cortex and medulla were screened out, respectively. Random forest, orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis and metabolic cumulative fold change analysis revealed that metabolic changes in medulla were more obviously dose-dependent than those in cortex, which confirmed the conclusion that medulla was more sensitive to cisplatin exposure. Furthermore, 29 intermediates were recognized as the most contributive metabolites for the sensitivity difference. Metabolic pathways interrupted by cisplatin mainly included amino acid, energy, lipid, pyrimidine, purine, and creatine metabolism. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism study of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:28300186

  6. Sparse representation of HCP grayordinate data reveals novel functional architecture of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Lv, Jinglei; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Shu; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2015-12-01

    The recently publicly released Human Connectome Project (HCP) grayordinate-based fMRI data not only has high spatial and temporal resolution, but also offers group-corresponding fMRI signals across a large population for the first time in the brain imaging field, thus significantly facilitating mapping the functional brain architecture with much higher resolution and in a group-wise fashion. In this article, we adopt the HCP grayordinate task-based fMRI (tfMRI) data to systematically identify and characterize task-based heterogeneous functional regions (THFRs) on cortical surface, i.e., the regions that are activated during multiple tasks conditions and contribute to multiple task-evoked systems during a specific task performance, and to assess the spatial patterns of identified THFRs on cortical gyri and sulci by applying a computational framework of sparse representations of grayordinate brain tfMRI signals. Experimental results demonstrate that both consistent task-evoked networks and intrinsic connectivity networks across all subjects and tasks in HCP grayordinate data are effectively and robustly reconstructed via the proposed sparse representation framework. Moreover, it is found that there are relatively consistent THFRs locating at bilateral parietal lobe, frontal lobe, and visual association cortices across all subjects and tasks. Particularly, those identified THFRs locate significantly more on gyral regions than on sulcal regions. These results based on sparse representation of HCP grayordinate data reveal novel functional architecture of cortical gyri and sulci, and might provide a foundation to better understand functional mechanisms of the human cerebral cortex in the future.

  7. Sparse Representation of HCP Grayordinate Data Reveals Novel Functional Architecture of Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Lv, Jinglei; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Shu; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    The recently publicly released Human Connectome Project (HCP) grayordinate-based fMRI data not only has high spatial and temporal resolution, but also offers group-corresponding fMRI signals across a large population for the first time in the brain imaging field, thus significantly facilitating mapping the functional brain architecture with much higher resolution and in a group-wise fashion. In this paper, we adopt the HCP grayordinate task-based fMRI (tfMRI) data to systematically identify and characterize task-based heterogeneous functional regions (THFRs) on cortical surface, i.e., the regions that are activated during multiple tasks conditions and contribute to multiple task-evoked systems during a specific task performance, and to assess the spatial patterns of identified THFRs on cortical gyri and sulci by applying a computational framework of sparse representations of grayordinate brain tfMRI signals. Experimental results demonstrate that both consistent task-evoked networks and intrinsic connectivity networks across all subjects and tasks in HCP grayordinate data are effectively and robustly reconstructed via the proposed sparse representation framework. Moreover, it is found that there are relatively consistent THFRs locating at bilateral parietal lobe, frontal lobe, and visual association cortices across all subjects and tasks. Particularly, those identified THFRs locate significantly more on gyral regions than on sulcal regions. These results based on sparse representation of HCP grayordinate data reveal novel functional architecture of cortical gyri and sulci, and might provide a foundation to better understand functional mechanisms of the human cerebral cortex in the future. PMID:26466353

  8. Intracranial recordings reveal transient response dynamics during information maintenance in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Noy, Niv; Bickel, Stephan; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Harel, Michal; Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Despite an extensive body of work, it is still not clear how short term maintenance of information is implemented in the human brain. Most prior research has focused on "working memory"-typically involving the storage of a number of items, requiring the use of a phonological loop and focused attention during the delay period between encoding and retrieval. These studies largely support a model of enhanced activity in the delay interval as the central mechanism underlying working memory. However, multi-item working memory constitutes only a subset of storage phenomena that may occur during daily life. A common task in naturalistic situations is short term memory of a single item-for example, blindly reaching to a previously placed cup of coffee. Little is known about such single-item, effortless, storage in the human brain. Here, we examined the dynamics of brain responses during a single-item maintenance task, using intracranial recordings implanted for clinical purpose in patients (ECoG). Our results reveal that active electrodes were dominated by transient short latency visual and motor responses, reflected in broadband high frequency power increases in occipito-temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. Only a very small set of electrodes showed activity during the early part of the delay period. Interestingly, no cortical site displayed a significant activation lasting to the response time. These results suggest that single item encoding is characterized by transient high frequency ECoG responses, while the maintenance of information during the delay period may be mediated by mechanisms necessitating only low-levels of neuronal activations.

  9. Altered functional protein networks in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of victims of suicide.

    PubMed

    Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna; Juhász, Gábor; Simor, Attila; Gulyássy, Péter; Szegő, Eva Mónika; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Eva; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Palkovits, Miklós; Penke, Botond; Czurkó, András

    2012-01-01

    Probing molecular brain mechanisms related to increased suicide risk is an important issue in biological psychiatry research. Gene expression studies on post mortem brains indicate extensive changes prior to a successful suicide attempt; however, proteomic studies are scarce. Thus, we performed a DIGE proteomic analysis of post mortem tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of suicide victims to identify protein changes and biomarker candidates of suicide. Among our matched spots we found 46 and 16 significant differences in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, respectively; by using the industry standard t test and 1.3 fold change as cut off for significance. Because of the risk of false discoveries (FDR) in these data, we also made FDR adjustment by calculating the q-values for all the t tests performed and by using 0.06 and 0.4 as alpha thresholds we reduced the number of significant spots to 27 and 9 respectively. From these we identified 59 proteins in the cortex and 11 proteins in the amygdala. These proteins are related to biological functions and structures such as metabolism, the redox system, the cytoskeleton, synaptic function, and proteolysis. Thirteen of these proteins (CBR1, DPYSL2, EFHD2, FKBP4, GFAP, GLUL, HSPA8, NEFL, NEFM, PGAM1, PRDX6, SELENBP1 and VIM,) have already been suggested to be biomarkers of psychiatric disorders at protein or genome level. We also pointed out 9 proteins that changed in both the amygdala and the cortex, and from these, GFAP, INA, NEFL, NEFM and TUBA1 are interacting cytoskeletal proteins that have a functional connection to glutamate, GABA, and serotonin receptors. Moreover, ACTB, CTSD and GFAP displayed opposite changes in the two examined brain structures that might be a suitable characteristic for brain imaging studies. The opposite changes of ACTB, CTSD and GFAP in the two brain structures were validated by western blot analysis.

  10. Goal-directed attention alters the tuning of object-based representations in extrastriate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anthony J.-W.; Britton, Michael; Turner, Gary R.; Vytlacil, Jason; Thompson, Todd W.; D'Esposito, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Humans survive in environments that contain a vast quantity and variety of visual information. All items of perceived visual information must be represented within a limited number of brain networks. The human brain requires mechanisms for selecting only a relevant fraction of perceived information for more in-depth processing, where neural representations of that information may be actively maintained and utilized for goal-directed behavior. Object-based attention is crucial for goal-directed behavior and yet remains poorly understood. Thus, in the study we investigate how neural representations of visual object information are guided by selective attention. The magnitude of activation in human extrastriate cortex has been shown to be modulated by attention; however, object-based attention is not likely to be fully explained by a localized gain mechanism. Thus, we measured information coded in spatially distributed patterns of brain activity with fMRI while human participants performed a task requiring selective processing of a relevant visual object category that differed across conditions. Using pattern classification and spatial correlation techniques, we found that the direction of selective attention is implemented as a shift in the tuning of object-based information representations within extrastriate cortex. In contrast, we found that representations within lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) coded for the attention condition rather than the concrete representations of object category. In sum, our findings are consistent with a model of object-based selective attention in which representations coded within extrastriate cortex are tuned to favor the representation of goal-relevant information, guided by more abstract representations within lateral PFC. PMID:22737117

  11. Willingness to wait and altered encoding of time-discounted reward in the orbitofrontal cortex with normal aging.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Matthew R; Bryden, Daniel W; Cerri, Domenic H; Haney, Zachary R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2012-04-18

    Normal aging has been associated with cognitive changes, including shifts in responding for time-discounted rewards. The orbitofrontal cortex, an area previously associated with aging-related cognitive changes, is critical for normal discounting. Previously we have shown in a choice task that rats prefer immediate over delayed reward and that neural representations of delayed reward in orbitofrontal cortex were attenuated, whereas immediate reward elicited strong responses. Changes in choice performance were correlated with changes in firing rate in orbitofrontal neurons, suggesting that these reward representations were critical to the rats' ability to wait for reward. Here we asked whether age-dependent changes in discounting behavior were related to changes in the representation of delayed reward in the orbitofrontal cortex. Young (3-6 months) and aged (22-26 months) rats were trained on the same discounting paradigm used previously. We found that aged rats showed less sensitivity to increasing delay preceding reward delivery, shifting behavior away from the delayed reward more slowly than younger rats. This sensitivity was specific to delay, since choice performance did not differ between the two groups when delay was held constant and reward size varied. Aged rats exhibited a corresponding increase in the prevalence of neurons that fired more strongly for delayed reward. Again this change was specific to delay; there was no change in encoding of different-sized rewards. These results suggest that natural aging results in altered representations of reward in orbitofrontal cortex. These changes may relate to the increased ability to delay gratification and reduced impulsivity associated with aging.

  12. Altered temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in the aging human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Neural response adaptation plays an important role in perception and cognition. Here, we used electroencephalography to investigate how aging affects the temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in human auditory cortex. Younger (18-31 years) and older (51-70 years) normal hearing adults listened to tone sequences with varying onset-to-onset intervals. Our results show long-lasting neural adaptation such that the response to a particular tone is a nonlinear function of the extended temporal history of sound events. Most important, aging is associated with multiple changes in auditory cortex; older adults exhibit larger and less variable response magnitudes, a larger dynamic response range, and a reduced sensitivity to temporal context. Computational modeling suggests that reduced adaptation recovery times underlie these changes in the aging auditory cortex and that the extended temporal stimulation has less influence on the neural response to the current sound in older compared with younger individuals. Our human electroencephalography results critically narrow the gap to animal electrophysiology work suggesting a compensatory release from cortical inhibition accompanying hearing loss and aging.

  13. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  14. Primary motor cortex alterations in Alzheimer disease: A study in the 3xTg-AD model.

    PubMed

    Orta-Salazar, E; Feria-Velasco, A I; Díaz-Cintra, S

    2017-04-19

    In humans and animal models, Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterised by accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, neuronal degeneration, and astrocytic gliosis, especially in vulnerable brain regions (hippocampus and cortex). These alterations are associated with cognitive impairment (loss of memory) and non-cognitive impairment (motor impairment). The purpose of this study was to identify cell changes (neurons and glial cells) and aggregation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the primary motor cortex (M1) in 3xTg-AD mouse models at an intermediate stage of AD. We used female 3xTg-AD mice aged 11 months and compared them to non-transgenic mice of the same age. In both groups, we assessed motor performance (open field test) and neuronal damage in M1 using specific markers: BAM10 (extracellular Aβ aggregates), tau 499 (hyperphosphorylated tau protein), GFAP (astrocytes), and Klüver-Barrera staining (neurons). Female 3xTg-AD mice in intermediate stages of the disease displayed motor and cellular alterations associated with Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposition in M1. Patients with AD display signs and symptoms of functional impairment from early stages. According to our results, M1 cell damage in intermediate-stage AD affects motor function, which is linked to progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered functional connectivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Peng, Jing; Nie, Binbin; Gao, Juan; Liu, Jiangtao; Li, Yang; Wang, Gang; Ma, Xin; Li, Kuncheng; Shan, Baoci

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate resting-state functional connectivity alteration of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD). Twenty-two first-episode MDD patients and thirty age-, gender- and education-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled. Rest state functional magnetic resonance images and structure magnetic resonance images were scanned. The functional connectivity analysis was done based on the result of voxel-based morphometry (VBM). And the right DLPFC was chosen as the seed region of interests (ROI), as its gray matter density (GMD) decreased in the MDD patients compared with controls and its GMD values were negative correlation with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores. Compared to healthy controls, the MDD patients showed increased functional connectivity with right the DLPFC in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), thalamus and precentral gyrus. In contrast, there were decreased functional connectivity between the right DLPFC and right parietal lobe. By applying the VBM results to the functional connectivity analysis, the study suggested that abnormality of GMD in right DLPFC might be related to the functional connectivity alteration in the pathophysiology of MDD, which might be useful in further characterizing structure-function relations in this disorder. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Lower Expression of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 67 in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: Contribution of Altered Regulation by Zif268

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Sohei; Bazmi, H. Holly; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be due at least in part to lower expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), a key enzyme for GABA synthesis, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia. The GAD67 promoter region contains a conserved Zif268 binding site, and Zif268 activation is accompanied by increased GAD67 expression. Thus, altered expression of the immediate early gene Zif268 may contribute to lower levels of GAD67 mRNA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Method The authors used polymerase chain reaction to quantify GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels in dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex area 9 from 62 matched pairs of schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, and in situ hybridization to assess Zif268 expression at laminar and cellular levels of resolution. The effects of potentially confounding variables were assessed in human subjects, and the effects of antipsychotic treatments were tested in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. The specificity of the Zif268 findings was assessed by quantifying mRNA levels for other immediate early genes. Results GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels were significantly lower and were positively correlated in the schizophrenia subjects. Both Zif268 mRNA-positive neuron density and Zif268 mRNA levels per neuron were significantly lower in the schizophrenia subjects. These findings were robust to the effects of the confounding variables examined and differed from other immediate early genes. Conclusions Deficient Zif268 mRNA expression may contribute to lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia, suggesting a potential mechanistic basis for altered cortical GABA synthesis and impaired cognition in schizophrenia. PMID:24874453

  17. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  18. LSD alters eyes-closed functional connectivity within the early visual cortex in a retinotopic fashion.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Leor; Sereno, Martin I; Leech, Robert; Kaelen, Mendel; Orban, Csaba; McGonigle, John; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J; Carhart-Harris, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The question of how spatially organized activity in the visual cortex behaves during eyes-closed, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)-induced "psychedelic imagery" (e.g., visions of geometric patterns and more complex phenomena) has never been empirically addressed, although it has been proposed that under psychedelics, with eyes-closed, the brain may function "as if" there is visual input when there is none. In this work, resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) data was analyzed from 10 healthy subjects under the influence of LSD and, separately, placebo. It was suspected that eyes-closed psychedelic imagery might involve transient local retinotopic activation, of the sort typically associated with visual stimulation. To test this, it was hypothesized that, under LSD, patches of the visual cortex with congruent retinotopic representations would show greater RSFC than incongruent patches. Using a retinotopic localizer performed during a nondrug baseline condition, nonadjacent patches of V1 and V3 that represent the vertical or the horizontal meridians of the visual field were identified. Subsequently, RSFC between V1 and V3 was measured with respect to these a priori identified patches. Consistent with our prior hypothesis, the difference between RSFC of patches with congruent retinotopic specificity (horizontal-horizontal and vertical-vertical) and those with incongruent specificity (horizontal-vertical and vertical-horizontal) increased significantly under LSD relative to placebo, suggesting that activity within the visual cortex becomes more dependent on its intrinsic retinotopic organization in the drug condition. This result may indicate that under LSD, with eyes-closed, the early visual system behaves as if it were seeing spatially localized visual inputs. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3031-3040, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  20. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Huang, Yanhua H; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-28

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD.

  1. Altered GABAergic markers, increased binocularity and reduced plasticity in the visual cortex of Engrailed-2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Allegra, Manuela; Genovesi, Sacha; Maggia, Marika; Cenni, Maria C.; Zunino, Giulia; Sgadò, Paola; Caleo, Matteo; Bozzi, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The maturation of the GABAergic system is a crucial determinant of cortical development during early postnatal life, when sensory circuits undergo a process of activity-dependent refinement. An altered excitatory/inhibitory balance has been proposed as a possible pathogenic mechanism of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The homeobox-containing transcription factor Engrailed-2 (En2) has been associated to ASD, and En2 knockout (En2−/−) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a partial loss of cortical GABAergic interneurons. Here we studied GABAergic markers and cortical function in En2−/− mice, by exploiting the well-known anatomical and functional features of the mouse visual system. En2 is expressed in the visual cortex at postnatal day 30 and during adulthood. When compared to age-matched En2+/+ controls, En2−/− mice showed an increased number of parvalbumin (PV+), somatostatin (SOM+), and neuropeptide Y (NPY+) positive interneurons in the visual cortex at P30, and a decreased number of SOM+ and NPY+ interneurons in the adult. At both ages, the differences in distinct interneuron populations observed between En2+/+ and En2−/− mice were layer-specific. Adult En2−/− mice displayed a normal eye-specific segregation in the retino-geniculate pathway, and in vivo electrophysiological recordings showed a normal development of basic functional properties (acuity, response latency, receptive field size) of the En2−/− primary visual cortex. However, a significant increase of binocularity was found in P30 and adult En2−/− mice, as compared to age-matched controls. Differently from what observed in En2+/+ mice, the En2−/− primary visual cortex did not respond to a brief monocular deprivation performed between P26 and P29, during the so-called “critical period.” These data suggest that altered GABAergic circuits impact baseline binocularity and plasticity in En2−/− mice, while leaving other visual functional properties unaffected

  2. Physical exercise mitigates doxorubicin-induced brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial alterations and cellular quality control signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-neoplastic agent, whose clinical use is limited by a dose-dependent mitochondrial toxicity in non-target tissues, including the brain. Here we analyzed the effects of distinct exercise modalities (12-week endurance treadmill-TM or voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) performed before and during sub-chronic DOX treatment on brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidative stress, permeability transition pore (mPTP), and proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis and auto(mito)phagy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into saline-sedentary (SAL+SED), DOX-sedentary (DOX+SED; 7-week DOX (2 mg · kg(-1)per week)), DOX+TM and DOX+FW. Animal behavior and post-sacrifice mitochondrial function were assessed. Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits, oxidative stress markers or related proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α and TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was followed through caspases 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, ANT and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin and p62)-related proteins were measured by semi-quantitative Western blotting. DOX impaired behavioral performance, mitochondrial function, including lower resistance to mPTP and increased apoptotic signaling, decreased the content in OXPHOS complex subunits and increased oxidative stress in brain cortex and cerebellum. Molecular markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy were also altered by DOX treatment in both brain subareas. Generally, TM and FW were able to mitigate DOX-related impairments in brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial activity, mPTP and apoptotic signaling. We conclude that the alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy markers induced by exercise performed before and during

  3. Multi-echo EPI of human fear conditioning reveals improved BOLD detection in ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Brice; Leuchs, Laura; Sämann, Philipp G; Czisch, Michael; Spoormaker, Victor I

    2017-08-01

    Standard T2(*) weighted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) performed with echo-planar imaging (EPI) suffers from signal loss in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) due to macroscopic field inhomogeneity. However, this region is of special interest to affective neuroscience and psychiatry. The Multi-echo EPI (MEPI) approach has several advantages over EPI but its performance against EPI in the vmPFC has not yet been examined in a study with sufficient statistical power using a task specifically eliciting activity in this region. We used a fear conditioning task with MEPI to compare the performance of MEPI and EPI in vmPFC and control regions in 32 healthy young subjects. We analyzed activity associated with short (12ms), standard (29ms) and long (46ms) echo times, and a voxel-wise combination of these three echo times. Behavioral data revealed successful differentiation of the conditioned versus safety stimulus; activity in the vmPFC was shown by the contrast "safety stimulus > conditioned stimulus" as in previous research and proved significantly stronger with the combined MEPI than standard single-echo EPI. Then, we aimed to demonstrate that the additional cluster extent (ventral extension) detected in the vmPFC with MEPI reflects activation in a relevant cluster (i.e., not just non-neuronal noise). To do this, we used resting state data from the same subjects to show that the time-course of this region was both connected to bilateral amygdala and the default mode network. Overall, we demonstrate that MEPI (by means of the weighted sum combination approach) outperforms standard EPI in vmPFC; MEPI performs always at least as good as the best echo time for a given brain region but provides all necessary echo times for an optimal BOLD sensitivity for the whole brain. This is relevant for affective neuroscience and psychiatry given the critical role of the vmPFC in emotion regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overlapping representations of the neck and whiskers in the rat motor cortex revealed by mapping at different anaesthetic depths

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Shashank; Kambi, Niranjan; Jain, Neeraj

    2008-01-01

    The primary motor cortex of mammals has an orderly representation of different body parts. Within the representation of each body part the organization is more complex, with groups of neurons representing movements of a muscle or a group of muscles. In rats, uncertainties continue to exist regarding organization of the primary motor cortex in the whisker and the neck region. Using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) we show that movements evoked in the whisker and the neck region of the rat motor cortex are highly sensitive to the depth of anaesthesia. At light anaesthetic depth, whisker movements are readily evoked from a large medial region of the motor cortex. Lateral to this is a small region where movements of the neck are evoked. However, in animals under deep anaesthesia whisker movements cannot be evoked. Instead, neck movements are evoked from this region. The neck movement region thus becomes greatly expanded. An analysis of the threshold currents required to evoke movements at different anaesthetic depths reveals that the caudal portion of the whisker region has dual representation, of both the whisker and the neck movements. The results also underline the importance of carefully controlling the depth of anaesthesia during ICMS experiments. PMID:18093166

  5. Alteration of Neuronal Excitability and Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex of a Mouse Model of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Gregg W; Sun, Ziyi; Kvajo, Mirna; Broek, Jantine A C; Fénelon, Karine; McKellar, Heather; Xiao, Lan; Xu, Bin; Bahn, Sabine; O'Donnell, James M; Gogos, Joseph A

    2017-04-12

    Using a genetic mouse model that faithfully recapitulates a DISC1 genetic alteration strongly associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, we examined the impact of this mutation within the prefrontal cortex. Although cortical layering, cytoarchitecture, and proteome were found to be largely unaffected, electrophysiological examination of the mPFC revealed both neuronal hyperexcitability and alterations in short-term synaptic plasticity consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release. Increased excitability of layer II/III pyramidal neurons was accompanied by consistent reductions in voltage-activated potassium currents near the action potential threshold as well as by enhanced recruitment of inputs arising from superficial layers to layer V. We further observed reductions in both the paired-pulse ratios and the enhanced short-term depression of layer V synapses arising from superficial layers consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release at these synapses. Recordings from layer II/III pyramidal neurons revealed action potential widening that could account for enhanced neurotransmitter release. Significantly, we found that reduced functional expression of the voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv1.1 substantially contributes to both the excitability and short-term plasticity alterations that we observed. The underlying dysregulation of Kv1.1 expression was attributable to cAMP elevations in the PFC secondary to reduced phosphodiesterase 4 activity present in Disc1 deficiency and was rescued by pharmacological blockade of adenylate cyclase. Our results demonstrate a potentially devastating impact of Disc1 deficiency on neural circuit function, partly due to Kv1.1 dysregulation that leads to a dual dysfunction consisting of enhanced neuronal excitability and altered short-term synaptic plasticity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Schizophrenia is a profoundly disabling psychiatric illness with a devastating impact not only upon the afflicted but

  6. Alteration in dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons from the prefrontal cortex of rats with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vega, Elenia; Gómez-Villalobos, Maria de Jésus; Flores, Gonzalo

    2004-09-17

    We have studied, in the rat, the dendritic morphological changes of the pyramidal neurons of the medial part of the prefrontal cortex induced by the chronic effect of high blood pressure. Renovascular hypertension was induced using a silver clip on the renal artery by surgery. The morphology of the pyramidal neurons from the medial part of the prefrontal cortex was investigated in these animals. The blood pressure was measured to confirm the increase in the arterial blood pressure. After 16 weeks of increase in the arterial blood pressure, the animals were sacrificed by overdoses of sodium pentobarbital and perfused intracardially with a 0.9% saline solution. The brains were removed, processed by the Golgi-Cox stain method and analyzed by the Sholl method. The dendritic morphology clearly showed that the hypertensive animals had an increase (32%) in the dendritic length of the pyramidal cells with a decrease (50%) in the density of dendritic spines when compared with sham animals. The branch-order analysis showed that the animals with hypertension exhibit more dendritic arborization at the level of the first to fourth branch order. This result suggests that renovascular hypertension may in part affect the dendritic morphology in this limbic structure, which may implicate cognitive impairment in hypertensive patients.

  7. Altered intrinsic functional connectivity of the cingulate cortex in children with severe temper outbursts.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amy Krain; Bennett, Randi; Posner, Jonathan; Hulvershorn, Leslie; Castellanos, F Xavier; Klein, Rachel G

    2017-08-14

    Severe temper outbursts (STO) in children are associated with impaired school and family functioning and may contribute to negative outcomes. These outbursts can be conceptualized as excessive frustration responses reflecting reduced emotion regulation capacity. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in negative affect as well as emotional control, and exhibits disrupted function in children with elevated irritability and outbursts. This study examined the intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of a region of the ACC, the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC), in 5- to 9-year-old children with STO (n = 20), comparing them to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) without outbursts (ADHD; n = 18). Additional analyses compared results to a sample of healthy children (HC; n = 18) and examined specific associations with behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Compared to the ADHD group, STO children exhibited reduced iFC between the aMCC and surrounding regions of the ACC, and increased iFC between the aMCC and precuneus. These differences were also seen between the STO and HC groups; ADHD and HC groups did not differ. Specificity analyses found associations between aMCC-ACC connectivity and hyperactivity, and between aMCC-precuneus iFC and emotion dysregulation. Disruption in aMCC networks may underlie the behavioral and emotional dysregulation characteristic of children with STO.

  8. Proteome alterations in cortex of mice exposed to fluoride and lead.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ruiyan; Zhang, Yuliang; Liu, Shuangling; Liu, Fengyu; Sun, Zilong; Wang, Jundong

    2015-03-01

    Both fluoride and lead can cross the blood-brain barrier and produce toxic effects on the central neural system, resulting in low learning and memory abilities, especially in children. In order to identify the proteomic pattern in the cortex of young animals, from the beginning of fertilization to the age of postnatal day 56, pregnant female mice and pups were administrated with 150 mg sodium fluoride/L and/or 300 mg lead acetate/L in their drinking water. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to identify differently expressed protein spots. Results showed that there were eight proteins in the cortex that significantly changed, whose biological functions were involved in (1) energy metabolism (Ndufs1, Atp5h, Atp6v1b2), (2) cytoskeleton (Spna2, Tuba1a, Tubb2a), (3) glycation repair (Hdhd2), and (4) cell stress response (Hspa8). Based on the previous and current studies, ATPase, Spna2, and Hspa8 were shared by fluoride and lead both as common target molecules.

  9. Alterations of functional connectivity and intrinsic activity within the cingulate cortex of suicidal ideators.

    PubMed

    Chase, Henry W; Segreti, Anna Maria; Keller, Timothy A; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Just, Marcel A; Pan, Lisa A; Brent, David A

    2017-04-01

    The 'default mode network' (DMN), a collection of brain regions including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), shows reliable inter-regional functional connectivity at rest. It has been implicated in rumination and other negative affective states, but its role in suicidal ideation is not well understood. We employed seed based functional connectivity methods to analyze resting state fMRI data in 34 suicidal ideators and 40 healthy control participants. Whole-brain connectivity with dorsal PCC or ventral PCC was broadly intact between the two groups, but while the control participants showed greater coupling between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and dorsal PCC, compared to the dACC and ventral PCC, this difference was reversed in the ideators. Furthermore, ongoing low frequency BOLD signal in these three regions (dorsal, ventral PCC, dACC) was reduced in the ideators. The structural integrity of the cingulum bundle, as measured using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), also explained variation in the functional connectivity measures but did not abolish the group differences. Together, these findings provide evidence of abnormalities in the DMN underlying the tendency towards suicidal ideation.

  10. Microstimulation Reveals Opposing Influences of Prelimbic and Infralimbic Cortex on the Expression of Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal-Gonzalez, Ivan; Rauch, Scott L.; Quirk, Gregory J.; Vidal-Gonzalez, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies using lesion, infusion, and unit-recording techniques suggest that the infralimbic (IL) subregion of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is necessary for the inhibition of conditioned fear following extinction. Brief microstimulation of IL paired with conditioned tones, designed to mimic neuronal tone responses, reduces the expression…

  11. Fine functional organization of auditory cortex revealed by Fourier optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kalatsky, Valery A; Polley, Daniel B; Merzenich, Michael M; Schreiner, Christoph E; Stryker, Michael P

    2005-09-13

    We provide an overall view of the functional tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex in the rat. We apply a recently developed technique for acquiring intrinsic signal optical maps, Fourier imaging, in the rat auditory cortex. These highly detailed maps, derived in a several-minute-long recording procedure, delineate multiple auditory cortical areas and demonstrate their shapes, sizes, and tonotopic order. Beyond the primary auditory cortex, there are at least three distinct areas with fine-scale tonotopic organization, as well as at least one additional high-frequency field. The arrangement of all of these cortical areas is consistent across subjects. The accuracy of these optical maps was confirmed by microelectrode mapping in the same subjects. This imaging method allows fast mapping of the auditory cortex at high spatial resolution comparable to that provided by conventional microelectrode technique. Although spiking activity is largely responsible for the evoked intrinsic signals, certain features of the optical signal cannot be explained by spiking activity only, and should probably be attributed to other mechanisms inducing metabolic activity, such as subthreshold membrane phenomena.

  12. Functional imaging with cellular resolution reveals precise micro-architecture in visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Kenichi; Chung, Sooyoung; Ch'ng, Yeang H.; Kara, Prakash; Reid, R. Clay

    2005-02-01

    Neurons in the cerebral cortex are organized into anatomical columns, with ensembles of cells arranged from the surface to the white matter. Within a column, neurons often share functional properties, such as selectivity for stimulus orientation; columns with distinct properties, such as different preferred orientations, tile the cortical surface in orderly patterns. This functional architecture was discovered with the relatively sparse sampling of microelectrode recordings. Optical imaging of membrane voltage or metabolic activity elucidated the overall geometry of functional maps, but is averaged over many cells (resolution >100µm). Consequently, the purity of functional domains and the precision of the borders between them could not be resolved. Here, we labelled thousands of neurons of the visual cortex with a calcium-sensitive indicator in vivo. We then imaged the activity of neuronal populations at single-cell resolution with two-photon microscopy up to a depth of 400µm. In rat primary visual cortex, neurons had robust orientation selectivity but there was no discernible local structure; neighbouring neurons often responded to different orientations. In area 18 of cat visual cortex, functional maps were organized at a fine scale. Neurons with opposite preferences for stimulus direction were segregated with extraordinary spatial precision in three dimensions, with columnar borders one to two cells wide. These results indicate that cortical maps can be built with single-cell precision.

  13. Network analysis of corticocortical connections reveals ventral and dorsal processing streams in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanxin; Sporns, Olaf; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Much of the information used for visual perception and visually guided actions is processed in complex networks of connections within the cortex. To understand how this works in the normal brain and to determine the impact of disease, mice are promising models. In primate visual cortex, information is processed in a dorsal stream specialized for visuospatial processing and guided action and a ventral stream for object recognition. Here, we traced the outputs of 10 visual areas and used quantitative graph analytic tools of modern network science to determine, from the projection strengths in 39 cortical targets, the community structure of the network. We found a high density of the cortical graph that exceeded that previously shown in monkey. Each source area showed a unique distribution of projection weights across its targets (i.e. connectivity profile) that was well-fit by a lognormal function. Importantly, the community structure was strongly dependent on the location of the source area: outputs from medial/anterior extrastriate areas were more strongly linked to parietal, motor and limbic cortex, whereas lateral extrastriate areas were preferentially connected to temporal and parahippocampal cortex. These two subnetworks resemble dorsal and ventral cortical streams in primates, demonstrating that the basic layout of cortical networks is conserved across species. PMID:22457489

  14. Spatially Directed Proteomics of the Human Lens Outer Cortex Reveals an Intermediate Filament Switch Associated With the Remodeling Zone

    PubMed Central

    Wenke, Jamie L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Schey, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify protein changes in the morphologically distinct remodeling zone (RZ) and adjacent regions of the human lens outer cortex using spatially directed quantitative proteomics. Methods Lightly fixed human lens sections were deparaffinized and membranes labeled with fluorescent wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-TRITC). Morphology directed laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate tissue from four distinct regions of human lens outer cortex: differentiating zone (DF), RZ, transition zone (TZ), and inner cortex (IC). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of the plasma membrane fraction from three lenses (21-, 22-, and 27-year) revealed changes in major cytoskeletal proteins including vimentin, filensin, and phakinin. Peptides from proteins of interest were quantified using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry and isotopically-labeled internal peptide standards. Results Results revealed an intermediate filament switch from vimentin to beaded filament proteins filensin and phakinin that occurred at the RZ. Several other cytoskeletal proteins showed significant changes between regions, while most crystallins remained unchanged. Targeted proteomics provided accurate, absolute quantification of these proteins and confirmed vimentin, periplakin, and periaxin decrease from the DF to the IC, while filensin, phakinin, and brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) increase significantly at the RZ. Conclusions Mass spectrometry-compatible fixation and morphology directed laser capture enabled proteomic analysis of narrow regions in the human lens outer cortex. Results reveal dramatic cytoskeletal protein changes associated with the RZ, suggesting that one role of these proteins is in membrane deformation and/or the establishment of ball and socket joints in the human RZ. PMID:27537260

  15. Adrenergic drugs modify the level of noradrenaline in the insular cortex and alter extinction of conditioned taste aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, Nadine; Angst, Marie-Josée; Schleef, Carmen; Gobaille, Serge; Sandner, Guy

    2007-03-12

    We compared the effect of conditioned taste aversion in rats by measuring the amount of sucrose that they drunk after conditioning, which differed according to whether rats had drunk the sucrose freely (SD: self drinking) during the conditioning session, or had been forced to drink it (IO: intra-oral administration through a chronically implanted cannula). The SD procedure delayed the extinction of conditioned taste aversion. Enhanced arousal, alertness, awareness or attention in the SD condition may have strengthened the memory of the taste. Brain noradrenergic networks are involved in such processes. We administered two noradrenergic drugs that produce opposite effects on noradrenaline release in the brain, methoxy-idazoxan, RX821002 (1mg/kg, i.p.), and guanfacine (0.12mg/kg, i.p.). We evaluated their effect (i) on the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex using microdialysis, (ii) on glycaemia that is an essential factor of taste learning and (iii) on the comparative SD versus IO conditioned taste aversion protocol mentioned above. Injecting RX821001 increased the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex up to two-fold of the baseline. This effect lasted 1h. The same dose of RX821002 did not elicit any alteration of glycaemia. It enhanced extinction of conditioned taste aversion in the SD group of rats. Injecting 0.12mg/kg of guanfacine produced the opposite effect. The noradrenaline level of the gustatory cortex decreased, but only down to 20% of the baseline. This decrease lasted 2h. Guanfacine increased glycaemia. Extinction of conditioned taste aversion was only marginally decreased by guanfacine in the SD group of rats. These results fit with Aston-Jones' point of view that the role of the noradrenergic coeruleo-cortical system may be to enhance arousal, alertness, awareness or attention to an event by a transient increase of cortical noradrenaline.

  16. Changing the Spatial Scope of Attention Alters Patterns of Neural Gain in Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Javier O.; Rungratsameetaweemana, Nuttida; Sprague, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last several decades, spatial attention has been shown to influence the activity of neurons in visual cortex in various ways. These conflicting observations have inspired competing models to account for the influence of attention on perception and behavior. Here, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to assess steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) in human subjects and showed that highly focused spatial attention primarily enhanced neural responses to high-contrast stimuli (response gain), whereas distributed attention primarily enhanced responses to medium-contrast stimuli (contrast gain). Together, these data suggest that different patterns of neural modulation do not reflect fundamentally different neural mechanisms, but instead reflect changes in the spatial extent of attention. PMID:24381272

  17. Pulsed infrared light alters neural activity in rat somatosensory cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Friedman, Robert M.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahavaden-Jansen, Anita; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed infrared light has shown promise as an alternative to electrical stimulation in applications where contact free or high spatial precision stimulation are desired. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is well characterized in the peripheral nervous system; however, to date, research has been limited in the central nervous system. In this study, pulsed infrared light (λ=1.875 μm, pulse width=250 μs, radiant exposure=0.01–0.55 J/cm2, fiber size=400 μm, repetition rate=50–200 Hz) was used to stimulate the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats, and its efficacy was assessed using intrinsic optical imaging and electrophysiology techniques. INS was found to evoke an intrinsic response of similar magnitude to that evoked by tactile stimulation (0.3–0.4% change in intrinsic signal magnitude). A maximum deflection in the intrinsic signal was measured to range from 0.05% to 0.4% in response to INS, and the activated region of cortex measured approximately 2 mm in diameter. The intrinsic signal magnitude increased with faster laser repetition rates and increasing radiant exposures. Single unit recordings indicated a statistically significant decrease in neuronal firing that was observed at the onset of INS stimulation (0.5 s stimulus) and continued up to 1 s after stimulation onset. The pattern of neuronal firing differed from that observed during tactile stimulation, potentially due to a different spatial integration field of the pulsed infrared light compared to tactile stimulation. The results demonstrate that INS can be used safely and effectively to manipulate neuronal firing. PMID:21513806

  18. [Alterations in the decision making processes linked to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in drug-abusing patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, A; Aguilar de Arcos, F; Pérez García, M

    The somatic marker hypothesis proposes that somatic signals guide the decision making processes in an adaptive sense for the organism. The processing of these somatic signals is linked to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity. The influence of somatic markers on decision making processes has been studied by means of the 'gambling task' (GT). Several studies using the GT in substance abusers have showed the existence of decision making impairments in these patients. To examine the performance in the GT of a Spanish sample of substance abusers; and to study the influence of clinically relevant variables: type of substance, years of abuse and abstinence period on GT performance. 106 substance abusers patients during the dishabituation phase participated in the study. We administered a computerized version of the GT in a single individual session. We used descriptive analyses to study the patients' performance in the GT. Next we carried out multiple regression analyses to study the influence of the clinical variables on the GT performance. A 76.4% of the sample patients showed impairments in the decision making processes measured by the GT. None of the clinical variables significantly predicted performance in the task. These results suggest the existence of decision making impairments in substance abusers that may be related to pre morbid alterations, or to a neurotoxic effect of drugs of abuse on the activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

  19. Natural speech reveals the semantic maps that tile human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Alexander G.; de Heer, Wendy A.; Griffiths, Thomas L.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.; Gallant, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    The meaning of language is represented in regions of the cerebral cortex collectively known as the “semantic system”. However, little of the semantic system has been mapped comprehensively, and the semantic selectivity of most regions is unknown. Here we systematically map semantic selectivity across the cortex using voxel-wise modeling of fMRI data collected while subjects listened to hours of narrative stories. We show that the semantic system is organized into intricate patterns that appear consistent across individuals. We then use a novel generative model to create a detailed semantic atlas. Our results suggest that most areas within the semantic system represent information about specific semantic domains, or groups of related concepts, and our atlas shows which domains are represented in each area. This study demonstrates that data-driven methods—commonplace in studies of human neuroanatomy and functional connectivity—provide a powerful and efficient means for mapping functional representations in the brain. PMID:27121839

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals complex cognitive control representations in the rostral frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, J; Beckmann, I; Kuhlemann, I; Schweikard, A; Münte, T F

    2015-08-06

    Convergent evidence suggests that the lateral frontal cortex is at the heart of a brain network subserving cognitive control. Recent theories assume a functional segregation along the rostro-caudal axis of the lateral frontal cortex based on differences in the degree of complexity of cognitive control. However, the functional contribution of specific rostral and caudal sub-regions remains elusive. Here we investigate the impact of disrupting rostral and caudal target regions on cognitive control processes, using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). Participants performed three different task-switching conditions that assessed differences in the degree of complexity of cognitive control processes, after temporally disrupting rostral, or caudal target regions, or a control region. Disrupting the rostral lateral frontal region specifically impaired behavioral performance of the most complex task-switching condition, in comparison to the caudal target region and the control region. These novel findings shed light on the neuroanatomical architecture supporting control over goal-directed behavior.

