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Sample records for cortical bone anisotropy

  1. Variability and Anisotropy of Fracture Toughness of Cortical Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Nordin, Norhaziqah; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    Bones form protective and load-bearing framework of the body. Therefore, their structural integrity is vital for the quality of life. Unfortunately, bones can only sustain a load until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Therefore, it is essential to study their mechanical and fracture behaviours in order to get an in-depth understanding of the origins of its fracture resistance that, in turn, can assist diagnosis and prevention of bone's trauma. This can be achieved by studying mechanical properties of bone, such as its fracture toughness. Generally, most of bone fractures occur for long bones that consist mostly of cortical bone. Therefore, in this study, only a cortical bone tissue was studied. Since this tissue has an anisotropic behaviour and possesses hierarchical and complex structure, in this paper, an experimental analysis for the fracture toughness of cortical bone tissue is presented in terms of J-integral. The data was obtained using single-edge-notch bending (SENB) cortical specimens of bone tested in a three-point bending setup. Variability of values of fracture toughness was investigated by testing specimens cut from different cortex positions of bovine femur called anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. In addition, anisotropy ratios of fracture toughness were considered by examining specimens cut from three different orientations: longitudinal, transverse and radial. Moreover, in order to link cortical bone fracture mechanisms with its underlying microstructure, fracture surfaces of specimens from different cortices and along different orientations were studied. Experimental results of this study provide a clear understanding of both variability and anisotropy of cortical bone tissue with regard to its fracture toughness.

  2. Micromechanical modeling of elastic properties of cortical bone accounting for anisotropy of dense tissue.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Laura; Saadat, Fatemeh; Sevostianov, Igor

    2014-10-17

    The paper analyzes the connection between microstructure of the osteonal cortical bone and its overall elastic properties. The existing models either neglect anisotropy of the dense tissue or simplify cortical bone microstructure (accounting for Haversian canals only). These simplifications (related mostly to insufficient mathematical apparatus) complicate quantitative analysis of the effect of microstructural changes - produced by age, microgravity, or some diseases - on the overall mechanical performance of cortical bone. The present analysis fills this gap; it accounts for anisotropy of the dense tissue and uses realistic model of the porous microstructure. The approach is based on recent results of Sevostianov et al. (2005) and Saadat et al. (2012) on inhomogeneities in a transversely-isotropic material. Bone's microstructure is modeled according to books of Martin and Burr (1989), Currey (2002), and Fung (1993) and includes four main families of pores. The calculated elastic constants for porous cortical bone are in agreement with available experimental data. The influence of each of the pore types on the overall moduli is examined.

  3. The relationship between the mechanical anisotropy of human cortical bone tissue and its microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Orias, Alejandro A.

    Orthopedics research has made significant advances in the areas of biomechanics, bone implants and bone substitute materials. However, to date there is no definitive model to explain the structure-property relationships in bone as a material to enable better implant designs or to develop a true biomechanical analog of bone. The objective of this investigation was to establish a relationship between the elastic anisotropy of cortical bone tissue and its microstructure. Ultrasonic wave propagation was used to measure stiffness coefficients for specimens sectioned along the length of a human femur. The elastic constants were orthotropic and varied with anatomical location. Stiffness coefficients were generally largest at the midshaft and stiffness anisotropy ratios were largest at the distal and proximal ends. These tests were run on four additional human femurs to assess the influence of phenotypic variation, and in most cases, it was found that phenotypes do not exert a significant effect. Stiffness coefficients were shown to be correlated as a power law relation to apparent density, but anisotropy ratios were not. Texture analysis was performed on selected samples to measure the orientation distribution of the bone mineral crystals. Inverse pole figures showed that bone mineral crystals had a preferred crystallographic orientation, coincident with the long axis of the femur, which is its principal loading direction. The degree of preferred orientation was represented in Multiples of a Random Distribution (MRD), and correlated to the anisotropy ratios. Variation in elastic anisotropy was shown to be primarily due to the bone mineral orientation. The results found in this work can be used to incorporate anisotropy into structural analysis for bone as a material.

  4. Elastic anisotropy and off-axis ultrasonic velocity distribution in human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dong Hwa; Dechow, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Elastic structure in cortical bone is usually simplified as orthotropic or transversely isotropic, which allows estimates of three-dimensional technical constants from ultrasonic and density measurements. These elastic property estimates can then be used to study phenotypic changes in cortical bone structure and function, and to create finite element models of skeletal structures for studies of organismal variation and functional adaptation. This study examines assumptions of orthotropic or transversely isotropic material structure in cortical bone through the investigation of off-axis ultrasonic velocities in the cortical plane in 10 samples each from a human femur, mandible and cranium. Longitudinal ultrasonic velocities were measured twice through each bone sample by rotating the perimeter of each sample in 1 ° angular intervals between two ultrasonic transducers. The data were fit to sine curves f(x) = (A× sin(x+ B) + C) and the goodness of fit was examined. All the data from the femur fit closely with the ideal sine curve model, and all three coefficients were similar among specimens, indicating similar elastic properties, anisotropies and orientations of the axes of maximum stiffness. Off-axis ultrasonic velocities in the mandible largely fit the sine curve model, although there were regional variations in the coefficients. Off-axis ultrasonic velocities from the cranial vault conformed to the sine curve model in some regions but not in others, which shows an irregular and complex pattern. We hypothesize that these variations in ultrasonic velocities reflect variations in the underlying bulk microstructure of the cortical bone, especially in the three-dimensional patterns of osteonal orientation and structure. Elastic property estimates made with ultrasonic techniques are likely valid in the femur and mandible; errors in estimates from cranial bone need to be evaluated regionally. Approximate orthotropic structure in bulk cortical bone specimens should be

  5. Relationships between the anisotropy of longitudinal wave velocity and hydroxyapatite crystallite orientation in bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Nakatsuji, Tomohiro; Yaoi, Yuichiro; Yamato, Yu; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Matsukawa, Mami; Yamazaki, Kaoru; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is now widely used for evaluating bone in vivo, because obtained ultrasonic wave properties directly reflect the visco-elasticity. Bone tissue is composed of minerals like hydroxyapatite (HAp) and a collagen matrix. HAp crystallites orientation is thus one parameter of bone elasticity. In this study, we experimentally investigated the anisotropy of ultrasonic wave velocity and the HAp crystallites orientation in the axial-radial and axial-tangential planes in detail, using cylindrical specimens obtained from the cortical bone of three bovine femurs. Longitudinal bulk wave propagation was investigated by using a conventional ultrasonic pulse system. We used the one cycle of sinusoidal pulse which was emitted from wide band transmitter. The nominal frequency of the pulse was 1MHz. First, we investigated the anisotropy of longitudinal wave velocity, measuring the anisotropy of velocity in two planes using cylindrical specimens obtained from identical bone areas. The wave velocity changed due to the rotation angle, showing the maximum value in the direction a little off the bone axis. Moreover, X-ray pole figure measurements also indicated that there were small tilts in the HAp crystallites orientation from the bone axis. The tilt angles were similar to those of the highest velocity direction. There were good correlations between velocity and HAp crystallites orientation obtained in different directions. However, a comparatively low correlation was found in posterior bone areas, which shows the stronger effects of bone microstructure. In the radial-tangential plane, where the HAp crystallites hardly ever align, weak anisotropy of velocity was found which seemed to depend on the bone microstructure. PMID:22014464

  6. The effect of supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization on the anisotropy of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas; Rives, Alain; Pelletier, Matthew H; Wang, Tian; Walsh, William R

    2015-03-01

    Bone allografts are used to replace bone that has been removed or to augment bone tissue in a number of clinical scenarios. In order to minimize the risk of infection and immune response, the bone is delipidated and terminally sterilized prior to implantation. The optimal method for bone graft sterilization has been the topic of considerable research and debate. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) treatments have been shown to terminally sterilize bone against a range of bacteria and viruses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of these SCCO(2) treatments on the anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. Adult bovine cortical cubes were prepared and treated using SCCO(2) and a range of common processing additives (ethanol, peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide). The bone was mechanically tested in uniaxial compression in the axial, radial and tangential orientations. Ultimate stress, strain, elastic modulus, energy and stiffness were evaluated. This study found that SCCO(2) treatment without additive did not alter the ultimate stress, stiffness or energy to failure depreciably in any orientation. The addition of sterilants peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide also preserved mechanical function, with no deleterious effect on stress or stiffness. This study highlights the expediency of SCCO(2) treatment for bone allograft processing as terminal sterilization can be achieved while maintaining the intrinsic mechanical properties of the graft.

  7. The effect of supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization on the anisotropy of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas; Rives, Alain; Pelletier, Matthew H; Wang, Tian; Walsh, William R

    2015-03-01

    Bone allografts are used to replace bone that has been removed or to augment bone tissue in a number of clinical scenarios. In order to minimize the risk of infection and immune response, the bone is delipidated and terminally sterilized prior to implantation. The optimal method for bone graft sterilization has been the topic of considerable research and debate. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) treatments have been shown to terminally sterilize bone against a range of bacteria and viruses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of these SCCO(2) treatments on the anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. Adult bovine cortical cubes were prepared and treated using SCCO(2) and a range of common processing additives (ethanol, peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide). The bone was mechanically tested in uniaxial compression in the axial, radial and tangential orientations. Ultimate stress, strain, elastic modulus, energy and stiffness were evaluated. This study found that SCCO(2) treatment without additive did not alter the ultimate stress, stiffness or energy to failure depreciably in any orientation. The addition of sterilants peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide also preserved mechanical function, with no deleterious effect on stress or stiffness. This study highlights the expediency of SCCO(2) treatment for bone allograft processing as terminal sterilization can be achieved while maintaining the intrinsic mechanical properties of the graft. PMID:24737303

  8. Insights into Reference Point Indentation Involving Human Cortical Bone: Sensitivity to Tissue Anisotropy and Mechanical Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Coulmier, Aurélie; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-01-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) is a microindentation technique involving 20 cycles of loading in “force-control” that can directly assess a patient’s bone tissue properties. Even though preliminary clinical studies indicate a capability for fracture discrimination, little is known about what mechanical behavior the various RPI properties characterize and how these properties relate to traditional mechanical properties of bone. To address this, the present study investigated the sensitivity of RPI properties to anatomical location and tissue organization as well as examined to what extent RPI measurements explain the intrinsic mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Multiple indents with a target force of 10 N were done in 2 orthogonal directions (longitudinal and transverse) per quadrant (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral) of the femoral mid-shaft acquired from 26 donors (25–101 years old). Additional RPI measurements were acquired for 3 orthogonal directions (medial only). Independent of age, most RPI properties did not vary among these locations, but they did exhibit transverse isotropy such that resistance to indentation is greater in the longitudinal (axial) direction than in the transverse direction (radial or circumferential). Next, beam specimens (~ 2 mm × 5 mm × 40 mm) were extracted from the medial cortex of femoral mid-shafts, acquired from 34 donors (21–99 years old). After monotonically loading the specimens in three-point bending to failure, RPI properties were acquired from an adjacent region outside the span. Indent direction was orthogonal to the bending axis. A significant inverse relationship was found between resistance to indentation and the apparent-level mechanical properties. Indentation distance increase (IDI) and a linear combination of IDI and the loading slope, averaged over cycles 3 through 20, provided the best explanation of the variance in ultimate stress (r2=0.25, p=0.003) and toughness (r2=0.35, p=0