  1. Natural speech reveals the semantic maps that tile human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Huth, Alexander G; de Heer, Wendy A; Griffiths, Thomas L; Theunissen, Frédéric E; Gallant, Jack L

    2016-04-28

    The meaning of language is represented in regions of the cerebral cortex collectively known as the 'semantic system'. However, little of the semantic system has been mapped comprehensively, and the semantic selectivity of most regions is unknown. Here we systematically map semantic selectivity across the cortex using voxel-wise modelling of functional MRI (fMRI) data collected while subjects listened to hours of narrative stories. We show that the semantic system is organized into intricate patterns that seem to be consistent across individuals. We then use a novel generative model to create a detailed semantic atlas. Our results suggest that most areas within the semantic system represent information about specific semantic domains, or groups of related concepts, and our atlas shows which domains are represented in each area. This study demonstrates that data-driven methods--commonplace in studies of human neuroanatomy and functional connectivity--provide a powerful and efficient means for mapping functional representations in the brain.

  2. Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura M.; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I.

    2015-01-01

    Social anhedonia (SA) is a debilitating characteristic of schizophrenia, a common feature in individuals at psychosis-risk, and a vulnerability for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Prior work (Hooker et al., 2014) revealed neural deficits in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when processing positive social cues in a community sample of people with high SA. Lower VLPFC neural activity was related to more severe self-reported schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms as well as the exacerbation of symptoms after social stress. In the current study, psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis was applied to further investigate the neural mechanisms mediated by the VLPFC during emotion processing. PPI analysis revealed that, compared to low SA controls, participants with high SA exhibited reduced connectivity between the VLPFC and the motor cortex, the inferior parietal and the posterior temporal regions when viewing socially positive (relative to neutral) emotions. Across all participants, VLPFC connectivity correlated with behavioral and self-reported measures of attentional control, emotion management, and reward processing. Our results suggest that impairments to the VLPFC mediated neural circuitry underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits associated with social anhedonia, and may serve as neural targets for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. PMID:26379532

  3. Connectivity architecture and subdivision of the human inferior parietal cortex revealed by diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Michael; Knösche, Thomas R; Friederici, Angela D; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan; Anwander, Alfred

    2014-09-01

    The human inferior parietal cortex convexity (IPCC) is an important association area, which integrates auditory, visual, and somatosensory information. However, the structural organization of the IPCC is a controversial issue. For example, cytoarchitectonic parcellations reported in the literature range from 2 to 7 areas. Moreover, anatomical descriptions of the human IPCC are often based on experiments in the macaque monkey. In this study, we used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging combined with probabilistic tractography to quantify the connectivity of the human IPCC, and used this information to parcellate this cortex area. This provides a new structural map of the human IPCC, comprising 3 subareas (inferior parietal cortex anterior, IPC middle, and IPC posterior) of comparable size, in a rostro-caudal arrangement in the left and right hemispheres. Each subarea is characterized by a connectivity fingerprint, and the parcellation is similar to the subdivision reported for the macaque IPCC with 3 areas in a rostro-caudal arrangement (PF, PFG, and PG). However, the present study also reliably demonstrates new structural features in the connectivity pattern of the human IPCC, which are not known to exist in the macaque. This study quantifies intersubject variability by providing a population representation of the subarea arrangement and demonstrates the substantial lateralization of the connectivity patterns of the IPCC. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Alterations of prefrontal cortex GABAergic transmission in the complex psychotic-like phenotype induced by adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Zamberletti, Erica; Beggiato, Sarah; Steardo, Luca; Prini, Pamela; Antonelli, Tiziana; Ferraro, Luca; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Although several findings indicate an association between adolescent cannabis abuse and the risk to develop schizophrenia later in life, the evidence for a causal relationship is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the emergence of psychotic-like behavior in adult female rats chronically exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence. To this aim, female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with THC during adolescence (PND 35-45) and, in adulthood (PND 75), a series of behavioral tests and biochemical assays were performed in order to investigate the long-term effects of adolescent THC exposure. Adolescent THC pretreatment leads to long-term behavioral alterations, characterized by recognition memory deficits, social withdrawal, altered emotional reactivity and sensitization to the locomotor activating effects of acute PCP. Moreover, since cortical disinhibition seems to be a key feature of many different animal models of schizophrenia and GABAergic hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been observed in postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients, we then investigated the long-lasting consequences of adolescent THC exposure on GABAergic transmission in the adult rat PFC. Biochemical analyses revealed that adolescent THC exposure results in reduced GAD67 and basal GABA levels within the adult PFC. GAD67 expression is reduced both in parvalbumin (PV)- and cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons; this alteration may be related to the altered emotional reactivity triggered by adolescent THC, as silencing PFC GAD67 expression through a siRNA-mediated approach is sufficient to impact rats' behavior in the forced swim test. Finally, the cellular underpinnings of the observed sensitized response to acute PCP in adult THC-treated rats could be ascribed to the increased cFos immunoreactivity and glutamate levels in the PFC and dorsal striatum. The present findings support the hypothesis that adolescent THC exposure may

  5. [Electrical activity of the visual cortex under conditions of altered monoamine levels in the brain of animals].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, V V; Gal'chenko, A A; Deriugina, O N

    1990-01-01

    In experiments on 8 rabbits and 12 rats changes in electrograms of the visual cortex of alert animals were studied under photic stimulation in conditions of pharmacological action on monoamine (MA) brain systems. After injection of MA precursors (5-oxitriptophane and d, 1-dioxiphenylalanine) following phenomena were observed: a) decrease of the amplitude of the averaged evoked potentials to rhythmic photic stimuli (1-20 imp. sec.-1); b) an enhancement of fast (15-25 Hz) oscillations in the cortical spontaneous electrical activity and weakening and modification of the effects of the blockader of synthesis of MA-alpha-methyl-dioxiphenylalanine. Under light stimulation potentiation of MA precursors effects was observed in the frequency spectra of electrocorticograms. In the same conditions the specificity of action of cathecholamines precursor was revealed in the form of an increase of power of rhythms of 5-7 Hz and it; decrease in 2-3 Hz. Possible mechanisms of the revealed phenomena are discussed.

  6. Darkness alters maturation of visual cortex and promotes fast recovery from monocular deprivation.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Kevin R; Mitchell, Donald E

    2013-03-04

    The existence of heightened brain plasticity during critical periods in early postnatal life is a central tenet of developmental sensory neuroscience and helps explain the enduring deficits induced by early abnormal sensory exposure. The human visual disorder amblyopia has been linked to unbalanced visual input to the two eyes in early postnatal visual cortical development and has been modeled in animals by depriving them of patterned visual input to one eye, a procedure known as monocular deprivation (MD). We investigated the possibility that a period of darkness might reset the central visual pathways to a more plastic stage and hence increase the capacity for recovery from early MD. Here we show that a 10 day period of complete darkness reverses maturation of stable cytoskeleton components in kitten visual cortex and also results in rapid elimination of, or even immunity from, visual deficits linked to amblyogenic rearing by MD. The heightened instability of the cytoskeleton induced by darkness likely represents just one of many parallel molecular changes that promote visual recovery, possibly by release of the various brakes on cortical plasticity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alterations of attention and emotional processing following childhood-onset damage to the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Navarro, Juan P.; Driscoll, David; Anderson, Steven W.; Tranel, Daniel; Bechara, Antoine; Buchanan, Tony W.

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC), especially the medial sector, plays a crucial role in emotional processing. Damage to this region results in impaired processing of emotional information, perhaps due to an inability to initiate and maintain attention toward emotional materials, a process that is normally automatic. Childhood onset damage to the PFC impairs emotional processing more than adult-onset PFC damage. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of the PFC in attention to emotional stimuli, and to explore how age at lesion onset affects this involvement. To address these issues, we studied both the emotional and attentional modulation of the startle reflex. Our sample was composed of 4 patients with childhood-onset PFC damage, 6 patients with adult-onset PFC damage, and 10 healthy comparison participants. Subjects viewed 54 affective pictures; acoustic startle probes were presented at 300 ms after picture onset in 18 pictures (as an index of attentional modulation) and at 3,800 ms after picture onset in 18 pictures (as an index of emotional modulation). Childhood-onset PFC patients did not show attentional or emotional modulation of the response, in contrast to adult-onset PFC damage and comparison participants. Early-onset damage to the PFC results, therefore, in more severe dysfunction in the processing of affective stimuli than adult-onset PFC damage, perhaps reflecting limited plasticity in the neural systems that support these processes. PMID:24377423

  8. Altered Functional Connectivity of the Primary Visual Cortex in Subjects with Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Kun; Liu, Yong; Yan, Xiaohe; Lin, Xiaoming; Jiang, Tianzi

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia, which usually occurs during early childhood and results in poor or blurred vision, is a disorder of the visual system that is characterized by a deficiency in an otherwise physically normal eye or by a deficiency that is out of proportion with the structural or functional abnormalities of the eye. Our previous study demonstrated alterations in the spontaneous activity patterns of some brain regions in individuals with anisometropic amblyopia compared to subjects with normal vision. To date, it remains unknown whether patients with amblyopia show characteristic alterations in the functional connectivity patterns in the visual areas of the brain, particularly the primary visual area. In the present study, we investigated the differences in the functional connectivity of the primary visual area between individuals with amblyopia and normal-sighted subjects using resting functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings demonstrated that the cerebellum and the inferior parietal lobule showed altered functional connectivity with the primary visual area in individuals with amblyopia, and this finding provides further evidence for the disruption of the dorsal visual pathway in amblyopic subjects. PMID:23844297

  9. Structural reorganization of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent rats is associated with altered glial plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Airee; Zamora-Martinez, Eva R; Edwards, Scott; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of glial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to CIE and were injected with mitotic markers to label and phenotype proliferating cells to test the hypothesis that CIE produces concurrent alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons and the cell cycle kinetics and developmental stages of glial progenitors in the mPFC. Medial prefrontal cortical tissue was processed for Golgi-Cox staining, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. CIE increased dendritic arborization and spine densities within basal and apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons via aberrant reorganization of actin cytoskeleton-associated molecules. CIE concomitantly increased the expression of total NR2B subunits without affecting phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr-1472 or levels of PSD-95. CIE reduced the length of S-phase of the cell cycle of glial progenitors and reduced proliferation and differentiation of progenitors into bHLH transcription factor Olig2-expressing premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). CIE also produced a corresponding hyperphosphorylation of Olig2, and reduced expression of myelin basic protein. Our findings demonstrate that CIE-induced alterations in OPCs and myelin-related proteins are associated with profound alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons. In sum, our results not only provide evidence that alcohol dependence leads to pathological changes in the mPFC, which may in part define a cellular basis for cognitive impairments associated with alcoholism, but also show dependence-associated morphological changes in the PFC at the single neuron level.

  10. Structural reorganization of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of alcohol dependent rats is associated with altered glial plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airee; Zamora-Martinez, Eva R.; Edwards, Scott; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of glial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to CIE and were injected with mitotic markers to label and phenotype proliferating cells to test the hypothesis that CIE produces concurrent alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons and the cell cycle kinetics and developmental stages of glial progenitors in the mPFC. Medial prefrontal cortical tissue was processed for Golgi-Cox staining, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. CIE increased dendritic arborization and spine densities within basal and apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons via aberrant reorganization of actin cytoskeleton-associated molecules. CIE concomitantly increased expression of total NR2B subunits without affecting phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr-1472 or levels of PSD-95. CIE reduced the length of S phase of the cell cycle of glial progenitors and reduced proliferation and differentiation of progenitors into bHLH transcription factor Olig2-expressing premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). CIE also produced a corresponding hyperphosphorylation of Olig2, and reduced expression of myelin basic protein. Our findings demonstrate that CIE-induced alterations in OPCs and myelin-related proteins are associated with profound alterations in the structure of pyramidal neurons. In sum, our results not only provide evidence that alcohol dependence leads to pathological changes in the mPFC, which may in part define a cellular basis for cognitive impairments associated with alcoholism, but also show dependence-associated morphological changes in the PFC at the single neuron level. PMID:24667898

  11. Genetic Elimination of GABAergic Neurotransmission Reveals Two Distinct Pacemakers for Spontaneous Waves of Activity in the Developing Mouse Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Curtis R.; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P.; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves. PMID:24623764

  12. Genetic elimination of GABAergic neurotransmission reveals two distinct pacemakers for spontaneous waves of activity in the developing mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Easton, Curtis R; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F; Moody, William J

    2014-03-12

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves.

  13. Dicer deficiency reveals microRNAs predicted to control gene expression in the developing adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Krill, Kenneth T; Gurdziel, Katherine; Heaton, Joanne H; Simon, Derek P; Hammer, Gary D

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, non-protein-coding RNAs that are an important means of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Deletion of Dicer, a key miRNA processing enzyme, is embryonic lethal in mice, and tissue-specific Dicer deletion results in developmental defects. Using a conditional knockout model, we generated mice lacking Dicer in the adrenal cortex. These Dicer-knockout (KO) mice exhibited perinatal mortality and failure of the adrenal cortex during late gestation between embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) and E18.5. Further study of Dicer-KO adrenals demonstrated a significant loss of steroidogenic factor 1-expressing cortical cells that was histologically evident as early as E16.5 coincident with an increase in p21 and cleaved-caspase 3 staining in the cortex. However, peripheral cortical proliferation persisted in KO adrenals as assessed by staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. To further characterize the embryonic adrenals from Dicer-KO mice, we performed microarray analyses for both gene and miRNA expression on purified RNA isolated from control and KO adrenals of E15.5 and E16.5 embryos. Consistent with the absence of Dicer and the associated loss of miRNA-mediated mRNA degradation, we observed an up-regulation of a small subset of adrenal transcripts in Dicer-KO mice, most notably the transcripts coded by the genes Nr6a1 and Acvr1c. Indeed, several miRNAs, including let-7, miR-34c, and miR-21, that are predicted to target these genes for degradation, were also markedly down-regulated in Dicer-KO adrenals. Together these data suggest a role for miRNA-mediated regulation of a subset of genes that are essential for normal adrenal growth and homeostasis.

  14. Neural oscillation, network, eloquent cortex and epileptogenic zone revealed by magnetoencephalography and awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Kandasamy, Regunath; Reza, Faruque; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a method of functional neuroimaging. The concomitant use of MEG and electrocorticography has been found to be useful in elucidating neural oscillation and network, and to localize epileptogenic zone and functional cortex. We describe our early experience using MEG in neurosurgical patients, emphasizing on its impact on patient management as well as the enrichment of our knowledge in neurosciences. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 subjects were included; five patients had intraaxial tumors, one with an extraaxial tumor and brain compression, two with arteriovenous malformations, one with cerebral peduncle hemorrhage and one with sensorimotor cortical dysplasia. All patients underwent evoked and spontaneous MEG recordings. MEG data was processed at band-pass filtering frequency of between 0.1 and 300 Hz with a sampling rate of 1 kHz. MEG source localization was performed using either overdetermined equivalent current dipoles or underdetermined inversed solution. Neuromag collection of events software was used to study brain network and epileptogenic zone. The studied data were analyzed for neural oscillation in three patients; brain network and clinical manifestation in five patients; and for the location of epileptogenic zone and eloquent cortex in two patients. Results: We elucidated neural oscillation in three patients. One demonstrated oscillatory phenomenon on stimulation of the motor-cortex during awake surgery, and two had improvement in neural oscillatory parameters after surgery. Brain networks corresponding to clinico-anatomical relationships were depicted in five patients, and two networks were illustrated here. Finally, we demonstrated epilepsy cases in which MEG data was found to be useful in localizing the epileptogenic zones and functional cortices. Conclusion: The application of MEG while enhancing our knowledge in neurosciences also has a useful role in epilepsy and awake surgery. PMID:25685205

  15. Altered Expression Pattern of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Isoforms in Piriform Cortex After Seizures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Bei; Li, Huanfa; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Shan; Gao, Guodong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    The piriform cortex (PC) is highly susceptible to chemical and electrical seizure induction. Epileptiform activity is associated with an acid shift in extracellular pH, suggesting that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) expressed by PC neurons may contribute to this enhanced epileptogenic potential. In epileptic rats and surgical samples from patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), PC layer II ASIC1a-immunopositive neurons appeared swollen with dendritic elongation, and there was loss of ASIC1a-positive neurons in layer III, consistent with enhanced vulnerability to TLE-induced plasticity and cell death. In rats, pilocarpine-induced seizures led to transient downregulation of ASIC1a and concomitant upregulation of ASIC2a in the first few days post-seizure. These changes in expression may be due to seizure-induced oxidative stress as a similar reciprocal change in ASIC1a, and ASIC2a expression was observed in PC12 cells following H2O2 application. The proportion of ASIC1a/ASIC2a heteromers was reduced in the acute phase following status epilepticus (SE) but increased during the latent phase when rats developed spontaneous seizures. Knockdown of ASIC2a by RNAi reduced dendritic length and spine density in primary neurons, suggesting that seizure-induced upregulation of ASIC2a contributes to dendritic lengthening in PC layer II in rats. Administration of the ASIC inhibitor amiloride before pilocarpine reduced the proportion of rats reaching Racine level IV seizures, protected layer II and III neurons, and prolonged survival in the acute phase following SE. Our findings suggest that ASICs may enhance susceptibility to epileptogenesis in the PC. Inhibition of ASICs, particularly ASIC2a, may suppress seizures originating in the PC.

  16. Metabolic alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex and related cognitive deficits in late adolescent methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun E; Kim, Geon Ha; Hwang, Jaeuk; Kim, Jung Yoon; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A; Kim, Binna; Kang, Ilhyang; Jeon, Saerom; Ma, Jiyoung; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Yoon, Sujung

    2016-11-04

    The adolescent brain, with ongoing prefrontal maturation, may be more vulnerable to drug use-related neurotoxic changes as compared to the adult brain. We investigated whether the use of methamphetamine (MA), a highly addictive psychostimulant, during adolescence affect metabolic and cognitive functions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In adolescent MA users (n = 44) and healthy adolescents (n = 53), the levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, were examined in the ACC using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The Stroop color-word task was used to assess Stroop interference, which may reflect cognitive functions of behavior monitoring and response selection that are mediated by the ACC. Adolescent MA users had lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.88, P = 0.005) and relatively higher interference scores (t = 2.03, P = 0.045) than healthy adolescents. Moreover, there were significant relationships between lower NAA levels in the ACC and worse interference scores in adolescent MA users (r = -0.61, P < 0.001). Interestingly, early onset of MA use, as compared to late onset, was related to both lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.24, P = 0.03) as well as lower performance on interference measure of the Stroop color-word task (t = 2.25, P = 0.03). The current findings suggest that metabolic dysfunction in the ACC and its related cognitive impairment may play an important role in adolescent-onset addiction, particularly during early adolescence.

  17. Cocaine Exposure In Utero Alters Synaptic Plasticity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Postnatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Lim, Byungkook

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine exposure during pregnancy causes abnormality in fetal brain development, leading to cognitive dysfunction of the offspring, but the underlying cellular mechanism remains mostly unclear. In this study, we examined synaptic functions in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of postnatal rats that were exposed to cocaine in utero, using whole-cell recording from mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices. Cocaine exposure in utero resulted in a facilitated activity-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapses on these pyramidal neurons and an elevated neuronal excitability in postnatal rat pups after postnatal day 15 (P15). This facilitated LTP could be primarily attributed to the reduction of GABAergic inhibition. Biochemical assays of isolated mPFC tissue from postnatal rats further showed that cocaine exposure in utero caused a marked reduction in the surface expression of GABAA receptor subunits α1, β2, and β3, but had no effect on glutamate receptor subunit GluR1. Both facilitated LTP and reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors persisted in rats up to at least P42. Finally, the behavioral consequence of cocaine exposure in utero was reflected by the reduction in the sensitivity of locomotor activity in postnatal rats to cocaine and the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine. Since the mPFC is an important part of the reward circuit in the rat brain and plays important roles in cognitive functions, these findings offer new insights into the cellular mechanism underlying the adverse effects of cocaine exposure in utero on brain development and cognitive functions. PMID:19812341

  18. Altered Cingulate and Insular Cortex Activation During Risk-Taking in Methamphetamine Dependence: Losses Lose Impact

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Stewart, Jennifer L.; May, April C.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine if methamphetamine-dependent (MD) individuals exhibit behavioral or neural processing differences in risk-taking relative to healthy comparison participants (CTL). Design This was a cross-sectional study comparing two groups’ behavior on a risk-taking task and neural processing as assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Settings The study was conducted in an inpatient treatment center and a research fMRI facility in the United States. Participants Sixty-eight recently abstinent MD individuals recruited from a treatment program and forty CTL recruited from the community completed the study. Measurements The study assessed risk-taking behavior (overall and post-loss) using the Risky Gains Task (RGT), sensation-seeking, impulsivity and blood-oxygenation level dependent activation in the brain during the decision phase of the RGT. Findings Relative to CTL, MD displayed decreased activation in the bilateral rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and greater activation in the left insula across risky and safe decisions (p<.05). Right mid insula activation among CTL did not vary between risky and safe decisions, but among MD it was higher during risky relative to safe decisions (p<.05). Among MD, lower activation in the right rostral ACC (r=−.39, p<.01) and higher activation in the right mid insula (r=.35, p<.01) during risky decisions were linked to a higher likelihood of choosing a risky option following a loss. Conclusions Methamphetamine-dependent individuals show disrupted risk-related processing in both anterior cingulate and insula, brain areas that have been implicated in cognitive control and interoceptive processing. Attenuated neural processing of risky options may lead to risk-taking despite experiencing negative consequences. PMID:24033715

  19. Exposure to a novel stimulus environment alters patterns of lateralization in avian auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, L M; Vicario, D S

    2015-01-29

    Perceptual filters formed early in development provide an initial means of parsing the incoming auditory stream. However, these filters may not remain fixed, and may be updated by subsequent auditory input, such that, even in an adult organism, the auditory system undergoes plastic changes to achieve a more efficient representation of the recent auditory environment. Songbirds are an excellent model system for experimental studies of auditory phenomena due to many parallels between song learning in birds and language acquisition in humans. In the present study, we explored the effects of passive immersion in a novel heterospecific auditory environment on neural responses in caudo-medial neostriatum (NCM), a songbird auditory area similar to the secondary auditory cortex in mammals. In zebra finches, a well-studied species of songbirds, NCM responds selectively to conspecific songs and contains a neuronal memory for tutor and other familiar conspecific songs. Adult male zebra finches were randomly assigned to either a conspecific or heterospecific auditory environment. After 2, 4 or 9 days of exposure, subjects were presented with heterospecific and conspecific songs during awake electrophysiological recording. The neural response strength and rate of adaptation to the testing stimuli were recorded bilaterally. Controls exposed to conspecific environment sounds exhibited the normal pattern of hemispheric lateralization with higher absolute response strength and faster adaptation in the right hemisphere. The pattern of lateralization was fully reversed in birds exposed to heterospecific environment for 4 or 9 days and partially reversed in birds exposed to heterospecific environment for 2 days. Our results show that brief passive exposure to a novel category of sounds was sufficient to induce a gradual reorganization of the left and right secondary auditory cortices. These changes may reflect modification of perceptual filters to form a more efficient representation

  20. Dietary (-)-epicatechin mitigates oxidative stress, NO metabolism alterations, and inflammation in renal cortex from fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Prince, Paula D; Lanzi, Cecilia Rodríguez; Toblli, Jorge E; Elesgaray, Rosana; Oteiza, Patricia I; Fraga, César G; Galleano, Monica

    2016-01-01

    High fructose consumption has been associated to deleterious metabolic conditions. In the kidney, high fructose causes renal alterations that contribute to the development of chronic kidney disease. Evidence suggests that dietary flavonoids have the ability to prevent/attenuate risk factors of chronic diseases. This work investigated the capacity of (-)-epicatechin to prevent the renal damage induced by high fructose consumption in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 10% (w/v) fructose in the drinking water for 8 weeks, with or without supplementation with (-)-epicatechin (20mg/kg body weight/d) in the rat chow diet. Results showed that, in the presence of mild proteinuria, the renal cortex from fructose-fed rats exhibited fibrosis and decreases in nephrin, synaptopodin, and WT1, all indicators of podocyte function in association with: (i) increased markers of oxidative stress; (ii) modifications in the determinants of NO bioavailability, i.e., NO synthase (NOS) activity and expression; and (iii) development of a pro-inflammatory condition, manifested as NF-κB activation, and associated with high expression of TNFα, iNOS, and IL-6. Dietary supplementation with (-)-epicatechin prevented or ameliorated the adverse effects of high fructose consumption. These results suggest that (-)-epicatechin ingestion would benefit when renal alterations occur associated with inflammation or metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alterations in Somatostatin mRNA Expression in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Harvey M.; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the inhibitory circuitry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia include reduced expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) for somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide present in a subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. However, neither the cellular substrate nor the causal mechanisms for decreased SST mRNA levels in schizophrenia are known. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the compartmental, laminar, and cellular levels of SST mRNA expression in the DLPFC of 23 pairs of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and control subjects. We also explored potential causal mechanisms by utilizing similar methods to analyze SST mRNA expression in 2 animal models. The expression of SST mRNA was significantly decreased in layers 2–superficial 6 of subjects with schizophrenia, but not in layer 1, deep 6 or the white matter. At the cellular level, both the density of cortical SST mRNA-positive neurons and the expression of SST mRNA per neuron were reduced in the subjects with schizophrenia. These alterations were not due to potential confounds and appeared to be a downstream consequence of impaired neurotrophin signaling through the trkB receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that a marked reduction in SST mRNA expression in a subset of GABA neurons contributes to DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:18203698

  2. Neonatal Irradiation Leads to Persistent Proteome Alterations Involved in Synaptic Plasticity in the Mouse Hippocampus and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Stefan J; Sepe, Sara; von Toerne, Christine; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Hauck, Stefanie M; Atkinson, Michael J; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Tapio, Soile

    2015-11-06

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that radiation doses as low as those used in computer tomography may result in long-term neurocognitive side effects. The aim of this study was to elucidate long-term molecular alterations related to memory formation in the brain after low and moderate doses of γ radiation. Female C57BL/6J mice were irradiated on postnatal day 10 with total body doses of 0.1, 0.5, or 2.0 Gy; the control group was sham-irradiated. The proteome analysis of hippocampus, cortex, and synaptosomes isolated from these brain regions indicated changes in ephrin-related, RhoGDI, and axonal guidance signaling. Immunoblotting and miRNA-quantification demonstrated an imbalance in the synapse morphology-related Rac1-Cofilin pathway and long-term potentiation-related cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling. Proteome profiling also showed impaired oxidative phosphorylation, especially in the synaptic mitochondria. This was accompanied by an early (4 weeks) reduction of mitochondrial respiration capacity in the hippocampus. Although the respiratory capacity was restored by 24 weeks, the number of deregulated mitochondrial complex proteins was increased at this time. All observed changes were significant at doses of 0.5 and 2.0 Gy but not at 0.1 Gy. This study strongly suggests that ionizing radiation at the neonatal state triggers persistent proteomic alterations associated with synaptic impairment.

  3. Summation of connectivity strengths in the visual cortex reveals stability of neuronal microcircuits after plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bachatene, Lyes; Bharmauria, Vishal; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2015-10-09

    Within sensory systems, neurons are continuously affected by environmental stimulation. Recently, we showed that, on cell-pair basis, visual adaptation modulates the connectivity strength between similarly tuned neurons to orientation and we suggested that, on a larger scale, the connectivity strength between neurons forming sub-networks could be maintained after adaptation-induced-plasticity. In the present paper, based on the summation of the connectivity strengths, we sought to examine how, within cell-assemblies, functional connectivity is regulated during an exposure-based adaptation. Using intrinsic optical imaging combined with electrophysiological recordings following the reconfiguration of the maps of the primary visual cortex by long stimulus exposure, we found that within functionally connected cells, the summed connectivity strengths remain almost equal although connections among individual pairs are modified. Neuronal selectivity appears to be strongly associated with neuronal connectivity in a "homeodynamic" manner which maintains the stability of cortical functional relationships after experience-dependent plasticity. Our results support the "homeostatic plasticity concept" giving new perspectives on how the summation in visual cortex leads to the stability within labile neuronal ensembles, depending on the newly acquired properties by neurons.

  4. Increased neural habituation in the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in social anxiety disorder revealed by FMRI.

    PubMed

    Sladky, Ronald; Höflich, Anna; Atanelov, Jacqueline; Kraus, Christoph; Baldinger, Pia; Moser, Ewald; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Windischberger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    A characterizing symptom of social anxiety disorder (SAD) is increased emotional reactivity towards potential social threat in combination with impaired emotion and stress regulation. While several neuroimaging studies have linked SAD with hyperreactivity in limbic brain regions when exposed to emotional faces, little is known about habituation in both the amygdala and neocortical regulation areas. 15 untreated SAD patients and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during repeated blocks of facial emotion ([Formula: see text]) and object discrimination tasks ([Formula: see text]). Emotion processing networks were defined by a task-related contrast ([Formula: see text]). Linear regression was employed for assessing habituation effects in these regions. In both groups, the employed paradigm robustly activated the emotion processing and regulation network, including the amygdalae and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Statistically significant habituation effects were found in the amygdalae, OFC, and pulvinar thalamus of SAD patients. No such habituation was found in healthy controls. Concurrent habituation in the medial OFC and the amygdalae of SAD patients as shown in this study suggests intact functional integrity and successful short-term down-regulation of neural activation in brain areas responsible for emotion processing. Initial hyperactivation may be explained by an insufficient habituation to new stimuli during the first seconds of exposure. In addition, our results highlight the relevance of the orbitofrontal cortex in social anxiety disorders.

  5. 7 Tesla fMRI Reveals Systematic Functional Organization for Binocular Disparity in Dorsal Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Nuno R.; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M.; Francis, Susan T.; Schluppeck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception. PMID:25698743

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals differentially expressed proteins in the rat frontal cortex after methamphetamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Faure, J J; Hattingh, S M; Stein, D J; Daniels, W M

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psycho-stimulant and the illicit use of the drug is escalating. In the present study, we examined protein expression profiles in the rat frontal cortex exposed to a total of eight MA injections (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) using 2-DE based proteomics. We investigated protein changes occurring in both the cytosolic fraction and the membrane fraction. 2-DE analysis resulted in 62 cytosolic and 44 membrane protein spots that were differentially regulated in the frontal cortex of rats exposed to MA when compared to control animals. Of these spots, 47 cytosolic and 42 membrane proteins were identified respectively, using ESI-Quad-TOF, which included ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1), beta-synuclein, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), gamma-enolase, dihydropyrimidase-related protein 2 (DRP 2), complexin 2 and synapsin II. These proteins are associated with protein degradation, redox regulation, energy metabolism, cellular growth, cytoskeletal modifications and synaptic function. Proteomic research may be useful in exploring the complex underlying molecular mechanisms of MA dependence.

  7. 7 tesla FMRI reveals systematic functional organization for binocular disparity in dorsal visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Nuno R; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M; Francis, Susan T; Schluppeck, Denis; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-02-18

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception.

  8. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered encoding of active movement

    PubMed Central

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; DeLong, Mahlon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the movement-related activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) are thought to be a major contributor to the motor signs of Parkinson’s disease. The existing evidence, however, variably indicates that M1 is under-activated with movement, overactivated (due to a loss of functional specificity) or activated with abnormal timing. In addition, few models consider the possibility that distinct cortical neuron subtypes may be affected differently. Those gaps in knowledge were addressed by studying the extracellular activity of antidromically-identified lamina 5b pyramidal-tract type neurons (n = 153) and intratelencephalic-type corticostriatal neurons (n = 126) in the M1 of two monkeys as they performed a step-tracking arm movement task. We compared movement-related discharge before and after the induction of parkinsonism by administration of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) and quantified the spike rate encoding of specific kinematic parameters of movement using a generalized linear model. The fraction of M1 neurons with movement-related activity declined following MPTP but only marginally. The strength of neuronal encoding of parameters of movement was reduced markedly (mean 29% reduction in the coefficients from the generalized linear model). This relative decoupling of M1 activity from kinematics was attributable to reductions in the coefficients that estimated the spike rate encoding of movement direction (−22%), speed (−40%), acceleration (−49%) and hand position (−33%). After controlling for MPTP-induced changes in motor performance, M1 activity related to movement itself was reduced markedly (mean 36% hypoactivation). This reduced activation was strong in pyramidal tract-type neurons (−50%) but essentially absent in corticostriatal neurons. The timing of M1 activation was also abnormal, with earlier onset times, prolonged response durations, and a 43% reduction in the prevalence of movement-related changes

  9. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered encoding of active movement.

    PubMed

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; DeLong, Mahlon R; Turner, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the movement-related activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) are thought to be a major contributor to the motor signs of Parkinson's disease. The existing evidence, however, variably indicates that M1 is under-activated with movement, overactivated (due to a loss of functional specificity) or activated with abnormal timing. In addition, few models consider the possibility that distinct cortical neuron subtypes may be affected differently. Those gaps in knowledge were addressed by studying the extracellular activity of antidromically-identified lamina 5b pyramidal-tract type neurons (n = 153) and intratelencephalic-type corticostriatal neurons (n = 126) in the M1 of two monkeys as they performed a step-tracking arm movement task. We compared movement-related discharge before and after the induction of parkinsonism by administration of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) and quantified the spike rate encoding of specific kinematic parameters of movement using a generalized linear model. The fraction of M1 neurons with movement-related activity declined following MPTP but only marginally. The strength of neuronal encoding of parameters of movement was reduced markedly (mean 29% reduction in the coefficients from the generalized linear model). This relative decoupling of M1 activity from kinematics was attributable to reductions in the coefficients that estimated the spike rate encoding of movement direction (-22%), speed (-40%), acceleration (-49%) and hand position (-33%). After controlling for MPTP-induced changes in motor performance, M1 activity related to movement itself was reduced markedly (mean 36% hypoactivation). This reduced activation was strong in pyramidal tract-type neurons (-50%) but essentially absent in corticostriatal neurons. The timing of M1 activation was also abnormal, with earlier onset times, prolonged response durations, and a 43% reduction in the prevalence of movement-related changes beginning in the 150

  10. Multivariate Pattern Analysis Reveals Category-Related Organization of Semantic Representations in Anterior Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Malone, Patrick S; Glezer, Laurie S; Kim, Judy; Jiang, Xiong; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2016-09-28

    The neural substrates of semantic representation have been the subject of much controversy. The study of semantic representations is complicated by difficulty in disentangling perceptual and semantic influences on neural activity, as well as in identifying stimulus-driven, "bottom-up" semantic selectivity unconfounded by top-down task-related modulations. To address these challenges, we trained human subjects to associate pseudowords (TPWs) with various animal and tool categories. To decode semantic representations of these TPWs, we used multivariate pattern classification of fMRI data acquired while subjects performed a semantic oddball detection task. Crucially, the classifier was trained and tested on disjoint sets of TPWs, so that the classifier had to use the semantic information from the training set to correctly classify the test set. Animal and tool TPWs were successfully decoded based on fMRI activity in spatially distinct subregions of the left medial anterior temporal lobe (LATL). In addition, tools (but not animals) were successfully decoded from activity in the left inferior parietal lobule. The tool-selective LATL subregion showed greater functional connectivity with left inferior parietal lobule and ventral premotor cortex, indicating that each LATL subregion exhibits distinct patterns of connectivity. Our findings demonstrate category-selective organization of semantic representations in LATL into spatially distinct subregions, continuing the lateral-medial segregation of activation in posterior temporal cortex previously observed in response to images of animals and tools, respectively. Together, our results provide evidence for segregation of processing hierarchies for different classes of objects and the existence of multiple, category-specific semantic networks in the brain. The location and specificity of semantic representations in the brain are still widely debated. We trained human participants to associate specific pseudowords with various

  11. Turning visual shapes into sounds: early stages of reading acquisition revealed in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, M; Vidal, J R; de Palma, L; Hamamé, C M; Ossandon, T; Kahane, P; Minotti, L; Bertrand, O; Lachaux, J-P

    2014-04-15

    The exact role of the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC) during the initial stages of reading acquisition is a hotly debated issue, especially regarding the comparative effect of learning on early stimulus-dependent vs. later task-dependent processes. We show that this controversy can be solved with high-temporal resolution intracerebral EEG recordings of the VOTC. We measured High-Frequency Activity (50-150 Hz) as a proxy of population-level spiking activity while participants learned Japanese Katakana symbols, and found that learning primarily affects top-down/task-dependent neural processing, after a few minutes only. In contrast, adaptation of early bottom-up/stimulus-dependent processing takes several days to adapt and provides the basis for fluent reading. Such evidence that two consecutive stages of neural processing, stimulus- and task-dependent are differentially affected by learning, can reconcile seemingly opposite hypotheses on the role of the VOTC during reading acquisition.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in internet gaming addicts.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangheng; DeVito, Elise; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2012-09-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is increasingly recognized as a widespread disorder with serious psychological and health consequences. Diminished white matter integrity has been demonstrated in a wide range of other addictive disorders which share clinical characteristics with IGA. Abnormal white matter integrity in addictive populations has been associated with addiction severity, treatment response and cognitive impairments. This study assessed white matter integrity in individuals with internet gaming addiction (IGA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). IGA subjects (N = 16) showed higher fractional anisotropy (FA), indicating greater white matter integrity, in the thalamus and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls (N = 15). Higher FA in the thalamus was associated with greater severity of internet addiction. Increased regional FA in individuals with internet gaming addiction may be a pre-existing vulnerability factor for IGA, or may arise secondary to IGA, perhaps as a direct result of excessive internet game playing.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in internet gaming addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; DeVito, Elise; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is increasingly recognized as a widespread disorder with serious psychological and health consequences. Diminished white matter integrity has been demonstrated in a wide range of other addictive disorders which share clinical characteristics with IGA. Abnormal white matter integrity in addictive populations has been associated with addiction severity, treatment response and cognitive impairments. This study assessed white matter integrity in individuals with internet gaming addiction (IGA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). IGA subjects (N=16) showed higher fractional anisotropy (FA), indicating greater white matter integrity, in the thalamus and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls (N=15). Higher FA in the thalamus was associated with greater severity of internet addiction. Increased regional FA in individuals with internet gaming addiction may be a pre-existing vulnerability factor for IGA, or may arise secondary to IGA, perhaps as a direct result of excessive internet game playing. PMID:22727905

  14. Noradrenergic innervation of the human adrenal cortex as revealed by dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, B G; McGadey, J; Russell, D; Neal, D E

    1992-01-01

    Noradrenergic innervation of the human adrenal cortex was investigated using immunohistochemistry directed at dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Nerves were present as slender trunks and individual varicose fibres in the capsule and all cortical zones except the inner zona reticularis. Some fibres were located adjacent to blood vessels and in the muscular tunics of arterioles; others were apparently adjacent to parenchymal cells. These results in the human confirm and extend previous animal studies and suggest a possible anatomical substrate for regulation of adrenal blood flow, and also for the direct action of noradrenaline on zona fasciculata cells to stimulate glucocorticoid secretion via beta-1-adrenoceptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1336772

  15. Auditory-driven phase reset in visual cortex: Human electrocorticography reveals mechanisms of early multisensory integration

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Manuel R.; Foxe, John J.; Fiebelkorn, Ian C.; Butler, John S.; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Molholm, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Findings in animal models demonstrate that activity within hierarchically early sensory cortical regions can be modulated by cross-sensory inputs through resetting of the phase of ongoing intrinsic neural oscillations. Here, subdural recordings evaluated whether phase resetting by auditory inputs would impact multisensory integration processes in human visual cortex. Results clearly showed auditory-driven phase reset in visual cortices and, in some cases, frank auditory event-related potentials (ERP) were also observed over these regions. Further, when audiovisual bisensory stimuli were presented, this led to robust multisensory integration effects which were observed in both the ERP and in measures of phase concentration. These results extend findings from animal models to human visual cortices, and highlight the impact of cross-sensory phase resetting by a non-primary stimulus on multisensory integration in ostensibly unisensory cortices. PMID:23624493

  16. Suppressive responses by visual food cues in postprandial activities of insular cortex as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-06-03

    'Hara-Hachibu' in Japanese means a subjective sense by which we stop eating just before the motivation to eat is completely lost, a similar concept to caloric restriction (CR). Insular cortex is a critical platform which integrates sensory information into decision-making processes in eating behavior. We compared the responses of insular cortex, as assessed by magnetoencephalography (MEG), immediately after presentation of food images in the Fasting condition with those in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition. Eleven healthy, right-handed males [age, 27.2±9.6 years; body mass index, 22.6±2.1kg/m(2) (mean±SD)] were enrolled in a randomized, two-crossover experiment (Fasting and 'Hara-Hachibu' conditions). Before the MEG recordings in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition, the participants consumed rice balls as much as they judged themselves to have consumed shortly before reaching satiety. During the MEG recordings, they viewed food pictures projected on a screen. The intensities of MEG responses to viewing food pictures were significantly lower in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition than those in the Fasting condition (P<0.05). The intensities of the MEG responses to the visual food stimuli in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition was positively associated with the factor-3 (food tasted) (r=0.693, P=0.018) and aggregated scores (r=0.659, P=0.027) of the Power of Food Scale, a self-report measure of hedonic hunger. These findings may help to elucidate the neural basis of variability of appetite phenotypes under the condition of CR among individuals, and to develop possible strategies for the maintenance of adequate CR in daily life. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging studies in congenital anophthalmia reveal preservation of brain architecture in 'visual' cortex.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; Cowey, Alan; Ragge, Nicola; Watkins, Kate

    2009-12-01

    The functional specialization of the human brain means that many regions are dedicated to processing a single sensory modality. When a modality is absent, as in congenital total blindness, 'visual' regions can be reliably activated by non-visual stimuli. The connections underlying this functional adaptation, however, remain elusive. In this study, using structural and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the structural differences in the brains of six bilaterally anophthalmic subjects compared with sighted subjects. Surprisingly, the gross structural differences in the brains were small, even in the occipital lobe where only a small region of the primary visual cortex showed a bilateral reduction in grey matter volume in the anophthalmic subjects compared with controls. Regions of increased cortical thickness were apparent on the banks of the Calcarine sulcus, but not in the fundus. Subcortically, the white matter volume around the optic tract and internal capsule in anophthalmic subjects showed a large decrease, yet the optic radiation volume did not differ significantly. However, the white matter integrity, as measured with fractional anisotropy showed an extensive reduction throughout the brain in the anophthalmic subjects, with the greatest difference in the optic radiations. In apparent contradiction to the latter finding, the connectivity between the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex measured with diffusion tractography did not differ between the two populations. However, these findings can be reconciled by a demonstration that at least some of the reduction in fractional anisotropy in the optic radiation is due to an increase in the strength of fibres crossing the radiations. In summary, the major changes in the 'visual' brain in anophthalmic subjects may be subcortical, although the evidence of decreased fractional anisotropy and increased crossing fibres could indicate considerable re-organization.