  9. Quantification of microarchitectural anisotropy in bone with diffraction enhanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean M.; Mehrotra, Meenal; LaRue, Amanda C.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) can quantify anisotropy in bone microarchitecture. Background: Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone. A noninvasive tool for measuring the degree of anisotropy (DA) in bone microarchitecture will help clinicians better assess fracture risk in osteoporotic patients. DEI detects small angular deflections in an x-ray beam, and is only sensitive to angular changes in one plane. If the beam is refracted by multiple anisotropic microstructures (e.g. osteocyte lacunae and pores) in bone, the angular spreading can be measured with DEI and differences in the amount of spreading for different bone orientations is indicative of the DA in bone microarchitecture. Method: An x-ray-tube based DEI system was used to collect an array of DEI reflectivity profiles measured through bovine cortical bone samples with the bones oriented with the bone axis in the plane perpendicular to the propagation of the x-ray beam. Micro-CT images of the bones were obtained using a Scanco uCT40 ex vivo scanner, and the DA of the pore structure was quantified using BoneJ. Results: The maximum and minimum measured reflectivity profile widths through bone varied by a factor of two; this suggests that the microarchitecture is preferentially aligned with the bone axis in a 2-to-1 ratio. The DA for the cortical pores was 0.6, which agrees with DEI's anisotropy measure. Conclusions: The preliminary findings of this study suggest that DEI is sensitive to anisotropy in bone microarchitecture.

  10. Analyzing the anisotropic Hooke's law for children's cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Emmanuelle; Lasaygues, Philippe; Baron, Cécile; Payan, Cédric; Launay, Franck; Follet, Hélène; Pithioux, Martine

    2015-09-01

    Child cortical bone tissue is rarely studied because of the difficulty of obtaining samples. Yet the preparation and ultrasonic characterization of the small samples available, while challenging, is one of the most promising ways of obtaining information on the mechanical behavior of non-pathological children׳s bone. We investigated children׳s cortical bone obtained from chirurgical waste. 22 fibula or femur samples from 21 children (1-18 years old, mean age: 9.7±5.8 years old) were compared to 16 fibula samples from 16 elderly patients (50-95 years old, mean age: 76.2±13.5 years old). Stiffness coefficients were evaluated via an ultrasonic method and anisotropy ratios were calculated as the ratio of C33/C11, C33/C22 and C11/C22. Stiffness coefficients were highly correlated with age in children (R>0.56, p<0.01). No significant difference was found between C11 and C22 for either adult or child bone (p>0.5), nor between C44 and C55 (p>0.5). We observe a transverse isotropy with C33>C22=C11>C44C55>C66. For both groups, we found no correlation between age and anisotropy ratios. This study offers the first complete analysis of stiffness coefficients in the three orthogonal bone axes in children, giving some indication of how bone anisotropy is related to age. Future perspectives include studying the effect of the structure and composition of bone on its mechanical behavior. PMID:26094248

  11. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. PMID:27087675

  12. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity.

  13. Penetration of cutting tool into cortical bone: experimental and numerical investigation of anisotropic mechanical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Li, Simin; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Demirci, Emrah; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2014-03-21

    An anisotropic mechanical behaviour of cortical bone and its intrinsic hierarchical microstructure act as protective mechanisms to prevent catastrophic failure due to natural loading conditions; however, they increase the extent of complexity of a penetration process in the case of orthopaedic surgery. Experimental results available in literature provide only limited information about processes in the vicinity of a tool-bone interaction zone. Also, available numerical models the bone-cutting process do not account for material anisotropy or the effect of damage mechanisms. In this study, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to address these issues and to elucidate the effect of anisotropic mechanical behaviour of cortical bone tissue on penetration of a sharp cutting tool. First, a set of tool-penetration experiments was performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to bone axis. Also, these experiments included bone samples cut from four different cortices to evaluate the effect of spatial variability and material anisotropy on the penetration processes. Distinct deformation and damage mechanisms linked to different microstructure orientations were captured using a micro-lens high-speed camera. Then, a novel hybrid FE model employing a smoothed-particle-hydrodynamic domain embedded into a continuum FE one was developed based on the experimental configuration to characterise the anisotropic deformation and damage behaviour of cortical bone under a penetration process. The results of our study revealed a clear anisotropic material behaviour of the studied cortical bone tissue and the influence of the underlying microstructure. The proposed FE model reflected adequately the experimental results and demonstrated the need for the use of the anisotropic and damage material model to analyse cutting of the cortical-bone tissue.

  14. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E.; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg−1. We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg−1 per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin–injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle–bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  15. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-09-29

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg(-1). We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg(-1) per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin-injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle-bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  16. The effect of shockwaves on mature and healing cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Forriol, F; Solchaga, L; Moreno, J L; Canãdell, J

    1994-10-01

    It has been proposed that high energy shockwaves could be used to create microfractures in cortical bone. This quality might be exploited clinically to perform closed osteotomies and promote healing in nonunion (15). However, no study has previously documented the effect of shockwaves on cortical bone "in vivo". We report an investigation designed to demonstrate the effect of shockwaves on mature cortical and healing bone. An osteotomy was performed on the tibiae of 37 lambs; two weeks later the operation site was exposed to shockwaves. Three weeks later the lambs were killed and specimens of the bone examined histologically and radiographically. Shockwaves had no effect on the periosteal surface of mature cortical bone, but on the endosteal surface some new trabecular bone was seen. Healing of bone was delayed by the shockwave therapy. We conclude that there is currently little place for shockwave treatment in clinical orthopaedics.

  17. The elastic properties of trabecular and cortical bone tissues are similar: results from two microscopic measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Turner, C H; Rho, J; Takano, Y; Tsui, T Y; Pharr, G M

    1999-04-01

    Acoustic microscopy (30-60 microm resolution) and nanoindentation (1-5 microm resolution) are techniques that can be used to evaluate the elastic properties of human bone at a microstructural level. The goals of the current study were (1) to measure and compare the Young's moduli of trabecular and cortical bone tissues from a common human donor, and (2) to compare the Young's moduli of bone tissue measured using acoustic microscopy to those measured using nanoindentation. The Young's modulus of cortical bone in the longitudinal direction was about 40% greater than (p<0.01) the Young's modulus in the transverse direction. The Young's modulus of trabecular bone tissue was slightly higher than the transverse Young's modulus of cortical bone, but substantially lower than the longitudinal Young's modulus of cortical bone. These findings were consistent for both measurement methods and suggest that elasticity of trabecular tissue is within the range of that of cortical bone tissue. The calculation of Young's modulus using nanoindentation assumes that the material is elastically isotropic. The current results, i.e., the average anisotropy ratio (E(L)/E(T)) for cortical bone determined by nanoindentation was similar to that determined by the acoustic microscope, suggest that this assumption does not limit nanoindentation as a technique for measurement of Young's modulus in anisotropic bone.

  18. Cement line staining in undecalcified thin sections of cortical bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, S. D.; Impeduglia, T. M.; Rubin, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for demonstrating cement lines in thin, undecalcified, transverse sections of cortical bone has been developed. Cortical bone samples are processed and embedded undecalcified in methyl methacrylate plastic. After sectioning at 3-5 microns, cross-sections are transferred to a glass slide and flattened for 10 min. Sections of cortical bone are stained for 20 sec free-floating in a fresh solution of 1% toluidine blue dissolved in 0.1% formic acid. The section is dehydrated in t-butyl alcohol, cleared in xylene, and mounted with Eukitt's medium. Reversal lines appear as thin, scalloped, dark blue lines against a light blue matrix, whereas bone formation arrest lines are thicker with a smooth contour. With this technique cellular detail, osteoid differentiation, and fluorochrome labels are retained. Results demonstrate the applicability of a one-step staining method for cement lines which will facilitate the assessment of bone remodeling activity in thin sections of undecalcified cortical bone.

  19. Improved osteoconduction of cortical bone grafts by biodegradable foam coating.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, K U; Bondre, S P; Gresser, J D; Wise, D L; Tomford, W W; Trantolo, D J

    1999-01-01

    Alteration of the geometrical surface configuration of cortical bone allografts may improve incorporation into host bone. A porous biodegradable coating that would maintain immediate structural recovery and subsequently allow normal graft healing and remodeling by promoting bony ingrowth could provide an osteoconductive surface scaffold. We investigated the feasibility of augmenting cortical bone grafts with osteoconductive biodegradable polymeric scaffold coatings. Three types of bone grafts were prepared: Type I--cortical bone without coating (control), Type II--cortical bone coated with PLGA-foam, Type III--cortical bone coated with PPF-foam. The grafts were implanted into the rat tibial metaphysis (16 animals for each type of bone graft). Post-operatively the animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and 4 weeks (8 animals for each type of bone graft at each time point). Histologic and histomorphometric analysis of grafts showed that the amount of new bone forming around the foam-coated grafts was significantly higher than in the control group (uncoated; p < 0.02). Although both foam formulations were initially equally osteoconductive, PLGA-based foam coatings appeared to have degraded at two weeks postoperatively, whereas PPF-based foam coatings were still present at 4 weeks postoperatively. While significant resorption was present in control allografts with little accompanying reactive new bone formation, PLGA-coated bone grafts showed evidence of bone resorption and subsequent bony ingrowth earlier than those coated with PPF-based foams suggesting that PPF-coated cortical bone grafts were longer protected against host reactions resulting in bone resorption.

  20. The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophi

    This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

  1. Model of flexural fatigue damage accumulation for cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L V; Gibeling, J C; Martin, R B; Gibson, V A; Stover, S M

    1997-07-01

    Analytical models that predict modulus degradation in cortical bone subjected to uniaxial fatigue loading in tension and compression are presented. On the basis of experimental observations, damage was modeled as self-limiting for tension but not for compression. These mechanistic uniaxial damage models were then developed into a model for flexural fatigue of cortical bone based on laminated beam theory. The unknown coefficients in the uniaxial damage models were obtained by successfully fitting the resulting equations to uniaxial fatigue data from the literature on human cortical bone in tension and compression. Then, the predictions of the flexural model for the behavior of human cortical bone were compared with experimental results from a small but independent set of specimens tested at three different ranges of load in our laboratory. The behavior of the modulus degradation curves and the flexural fatigue lives of the specimens were in excellent agreement with the predictions of the model.