  18. MEG Multivariate Analysis Reveals Early Abstract Action Representations in the Lateral Occipitotemporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Tucciarelli, Raffaele; Turella, Luca; Oosterhof, Nikolaas N; Weisz, Nathan; Lingnau, Angelika

    2015-12-09

    Understanding other people's actions is a fundamental prerequisite for social interactions. Whether action understanding relies on simulating the actions of others in the observers' motor system or on the access to conceptual knowledge stored in nonmotor areas is strongly debated. It has been argued previously that areas that play a crucial role in action understanding should (1) distinguish between different actions, (2) generalize across the ways in which actions are performed (Dinstein et al., 2008; Oosterhof et al., 2013; Caramazza et al., 2014), and (3) have access to action information around the time of action recognition (Hauk et al., 2008). Whereas previous studies focused on the first two criteria, little is known about the dynamics underlying action understanding. We examined which human brain regions are able to distinguish between pointing and grasping, regardless of reach direction (left or right) and effector (left or right hand), using multivariate pattern analysis of magnetoencephalography data. We show that the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) has the earliest access to abstract action representations, which coincides with the time point from which there was enough information to allow discriminating between the two actions. By contrast, precentral regions, though recruited early, have access to such abstract representations substantially later. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to the LOTC, the early recruitment of precentral regions does not contain the detailed information that is required to recognize an action. We discuss previous theoretical claims of motor theories and how they are incompatible with our data. It is debated whether our ability to understand other people's actions relies on the simulation of actions in the observers' motor system, or is based on access to conceptual knowledge stored in nonmotor areas. Here, using magnetoencephalography in combination with machine learning, we examined where in the brain and at

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Brain Cortex Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tambalo, Stefano; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rigolio, Roberta; Fiorini, Silvia; Bontempi, Pietro; Mallucci, Giulia; Balzarotti, Beatrice; Marmiroli, Paola; Sbarbati, Andrea; Cavaletti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cortical reorganization occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is thought to play a key role in limiting the effect of structural tissue damage. Conversely, its exhaustion may contribute to the irreversible disability that accumulates with disease progression. Several aspects of MS-related cortical reorganization, including the overall functional effect and likely modulation by therapies, still remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of functional cortical reorganization and its brain structural/pathological correlates in Dark Agouti rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted preclinical model of chronic MS. Morphological and functional MRI (fMRI) were performed before disease induction and during the relapsing and chronic phases of EAE. During somatosensory stimulation of the right forepaw, fMRI demonstrated that cortical reorganization occurs in both relapsing and chronic phases of EAE with increased activated volume and decreased laterality index versus baseline values. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated gray matter (GM) atrophy in the cerebral cortex, and both GM and white matter atrophy were assessed by ex vivo pathology of the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Neuroinflammation persisted in the relapsing and chronic phases, with dendritic spine density in the layer IV sensory neurons inversely correlating with the number of cluster of differentiation 45-positive inflammatory lesions. Our work provides an innovative experimental platform that may be pivotal for the comprehension of key mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of irreversible brain damage and for the development of innovative therapies to reduce disability in EAE/MS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Since the early 2000s, functional MRI (fMRI) has demonstrated profound modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas during motor, cognitive, and sensory tasks in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Experimental autoimmune

  20. Astrocyte activation in the anterior cingulate cortex and altered glutamatergic gene expression during paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Spinal astrocyte activation contributes to the pathogenesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP) in animal models. We examined glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; an astrocyte marker) immunoreactivity and gene expression of GFAP, glutamate transporters and receptor subunits by real time PCR in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) at 7 days post first administration of paclitaxel, a time point when mice had developed thermal hyperalgesia. The ACC, an area in the brain involved in pain perception and modulation, was chosen because changes in this area might contribute to the pathophysiology of PINP. GFAP transcripts levels were elevated by more than fivefold and GFAP immunoreactivity increased in the ACC of paclitaxel-treated mice. The 6 glutamate transporters (GLAST, GLT-1 EAAC1, EAAT4, VGLUT-1 and VGLUT-2) quantified were not significantly altered by paclitaxel treatment. Of the 12 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits transcripts analysed 6 (GLuA1, GLuA3, GLuK2, GLuK3, GLuK5 and GLuN1) were significantly up-regulated, whereas GLuA2, GLuK1, GLuK4, GLuN2A and GLuN2B were not significantly altered and GLuA4 was lowly expressed. Amongst the 8 metabotropic receptor subunits analysed only mGLuR8 was significantly elevated. In conclusion, during PINP there is astrocyte activation, with no change in glutamate transporter expression and differential up-regulation of glutamate receptor subunits in the ACC. Thus, targeting astrocyte activation and the glutamatergic system might be another therapeutic avenue for management of PINP. PMID:26528412

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein isoform alterations in the orbitofrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may play a role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, in which hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis abnormalities are observed and stress has been implicated. A critical component of the HPA axis which mediates cellular stress responses in the OFC, and has been implicated in psychiatric illness, is the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Methods In the lateral OFC, we employed quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting to investigate GR mRNA and protein expression in 34 bipolar disorder cases, 35 schizophrenia cases and 35 controls. Genotype data for eleven GR gene (NR3C1) polymorphisms was also used to explore possible effects of NR3C1 sequence variation on GR mRNA and protein expression in the lateral OFC. Results We found no diagnostic differences in pan GR, GR-1C or GR-1F mRNA expression. However, the GR-1B mRNA transcript variant was decreased (14.3%) in bipolar disorder cases relative to controls (p < 0.05), while GR-1H mRNA was decreased (22.0%) in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (p < 0.005). By western blotting, there were significant increases in abundance of a truncated GRα isoform, putative GRα-D1, in bipolar disorder (56.1%, p < 0.005) and schizophrenia (31.5% p < 0.05). Using genotype data for eleven NR3C1 polymorphisms, we found no evidence of effects of NR3C1 genotype on GR mRNA or GRα protein expression in the OFC. Conclusions These findings reveal selective abnormalities of GR mRNA expression in the lateral OFC in psychiatric illness, which are more specific and may be less influenced by NR3C1 genotype than those of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reported previously. Our results suggest that the GRα-D1 protein isoform may be up-regulated widely across the frontal cortex in psychiatric illness. PMID:22812453

  2. tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within primary motor cortex predict motor learning and motor memory: A 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyoung; Stephenson, Mary C.; Morris, Peter G.; Jackson, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability in a polarity specific manner and has been shown to influence learning and memory. tDCS may have both on-line and after-effects on learning and memory, and the latter are thought to be based upon tDCS-induced alterations in neurochemistry and synaptic function. We used ultra-high-field (7 T) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), together with a robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task, to investigate whether tDCS-induced alterations in GABA and Glutamate within motor cortex predict motor learning and memory. Note that adaptation to a robot-induced force field has long been considered to be a form of model-based learning that is closely associated with the computation and ‘supervised’ learning of internal ‘forward’ models within the cerebellum. Importantly, previous studies have shown that on-line tDCS to the cerebellum, but not to motor cortex, enhances model-based motor learning. Here we demonstrate that anodal tDCS delivered to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex induces a significant reduction in GABA concentration. This effect was specific to GABA, localised to the left motor cortex, and was polarity specific insofar as it was not observed following either cathodal or sham stimulation. Importantly, we show that the magnitude of tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within motor cortex predicts individual differences in both motor learning and motor memory on the robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task. PMID:24904994

  3. tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within primary motor cortex predict motor learning and motor memory: a 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyoung; Stephenson, Mary C; Morris, Peter G; Jackson, Stephen R

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability in a polarity specific manner and has been shown to influence learning and memory. tDCS may have both on-line and after-effects on learning and memory, and the latter are thought to be based upon tDCS-induced alterations in neurochemistry and synaptic function. We used ultra-high-field (7 T) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), together with a robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task, to investigate whether tDCS-induced alterations in GABA and Glutamate within motor cortex predict motor learning and memory. Note that adaptation to a robot-induced force field has long been considered to be a form of model-based learning that is closely associated with the computation and 'supervised' learning of internal 'forward' models within the cerebellum. Importantly, previous studies have shown that on-line tDCS to the cerebellum, but not to motor cortex, enhances model-based motor learning. Here we demonstrate that anodal tDCS delivered to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex induces a significant reduction in GABA concentration. This effect was specific to GABA, localised to the left motor cortex, and was polarity specific insofar as it was not observed following either cathodal or sham stimulation. Importantly, we show that the magnitude of tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within motor cortex predicts individual differences in both motor learning and motor memory on the robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Altered CB receptor-signaling in prefrontal cortex from an animal model of depression is reversed by chronic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Rojo, M Luisa; Pazos, Angel; Díaz, Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in the rat (OBX) induces behavioral, neurochemical, and structural abnormalities similar to those observed in human depression that are normalized after chronic, but not acute, treatment with antidepressants. In our study, OBX animals exhibited significant increases in both CB(1) receptor density ([(3)H]CP55490 binding) and functionality (stimulation of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding by the cannabinoid (CB) agonist WIN 55212-2) at the prefrontal cortex (PFC). After chronic treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day, 14 days, s.c.), OBX-induced hyperactivity in the open-field test was fully abolished. Interestingly, chronic fluoxetine fully reversed the enhanced CB(1)-receptor signaling in PFC observed following OBX. The CB agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg, i.p., 1 day) did not produce any behavioral effect in sham-operated animals but returned locomotor activity to control values in OBX rats. As both acute administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and chronic fluoxetine elicited a similar behavioral effect in the OBX rat, it is not unlikely that the regionally selective enhancement of CB(1) receptor-signaling in the PFC could be related with the altered OBX behavior. Our findings reinforce the utility of this animal model to further investigating the implication of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of emotional processes and its potential role in the adaptive responses to chronic antidepressants.

  5. 10 Hz rTMS over right parietal cortex alters sense of agency during self-controlled movements

    PubMed Central

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Karabanov, Anke N.; Christensen, Mark S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    A large body of fMRI and lesion-literature has provided evidence that the Inferior Parietal Cortex (IPC) is important for sensorimotor integration and sense of agency (SoA). We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to explore the role of the IPC during a validated SoA detection task. 12 healthy, right-handed adults were included. The effects of rTMS on subjects' SoA during self-controlled movements were explored. The experiment consisted of 1/3 self-controlled movements and 2/3 computer manipulated movements that introduced uncertainty as to whether the subjects were agents of an observed movement. Subjects completed three sessions, in which subjects received online rTMS over the right IPC (active condition), over the vertex (CZ) (sham condition) or no TMS but a sound-matched control. We found that rTMS over right IPC significantly altered SoA of the non-perturbed movements. Following IPC stimulation subjects were more likely to experience self-controlled movements as being externally perturbed compared to the control site (P = 0.002) and the stimulation-free control (P = 0.042). The data support the importance of IPC activation during sensorimotor comparison in order to correctly determine the agent of movements. PMID:25009489

  6. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-03

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets.

  7. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-Parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbach, David; Conti, Melissa M.; Ostock, Corinne Y.; Dupre, Kristin B.; Bishop, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression are altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD / dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD / dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:26363150

  8. Semaphorin and plexin gene expression is altered in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients with and without auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Sáez, Ana Rosa; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; González-Martínez, Rocio; Costa, Juan; Haro, Josep María; Callado, Luis F; Meana, J Javier; Nacher, Juán; Sanjuán, Julio; Moltó, María Dolores

    2015-10-30

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are clinical hallmarks of schizophrenia, however little is known about molecular genetics of these symptoms. In this study, gene expression profiling of postmortem brain samples from prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients without AH (SNA), patients with AH (SA) and control subjects were compared. Genome-wide expression analysis was conducted using samples of three individuals of each group and the Affymetrix GeneChip Human-Gene 1.0 ST-Array. This analysis identified the Axon Guidance pathway as one of the most differentially expressed network among SNA, SA and CNT. To confirm the transcriptome results, mRNA level quantification of seventeen genes involved in this pathway was performed in a larger sample. PLXNB1, SEMA3A, SEMA4D and SEM6C were upregulated in SNA or SA patients compared to controls. PLXNA1 and SEMA3D showed down-regulation in their expression in the patient's samples, but differences remained statistically significant between the SNA patients and controls. Differences between SNA and SA were found in PLXNB1 expression which is decreased in SA patients. This study strengthens the contribution of brain plasticity in pathophysiology of schizophrenia and shows that non-hallucinatory patients present more alterations in frontal regions than patients with hallucinations concerning neural plasticity.

  9. Altered activity of the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of an active avoidance task

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xilu; Beck, Kevin D.; Myers, Catherine E.; Servatius, Richard J.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Altered medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala function is associated with anxiety-related disorders. While the mPFC-amygdala pathway has a clear role in fear conditioning, these structures are also involved in active avoidance. Given that avoidance perseveration represents a core symptom of anxiety disorders, the neural substrate of avoidance, especially its extinction, requires better understanding. The present study was designed to investigate the activity, particularly, inhibitory neuronal activity in mPFC and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of lever-press avoidance in rats. Neural activity was examined in the mPFC, intercalated cell clusters (ITCs) lateral (LA), basal (BA) and central (CeA) amygdala, at various time points during acquisition and extinction, using induction of the immediate early gene product, c-Fos. Neural activity was greater in the mPFC, LA, BA, and ITC during the extinction phase as compared to the acquisition phase. In contrast, the CeA was the only region that was more activated during acquisition than during extinction. Our results indicate inhibitory neurons are more activated during late phase of acquisition and extinction in the mPFC and LA, suggesting the dynamic involvement of inhibitory circuits in the development and extinction of avoidance response. Together, these data start to identify the key brain regions important in active avoidance behavior, areas that could be associated with avoidance perseveration in anxiety disorders. PMID:26441578

  10. Prenatal cocaine exposure alters functional activation in the ventral prefrontal cortex and its structural connectivity with the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihao; Santhanam, Priya; Coles, Claire D; Ellen Lynch, Mary; Hamann, Stephan; Peltier, Scott; Hu, Xiaoping

    2013-07-30

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with arousal dysregulation, and alterations of amygdala activity in response to emotional arousal have previously been reported. However, voluntary regulation of emotional affect, enabling appropriate neural response to different streams of stimuli, must also engage prefrontal regions, yet the impact of PCE on these prefrontal mechanisms has not been investigated. Recent neuroimaging studies have shown the involvement of ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in the modulation of amygdala reactivity and the mediation of effective emotional regulation. Based on these findings, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the present study compared functional activations of the vPFC as well as its structural connectivity with the amygdala between groups of PCE and control adolescents. In a working memory task with emotional distracters, the PCE adolescents exhibited less capability of increasing their vPFC activation in response to increased memory load, which corresponded with their less suppressed amygdala activation. Reduced structural connectivity between the vPFC and the amygdala was also observed from DTI measurement in the PCE group. In addition, correlations between amygdala activation and (i) vPFC activation, as well as (ii) amygdala-vPFC structural connectivity, were observed in the control but not in the PCE group. These data complement previous findings of the impact of PCE on the activity of the amygdala and extend our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effect of PCE on arousal dysregulation reported in human and animal studies.

  11. Cell-based reporters reveal in vivo dynamics of dopamine and norepinephrine release in murine cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Arnaud; Joseph, Victory; Slesinger, Paul A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal coding of stimulus-to-action sequences are believed to involve the release of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). The electrochemical similarity of these monoamines, however, confounds real-time measurements of their release. Here we report the creation of cell-based neurotransmitter fluorescent-engineered reporters (CNiFERs) that utilize the specificity of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to discriminate nanomolar concentrations of DA and NE. CNiFERs were implanted into frontal cortex of mice to measure the timing of neurotransmitter release during classical conditioning using two-photon microscopy. The onset of DA release correlated with that of licking and monotonically shifted from the time of the reward toward that of the cue. In contrast, concurrent release of NE did not correlate with licking or the cue. This new generation of CNiFERs provides unique tools to assess the release of monoamines. The molecular design of these CNiFERs may be generalized to realize CNiFERs for any molecule that activates a GPCR. PMID:25344639

  12. Nonlinear properties of medial entorhinal cortex neurons reveal frequency selectivity during multi-sinusoidal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Christophe; Economo, Michael N; White, John A; Moore, Lee E

    2014-01-01

    The neurons in layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex are part of the grid cell network involved in the representation of space. Many of these neurons are likely to be stellate cells with specific oscillatory and firing properties important for their function. A fundamental understanding of the nonlinear basis of these oscillatory properties is critical for the development of theories of grid cell firing. In order to evaluate the behavior of stellate neurons, measurements of their quadratic responses were used to estimate a second order Volterra kernel. This paper uses an operator theory, termed quadratic sinusoidal analysis (QSA), which quantitatively determines that the quadratic response accounts for a major part of the nonlinearity observed at membrane potential levels characteristic of normal synaptic events. Practically, neurons were probed with multi-sinusoidal stimulations to determine a Hermitian operator that captures the quadratic function in the frequency domain. We have shown that the frequency content of the stimulation plays an important role in the characteristics of the nonlinear response, which can distort the linear response as well. Stimulations with enhanced low frequency amplitudes evoked a different nonlinear response than broadband profiles. The nonlinear analysis was also applied to spike frequencies and it was shown that the nonlinear response of subthreshold membrane potential at resonance frequencies near the threshold is similar to the nonlinear response of spike trains.

  13. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Reveals Executive Control Dissociation in the Rostral Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    He, Weijiang; Fan, Chenggui; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that the rostral prefrontal cortex (rPFC) plays a crucial role in executive tasks, the various functions of the rPFC in the humans are still understudied. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to interfere with the executive control functions of the right rostrolateral PFC (RLPFC) or the right rostromedial PFC (RMPFC). Subjects performed a task-switching paradigm, which included spatial detection (SD), prospective memory (PM) and working memory (WM) tasks, after cTBS. The performance of 18 healthy volunteers was evaluated on different days after cTBS over the right RLPFC, the right RMPFC, and the vertex (serving as a control site). The application of cTBS over the RLPFC significantly increased the switching costs (SCs) of the error rates (ERs) when switching to the PM task, while RMPFC-cTBS decreased SCs of ERs when switching to the WM task, compared with the control vertex site. These findings provide evidence for a differential role of the RLPFC and the RMPFC in executive functions, with a specific involvement of the RLPFC and the RMPFC in PM, and WM, respectively.

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals compensatory effects in the piriform cortex of VX nerve agent exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Wright, James D; Manda, Srikanth S; Zhong, Jun; Na, Chan Hyun; Meyerhoff, James; Benton, Bernard; Jabbour, Rabih; Willis, Kristen; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the toxicity induced by the nerve agent VX, an MS-based phosphoproteomic analysis was carried out on the piriform cortex region of brains from VX-treated rats. Using isobaric tag based TMT labeling followed by titanium dioxide enrichment strategy, we identified 9975 unique phosphosites derived from 3287 phosphoproteins. Temporal changes in the phosphorylation status of peptides were observed over a time period of 24 h in rats exposed to a 1× LD50, intravenous (i.v.) dose with the most notable changes occurring at the 1 h postexposure time point. Five major functional classes of proteins exhibited changes in their phosphorylation status: (i) ion channels/transporters, including ATPases, (ii) kinases/phosphatases, (iii) GTPases, (iv) structural proteins, and (v) transcriptional regulatory proteins. This study is the first quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of VX toxicity in the brain. Understanding the toxicity and compensatory signaling mechanisms will improve the understanding of the complex toxicity of VX in the brain and aid in the elucidation of novel molecular targets that would be important for development of improved countermeasures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001184 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001184).

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography angiography reveals laminar microvascular hemodynamics in the rat somatosensory cortex during activation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Radhakrishnan, Harsha

    2014-11-15

    The BOLD (blood-oxygen-level dependent) fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) signal is shaped, in part, by changes in red blood cell (RBC) content and flow across vascular compartments over time. These complex dynamics have been challenging to characterize directly due to a lack of appropriate imaging modalities. In this study, making use of infrared light scattering from RBCs, depth-resolved Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) angiography was applied to image laminar functional hyperemia in the rat somatosensory cortex. After defining and validating depth-specific metrics for changes in RBC content and speed, laminar hemodynamic responses in microvasculature up to cortical depths of >1mm were measured during a forepaw stimulus. The results provide a comprehensive picture of when and where changes in RBC content and speed occur during and immediately following cortical activation. In summary, the earliest and largest microvascular RBC content changes occurred in the middle cortical layers, while post-stimulus undershoots were most prominent superficially. These laminar variations in positive and negative responses paralleled known distributions of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, suggesting neuronal underpinnings. Additionally, the RBC speed response consistently returned to baseline more promptly than RBC content after the stimulus across cortical layers, supporting a "flow-volume mismatch" of hemodynamic origin.

  16. Microstimulation reveals opposing influences of prelimbic and infralimbic cortex on the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Gonzalez, Ivan; Vidal-Gonzalez, Benjamín; Rauch, Scott L; Quirk, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies using lesion, infusion, and unit-recording techniques suggest that the infralimbic (IL) subregion of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is necessary for the inhibition of conditioned fear following extinction. Brief microstimulation of IL paired with conditioned tones, designed to mimic neuronal tone responses, reduces the expression of conditioned fear to the tone. In the present study we used microstimulation to investigate the role of additional mPFC subregions: the prelimbic (PL), dorsal anterior cingulate (ACd), and medial precentral (PrCm) cortices in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear. These are tone-responsive areas that have been implicated in both acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear. In contrast to IL, microstimulation of PL increased the expression of conditioned fear and prevented extinction. Microstimulation of ACd and PrCm had no effect. Under low-footshock conditions (to avoid ceiling levels of freezing), microstimulation of PL and IL had opposite effects, respectively increasing and decreasing freezing to the conditioned tone. We suggest that PL excites amygdala output and IL inhibits amygdala output, providing a mechanism for bidirectional modulation of fear expression.

  17. Mental blocks: fMRI reveals top-down modulation of early visual cortex when obstacles interfere with grasp planning.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Craig S; Gallivan, Jason P; Culham, Jody C; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2011-06-01

    When grasping an object, the fingers, hand and arm rarely collide with other non-target objects in the workspace. Kinematic studies of neurological patients (Schindler et al., 2004) and healthy participants (Chapman and Goodale, 2010a) suggest that the location of potential obstacles and the degree of interference they pose are encoded by the dorsal visual stream during action planning. Here, we used a slow event-related paradigm in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural encoding of obstacles in normal participants. Fifteen right-handed participants grasped a square target object with a thumb-front or thumb-side wrist-posture with (1) no obstacle present, (2) an obstacle behind the target object (interfering with the thumb-front grasp), or (3) an obstacle beside the target object (interfering with the thumb-side grasp). Within a specified network of areas involved in planning, a group voxelwise analysis revealed that one area in the left posterior intraparietal sulcus (pIPS) and one in early visual cortex were modulated by the degree of obstacle interference, and that this modulation occurred prior to movement execution. Given previous reports of a functional link between IPS and early visual cortex, we suggest that the increasing activity in the IPS with obstacle interference provides the top-down signal to suppress the corresponding obstacle coding in early visual areas, where we observed that activity decreased with interference. This is the first concrete evidence that the planning of a grasping movement can modulate early visual cortex and provides a unifying framework for understanding the dual role played by the IPS in motor planning and attentional orienting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RNA-Sequencing Analysis Reveals a Regulatory Role for Transcription Factor Fezf2 in the Mature Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Clare, Alison J; Wicky, Hollie E; Empson, Ruth M; Hughes, Stephanie M

    2017-01-01

    Forebrain embryonic zinc finger (Fezf2) encodes a transcription factor essential for the specification of layer 5 projection neurons (PNs) in the developing cerebral cortex. As with many developmental transcription factors, Fezf2 continues to be expressed into adulthood, suggesting it remains crucial to the maintenance of neuronal phenotypes. Despite the continued expression, a function has yet to be explored for Fezf2 in the PNs of the developed cortex. Here, we investigated the role of Fezf2 in mature neurons, using lentiviral-mediated delivery of a shRNA to conditionally knockdown the expression of Fezf2 in the mouse primary motor cortex (M1). RNA-sequencing analysis of Fezf2-reduced M1 revealed significant changes to the transcriptome, identifying a regulatory role for Fezf2 in the mature M1. Kyoto Encyclopedia Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses of Fezf2-regulated genes indicated a role in neuronal signaling and plasticity, with significant enrichment of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules and calcium signaling pathways. Gene Ontology analysis supported a functional role for Fezf2-regulated genes in neuronal transmission and additionally indicated an importance in the regulation of behavior. Using the mammalian phenotype ontology database, we identified a significant overrepresentation of Fezf2-regulated genes associated with specific behavior phenotypes, including associative learning, social interaction, locomotor activation and hyperactivity. These roles were distinct from that of Fezf2-regulated genes identified in development, indicating a dynamic transition in Fezf2 function. Together our findings demonstrate a regulatory role for Fezf2 in the mature brain, with Fezf2-regulated genes having functional roles in sustaining normal neuronal and behavioral phenotypes. These results support the hypothesis that developmental transcription factors are important for maintaining neuron transcriptomes and that disruption of their

  19. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Reveals Abnormal Hemodynamics in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Menopausal Depression Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chen-Yu; Sun, Jing-Jing

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective. Menopausal depression (MD) is characterized by depressive symptoms along with hormonal fluctuations. We investigate brain function alteration between major depressive disorder (MDD) and MD. Methods. The difference in oxygenated hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) for the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was compared retrospectively among 90 females presented with 30 MDD, 30 MD, and 30 healthy controls (HCs) using verbal fluency task (VFT) with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Results. We observed a significant difference in Oxy-Hb alteration in the left dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC) using VFT with NIRS (channel 18, P = 0.007) between the MD and MDD groups. A significant difference in Oxy-Hb levels was observed among the three groups in the bilateral DLPFC (channels 18, 27, 33, 39, 41, and 45; P < 0.05). Compared to the HCs, the MD group presented lower Oxy-Hb activation in the right DLPFC (channel 41; P = 0.048) and the left DLPFC (channels 18, 39, and 45; P < 0.05), and the MDD group presented lower Oxy-Hb activation in the right DLPFC (channels 27, 33, and 41; P < 0.05) and the left DLPFC (channels 39 and 45; P < 0.05). Conclusion. Abnormal hemodynamics of the left DLPFC can differentiate MD from MDD by NIRS. PMID:28293062

  20. Spoken word memory traces within the human auditory cortex revealed by repetition priming and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gagnepain, Pierre; Chételat, Gael; Landeau, Brigitte; Dayan, Jacques; Eustache, Francis; Lebreton, Karine

    2008-05-14

    Previous neuroimaging studies in the visual domain have shown that neurons along the perceptual processing pathway retain the physical properties of written words, faces, and objects. The aim of this study was to reveal the existence of similar neuronal properties within the human auditory cortex. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a repetition priming paradigm, with words and pseudowords heard in an acoustically degraded format. Both the amplitude and peak latency of the hemodynamic response (HR) were assessed to determine the nature of the neuronal signature of spoken word priming. A statistically significant stimulus type by repetition interaction was found in various bilateral auditory cortical areas, demonstrating either HR suppression and enhancement for repeated spoken words and pseudowords, respectively, or word-specific repetition suppression without any significant effects for pseudowords. Repetition latency shift only occurred with word-specific repetition suppression in the right middle/posterior superior temporal sulcus. In this region, both repetition suppression and latency shift were related to behavioral priming. Our findings highlight for the first time the existence of long-term spoken word memory traces within the human auditory cortex. The timescale of auditory information integration and the neuronal mechanisms underlying priming both appear to differ according to the level of representations coded by neurons. Repetition may "sharpen" word-nonspecific representations coding short temporal variations, whereas a complex interaction between the activation strength and temporal integration of neuronal activity may occur in neuronal populations coding word-specific representations within longer temporal windows.

  1. Mechanisms of Direction Selectivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex as Revealed by Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lampl, Ilan; Ferster, David

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for the direction of visual motion. Cortical direction selectivity could emerge from the spatiotemporal configuration of inputs from thalamic cells, from intracortical inhibitory interactions, or from a combination of thalamic and intracortical interactions. To distinguish between these possibilities, we studied the effect of adaptation (prolonged visual stimulation) on the direction selectivity of intracellularly recorded cortical neurons. It is known that adaptation selectively reduces the responses of cortical neurons, while largely sparing the afferent LGN input. Adaptation can therefore be used as a tool to dissect the relative contribution of afferent and intracortical interactions to the generation of direction selectivity. In both simple and complex cells, adaptation caused a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (−2.5 mV, simple cells, −0.95 mV complex cells). In simple cells, adaptation in either direction only slightly reduced the visually evoked depolarization; this reduction was similar for preferred and null directions. In complex cells, adaptation strongly reduced visual responses in a direction-dependent manner: the reduction was largest when the stimulus direction matched that of the adapting motion. As a result, adaptation caused changes in the direction selectivity of complex cells: direction selectivity was reduced after preferred direction adaptation and increased after null direction adaptation. Because adaptation in the null direction enhanced direction selectivity rather than reduced it, it seems unlikely that inhibition from the null direction is the primary mechanism for creating direction selectivity. PMID:20739595

  2. Neuroanatomical alterations and synaptic plasticity impairment in the perirhinal cortex of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roncacé, Vincenzo; Burattini, Costanza; Stagni, Fiorenza; Guidi, Sandra; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2017-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS), a genetic condition due to triplication of Chromosome 21, is characterized by numerous neurodevelopmental alterations and intellectual disability. Individuals with DS and DS mouse models are impaired in several memory domains, including hippocampus-dependent declarative (spatial, in rodents) memory and visual recognition memory, a form of memory in which the perirhinal cortex (PRC) plays a fundamental role. The anatomo-functional substrates of hippocampus-dependent memory impairment have been largely elucidated in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. In contrast, there is a lack of corresponding information regarding visual recognition memory. Therefore, we deemed it of interest to examine at both an anatomical and functional level the PRC of Ts65Dn mice. We found that the PRC of adult (1.5-3.5month-old) Ts65Dn mice exhibited diffused hypocellularity and neurons with a reduced spine density. No difference between Ts65Dn and euploid mice was detected in the abundance of glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals. We examined brain slices for long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity involved in long-term memory. Theta burst stimulation of intracortical fibers was used in order to elicit LTP in the superficial layers of the PRC. We found that in trisomic slices LTP had a similar time-course but a reduced magnitude in comparison with euploid slices. While exposure to the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin had no effect on LTP magnitude, exposure to the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP55845 caused an increase in LTP magnitude that became even larger than in euploid slices. Western blot analysis showed increased levels of the G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channel 2 (GIRK2) in the PRC of Ts65Dn mice, consistent with triplication of the gene coding for GIRK2. This suggests that the reduced magnitude of LTP may be caused by GIRK2-dependent exaggerated GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition. Results provide novel evidence for anatomo

  3. Post-Stroke Longitudinal Alterations of Inter-Hemispheric Correlation and Hemispheric Dominance in Mouse Pre-Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Panarese, Alessandro; Alia, Claudia; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo; Di Garbo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Limited restoration of function is known to occur spontaneously after an ischemic injury to the primary motor cortex. Evidence suggests that Pre-Motor Areas (PMAs) may “take over” control of the disrupted functions. However, little is known about functional reorganizations in PMAs. Forelimb movements in mice can be driven by two cortical regions, Caudal and Rostral Forelimb Areas (CFA and RFA), generally accepted as primary motor and pre-motor cortex, respectively. Here, we examined longitudinal changes in functional coupling between the two RFAs following unilateral photothrombotic stroke in CFA (mm from Bregma: +0.5 anterior, +1.25 lateral). Methods Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the RFAs of both hemispheres in freely moving injured and naïve mice. Neural signals were acquired at 9, 16 and 23 days after surgery (sub-acute period in stroke animals) through one bipolar electrode per hemisphere placed in the center of RFA, with a ground screw over the occipital bone. LFPs were pre-processed through an efficient method of artifact removal and analysed through: spectral,cross-correlation, mutual information and Granger causality analysis. Results Spectral analysis demonstrated an early decrease (day 9) in the alpha band power in both the RFAs. In the late sub-acute period (days 16 and 23), inter-hemispheric functional coupling was reduced in ischemic animals, as shown by a decrease in the cross-correlation and mutual information measures. Within the gamma and delta bands, correlation measures were already reduced at day 9. Granger analysis, used as a measure of the symmetry of the inter-hemispheric causal connectivity, showed a less balanced activity in the two RFAs after stroke, with more frequent oscillations of hemispheric dominance. Conclusions These results indicate robust electrophysiological changes in PMAs after stroke. Specifically, we found alterations in transcallosal connectivity, with reduced inter-hemispheric functional

  4. Chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute glutamate stress response in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Pauline; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that interhemispheric regulation of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated stress responses is subserved by glutamate (GLU)- containing callosal neurons. Evidence of chronic stress-induced dendritic and spine atrophy among PFC pyramidal neurons led us to examine how chronic restraint stress (CRS) might alter the apical dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute GLU stress responses in the left versus right PFC. Morphometric analyses of retrogradely labeled, dye-filled PFC callosal neurons revealed hemisphere-specific CRS-induced dendritic retraction; whereas significant dendritic atrophy occurred primarily within the distal arbor of left PFC neurons, it was observed within both the proximal and distal arbor of right PFC neurons. Overall, CRS also significantly reduced spine densities in both hemispheres with the greatest loss occurring among left PFC neurons, mostly at the distal extent of the arbor. While much of the overall decrease in dendritic spine density was accounted by the loss of thin spines, the density of mushroom-shaped spines, despite being fewer in number, was halved. Using microdialysis we found that, compared to controls, basal PFC GLU levels were significantly reduced in both hemispheres of CRS animals and that their GLU response to 30 min of tail-pinch stress was significantly prolonged in the left, but not the right PFC. Together, these findings show that a history of chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology and spine density of PFC callosal neurons and suggest a mechanism by which this might disrupt the interhemispheric regulation of PFC-mediated responses to subsequent stressors.