  2. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Disuse-Induced Cortical Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Akamine, T.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian; Tang, L. Y.; Zeng, Q. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can prevent disuse (underloaded)-induced cortical bone loss as well as add extra bone to underloaded bones. Thirteen-month-old retired female Sprague-Dawley breeders served as controls or were subjected to simultaneous right hindlimb immobilization by bandaging and daily subcutaneous doses of 0, 1, 3, or 6 mg PGE2/kg/d for two and six weeks. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). Disuse-induced cortical bone loss occurred by enlarging the marrow cavity and increasing intracortical porosity. PGE2 treatment of disuse shafts further increased intracortical porosity above that in disuse alone controls. This bone loss was counteracted by enhancement of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation. Stimulation of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation slightly enlarged the total tissue (cross-sectional) area and inhibited marrow cavity enlargement. These PGE2-induced activities netted the same percentage of cortical bone with a different distribution than the beginning and age related controls. These findings indicate the PGE2-induced increase in bone formation compensated for the disuse and PGE2-induced bone loss, and thus prevented immobilization induced bone loss.

  3. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen H; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  4. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    PubMed

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  5. Cortical bone screw fixation in ionically modified apatite cements.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Duncan, C O; Dover, M S; Bassett, D C; Nishikawa, H; Monaghan, A; Gbureck, U

    2005-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite cements are used in reconstruction of the face; usually in well-defined cavities where the cement can be stabilized without the need for internal fixation. A hydroxyapatite cement that could enable screw fixation and some loading therefore has considerable potential in maxillofacial reconstruction. It has been demonstrated recently that water demand of calcium phosphate cements can be reduced by ionically modifying the liquid component. This study investigated the capacity of an ionically modified precompacted apatite cement to retain self-tapping cortical bone screws. Screw pullout forces were determined in the direction of the screw long axis and perpendicular to it, using cortical bone and polymethylmethacrylate cement as a control. In bending pullout tests, measured forces to remove screws from ionically modified precompacted cement were insignificantly different from cortical bone. However, pullout forces of bone screws from hydroxyapatite cement decreased with aging time in vitro.

  6. Disuse exaggerates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefferan, Theresa E.; Kennedy, Angela M.; Evans, Glenda L.; Turner, Russell T.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse is associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis. However, comorbidity factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related bone fractures. Suboptimal mechanical loading of the skeleton, an established risk factor for bone loss, may occur in some alcohol abusers due to reduced physical activity, muscle atrophy, or both. The effect of alcohol consumption and reduced physical activity on bone metabolism has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical disuse alters bone metabolism in a rat model for chronic alcohol abuse. METHODS: Alcohol was administered in the diet (35% caloric intake) of 6-month-old male rats for 4 weeks. Rats were hindlimb-unloaded the final 2 weeks of the experiment to prevent dynamic weight bearing. Afterward, cortical bone histomorphometry was evaluated at the tibia-fibula synostosis. RESULTS: At the periosteal surface of the tibial diaphysis, alcohol and hindlimb unloading independently decreased the mineralizing perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate. In addition, alcohol, but not hindlimb unloading, increased endocortical bone resorption. The respective detrimental effects of alcohol and hindlimb unloading to inhibit bone formation were additive; there was no interaction between the two variables. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced weight bearing accentuates the detrimental effects of alcohol on cortical bone in adult male rats by further inhibiting bone formation. This finding suggests that reduced physical activity may be a comorbidity factor for osteoporosis in alcohol abusers.

  7. Measurement of microstructural strain in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    NICOLELLA, DANIEL P.; BONEWALD, LYNDA F.; MORAVITS, DONALD E.; LANKFORD, JAMES

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that mechanical factors affect bone remodeling such that increased mechanical demand results in net bone formation, whereas decreased demand results in net bone resorption. Current theories suggest that bone modeling and remodeling is controlled at the cellular level through signals mediated by osteocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate how macroscopically applied bone strains similar in magnitude to those that occur in vivo are manifest at the microscopic level in the bone matrix. Using a digital image correlation strain measurement technique, experimentally determined bone matrix strains around osteocyte lacuna resulting from macroscopic strains of approximately 2,000 microstrain (0.2%) reach levels of over 30,000 microstrain (3%) over fifteen times greater than the applied macroscopic strain. Strain patterns were highly heterogeneous and in some locations similar to observed microdamage around osteocyte lacuna indicating the resulting strains may represent the precursors to microdamage. This information may lead to a better understanding of how bone cells are affected by whole bone functional loading. PMID:16123021

  8. Mechanical properties of porcine femoral cortical bone measured by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Chittenden, Michael; Schirer, Jeffrey; Dickinson, Michelle; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2012-06-26

    This study uses a nanoindentation technique to examine variations in the local mechanical properties of porcine femoral cortical bone under hydrated conditions. Bone specimens from three age groups (6, 12 and 42 months), representing developing bone, ranging from young to mature animals, were tested on the longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional surfaces. Elastic modulus and hardness of individual lamellae within bone's microstructure: laminar bone, interstitial bone, and osteons, were measured. Both the elastic modulus and hardness increased with age. However, the magnitudes of these increases were different for each microstructural component. The longitudinal moduli were higher than the transverse moduli. Dehydrated samples were also tested to allow a comparison with hydrated samples and these resulted in higher moduli and hardness than the hydrated samples. Again, the degree of variation was different for each microstructural component. These results indicate that the developmental changes in bone have different rates of mechanical change within each microstructural component.

  9. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  10. Bone density and cortical structure after pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, Anniek M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Foster, Bethany J; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Leonard, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure.

  11. Compressive behaviour of child and adult cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Pani, Carla; Taddei, Fulvia; Alberghini, Marco; Viceconti, Marco; Manfrini, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In this study, cortical bone tissue from children was investigated. It is extremely difficult to obtain human child tissue. Therefore, the only possibility was to use bone tissue, free from any lesion, collected from young bone cancer patients. The compressive mechanical behaviour of child bone tissue was compared to the behaviour of adult tissue. Moreover, two hypotheses were tested: 1) that the mechanical behaviour of both groups is correlated to ash density; 2) that yield strain is an invariant. Small parts of the diaphysis of femora or tibiae from 12 children (4-15 years) and 12 adults (22-61 years) were collected. Cylindrical specimens were extracted from the cortical wall along the longitudinal axis of the diaphysis. A total of 107 specimens underwent compressive testing (strain rate: 0.1 s(-1)). Only the specimens showing a regular load-displacement curve (94) were considered valid and thereafter reduced to ash. It was found that the child bone tissue had significant lower compressive Young's modulus (-34%), yield stress (-38%), ultimate stress (-33%) and ash density (-17%) than the adult tissue. Conversely, higher compressive ultimate strain was found in the child group (+24%). Despite specimens extracted from both children and adults, ash density largely described the variation in tissue strength and stiffness (R(2)=in the range of 0.86-0.91). Furthermore, yield strain seemed to be roughly an invariant to subject age and tissue density. These results confirm that the mechanical properties of child cortical bone tissue are different from that of adult tissue. However, such differences are correlated to differences in tissue ash density. In fact, ash density was found to be a good predictor of strength and stiffness, also for cortical bone collected from children. Finally, the present findings support the hypothesis that compressive yield strain is an invariant.

  12. Specimen-specific multi-scale model for the anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Deuerling, Justin M; Yue, Weimin; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Roeder, Ryan K

    2009-09-18

    The anisotropic elastic constants of human cortical bone were predicted using a specimen-specific micromechanical model that accounted for structural parameters across multiple length scales. At the nano-scale, the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril were estimated from measured volume fractions of the constituent phases, namely apatite crystals and Type I collagen. The elastic constants of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were predicted using the measured orientation distribution function (ODF) for the apatite crystals to average the contribution of misoriented mineralized collagen fibrils. Finally, the elastic constants of cortical bone tissue were determined by accounting for the measured volume fraction of Haversian porosity within the ECM. Model predictions using the measured apatite crystal ODF were not statistically different from experimental measurements for both the magnitude and anisotropy of elastic constants. In contrast, model predictions using common idealized assumptions of perfectly aligned or randomly oriented apatite crystals were significantly different from the experimental measurements. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the apatite crystal volume fraction and ODF were the most influential structural parameters affecting model predictions of the magnitude and anisotropy, respectively, of elastic constants.

  13. Post-yield and failure properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Uwe; Schwiedrzik, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and associated skeletal diseases pose a significant challenge for health care systems worldwide. Age-related fractures have a serious impact on personal, social and economic wellbeing. A significant proportion of physiological loading is carried by the cortical shell. Its role in the fracture resistance and strength of whole bones in the ageing skeleton is of utmost importance. Even though a large body of knowledge has been accumulated on this topic on the macroscale, the underlying micromechanical material behaviour and the scale transition of bone's mechanical properties are yet to be uncovered. Therefore, this review aims at providing an overview of the state-of-the-art of the post-yield and failure properties of cortical bone at the extracellular matrix and the tissue level. PMID:27579166

  14. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities.

  15. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities. PMID:25922212

  16. Knee loading stimulates cortical bone formation in murine femurs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Su, Min; Tanaka, Shigeo M; Yokota, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Background Bone alters its architecture and mass in response to the mechanical environment, and thus varying loading modalities have been examined for studying load-driven bone formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the anabolic effects of knee loading on diaphyseal cortical bone in the femur. Methods Using a custom-made piezoelectric loader, 0.5-N loads were laterally applied to the left knee of C57/BL/6 mice at 5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz for 3 minutes per day for 3 consecutive days. Animals were sacrificed for examination 13 days after the last loading. The contralateral femur was used as a non-loading control, and the statistical significance of loading effects was evaluated with p < 0.05. Results Although diaphyseal strains were measured as small as 12 μstrains, bone histomorphometry clearly demonstrated frequency-dependent enhancement of bone formation. Compared to a non-loading control, bone formation on the periosteal surface was significantly enhanced. The loading at 15 Hz was most effective in elevating the mineralizing surface (1.7 x; p < 0.05), mineral apposition rate (1.4 x; p < 0.001), and bone formation rate (2.4 x; p < 0.01). The loading at 10 Hz elevated the mineralizing surface (1.4 x; p < 0.05), mineral apposition rate (1.3 x; p < 0.01), and bone formation rate (1.8 x; p < 0.05). The cross-sectional cortical area and the cortical thickness in the femoral diaphysis were significantly increased by loading at 10 Hz (both 9%) and 15 Hz (12% and 13%, respectively). Conclusion The results support the anabolic effects of knee loading on diaphyseal cortical bone in the femur with small in situ strain, and they extend our knowledge on the interplay between bone and joints. Strengthening the femur contributes to preventing femoral fractures, and the discovery about the described knee loading might provide a novel strategy to strengthen osteoporotic bones. Further analyses are required to understand the biophysical and molecular mechanism behind knee

  17. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  18. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  19. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury.