  5. Altered cognitive function of prefrontal cortex during error feedback in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, based on FMRI and dynamic causal modeling.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Emiko; Sato, Yasuhiro; Kochiyama, Takanori; Saito, Naohiro; Izumiyama, Masahiro; Morishita, Joe; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Shima, Keisetsu; Mushiake, Hajime; Hongo, Michio; Fukudo, Shin

    2012-11-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have increased activity in the insula and reduced activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in response to visceral stimulation. We investigated whether they have latent impairments in cognitive flexibility because of dysfunction in the DLPFC and insula and altered connectivity between brain regions. We analyzed data from 30 individuals with IBS (15 men; age, 21.7 ± 3.0 y) diagnosed based on Rome III criteria, along with 30 individuals matched for age, sex, and education level (controls). Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed to evaluate cognitive flexibility and was assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, in which subjects are allowed to change choice criteria, defined as set-shifting in response to error feedback. Brain images were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping 5 and 8 software and dynamic causal modeling. Subjects with IBS had significantly more Nelson perseverative errors (P < .05) and set-maintenance difficulties (P < .05) than controls. They also showed significantly decreased activity of the right DLPFC (Brodmann's area 9; P < .001) and right hippocampus (P < .001), and significantly increased activity of the left posterior insula (P < .001) at error feedback during set-shifting. Dynamic causal modeling analysis during set-shifting revealed significantly less connectivity from the DLPFC to pre-supplementary motor area in subjects with IBS, compared with controls (P = .012). Individuals with IBS have latent impairments in cognitive flexibility as a result of altered activity of the DLPFC, insula, and hippocampus, and impaired connectivity between the DLPFC and pre-supplementary motor area. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ectopic Aire Expression in the Thymic Cortex Reveals Inherent Properties of Aire as a Tolerogenic Factor within the Medulla.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Morimoto, Junko; Kawano, Hiroshi; Hirota, Fumiko; Morita, Ryoko; Mouri, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Ikuta, Koichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2015-11-15

    Cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play essential roles in the positive and negative selection of developing thymocytes, respectively. Aire in mTECs plays an essential role in the latter process through expression of broad arrays of tissue-restricted Ags. To determine whether the location of Aire within the medulla is absolutely essential or whether Aire could also function within the cortex for establishment of self-tolerance, we used bacterial artificial chromosome technology to establish a semiknockin strain of NOD-background (β5t/Aire-transgenic) mice expressing Aire under control of the promoter of β5t, a thymoproteasome expressed exclusively in the cortex. Although Aire was expressed in cTECs as typical nuclear dot protein in β5t/Aire-Tg mice, cTECs expressing Aire ectopically did not confer transcriptional expression of either Aire-dependent or Aire-independent tissue-restricted Ag genes. We then crossed β5t/Aire-Tg mice with Aire-deficient NOD mice, generating a strain in which Aire expression was confined to cTECs. Despite the presence of Aire(+) cTECs, these mice succumbed to autoimmunity, as did Aire-deficient NOD mice. The thymic microenvironment harboring Aire(+) cTECs, within which many Aire-activated genes were present, also showed no obvious alteration of positive selection, suggesting that Aire's unique property of generating a self-tolerant T cell repertoire is functional only in mTECs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Cell-Targeted Optogenetics and Electrical Microstimulation Reveal the Primate Koniocellular Projection to Supra-granular Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carsten; Evrard, Henry C; Shapcott, Katharine A; Haverkamp, Silke; Logothetis, Nikos K; Schmid, Michael C

    2016-04-06

    Electrical microstimulation and more recently optogenetics are widely used to map large-scale brain circuits. However, the neuronal specificity achieved with both methods is not well understood. Here we compare cell-targeted optogenetics and electrical microstimulation in the macaque monkey brain to functionally map the koniocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) projection to primary visual cortex (V1). Selective activation of the LGN konio neurons with CamK-specific optogenetics caused selective electrical current inflow in the supra-granular layers of V1. Electrical microstimulation targeted at LGN konio layers revealed the same supra-granular V1 activation pattern as the one elicited by optogenetics. Taken together, these findings establish a selective koniocellular LGN influence on V1 supra-granular layers, and they indicate comparable capacities of both stimulation methods to isolate thalamo-cortical circuits in the primate brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Region-specific alterations of A-to-I RNA editing of serotonin 2c receptor in the cortex of suicides with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, D; van der Laan, S; Underwood, M D; Salvetat, N; Cavarec, L; Vincent, L; Molina, F; Mann, J J; Arango, V; Pujol, J F

    2016-01-01

    Brain region-specific abnormalities in serotonergic transmission appear to underlie suicidal behavior. Alterations of RNA editing on the serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C) pre-mRNA in the brain of suicides produce transcripts that attenuate 5-HT2CR signaling by impairing intracellular G-protein coupling and subsequent intracellular signal transduction. In brain, the distribution of RNA-editing enzymes catalyzing deamination (A-to-I modification) shows regional variation, including within the cerebral cortex. We tested the hypothesis that altered pre-mRNA 5-HT2CR receptor editing in suicide is region-specific. To this end, we investigated the complete 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile in two architectonically distinct cortical areas involved in mood regulation and decision-making in a clinically well-characterized cohort of age- and sex-matched non-psychiatric drug-free controls and depressed suicides. By using an original biochemical detection method, that is, capillary electrophoresis single-stranded conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP), we corroborated the 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile previously described in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9 (BA9)). Editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA displayed clear regional difference when comparing dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9) and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24). Compared with non-psychiatric control individuals, alterations of editing levels of 5-HT2CR mRNA were detected in both cortical areas of depressed suicides. A marked increase in editing on 5-HT2CR was especially observed in the anterior cingulate cortex in suicides, implicating this cortical area in suicide risk. The results suggest that region-specific changes in RNA editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA and deficient receptor function likely contribute to the etiology of major depressive disorder or suicide. PMID:27576167

  9. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure selectively alters the expression of Gα subunit isoforms and RGS subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Luessen, D J; Sun, H; McGinnis, M M; McCool, B A; Chen, R

    2017-10-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure induces pronounced changes in GPCR-mediated G-protein signaling. Recent microarray and RNA-seq analyses suggest associations between alcohol abuse and the expression of genes involved in G-protein signaling. The activity of G-proteins (e.g. Gαi/o and Gαq) is negatively modulated by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins which are implicated in drugs of abuse including alcohol. The present study used 7days of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure followed by 24h withdrawal (CIE) to investigate changes in mRNA and protein levels of G-protein subunit isoforms and RGS protein subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive deficit attributed to excessive alcohol drinking. We found that this ethanol paradigm induced differential expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes. For example, there were increased mRNA and protein levels of Gαi1/3 subunits and no changes in the expression of Gαs and Gαq subunits in ethanol-treated animals. Moreover, CIE increased the mRNA but not the protein levels of Gαo. Additionally, a modest increase in Gαi2 mRNA level by CIE was accompanied by a pronounced increase in its protein level. Interestingly, we found that CIE increased mRNA and protein levels of RGS2, RGS4, RGS7 and RGS19 but had no effect on the expression of RGS5, RGS6, RGS8, RGS12 or RGS17. Changes in the expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes could contribute to the functional alterations of certain GPCRs following chronic ethanol exposure. The present study suggests that RGS proteins may be potential new targets for intervention of alcohol abuse via modification of Gα-mediated GPCR function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prominent synaptic and metabolic abnormalities revealed by proteomic analysis of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Pennington, K; Beasley, C L; Dicker, P; Fagan, A; English, J; Pariante, C M; Wait, R; Dunn, M J; Cotter, D R

    2008-12-01

    There is evidence for both similarity and distinction in the presentation and molecular characterization of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In this study, we characterized protein abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Tissue samples were obtained from 35 individuals with schizophrenia, 35 with bipolar disorder and 35 controls. Eleven protein spots in schizophrenia and 48 in bipolar disorder were found to be differentially expressed (P<0.01) in comparison to controls, with 7 additional spots found to be altered in both diseases. Using mass spectrometry, 15 schizophrenia-associated proteins and 51 bipolar disorder-associated proteins were identified. The functional groups most affected included synaptic proteins (7 of the 15) in schizophrenia and metabolic or mitochondrial-associated proteins (25 of the 51) in bipolar disorder. Six of seven synaptic-associated proteins abnormally expressed in bipolar disorder were isoforms of the septin family, while two septin protein spots were also significantly differentially expressed in schizophrenia. This finding represented the largest number of abnormalities from one protein family. All septin protein spots were upregulated in disease in comparison to controls. This study provides further characterization of the synaptic pathology present in schizophrenia and of the metabolic dysfunction observed in bipolar disorder. In addition, our study has provided strong evidence implicating the septin protein family of proteins in psychiatric disorders for the first time.

  11. An Integrated Multi-Omics Study Revealed Metabolic Alterations Underlying the Effects of Coffee Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shoko; Saito, Kenji; Jia, Huijuan; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that coffee consumption may reduce the risks of developing obesity and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. Our previous study revealed the changes on gene expression profiles in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet containing three types of coffee (caffeinated, decaffeinated and green unroasted coffee), using DNA microarrays. The results revealed remarkable alterations in lipid metabolism-related molecules which may be involved in the anti-obesity effects of coffee. We conducted the present study to further elucidate the metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption through comprehensive proteomic and metabolomic analyses. Proteomics revealed an up-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a key enzyme in the TCA cycle) and its related proteins, suggesting increased energy generation. The metabolomics showed an up-regulation of metabolites involved in the urea cycle, with which the transcriptome data were highly consistent, indicating accelerated energy expenditure. The TCA cycle and the urea cycle are likely be accelerated in a concerted manner, since they are directly connected by mutually providing each other's intermediates. The up-regulation of these pathways might result in a metabolic shift causing increased ATP turnover, which is related to the alterations of lipid metabolism. This mechanism may play an important part in the suppressive effects of coffee consumption on obesity, inflammation, and hepatosteatosis. This study newly revealed global metabolic alterations induced by coffee intake, providing significant insights into the association between coffee intake and the prevention of type 2 diabetes, utilizing the benefits of multi-omics analyses. PMID:24618914

  12. An integrated multi-omics study revealed metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shoko; Saito, Kenji; Jia, Huijuan; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that coffee consumption may reduce the risks of developing obesity and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. Our previous study revealed the changes on gene expression profiles in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet containing three types of coffee (caffeinated, decaffeinated and green unroasted coffee), using DNA microarrays. The results revealed remarkable alterations in lipid metabolism-related molecules which may be involved in the anti-obesity effects of coffee. We conducted the present study to further elucidate the metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption through comprehensive proteomic and metabolomic analyses. Proteomics revealed an up-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a key enzyme in the TCA cycle) and its related proteins, suggesting increased energy generation. The metabolomics showed an up-regulation of metabolites involved in the urea cycle, with which the transcriptome data were highly consistent, indicating accelerated energy expenditure. The TCA cycle and the urea cycle are likely be accelerated in a concerted manner, since they are directly connected by mutually providing each other's intermediates. The up-regulation of these pathways might result in a metabolic shift causing increased ATP turnover, which is related to the alterations of lipid metabolism. This mechanism may play an important part in the suppressive effects of coffee consumption on obesity, inflammation, and hepatosteatosis. This study newly revealed global metabolic alterations induced by coffee intake, providing significant insights into the association between coffee intake and the prevention of type 2 diabetes, utilizing the benefits of multi-omics analyses.

  13. Metabolomic analysis reveals altered metabolic pathways in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shao, Wei; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Wensheng; Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Zeyu; Huang, Huiying; Chen, Jiacheng; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. Alterations in metabolic pathways are inextricably linked to GC progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of sera derived from a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis, revealed significantly altered metabolic pathways correlated with the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Rats were histologically classified into four pathological groups (gastritis, GS; low-grade gastric dysplasia, LGD; high-grade gastric dysplasia, HGD; GC) and the normal control group (CON). The metabolic profiles of the five groups were clearly distinguished from each other. Furthermore, significant inter-metabolite correlations were extracted and used to reconstruct perturbed metabolic networks associated with the four pathological stages compared with the normal stage. Then, significantly altered metabolic pathways were identified by pathway analysis. Our results showed that oxidative stress-related metabolic pathways, choline phosphorylation and fatty acid degradation were continually disturbed during gastric carcinogenesis. Moreover, amino acid metabolism was perturbed dramatically in gastric dysplasia and GC. The GC stage showed more changed metabolite levels and more altered metabolic pathways. Two activated pathways (glycolysis; glycine, serine and threonine metabolism) substantially contributed to the metabolic alterations in GC. These results lay the basis for addressing the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis and extend our understanding of GC progression. PMID:27527852

  14. Voltage-Sensitive Dyes And Imaging Techniques Reveal New Patterns Of Electrical Activity In Heart Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Guy

    1988-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes bind to the plasms membrane of excitable cells (ie., muscle or nerve cells) and exhibit fluorescence and/or absorption changes that vary linearly with changes in transmembrane electrical potential. These potentiometric optical probes can be used to measure local changes in transmembrane potential by monitoring optical signals from dye molecules bound to the surface membrane. Consequently, when excitable cells are stained with such a dye and are stimulated to fire an electrical impulse (ie., an action potential (AP)), the changes in dye fluorescence have the characteristic shape and time course of APs recorded with an intracellular micro-electrode. Potentiometric dyes in conjuction with imaging techniques can now be used to visualize complex patterns and propagation of electrical activity. With photodiode arrays on video imaging techniques, patterns of biological electrical activity can be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution which could not be obtained by conventional micro-electrodes. These methods reveal new details and offer powerful approaches to study fundamental problem in cardiac electrophysiology, communication in nerve networks, and the organization of cortical neurons.

  15. Repeated Structural Imaging Reveals Nonlinear Progression of Experience-Dependent Volume Changes in Human Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Elisabeth; Kühn, Simone; Verrel, Julius; Mårtensson, Johan; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Evidence for experience-dependent structural brain change in adult humans is accumulating. However, its time course is not well understood, as intervention studies typically consist of only 2 imaging sessions (before vs. after training). We acquired up to 18 structural magnetic resonance images over a 7-week period while 15 right-handed participants practiced left-hand writing and drawing. After 4 weeks, we observed increases in gray matter of both left and right primary motor cortices relative to a control group; 3 weeks later, these differences were no longer reliable. Time-series analyses revealed that gray matter in the primary motor cortices expanded during the first 4 weeks and then partially renormalized, in particular in the right hemisphere, despite continued practice and increasing task proficiency. Similar patterns of expansion followed by partial renormalization are also found in synaptogenesis, cortical map plasticity, and maturation, and may qualify as a general principle of structural plasticity. Research on human brain plasticity needs to encompass more than 2 measurement occasions to capture expansion and potential renormalization processes over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-02-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress.

  17. Environmental enrichment alters organizational features of the forepaw representation in the primary somatosensory cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Coq, J O; Xerri, C

    1998-07-01

    The cortical forepaw area of young adult rats was mapped by recording the response properties of small clusters of neurons in layer IV of the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. First we quantitatively analyzed the somatotopic organizational features of the cortical forepaw representation in terms of areal extent and topography, receptive field (RF) sensory modality, size, and location. We also assessed the influence of environmental enrichment, known to induce structural alterations in cortical connectivity, on the representational characteristics of the forepaw maps. Long-Evans rats were housed in environments (standard, SE; enriched, EE) promoting differential tactile experience for 71-113 days from weaning. Within the SI, we found a single and complete topographic map of the cutaneous surfaces of the forepaw consisting of a rostrolateral-caudomedial sequence of digit and pad representational zones. Small islets of noncutaneous responses (NCR; high-threshold, deep-receptor input) within the boundaries of the cutaneous maps were a conspicuous feature of the forepaw map for SE rats. These islets created discontinuities in the representation of contiguous skin territories. In the SE rats, about 79% of the cortical sites activated by light tactile stimulation had a single cutaneous RF, whereas about 21% exhibited multiple RFs. Most single-digit RFs we delineated in the SE rats extended across two or three phalanges. As a result, the representations of the phalangeal skin surfaces were not segregated but formed an overlapping continuum. Moreover, within these regions, as the electrode was displaced in regular steps across the mediolateral axis, RFs did not shift across the digit skin surface in an orderly manner, suggesting a lack of internal topography in the finger representation zones. Tactile experience promoted by environmental enrichment induced alterations in the representational features of the SI cutaneous map of the forepaw. In EE rats, the areal extent of

  18. Experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism alters crucial enzyme activities in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the offspring rat.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Tsakiris, Stylianos; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Kimpizi, Despoina; Bimpis, Alexios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Liapi, Charis

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency during neurodevelopment can result into significant structural and functional changes within the developing central nervous system (CNS), and is associated with the establishment of serious cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism as a multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a brain region-specific manner. This experimental approach has been recently developed and characterized by the authors based on neurochemical analyses performed on newborn and 21-day-old rat offspring whole brain homogenates; as a continuum to this effort, the current study focused on two CNS regions of major significance for cognitive development: the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. Maternal exposure to PTU in the drinking water during gestation and/or lactation resulted into changes in the activities of acetylcholinesterase and two important adenosinetriphosphatases (Na(+),K(+)- and Mg(2+)-ATPase), that seemed to take place in a CNS-region-specific manner and that were dependent upon the PTU-exposure timeframe followed. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they: (i) highlight the variability involved in the changes of the aforementioned enzymatic parameters in the studied CNS regions (attributed to both the different neuroanatomical composition and the thyroid-hormone-dependent neurodevelopmental growth/differentiation patterns of the latter), (ii) reveal important information with regards to the neurochemical mechanisms that could be involved in the way clinical hypothyroidism could affect optimal neurodevelopment and, ultimately, cognitive function, as well as (iii) underline the need for the adoption of more consistent

  19. Traumatic stress reactivity promotes excessive alcohol drinking and alters the balance of prefrontal cortex-amygdala activity

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, S; Baynes, B B; Carmichael, C Y; Zamora-Martinez, E R; Barrus, M; Koob, G F; Gilpin, N W

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcoholism are highly comorbid in humans and have partially overlapping symptomatic profiles. The aim of these studies was to examine the effects of traumatic stress (and stress reactivity) on alcohol-related behaviors and neuronal activation patterns. Male Wistar rats were trained to respond for alcohol, were exposed to predator odor (bobcat urine) paired with context and were tested for short- and long-term avoidance of the predator odor-paired context, alcohol self-administration and compulsivity of alcohol responding. Rats were re-exposed to the odor-paired context for western blot analysis of ERK phosphorylation in subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the amygdala. Rats that avoided the predator-paired chamber (Avoiders) exhibited persistent avoidance up to 6 weeks post conditioning. Avoiders exhibited increases in operant alcohol responding over weeks, as well as more compulsive-like responding for alcohol adulterated with quinine. Following re-exposure to the predator odor-paired context, Avoiders and Non-Avoiders exhibited unique patterns of neuronal activation in subregions of the mPFC and the amygdala, which were correlated with changes in avoidance and alcohol drinking. Furthermore, activity of upstream regions was differentially predictive of downstream regional activity in the Avoiders versus Non-Avoiders. An animal model for assessing the effect of traumatic stress on alcohol drinking reveals individual differences in neuronal activation patterns associated with re-exposure to traumatic stress-related stimuli, and may provide insight into the neural mechanisms underlying excessive alcohol consumption in humans with PTSD. PMID:23982628

  20. Traumatic stress reactivity promotes excessive alcohol drinking and alters the balance of prefrontal cortex-amygdala activity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S; Baynes, B B; Carmichael, C Y; Zamora-Martinez, E R; Barrus, M; Koob, G F; Gilpin, N W

    2013-08-27

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcoholism are highly comorbid in humans and have partially overlapping symptomatic profiles. The aim of these studies was to examine the effects of traumatic stress (and stress reactivity) on alcohol-related behaviors and neuronal activation patterns. Male Wistar rats were trained to respond for alcohol, were exposed to predator odor (bobcat urine) paired with context and were tested for short- and long-term avoidance of the predator odor-paired context, alcohol self-administration and compulsivity of alcohol responding. Rats were re-exposed to the odor-paired context for western blot analysis of ERK phosphorylation in subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the amygdala. Rats that avoided the predator-paired chamber (Avoiders) exhibited persistent avoidance up to 6 weeks post conditioning. Avoiders exhibited increases in operant alcohol responding over weeks, as well as more compulsive-like responding for alcohol adulterated with quinine. Following re-exposure to the predator odor-paired context, Avoiders and Non-Avoiders exhibited unique patterns of neuronal activation in subregions of the mPFC and the amygdala, which were correlated with changes in avoidance and alcohol drinking. Furthermore, activity of upstream regions was differentially predictive of downstream regional activity in the Avoiders versus Non-Avoiders. An animal model for assessing the effect of traumatic stress on alcohol drinking reveals individual differences in neuronal activation patterns associated with re-exposure to traumatic stress-related stimuli, and may provide insight into the neural mechanisms underlying excessive alcohol consumption in humans with PTSD.

  1. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Brian E; Driessen, Terri M; Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for post-partum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for post-partum disorders. This study evaluated microarray gene expression changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region implicated in both maternal behavior and psychiatric disorders. Post-partum mice were compared to virgin controls housed with females and isolated for identical durations. Using the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET), we found that the genetic landscape of maternal mPFC bears statistical similarity to gene databases associated with schizophrenia (5 of 5 sets) and bipolar disorder (BPD, 3 of 3 sets). In contrast to previous studies of maternal lateral septum (LS) and medial preoptic area (MPOA), enrichment of autism and depression-linked genes was not significant (2 of 9 sets, 0 of 4 sets). Among genes linked to multiple disorders were fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7), glutamate metabotropic receptor 3 (Grm3), platelet derived growth factor, beta polypeptide (Pdgfrb), and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1). RT-qPCR confirmed these gene changes as well as FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1) and proenkephalin (Penk). Systems-level methods revealed involvement of developmental gene networks in establishing the maternal phenotype and indirectly suggested a role for numerous microRNAs and transcription factors in mediating expression changes. Together, this study suggests that a subset of genes involved in shaping the healthy maternal brain may also be dysregulated in mental health disorders and put females at risk for post-partum psychosis with aspects of schizophrenia

  2. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-03-30

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as (1)H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations.

  3. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as 1H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations. PMID:28358020

  4. A ‘complex’ of brain metabolites distinguish altered chemistry in the cingulate cortex of episodic migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, L.; Veggeberg, R.; Prescot, A.; Jensen, J.E.; Renshaw, P.; Scrivani, S.; Spierings, E.L.H.; Burstein, R.; Borsook, D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of migraine, the pathophysiology of the disease remains unclear. Current understanding of migraine has alluded to the possibility of a hyperexcitable brain. The aim of the current study is to investigate human brain metabolite differences in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during the interictal phase in migraine patients. We hypothesized that there may be differences in levels of excitatory neurotransmitters and/or their derivatives in the migraine cohort in support of the theory of hyperexcitability in migraine. 2D J-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) data were acquired on a 3 Tesla (3 T) MRI from a voxel placed over the ACC of 32 migraine patients (MP; 23 females, 9 males, age 33 ± 9.6 years) and 33 healthy controls (HC; 25 females, 8 males, age 32 ± 9.6 years). Amplitude correlation matrices were constructed for each subject to evaluate metabolite discriminability. ProFit-estimated metabolite peak areas were normalized to a water reference signal to assess subject differences. The initial analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test for group differences for all metabolites/creatine (Cre) ratios between healthy controls and migraineurs but showed no statistically significant differences. In addition, we used a multivariate approach to distinguish migraineurs from healthy subjects based on the metabolite/Cre ratio. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) model was used to identify 3 metabolite ratios sufficient to minimize minimum classification error (MCE). The 3 selected metabolite ratios were aspartate (Asp)/Cre, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/Cre, and glutamine (Gln)/Cre. These findings are in support of a ‘complex’ of metabolite alterations, which may underlie changes in neuronal chemistry in the migraine brain. Furthermore, the parallel changes in the three-metabolite ‘complex’ may confer more subtle but biological processes that are ongoing. The data also support the current theory that the

  5. Cocaine-induced chromatin remodeling increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription in the rat medial prefrontal cortex, which alters the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Kumaresan, Vidhya; Schmidt, Heath D; Famous, Katie R; Chawla, Prianka; Vassoler, Fair M; Overland, Ryan P; Xia, Eva; Bass, Caroline E; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Pierce, R Christopher; Cha, Jang-Ho J

    2010-09-01

    Cocaine self-administration alters patterns of gene expression in the brain that may underlie cocaine-induced neuronal plasticity. In the present study, male Sprague Dawley rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) 2 h/d for 14 d, followed by 7 d of forced abstinence. Compared with yoked saline control rats, cocaine self-administration resulted in increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). To examine the functional relevance of this finding, cocaine self-administration maintained under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement was assessed after short hairpin RNA-induced suppression of BDNF expression in the mPFC. Decreased BDNF expression in the mPFC increased the cocaine self-administration breakpoint. Next, the effect of cocaine self-administration on specific BDNF exons was assessed; results revealed selectively increased BDNF exon IV-containing transcripts in the mPFC. Moreover, there were significant cocaine-induced increases in acetylated histone H3 (AcH3) and phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) association with BDNF promoter IV. In contrast, there was decreased methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) association with BDNF promoter IV in the mPFC of rats that previously self-administered cocaine. Together, these results indicate that cocaine-induced increases in BDNF promoter IV transcript in the mPFC are driven by increased binding of AcH3 and pCREB as well as decreased MeCP2 binding at this BDNF promoter. Collectively, these results indicate that cocaine self-administration remodels chromatin in the mPFC, resulting in increased expression of BDNF, which appears to represent a compensatory neuroadaptation that reduces the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine.

  6. Stress and combined exposure to low doses of pyridostigmine bromide, DEET, and permethrin produce neurochemical and neuropathological alterations in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A; Abou-Donia, Suzanne; El-Masry, Eman; Shetty, Ashok; Abou-Donia, Mohamed

    2004-01-23

    Exposure to a combination of stress and low doses of the chemicals pyridostigmine bromide (PB), DEET, and permethrin in adult rats, a model of Gulf War exposure, produces blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neuronal cell death in the cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, thalamus, and hypothalamus. In this study, neuropathological alterations in other areas of the brain where no apparent BBB disruption was observed was studied following such exposure. Animals exposed to both stress and chemical exhibited decreased brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum and decreased m2 muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor ligand binding in the midbrain and cerebellum. These alterations were associated with significant neuronal cell death, reduced microtubule-associated protein (MAP-2) expression, and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. In the cerebellum, the neurochemical alterations were associated with Purkinje cell loss and increased GFAP immunoreactivity in the white matter. However, animals subjected to either stress or chemicals alone did not show any of these changes in comparison to vehicle-treated controls. Collectively, these results suggest that prolonged exposure to a combination of stress and the chemicals PB, DEET, and permethrin can produce significant damage to the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, even in the absence of apparent BBB damage. As these areas of the brain are respectively important for the maintenance of motor and sensory functions, learning and memory, and gait and coordination of movements, such alterations could lead to many physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral abnormalities, particularly motor deficits and learning and memory dysfunction.

  7. Simultaneous fNIRS and thermal infrared imaging during cognitive task reveal autonomic correlates of prefrontal cortex activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinti, Paola; Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Functional Near Infrared-Spectroscopy (fNIRS) represents a powerful tool to non-invasively study task-evoked brain activity. fNIRS assessment of cortical activity may suffer for contamination by physiological noises of different origin (e.g. heart beat, respiration, blood pressure, skin blood flow), both task-evoked and spontaneous. Spontaneous changes occur at different time scales and, even if they are not directly elicited by tasks, their amplitude may result task-modulated. In this study, concentration changes of hemoglobin were recorded over the prefrontal cortex while simultaneously recording the facial temperature variations of the participants through functional infrared thermal (fIR) imaging. fIR imaging provides touch-less estimation of the thermal expression of peripheral autonomic. Wavelet analysis revealed task-modulation of the very low frequency (VLF) components of both fNIRS and fIR signals and strong coherence between them. Our results indicate that subjective cognitive and autonomic activities are intimately linked and that the VLF component of the fNIRS signal is affected by the autonomic activity elicited by the cognitive task. Moreover, we showed that task-modulated changes in vascular tone occur both at a superficial and at larger depth in the brain. Combined use of fNIRS and fIR imaging can effectively quantify the impact of VLF autonomic activity on the fNIRS signals. PMID:26632763

  8. Direct 3D Analyses Reveal Barrel-Specific Vascular Distribution and Cross-Barrel Branching in the Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingpeng; Guo, Congdi; Chen, Shangbin; Jiang, Tao; He, Yong; Ding, Wenxiang; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Whether vascular distribution is spatially specific among cortical columns is a fundamental yet controversial question. Here, we have obtained 1-μm resolution 3D datasets that cover the whole mouse barrel cortex by combining Nissl staining with micro-optical sectioning tomography to simultaneously visualize individual cells and blood vessels, including capillaries. Pinpointing layer IV of the posteromedial barrel subfield, direct 3D reconstruction and quantitative analysis showed that (1) penetrating vessels preferentially locate in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall (75.1%) rather than the barrel hollows, (2) the branches of 70% penetrating vessels only reach the neighboring but not always all the neighboring barrels and the other 30% extend beyond the neighboring barrels and may provide cross-barrel blood supply or drainage, (3) the branches of 59.6% penetrating vessels reach all the neighboring barrels, while the rest only reach part of them, and (4) the length density of microvessels in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall is lower than that in the barrel hollows with a ratio of 0.92. These results reveal that the penetrating vessels and microvessels exhibit a barrel-specific organization, whereas the branches of penetrating vessels do not, which suggests a much more complex vascular distribution pattern among cortical columns than previously thought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Tactile Object Familiarity in the Blind Brain Reveals the Supramodal Perceptual-Mnemonic Nature of the Perirhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cacciamani, Laura; Likova, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to investigate the neural underpinnings of tactile object familiarity in the blind during both perception and memory. In the sighted, the perirhinal cortex (PRC) has been implicated in the assessment of visual object familiarity—a crucial everyday task—as evidenced by reduced activation when an object becomes familiar. Here, to examine the PRC’s role in tactile object familiarity in the absence of vision, we trained blind participants on a unique memory-guided drawing technique and measured brain activity while they perceptually explored raised-line drawings, drew them from tactile memory, and scribbled (control). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after a week of training revealed a significant decrease in PRC activation from pre- to post-training (i.e., from unfamiliar to familiar) during perceptual exploration as well as memory-guided drawing, but not scribbling. This familiarity-based reduction is the first evidence that the PRC represents tactile object familiarity in the blind. Furthermore, the finding of this effect during both tactile perception and tactile memory provides the critical link in establishing the PRC as a structure whose representations are supramodal for both perception and memory. PMID:27148002

  10. Simultaneous fNIRS and thermal infrared imaging during cognitive task reveal autonomic correlates of prefrontal cortex activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Paola; Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-12-01

    Functional Near Infrared-Spectroscopy (fNIRS) represents a powerful tool to non-invasively study task-evoked brain activity. fNIRS assessment of cortical activity may suffer for contamination by physiological noises of different origin (e.g. heart beat, respiration, blood pressure, skin blood flow), both task-evoked and spontaneous. Spontaneous changes occur at different time scales and, even if they are not directly elicited by tasks, their amplitude may result task-modulated. In this study, concentration changes of hemoglobin were recorded over the prefrontal cortex while simultaneously recording the facial temperature variations of the participants through functional infrared thermal (fIR) imaging. fIR imaging provides touch-less estimation of the thermal expression of peripheral autonomic. Wavelet analysis revealed task-modulation of the very low frequency (VLF) components of both fNIRS and fIR signals and strong coherence between them. Our results indicate that subjective cognitive and autonomic activities are intimately linked and that the VLF component of the fNIRS signal is affected by the autonomic activity elicited by the cognitive task. Moreover, we showed that task-modulated changes in vascular tone occur both at a superficial and at larger depth in the brain. Combined use of fNIRS and fIR imaging can effectively quantify the impact of VLF autonomic activity on the fNIRS signals.

  11. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity in Late Preterm Preadolescence: An Anatomic Seed-Based Study of Resting State Networks Related to the Posteromedial and Lateral Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew J; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Choi, SoYoung; Ceschin, Rafael; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M; Corby, Patricia; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Late preterm birth confers increased risk of developmental delay, academic difficulties and social deficits. The late third trimester may represent a critical period of development of neural networks including the default mode network (DMN), which is essential to normal cognition. Our objective is to identify functional and structural connectivity differences in the posteromedial cortex related to late preterm birth. Thirty-eight preadolescents (ages 9-13; 19 born in the late preterm period (≥32 weeks gestational age) and 19 at term) without access to advanced neonatal care were recruited from a low socioeconomic status community in Brazil. Participants underwent neurocognitive testing, 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI). Seed-based probabilistic diffusion tractography and RS-fMRI analyses were performed using unilateral seeds within the posterior DMN (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus) and lateral parietal DMN (superior marginal and angular gyri). Late preterm children demonstrated increased functional connectivity within the posterior default mode networks and increased anti-correlation with the central-executive network when seeded from the posteromedial cortex (PMC). Key differences were demonstrated between PMC components with increased anti-correlation with the salience network seen only with posterior cingulate cortex seeding but not with precuneus seeding. Probabilistic tractography showed increased streamlines within the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus within late preterm children while decreased intrahemispheric streamlines were also observed. No significant differences in neurocognitive testing were demonstrated between groups. Late preterm preadolescence is associated with altered functional connectivity from the PMC and lateral parietal cortex to known distributed functional cortical networks despite no significant executive

  12. Analysis of Graph Invariants in Functional Neocortical Circuitry Reveals Generalized Features Common to Three Areas of Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gururangan, Suchin S.; Sadovsky, Alexander J.; MacLean, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Correlations in local neocortical spiking activity can provide insight into the underlying organization of cortical microcircuitry. However, identifying structure in patterned multi-neuronal spiking remains a daunting task due to the high dimensionality of the activity. Using two-photon imaging, we monitored spontaneous circuit dynamics in large, densely sampled neuronal populations within slices of mouse primary auditory, somatosensory, and visual cortex. Using the lagged correlation of spiking activity between neurons, we generated functional wiring diagrams to gain insight into the underlying neocortical circuitry. By establishing the presence of graph invariants, which are label-independent characteristics common to all circuit topologies, our study revealed organizational features that generalized across functionally distinct cortical regions. Regardless of sensory area, random and -nearest neighbors null graphs failed to capture the structure of experimentally derived functional circuitry. These null models indicated that despite a bias in the data towards spatially proximal functional connections, functional circuit structure is best described by non-random and occasionally distal connections. Eigenvector centrality, which quantifies the importance of a neuron in the temporal flow of circuit activity, was highly related to feedforwardness in all functional circuits. The number of nodes participating in a functional circuit did not scale with the number of neurons imaged regardless of sensory area, indicating that circuit size is not tied to the sampling of neocortex. Local circuit flow comprehensively covered angular space regardless of the spatial scale that we tested, demonstrating that circuitry itself does not bias activity flow toward pia. Finally, analysis revealed that a minimal numerical sample size of neurons was necessary to capture at least 90 percent of functional circuit topology. These data and analyses indicated that functional circuitry

  13. Vitamin D3 restores altered cholinergic and insulin receptor expression in the cerebral cortex and muscarinic M3 receptor expression in pancreatic islets of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush T; Antony, Sherin; Nandhu, Mohan S; Sadanandan, Jayanarayanan; Naijil, George; Paulose, Chiramadathikudiyil S

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional therapy is a challenging but necessary dimension in the management of diabetes and neurodegenerative changes associated with it. The study evaluates the effect of vitamin D(3) in preventing the altered function of cholinergic, insulin receptors and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. Muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptors in pancreas control insulin secretion. Vitamin D(3) treatment in M3 receptor regulation in the pancreatic islets was also studied. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry of muscarinic M3 receptor was studied in the pancreatic islets using specific antibodies. Y-maze was used to evaluate the exploratory and spatial memory. Diabetes induced a decrease in muscarinic M1, insulin and vitamin D receptor expression and an increase in muscarinic M3, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine esterase and GLUT3 expression. Vitamin D(3) and insulin treatment reversed diabetes-induced alterations to near control. Diabetic rats showed a decreased Y-maze performance while vitamin D(3) supplementation improved the behavioural deficit. In conclusion, vitamin D(3) shows a potential therapeutic effect in normalizing diabetes-induced alterations in cholinergic, insulin and vitamin D receptor and maintains a normal glucose transport and utilisation in the cortex. In addition vitamin D(3) modulated muscarinic M3 receptors activity in pancreas and plays a pivotal role in controlling insulin secretion. Hence our findings proved, vitamin D(3) supplementation as a potential nutritional therapy in ameliorating diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions and suggest an interaction between vitamin D(3) and muscarinic M3 receptors in regulating insulin secretion from pancreas.

  14. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-01-18

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Brain networks of affective mentalizing revealed by the tear effect: The integrative role of the medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruka K; Kitada, Ryo; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Okazaki, Shuntaro; Kochiyama, Takanori; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-12-01

    Affective mentalizing involves the integration of various social signals in order to infer the affective states of others. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that the medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, and the temporo-parietal junction constitute the core affective mentalizing network. However, the relative contributions of these regions to affective mentalizing remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate which of these nodes are involved in the integration of two social signals: emotional tears and facial expressions. We assumed that this integration would produce a supra-additive effect, indicated by greater activity than the sum of the effects of the individual social signals. Female subjects rated the sadness of faces with either tears or tear-like circles, and either sad or neutral expressions. We observed the supra-additive effect in the medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex but not in the temporo-parietal junction. These results indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex play an important role in integrating tears and facial expressions during affective mentalizing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracortical Microstimulation Maps of Motor, Somatosensory, and Posterior Parietal Cortex in Tree Shrews (Tupaia belangeri) Reveal Complex Movement Representations.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mary K L; Cooke, Dylan F; Krubitzer, Leah

    2017-02-01

    Long-train intracortical microstimulation (LT-ICMS) is a popular method for studying the organization of motor and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in mammals. In primates, LT-ICMS evokes both multijoint and multiple-body-part movements in primary motor, premotor, and PPC. In rodents, LT-ICMS evokes complex movements of a single limb in motor cortex. Unfortunately, very little is known about motor/PPC organization in other mammals. Tree shrews are closely related to both primates and rodents and could provide insights into the evolution of complex movement domains in primates. The present study investigated the extent of cortex in which movements could be evoked with ICMS and the characteristics of movements elicited using both short train (ST) and LT-ICMS in tree shrews. We demonstrate that LT-ICMS and ST-ICMS maps are similar, with the movements elicited with ST-ICMS being truncated versions of those elicited with LT-ICMS. In addition, LT-ICMS-evoked complex movements within motor cortex similar to those in rodents. More complex movements involving multiple body parts such as the hand and mouth were also elicited in motor cortex and PPC, as in primates. Our results suggest that complex movement networks present in PPC and motor cortex were present in mammals prior to the emergence of primates.

  17. Developmental Links between the Fetal and Adult Zones of the Adrenal Cortex Revealed by Lineage Tracing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Ad4BP/SF-1 is essential for development of the adrenal cortex and the gonads, which derive from a common adrenogonadal primordium. The adrenal cortex subsequently forms morphologically distinct compartments: the inner (fetal) and outer (definitive or adult) zones. Despite considerable effort, the mechanisms that mediate the differential development of the adrenal and gonadal primordia and the fetal and adult adrenal cortices remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal-specific enhancer (FAdE) in the Ad4BP/SF-1 locus that directs transgene expression to the fetal adrenal cortex and demonstrated that this enhancer is autoregulated by Ad4BP/SF-1. We now combine the FAdE with the Cre/loxP system to trace cell lineages in which the FAdE was active at some stage in development. These lineage-tracing studies establish definitively that the adult cortex derives from precursor cells in the fetal cortex in which the FAdE was activated before the organization into two distinct zones. The potential of these fetal adrenocortical cells to enter the pathway that eventuates in cells of the adult cortex disappeared by embryonic day 14.5. Thus, these studies demonstrate a direct link between the fetal and adult cortices involving a transition that must occur before a specific stage of development. PMID:18809574

  18. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0 · 05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings.

  19. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0·05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  20. Correlations of neuronal and microvascular densities in murine cortex revealed by direct counting and colocalization of nuclei and vessels

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Kaufhold, John P.; Blinder, Pablo; Friedman, Beth; Drew, Patrick J.; Karten, Harvey J.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the density of neurons varies within the adult brain. In neocortex, this includes variations in neuronal density between different lamina as well as between different regions. Yet the concomitant variation of the microvessels is largely uncharted. Here we present automated histological, imaging, and analysis tools to simultaneously map the locations of all neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei and the centerlines and diameters of all blood vessels within thick slabs of neocortex from mice. Based on total inventory measurements of different cortical regions (~ 107 cells vectorized across brains), these methods revealed: (1) In three dimensions, the mean distance of the center of neuronal somata to the closest microvessel was 14 μm. (2) Volume samples within lamina of a given region show that the density of microvessels does not match the strong laminar variation in neuronal density. This holds for both agranular and granular cortex. (3) Volume samples in successive radii from the midline to the ventral-lateral edge, where each volume summed the number of cells and microvessels from the pia to the white matter, show a significant correlation between neuronal and microvessel densities. These data show that while neuronal and vascular densities do not track each other on the 100 μm scale of cortical lamina, they do track each other on the 1 – 10 mm scale of the cortical mantle. The absence of a disproportionate density of blood vessels in granular lamina is argued to be consistent with the initial locus of functional brain imaging signals. PMID:19923289

  1. Functional mapping of gustatory neurons in the insular cortex revealed by pERK-immunohistochemistry and in vivo optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Takei, Hiroki; Song, Liqui; Chen, Shaoyun; Suzuki, Ikuko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Iwata, Koichi; Koshikawa, Noriaki

    2010-04-01

    Neural plasticity in the gustatory area of the insular cortex (IC) plays a critical role in detecting novel taste and taste memory formation, which require extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1-2 (ERK1-2) phosphorylation. However, the distribution patterns of phosphorylated ERK1-2 (pERK) responses to gustatory stimulation remain unknown. This study examined distribution patterns of gustatory stimulation-driven pERK expression in the IC of anesthetized and alert rats. In both pentobarbital-anesthetized and alert rats, gustatory stimulation (10% sucrose) induced pERK-like immunoreactivity in pyramidal cells of all IC subdivisions: agranular (AI), dysgranular (DI), and granular IC (GI). Alert naïve rats exhibited approximately 10-fold larger number of pERK-like immunopositive (pERK-LI) cells than anesthetized naïve rats in response to sucrose application. Most pERK-LI cells were located in layers II/III but not deeper layers and almost no parvalbumin/somatostatin-immunopositive cells expressed pERK. In the AI, rostral regions exhibited more pERK-LI cells than caudal regions, whereas most pERK-LI cells existed in the DI/GI around the intersection of the rhinal fissure and middle cerebral artery (MCA), where in vivo optical imaging revealed activation during sucrose application in addition to the ventral primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. Gustatory experience affected the number of pERK-LI cells in the IC: sucrose stimulation induced more pERK-LI cells in the DI/GI of alert naïve rats than sucrose-exposed rats, which had received sucrose solution for 1 week. These results suggest that pyramidal cells in the upper layers of the gustatory region are highly susceptible to ERK1-2 phosphorylation by gustatory stimulation, which may induce neuroplastic changes in the IC.

  2. Calretinin and Neuropeptide Y interneurons are differentially altered in the motor cortex of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rosemary M.; Blizzard, Catherine A.; Young, Kaylene M.; King, Anna E.; Dickson, Tracey C.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance may have a critical role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Impaired inhibitory circuitry is consistently reported in the motor cortex of both familial and sporadic patients, closely associated with cortical hyperexcitability and ALS onset. Inhibitory network dysfunction is presumably mediated by intra-cortical inhibitory interneurons, however, the exact cell types responsible are yet to be identified. In this study we demonstrate dynamic changes in the number of calretinin- (CR) and neuropeptide Y-expressing (NPY) interneurons in the motor cortex of the familial hSOD1G93A ALS mouse model, suggesting their potential involvement in motor neuron circuitry defects. We show that the density of NPY-populations is significantly decreased by ~17% at symptom onset (8 weeks), and by end-stage disease (20 weeks) is significantly increased by ~30%. Conversely, the density of CR-populations is progressively reduced during later symptomatic stages (~31%) to end-stage (~36%), while CR-expressing interneurons also show alteration of neurite branching patterns at symptom onset. We conclude that a differential capacity for interneurons exists in the ALS motor cortex, which may not be a static phenomenon, but involves early dynamic changes throughout disease, implicating specific inhibitory circuitry. PMID:28294153

  3. Combination of DFP and Taurine Counteracts the Aluminum-Induced Alterations in Oxidative Stress and ATPase in Cortex and Blood of Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tong; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Jinyu; Kong, Zhengqiao

    2016-11-01

    The study investigated the combined effect of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one (DFP) and taurine on aluminum (Al) toxicity in cortex and blood of rats. The control group received 1 ml/kg/day saline solution for 8 weeks. Other animals were exposed to Al at a dose of 281.40 mg/kg/day orally for 4 weeks. Then, they were administered with 1 ml/kg/day saline solution, 400 mg/(kg·day) taurine, 13.82 mg/(kg·day) DFP, 27.44 mg/(kg·day) DFP, 400 mg/(kg·day) taurine +13.82 mg/(kg·day) DFP, and 400 mg/(kg·day) taurine +27.44 mg/(kg·day) DFP for 4 weeks. The changes in markers of oxidative stress, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and triphosphatase (ATPase) in the cortex and blood were determined. Administration of Al led to significant increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the cortex and blood, compared with the control group. DFP was observed to reverse alteration of these parameters except for Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. Treatment with taurine caused significant increase of GSH-Px activity and decrease of the MDA level in the cortex and serum and rise of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase in the blood. Effects of DFP combined with taurine were investigated and found to provide a more significant benefit than either drug alone. Combined intake of taurine and DFP could achieve an optimum effect of therapy for Al exposure.

  4. Glutaminase and MMP-9 Downregulation in Cortex and Hippocampus of LPA1 Receptor Null Mice Correlate with Altered Dendritic Spine Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Peñalver, Ana; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Blanco, Eduardo; Cardona, Carolina; Castilla, Laura; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Sánchez-Varo, Raquel; Alonso, Francisco J; Pérez-Hernández, Mercedes; Colado, María I; Gutiérrez, Antonia; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Márquez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator that regulates nervous system development and functions acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we explore the crosstalk between LPA1 receptor and glutamatergic transmission by examining expression of glutaminase (GA) isoforms in different brain areas isolated from wild-type (WT) and KOLPA1 mice. Silencing of LPA1 receptor induced a severe down-regulation of Gls-encoded long glutaminase protein variant (KGA) (glutaminase gene encoding the kidney-type isoforms, GLS) protein expression in several brain regions, particularly in brain cortex and hippocampus. Immunohistochemical assessment of protein levels for the second type of glutaminase (GA) isoform, glutaminase gene encoding the liver-type isoforms (GLS2), did not detect substantial differences with regard to WT animals. The regional mRNA levels of GLS were determined by real time RT-PCR and did not show significant variations, except for prefrontal and motor cortex values which clearly diminished in KO mice. Total GA activity was also significantly reduced in prefrontal and motor cortex, but remained essentially unchanged in the hippocampus and rest of brain regions examined, suggesting activation of genetic compensatory mechanisms and/or post-translational modifications to compensate for KGA protein deficit. Remarkably, Golgi staining of hippocampal regions showed an altered morphology of glutamatergic pyramidal cells dendritic spines towards a less mature filopodia-like phenotype, as compared with WT littermates. This structural change correlated with a strong decrease of active matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of KOLPA1 mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LPA signaling through LPA(1) influence expression of the main isoenzyme of glutamate biosynthesis with strong repercussions on dendritic spines maturation, which may partially explain the cognitive and learning defects previously

  5. Glutaminase and MMP-9 Downregulation in Cortex and Hippocampus of LPA1 Receptor Null Mice Correlate with Altered Dendritic Spine Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Peñalver, Ana; Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Blanco, Eduardo; Cardona, Carolina; Castilla, Laura; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Sánchez-Varo, Raquel; Alonso, Francisco J.; Pérez-Hernández, Mercedes; Colado, María I.; Gutiérrez, Antonia; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Márquez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator that regulates nervous system development and functions acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we explore the crosstalk between LPA1 receptor and glutamatergic transmission by examining expression of glutaminase (GA) isoforms in different brain areas isolated from wild-type (WT) and KOLPA1 mice. Silencing of LPA1 receptor induced a severe down-regulation of Gls-encoded long glutaminase protein variant (KGA) (glutaminase gene encoding the kidney-type isoforms, GLS) protein expression in several brain regions, particularly in brain cortex and hippocampus. Immunohistochemical assessment of protein levels for the second type of glutaminase (GA) isoform, glutaminase gene encoding the liver-type isoforms (GLS2), did not detect substantial differences with regard to WT animals. The regional mRNA levels of GLS were determined by real time RT-PCR and did not show significant variations, except for prefrontal and motor cortex values which clearly diminished in KO mice. Total GA activity was also significantly reduced in prefrontal and motor cortex, but remained essentially unchanged in the hippocampus and rest of brain regions examined, suggesting activation of genetic compensatory mechanisms and/or post-translational modifications to compensate for KGA protein deficit. Remarkably, Golgi staining of hippocampal regions showed an altered morphology of glutamatergic pyramidal cells dendritic spines towards a less mature filopodia-like phenotype, as compared with WT littermates. This structural change correlated with a strong decrease of active matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of KOLPA1 mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LPA signaling through LPA1 influence expression of the main isoenzyme of glutamate biosynthesis with strong repercussions on dendritic spines maturation, which may partially explain the cognitive and learning defects previously

  6. Reversal learning impairment and alterations in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus in a model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Begega, Azucena; Aller, María Angeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2010-09-01

    Patients with liver dysfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a neurological complication that affects attention and memory. Various experimental animal models have been used to study HE, the most frequently used being the portocaval shunt (PCS). In order to determine brain substrates of cognitive impairment in this model, we assessed reversal learning and c-Fos expression in a rat model of portosystemic derivation. PCS and sham-operated rats (SHAM) were tested for reversal learning. Brains were processed for c-Fos immunocytochemistry. The total number of c-Fos positive nuclei was quantified in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The spatial reference memory task showed no differences between groups in escape latencies. The no-platform probe test showed that both the PCS and the SHAM learned the location of platform. However, the PCS group perseverated in the old target during reversal. The PCS group presented less c-Fos- positive cells in prelimbic cortex, CA1 and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus than SHAM. Overall, these results suggest that this specific model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy produces reversal learning impairment that could be linked to dysfunction in neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

  7. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alvaro I.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA) and tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on structure of mPFC neurons and levels of myelin associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons and these changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels that occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produces hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC. PMID:25732140

  8. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Navarro, A I; Mandyam, C D

    2015-05-07

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA). Tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on the structure of mPFC neurons and the levels of myelin-associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels which occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produced hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. T2* mapping and B0 orientation-dependence at 7 T reveal cyto- and myeloarchitecture organization of the human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Adad, J. Cohen; Polimeni, J.R.; Helmer, K.G.; Benner, T.; McNab, J.A.; Wald, L.L.; Rosen, B.R.; Mainero, C.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high field MRI (≥7 T) has recently shown great sensitivity to depict patterns of tissue microarchitecture. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated a dependency between T2* and orientation of white matter fibers with respect to the main magnetic field B0. In this study we probed the potential of T2* mapping at 7 T to provide new markers of cortical architecture. We acquired multi-echo measurements at 7 T and mapped T2* over the entire cortex of eight healthy individuals using surface-based analysis. B0 dependence was tested by computing the angle θz between the normal of the surface and the direction of B0, then fitting T2*(θz) using model from the literature. Average T2* in the cortex was 32.20+/−1.35 ms. Patterns of lower T2* were detected in the sensorimotor, visual and auditory cortices, likely reflecting higher myelin content. Significantly lower T2* was detected in the left hemisphere of the auditory region (p<0.005), suggesting higher myelin content, in accordance with previous investigations. B0 orientation dependence was detected in some areas of the cortex, the strongest being in the primary motor cortex (ΔR2*=4.10 Hz). This study demonstrates that quantitative T2* measures at 7 T MRI can reveal patterns of cytoarchitectural organization of the human cortex in vivo and that B0 orientation dependence can probe the coherency and orientation of gray matter fibers in the cortex, shedding light into the potential use of this type of contrast to characterize cyto-/myeloarchitecture and to understand the pathophysiology of diseases associated with changes in iron and/or myelin concentration. PMID:22270354

  10. Multipronged quantitative proteomics reveals serum proteome alterations in breast cancer intrinsic subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Akshada; Dabhi, Raju; Taunk, Khushman; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; RoyChoudhury, Sourav; Mane, Anupama; Bayatigeri, Santhakumari; Chaudhury, Koel; Santra, Manas K; Rapole, Srikanth

    2017-06-23

    Being molecularly heterogeneous, breast cancer tends to be a complicated oncological disease with high incidence rates throughout the world. The primary aim of this study was to identify the set of serum proteins with discriminatory capabilities towards the four major subtypes of breast cancer. We employed multipronged quantitative proteomic approaches like 2D-DIGE, iTRAQ and SWATH-MS and identified 307 differentially regulated proteins. Luminal A subtype consisted of 24, Luminal B subtype 38, HER2 Enriched subtype 17 and Triple negative breast cancer subtype 10 differentially regulated subtype specific proteins. These specific proteins were further subjected to bioinformatic tools which revealed the involvement in platelet degranulation, fibrinolysis, lipid metabolism, immune response, complement activation, blood coagulation, glycolysis and cancer signaling pathways in the subtypes of the breast cancer. The significant discrimination efficiency of the models generated through multivariate statistical analysis was decent to distinguish each of the four subtypes from controls. Further, some of the statistically significant differentially regulated proteins were verified and validated by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry based selected reaction monitoring (SRM) approach. Our Multipronged proteomics approaches revealed panel of serum proteins specifically altered for individual subtypes of breast cancer. The mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006441. Worldwide, breast cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths in women and it encompasses four major molecular subtypes. As breast cancer treatment majorly depends on identification of specific subtype, it is important to diagnosis the disease at subtype level. Our results using multipronged quantitative proteomics identified 307 differentially regulated proteins in which 24 were specific for Luminal A, 38 for Luminal B, 17 for HER2 enriched and 10

  11. FGF-2 deficiency causes dysregulation of Arhgef6 and downstream targets in the cerebral cortex accompanied by altered neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Baum, Philip; Vogt, Miriam A; Gass, Peter; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is an abundant growth factor in the brain and exerts multiple functions on neural cells ranging from cell division, cell fate determination to differentiation. However, many details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diverse functions of FGF-2 are poorly understood. In a comparative microarray analysis of motor sensory cortex (MSC) tissue of adult knockout (FGF-2(-/-)) and control (FGF-2(+/+)) mice, we found a substantial number of regulated genes, which are implicated in cytoskeletal machinery dynamics. Specifically, we found a prominent downregulation of Arhgef6. Arhgef6 mRNA was significantly reduced in the FGF-2(-/-) cortex, and Arhgef6 protein virtually absent, while RhoA protein levels were massively increased and Cdc42 protein levels were reduced. Since Arhgef6 is localized to dendritic spines, we next analyzed dendritic spines of adult FGF2(-/-) and control mouse cortices. Spine densities were significantly increased, whereas mean length of spines on dendrites of layer V of MSC neurons in adult FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly decreased as compared to respective controls. Furthermore, neurite length in dissociated cortical cultures from E18 FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly reduced at DIV7 as compared to wildtype neurons. Despite the fact that altered neuronal morphology and alterations in dendritic spines were observed, FGF-2(-/-) mice behave relatively unsuspicious in several behavioral tasks. However, FGF-2(-/-) mice exhibited decreased thermal pain sensitivity in the hotplate-test.

  12. Comparison of the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial proteins in cerebral cortex between rat Alzheimer’s disease and the cerebral ischemia model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houyou; Yang, Changwei; Chen, Shi; Huang, Yang; Liu, Chuanming; Liu, Jian; Yin, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and ischemic brain injury are two major neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction commonly occurs in AD and ischemic brain injury. Currently, little attention has been paid to the glycans on mitochondrial glycoproteins, which may play vital roles during the process of mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to illustrate and compare the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins extracted from the cerebral cortex of the rat models of these two diseases using High-throughput lectin microarrays. The results shown that the number of lectins with significant differences compared to normal brains was nine for the rat sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (SAD) model and eighteen for the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Interestingly, five lectins showed opposite expression patterns between the SAD and MCAO rat models. We conclude that glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins in the cerebral cortex may provide vital information to help understand mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. In addition, glycans recognized by diverse lectins with opposite expression patterns between these two diseases hints at the different pathomechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. PMID:28071664

  13. Alteration in 5-HT₂C, NMDA receptor and IP3 in cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: restorative role of Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Amee; Anju, T R; Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paulose, C S

    2015-01-01

    Bacopa monnieri is effective in stress management, brain function and a balanced mood. 5-HT2C receptors have been implicated in stress whereas NMDA receptors and mGlu5 play crucial role in memory and cognition. In the present study, we investigated the role of B. monnieri extract in ameliorating pilocarpine induced temporal lobe epilepsy through regulation of 5-HT2C and NMDA receptors in cerebral cortex. Our studies confirmed an increased 5-HT2C receptor function during epilepsy thereby facilitating IP3 release. We also observed an decreased NMDA receptor function with an elevated mGlu5 and GLAST gene expression in epileptic condition indicating the possibility for glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. These alterations lead to impaired behavioural functions as indicated by the Elevated Plus maze test. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments to epileptic rats reversed the alterations in 5-HT2C, NMDA receptor functions and IP3 content thereby effectively managing the neurotransmitter balance in the cerebral cortex.

  14. Bidimensional unconstrained optimization approach to EMD: An algorithm revealing skin perfusion alterations in pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients.

    PubMed

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Colominas, Marcelo A; Schlotthauer, Gastón; Etienne, Maxime; Martin, Ludovic; Abraham, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited and systemic metabolic disorder that affects the skin, leading among other things to a peau d'orange appearance. Unfortunately, PXE is still poorly understood and there is no existing therapy to treat the disease. Because the skin is the first organ to be affected in PXE, we propose herein a study of skin microvascular perfusion. By means of this analysis, our goal is to increase knowledge of PXE. For this purpose, microvascular data from patients suffering from PXE and from healthy control subjects were recorded using the laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) modality. These data were processed using the recent 2D version of the unconstrained optimization approach to empirical mode decomposition (UOA-EMD). Our work therefore corresponds to the first time this algorithm has been applied to biomedical data. Our study shows that the 2D-UOA-EMD is able to reveal spatial patterns on local textures of LSCI data. Moreover, these spatial patterns differ between PXE patients and control subjects. Quantification measure of these spatial patterns reveals statistical significant differences between PXE and control subjects, in the neck (p=0.0004) and in the back (p=0.0052). For the first time, alterations in microvascular perfusion in PXE patients have been revealed. Our findings open new avenues for our understanding of pathophysiologic skin changes in PXE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  16. High-resolution genomic profiling of chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals new recurrent genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Jennifer; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Miller, Florian; Winkler, Dirk; Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Bullinger, Lars; Kühn, Michael W M; Gerhardinger, Andreas; Bloehdorn, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Su, Xiaoping; Ma, Jing; Pounds, Stanley; Hallek, Michael; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan; Busch, Raymonde; Mertens, Daniel; Downing, James R; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Döhner, Hartmut

    2012-12-06

    To identify genomic alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism-array analysis using Affymetrix Version 6.0 on 353 samples from untreated patients entered in the CLL8 treatment trial. Based on paired-sample analysis (n = 144), a mean of 1.8 copy number alterations per patient were identified; approximately 60% of patients carried no copy number alterations other than those detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity was detected in 6% of CLL patients and was found most frequently on 13q, 17p, and 11q. Minimally deleted regions were refined on 13q14 (deleted in 61% of patients) to the DLEU1 and DLEU2 genes, on 11q22.3 (27% of patients) to ATM, on 2p16.1-2p15 (gained in 7% of patients) to a 1.9-Mb fragment containing 9 genes, and on 8q24.21 (5% of patients) to a segment 486 kb proximal to the MYC locus. 13q deletions exhibited proximal and distal breakpoint cluster regions. Among the most common novel lesions were deletions at 15q15.1 (4% of patients), with the smallest deletion (70.48 kb) found in the MGA locus. Sequence analysis of MGA in 59 samples revealed a truncating mutation in one CLL patient lacking a 15q deletion. MNT at 17p13.3, which in addition to MGA and MYC encodes for the network of MAX-interacting proteins, was also deleted recurrently.

  17. c-Fos positive nucleus reveals that contextual specificity of latent inhibition is dependent of insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Esperanza; Vargas, Juan Pedro; Diaz, Estrella; Escarabajal, María Dolores; Carrasco, Manuel; López, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The present study analyzed the functional activity of granular and agranular insular cortices in contextual specificity of latent inhibition using a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. c-Fos immunolabeling was examined in insular cortex in preexposed and no preexposed groups under similar and different context conditions. Result showed that the exposition to a novel taste increased c-fos activity in insular cortex. However, a context shift caused an increase in immunolabeling in animals preexposed to saccharine. These results suggest insular cortex is part of a complex system to evaluate taste-response, and it may read the meaning of taste stimuli depending on the context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain structure. Cell types in the mouse cortex and hippocampus revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Amit; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; Codeluppi, Simone; Lönnerberg, Peter; La Manno, Gioele; Juréus, Anna; Marques, Sueli; Munguba, Hermany; He, Liqun; Betsholtz, Christer; Rolny, Charlotte; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Linnarsson, Sten

    2015-03-06

    The mammalian cerebral cortex supports cognitive functions such as sensorimotor integration, memory, and social behaviors. Normal brain function relies on a diverse set of differentiated cell types, including neurons, glia, and vasculature. Here, we have used large-scale single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to classify cells in the mouse somatosensory cortex and hippocampal CA1 region. We found 47 molecularly distinct subclasses, comprising all known major cell types in the cortex. We identified numerous marker genes, which allowed alignment with known cell types, morphology, and location. We found a layer I interneuron expressing Pax6 and a distinct postmitotic oligodendrocyte subclass marked by Itpr2. Across the diversity of cortical cell types, transcription factors formed a complex, layered regulatory code, suggesting a mechanism for the maintenance of adult cell type identity.

  19. Inhalation of air polluted with gasoline vapours alters the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kinawy, Amal A; Ezzat, Ahmed R; Al-Suwaigh, Badryah R

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of exposure to the vapours of two kinds of gasoline, a widely used fuel for the internal combustion engines on the levels of the amino acid neurotransmitters of the rat brain. Recent studies provide strong evidence for a causative role for traffic-related air pollution on morbidity outcomes as well as premature death (Health Effects Institute, 2009; Levy et al., 2010; von Stackelberg et al., 2013). Exposure to the vapours of gasoline or its constituents may be accidental, occupational by workers at fuel stations and factories, or through abuse as a mean of mood alteration (Fortenberry, 1985; Mc Garvey et al., 1999). Two kinds of gasoline that are common in Egypt have been used in this study. The first contains octane enhancers in the form of lead derivatives (leaded gasoline; G1) and the other contains methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the octane enhancer (unleaded gasoline; G2). The levels of the major excitatory (aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and the inhibitory (GABA and glycine) amino acid neurotransmitters were determined in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The current study revealed that the acute inhalation of air polluted with the two types of gasoline vapours (1/2 LC50 for 30 min) induced elevation in the levels of aspartic and glutamic acids along with a decrease in glycine and GABA in most studied brain areas. Chronic inhalation of both types of gasoline (a single daily 30-min session of 1/5 LC50 for 60 days) caused a significant increase in the aspartic and glutamic acid concentrations of the hippocampus without affecting the levels of GABA or glycine. Acute and chronic inhalation of either one of G1 and G2 vapours induced a disturbance and fluctuation in the levels of the free amino acids that act as excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the brain areas under investigation. These neurotransmitters are fundamental for the communicative functioning of the neurons and such

  20. Historical comparisons reveal altered competitive interactions in a guild of crustose coralline algae.

    PubMed

    McCoy, S J; Pfister, C A

    2014-04-01

    As the ocean environment changes over time, a paucity of long-term data sets and historical comparisons limits the exploration of community dynamics over time in natural systems. Here, we used a long-term experimental data set to present evidence for a reversal of competitive dominance within a group of crustose coralline algae (CCA) from the 1980s to present time in the northeast Pacific Ocean. CCA are cosmopolitan species distributed globally, and dominant space holders in intertidal and subtidal systems. Competition experiments showed a markedly lower competitive ability of the previous competitively dominant species and a decreased response of competitive dynamics to grazer presence. Competitive networks obtained from survey data showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed reductions in interaction strengths across the assemblage. We discuss the potential role of environmental change, including ocean acidification, in altered ecological dynamics in this system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Transcriptomic profiling of urine extracellular vesicles reveals alterations of CDH3 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; González, Esperanza; Cortazar, Ana R.; Palomo, Laura; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Lacasa-Viscasillas, Isabel; Berdasco, Maria; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Martín-Martín, Natalia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Valcarcel-Jimenez, Lorea; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Tampan, Jorge; Cachi-Fuentes, Guido; Esteller, Manel; Aransay, Ana M.; Unda, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are emerging structures with promising properties for intercellular communication. In addition, the characterization of EV in biofluids is an attractive source of non-invasive diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Here we show that urinary EV (uEV) from prostate cancer (PCa) patients exhibit genuine and differential physical and biological properties compared to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Importantly, transcriptomics characterization of uEVs led us to define the decreased abundance of Cadherin 3, type 1 (CDH3) transcript in uEV from PCa patients. Tissue and cell line analysis strongly suggested that the status of CDH3 in uEVs is a distal reflection of changes in the expression of this cadherin in the prostate tumor. CDH3 was negatively regulated at the genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic level in PCa. Our results reveal that uEVs could represent a non-invasive tool to inform about the molecular alterations in PCa. PMID:26771841

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of urine extracellular vesicles reveals alterations of CDH3 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Zuñiga-Garcia, Patricia; Torrano, Verónica; Loizaga, Ana; Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; González, Esperanza; Cortazar, Ana R; Palomo, Laura; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Lacasa-Viscasillas, Isabel; Berdasco, Maria; Sutherland, James D; Barrio, Rosa; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Martín-Martín, Natalia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Valcarcel-Jimenez, Lorea; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Tampan, Jorge; Cachi-Fuentes, Guido; Esteller, Manel; Aransay, Ana M; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-02-09

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are emerging structures with promising properties for intercellular communication. In addition, the characterization of EV in biofluids is an attractive source of non-invasive diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Here we show that urinary EV (uEV) from prostate cancer (PCa) patients exhibit genuine and differential physical and biological properties compared to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Importantly, transcriptomics characterization of uEVs led us to define the decreased abundance of Cadherin 3, type 1 (CDH3) transcript in uEV from PCa patients. Tissue and cell line analysis strongly suggested that the status of CDH3 in uEVs is a distal reflection of changes in the expression of this cadherin in the prostate tumor. CDH3 was negatively regulated at the genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic level in PCa. Our results reveal that uEVs could represent a non-invasive tool to inform about the molecular alterations in PCa.

  3. Competitive (AP7) and non-competitive (MK-801) NMDA receptor antagonists differentially alter glucose utilization in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Lee, S.J.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of D,L-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, on regional brain metabolism were studied in unanesthetized, freely moving rats by using the quantitative {sup 14}C2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic procedure. AP7 (338 or 901 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity throughout most of the regions studied including sensory, motor, and limbic cortices. In contrast, MK-801 (0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity in sensory cortices, and an increase in limbic regions such as the hippocampal stratum lacunosum moleculare and entorhinal cortex. MK-801 also produced a biphasic response in agranular motor cortex, whereby the low dose increased while the high dose decreased labeling. In addition, MK-801 produced heterogeneous effects on regional cerebral metabolism in sensory cortices. Metabolic activity decreased in layer IV relative to layer Va following MK-801 treatment in primary somatosensory (SI) and visual (VI) cortices, suggesting a shift in activity from afferent fibers innervating layer IV to those innervating layer Va. MK-801 administration also decreased metabolic activity in granular SI relative to dysgranular SI, and in VI relative to secondary visual cortex (VII), thus providing a relative sparing of activity in dysgranular SI and VII. Thus, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist suppressed activity from extrinsic neocortical sources, enhancing relative intracortical activity and stimulating limbic regions, while the competitive NMDA antagonist depressed metabolic activity in all cortical regions.

  4. Altered Modulation of Silent Period in Tongue Motor Cortex of Persistent Developmental Stuttering in Relation to Stuttering Severity.

    PubMed

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Del Ben, Giovanni; Bernardini, Simona; Natarelli, Giulia; Bencich, Marco; Monti, Fabrizio; Manganotti, Paolo; Battaglini, Piero Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a "state" condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials. Tongue silent period duration was increased in DS, especially in the left hemisphere (P<0.05; Hedge's g or Cohen's dunbiased = 1.054, i.e. large effect size), suggesting a "state" condition of higher intracortical inhibition in left motor cortex networks. Differences in motor thresholds (different excitatory/inhibitory ratios in DS) were evident, as well as significant differences in SPT. In fluent speakers, the left hemisphere may be marginally more excitable than the right one in motor thresholds at lower muscular activation, while active motor thresholds and SPT were higher in the left hemisphere of DS with respect to the right one, resulting also in a positive correlation with stuttering severity. Pre-TMS electromyography data gave overlapping evidence. Findings suggest the existence of a complex intracortical balance in DS tongue primary motor cortex, with a particular interplay between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, also in neural substrates related to silent periods. Findings are discussed with respect to functional and structural impairments in stuttering, and are also proposed as novel neural markers of a stuttering "state" in persistent DS, helping to define more focused treatments (e.g. neuro-modulation).

  5. How does transcranial DC stimulation of the primary motor cortex alter regional neuronal activity in the human brain?

    PubMed

    Lang, Nicolas; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ward, Nick S; Lee, Lucy; Nitsche, Michael A; Paulus, Walter; Rothwell, John C; Lemon, Roger N; Frackowiak, Richard S

    2005-07-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor hand area (M1) can produce lasting polarity-specific effects on corticospinal excitability and motor learning in humans. In 16 healthy volunteers, O positron emission tomography (PET) of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) at rest and during finger movements was used to map lasting changes in regional synaptic activity following 10 min of tDCS (+/-1 mA). Bipolar tDCS was given through electrodes placed over the left M1 and right frontopolar cortex. Eight subjects received anodal or cathodal tDCS of the left M1, respectively. When compared to sham tDCS, anodal and cathodal tDCS induced widespread increases and decreases in rCBF in cortical and subcortical areas. These changes in rCBF were of the same magnitude as task-related rCBF changes during finger movements and remained stable throughout the 50-min period of PET scanning. Relative increases in rCBF after real tDCS compared to sham tDCS were found in the left M1, right frontal pole, right primary sensorimotor cortex and posterior brain regions irrespective of polarity. With the exception of some posterior and ventral areas, anodal tDCS increased rCBF in many cortical and subcortical regions compared to cathodal tDCS. Only the left dorsal premotor cortex demonstrated an increase in movement related activity after cathodal tDCS, however, modest compared with the relatively strong movement-independent effects of tDCS. Otherwise, movement related activity was unaffected by tDCS. Our results indicate that tDCS is an effective means of provoking sustained and widespread changes in regional neuronal activity. The extensive spatial and temporal effects of tDCS need to be taken into account when tDCS is used to modify brain function.

  6. Altered Modulation of Silent Period in Tongue Motor Cortex of Persistent Developmental Stuttering in Relation to Stuttering Severity

    PubMed Central

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Del Ben, Giovanni; Bernardini, Simona; Natarelli, Giulia; Bencich, Marco; Monti, Fabrizio; Manganotti, Paolo; Battaglini, Piero Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a “state” condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials. Tongue silent period duration was increased in DS, especially in the left hemisphere (P<0.05; Hedge’s g or Cohen’s dunbiased = 1.054, i.e. large effect size), suggesting a “state” condition of higher intracortical inhibition in left motor cortex networks. Differences in motor thresholds (different excitatory/inhibitory ratios in DS) were evident, as well as significant differences in SPT. In fluent speakers, the left hemisphere may be marginally more excitable than the right one in motor thresholds at lower muscular activation, while active motor thresholds and SPT were higher in the left hemisphere of DS with respect to the right one, resulting also in a positive correlation with stuttering severity. Pre-TMS electromyography data gave overlapping evidence. Findings suggest the existence of a complex intracortical balance in DS tongue primary motor cortex, with a particular interplay between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, also in neural substrates related to silent periods. Findings are discussed with respect to functional and structural impairments in stuttering, and are also proposed as novel neural markers of a stuttering “state” in persistent DS, helping to define more focused treatments (e.g. neuro-modulation). PMID:27711148

  7. Ifenprodil infusion in agranular insular cortex alters social behavior and vocalizations in rats exposed to moderate levels of ethanol during prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Bird, Clark W; Barto, Daniel; Magcalas, Christy M; Rodriguez, Carlos I; Donaldson, Tia; Davies, Suzy; Savage, Daniel D; Hamilton, Derek A

    2017-03-01

    Moderate exposure to alcohol during development leads to subtle neurobiological and behavioral effects classified under the umbrella term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Alterations in social behaviors are a frequently observed consequence of maternal drinking, as children with FASDs display inappropriate aggressive behaviors and altered responses to social cues. Rodent models of FASDs mimic the behavioral alterations seen in humans, with rats exposed to ethanol during development displaying increased aggressive behaviors, decreased social investigation, and altered play behavior. Work from our laboratory has observed increased wrestling behavior in adult male rats following prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), and increased expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the agranular insular cortex (AIC). This study was undertaken to determine if ifenprodil, a GluN2B preferring negative allosteric modulator, has a significant effect on social behaviors in PAE rats. Using a voluntary ethanol exposure paradigm, rat dams were allowed to drink a saccharin-sweetened solution of either 0% or 5% ethanol throughout gestation. Offspring at 6-8 months of age were implanted with cannulae into AIC. Animals were isolated for 24h before ifenprodil or vehicle was infused into AIC, and after 15min they were recorded in a social interaction chamber. Ifenprodil treatment altered aspects of wrestling, social investigatory behaviors, and ultrasonic vocalizations in rats exposed to ethanol during development that were not observed in control animals. These data indicate that GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in AIC play a role in social behaviors and may underlie alterations in behavior and vocalizations observed in PAE animals.

  8. Transcriptome sequencing revealed significant alteration of cortical promoter usage and splicing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing Qin; Wang, Xi; Beveridge, Natalie J; Tooney, Paul A; Scott, Rodney J; Carr, Vaughan J; Cairns, Murray J

    2012-01-01

    While hybridization based analysis of the cortical transcriptome has provided important insight into the neuropathology of schizophrenia, it represents a restricted view of disease-associated gene activity based on predetermined probes. By contrast, sequencing technology can provide un-biased analysis of transcription at nucleotide resolution. Here we use this approach to investigate schizophrenia-associated cortical gene expression. The data was generated from 76 bp reads of RNA-Seq, aligned to the reference genome and assembled into transcripts for quantification of exons, splice variants and alternative promoters in postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG/BA22) from 9 male subjects with schizophrenia and 9 matched non-psychiatric controls. Differentially expressed genes were then subjected to further sequence and functional group analysis. The output, amounting to more than 38 Gb of sequence, revealed significant alteration of gene expression including many previously shown to be associated with schizophrenia. Gene ontology enrichment analysis followed by functional map construction identified three functional clusters highly relevant to schizophrenia including neurotransmission related functions, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and neural development. Significantly, more than 2000 genes displayed schizophrenia-associated alternative promoter usage and more than 1000 genes showed differential splicing (FDR<0.05). Both types of transcriptional isoforms were exemplified by reads aligned to the neurodevelopmentally significant doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) gene. This study provided the first deep and un-biased analysis of schizophrenia-associated transcriptional diversity within the STG, and revealed variants with important implications for the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  9. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 alters oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Beatriz; Riquelme, Raquel; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Jiménez, Antonio Jesús; de Diego, Isabel; Gómez-Conde, Ana Isabel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Aguirre, José Ángel; Chun, Jerold; Pedraza, Carmen; Santín, Luis Javier; Fernández, Oscar; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intercellular signaling lipid that regulates multiple cellular functions, acting through specific G-protein coupled receptors (LPA(1-6)). Our previous studies using viable Malaga variant maLPA1-null mice demonstrated the requirement of the LPA1 receptor for normal proliferation, differentiation, and survival of the neuronal precursors. In the cerebral cortex LPA1 is expressed extensively in differentiating oligodendrocytes, in parallel with myelination. Although exogenous LPA-induced effects have been investigated in myelinating cells, the in vivo contribution of LPA1 to normal myelination remains to be demonstrated. This study identified a relevant in vivo role for LPA1 as a regulator of cortical myelination. Immunochemical analysis in adult maLPA1-null mice demonstrated a reduction in the steady-state levels of the myelin proteins MBP, PLP/DM20, and CNPase in the cerebral cortex. The myelin defects were confirmed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Stereological analysis limited the defects to adult differentiating oligodendrocytes, without variation in the NG2+ precursor cells. Finally, a possible mechanism involving oligodendrocyte survival was demonstrated by the impaired intracellular transport of the PLP/DM20 myelin protein which was accompanied by cellular loss, suggesting stress-induced apoptosis. These findings describe a previously uncharacterized in vivo functional role for LPA1 in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the CNS, underlining the importance of the maLPA1-null mouse as a model for the study of demyelinating diseases.

  10. Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the lateral prefrontal cortex alters reinforcement learning bias.