  20. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  1. A new WNT on the bone: WNT16, cortical bone thickness, porosity and fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Francesca; Lerner, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has provided abundant data implicating the WNT pathway in bone development and in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Rare human mutations together with gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice have clearly demonstrated that disrupted regulation of this pathway leads to altered bone mass. In addition to these rare human and mice mutations, large population-based genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ∼60 loci strongly associated with variations in bone mineral density (BMD) at different skeletal sites. Among the loci/genes identified by BMD GWAS, components of the WNT signaling pathway are numerous and have been shown to contribute to skeletal development and homeostasis. Within the components of WNT signaling, the gene coding for WNT16, one of the 19 WNT ligands of the human genome, has been found strongly associated with specific bone traits such as cortical bone thickness, cortical porosity and fracture risk. Recently, the first functional characterization of Wnt16 has confirmed the critical role of Wnt16 in the regulation of cortical bone mass and bone strength in mice. These reports have extended our understanding of Wnt16 function in bone homeostasis and have not only confirmed the unique association of Wnt16 with cortical bone and fracture susceptibility, as suggested by GWAS in human populations, but have also provided novel insights into the biology of this WNT ligand and the mechanism(s) by which it regulates cortical but not trabecular bone homeostasis. Most interestingly, Wnt16 appears to be a strong anti-resorptive soluble factor acting on both osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors. PMID:25987984

  2. Indentation size effect of cortical bones submitted to different soft tissue removals.

    PubMed

    Bandini, A; Chicot, D; Berry, P; Decoopman, X; Pertuz, A; Ojeda, D

    2013-04-01

    Properties of elasticity, hardness and viscosity are determined for the study of the visco-elastoplastic behavior of bones. The mechanical properties are compared in two upright sections of the bone due to their anisotropy. Besides, influence of hydration treatments leading to structural modifications of collagen and ground substance contents of bones on the mechanical properties is studied on a femoral cortical bovine bone. The treatments applied to the bone are used by forensic anthropologists to remove the soft tissue and modifying the hydration degree coupled to the collagen content. From instrumented indentation experiments, the hardness is characterized by the macrohardness and a hardness length-scale factor stating the hardness-load dependence. The elastic modulus results from the application of the methodology of Oliver and Pharr (1992). The coefficient of viscosity is deduced from a rheological model representing the indenter time-displacement observed under the application of a constant load. As a result, all the mechanical properties are found to be lower in the transverse section in an extent depending on the hydration treatment, i.e. the different values are located between 5% and 25% for the hardness around 0.5GPa, between 25% and 40% for the elastic modulus around 20GPa and between 2% and 35% for the coefficient of viscosity around 60GPa.s. Unexpectedly, the elastic modulus to coefficient of viscosity ratio is found to be independent on the hydration treatment.

  3. Comparative study between cortical bone graft versus bone dust for reconstruction of cranial burr holes

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Paulo V.; Ferreira, Nelson P.; Faria, Mario B.; Ferreira, Marcelo P.; Kraemer, Jorge L.; Collares, Marcus V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: As a consequence of the progressive evolution of neurosurgical techniques, there has been increasing concern with the esthetic aspects of burr holes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the use of cortical bone graft and bone dust for correcting cranial deformities caused by neurosurgical trephines. Methods: Twenty-three patients were enrolled for cranial burr hole reconstruction with a 1-year follow-up. A total of 108 burr holes were treated; 36 burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous cortical bone discs (33.3%), and the remaining 72 with autogenous wet bone powder (66.6%). A trephine was specifically designed to produce this coin-shaped bone plug of 14 mm in diameter, which fit perfectly over the burr holes. The reconstructions were studied 12 months after the surgical procedure, using three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography. Additionally, general and plastic surgeons blinded for the study evaluated the cosmetic results of those areas, attributing scores from 0 to 10. Results: The mean bone densities were 987.95 ± 186.83 Hounsfield units (HU) for bone fragment and 473.55 ± 220.34 HU for bone dust (P < 0.001); the mean cosmetic scores were 9.5 for bone fragment and 5.7 for bone dust (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The use of autologous bone discs showed better results than bone dust for the reconstruction of cranial burr holes because of their lower degree of bone resorption and, consequently, better cosmetic results. The lack of donor site morbidity associated with procedural low cost qualifies the cortical autograft as the first choice for correcting cranial defects created by neurosurgical trephines. PMID:21206899

  4. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2013-02-15

    Chemical pretreatment has been the prevailing sample preparation procedure for infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies on bone. However, experiments have indicated that chemical pretreatment can potentially affect the interactions between the components. Typically the IR techniques have involved transmission experiments. Here we report experimental studies using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FTIR). As a nondestructive technique, PA-FTIR can detect absorbance spectrum from a sample at controllable sampling depth and with little or no sample preparation. Additionally, the coupling inert gas, helium, which is utilized in the PA-FTIR system, can inhibit bacteria growth of bone by displacing oxygen. Therefore, we used this technique to study the undisturbed human cortical bone. It is found that photoacoustic mode (linear-scan, LS-PA-FTIR) can obtain basically similar spectra of bone as compared to the traditional transmission mode, but it seems more sensitive to amide III and ν(2) carbonate bands. The ν(3) phosphate band is indicative of detailed mineral structure and symmetry of native bone. The PA-FTIR depth profiling experiments on human cortical bone also indicate the influence of water on OH band and the cutting effects on amide I and mineral bands. Our results indicate that phosphate ion geometry appears less symmetric in its undisturbed state as detected by the PA-FTIR as compared to higher symmetry observed using transmission techniques on disturbed samples. Moreover, the PA-FTIR spectra indicate a band at 1747 cm(-1) possibly resulting from CO stretching of lipids, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides from the arteries. Comparison of the spectra in transverse and longitudinal cross-sections demonstrates that, the surface area of the longitudinal section bone appears to have more organic matrix exposed and with higher mineral stoichiometry.

  5. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed human cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2013-02-01

    Chemical pretreatment has been the prevailing sample preparation procedure for infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies on bone. However, experiments have indicated that chemical pretreatment can potentially affect the interactions between the components. Typically the IR techniques have involved transmission experiments. Here we report experimental studies using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FTIR). As a nondestructive technique, PA-FTIR can detect absorbance spectrum from a sample at controllable sampling depth and with little or no sample preparation. Additionally, the coupling inert gas, helium, which is utilized in the PA-FTIR system, can inhibit bacteria growth of bone by displacing oxygen. Therefore, we used this technique to study the undisturbed human cortical bone. It is found that photoacoustic mode (linear-scan, LS-PA-FTIR) can obtain basically similar spectra of bone as compared to the traditional transmission mode, but it seems more sensitive to amide III and ν2 carbonate bands. The ν3 phosphate band is indicative of detailed mineral structure and symmetry of native bone. The PA-FTIR depth profiling experiments on human cortical bone also indicate the influence of water on OH band and the cutting effects on amide I and mineral bands. Our results indicate that phosphate ion geometry appears less symmetric in its undisturbed state as detected by the PA-FTIR as compared to higher symmetry observed using transmission techniques on disturbed samples. Moreover, the PA-FTIR spectra indicate a band at 1747 cm-1 possibly resulting from Cdbnd O stretching of lipids, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides from the arteries. Comparison of the spectra in transverse and longitudinal cross-sections demonstrates that, the surface area of the longitudinal section bone appears to have more organic matrix exposed and with higher mineral stoichiometry.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Shock Wave Propagation in Fractured Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Frédéric; Cleveland, Robin

    2009-04-01

    Shock waves (SW) are considered a promising method to treat bone non unions, but the associated mechanisms of action are not well understood. In this study, numerical simulations are used to quantify the stresses induced by SWs in cortical bone tissue. We use a 3D FDTD code to solve the linear lossless equations that describe wave propagation in solids and fluids. A 3D model of a fractured rat femur was obtained from micro-CT data with a resolution of 32 μm. The bone was subject to a plane SW pulse with a peak positive pressure of 40 MPa and peak negative pressure of -8 MPa. During the simulations the principal tensile stress and maximum shear stress were tracked throughout the bone. It was found that the simulated stresses in a transverse plane relative to the bone axis may reach values higher than the tensile and shear strength of the bone tissue (around 50 MPa). These results suggest that the stresses induced by the SW may be large enough to initiate local micro-fractures, which may in turn trigger the start of bone healing for the case of a non union.

  7. Tensile mechanical properties of swine cortical mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Brosh, Tamar; Rozitsky, Doron; Geron, Silvia; Pilo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Temporary orthodontic mini implants serve as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatments. Often, they are inserted in the jaw bones, between the roots of the teeth. The stability of the mini implants within the bone is one of the major factors affecting their success and, consequently, that of the orthodontic treatment. Bone mechanical properties are important for implant stability. The aim of this study was to determine the tensile properties of the alveolar and basal mandible bones in a swine model. The diametral compression test was employed to study the properties in two orthogonal directions: mesio-distal and occluso-gingival. Small cylindrical cortical bone specimens (2.6 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were obtained from 7 mandibles using a trephine drill. The sites included different locations (anterior and posterior) and aspects (buccal and lingual) for a total of 16 specimens from each mandible. The load-displacement curves were continuously monitored while loading half of the specimens in the oclluso-gingival direction and half in the mesio-distal direction. The stiffness was calculated from the linear portion of the curve. The mesio-distal direction was 31% stiffer than the occluso-gingival direction. The basal bone was 40% stiffer than the alveolar bone. The posterior zone was 46% stiffer than the anterior zone. The lingual aspect was stiffer than the buccal aspect. Although bone specimens do not behave as brittle materials, the diametral compression test can be adequately used for determining tensile behavior when only small bone specimens can be obtained. In conclusion, to obtain maximal orthodontic mini implant stability, the force components on the implants should be oriented mostly in the mesio-distal direction.