    PubMed

    Ott, Derek V M; Ullsperger, Markus; Jocham, Gerhard; Neumann, Jane; Klein, Tilmann A

    2011-07-15

    The prefrontal cortex is known to play a key role in higher-order cognitive functions. Recently, we showed that this brain region is active in reinforcement learning, during which subjects constantly have to integrate trial outcomes in order to optimize performance. To further elucidate the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in reinforcement learning, we applied continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) either to the left or right DLPFC, or to the vertex as a control region, respectively, prior to the performance of a probabilistic learning task in an fMRI environment. While there was no influence of cTBS on learning performance per se, we observed a stimulation-dependent modulation of reward vs. punishment sensitivity: Left-hemispherical DLPFC stimulation led to a more reward-guided performance, while right-hemispherical cTBS induced a more avoidance-guided behavior. FMRI results showed enhanced prediction error coding in the ventral striatum in subjects stimulated over the left as compared to the right DLPFC. Both behavioral and imaging results are in line with recent findings that left, but not right-hemispherical stimulation can trigger a release of dopamine in the ventral striatum, which has been suggested to increase the relative impact of rewards rather than punishment on behavior.

  11. Early auditory enrichment with music enhances auditory discrimination learning and alters NR2B protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2009-01-03

    Previous studies have shown that the functional development of auditory system is substantially influenced by the structure of environmental acoustic inputs in early life. In our present study, we investigated the effects of early auditory enrichment with music on rat auditory discrimination learning. We found that early auditory enrichment with music from postnatal day (PND) 14 enhanced learning ability in auditory signal-detection task and in sound duration-discrimination task. In parallel, a significant increase was noted in NMDA receptor subunit NR2B protein expression in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, we found that auditory enrichment with music starting from PND 28 or 56 did not influence NR2B expression in the auditory cortex. No difference was found in the NR2B expression in the inferior colliculus (IC) between music-exposed and normal rats, regardless of when the auditory enrichment with music was initiated. Our findings suggest that early auditory enrichment with music influences NMDA-mediated neural plasticity, which results in enhanced auditory discrimination learning.

  12. Severe alterations in lipid composition of frontal cortex lipid rafts from Parkinson's disease and incidental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson's disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Bilingual Language Control in Perception versus Action: MEG Reveals Comprehension Control Mechanisms in Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Domain-General Control of Production in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2016-01-13

    For multilingual individuals, adaptive goal-directed behavior as enabled by cognitive control includes the management of two or more languages. This work used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the degree of neural overlap between language control and domain-general cognitive control both in action and perception. Highly proficient Arabic-English bilingual individuals participated in maximally parallel language-switching tasks in production and comprehension as well as in analogous tasks in which, instead of the used language, the semantic category of the comprehended/produced word changed. Our results indicated a clear dissociation of language control mechanisms in production versus comprehension. Language-switching in production recruited dorsolateral prefrontal regions bilaterally and, importantly, these regions were similarly recruited by category-switching. Conversely, effects of language-switching in comprehension were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex and were not shared by category-switching. These results suggest that bilingual individuals rely on adaptive language control strategies and that the neural involvement during language-switching could be extensively influenced by whether the switch is active (e.g., in production) or passive (e.g., in comprehension). In addition, these results support that humans require high-level cognitive control to switch languages in production, but the comprehension of language switches recruits a distinct neural circuitry. The use of MEG enabled us to obtain the first characterization of the spatiotemporal profile of these effects, establishing that switching processes begin ∼ 400 ms after stimulus presentation. This research addresses the neural mechanisms underlying multilingual individuals' ability to successfully manage two or more languages, critically targeting whether language control is uniform across linguistic domains (production and comprehension) and whether it is a subdomain of general

  14. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression.

  15. Association between As and Cu renal cortex accumulation and physiological and histological alterations after chronic arsenic intake

    SciTech Connect

    Rubatto Birri, Paolo N.; Perez, Roberto D.; Cremonezzi, David; Perez, Carlos A.; Rubio, Marcelo; Bongiovanni, Guillermina A.

    2010-07-15

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most abundant hazards in the environment and it is a human carcinogen. Related to excretory functions, the kidneys in humans, animal models or naturally exposed fauna, are target organs for As accumulation and deleterious effects. Previous studies carried out using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry by synchrotron radiation (SR-{mu}XRF) showed a high concentration of As in the renal cortex of chronically exposed rats, suggesting that this is a suitable model for studies on renal As accumulation. This accumulation was accompanied by a significant increase in copper (Cu) concentration. The present study focused on the localization of these elements in the renal cortex and their correlation with physiological and histological As-related renal effects. Experiments were performed on nine male Wistar rats, divided into three experimental groups. Two groups received 100 {mu}g/ml sodium arsenite in drinking water for 60 and 120 consecutive days, respectively. The control group received water without sodium arsenite (<50 ppb As). For histological analysis, 5-{mu}m-thick sections of kidneys were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Biochemical analyses were used to determine concentrations of plasma urea and creatinine. The As and Cu mapping were carried out by SR-{mu}XRF using a collimated white synchrotron spectrum (300 {mu}mx300 {mu}m) on kidney slices (2 mm thick) showing As and Cu co-distribution in the renal cortex. Then, renal cortical slices (100 {mu}m thick) were scanned with a focused white synchrotron spectrum (30 {mu}mx30 {mu}m). Peri-glomerular accumulation of As and Cu at 60 and 120 days was found. The effects of 60 days of arsenic consumption were seen in a decreased Bowman's space as well as a decreased plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio. Major deleterious effects; however, were seen on tubules at 120 days of exposition. This study supports the hypothesis that tubular accumulation of As-Cu may have some bearing on the

  16. Adolescent binge ethanol exposure alters specific forebrain cholinergic cell populations and leads to selective functional deficits in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Gina M; Savage, Lisa M

    2017-10-11

    Adolescence has been identified as a vulnerable developmental time period during which exposure to drugs can have long-lasting, detrimental effects. Although adolescent binge-like ethanol (EtOH) exposure leads to a significant reduction in forebrain cholinergic neurons, EtOH's functional effect on acetylcholine (ACh) release during behavior has yet to be examined. Using an adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure model (AIE), rats were exposed to binge-like levels of EtOH from postnatal days (PD) 25 to 55. Three weeks following the final EtOH exposure, cholinergic functioning was assessed during a spontaneous alternation protocol. During maze testing, ACh levels increased in both the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. However, selectively in the prefrontal cortex, AIE rats displayed reduced levels of behaviorally relevant ACh efflux. We found no treatment differences in spatial exploration, spatial learning, spatial reversal, or novel object recognition. In contrast, AIE rats were impaired during the first attentional set shift on an operant set-shifting task, indicative of an EtOH-mediated deficit in cognitive flexibility. A unique pattern of cholinergic cell loss was observed in the basal forebrain following AIE: Within the medial septum/diagonal band there was a selective loss (30%) of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons that were nestin negative (ChAT+/nestin-); whereas in the Nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM) there was a selective reduction (50%) in ChAT+/nestin+. These results indicate that early adolescent binge EtOH exposure leads to a long-lasting frontocortical functional cholinergic deficit, driven by a loss of ChAT+/nestin+ neurons in the NbM, which was associated with impaired cognitive flexibility during adulthood. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Streptozotocin diabetic mice display depressive-like behavior and alterations in the structure, neurotransmission and plasticity of medial prefrontal cortex interneurons.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Coviello, Simona; Perez-Rando, Marta; Curto, Yasmina; Carceller, Héctor; Salvador, Alicia; Nacher, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus patients are at increased risk of developing depression, although the neurobiological bases of this comorbidity are not yet fully understood. These patients show CNS alterations, similar to those found in major depression, including changes in the structure and neurotransmission of excitatory neurons. However, although depressive patients and animal models also display alterations in inhibitory networks, little is known about the effects of diabetes on interneurons. Our main objective was to study the impact of diabetes on interneurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), one of the regions most affected by major depression. For this purpose we have induced diabetes with high-dose streptozotozin in transgenic mice displaying fluorescent interneurons. These animals showed a depressive-like behavior (increased immobility time in tail suspension test) in parallel with reductions in interneuronal dendritic arborization and in the expression of GAD67, the enzyme that synthetizes the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. However, the levels of PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule exclusively expressed by interneurons in the mPFC, were unaltered in the different regions and layers of this cortical area. Interestingly, diabetic mice also showed increased levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein. These results indicate that the structure and neurotransmission of interneurons is altered in the mPFC of diabetic mice and suggest that these changes may play a key role in the depressive symptoms associated to diabetes.

  18. Dual origins of measured phase-amplitude coupling reveal distinct neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Alex P; Yaffe, Robert B; Wittig, John H; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2017-03-01

    Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is hypothesized to coordinate neural activity, but its role in successful memory formation in the human cortex is unknown. Measures of PAC are difficult to interpret, however. Both increases and decreases in PAC have been linked to memory encoding, and PAC may arise due to different neural mechanisms. Here, we use a waveform analysis to examine PAC in the human cortex as participants with intracranial electrodes performed a paired associates memory task. We found that successful memory formation exhibited significant decreases in left temporal lobe and prefrontal cortical PAC, and these two regions exhibited changes in PAC within different frequency bands. Two underlying neural mechanisms, nested oscillations and sharp waveforms, were responsible for the changes in these regions. Our data therefore suggest that decreases in measured cortical PAC during episodic memory reflect two distinct underlying mechanisms that are anatomically segregated in the human brain.

  19. Functionally defined white matter reveals segregated pathways in human ventral temporal cortex associated with category-specific processing

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Jesse; Pestilli, Franco; Witthoft, Nathan; Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Poltoratski, Sonia; Yoon, Jennifer; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2014-01-01

    Summary It is unknown if the white matter properties associated with specific visual networks selectively affect category-specific processing. In a novel protocol we combined measurements of white matter structure, functional selectivity, and behavior in the same subjects. We find two parallel white matter pathways along the ventral temporal lobe connecting to either face-selective or place-selective regions. Diffusion properties of portions of these tracts adjacent to face- and place-selective regions of ventral temporal cortex correlate with behavioral performance for face or place processing, respectively. Strikingly, adults with developmental prosopagnosia (face blindness) express an atypical structure-behavior relationship near face-selective cortex, suggesting that white matter atypicalities in this region may have behavioral consequences. These data suggest that examining the interplay between cortical function, anatomical connectivity, and visual behavior is integral to understanding functional networks and their role in producing visual abilities and deficits. PMID:25569351

  20. Concurrent TMS–fMRI reveals dynamic interhemispheric influences of the right parietal cortex during exogenously cued visuospatial attention

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Klaartje; Ruff, Christian C; Bjoertomt, Otto; Schenkluhn, Bertram; Bestmann, Sven; Blankenburg, Felix; Driver, Jon; Chambers, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    We used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional MRI (TMS-fMRI) during a visuospatial cueing paradigm in humans, to study the causal role of the right angular gyrus (AG) as a source of attentional control. Our findings show that TMS over the right AG (high vs. low intensity) modulates neural responses interhemispherically, in a manner that varies dynamically with the current attentional condition. The behavioural impact of such TMS depended not only on the target hemifield but also on exogenous cue validity, facilitating spatial reorienting to invalidly cued right visual targets. On a neural level, right AG TMS had corresponding interhemispheric effects in the left AG and left retinotopic cortex, including area V1. We conclude that the direction of covert visuospatial attention can involve dynamic interplay between the right AG and remote interconnected regions of the opposite left hemisphere, whereas our findings also suggest that the right AG can influence responses in the retinotopic visual cortex. PMID:21324004

  1. Alterations of the Ceramide Metabolism in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Are Independent of the Sphingomyelinase Pathway and Not Influenced by the Acid Sphingomyelinase Inhibitor Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Brunkhorst, R.; Friedlaender, F.; Ferreirós, N.; Schwalm, S.; Koch, A.; Grammatikos, G.; Toennes, S.; Foerch, C.; Pfeilschifter, J.; Pfeilschifter, W.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramides induce important intracellular signaling pathways, modulating proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and inflammation. However, the relevance of the ceramide metabolism in the reconvalescence phase after stroke is unclear. Besides its well-known property as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine has been reported to inhibit the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a key regulator of ceramide levels which derives ceramide from sphingomyelin. Furthermore, fluoxetine has shown therapeutic potential in a randomized controlled rehabilitation trial in stroke patients. Our aim was to investigate and modulate ceramide concentrations in the peri-infarct cortex, whose morphological and functional properties correlate with long-term functional outcome in stroke. We show that certain ceramide species are modulated after experimental stroke and that these changes do not result from alterations of ASM activity, but rather from nontranscriptional induction of the ceramide de novo pathway. Unexpectedly, although reducing lesion size, fluoxetine did not improve functional outcome in our model and had no significant influence on ASM activity or the concentration of ceramides. The ceramide metabolism could emerge as a potential therapeutic target in the reconvalescence phase after stroke, as its accumulation in the peri-infarct cortex potentially influences membrane functions as well as signaling events in the tissue essential for neurological recovery. PMID:26605090

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language.

    PubMed

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of motor cortex engagement during emotion perception. Participants observed pictures of body expressions and categorized them as happy, fearful or neutral while receiving TMS over the left or right motor cortex at 150 and 300 ms after picture onset. In the early phase (150 ms), we observed a reduction of excitability for happy and fearful emotional bodies that was specific to the right hemisphere and correlated with participants' disposition to feel personal distress. This 'orienting' inhibitory response to emotional bodies was also paralleled by a general drop in categorization accuracy when stimulating the right but not the left motor cortex. Conversely, at 300 ms, greater excitability for negative, positive and neutral movements was found in both hemispheres. This later motor facilitation marginally correlated with participants' tendency to assume the psychological perspectives of others and reflected simulation of the movement implied in the neutral and emotional body expressions. These findings highlight the motor system's involvement during perception of emotional bodies. They suggest that fast orienting reactions to emotional cues--reflecting neural processing necessary for visual perception--occur before motor features of the observed emotional expression are simulated in the motor system and that distinct empathic dispositions influence these two neural motor phenomena. Implications for theories of embodied simulation are discussed.

  3. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    PubMed

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs.

  4. Connectivity Reveals Sources of Predictive Coding Signals in Early Visual Cortex During Processing of Visual Optic Flow.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Superimposed on the visual feed-forward pathway, feedback connections convey higher level information to cortical areas lower in the hierarchy. A prominent framework for these connections is the theory of predictive coding where high-level areas send stimulus interpretations to lower level areas that compare them with sensory input. Along these lines, a growing body of neuroimaging studies shows that predictable stimuli lead to reduced blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses compared with matched nonpredictable counterparts, especially in early visual cortex (EVC) including areas V1-V3. The sources of these modulatory feedback signals are largely unknown. Here, we re-examined the robust finding of relative BOLD suppression in EVC evident during processing of coherent compared with random motion. Using functional connectivity analysis, we show an optic flow-dependent increase of functional connectivity between BOLD suppressed EVC and a network of visual motion areas including MST, V3A, V6, the cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv), and precuneus (Pc). Connectivity decreased between EVC and 2 areas known to encode heading direction: entorhinal cortex (EC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). Our results provide first evidence that BOLD suppression in EVC for predictable stimuli is indeed mediated by specific high-level areas, in accord with the theory of predictive coding. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Object representations in the temporal cortex of monkeys and humans as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew H; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Frihauf, Jennifer B; Tootell, Roger B H; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2009-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the neural processes associated with identifying everyday stimuli include the classification of those stimuli into a limited number of semantic categories. How the neural representations of these stimuli are organized in the temporal lobe remains under debate. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify correlates for three current hypotheses concerning object representations in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and humans: representations based on animacy, semantic categories, or visual features. Subjects were presented with blocked images of faces, body parts (animate stimuli), objects, and places (inanimate stimuli), and multiple overlapping contrasts were used to identify the voxels most selective for each category. Stimulus representations appeared to segregate according to semantic relationships. Discrete regions selective for animate and inanimate stimuli were found in both species. These regions could be further subdivided into regions selective for individual categories. Notably, face-selective regions were contiguous with body-part-selective regions, and object-selective regions were contiguous with place-selective regions. When category-selective regions in monkeys were tested with blocks of single exemplars, individual voxels showed preferences for visually dissimilar exemplars from the same category and voxels with similar preferences tended to cluster together. Our results provide some novel observations with respect to how stimulus representations are organized in IT cortex. In addition, they further support the idea that representations of complex stimuli in IT cortex are organized into multiple hierarchical tiers, encompassing both semantic and physical properties.

  6. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces

    PubMed Central

    Cuaya, Laura V.; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs’ brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs. PMID:26934715

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing Revealed Significant Alteration of Cortical Promoter Usage and Splicing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing Qin; Wang, Xi; Beveridge, Natalie J.; Tooney, Paul A.; Scott, Rodney J.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Cairns, Murray J.

    2012-01-01

    Background While hybridization based analysis of the cortical transcriptome has provided important insight into the neuropathology of schizophrenia, it represents a restricted view of disease-associated gene activity based on predetermined probes. By contrast, sequencing technology can provide un-biased analysis of transcription at nucleotide resolution. Here we use this approach to investigate schizophrenia-associated cortical gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings The data was generated from 76 bp reads of RNA-Seq, aligned to the reference genome and assembled into transcripts for quantification of exons, splice variants and alternative promoters in postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG/BA22) from 9 male subjects with schizophrenia and 9 matched non-psychiatric controls. Differentially expressed genes were then subjected to further sequence and functional group analysis. The output, amounting to more than 38 Gb of sequence, revealed significant alteration of gene expression including many previously shown to be associated with schizophrenia. Gene ontology enrichment analysis followed by functional map construction identified three functional clusters highly relevant to schizophrenia including neurotransmission related functions, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and neural development. Significantly, more than 2000 genes displayed schizophrenia-associated alternative promoter usage and more than 1000 genes showed differential splicing (FDR<0.05). Both types of transcriptional isoforms were exemplified by reads aligned to the neurodevelopmentally significant doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) gene. Conclusions This study provided the first deep and un-biased analysis of schizophrenia-associated transcriptional diversity within the STG, and revealed variants with important implications for the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:22558445

  8. Tolerance to the sedative and anxiolytic effects of diazepam is associated with different alterations of GABAA receptors in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, M C; Gutiérrez, M L; Gravielle, M C

    2015-12-03

    The clinical use of benzodiazepines is limited by the development of tolerance to their pharmacological effects. Tolerance to each of the pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines develops at different rates. The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism of tolerance by performing behavioral tests in combination with biochemical studies. To this end, we administered prolonged treatments of diazepam to rats for 7 or 14 days. Tolerance to the sedative effects of diazepam was detected by means of the open field test after the 7- and 14-day treatments, whereas tolerance to the anxiolytic actions of benzodiazepine manifested following only the 14-day treatment in the elevated plus maze. The cerebral cortical concentrations of diazepam did not decline after the diazepam treatments, indicating that tolerance was not due to alterations in pharmacokinetic factors. The uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions and an increase in the degree of phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit at serine 327 in the cerebral cortex were produced by day 7 of diazepam treatment and persisted after 14 days of exposure to benzodiazepine. Thus, these alterations could be part of the mechanism of tolerance to the sedative effects of diazepam. An increase in the percentage of α1-containing GABAA receptors in the cerebral cortex was observed following the 14-day treatment with diazepam but not the 7-day treatment, suggesting that tolerance to the anxiolytic effects is associated with a change in receptor subunit composition. The understanding of the molecular bases of tolerance could be important for the development of new drugs that maintain their efficacies over long-term treatments. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  10. Inflammation-related alterations of lipids after spinal cord injury revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamosaityte, Sandra; Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Koch, Maria; Later, Robert; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers several lipid alterations in nervous tissue. It is characterized by extensive demyelination and the inflammatory response leads to accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, which often transform into foam cells by accumulation of lipid droplets after engulfment of the damaged myelin sheaths. Using an experimental rat model, Raman microspectroscopy was applied to retrieve the modifications of the lipid distribution following SCI. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and endogenous two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopies were used for the detection of lipid-laden inflammatory cells. The Raman mapping of CH2 deformation mode intensity at 1440 cm-1 retrieved the lipid-depleted injury core. Preserved white matter and inflammatory regions with myelin fragmentation and foam cells were localized by specifically addressing the distribution of esterified lipids, i.e., by mapping the intensity of the carbonyl Raman band at 1743 cm-1, and were in agreement with CARS/TPEF microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the inflammatory regions are notably rich in saturated fatty acids. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy enabled to specifically detect inflammation after SCI and myelin degradation products.

  11. Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals Altered Desmosomal Protein Organization in Tissue from Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Warren, Maxine F; Feldman, Ron J; Swerlick, Robert A; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3. To better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, biopsies from patients with PV were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy, a form of superresolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and patient IgG colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of desmoglein 3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that desmoglein 3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in tissue of patients with PV. Further, this study reveals that superresolution optical imaging is a powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin.

  12. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  13. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments.

    PubMed

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-19

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  14. Super-resolution microscopy reveals altered desmosomal protein organization in pemphigus vulgaris patient tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Warren, Maxine F.; Feldman, Ron J.; Swerlick, Robert A.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). In order to better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, PV patient biopsies were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy (SIM), a form of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and localized to PV IgG-containing endocytic linear arrays. Patient IgG also colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of Dsg3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that Dsg3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in PV patient tissue. Further, this study reveals that super-resolution optical imaging is powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin. PMID:26763424

  15. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material. PMID:27194180

  16. Characterization of 4-HNE Modified L-FABP Reveals Alterations in Structural and Functional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smathers, Rebecca L.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Galligan, James J.; Shearn, Colin T.; Reigan, Philip; Marks, Michael J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative stress and subsequent lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The reactivity of 4-HNE towards DNA and nucleophilic amino acids has been well established. In this report, using proteomic approaches, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is identified as a target for modification by 4-HNE. This lipid binding protein mediates the uptake and trafficking of hydrophobic ligands throughout cellular compartments. Ethanol caused a significant decrease in L-FABP protein (P<0.001) and mRNA (P<0.05), as well as increased poly-ubiquitinated L-FABP (P<0.001). Sites of 4-HNE adduction on mouse recombinant L-FABP were mapped using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry on apo (Lys57 and Cys69) and holo (Lys6, Lys31, His43, Lys46, Lys57 and Cys69) L-FABP. The impact of 4-HNE adduction was found to occur in a concentration-dependent manner; affinity for the fluorescent ligand, anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, was reduced from 0.347 µM to Kd1 = 0.395 µM and Kd2 = 34.20 µM. Saturation analyses revealed that capacity for ligand is reduced by approximately 50% when adducted by 4-HNE. Thermal stability curves of apo L-FABP was also found to be significantly affected by 4-HNE adduction (ΔTm = 5.44°C, P<0.01). Computational-based molecular modeling simulations of adducted protein revealed minor conformational changes in global protein structure of apo and holo L-FABP while more apparent differences were observed within the internal binding pocket, revealing reduced area and structural integrity. New solvent accessible portals on the periphery of the protein were observed following 4-HNE modification in both the apo and holo state, suggesting an adaptive response to carbonylation. The results from this study detail the dynamic process associated with L-FABP modification by 4-HNE and provide insight as to how alterations in structural integrity and ligand binding may a

  17. Transcranial theta-burst stimulation alters GLT-1 and vGluT1 expression in rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mancic, Bojana; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Tihomir V; Djuric, Ana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Milanovic, Sladjan; Ninkovic, Milica

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces changes in expression of proteins engaged in activity of excitatory and inhibitory systems as well as redox homeostasis. Our aim was to investigate the effect of single (SS) and repeated session (RS) of intermittent and continuous theta-burst stimulation (iTBS; cTBS) on the expression of vesicular and plasmatic glutamate transporters 1 (vGluT1 and GLT-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and influence on oxidative status in rats cerebellar tissue and plasma. Redox state parameters in cerebellar tissue and plasma were assessed 24 h after single and 48 h after the last TBS session. Molecular changes were examined by immunofluorescence. Stimulation significantly increased thiol groups (SH) in tissue of SS iTBS group, and decreased in iTBS RS. Activity of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) was increased markedly in cTBS RS. Immunoreactivity of vGluT1 in cTBS RS decreased, while GLT-1 increased in cTBS SS and cTBS RS, compared to control. Present study gives insight in molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which iTBS and cTBS exerts its effects on rats cerebellar cortex.

  18. Electrophysiology Alterations in Primary Visual Cortex Neurons of Retinal Degeneration (S334ter-line-3) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Wang, Yi; Liang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yihuai; Ng, Tsz Kin; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the brain is critical for the success of treatments aimed at restoring vision at the retinal level. The success of these treatments relies highly on the functionality of the surviving neurons along the entire visual pathway. Electrophysiological properties at the retina level have been investigated during the progression of retinal degeneration; however, little is known about the changes in electrophysiological properties that occur in the primary visual cortex (V1) during the course of retinal degeneration. By conducting extracellular recording, we examined the electrophysiological properties of V1 in S334ter-line-3 rats (a transgenic model of retinal degeneration developed to express a rhodopsin mutation similar to that found in human retinitis pigmentosa patients). We measured the orientation tuning, spatial and temporal frequency tunings and the receptive field (RF) size for 127 V1 neurons from 11 S334ter-3 rats and 10 Long-Evans (LE) rats. V1 neurons in the S334ter-3 rats showed weaker orientation selectivity, lower optimal spatial and temporal frequency values and a smaller receptive field size compared to the LE rats. These results suggest that the visual cognitive ability significantly changes during retinal degeneration. PMID:27225415

  19. Chronic recordings reveal tactile stimuli can suppress spontaneous activity of neurons in somatosensory cortex of awake and anesthetized primates.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Reed, Jamie L; Franca, Joao G; Jain, Neeraj; Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-04-01

    In somatosensory cortex, tactile stimulation within the neuronal receptive field (RF) typically evokes a transient excitatory response with or without postexcitatory inhibition. Here, we describe neuronal responses in which stimulation on the hand is followed by suppression of the ongoing discharge. With the use of 16-channel microelectrode arrays implanted in the hand representation of primary somatosensory cortex of New World monkeys and prosimian galagos, we recorded neuronal responses from single units and neuron clusters. In 66% of our sample, neuron activity tended to display suppression of firing when regions of skin outside of the excitatory RF were stimulated. In a small proportion of neurons, single-site indentations suppressed firing without initial increases in response to any of the tested sites on the hand. Latencies of suppressive responses to skin indentation (usually 12-34 ms) were similar to excitatory response latencies. The duration of inhibition varied across neurons. Although most observations were from anesthetized animals, we also found similar neuron response properties in one awake galago. Notably, suppression of ongoing neuronal activity did not require conditioning stimuli or multi-site stimulation. The suppressive effects were generally seen following single-site skin indentations outside of the neuron's minimal RF and typically on different digits and palm pads, which have not often been studied in this context. Overall, the characteristics of widespread suppressive or inhibitory response properties with and without initial facilitative or excitatory responses add to the growing evidence that neurons in primary somatosensory cortex provide essential processing for integrating sensory stimulation from across the hand.

  20. Dissociation between neuronal activity in sensorimotor cortex and hand movement revealed as a function of movement rate.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Dora; Siero, Jeroen C W; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Leijten, Frans S S; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-07-11

    It is often assumed that similar behavior is generated by the same brain activity. However, this does not take into account the brain state or recent behavioral history and movement initiation or continuation may not be similarly generated in the brain. To study whether similar movements are generated by the same brain activity, we measured neuronal population activity during repeated movements. Three human subjects performed a motor repetition task in which they moved their hand at four different rates (0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz). From high-resolution electrocorticography arrays implanted on motor and sensory cortex, high-frequency power (65-95 Hz) was extracted as a measure of neuronal population activity. During the two faster movement rates, high-frequency power was significantly suppressed, whereas movement parameters remained highly similar. This suppression was nonlinear: after the initial movement, neuronal population activity was reduced most strongly, and the data fit a model in which a fast decline rapidly converged to saturation. The amplitude of the beta-band suppression did not change with different rates. However, at the faster rates, beta power did not return to baseline between movements but remained suppressed. We take these findings to indicate that the extended beta suppression at the faster rates, which may suggest a release of inhibition in motor cortex, facilitates movement initiation. These results show that the relationship between behavior and neuronal activity is not consistent: recent movement influences the state of motor cortex and facilitates next movements by reducing the required level of neuronal activity.

  1. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts.

    PubMed

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Baima, Simona; Morelli, Giorgio; Scaccini, Cristina; Langridge, James; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2015-06-15

    The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower) is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird's-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle). We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant's developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential of an

  2. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W; Hyder, Eric C; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V; Sutton, Jeffrey P

    2013-02-12

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep-wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep-wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep-wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep-wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior.

  3. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F.; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W.; Hyder, Eric C.; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep–wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep–wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep–wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep–wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior. PMID:23297197

  4. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Baima, Simona; Morelli, Giorgio; Scaccini, Cristina; Langridge, James; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower) is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird’s-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle). We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant’s developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential of an

  5. Single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment alters c-Fos or FosB immunoreactivity in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Szakács, Réka; Fazekas, Ildikó; Mihály, András; Krisztin-Péva, Beáta; Juhász, Anna; Janka, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment on the inducible transcription factor c-Fos and FosB, and thereby to estimate the effects of high-doses of corticosterone on calcium-dependent neuronal responses in the rat cerebral cortex. At the same time we investigated the distribution of interneurons containing calretinin (CR), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in chronically treated animals in order to collect data on the involvement of inhibitory neurons in this process. Adult male rats were injected subcutaneously with 10mg corticosterone, whereas controls received the vehicle (sesame oil). The animals were fixed by transcardial perfusion 12 and 24h following single corticosterone injection, and the brains were processed for c-Fos and FosB immunohistochemistry. To investigate the effects of repeated corticosterone administration, rats were daily treated with the same amount of corticosterone (10mg/animal, subcutaneously) for 21 days. Controls were injected with vehicle. At the end of the experiment, the rats were perfused and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of the FosB protein, CR, VIP and NPY. Quantitative evaluation of immunolabelled cells was performed in the neocortex and the hippocampus. The number of immunoreactive nuclei per unit area was used as a quantitative measure of the effects of corticosterone. It was found that a single-dose administration of corticosterone resulted in a significant, time-dependent increase of c-Fos protein immunoreactivity in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, as well as in regions CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus 12 and 24h post-injection with respect to control animals. Significant enhancement of c-Fos immunoreactivity was also observed in the neocortex at 12 and 24h post-injection. Single-dose treatment did not significantly alter FosB immunolabelling. Repeated administration of corticosterone produced a complex

  6. Structural alterations of spiny stellate cells in the somatosensory cortex in ephrin-A5-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Guellmar, André; Rudolph, Judith; Bolz, Jürgen

    2009-12-10

    Previous studies demonstrated that in ephrin-A5-deficient mice corticothalamic arbors are reduced by more than 50% in layer 4 of the somatosensory cortex (S1), where ephrin-A5 is normally expressed. Here we examined possible consequences of the reduced thalamic input on spiny stellate cells, the target neurons of thalamocortical afferents. Using ballistic delivery of particles coated with lipophilic dyes in fixed slices and confocal laser-microscopy, we could quantitatively analyze the morphology of these neurons. Cells were examined in S1 at postnatal day 8 (P8), when thalamic afferents establish synaptic contacts and the dendrites of their target cells are covered with filopodia, and at P23, after synapse formation and replacement of filopodia by spines. Our results indicate that at P8 the dendrites of cells in mutant animals exhibit more filopodia and are more branched than dendrites of wildtype cells. In contrast, there is no difference in the extent of the dendritic tree between knockout and control animals. At P23, dendrites of neurons in ephrin-A5-deficient mice are still more branched, but possess fewer spines than wildtype cells. Thus, at early stages layer 4 neurons appear to compensate the reduced thalamic input by increasing dendritic branching and the density of filopodia. However, while at later stages the dendrites of layer 4 neurons in mutants are still more branched, their spine density is now lower than in wildtype cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the structure of spiny stellate cells is shaped by thalamic input and Eph receptor signaling.

  7. Bimodal stimulus timing-dependent plasticity in primary auditory cortex is altered after noise exposure with and without tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Seth D.; Shore, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Central auditory circuits are influenced by the somatosensory system, a relationship that may underlie tinnitus generation. In the guinea pig dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), pairing spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) stimulation with tones at specific intervals and orders facilitated or suppressed subsequent tone-evoked neural responses, reflecting spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Furthermore, after noise-induced tinnitus, bimodal responses in DCN were shifted from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian timing rules with less discrete temporal windows, suggesting a role for bimodal plasticity in tinnitus. Here, we aimed to determine if multisensory STDP principles like those in DCN also exist in primary auditory cortex (A1), and whether they change following noise-induced tinnitus. Tone-evoked and spontaneous neural responses were recorded before and 15 min after bimodal stimulation in which the intervals and orders of auditory-somatosensory stimuli were randomized. Tone-evoked and spontaneous firing rates were influenced by the interval and order of the bimodal stimuli, and in sham-controls Hebbian-like timing rules predominated as was seen in DCN. In noise-exposed animals with and without tinnitus, timing rules shifted away from those found in sham-controls to more anti-Hebbian rules. Only those animals with evidence of tinnitus showed increased spontaneous firing rates, a purported neurophysiological correlate of tinnitus in A1. Together, these findings suggest that bimodal plasticity is also evident in A1 following noise damage and may have implications for tinnitus generation and therapeutic intervention across the central auditory circuit. PMID:26289461

  8. Glutamatergic ionotropic blockade within accumbens disrupts working memory and might alter the endocytic machinery in rat accumbens and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, G; Ruiz, A M; Beling, A; Borgonovo, J; Martínez, G; Landa, A I; Sosa, M A; Gargiulo, P A

    2007-01-01

    Effects of blocking N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and non-NMDA glutamatergic receptors on performance in the hole board test was studied in male rats bilaterally cannulated into the nucleus accumbens (Acc). Rats, divided into 5 groups, received either 1 microl injections of saline, (+/-) 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP-7) (0.5 or 1 microg) or 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4,tetrahydrobenzo-(f)quinoxaline-7-sulphonamide disodium (NBQX, 0.5 or 1 microg) 10 min before testing. An increase by AP-7 was observed in ambulatory movements (0.5 microg; p < 0.05), non-ambulatory movements and number of movements (1 microg; p < 0.05); sniffing and total exploration (1 microg; p < 0.01). When holes were considered in order from the first to the fifth by the number of explorations, the most visited holes (first and second) of the AP-7 group were significantly higher than the corresponding holes of saline group (p < 0.05 for 0.5 microg and p < 0.001 for 1 microg). When the second hole was compared with the first of his group, a difference was only observed in the AP-7 1 microg group (p < 0.001). Increasing differences between the other holes and the first were observed by drug treatment. At molecular level, it was observed that AP-7 induced an increase of the coat protein AP-2 expression in Acc, but not AP-180 neither the synaptic protein synaptophysin. The increase of AP-2 was also observed in the medial prefrontal cortex by the action of AP-7 but not NBQX. We conclude that NMDA glutamatergic blockade might induce an activation of the endocytic machinery into the Acc, leading to stereotypies and perseverations, lacking cortical intentional direction.

  9. Bimodal stimulus timing-dependent plasticity in primary auditory cortex is altered after noise exposure with and without tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2015-12-01

    Central auditory circuits are influenced by the somatosensory system, a relationship that may underlie tinnitus generation. In the guinea pig dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), pairing spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) stimulation with tones at specific intervals and orders facilitated or suppressed subsequent tone-evoked neural responses, reflecting spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Furthermore, after noise-induced tinnitus, bimodal responses in DCN were shifted from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian timing rules with less discrete temporal windows, suggesting a role for bimodal plasticity in tinnitus. Here, we aimed to determine if multisensory STDP principles like those in DCN also exist in primary auditory cortex (A1), and whether they change following noise-induced tinnitus. Tone-evoked and spontaneous neural responses were recorded before and 15 min after bimodal stimulation in which the intervals and orders of auditory-somatosensory stimuli were randomized. Tone-evoked and spontaneous firing rates were influenced by the interval and order of the bimodal stimuli, and in sham-controls Hebbian-like timing rules predominated as was seen in DCN. In noise-exposed animals with and without tinnitus, timing rules shifted away from those found in sham-controls to more anti-Hebbian rules. Only those animals with evidence of tinnitus showed increased spontaneous firing rates, a purported neurophysiological correlate of tinnitus in A1. Together, these findings suggest that bimodal plasticity is also evident in A1 following noise damage and may have implications for tinnitus generation and therapeutic intervention across the central auditory circuit.

  10. Connectivity profiles reveal the relationship between brain areas for social cognition in human and monkey temporoparietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Rogier B.; Sallet, Jérôme; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2013-01-01

    The human ability to infer the thoughts and beliefs of others, often referred to as “theory of mind,” as well as the predisposition to even consider others, are associated with activity in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) area. Unlike the case of most human brain areas, we have little sense of whether or how TPJ is related to brain areas in other nonhuman primates. It is not possible to address this question by looking for similar task-related activations in nonhuman primates because there is no evidence that nonhuman primates engage in theory-of-mind tasks in the same manner as humans. Here, instead, we explore the relationship by searching for areas in the macaque brain that interact with other macaque brain regions in the same manner as human TPJ interacts with other human brain regions. In other words, we look for brain regions with similar positions within a distributed neural circuit in the two species. We exploited the fact that human TPJ has a unique functional connectivity profile with cortical areas with known homologs in the macaque. For each voxel in the macaque temporal and parietal cortex we evaluated the similarity of its functional connectivity profile to that of human TPJ. We found that areas in the middle part of the superior temporal cortex, often associated with the processing of faces and other social stimuli, have the most similar connectivity profile. These results suggest that macaque face processing areas and human mentalizing areas might have a similar precursor. PMID:23754406

  11. Functionally Brain Network Connected to the Retrosplenial Cortex of Rats Revealed by 7T fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjuan; Nie, Binbin; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhu, Haitao; Liu, Hua; Shan, Baoci

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks are regarded as important mechanisms for increasing our understanding of brain function in healthy and diseased states, and increased interest has been focused on extending the study of functional networks to animal models because such models provide a functional understanding of disease progression, therapy and repair. In rodents, the retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is an important cortical region because it has a large size and presents transitional patterns of lamination between the neocortex and archicortex. In addition, a number of invasive studies have highlighted the importance of the RSC for many functions. However, the network based on the RSC in rodents remains unclear. Based on the critical importance of the RSC, we defined the bilateral RSCs as two regions of interest and estimated the network based on the RSC. The results showed that the related regions include the parietal association cortex, hippocampus, thalamus nucleus, midbrain structures, and hypothalamic mammillary bodies. Our findings indicate two possible major networks: a sensory-cognitive network that has a hub in the RSCs and processes sensory information, spatial learning, and episodic memory; and a second network that is involved in the regulation of visceral functions and arousal. In addition, functional asymmetry between the bilateral RSCs was observed. PMID:26745803

  12. Connectivity profiles reveal the relationship between brain areas for social cognition in human and monkey temporoparietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Mars, Rogier B; Sallet, Jérôme; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Rushworth, Matthew F S

    2013-06-25

    The human ability to infer the thoughts and beliefs of others, often referred to as "theory of mind," as well as the predisposition to even consider others, are associated with activity in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) area. Unlike the case of most human brain areas, we have little sense of whether or how TPJ is related to brain areas in other nonhuman primates. It is not possible to address this question by looking for similar task-related activations in nonhuman primates because there is no evidence that nonhuman primates engage in theory-of-mind tasks in the same manner as humans. Here, instead, we explore the relationship by searching for areas in the macaque brain that interact with other macaque brain regions in the same manner as human TPJ interacts with other human brain regions. In other words, we look for brain regions with similar positions within a distributed neural circuit in the two species. We exploited the fact that human TPJ has a unique functional connectivity profile with cortical areas with known homologs in the macaque. For each voxel in the macaque temporal and parietal cortex we evaluated the similarity of its functional connectivity profile to that of human TPJ. We found that areas in the middle part of the superior temporal cortex, often associated with the processing of faces and other social stimuli, have the most similar connectivity profile. These results suggest that macaque face processing areas and human mentalizing areas might have a similar precursor.

  13. Spatiotemporal characteristics of form analysis in the human visual cortex revealed by rapid event-related fMRI adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Huberle, Elisabeth

    2005-11-01

    The integration of local elements to coherent forms is at the core of understanding visual perception. Accumulating evidence suggests that both early retinotopic and higher occipitotemporal areas contribute to the integration of local elements to global forms. However, the spatiotemporal characteristics of form analysis in the human visual cortex remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate form analysis at different spatial (global vs. local structure) and temporal (different stimulus presentation rates) scales across stages of visual analysis (from V1 to the lateral occipital complex-LOC) in the human brain. We used closed contours rendered by Gabor elements and manipulated either the global contour structure or the orientation of the local Gabor elements. Our rapid event-related fMRI adaptation studies suggest that contour integration and form processing in early visual areas is transient and limited within the local neighborhood of their cells' receptive field. In contrast, higher visual areas appear to process the perceived global form in a more sustained manner. Finally, we demonstrate that these spatiotemporal properties of form processing in the visual cortex are modulated by attention. Attention to the global form maintains sustained processing in occipitotemporal areas, whereas attention to local elements enhances their integration in early visual areas. These findings provide novel neuroimaging evidence for form analysis at different spatiotemporal scales across human visual areas and validate the use of rapid event-related fMRI adaptation for investigating processing across stages of visual analysis in the human brain.

  14. Topographic representations of object size and relationships with numerosity reveal generalized quantity processing in human parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ben M.; Fracasso, Alessio; Petridou, Natalia; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2015-01-01

    Humans and many animals analyze sensory information to estimate quantities that guide behavior and decisions. These quantities include numerosity (object number) and object size. Having recently demonstrated topographic maps of numerosity, we ask whether the brain also contains maps of object size. Using ultra-high-field (7T) functional MRI and population receptive field modeling, we describe tuned responses to visual object size in bilateral human posterior parietal cortex. Tuning follows linear Gaussian functions and shows surround suppression, and tuning width narrows with increasing preferred object size. Object size-tuned responses are organized in bilateral topographic maps, with similar cortical extents responding to large and small objects. These properties of object size tuning and map organization all differ from the numerosity representation, suggesting that object size and numerosity tuning result from distinct mechanisms. However, their maps largely overlap and object size preferences correlate with numerosity preferences, suggesting associated representations of these two quantities. Object size preferences here show no discernable relation to visual position preferences found in visuospatial receptive fields. As such, object size maps (much like numerosity maps) do not reflect sensory organ structure but instead emerge within the brain. We speculate that, as in sensory processing, optimization of cognitive processing using topographic maps may be a common organizing principle in association cortex. Interactions between object size and numerosity maps may associate cognitive representations of these related features, potentially allowing consideration of both quantities together when making decisions. PMID:26483452

  15. Liquid-Diet with Alcohol Alters Maternal, Fetal and Placental Weights and the Expression of Molecules Involved in Integrin Signaling in the Fetal Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Ujjwal K.; Dhossche, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes wide range of behavioral and structural deficits in children, commonly known as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Children with FAS may suffer behavioral deficits in the absence of obvious malformations. In rodents, the exposure to alcohol during gestation changes brain structures and weights of offspring. The mechanism of FAS is not completely understood. In the present study, an established rat (Long-Evans) model of FAS was used. The litter size and the weights of mothers, fetuses and placentas were examined on gestation days 18 or 20. On gestation day 18, the effects of chronic alcohol on the expression levels of integrin receptor subunits, phospholipase-Cγ and N-cadherin were examined in the fetal cerebral cortices. Presence of alcohol in the liquid-diet reduced the consumption and decreased weights of mothers and fetuses but increased the placental weights. Expression levels of β1 and α3 integrin subunits and phospholipase-Cγ2 were significantly altered in the fetal cerebral cortices of mothers on alcohol containing diet. Results show that alcohol consumption during pregnancy even with protein, mineral and vitamin enriched diet may affect maternal and fetal health, and alter integrin receptor signaling pathways in the fetal cerebral cortex disturbing the development of fetal brains. PMID:21139874

  16. Liquid-diet with alcohol alters maternal, fetal and placental weights and the expression of molecules involved in integrin signaling in the fetal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ujjwal K; Dhossche, Julie M

    2010-11-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes wide range of behavioral and structural deficits in children, commonly known as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Children with FAS may suffer behavioral deficits in the absence of obvious malformations. In rodents, the exposure to alcohol during gestation changes brain structures and weights of offspring. The mechanism of FAS is not completely understood. In the present study, an established rat (Long-Evans) model of FAS was used. The litter size and the weights of mothers, fetuses and placentas were examined on gestation days 18 or 20. On gestation day 18, the effects of chronic alcohol on the expression levels of integrin receptor subunits, phospholipase-Cγ and N-cadherin were examined in the fetal cerebral cortices. Presence of alcohol in the liquid-diet reduced the consumption and decreased weights of mothers and fetuses but increased the placental weights. Expression levels of β(1) and α(3) integrin subunits and phospholipase-Cγ(2) were significantly altered in the fetal cerebral cortices of mothers on alcohol containing diet. Results show that alcohol consumption during pregnancy even with protein, mineral and vitamin enriched diet may affect maternal and fetal health, and alter integrin receptor signaling pathways in the fetal cerebral cortex disturbing the development of fetal brains.

  17. Genomic Convergence Analysis of Schizophrenia: mRNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Synaptic Vesicular Transport in Post-Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Joann; Miller, Neil A.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; May, Gregory D.; Huntley, Jim J.; Luo, Shujun; Zhang, Lu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Lewis, Sharon; Beavis, William D.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Virk, Selene M.; Black, C. Forrest; Myers, M. Kathy; Mader, Lar C.; Langley, Ray J.; Utsey, John P.; Kim, Ryan W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Khalsa, Sat Kirpal; Garcia, Meredith; Ambriz-Griffith, Victoria; Harlan, Richard; Czika, Wendy; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Schroth, Gary P.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ. PMID:18985160

  18. Low level postnatal methylmercury exposure in vivo alters developmental forms of short-term synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Sameera; Yuan, Yukun

    2009-11-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been previously shown to affect neurotransmitter release. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) is primarily related to changes in the probability of neurotransmitter release. To determine if MeHg affects STP development, we examined STP forms in the visual cortex of rat following in vivo MeHg exposure. Neonatal rats received 0 (0.9% NaCl), 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg subcutaneously for 15 or 30 days beginning on postnatal day 5, after which visual cortical slices were prepared for field potential recordings. In slices prepared from rats treated with vehicle, field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by paired-pulse stimulation at 20-200 ms inter-stimulus intervals showed a depression (PPD) of the second fEPSP (fEPSP2). PPD was also seen in slices prepared from rats after 15 day treatment with 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg. However, longer duration treatment (30 days) with either dose of MeHg resulted in paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of fEPSP2 in the majority of slices examined. PPF remained observable in slices prepared from animals in which MeHg exposure had been terminated for 30 days after completion of the initial 30 day MeHg treatment, whereas slices from control animals still showed PPD. MeHg did not cause any frequency- or region-preferential effect on STP. Manipulations of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} or application of the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist bicuculline could alter the strength and polarity of MeHg-induced changes in STP. Thus, these data suggest that low level postnatal MeHg exposure interferes with the developmental transformation of STP in the visual cortex, which is a long-lasting effect.

  19. Learning-related representational changes reveal dissociable integration and separation signatures in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Margaret L.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Preston, Alison R.

    2015-01-01

    The episodic memory system enables accurate retrieval while maintaining flexibility by representing both specific episodes and generalizations across events. Although theories suggest that the hippocampus (HPC) is dedicated to represent specific episodes while the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) generalizes, other accounts posit that HPC can also integrate related memories. Here we use high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans to examine how representations of memory elements change to either differentiate or generalize across related events. We show that while posterior HPC and anterior MPFC maintain distinct memories for individual events, anterior HPC and posterior MPFC integrate across memories. Integration is particularly likely for established memories versus those encoded simultaneously, highlighting the greater impact of prior knowledge on new encoding. We also show dissociable coding signatures in ventrolateral PFC, a region previously implicated in interference resolution. These data highlight how memory elements are represented to simultaneously promote generalization across memories and protect from interference. PMID:26303198

  20. Blocking c-Fos Expression Reveals the Role of Auditory Cortex Plasticity in Sound Frequency Discrimination Learning.

    PubMed

    de Hoz, Livia; Gierej, Dorota; Lioudyno, Victoria; Jaworski, Jacek; Blazejczyk, Magda; Cruces-Solís, Hugo; Beroun, Anna; Lebitko, Tomasz; Nikolaev, Tomasz; Knapska, Ewelina; Nelken, Israel; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2017-03-17

    The behavioral changes that comprise operant learning are associated with plasticity in early sensory cortices as well as with modulation of gene expression, but the connection between the behavioral, electrophysiological, and molecular changes is only partially understood. We specifically manipulated c-Fos expression, a hallmark of learning-induced synaptic plasticity, in auditory cortex of adult mice using a novel approach based on RNA interference. Locally blocking c-Fos expression caused a specific behavioral deficit in a sound discrimination task, in parallel with decreased cortical experience-dependent plasticity, without affecting baseline excitability or basic auditory processing. Thus, c-Fos-dependent experience-dependent cortical plasticity is necessary for frequency discrimination in an operant behavioral task. Our results connect behavioral, molecular and physiological changes and demonstrate a role of c-Fos in experience-dependent plasticity and learning.

  1. Connectivity reveals relationship of brain areas for reward-guided learning and decision making in human and monkey frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Mars, Rogier B.; Sallet, Jérôme; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2015-01-01

    Reward-guided decision-making depends on a network of brain regions. Among these are the orbitofrontal and the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it is difficult to ascertain if these areas constitute anatomical and functional unities, and how these areas correspond between monkeys and humans. To address these questions we looked at connectivity profiles of these areas using resting-state functional MRI in 38 humans and 25 macaque monkeys. We sought brain regions in the macaque that resembled 10 human areas identified with decision making and brain regions in the human that resembled six macaque areas identified with decision making. We also used diffusion-weighted MRI to delineate key human orbital and medial frontal brain regions. We identified 21 different regions, many of which could be linked to particular aspects of reward-guided learning, valuation, and decision making, and in many cases we identified areas in the macaque with similar coupling profiles. PMID:25947150

  2. Monocular inhibition reveals temporal and spatial changes in gene expression in the primary visual cortex of marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yuki; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the time course of the expression of several activity-dependent genes evoked by visual inputs in the primary visual cortex (V1) in adult marmosets. In order to examine the rapid time course of activity-dependent gene expression, marmosets were first monocularly inactivated by tetrodotoxin (TTX), kept in darkness for two days, and then exposed to various length of light stimulation. Activity-dependent genes including HTR1B, HTR2A, whose activity-dependency were previously reported by us, and well-known immediate early genes (IEGs), c-FOS, ZIF268, and ARC, were examined by in situ hybridization. Using this system, first, we demonstrated the ocular dominance type of gene expression pattern in V1 under this condition. IEGs were expressed in columnar patterns throughout layers II–VI of all the tested monocular marmosets. Second, we showed the regulation of HTR1B and HTR2A expressions by retinal spontaneous activity, because HTR1B and HTR2A mRNA expressions sustained a certain level regardless of visual stimulation and were inhibited by a blockade of the retinal activity with TTX. Third, IEGs dynamically changed its laminar distribution from half an hour to several hours upon a stimulus onset with the unique time course for each gene. The expression patterns of these genes were different in neurons of each layer as well. These results suggest that the regulation of each neuron in the primary visual cortex of marmosets is subjected to different regulation upon the change of activities from retina. It should be related to a highly differentiated laminar structure of marmoset visual systems, reflecting the functions of the activity-dependent gene expression in marmoset V1. PMID:23576954

  3. A Global Orientation Map in the Primary Visual Cortex (V1): Could a Self Organizing Model Reveal Its Hidden Bias?

    PubMed

    Philips, Ryan T; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable accomplishment of self organizing models is their ability to simulate the development of feature maps in the cortex. Additionally, these models have been trained to tease out the differential causes of multiple feature maps, mapped on to the same output space. Recently, a Laterally Interconnected Synergetically Self Organizing Map (LISSOM) model has been used to simulate the mapping of eccentricity and meridional angle onto orthogonal axes in the primary visual cortex (V1). This model is further probed to simulate the development of the radial bias in V1, using a training set that consists of both radial (rectangular bars of random size and orientation) as well as non-radial stimuli. The radial bias describes the preference of the visual system toward orientations that match the angular position (meridional angle) of that orientation with respect to the point of fixation. Recent fMRI results have shown that there exists a coarse scale orientation map in V1, which resembles the meridional angle map, thereby providing a plausible neural basis for the radial bias. The LISSOM model, trained for the development of the retinotopic map, on probing for orientation preference, exhibits a coarse scale orientation map, consistent with these experimental results, quantified using the circular cross correlation (rc ). The rc between the orientation map developed on probing with a thin annular ring containing sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 0.5 cycles per degree (cpd) and the corresponding meridional map for the same annular ring, has a value of 0.8894. The results also suggest that the radial bias goes beyond the current understanding of a node to node correlation between the two maps.

  4. A Global Orientation Map in the Primary Visual Cortex (V1): Could a Self Organizing Model Reveal Its Hidden Bias?

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Ryan T.; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable accomplishment of self organizing models is their ability to simulate the development of feature maps in the cortex. Additionally, these models have been trained to tease out the differential causes of multiple feature maps, mapped on to the same output space. Recently, a Laterally Interconnected Synergetically Self Organizing Map (LISSOM) model has been used to simulate the mapping of eccentricity and meridional angle onto orthogonal axes in the primary visual cortex (V1). This model is further probed to simulate the development of the radial bias in V1, using a training set that consists of both radial (rectangular bars of random size and orientation) as well as non-radial stimuli. The radial bias describes the preference of the visual system toward orientations that match the angular position (meridional angle) of that orientation with respect to the point of fixation. Recent fMRI results have shown that there exists a coarse scale orientation map in V1, which resembles the meridional angle map, thereby providing a plausible neural basis for the radial bias. The LISSOM model, trained for the development of the retinotopic map, on probing for orientation preference, exhibits a coarse scale orientation map, consistent with these experimental results, quantified using the circular cross correlation (rc). The rc between the orientation map developed on probing with a thin annular ring containing sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 0.5 cycles per degree (cpd) and the corresponding meridional map for the same annular ring, has a value of 0.8894. The results also suggest that the radial bias goes beyond the current understanding of a node to node correlation between the two maps. PMID:28111542

  5. Structure of Spike Count Correlations Reveals Functional Interactions between Neurons in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Area 8a of Behaving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Matthew L.; Pieper, Florian; Sachs, Adam; Joober, Ridha; Martinez-Trujillo, Julio C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons within the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) are clustered in microcolumns according to their visuospatial tuning. One issue that remains poorly investigated is how this anatomical arrangement influences functional interactions between neurons during behavior. To investigate this question we implanted 4 mm×4 mm multielectrode arrays in two macaques' dlPFC area 8a and measured spike count correlations (rsc) between responses of simultaneously recorded neurons when animals maintained stationary gaze. Positive and negative rsc were significantly higher than predicted by chance across a wide range of inter-neuron distances (from 0.4 to 4 mm). Positive rsc were stronger between neurons with receptive fields (RFs) separated by ≤90° of angular distance and progressively decreased as a function of inter-neuron physical distance. Negative rsc were stronger between neurons with RFs separated by >90° and increased as a function of inter-neuron distance. Our results show that short- and long-range functional interactions between dlPFC neurons depend on the physical distance between them and the relationship between their visuospatial tuning preferences. Neurons with similar visuospatial tuning show positive rsc that decay with inter-neuron distance, suggestive of excitatory interactions within and between adjacent microcolumns. Neurons with dissimilar tuning from spatially segregated microcolumns show negative rsc that increase with inter-neuron distance, suggestive of inhibitory interactions. This pattern of results shows that functional interactions between prefrontal neurons closely follow the pattern of connectivity reported in anatomical studies. Such interactions may be important for the role of the prefrontal cortex in the allocation of attention to targets in the presence of competing distracters. PMID:23630595

  6. Monocular inhibition reveals temporal and spatial changes in gene expression in the primary visual cortex of marmoset.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Yuki; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the time course of the expression of several activity-dependent genes evoked by visual inputs in the primary visual cortex (V1) in adult marmosets. In order to examine the rapid time course of activity-dependent gene expression, marmosets were first monocularly inactivated by tetrodotoxin (TTX), kept in darkness for two days, and then exposed to various length of light stimulation. Activity-dependent genes including HTR1B, HTR2A, whose activity-dependency were previously reported by us, and well-known immediate early genes (IEGs), c-FOS, ZIF268, and ARC, were examined by in situ hybridization. Using this system, first, we demonstrated the ocular dominance type of gene expression pattern in V1 under this condition. IEGs were expressed in columnar patterns throughout layers II-VI of all the tested monocular marmosets. Second, we showed the regulation of HTR1B and HTR2A expressions by retinal spontaneous activity, because HTR1B and HTR2A mRNA expressions sustained a certain level regardless of visual stimulation and were inhibited by a blockade of the retinal activity with TTX. Third, IEGs dynamically changed its laminar distribution from half an hour to several hours upon a stimulus onset with the unique time course for each gene. The expression patterns of these genes were different in neurons of each layer as well. These results suggest that the regulation of each neuron in the primary visual cortex of marmosets is subjected to different regulation upon the change of activities from retina. It should be related to a highly differentiated laminar structure of marmoset visual systems, reflecting the functions of the activity-dependent gene expression in marmoset V1.

  7. Aqueous alteration revealed by diverse mineralogy at Amazonian-aged Lyot crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Located close to the hemispheric dichotomy, Lyot crater is the largest (with diameter 220 km) and deepest impact crater in the northern lowlands of Mars. The impact event could have released substantial amount of volatiles and strongly influenced the evolution of Amazonian Mars climate [1]. Previous works have shown that the impact event probably induced overland flow that formed the channels north of Lyot [2] and within the crater, kilometer-long valleys have formed in micro-environments that post-date the impact [3]. These features suggest that groundwater may have been mobilized in the subsurface, and there was melting of ice-rich deposits after the impact event. In a recent mineralogy survey [4], diverse hydrated minerals in and around Lyot crater have been revealed by data acquired from Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). The concentration of hydrated minerals in this region is much greater than average northern plains, suggesting substantial aqueous alteration directly associated to the Lyot impact or in the regional stratigraphy. We have found 7 Fe/Mg phyllosilicate detections, likely smectite or mixed-layer smectite-chlorite, in the central ring region; 10 chlorite/prehnite detections (identified with a typical 2.35 µm absorption, in which 2 have an additional 1.48 µm absorption that matches prehnite, confirming [5]) in the central ring, crater floor, outer rim, and ejecta blanket; and 9 locations with absorptions at 2.21 µm with/without the coexistence with the 2.35 µm feature, which can be explained by illite/muscovite or a mixture of hydrated silica and chlorite/prehnite. The unit with 2.21-µm absorptions is often associated with the smooth mantling deposit, superposed on the valleys within the crater and on the crater rim. Further morphological analysis over these units with distinct mineralogy will shed light on the aqueous activity that formed these minerals. Combined with geological map of the region, we will establish

  8. Aristotle's illusion reveals interdigit functional somatosensory alterations in focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tinazzi, Michele; Marotta, Angela; Fasano, Alfonso; Bove, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Squintani, Giovanna; Pozzer, Lara; Fiorio, Mirta

    2013-03-01

    In focal hand dystonia, the cortical somatosensory representation of the fingers is abnormal, with overlapping receptive fields and reduced interdigit separation. These abnormalities are associated with deficits in sensory perception, as previously demonstrated by applying tactile stimuli to one finger at a time. What is still unknown is whether the sensory deficits can be observed when tactile perception involves more than one finger. To address this issue, we applied 'Aristotle's illusion' to 15 patients with focal hand dystonia, 15 patients with dystonia not affecting the hand (blepharospasm and cervical dystonia) and 15 healthy control subjects. In this illusion, one object touching the contact point of two crossed fingertips is perceived as two objects by a blindfolded subject. The same object placed between two parallel fingertips is correctly perceived as one. The illusory doubling sensation is because of the fact that the contact point between the crossed fingers consists of non-adjacent and functionally unrelated skin regions, which usually send sensory signals to separate spots in the somatosensory cortex. In our study, participants were touched by one sphere between the second-third digits, the second-fourth digits and the fourth-fifth digits of both hands, either in crossed or in parallel position, and had to refer whether they felt one or two stimuli. The percentage of 'two stimuli' responses was an index of the illusory doubling. Both healthy control subjects and dystonic patients presented Aristotle's illusion when the fingers were crossed. However, patients with focal hand dystonia presented a significant reduction of the illusion when the sphere was placed between the crossed fourth and fifth digits of the affected hand. This reduction correlated with the severity of motor disease at the fingers. Similar findings were not observed in non-hand dystonia and control groups. The reduction of Aristotle's illusion in non-affected fingers and its

  9. High throughput lipidomic profiling of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder brain tissue reveals alterations of free fatty acids, phosphatidylcholines, and ceramides.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Emanuel; Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Whitfield, Phil; Major, Hilary; Leweke, F M; Koethe, Dagmar; McKenna, Peter; Bahn, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    A mass spectrometry based high throughput approach was employed to profile white and gray matter lipid levels in the prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9) of 45 subjects including 15 schizophrenia and 15 bipolar disorder patients as well as 15 controls samples. We found statistically significant alterations in levels of free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine in gray and white matter of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder samples compared to controls. Also, ceramides were identified to be significantly increased in white matter of both neuropsychiatric disorders as compared to control levels. The patient cohort investigated in this study includes a number of drug naive as well as untreated patients, allowing the assessment of drug effects on lipid levels. Our findings indicate that while gray matter phosphatidylcholine levels were influenced by antipsychotic medication, this was not the case for phosphatidylcholine levels in white matter. Changes in free fatty acids or ceramides in either white or gray matter also did not appear to be influenced by antipsychotic treatment. To assess lipid profiles in the living patient, we also profiled lipids of 40 red blood cell samples, including 7 samples from drug naive first onset patients. We found significant alterations in the concentrations of free fatty acids as well as ceramide. Overall, our findings suggest that lipid abnormalities may be a disease intrinsic feature of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder reflected by significant changes in the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues.

  10. Cooperative genomic alteration network reveals molecular classification across 12 major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Zhang, Yong; Ping, Yanyan; Zhao, Hongying; Pang, Lin; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2017-01-25

    The accumulation of somatic genomic alterations that enables cells to gradually acquire growth advantage contributes to tumor development. This has the important implication of the widespread existence of cooperative genomic alterations in the accumulation process. Here, we proposed a computational method HCOC that simultaneously consider genetic context and downstream functional effects on cancer hallmarks to uncover somatic cooperative events in human cancers. Applying our method to 12 TCGA cancer types, we totally identified 1199 cooperative events with high heterogeneity across human cancers, and then constructed a pan-cancer cooperative alteration network. These cooperative events are associated with genomic alterations of some high-confident cancer drivers, and can trigger the dysfunction of hallmark associated pathways in a co-defect way rather than single alterations. We found that these cooperative events can be used to produce a prognostic classification that can provide complementary information with tissue-of-origin. In a further case study of glioblastoma, using 23 cooperative events identified, we stratified patients into molecularly relevant subtypes with a prognostic significance independent of the Glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (GCIMP). In summary, our method can be effectively used to discover cancer-driving cooperative events that can be valuable clinical markers for patient stratification.

  11. Cooperative genomic alteration network reveals molecular classification across 12 major cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Zhang, Yong; Ping, Yanyan; Zhao, Hongying; Pang, Lin; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic genomic alterations that enables cells to gradually acquire growth advantage contributes to tumor development. This has the important implication of the widespread existence of cooperative genomic alterations in the accumulation process. Here, we proposed a computational method HCOC that simultaneously consider genetic context and downstream functional effects on cancer hallmarks to uncover somatic cooperative events in human cancers. Applying our method to 12 TCGA cancer types, we totally identified 1199 cooperative events with high heterogeneity across human cancers, and then constructed a pan-cancer cooperative alteration network. These cooperative events are associated with genomic alterations of some high-confident cancer drivers, and can trigger the dysfunction of hallmark associated pathways in a co-defect way rather than single alterations. We found that these cooperative events can be used to produce a prognostic classification that can provide complementary information with tissue-of-origin. In a further case study of glioblastoma, using 23 cooperative events identified, we stratified patients into molecularly relevant subtypes with a prognostic significance independent of the Glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (GCIMP). In summary, our method can be effectively used to discover cancer-driving cooperative events that can be valuable clinical markers for patient stratification. PMID:27899621

  12. Ethanol consumption during early pregnancy alters the disposition of tangentially migrating GABAergic interneurons in the fetal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Verginia C; Yeh, Pamela W L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Yeh, Hermes H

    2008-02-20

    Consumption of alcohol (ethanol) during pregnancy can lead to developmental defects in the offspring, the most devastating being the constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). In the brain, a hallmark of FAS is abnormal cerebral cortical morphology consistent with insult during corticogenesis. Here, we report that exposure to a relatively low level of ethanol in utero (average maternal and fetal blood alcohol level of 25 mg/dl) promotes premature tangential migration into the cortical anlage of primordial GABAergic interneurons, including those originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). This ethanol-induced effect was evident in vivo at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in GAD67 knock-in and BAC-Lhx6 embryos, as well as in vitro in isotypic telencephalic slice cocultures obtained from E14.5 embryos exposed to ethanol in utero. Analysis of heterotypic cocultures indicated that both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors contribute to the aberrant migratory profile of MGE-derived cells. In this light, we provide evidence for an interaction between ethanol exposure in utero and the embryonic GABAergic system. Exposure to ethanol in utero elevated the ambient level of GABA and increased the sensitivity to GABA of MGE-derived cells. Our results uncovered for the first time an effect of ethanol consumption during pregnancy on the embryonic development of GABAergic cortical interneurons. We propose that ethanol exerts its effect on the tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons extrinsically by modulating extracellular levels of GABA and intrinsically by altering GABA(A) receptor function.

  13. GLP-1 receptors exist in the parietal cortex, hypothalamus and medulla of human brains and the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide alters brain activity related to highly desirable food cues in individuals with diabetes: a crossover, randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Sofopoulos, Michail; Tsoukas, Michael A.; Dincer, Fadime; Thakkar, Bindiya; Sahin-Efe, Ayse; Filippaios, Andreas; Bowers, Jennifer; Srnka, Alexandra; Gavrieli, Anna; Ko, Byung-Joon; Liakou, Chrysoula; Kanyuch, Nickole; Tseleni-Balafouta, Sofia; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue that has been demonstrated to successfully treat diabetes and promote weight loss. The mechanisms by which liraglutide confers weight loss remain to be fully clarified. Thus, we investigated whether GLP-1 receptors are expressed in human brains and whether liraglutide administration affects neural responses to food cues in diabetic individuals (primary outcome). Methods In 22 consecutively studied human brains, expression of GLP-1 receptors in the hypothalamus, medulla oblongata and parietal cortex was examined using immunohistochemistry. In a randomised (assigned by the pharmacy using a randomisation enrollment table), placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 21 individuals with type 2 diabetes (18 included in analysis due to lack or poor quality of data) were treated with placebo and liraglutide for a total of 17 days each (0.6 mg for 7 days, 1.2 mg for 7 days and 1.8 mg for 3 days). Participants were eligible if they had type 2 diabetes and were currently being treated with lifestyle changes or metformin. Participants, caregivers, people doing measurements and/or examinations, and people assessing the outcomes were blinded to the medication assignment. We studied metabolic changes as well as neurocognitive and neuroimaging (fMRI) of responses to food cues at the clinical research centre of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of GLP-1 receptors on neurons in the human hypothalamus, medulla and parietal cortex. Liraglutide decreased activation of the parietal cortex in response to highly desirable (vs less desirable) food images (p < 0.001; effect size: placebo 0.53 ± 0.24, liraglutide −0.47 ± 0.18). No significant adverse effects were noted. In a secondary analysis, we observed decreased activation in the insula and putamen, areas involved in the reward system. Furthermore, we showed that increased ratings of hunger

  14. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall’s coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants’ Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  15. Altered expression and localization of synaptophysin in developing cerebellar cortex of neonatal rats due to maternal diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hami, Javad; Vafaei-Nezhad, Saeed; Ivar, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Akram; Ghaemi, Kazem; Mostafavizadeh, Mostafa; Hosseini, Mehran

    2016-12-01

    There is sufficient evidence that diabetes during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of neurodevelopmental anomalies including learning deficits, behavioral problems and motor dysfunctions in the offspring. Synaptophysin (SYP) is an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles and is considered as a marker for synaptogenesis and synaptic density. This study aimed to examine the effects of maternal diabetes in pregnancy on the expression and localization of SYP in the developing rat cerebellum. Wistar female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition and male offspring was euthanized at postnatal day (P) 0, 7, and 14. The results revealed a significant down-regulation in the mRNA expression of SYP in the offspring born to diabetic animals at both P7 and P14 (P < 0.05 each). One week after birth, there was a significant reduction in the localization of SYP expression in the external granular (EGL) and in the molecular (ML) layers of neonates born to diabetic animals (P < 0.05 each). We also found a marked decrease in the expression of SYP in all of the cerebellar cortical layers of STZ-D group pups at P14 (P < 0.05 each). Moreover, our results revealed no significant changes in either expression or localization of SYP in insulin-treated group pups when compared with the controls (P ≥ 0.05 each). The present study demonstrated that maternal diabetes has adverse effects on the synaptogenesis in the offspring's cerebellum. Furthermore, the rigid maternal blood glucose control in the most cases normalized these negative impacts.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolomics reveals altered waste clearance and accelerated aging in HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Dutta, Anupriya; Morgello, Susan; Gabuzda, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Some features of HAND resemble those of age-associated cognitive decline in the absence of HIV, suggesting that overlapping mechanisms may contribute to neurocognitive impairment. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 100 individuals (46 HIV-positive patients and 54 HIV-negative controls). Methods: Untargeted CSF metabolite profiling was performed using liquid/gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was performed by Bioplex. Bioinformatic analyses were performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results: Alterations in the CSF metabolome of HIV patients on ART mapped to pathways associated with neurotransmitter production, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and metabolic waste. Many CSF metabolites altered in HIV overlapped with those altered with advanced age in HIV-negative controls, suggesting a pattern indicative of accelerated aging. Machine learning models identified neurotransmitters (glutamate, N-acetylaspartate), markers of glial activation (myo-inositol), and ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyric acid, 1,2-propanediol) as top-ranked classifiers of HAND. These CSF metabolites correlated with worse neurocognitive test scores, plasma inflammatory biomarkers [interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2Ra], and intrathecal IFN responses (IFN-γ and kynurenine : tryptophan ratio), suggesting inter-relationships between systemic and intrathecal inflammation and metabolic alterations in CSF. Conclusions: Alterations in the CSF metabolome of HIV patients on ART suggest that persistent inflammation, glial responses, glutamate neurotoxicity, and altered brain waste disposal systems contribute to mechanisms involved in HAND that may be augmented with aging. PMID:24752083

  17. Cross-adaptation combined with TMS reveals a functional overlap between vision and imagery in the early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Bona, Silvia; Silvanto, Juha

    2012-02-01

    The extent to which the generation of mental images draws on the neuronal representations involved in visual perception has been the subject of much debate. To investigate this overlap, we assessed whether adaptation to visual stimuli affects the ability to generate visual mental images; such cross-adaptation would indicate shared neural representations between visual perception and imagery. Mental imagery was tested using a modified version of the clock task, in which subjects are presented with a digital time (e.g. "2.15") and are asked to generate a mental image of the clock hands displaying this time on an empty clock face. Participants were adapted to oriented lines either on the upper or lower side of the clock face prior to the mental image generation. The results showed that mental imagery was impaired when the mental image had to be generated in the adapted region of visual space (Experiment 1). In Experiment 2, we used TMS to determine whether this adaptation effect occurs in the early visual cortex (EVC; V1/V2). Relative to control conditions (No TMS and Vertex TMS), EVC TMS facilitated mental imagery generation when the mental image spatially overlapped with the adapter. Our results thus show that neuronal representations in the EVC which encode (and are suppressed by) visual input play a causal role in visual mental imagery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Laminar microvascular transit time distribution in the mouse somatosensory cortex revealed by Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Conrad W; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2016-01-15

    The transit time distribution of blood through the cerebral microvasculature both constrains oxygen delivery and governs the kinetics of neuroimaging signals such as blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI). However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of an intravascular tracer as it passes through the field-of-view. Quantitative transit time metrics are derived from temporal analysis of the dynamic scattering signal, closely related to tracer concentration. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in surface pial vessels, we used DyC-OCT to investigate the transit time distribution in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with earlier transit times and less heterogeneity in the middle cortical layers. The early transit times in the middle cortical layers may explain, at least in part, the early BOLD fMRI onset times observed in these layers. The layer-dependencies in heterogeneity may help explain how a single vascular supply manages to deliver oxygen to individual cortical layers with diverse metabolic needs.

  19. Two distinct auditory-motor circuits for monitoring speech production as revealed by content-specific suppression of auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, Sari; Nora, Anni; Leminen, Alina; Hakala, Tero; Huotilainen, Minna; Shtyrov, Yury; Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Service, Elisabet

    2015-06-01

    Speech production, both overt and covert, down-regulates the activation of auditory cortex. This is thought to be due to forward prediction of the sensory consequences of speech, contributing to a feedback control mechanism for speech production. Critically, however, these regulatory effects should be specific to speech content to enable accurate speech monitoring. To determine the extent to which such forward prediction is content-specific, we recorded the brain's neuromagnetic responses to heard multisyllabic pseudowords during covert rehearsal in working memory, contrasted with a control task. The cortical auditory processing of target syllables was significantly suppressed during rehearsal compared with control, but only when they matched the rehearsed items. This critical specificity to speech content enables accurate speech monitoring by forward prediction, as proposed by current models of speech production. The one-to-one phonological motor-to-auditory mappings also appear to serve the maintenance of information in phonological working memory. Further findings of right-hemispheric suppression in the case of whole-item matches and left-hemispheric enhancement for last-syllable mismatches suggest that speech production is monitored by 2 auditory-motor circuits operating on different timescales: Finer grain in the left versus coarser grain in the right hemisphere. Taken together, our findings provide hemisphere-specific evidence of the interface between inner and heard speech.

  20. Phase-synchronization-based parcellation of resting state fMRI signals reveals topographically organized clusters in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Nicolás; Harvey, Ben M; Renken, Remco J; Dumoulin, Serge O; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2017-09-01

    Resting-state fMRI is widely used to study brain function and connectivity. However, interpreting patterns of resting state (RS) fMRI activity remains challenging as they may arise from different neuronal mechanisms than those triggered by exogenous events. Currently, this limits the use of RS-fMRI for understanding cortical function in health and disease. Here, we examine the phase synchronization (PS) properties of blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals obtained during visual field mapping (VFM) and RS with 7T fMRI. This data-driven approach exploits spatiotemporal covariations in the phase of BOLD recordings to establish the presence of clusters of synchronized activity. We find that, in both VFM and RS data, selecting the most synchronized neighboring recording sites identifies spatially localized PS clusters that follow the topographic organization of the visual cortex. However, in activity obtained during VFM, PS is spatially more extensive than in RS activity, likely reflecting stimulus-driven interactions between local responses. Nevertheless, the similarity of the PS clusters obtained for RS and stimulus-driven fMRI suggest that they share a common neuroanatomical origin. Our finding justifies and facilitates direct comparison of RS and stimulus-evoked activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender differences in cognitive Theory of Mind revealed by transcranial direct current stimulation on medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Adenzato, Mauro; Brambilla, Michela; Manenti, Rosa; De Lucia, Lucia; Trojano, Luigi; Garofalo, Sara; Enrici, Ivan; Cotelli, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Gender differences in social cognition are a long discussed issue, in particular those concerning Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e., the ability to explain and predict other people’s mental states. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to test the hypothesis that anodal tDCS over the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) selectively enhances cognitive ToM performance in females. In the first experiment we administered to sixteen females and sixteen males a cognitive ToM task during anodal or placebo tDCS over the mPFC. In the second experiment further sixteen females completed the task receiving anodal or placebo tDCS over the vertex. The results showed that anodal tDCS over the mPFC enhances ToM in females but not in males, an effect indicated by enhanced ToM in females that received anodal tDCS over the mPFC compared with females that received tDCS over the vertex. These findings are relevant for three reasons. First, we found evidence of gender-related differences in cognitive ToM, extending previous findings concerning affective ToM. Second, these differences emerge with anodal stimulation of the mPFC, confirming the crucial role of this area in cognitive ToM. Third, we show that taking into account gender-related differences is mandatory for the investigation of ToM. PMID:28117378

  2. Altered posterior cingulate cortical cyctoarchitecture, but normal density of neurons and interneurons in the posterior cingulate cortex and fusiform gyrus in autism

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, Douglas L.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2011-01-01

    (PCC), a component of the limbic system. Abnormal activation has also been noted in the fusiform gyrus (FFG), a region important for facial recognition and a key element in social interaction. A potential imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the cortex may contribute to altered information processing in autism. Furthermore, reduced numbers of GABA receptors have previously been reported in the autistic brain. Thionin stained sections were used to qualitatively assess cytoarchitectonic patterning and quantitatively determine the density of neurons and immunohistochemistry was used to determine the densities of a subset of GABAergic interneurons utilizing parvalbumin- and calbindin- immunoreactivity. In autism, the PCC displayed altered cytoarchitecture with irregularly distributed neurons, poorly demarcated layers IV and V, and increased presence of white matter neurons. In contrast, no neuropathology was observed in the FFG. There was no significant difference in the density of thionin, parvalbumin, or calbindin interneurons in either region and there was a trend towards a reduced density of calbindin neurons in the PCC. This study highlights the presence of abnormal findings in the PCC, which appear to be developmental in nature and could affect the local processing of social-emotional behaviors as well as functioning of interrelated areas. PMID:21360830

  3. Medial prefrontal cortex neuronal activation and synaptic alterations after stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking: a study using c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats.