  8. Tensile Mechanical Properties of Swine Cortical Mandibular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Brosh, Tamar; Rozitsky, Doron; Geron, Silvia; Pilo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Temporary orthodontic mini implants serve as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatments. Often, they are inserted in the jaw bones, between the roots of the teeth. The stability of the mini implants within the bone is one of the major factors affecting their success and, consequently, that of the orthodontic treatment. Bone mechanical properties are important for implant stability. The aim of this study was to determine the tensile properties of the alveolar and basal mandible bones in a swine model. The diametral compression test was employed to study the properties in two orthogonal directions: mesio-distal and occluso-gingival. Small cylindrical cortical bone specimens (2.6 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were obtained from 7 mandibles using a trephine drill. The sites included different locations (anterior and posterior) and aspects (buccal and lingual) for a total of 16 specimens from each mandible. The load-displacement curves were continuously monitored while loading half of the specimens in the oclluso-gingival direction and half in the mesio-distal direction. The stiffness was calculated from the linear portion of the curve. The mesio-distal direction was 31% stiffer than the occluso-gingival direction. The basal bone was 40% stiffer than the alveolar bone. The posterior zone was 46% stiffer than the anterior zone. The lingual aspect was stiffer than the buccal aspect. Although bone specimens do not behave as brittle materials, the diametral compression test can be adequately used for determining tensile behavior when only small bone specimens can be obtained. In conclusion, to obtain maximal orthodontic mini implant stability, the force components on the implants should be oriented mostly in the mesio-distal direction. PMID:25463971

  9. WNT16 Influences Bone Mineral Density, Cortical Bone Thickness, Bone Strength, and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Joel; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Bergström, Ulrica; Kähönen, Mika; Leo, Paul J.; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Viikari, Jorma; Ladouceur, Martin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Prince, Richard L.; Sievanen, Harri; Leslie, William D.; Mellström, Dan; Eisman, John A.; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Goltzman, David; Hanley, David A.; Jones, Graeme; St. Pourcain, Beate; Xiao, Yongjun; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Reid, Ian R.; Ring, Susan M.; Sambrook, Philip N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Dennison, Elaine M.; Kemp, John P.; Danoy, Patrick; Sayers, Adrian; Wilson, Scott G.; Nethander, Maria; McCloskey, Eugene; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Eastell, Richard; Liu, Jeff; Spector, Tim; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Brommage, Robert; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Brown, Matthew A.; Ohlsson, Claes; Richards, J. Brent; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT) and bone mineral density (BMD) by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466) located in the WNT16 gene (7q31), associated with CBT (effect size of −0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2×10−9). This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg), also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (−0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3×10−12, and −0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2×10−15, respectively). Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3×10−9), with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9×10−6 and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2×10−6). We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16−/− mice had 27% (P<0.001) thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%–61% (6.5×10−13bone strength, and risk of fracture. PMID:22792071

  10. Tensile behavior of cortical bone: dependence of organic matrix material properties on bone mineral content.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Guzelsu, N

    2007-01-01

    A porous composite model is developed to analyze the tensile mechanical properties of cortical bone. The effects of microporosity (volksman's canals, osteocyte lacunae) on the mechanical properties of bone tissue are taken into account. A simple shear lag theory, wherein tensile loads are transferred between overlapped mineral platelets by shearing of the organic matrix, is used to model the reinforcement provided by mineral platelets. It is assumed that the organic matrix is elastic in tension and elastic-perfectly plastic in shear until it fails. When organic matrix shear stresses at the ends of mineral platelets reach their yield values, the stress-strain curve of bone tissue starts to deviate from linear behavior. This is referred as the microscopic yield point. At the point where the stress-strain behavior of bone shows a sharp curvature, the organic phase reaches its shear yield stress value over the entire platelet. This is referred as the macroscopic yield point. It is assumed that after macroscopic yield, mineral platelets cannot contribute to the load bearing capacity of bone and that the mechanical behavior of cortical bone tissue is determined by the organic phase only. Bone fails when the principal stress of the organic matrix is reached. By assuming that mechanical properties of the organic matrix are dependent on bone mineral content below the macroscopic yield point, the model is used to predict the entire tensile mechanical behavior of cortical bone for different mineral contents. It is found that decreased shear yield stresses and organic matrix elastic moduli are required to explain the mechanical behavior of bones with lowered mineral contents. Under these conditions, the predicted values (elastic modulus, 0.002 yield stress and strain, and ultimate stress and strain) are within 15% of experimental data.

  11. Tensile behavior of cortical bone: dependence of organic matrix material properties on bone mineral content.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Guzelsu, N

    2007-01-01

    A porous composite model is developed to analyze the tensile mechanical properties of cortical bone. The effects of microporosity (volksman's canals, osteocyte lacunae) on the mechanical properties of bone tissue are taken into account. A simple shear lag theory, wherein tensile loads are transferred between overlapped mineral platelets by shearing of the organic matrix, is used to model the reinforcement provided by mineral platelets. It is assumed that the organic matrix is elastic in tension and elastic-perfectly plastic in shear until it fails. When organic matrix shear stresses at the ends of mineral platelets reach their yield values, the stress-strain curve of bone tissue starts to deviate from linear behavior. This is referred as the microscopic yield point. At the point where the stress-strain behavior of bone shows a sharp curvature, the organic phase reaches its shear yield stress value over the entire platelet. This is referred as the macroscopic yield point. It is assumed that after macroscopic yield, mineral platelets cannot contribute to the load bearing capacity of bone and that the mechanical behavior of cortical bone tissue is determined by the organic phase only. Bone fails when the principal stress of the organic matrix is reached. By assuming that mechanical properties of the organic matrix are dependent on bone mineral content below the macroscopic yield point, the model is used to predict the entire tensile mechanical behavior of cortical bone for different mineral contents. It is found that decreased shear yield stresses and organic matrix elastic moduli are required to explain the mechanical behavior of bones with lowered mineral contents. Under these conditions, the predicted values (elastic modulus, 0.002 yield stress and strain, and ultimate stress and strain) are within 15% of experimental data. PMID:16434048

  12. Reduced Bone Density and Cortical Bone Indices in Female Adiponectin-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Naot, Dorit; Watson, Maureen; Callon, Karen E; Tuari, Donna; Musson, David S; Choi, Ally J; Sreenivasan, Dharshini; Fernandez, Justin; Tu, Pao Ting; Dickinson, Michelle; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Cornish, Jillian

    2016-09-01

    A positive association between fat and bone mass is maintained through a network of signaling molecules. Clinical studies found that the circulating levels of adiponectin, a peptide secreted from adipocytes, are inversely related to visceral fat mass and bone mineral density, and it has been suggested that adiponectin contributes to the coupling between fat and bone. Our study tested the hypothesis that adiponectin affects bone tissue by comparing the bone phenotype of wild-type and adiponectin-knockout (APN-KO) female mice between the ages of 8-37 weeks. Using a longitudinal study design, we determined body composition and bone density using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. In parallel, groups of animals were killed at different ages and bone properties were analyzed by microcomputed tomography, dynamic histomorphometry, 3-point bending test, nanoindentation, and computational modelling. APN-KO mice had reduced body fat and decreased whole-skeleton bone mineral density. Microcomputed tomography analysis identified reduced cortical area fraction and average cortical thickness in APN-KO mice in all the age groups and reduced trabecular bone volume fraction only in young APN-KO mice. There were no major differences in bone strength and material properties between the 2 groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive effect of adiponectin on bone geometry and density in our mouse model. Assuming adiponectin has similar effects in humans, the low circulating levels of adiponectin associated with increased fat mass are unlikely to contribute to the parallel increase in bone mass. Therefore, adiponectin does not appear to play a role in the coupling between fat and bone tissue. PMID:27384302

  13. Fatigue damage-fracture mechanics interaction in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Fyhrie, D P

    2002-03-01

    Fatigue loading causes accumulation of damage that may lead to the initiation of a macrocrack and result in a catastrophic failure of bone. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of fatigue damage on crack growth parameters in bovine cortical bone. Nineteen rectangular beam specimens (4 x 4 x 48 mm) were machined from bovine tibiae. The long axis of the beams was aligned with the long axis of bones. Using a four-point bending fatigue setup, ten specimens were fatigue-damaged to different levels as indicated by stiffness loss. A through-thickness notch was machined at the center of each damaged and undamaged beam. The notched specimens were then monotonically loaded beyond failure using a three-point bending protocol. Critical stress intensity factor, K(I), and work to critical load, W(Q), were significantly lower in the damaged group than in the undamaged group (p < 0.03). When the undamaged specimens were assigned a percent stiffness loss of zero and pooled with the damaged group, significant negative correlations of percent stiffness loss with K(I) (R = 0.58, p < 0.01), W(Q) (R = 0.54, p < 0.02), maximum load, P(max) (R = 0.59, p < 0.008), deflection at maximum load, Delta(max) (R = 0.48, p < 0.04), structural stiffness, S(max) (R = 0.53, p < 0.02), W(max) (R = 0.55, p < 0.02), and load at 1.4 mm deflection (a value beyond failure but without complete fracture), P(1.4) (R = 0.47, p < 0.05), were found. Post hoc analysis revealed that the average load-deflection curve from the damaged group was transformable into that from the undamaged group through a special shift on the load-deflection plane. Fatigue damage reduces bone stiffness and resistance to crack initiation, maximum load-carrying capacity, and deflection before and after failure in cortical bone. The data suggest there is a single rule that governs the overall effect of fatigue damage on the fracture behavior of cortical bone. PMID:11882466

  14. Experimental analysis of drilling process in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Shi, Yikai; Yang, Ning; Yuan, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part in orthopaedics, traumatology and bone biopsy. Prediction and control of drilling forces and torque are critical to the success of operations involving bone drilling. This paper studied the drilling force, torque and drilling process with automatic and manual drill penetrating into bovine cortical bone. The tests were performed on a drilling system which is used to drill and measure forces and torque during drilling. The effects of drilling speed, feed rate and drill bit diameter on force and torque were discussed separately. The experimental results were proven to be in accordance with the mathematic expressions introduced in this paper. The automatic drilling saved drilling time by 30-60% in the tested range and created less vibration, compared to manual drilling. The deviation between maximum and average force of the automatic drilling was 5N but 25N for manual drilling. To conclude, using the automatic method has significant advantages in control drilling force, torque and drilling process in bone drilling.