    PubMed

    Cifani, Carlo; Koya, Eisuke; Navarre, Brittany M; Calu, Donna J; Baumann, Michael H; Marchant, Nathan J; Liu, Qing-Rong; Khuc, Thi; Pickel, James; Lupica, Carl R; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-06-20

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress and there is evidence for a role of ovarian hormones in stress responses and feeding. We studied the role of these hormones in stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activation in c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats, which express GFP in strongly activated neurons. Food-restricted ovariectomized or sham-operated c-fos-GFP rats were trained to lever-press for palatable food pellets. Subsequently, lever-pressing was extinguished and reinstatement of food seeking and mPFC neuronal activation was assessed after injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or pellet priming (1-4 noncontingent pellets). Estrous cycle effects on reinstatement were also assessed in wild-type rats. Yohimbine- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement was associated with Fos and GFP induction in mPFC; both reinstatement and neuronal activation were minimally affected by ovarian hormones in both c-fos-GFP and wild-type rats. c-fos-GFP transgenic rats were then used to assess glutamatergic synaptic alterations within activated GFP-positive and nonactivated GFP-negative mPFC neurons following yohimbine-induced reinstatement of food seeking. This reinstatement was associated with reduced AMPA receptor/NMDA receptor current ratios and increased paired-pulse facilitation in activated GFP-positive but not GFP-negative neurons. While ovarian hormones do not appear to play a role in stress-induced relapse of food seeking in our rat model, this reinstatement was associated with unique synaptic alterations in strongly activated mPFC neurons. Our paper introduces the c-fos-GFP transgenic rat as a new tool to study unique synaptic changes in activated neurons during behavior.

  4. Sevoflurane anesthesia induces neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of medial prefrontal cortex local field potentials networks in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Zhang, Qian; Tian, Xin; Wang, Guolin

    2016-08-01

    Sevoflurane has been found to increase apoptosis and pathologic markers associated with Alzheimer disease, provoking concern over their potential contribution to postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the effects of sevoflurane on contextual fear memory of aged rats and to characterize local population connectivity of local field potentials (LFPs) in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of aged rats during contextual fear memory. Eighteen-month-old male SD rats were implanted with one multichannel electrode array in mPFC. The aged rats were divided into control group, sevoflurane group (1 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h) and surgical group with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h. We then assessed the effect of the anesthesia on contextual fear memory, and alterations in the local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks by partial directed coherence (PDC). Surgery impaired contextual fear memory and reduced local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats at day 1 after the surgery and anesthesia. 1 MAC Sevoflurane anesthesia induced neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats when tested 1, 7, 15 and 30 days after exposure (P > 0.05). PDC values of theta band mPFC LFPs became strongly increased during contextual fear memory at 1, 7, 15, and 30 days after anesthesia. Our results suggest that 1 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia does not induce contextual fear memory impairment in aged rats and suggest that the increased local population connectivity in theta bands LFPs of mPFC plays a role in contextual fear memory. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  5. Maladaptive Sexual Behavior Following Concurrent Methamphetamine and Sexual Experience in Male Rats is Associated with Altered Neural Activity in Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Lindsey B; Frohmader, Karla S; Coolen, Lique M

    2017-09-01

    The use of psychostimulants is often associated with hypersexuality, and psychostimulant users have identified the effects of drug on sexual behavior as a reason for further use. It was previously demonstrated in male rats that methamphetamine (Meth), when administered concurrently with sexual behavior results in impairment of inhibition of sexual behavior in a conditioned sex aversion (CSA) paradigm where mating is paired with illness. This is indicative of maladaptive sex behavior following Meth and sex experience. The present study examined the neural pathways activated during inhibition of sexual behavior in male rats and the effects of concurrent Meth and sexual behavior on neural activity, using ERK phosphorylation (pERK). First, exposure to conditioned aversive stimuli in males trained to inhibit sexual behavior in the CSA paradigm increased pERK expression in medial prefrontal (mPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and areas in striatum and amygdala. Second, effects of concurrent Meth and sex experience were tested in males that were exposed to four daily sessions of concurrent Meth (1 mg/kg) or saline and mating and subsequently exposed to CSA one week after last treatment. Meth and mating-treated males showed significant impairment of inhibition of mating, higher pERK expression under baseline conditions, and disrupted pERK induction by exposure to the conditioned aversive stimuli in mPFC and OFC. These alterations of pERK occurred in CaMKII-expressing neurons, suggesting changes in efferent projections of these areas. Altogether, these data show that concurrent Meth and mating experience causes maladapative sexual behavior that is associated with alterations in neural activation in mPFC and OFC.

  6. A single intracerebroventricular Aβ25-35 infusion leads to prolonged alterations in arginine metabolism in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bergin, D H; Jing, Y; Zhang, H; Liu, P

    2015-07-09

    While amyloid beta (Aβ) plays a central role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent evidence suggests the involvement of arginine metabolism in AD pathogenesis. Earlier research has shown that a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of pre-aggregated Aβ25-35 (the neurotoxic domain of the full-length Aβ) altered arginine metabolism in the rat hippocampus (particularly the CA2/3 and dentate gyrus (DG) sub-regions) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) at the time point of 8 days post-infusion. The present study measured the levels of L-arginine and its nine downstream metabolites (L-citrulline, L-ornithine, agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine, glutamate, GABA and glutamine) in the hippocampus and PFC at the time points of 42 and 97 days following a single bilateral i.c.v. infusion of Aβ25-35 (30 nmol/rat) or Aβ35-25 (reverse peptide; 30 nmol/rat). At the 42-day time point, Aβ25-35 resulted in decreased levels of glutamate, glutamine and spermine in the CA2/3 sub-region of the hippocampus. At the 97-day time point, however, there were decreased L-ornithine, GABA and putrescine levels, but increased glutamate/GABA ratio, in the PFC and increased spermine levels in the DG sub-region. Cluster analyses showed that L-arginine and its three main metabolites L-citrulline, L-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which changed as a function of Aβ25-35 at the 42-day and 97-day time points, particularly in the CA2/3 and PFC regions respectively. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that a single i.c.v. infusion of pre-aggregated Aβ25-35 leads to prolonged alterations in arginine metabolism in a region-specific and time-dependent manner, which further supports the involvement of arginine metabolism in AD pathogenesis.

  7. Striatal patch compartment lesions alter methamphetamine-induced behavior and immediate early gene expression in the striatum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Gilbert, Yamiece E; Logan, Anna S; Hebbard, John C; Horner, Kristen A

    2014-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) induces stereotypy, which is characterized as inflexible, repetitive behavior. Enhanced activation of the patch compartment of the striatum has been correlated with stereotypy, suggesting that stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of this region. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to METH-induced stereotypy is not clear. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of METH-induced stereotypy, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered METH-induced behaviors. Animals were bilaterally infused in the striatum with the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) to specifically ablate the neurons of the patch compartment. Eight days later, animals were treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg), placed in activity chambers, observed for 2 h and killed. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the number and total area of mu-labeled patches in the striatum. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the intensity of METH-induced stereotypy and the spatial immobility typically observed with METH-induced stereotypy. In support of this observation, DERM-SAP pretreatment also significantly increased locomotor activity in METH-treated animals. In the striatum, DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing METH-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. DERM-SAP pretreatment followed by METH administration augmented c-Fos expression in the SNpc and reduced METH-induced c-Fos expression in the SNpr. In the medial prefrontal, but not sensorimotor cortex, c-Fos and zif/268 expression was increased following METH treatment in animals pre-treated with DERM-SAP. These data indicate that the patch compartment is necessary for the expression of repetitive behaviors and suggests that alterations in activity in the basal ganglia may contribute to this phenomenon.

  8. Alteration in glutathione content and associated enzyme activities in the synaptic terminals but not in the non-synaptic mitochondria from the frontal cortex of Parkinson's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Harish, G; Mahadevan, Anita; Srinivas Bharath, M M; Shankar, S K

    2013-01-01

    Altered redox dynamics contribute to physiological aging and Parkinson's disease (PD). This is reflected in the substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients as lowered antioxidant levels and elevated oxidative damage. Contrary to this observation, we previously reported that non-SN regions such as caudate nucleus and frontal cortex (FC) exhibited elevated antioxidants and lowered mitochondrial and oxidative damage indicating constitutive protective mechanisms in PD brains. To investigate whether the sub-cellular distribution of antioxidants could contribute to these protective effects, we examined the distribution of antioxidant/oxidant markers in the neuropil fractions [synaptosomes, non-synaptic mitochondria and cytosol] of FC from PD (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). In the control FC, all the antioxidant activities [Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase (GPx), GSH-S-transferase (GST)] except glutathione reductase (GR) were the highest in cytosol, but several fold lower in mitochondria and much lower in synaptosomes. However, FC synaptosomes from PD brains had significantly higher levels of GSH (p = 0.01) and related enzymes [GPx (p = 0.02), GR (p = 0.06), GST (p = 0.0001)] compared to controls. Conversely, mitochondria from the FC of PD cases displayed elevated SOD activity (p = 0.02) while the GSH and related enzymes were relatively unaltered. These changes in the neuropil fractions were associated with unchanged or lowered oxidative damage. Further, the mitochondrial content in the synaptosomes of both PD and control brains was ≥five-fold lower compared to the non-synaptic mitochondrial fraction. Altered distribution of oxidant/antioxidant markers in the neuropil fractions of the human brain during aging and PD has implications for (1) degenerative and protective mechanisms (2) distinct antioxidant mechanisms in synaptic terminals compared to other compartments.

  9. Early exposure to bisphenol A alters neuron and glia number in the rat prefrontal cortex of adult males, but not females

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Renee N.; Wise, Leslie M.; Park, Pul Y.; Schantz, Susan L.; Juraska, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during early development can alter sexual differentiation of the brain in rodents, although few studies have examined effects on areas of the brain associated with cognition. The current study examined if developmental BPA exposure alters the total number of neurons and glia in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in adulthood. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were orally exposed to 0, 4, 40, or 400 μg/kg BPA in corn oil throughout pregnancy. From postnatal days 1-9, pups were given daily oral doses of oil or BPA, at doses corresponding to those given during gestation. Brains were examined in adulthood, and the volume of layers 2/3 and layers 5/6 of the mPFC were parcellated. The density of neurons and glia in these layers was quantified stereologically with the optical disector, and density was multiplied by volume for each animal. Males exposed to 400 μg/kg BPA were found to have increased numbers of neurons and glia in layers 5/6. Although there were no significant effects of BPA in layers 2/3, the pattern of increased neuron number in males exposed to 400 μg/kg BPA was similar to that seen in layers 5/6. No effects of BPA were seen in females or in males exposed to the other doses of BPA. This study indicates that males are more susceptible to the long-lasting effects of BPA on anatomy of the mPFC, an area implicated in neurological disorders. PMID:25193849

  10. Altered Regulation of Protein Kinase A Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Normal and Brain-Injured Animals Actively Engaged in a Working Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Nobuhide; Moore, Anthony N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling is required for short- and long-term memory. In contrast, enhanced PKA activity has been shown to impair working memory, a prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent, transient form of memory critical for cognition and goal-directed behaviors. Working memory can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the absence of overt damage to the PFC. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to this deficit are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined whether altered PKA signaling in the PFC as a result of TBI is a contributing mechanism. We measured PKA activity in medial PFC (mPFC) tissue homogenates prepared from sham and 14-day postinjury rats. PKA activity was measured both when animals were inactive and when actively engaged in a spatial working memory task. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that PKA activity in the mPFC is actively suppressed in uninjured animals performing a working memory task. By comparison, both basal and working memory-related PKA activity was elevated in TBI animals. Inhibition of PKA activity by intra-mPFC administration of Rp-cAMPS into TBI animals had no influence on working memory performance 30 min postinfusion, but significantly improved working memory when tested 24 h later. This improvement was associated with reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 messenger RNA levels. Taken together, these results suggest that TBI-associated working memory dysfunction may result, in part, from enhanced PKA activity, possibly leading to altered expression of plasticity-related genes in the mPFC. PMID:25027811

  11. Levels of plasma sodium and potassium as well as alterations in adrenal cortex of Rattus norvegicus in response to sublethal heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Barai, S R; Suryawanshi, S A; Pandey, A K

    2009-03-01

    In order to record the effects of sublethal heroin administration on plasma mineral metabolism, the drug was administered intramuscularly (16.4 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1); 0.75 LD50 dose) in Rattus norvegicus for 30 days. Plasma sodium and potassium levels of the control rats fluctuated between 153.14 +/- 2.88 - 157.23 +/- 2.16 meq l(-1) and 5.04 +/- 0.32 - 5.63 +/- 0.41 meq l(-1), respectively. Plasma sodium level of the treated rats registered a progressive decline (p<0.01) at 24 hr with the minimum value (126.53 +/- 2.68 meq l(-1)) on day 30 whereas plasma potassium level registered a progressive increase during entire period of the treatment with peak (8.78 +/- 0.23 meq l(-1)) on day 30. Though sublethal herion administration for 30 days elcited cytoplasmic vacuolation in all the three zones of adrenal cortex, much of cytological alterations were observed in zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata cells. In zona glomerulosa cells, degenerative changes in the organelles were more pronounced as evident by the loss of typical cristae in the mitochondria and hormone granules were rarely seen in these cells. Though rough endoplasmic reticula were scanty, many lipid granules encountered in zona glomerulosa cells of the treated rats.

  12. Location, Location, Location: Alterations in the Functional Topography of Face- but not Object- or Place-Related Cortex in Adolescents with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, K. Suzanne; Luna, Beatriz; Minshew, Nancy; Behrmann, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    In autism, impairments in face processing are a relatively recent discovery, but have quickly become a widely accepted aspect of the behavioral profile. Only a handful of studies have investigated potential atypicalities in autism in the development of the neural substrates mediating face processing. High-functioning individuals with autism (HFA) and matched typically developing (TD) controls watched dynamic movie vignettes of faces, common objects, buildings, and scenes of navigation while undergoing an fMRI scan. With these data, we mapped the functional topography of category-selective activation for faces bilaterally in the fusiform gyrus, occipital face area, and posterior superior temporal sulcus. Additionally, we mapped category-selective activation for objects in the lateral occipital area and for places in the parahippocampal place area in the two groups. Our findings do not indicate a generalized disruption in the development of the entire ventral visual pathway in autism. Instead, our results suggest that the functional topography of face-related cortex is selectively disrupted in autism and that this alteration is present in early adolescence. Furthermore, for those HFA adolescents who do exhibit face-selective activation, this activation tends to be located in traditionally object-related regions, which supports the hypothesis that perceptual processing of faces in autism may be more akin to the perceptual processing of common objects in TD individuals. PMID:20631857

  13. Maternal separation and early stress cause long-lasting effects on dopaminergic and endocannabinergic systems and alters dendritic morphology in the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano-López, Antonio; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; García, Fabio García; Regalado-Santiago, Citlalli; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    A considerable amount experimental studies have shown that maternal separation (MS) is associated with adult offspring abnormal behavior and cognition disorder. Accordingly, this experimental procedure has been proposed as a predictor for alcohol and drug dependence based on the neurodevelopmental soon after birth. Endocannabinoid system (eCBs) has been implicated in reward processes, including drug abuse and dependence. MS and associated stress causes changes in the eCBs that seem to facilitate alcohol consumption. In this study, we seek to evaluate potential morphological changes in neurons of the frontal cortex (FCx) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), in the expression of receptors and enzymes of the endocannabinoid and dopamine systems and in second messengers, such as Akt, in adult rats subjected to MS and early stress (MS + ES; 2 × 180 min daily) vs. nonseparated rats (NMS). Results showed that MS + ES induces higher D2R expression and lower D3R, FAAH, and MAGL expression compared with NMS rats. Alterations in total dendritic length were also detected and were characterized by increases in the NAcc while there were decreases in the FCx. We believe MS + ES-induced changes in the dopaminergic and endocannabinergic systems and in the neuronal microstructure might be contributing to alcohol seeking behavior and, potential vulnerability to other drugs in rats. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 819-831, 2016.

  14. Altered resting state functional connectivity of anterior cingulate cortex in drug naïve adolescents at the earliest stages of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Santino; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Romana Montecchi, Francesca; Riva, Giuseppe; Carducci, Filippo; Cosimo Quattrocchi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Previous Resting-State Functional Connectivity (RSFC) studies have shown several functional alterations in adults with or recovered from long Anorexia Nervosa (AN). The aim of this paper was to investigate whole brain RSFC in adolescents with AN in the earliest stages, less than 6 months, of the disorder. Sixteen drug-naïve outpatient female adolescents with AN-restrictive type (AN-r) (mean age: 15,8; SD 1,7) were compared to 16 age-matched healthy female (mean age: 16,3; SD 1,4). Relevant resting state networks (RSNs) were identified using independent component analysis (ICA) from functional magnetic resonance imaging data; a dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the RSNs. Between-group differences of the functional connectivity maps were found in the executive control network (ECN). Particularly, decreased temporal correlation was observed in AN-r patients relative to healthy controls between the ECN functional connectivity maps and the anterior cingulate cortex (p < 0.05 corrected). Our results in AN adolescents may represent an early trait-related biomarker of the disease. Considering that the above mentioned network and its area are mainly involved in cognitive control and emotional processing, our findings could explain the impaired cognitive flexibility in relation to body image and appetite in AN patients. PMID:26043139

  15. Integrated molecular analysis reveals complex interactions between genomic and epigenomic alterations in esophageal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Peng, DunFa; Guo, Yan; Chen, Heidi; Zhao, Shilin; Washington, Kay; Hu, TianLing; Shyr, Yu; El-Rifai, Wael

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is rapidly rising in the United States and Western countries. In this study, we carried out an integrative molecular analysis to identify interactions between genomic and epigenomic alterations in regulating gene expression networks in EAC. We detected significant alterations in DNA copy numbers (CN), gene expression levels, and DNA methylation profiles. The integrative analysis demonstrated that altered expression of 1,755 genes was associated with changes in CN or methylation. We found that expression alterations in 84 genes were associated with changes in both CN and methylation. These data suggest a strong interaction between genetic and epigenetic events to modulate gene expression in EAC. Of note, bioinformatics analysis detected a prominent K-RAS signature and predicted activation of several important transcription factor networks, including β-catenin, MYB, TWIST1, SOX7, GATA3 and GATA6. Notably, we detected hypomethylation and overexpression of several pro-inflammatory genes such as COX2, IL8 and IL23R, suggesting an important role of epigenetic regulation of these genes in the inflammatory cascade associated with EAC. In summary, this integrative analysis demonstrates a complex interaction between genetic and epigenetic mechanisms providing several novel insights for our understanding of molecular events in EAC. PMID:28102292

  16. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  17. Hemodynamic and electrophysiological spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the cortex: directional influences revealed by Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-01-15

    We used a combined electrophysiological/hemodynamic system to examine low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) in spontaneous neuronal activities (spike trains and local field potentials) and hemodynamic signals (cerebral blood flow) recorded from the anesthetized rat somatosensory and visual cortices. The laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) probe was tilted slightly to approach the area in which a microelectrode array (MEA) was implanted for simultaneous recordings. Spike trains (STs) were converted into continuous-time rate functions (CRFs) using the ST instantaneous firing rates. LFOs were detected for all three of the components using the multi-taper method (MTM). The frequencies of these LFOs ranged from 0.052 to 0.167 Hz (mean±SD, 0.10±0.026 Hz) for cerebral blood flow (CBF), from 0.027 to 0.26 Hz (mean±SD, 0.12±0.041 Hz) for the CRFs of the STs and from 0.04 to 0.19 Hz (mean±SD, 0.11±0.035 Hz) for local field potentials (LFPs). We evaluated the Granger causal relationships of spontaneous LFOs among CBF, LFPs and CRFs using Granger causality (GC) analysis. Significant Granger causal relationships were observed from LFPs to CBF, from STs to CBF and from LFPs to STs at approximately 0.1 Hz. The present results indicate that spontaneous LFOs exist not only in hemodynamic components but also in neuronal activities of the rat cortex. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to identify Granger causal influences among CBF, LFPs and STs and show that spontaneous LFOs carry important Granger causal influences from neural activities to hemodynamic signals.

  18. A new efficient method for synaptic vesicle quantification reveals differences between medial prefrontal cortex perforated and nonperforated synapses.

    PubMed

    Nava, Nicoletta; Chen, Fenghua; Wegener, Gregers; Popoli, Maurizio; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2014-02-01

    Communication between neurons is mediated by the release of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles from presynaptic terminals. Quantitative characterization of synaptic vesicles can be highly valuable for understanding mechanisms underlying synaptic function and plasticity. We performed a quantitative ultrastructural analysis of cortical excitatory synapses by mean of a new, efficient method, as an alternative to three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Based on a hierarchical sampling strategy and unequivocal identification of the region of interest, serial sections from excitatory synapses of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of six Sprague-Dawley rats were acquired with a transmission electron microscope. Unbiased estimates of total 3D volume of synaptic terminals were obtained through the Cavalieri estimator, and adequate correction factors for vesicle profile number estimation were applied for final vesicle quantification. Our analysis was based on 79 excitatory synapses, nonperforated (NPSs) and perforated (PSs) subtypes. We found that total number of docked and reserve-pool vesicles in PSs significantly exceeded that in NPSs (by, respectively, 77% and 78%). These differences were found to be related to changes in size between the two subtypes (active zone area by 86%; bouton volume by 105%) rather than to postsynaptic density shape. Positive significant correlations were found between number of docked and reserve-pool vesicles, active zone area and docked vesicles, and bouton volume and reserve pool vesicles. Our method confirmed the large size of mPFC PSs and a linear correlation between presynaptic features of typical hippocampal synapses. Moreover, a greater number of docked vesicles in PSs may promote a high synaptic strength of these synapses.

  19. Causal relationships between frequency bands of extracellular signals in visual cortex revealed by an information theoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Besserve, Michel; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Logothetis, Nikos K; Panzeri, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing how different cortical rhythms interact and how their interaction changes with sensory stimulation is important to gather insights into how these rhythms are generated and what sensory function they may play. Concepts from information theory, such as Transfer Entropy (TE), offer principled ways to quantify the amount of causation between different frequency bands of the signal recorded from extracellular electrodes; yet these techniques are hard to apply to real data. To address the above issues, in this study we develop a method to compute fast and reliably the amount of TE from experimental time series of extracellular potentials. The method consisted in adapting efficiently the calculation of TE to analog signals and in providing appropriate sampling bias corrections. We then used this method to quantify the strength and significance of causal interaction between frequency bands of field potentials and spikes recorded from primary visual cortex of anaesthetized macaques, both during spontaneous activity and during binocular presentation of naturalistic color movies. Causal interactions between different frequency bands were prominent when considering the signals at a fine (ms) temporal resolution, and happened with a very short (ms-scale) delay. The interactions were much less prominent and significant at coarser temporal resolutions. At high temporal resolution, we found strong bidirectional causal interactions between gamma-band (40-100 Hz) and slower field potentials when considering signals recorded within a distance of 2 mm. The interactions involving gamma bands signals were stronger during movie presentation than in absence of stimuli, suggesting a strong role of the gamma cycle in processing naturalistic stimuli. Moreover, the phase of gamma oscillations was playing a stronger role than their amplitude in increasing causations with slower field potentials and spikes during stimulation. The dominant direction of causality was mainly found

  20. Systems Reconsolidation Reveals a Selective Role for the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Generalized Contextual Fear Memory Expression

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Einar Ö; Pors, Jennifer; Nader, Karim

    2015-01-01

    After acquisition, hippocampus-dependent memories undergo a systems consolidation process, during which they become independent of the hippocampus and dependent on the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) for memory expression. However, consolidated remote memories can become transiently hippocampus-dependent again following memory reactivation. How this systems reconsolidation affects the role of the ACC in remote memory expression is not known. Using contextual fear conditioning, we show that the expression of 30-day-old remote memory can transiently be supported by either the ACC or the dorsal hippocampus following memory reactivation, and that the ACC specifically mediates expression of remote generalized contextual fear memory. We found that suppression of neural activity in the ACC with the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) impaired the expression of remote, but not recent, contextual fear memory. Fear expression was not affected by this treatment if preceded by memory reactivation 6 h earlier, nor was it affected by suppression of neural activity in the dorsal hippocampus with the GABA-receptor agonist muscimol. However, simultaneous targeting of both the ACC and the dorsal hippocampus 6 h after memory reactivation disrupted contextual fear memory expression. Second, we observed that expression of a 30-day-old generalized contextual fear memory in a novel context was not affected by memory reactivation 6 h earlier. However, intra-ACC CNQX infusion before testing impaired contextual fear expression in the novel context, but not the original training context. Together, these data suggest that although the dorsal hippocampus may be recruited during systems reconsolidation, the ACC remains necessary for the expression of generalized contextual fear memory. PMID:25091528

  1. Laminar microvascular transit time distribution in the mouse somatosensory cortex revealed by Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    The transit time distribution of blood through the cerebral microvasculature both constrains oxygen delivery and governs the kinetics of neuroimaging signals such as blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI). However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of an intravascular tracer as it passes through the field-of-view. Quantitative transit time metrics are derived from temporal analysis of the dynamic scattering signal, closely related to tracer concentration. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in surface pial vessels, we used DyC-OCT to investigate the transit time distribution in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with earlier transit times and less heterogeneity in the middle cortical layers. The early transit times in the middle cortical layers may explain, at least in part, the early BOLD fMRI onset times observed in these layers. The layer-dependencies in heterogeneity may help explain how a single vascular supply manages to deliver oxygen to individual cortical layers with diverse metabolic needs. PMID:26477654

  2. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  3. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Anisometropic Amblyopia Subjects: Revealed by Resting-State fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoming; Ding, Kun; Liu, Yong; Yan, Xiaohe; Song, Shaojie; Jiang, Tianzi

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, usually occurs during early childhood and results in poor or blurred vision. Recent neuroimaging studies have found cortical structural/functional abnormalities in amblyopia. However, until now, it was still not known whether the spontaneous activity of the brain changes in amblyopia subjects. In the present study, regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of the homogeneity of functional magnetic resonance imaging signals, was used for the first time to investigate changes in resting-state local spontaneous brain activity in individuals with anisometropic amblyopia. Compared with age- and gender-matched subjects with normal vision, the anisometropic amblyopia subjects showed decreased ReHo of spontaneous brain activity in the right precuneus, the left medial prefrontal cortex, the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum, and increased ReHo of spontaneous brain activity was found in the bilateral conjunction area of the postcentral and precentral gyri, the left paracentral lobule, the left superior temporal gyrus, the left fusiform gyrus, the conjunction area of the right insula, putamen and the right middle occipital gyrus. The observed decreases in ReHo may reflect decreased visuo-motor processing ability, and the increases in ReHo in the somatosensory cortices, the motor areas and the auditory area may indicate compensatory plasticity in amblyopia. PMID:22937041

  4. Mean kurtosis alterations of cerebral white matter in patients with schizophrenia revealed by diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Narita, Hisashi; Tha, Khin K; Hashimoto, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shin; Shirato, Hiroki; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2016-11-03

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging can provide a better understanding of microstructural white matter (WM) changes where crossing fibers exist, compared with conventional diffusion tensor imaging. Here, we aimed to examine the differences of mean kurtosis (MK) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values between patients with schizophrenia and control subjects using voxel-based analysis (VBA). Additionally, we examined the correlation between these values and severity of clinical symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. MK and FA values were acquired with a 3.0T scanner from 31 patients with schizophrenia and 31 age-, handedness-, and sex-matched healthy controls. VBA was used to compare the MK and FA maps of the patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We also performed a correlation analysis between the MK and FA values of the regions with significant differences and the positive and negative syndrome scale scores in patients with schizophrenia. Compared to FA values, voxels with MK decrease were more widespread across bilateral cerebral the WM of patients with schizophrenia. The MK values of left superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly negatively correlated with the severity of positive symptoms (r=-0.451, P=0.011). There was no significant correlation between MK and FA values and other clinical variables. The diffusion kurtosis indices are suitable for evaluating altered WM structures in the human brain as they may detect white matter alterations of crossing fibers alterations of WM in schizophrenia and assess the clinical state of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Alterations of the Primary Visual Cortex in Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma Patients before and after Surgery: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Honghan; Jiang, Fei; Liu, Dan; Cai, Fengqin; Pei, Chonggang; Zhou, Fuqing; Zeng, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the altered intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the primary visual cortex (V1) in primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) patients before and after surgery using resting-state functional MRI. Materials and Methods Twenty-five preoperative PACG (pre-PACG) patients and 25 well-matched healthy controls (HCs) were included in this study, and 9 PACG patients were assessed again at least 3 months after treatment (post-PACG). We generated the iFC maps of the seed regions in the centers of the left and right V1 and conducted group comparisons. Then, the relationships between the altered iFC coefficients and clinical variables were investigated in the pre-PACG patients. Results Compared with the HCs, the pre-PACG patients showed decreased iFC between the left V1 and right V2 (covering the cuneus, calcarine and lingual gyrus) and increased iFC between the left V1 and left temporal-parietal region, left frontal opercula-insula-basal ganglia region, right insula-basal ganglia region, and right inferior parietal lobule (P < 0.01, corrected). Compared with the pre-PACG patients, the post-PACG patients showed increased iFC between the left V1 and bilateral V2, and between the left V1 and left or right postcentral gyrus; in addition, they showed decreased iFC between the left V1 and the dorsal-attention and frontoparietal-control networks. In the pre-PACG patients, visual activity (VA) was positively correlated with increased iFC between the left V1 and the left temporal-parietal region or the right inferior parietal lobule. Similar patterns of alterations were observed in the right V1-iFC in both the pre- and post-PACG patients. Conclusions The primary findings have demonstrated a gradual decrease in visual information integration in the left V1-V2 pathway and VA-related functional compensation in the pre-PACG patients, generating further evidence of functional restoration in post-PACG patients. PMID:28122025

  6. Potentiation of barbiturate-induced alterations in presynaptic noradrenergic function in rat frontal cortex by imidazol(in)e α2-adrenoceptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, J W; Parker, C A; Wülfert, E; Hudson, A L; Nutt, D J

    1998-01-01

    In order to resolve the extent to which presynaptic noradrenergic mechanisms contribute to the anaesthetic-sparing effects of α2-adrenoceptor agonists in vivo microdialysis was used to investigate the combined effects of sodium pentobarbitone and imidazol(in)e α2-adrenoceptor agonists on extracellular levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the rat frontal cortex.Dialysate levels of NA were markedly reduced by the addition of TTX (2 μM) or by the removal of calcium in the perfusate. These data imply that dialysate NA levels are ultimately dependent on exocytotic release mechanisms from afferent coeruleo-cortical neurones.Systemic administration of sodium pentobarbitone (85 mg kg−1, i.p.) induced general anaesthesia and reduced NA levels by 92% after 30 min. The restoration of basal levels 90 min later was closely associated with a return of the corneal blink reflex.Basal NA levels in conscious animals were not affected by an intravenous infusion of equally radioactive solutions of either imidazoline (clonidine) or imidazole (mivazerol) α2-adrenoceptor agonists. The dose rate employed for each compound was 2 μg kg−1 h−1 over 2 h.The co-administration of intravenous clonidine or mivazerol, each at 2 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h, with sodium pentobarbitone (85 mg kg−1, i.p.), produced a marked and prolonged reduction in NA efflux. After 2 h, NA levels remained suppressed by 95% (clonidine) and 80% (mivazerol) and animals remained deeply anaesthetized.The accumulation of tritium in brain tissue was 42–73% lower across all brain regions examined after [3H]-mivazerol administration than after [3H]-clonidine administration. Sodium pentobarbitone did not alter the accumulation of tritium in brain tissue after the administration of either α2-adrenoceptor agonist.These data demonstrate that α2-adrenoceptor agonists potentiate the inhibitory effects of sodium pentobarbitone on extracellular levels of NA in the frontal cortex. Further

  7. Causal relationships between frequency bands of extracellular signals in visual cortex revealed by an information theoretic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schölkopf, Bernhard; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Panzeri, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing how different cortical rhythms interact and how their interaction changes with sensory stimulation is important to gather insights into how these rhythms are generated and what sensory function they may play. Concepts from information theory, such as Transfer Entropy (TE), offer principled ways to quantify the amount of causation between different frequency bands of the signal recorded from extracellular electrodes; yet these techniques are hard to apply to real data. To address the above issues, in this study we develop a method to compute fast and reliably the amount of TE from experimental time series of extracellular potentials. The method consisted in adapting efficiently the calculation of TE to analog signals and in providing appropriate sampling bias corrections. We then used this method to quantify the strength and significance of causal interaction between frequency bands of field potentials and spikes recorded from primary visual cortex of anaesthetized macaques, both during spontaneous activity and during binocular presentation of naturalistic color movies. Causal interactions between different frequency bands were prominent when considering the signals at a fine (ms) temporal resolution, and happened with a very short (ms-scale) delay. The interactions were much less prominent and significant at coarser temporal resolutions. At high temporal resolution, we found strong bidirectional causal interactions between gamma-band (40–100 Hz) and slower field potentials when considering signals recorded within a distance of 2 mm. The interactions involving gamma bands signals were stronger during movie presentation than in absence of stimuli, suggesting a strong role of the gamma cycle in processing naturalistic stimuli. Moreover, the phase of gamma oscillations was playing a stronger role than their amplitude in increasing causations with slower field potentials and spikes during stimulation. The dominant direction of causality was mainly found

  8. The influence of fetal ethanol exposure on subsequent development of the cerebral cortex as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Leigland, Lindsey A; Ford, Matthew M; Lerch, Jason P; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2013-06-01

    . Additionally, regional patterns in cortical thickness differences suggested primary sensory areas were particularly vulnerable to gestational EtOH exposure. Structural MRI measurements were in accordance with previous histological studies performed in animal models of FASD. In addition to establishing a summary of MRI outcomes throughout development in FASD, this research suggests that MRI techniques are sufficiently sensitive to detect neuroanatomical effects of fetal EtOH exposure on development of the cerebral cortex during the period of time corresponding to late gestation in humans. Importantly, this research provides a link between animal histological data and human MRI data. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. Calibrated imaging reveals altered grey matter metabolism related to white matter microstructure and symptom severity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Nicholas A; Turner, Monroe P; Ouyang, Minhui; Himes, Lyndahl; Thomas, Binu P; Hutchison, Joanna L; Faghihahmadabadi, Shawheen; Davis, Scott L; Strain, Jeremy F; Spence, Jeffrey; Krawczyk, Daniel C; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang; Hart, John; Frohman, Teresa C; Frohman, Elliot M; Okuda, Darin T; Rypma, Bart

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) involves damage to white matter microstructures. This damage has been related to grey matter function as measured by standard, physiologically-nonspecific neuroimaging indices (i.e., blood-oxygen-level dependent signal [BOLD]). Here, we used calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine the extent to which specific, evoked grey matter physiological processes were associated with white matter diffusion in MS. Evoked changes in BOLD, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2 ) were measured in visual cortex. Individual differences in the diffusion tensor measure, radial diffusivity, within occipital tracts were strongly associated with MS patients' BOLD and CMRO2 . However, these relationships were in opposite directions, complicating the interpretation of the relationship between BOLD and white matter microstructural damage in MS. CMRO2 was strongly associated with individual differences in patients' fatigue and neurological disability, suggesting that alterations to evoked oxygen metabolic processes may be taken as a marker for primary symptoms of MS. This work demonstrates the first application of calibrated and diffusion imaging together and details the first application of calibrated functional MRI in a neurological population. Results lend support for neuroenergetic hypotheses of MS pathophysiology and provide an initial demonstration of the utility of evoked oxygen metabolism signals for neurology research. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5375-5390, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analysis of White Adipose Tissue Gene Expression Reveals CREB1 Pathway Altered in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    McCourt, Andrew Christopher; Parker, Jennifer; Silajdžić, Edina; Haider, Salman; Sethi, Huma; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Warner, Thomas T; Björkqvist, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classical neurological symptoms, Huntington's disease (HD) is complicated by peripheral pathology and both the mutant gene and the protein are found in cells and tissues throughout the body. Despite the adipose tissue gene expression alterations described in HD mouse models, adipose tissue and its gene expression signature have not been previously explored in human HD. We investigated gene expression signatures in subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained from control subjects, premanifest HD gene carriers and manifest HD subjects with the aim to identify gene expression changes and signalling pathway alterations in adipose tissue relevant to HD. Gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST Array. Target genes were technically validated using real-time quantitative PCR and the expression signature was validated in an independent subject cohort. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, more than 500 genes were significantly different in premanifest HD subjects as compared to healthy controls. Pathway analysis suggests that the differentially expressed genes found here in HD adipose tissue are involved in fatty acid metabolism pathways, angiotensin signalling pathways and immune pathways. Transcription factor analysis highlights CREB1. Using RT-qPCR, we found that MAL2, AGTR2, COBL and the transcription factor CREB1 were significantly upregulated, with CREB1 and AGT also being significantly upregulated in a separate cohort. Distinct gene expression profiles can be seen in HD subcutaneous adipose tissue, with CREB1 highlighted as a key transcription factor.

  11. Altered spontaneous activity in antisocial personality disorder revealed by regional homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Liu, Wangyong; Chen, Jingang; Liao, Jian; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-07

    There is increasing evidence that antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) stems from brain abnormalities. However, there are only a few studies investigating brain structure in ASPD. The aim of this study was to find regional coherence abnormalities in resting-state functional MRI of ASPD. Thirty-two ASPD individuals and 34 controls underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan. The regional homogeneity (ReHo) approach was used to examine whether ASPD was related to alterations in resting-state neural activity. Support vector machine discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity/specificity characteristics of the ReHo index in discriminating between the ASPD individuals and controls. The results showed that, compared with controls, ASPD individuals show lower ReHo in the right cerebellum posterior lobe (Crus1) and the right middle frontal gyrus, as well as higher ReHo in the right middle occipital gyrus (BA 19), left inferior temporal gyrus (BA 37), and right inferior occipital gyrus (cuneus, BA 18). All alternation regions reported a predictive accuracy above 70%. To our knowledge, this study was the first to study the change in regional activity coherence in the resting brain of ASPD individuals. These results not only elucidated the pathological mechanism of ASPD from a resting-state functional viewpoint but also showed that these alterations in ReHo may serve as potential markers for the detection of ASPD.

  12. Perceptual suppression revealed by adaptive multi-scale entropy analysis of local field potential in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2013-04-01

    Generalized flash suppression (GFS), in which a salient visual stimulus can be rendered invisible despite continuous retinal input, provides a rare opportunity to directly study the neural mechanism of visual perception. Previous work based on linear methods, such as spectral analysis, on local field potential (LFP) during GFS has shown that the LFP power at distinctive frequency bands are differentially modulated by perceptual suppression. Yet, the linear method alone may be insufficient for the full assessment of neural dynamic due to the fundamentally nonlinear nature of neural signals. In this study, we set forth to analyze the LFP data collected from multiple visual areas in V1, V2 and V4 of macaque monkeys while performing the GFS task using a nonlinear method - adaptive multi-scale entropy (AME) - to reveal the neural dynamic of perceptual suppression. In addition, we propose a new cross-entropy measure at multiple scales, namely adaptive multi-scale cross-entropy (AMCE), to assess the nonlinear functional connectivity between two cortical areas. We show that: (1) multi-scale entropy exhibits percept-related changes in all three areas, with higher entropy observed during perceptual suppression; (2) the magnitude of the perception-related entropy changes increases systematically over successive hierarchical stages (i.e. from lower areas V1 to V2, up to higher area V4); and (3) cross-entropy between any two cortical ar