  15. Bone balance within a cortical BMU: local controls of bone resorption and formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Dunstan, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining bone volume during bone turnover by a BMU is known as bone balance. Balance is required to maintain structural integrity of the bone and is often dysregulated in disease. Consequently, understanding how a BMU controls bone balance is of considerable interest. This paper develops a methodology for identifying potential balance controls within a single cortical BMU. The theoretical framework developed offers the possibility of a directed search for biological processes compatible with the constraints of balance control. We first derive general control constraint equations and then introduce constitutive equations to identify potential control processes that link key variables that describe the state of the BMU. The paper describes specific local bone volume balance controls that may be associated with bone resorption and bone formation. Because bone resorption and formation both involve averaging over time, short-term fluctuations in the environment are removed, leaving the control systems to manage deviations in longer-term trends back towards their desired values. The length of time for averaging is much greater for bone formation than for bone resorption, which enables more filtering of variability in the bone formation environment. Remarkably, the duration for averaging of bone formation may also grow to control deviations in long-term trends of bone formation. Providing there is sufficient bone formation capacity by osteoblasts, this leads to an extraordinarily robust control mechanism that is independent of either osteoblast number or the cellular osteoid formation rate. A complex picture begins to emerge for the control of bone volume. Different control relationships may achieve the same objective, and the 'integration of information' occurring within a BMU may be interpreted as different sets of BMU control systems coming to the fore as different information is supplied to the BMU, which in turn leads to different observable BMU behaviors.

  16. Osteoprogenitor cells from bone marrow and cortical bone: understanding how the environment affects their fate.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Powell, Sebastian; Sung, David; Minardi, Silvia; Ferrari, Mauro; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ where skeletal progenitors and hematopoietic cells share and compete for space. Presumptive mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified and harvested from the bone marrow (BM-MSC) and cortical bone fragments (CBF-MSC). In this study, we demonstrate that despite the cells sharing a common ancestor, the differences in the structural properties of the resident tissues affect cell behavior and prime them to react differently to stimuli. Similarly to the bone marrow, the cortical portion of the bone contains a unique subset of cells that stains positively for the common MSC-associated markers. These cells display different multipotent differentiation capability, clonogenic expansion, and immunosuppressive potential. In particular, when compared with BM-MSC, CBF-MSC are bigger in size, show a lower proliferation rate at early passages, have a greater commitment toward the osteogenic lineage, constitutively produce nitric oxide as a mediator for bone remodeling, and more readily respond to proinflammatory cytokines. Our data suggest that the effect of the tissue's microenvironment makes the CBF-MSC a superior candidate in the development of new strategies for bone repair.

  17. The contribution of cortical and trabecular tissues to bone strength: insights from denosumab studies

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Giovanni; Napolano, Rosa; Gioia, Margherita; Moretti, Antimo; Riccio, Ilaria; Gimigliano, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Summary All materials undergo an aging process which is characterized essentially by changes of the rigidity (stiffness), of the ability to absorb the stresses (toughness) and then ultimately in the mechanical resistance (strength). Both cortical and trabecular bone undergo a continuous process of structural remodeling with the main aim to preserve their biomechanical properties. An imbalance in this process, which promotes bone resorption, results in a quantitative loss of bone tissue and in a qualitative alteration of the skeletal microarchitecture, as you can see in osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis or bone metastases. Cortical component has a prominent role on strength therefore loss of cortical bone that is prevalent in elderly may explain the higher frequency of fractures of bones composed mainly of cortical bone such as the proximal femur. Remodeling inhibition with denosumab improved structural strength without altering material properties, that can be primarily explained by the combined effects of increased trabecular and cortical bone mass, and reductions in trabecular eroded surfaces and particularly cortical porosity. Denosumab for its mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics results in a significant, early and continued increase in BMD with enhanced bone strength improving both cortical and trabecular bone. PMID:23858311

  18. Decreased cortical and increased cancellous bone in two children with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Boechat, M I; Westra, S J; Van Dop, C; Kaufman, F; Gilsanz, V; Roe, T F

    1996-01-01

    The basis for this study is two children with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) who radiographically manifested both marked subperiosteal resorption and prominent osteosclerosis. We hypothesize that the parathyroid hormone (PTH) elevation not only increased osteoclastic resorption of cortical bone but also simultaneously enhanced cancellous bone formation, giving rise to osteosclerosis. In this report, we describe the changes in trabecular and cortical bone density, as measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT), in these two young patients with severe PHPT, before and after removal of a parathyroid adenoma. Before surgery, the radiographic findings of subperiosteal resorption and osteosclerosis were associated with low cortical and high cancellous bone density values in both children. Within 1 week of surgery, both cortical and cancellous bone density values increased and serum concentrations of calcium and, to a lesser degree, phosphorus decreased due to the "hungry bone syndrome." Twelve weeks after parathyroidectomy, QCT bone density values and skeletal radiographs were normal in both patients. The findings suggest that in patients with severe PHPT, the catabolic effect of PTH on cortical bone may be associated with a simultaneous anabolic effect on cancellous bone, and PTH may cause a significant redistribution of bone mineral from cortical to cancellous bone. PMID:8544781

  19. Aging and fracture of human cortical bone and tooth dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Kurt J.; Ager, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-06-01

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms, which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms, which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms, which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force (e.g., the stress intensity) as a function of crack extension (“R-curve approach”). Here this methodology is used to study the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  20. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  1. Cortical and cancellous bone in the human femoral neck: evaluation of an interactive image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Bell, K L; Garrahan, N; Kneissel, M; Loveridge, N; Grau, E; Stanton, M; Reeve, J

    1996-11-01

    An interactive image analysis package was developed to examine whole cross-sections from the femoral neck. The package quantifies cortical width (Ct.Wi), cortical porosity (Ct.Po), and proportions of cortical, cancellous bone as a percentage of bone plus marrow area. Segmental analysis was used to quantify circumferential variations in bone distribution within the femoral cross-section. To evaluate reproducibility of data four independent operators analyzed previously prepared femoral neck sections from a 2000 BC population. Differences in total and circumferential distributions of cortical and cancellous bone with respect to gender and age of samples were demonstrated. Reproducibility was assessed using coefficients of variation (CV). Analysis of sections using a variable magnification, giving largest possible image size, rather than a set magnification reduced variation between operators for all measurements. Use of a calculated threshold significantly decreased variation between operators for the proportions of cortical and cancellous bone (p < or = 0.026). Dividing the image into 8 rather than 16 segments also improved reproducibility. There was little agreement between operators in the determination of cortical porosity. The mean CV for the other quantitative indices such as cortical width and proportions of cortical and cancellous bone ranged from 4.87% to 13.52%. The genders showed similar patterns in circumferential distribution of bone. Cortical width was significantly greater in the inferior region compared to the other areas, whereas percent cortical bone was lowest at the superior region. The center of mass (COM) for the younger age group was located anteriorly, whereas in the older samples the COM was located posteriorly of the center of area (p = 0.041). Basic data relating to cortical and cancellous bone of acceptable reproducibility in comparison with current standards in iliac histomorphometry can now be provided at modest cost in operator time and

  2. Porous poly(propylene fumarate) foam coating of orthotopic cortical bone grafts for improved osteoconduction.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kai-Uwe; Bondre, Shrikar; Hile, David D; Thompson, Benjamin M J; Wise, Donald L; Tomford, William W; Trantolo, Debra J

    2002-12-01

    A porous biodegradable scaffold coating for perforated and demineralized cortical bone allografts could maintain immediate structural recovery and subsequently allow normal healing and remodeling by promoting bony ingrowth and avoiding accelerated graft resorption. This new type of osteoconductive surface modification should improve allograft incorporation by promoting new bone growth throughout the biodegradable scaffold, hence encasing the graft with the recipient's own bone. We investigated the feasibility of augmenting orthotopically transplanted cortical bone grafts with osteoconductive biodegradable polymeric scaffold coatings. Five types of bone grafts were prepared: type I, untreated fresh-frozen cortical bone grafts (negative control); type II, perforated and partially demineralized cortical bone grafts without additional coating (positive control); type III, perforated and partially demineralized cortical bone coated with a low-porosity poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) foam; type IV, perforated and partially demineralized cortical bone coated with a medium-porosity PPF foam; and type V, perforated and partially demineralized cortical bone coated with a high-porosity PPF foam. Grafts were implanted into the rat tibial diaphysis. Fixation was achieved with an intramedullary threaded K-wire. Two sets of animals were operated on. Animals were killed in groups of eight with one set being killed 12 weeks, and the other 16 weeks, postoperatively. Radiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses of grafts showed that the amount of new bone forming around the foam-coated grafts was significantly higher than that in the type I control group (uncoated) or that in type II group (perforated and partially demineralized cortical bone grafts). Although all foam formulations appeared initially equally osteoconductive, histologic evaluation of medium-porosity PPF foam-based coatings appeared to result in a sustained response 16 weeks postoperatively. Significant

  3. Computer modelling of the structure of the cortical and trabecular bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents computer models of the structure of cortical and trabecular bone tissue. The model fragment of the cortical bone tissue was built based on a real image of the natural bone microstructure. The osteons and Haversian canals were directly taken into consideration. The Volkmann's canals and the orientation of the collagenous mineral fibers in the osteons and the surrounding matrix were considered indirectly. The model fragment of the trabecular bone tissue was built based on the data of structure of the real bone fragments, taking into account the orientation of the trabecules of bones, their length and thickness.

  4. To what extent can cortical bone millimeter-scale elasticity be predicted by a two-phase composite model with variable porosity?

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Grimal, Quentin; Parnell, William J; Raum, Kay; Gerisch, Alf; Peyrin, Françoise; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    An evidence gap exists in fully understanding and reliably modeling the variations in elastic anisotropy that are observed at the millimeter scale in human cortical bone. The porosity (pore volume fraction) is known to account for a large part, but not all, of the elasticity variations. This effect may be modeled by a two-phase micromechanical model consisting of a homogeneous matrix pervaded by cylindrical pores. Although this model has been widely used, it lacks experimental validation. The aim of the present work is to revisit experimental data (elastic coefficients, porosity) previously obtained from 21 cortical bone specimens from the femoral mid-diaphysis of 10 donors and test the validity of the model by proposing a detailed discussion of its hypotheses. This includes investigating to what extent the experimental uncertainties, pore network modeling, and matrix elastic properties influence the model's predictions. The results support the validity of the two-phase model of cortical bone which assumes that the essential source of variations of elastic properties at the millimeter-scale is the volume fraction of vascular porosity. We propose that the bulk of the remaining discrepancies between predicted stiffness coefficients and experimental data (RMSE between 6% and 9%) is in part due to experimental errors and part due to small variations of the extravascular matrix properties. More significantly, although most of the models that have been proposed for cortical bone were based on several homogenization steps and a large number of variable parameters, we show that a model with a single parameter, namely the volume fraction of vascular porosity, is a suitable representation for cortical bone. The results could provide a guide to build specimen-specific cortical bone models. This will be of interest to analyze the structure-function relationship in bone and to design bone-mimicking materials.

  5. To what extent can cortical bone millimeter-scale elasticity be predicted by a two-phase composite model with variable porosity?

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Grimal, Quentin; Parnell, William J; Raum, Kay; Gerisch, Alf; Peyrin, Françoise; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    An evidence gap exists in fully understanding and reliably modeling the variations in elastic anisotropy that are observed at the millimeter scale in human cortical bone. The porosity (pore volume fraction) is known to account for a large part, but not all, of the elasticity variations. This effect may be modeled by a two-phase micromechanical model consisting of a homogeneous matrix pervaded by cylindrical pores. Although this model has been widely used, it lacks experimental validation. The aim of the present work is to revisit experimental data (elastic coefficients, porosity) previously obtained from 21 cortical bone specimens from the femoral mid-diaphysis of 10 donors and test the validity of the model by proposing a detailed discussion of its hypotheses. This includes investigating to what extent the experimental uncertainties, pore network modeling, and matrix elastic properties influence the model's predictions. The results support the validity of the two-phase model of cortical bone which assumes that the essential source of variations of elastic properties at the millimeter-scale is the volume fraction of vascular porosity. We propose that the bulk of the remaining discrepancies between predicted stiffness coefficients and experimental data (RMSE between 6% and 9%) is in part due to experimental errors and part due to small variations of the extravascular matrix properties. More significantly, although most of the models that have been proposed for cortical bone were based on several homogenization steps and a large number of variable parameters, we show that a model with a single parameter, namely the volume fraction of vascular porosity, is a suitable representation for cortical bone. The results could provide a guide to build specimen-specific cortical bone models. This will be of interest to analyze the structure-function relationship in bone and to design bone-mimicking materials. PMID:25462527

  6. Cancellous Screws Are Biomechanically Superior to Cortical Screws in Metaphyseal Bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Boone, Christopher; Behn, Anthony W; Ledesma, Justin B; Bishop, Julius A

    2016-09-01

    Cancellous screws are designed to optimize fixation in metaphyseal bone environments; however, certain clinical situations may require the substitution of cortical screws for use in cancellous bone, such as anatomic constraints, fragment size, or available instrumentation. This study compares the biomechanical properties of commercially available cortical and cancellous screw designs in a synthetic model representing various bone densities. Commercially available, fully threaded, 4.0-mm outer-diameter cortical and cancellous screws were tested in terms of pullout strength and maximum insertion torque in standard-density and osteoporotic cancellous bone models. Pullout strength and maximum insertion torque were both found to be greater for cancellous screws than cortical screws in all synthetic densities tested. The magnitude of difference in pullout strength between cortical and cancellous screws increased with decreasing synthetic bone density. Screw displacement prior to failure and total energy absorbed during pullout strength testing were also significantly greater for cancellous screws in osteoporotic models. Stiffness was greater for cancellous screws in standard and osteoporotic models. Cancellous screws have biomechanical advantages over cortical screws when used in metaphyseal bone, implying the ability to both achieve greater compression and resist displacement at the screw-plate interface. Surgeons should preferentially use cancellous over cortical screws in metaphyseal environments where cortical bone is insufficient for fixation. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e828-e832.].

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system. PMID:9001936

  8. A method for isolating high quality RNA from mouse cortical and cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Patrick Ross, F; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2014-11-01

    The high incidence of fragility fractures in cortico-cancellous bone locations, plus the fact that individual skeletal sites exhibit different responsiveness to load and disease, emphasizes the need to document separately gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone. A further confounding factor is marrow contamination since its high cellularity may effect gene expression measurements. We isolated RNA from cortical and cancellous bone of intact mouse tibiae, and also after marrow removal by flushing or centrifugation. RNA isolated from cancellous bone by each method was sufficient for gene expression analysis. Centrifugation removed contaminating cells more efficiently than flushing, as indexed by histology and decreased expression of Icam4, a highly expressed erythroid gene. In contrast, centrifuged cortical bone had 12- and 13- fold higher expression of the bone-related genes Col1a1 and Bglap, while levels in marrow-free cancellous bone were 30- and 31-fold higher when compared to bone where marrow was left intact. Furthermore, cortical bone had higher expression of Col1a1 and Bglap than cancellous bone. Thus, RNA isolated by this novel approach can reveal site-specific changes in gene expression in cortical and cancellous bone sites. PMID:25073031

  9. Comparative cortical bone thickness between the long bones of humans and five common non-human mammal taxa.

    PubMed

    Croker, Sarah L; Reed, Warren; Donlon, Denise

    2016-03-01

    The task of identifying fragments of long bone shafts as human or non-human is difficult but necessary, for both forensic and archaeological cases, and a fast simple method is particularly useful. Previous literature suggests there may be differences in the thickness of the cortical bone between these two groups, but this has not been tested thoroughly. The aim of this study was not only to test this suggestion, but also to provide data that could be of practical assistance for future comparisons. The major limb bones (humerus, radius, femur and tibia) of 50 Caucasoid adult skeletons of known age and sex were radiographed, along with corresponding skeletal elements from sheep, pigs, cattle, large dogs and kangaroos. Measurements were taken from the radiographs at five points along the bone shaft, of shaft diameter, cortical bone thickness, and a cortical thickness index (sum of cortices divided by shaft diameter) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral orientations. Each variable for actual cortical bone thickness as well as cortical thickness indices were compared between the human group (split by sex) and each of the non-human groups in turn, using Student's t-tests. Results showed that while significant differences did exist between the human groups and many of the non-human groups, these were not all in the same direction. That is, some variables in the human groups were significantly greater than, and others were significantly less than, the corresponding variable in the non-human groups, depending on the particular non-human group, sex of the human group, or variable under comparison. This was the case for measurements of both actual cortical bone thickness and cortical thickness index. Therefore, for bone shaft fragments for which the skeletal element is unknown, the overlap in cortical bone thickness between different areas of different bones is too great to allow identification using this method alone. However, by providing extensive cortical bone

  10. Comparative cortical bone thickness between the long bones of humans and five common non-human mammal taxa.

    PubMed

    Croker, Sarah L; Reed, Warren; Donlon, Denise

    2016-03-01

    The task of identifying fragments of long bone shafts as human or non-human is difficult but necessary, for both forensic and archaeological cases, and a fast simple method is particularly useful. Previous literature suggests there may be differences in the thickness of the cortical bone between these two groups, but this has not been tested thoroughly. The aim of this study was not only to test this suggestion, but also to provide data that could be of practical assistance for future comparisons. The major limb bones (humerus, radius, femur and tibia) of 50 Caucasoid adult skeletons of known age and sex were radiographed, along with corresponding skeletal elements from sheep, pigs, cattle, large dogs and kangaroos. Measurements were taken from the radiographs at five points along the bone shaft, of shaft diameter, cortical bone thickness, and a cortical thickness index (sum of cortices divided by shaft diameter) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral orientations. Each variable for actual cortical bone thickness as well as cortical thickness indices were compared between the human group (split by sex) and each of the non-human groups in turn, using Student's t-tests. Results showed that while significant differences did exist between the human groups and many of the non-human groups, these were not all in the same direction. That is, some variables in the human groups were significantly greater than, and others were significantly less than, the corresponding variable in the non-human groups, depending on the particular non-human group, sex of the human group, or variable under comparison. This was the case for measurements of both actual cortical bone thickness and cortical thickness index. Therefore, for bone shaft fragments for which the skeletal element is unknown, the overlap in cortical bone thickness between different areas of different bones is too great to allow identification using this method alone. However, by providing extensive cortical bone

  11. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  12. Using the gradient of human cortical bone properties to determine age-related bone changes via ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Baron, Cécile

    2012-06-01

    Bone fragility depends not only on bone mass but also on bone quality (structure and material). To accurately evaluate fracture risk or propose therapeutic treatment, clinicians need a criterion, which reflects the determinants of bone strength: geometry, structure and material. In human long bone, the changes due to aging, accentuated by osteoporosis are often revealed through the trabecularization of cortical bone, i.e., increased porosity of endosteal bone inducing a thinning of the cortex. Consequently, the intracortical porosity gradient corresponding to the spatial variation in porosity across the cortical thickness is representative of loss of mass, changes in geometry (thinning) and variations in structure (porosity). This article examines the gradient of material properties and its age-related evolution as a relevant parameter to assess bone geometry, structure and material. By applying a homogenization process, cortical bone can be considered as an anisotropic functionally graded material with variations in material properties. A semi-analytical method based on the sextic Stroh formalism is proposed to solve the wave equation in an anisotropic functionally graded waveguide for two geometries, a plate and a tube, without using a multilayered model to represent the structure. This method provides an analytical solution called the matricant and explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Our findings indicate that ultrasonic guided waves are sensitive to the age-related evolution of realistic gradients in human bone properties across the cortical thickness and have their place in a multimodal clinical protocol.

  13. Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Prouteau, Stéphanie; Courteix, Daniel; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Bone responds to impact-loading activity by increasing its size and/or density. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude and modality of the bone response between cortical and trabecular bone in the forearms of tennis players. Bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ulna and radius were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 57 players (24.5 +/- 5.7 yr old), at three sites: the ultradistal region (50% trabecular bone), the mid-distal regions, and third-distal (mainly cortical bone). At the ultradistal radius, the side-to-side difference in BMD was larger than in bone area (8.4 +/- 5.2% and 4.9 +/- 4.0%, respectively, p < 0.01). In the cortical sites, the asymmetry was lower (p < 0.01) in BMD than in bone area (mid-distal radius: 4.0 +/- 4.3% vs 11.7 +/- 6.8%; third-distal radius: 5.0 +/- 4.8% vs 8.4 +/- 6.2%). The asymmetry in bone area explained 33% of the variance of the asymmetry in BMC at the ultradistal radius, 66% at the mid-distal radius, and 53% at the third-distal radius. The ulna displayed similar results. Cortical and trabecular bone seem to respond differently to mechanical loading. The first one mainly increases its size, whereas the second one preferentially increases its density.

  14. Effect of the quantity and quality of cortical bone on the failure force of a miniscrew implant.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Takano, Masamitsu; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Muguruma, Takeshi; Nakagaki, Susumu; Sakakura, Yasunori; Ochi, Morio; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the influence of the quantity and quality of cortical bone on the failure force of miniscrew implants. Twenty-six titanium alloy miniscrew implants (AbsoAnchor) 1.4mm in diameter and 5 or 7 mm long were placed in cross-sectioned maxillae (n = 6) and mandibles (n = 20) of human cadavers. Computed tomography imaging was used to estimate the cortical bone thickness and bone mineral density [total bone mineral density (TBMD, values obtained from cortical bone plus trabecular bone); cortical bone mineral density (CBMD, values obtained from only cortical bone)]. Maximum force at failure was measured in a shear test. Nanoindentation tests were performed to measure the hardness and elastic modulus of cortical bone around the miniscrew implants. The mean failure force of miniscrew implants placed in mandibles was significantly greater than that for implants in maxillae, and the bone hardness of mandibles was significantly greater than that of maxillae. The length of miniscrew implants did not influence the mean failure force in monocortical placement in the mandible. Cortical bone thickness, TBMD, CBMD, and bone hardness were significantly related to the mean failure force. CBMD was related to the mechanical properties of cortical bone. In conclusion, the quantity and quality of cortical bone greatly influenced the failure force of miniscrew implants. PMID:23041933

  15. Regional, ontogenetic, and sex-related variations in elastic properties of cortical bone in baboon mandibles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Ashley, Dennis W.; Dechow, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical features of cortical bone and their changes with growth and adaptation to function plays an important role in our ability to interpret the morphology and evolution of craniofacial skeletons. We assessed the elastic properties of cortical bone of juvenile and adult baboon mandibles using ultrasonic techniques. Results showed that, overall, cortical bone from baboon mandibles could be modeled as an orthotropic elastic solid. There were significant differences in the directions of maximum stiffness, thickness, density, and elastic stiffness among different functional areas, indicating regional adaptations. After maturity, the cortical bone becomes thicker, denser, and stiffer, but less anisotropic. There were differences in elastic properties of the corpus and ramus between male and female mandibles which are not observed in human mandibles. There were correlations between cortical thicknesses and densities, between bone elastic properties and microstructural configuration, and between the directions of maximum stiffness and bone anatomical axes in some areas. The relationships between bone extrinsic and intrinsic properties bring us insights into the integration of form and function in craniofacial skeletons and suggest that we need to consider both macroscopic form, microstructural variation, and the material properties of bone matrix when studying the functional properties and adaptive nature of the craniofacial skeleton in primates. The differences between baboon and human mandibles is at variance to the pattern of differences in crania, suggesting differences in bone adaption to varying skeletal geometries and loading regimes at both phylogenetic and ontogenetic levels. PMID:19927280

  16. Non-destructive Characterization of Microdamage in Cortical Bone using Low Field Pulsed NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nicolella, Daniel P.; Ni, Qingwen; Chan, Kwai S.

    2010-01-01

    The microcracking and damage accumulation process in human cortical bone was characterized by performing cyclic loading under four-point bending at ambient temperature. A non-destructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin (T2) relaxation technique was applied to quantify the apparent changes in bone porosity as a function of cyclic loading and prior damage accumulation, first to unloaded cortical bone to quantify the initial porosity and then to fatigued cortical bone that was subjected to cyclic loading to various levels of modulus degradation and microdamage in the form of microcracks. The NMR T2 relaxation time and amplitude data of the fatigued bone were compared against the undamaged state. The difference in the T2 relaxation time data was taken as a measure of the increase in pore size, bone porosity or microcrack density due to microdamage induced by cyclic loading. A procedure was developed to deduce the number and size distributions of microcracks formed in cortical bone. Serial sectioning of the fatigued bone showed the formation of microcracks along the cement lines or within the interstitial tissue. The results on the evolution of microdamage derived from NMR measurements were verified by independent experimental measurements of microcrack density using histological characterization techniques. The size distribution and population of the microcracks were then utilized in conjunction with an analytical model to predict the degradation of the elastic modulus of cortical bone as a function of damage accumulation. PMID:21316626

  17. Cortical Bone Porosity: What Is It, Why Is It Important, and How Can We Detect It?

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M L; Kawalilak, C E; Harrison, K; Johnston, B D; Johnston, J D

    2016-10-01

    There is growing recognition of the role of micro-architecture in osteoporotic bone loss and fragility. This trend has been driven by advances in imaging technology, which have enabled a transition from measures of mass to micro-architecture. Imaging trabecular bone has been a key research focus, but advances in resolution have also enabled the detection of cortical bone micro-architecture, particularly the network of vascular canals, commonly referred to as 'cortical porosity.' This review aims to provide an overview of what this level of porosity is, why it is important, and how it can be characterized by imaging. Moving beyond a 'trabeculocentric' view of bone loss holds the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of interventions. Furthermore, cortical porosity is intimately linked to the remodeling process, which underpins bone loss, and thus a larger potential exists to improve our fundamental understanding of bone health through imaging of both humans and animal models. PMID:27623679

  18. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    PubMed

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (<1%). These findings confirm that BV/TV and fabric anisotropy are the best determinants of trabecular bone stiffness and show, against common belief, that other

  19. Pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime in porcine cortical and cancellous bone determined by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Bendtsen, Michael; Bue, Mats; Brock, Birgitte; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    Traditionally, the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in bone have been investigated using bone biopsy specimens, but this approach suffers from considerable methodological limitations. Consequently, new methods are needed. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of microdialysis (MD) for measuring cefuroxime in bone and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. The measurements were conducted in bone wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone and in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue. As a reference, the free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1,500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences were found between the key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone. The mean ± standard error of the mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values from 0 to 5 h were 6,013 ± 1,339, 3,222 ± 1086, 2,232 ± 635, and 952 ± 290 min · μg/ml for free plasma, subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively (P < 0.01, analysis of variance). The AUC for cortical bone was also significantly different from that for cancellous bone (P = 0.04). This heterogeneous tissue distribution was also reflected in other key pharmacokinetic parameters. This study validates MD as a suitable method for measuring cefuroxime in bone. Cefuroxime penetration was impaired for all tissues, and bone may not be considered one distinct compartment.

  20. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  1. Cortical bone trajectory screws for the middle-upper thorax

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Xue, En-Xing; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To quantify the reference data concerning the morphometrics of the middle-upper thorax to guide the placement of cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screws. Eighty patients were studied on computed tomography (CT) scans. The reference anatomical parameters were measured. Next, 20 cadaveric specimens were implanted with CBT screws based on CT measurements. These specimens were then judged directly from the cadaveric vertebrae and X-ray. The maximum length of the trajectory, the maximum diameter, and the cephaled angle exhibited a slight increase trend while the transverse and sagittal angles of the pedicle tended to decrease from T3 to T8. We recommend that the width of CBT screw for middle-upper thoracic spine is 5.0 mm, the length is 25 to 35 mm. The cadaveric anatomical study revealed that 5/240 screws penetrated in the medial or lateral areas, 5/240 screws penetrated in the superior or inferior pedicle wall, and 2/240 screws did not fit into the superior endplate of the pedicle. The CBT screws are safe for the middle-upper thorax. This study provides a theoretical basis for clinical surgery. PMID:27583893

  2. Association of Jumping Mechanography-Derived Indices of Muscle Function with Tibial Cortical Bone Geometry.

    PubMed

    Verroken, Charlotte; Zmierczak, Hans-Georg; Goemaere, Stefan; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Lapauw, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Jumping mechanography has been developed to estimate maximum voluntary muscle forces. This study assessed associations of jumping mechanography-derived force and power measurements with tibial cortical bone geometry, compared to other estimates of muscle mass, size, and function. Healthy men (n = 181; 25-45 years) were recruited in a cross-sectional, population-based sibling-pair study. Muscle parameters include isokinetic peak torque of the quadriceps, DXA-derived leg lean mass, mechanography-derived peak jump force and power, and pQCT-derived mid-tibial (66 %) muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Mid-tibial cortical bone parameters were assessed by pQCT. In age, height, and weight-adjusted analyses, jump force and power correlated positively with cortical bone area, cortical thickness, and polar strength-strain index (SSIp) (β = 0.23-0.34, p ≤ 0.001 for force; β = 0.25-0.30, p ≤ 0.007 for power) and inversely with endosteal circumference adjusted for periosteal circumference (ECPC) (β = -0.16, p < 0.001 for force; β = -0.13, p = 0.007 for power). Force but not power correlated with cortical over total bone area ratio (β = 0.25, p = 0.002). Whereas leg lean mass correlated with all cortical parameters except cortical over total bone area ratio (β = 0.25-0.62, p ≤ 0.004), muscle CSA only correlated with cortical bone area, periosteal circumference, and SSIp (β = 0.21-0.26, p ≤ 0.001), and quadriceps torque showed no significant correlations with the bone parameters. Multivariate models indicated that leg lean mass was independently associated with overall bone size and strength reflected by periosteal and endosteal circumference and SSIp (β = 0.32-0.55, p ≤ 0.004), whereas jump force was independently associated with cortical bone size reflected by ECPC, cortical thickness, and cortical over total bone area ratio (β = 0.13-0.28; p ≤ 0.002). These data indicate that jumping mechanography provides relevant

  3. Obesity alters cortical and trabecular bone density and geometry in women

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, D.; Schlussel, Y.; Riedt, C. S.; Gordon, C.; Stahl, T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The goal in this study was to determine the relationship between body mass index and trabecular and cortical bone using quantitative computed tomography. A higher body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with trabecular and cortical bone parameters, and serum parathyroid hormone, and negatively associated with cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D. When BMI is greater than 35 kg/m2, adiposity affects vBMD and may explain the higher fracture risk in this population without low BMD. Introduction The influence of adult obesity on the trabecular and cortical bone, geometry, and strength has not been fully addressed. The goal in this study was to determine the relationship between body mass index and trabecular and cortical bone mass and geometry, over a wide range of body weights. Methods We examined 211 women (25–71 years; BMI 18–57 kg/m2) who were classified into three categories of BMI (kg/m2) including normal-weight (BMI<25), overweight and obese-class I (BMI 25–35) and obese-class II–III (BMI>35), and also by menopausal status. Volumetric bone mineral density (mg/cm3), trabecular, and cortical components as well as geometric characteristics at the 4%, 38%, and 66% from the distal tibia were measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and serum was analyzed for parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD). Results Higher BMI was associated with greater values of trabecular bone and cortical BMC and area and PTH (r>0.39, p<0.001), but lower cortical vBMD and 25OHD (r>−0.27, p<0.001). When controlling for lower leg muscle area, fat area was inversely associated with cortical vBMD (r=−0.16, p<0.05). Premenopausal obese women with both higher BMI and PTH had lower cortical vBMD (r<−0.40, p<0.001). While age is a predictor for most bone variables, fat mass explains more variance for vBMD, and lean mass and 25OHD explain greater variance in geometric and strength indices (p<0

  4. Evaluation of alveolar cortical bone thickness and density for orthodontic mini-implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Sofan, Aisha AA.; Altieri, Federica; Barbato, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mini-implant stability is primarily related to bone quality and quantity. This study evaluated alveolar cortical bone thickness and density differences between interradicular sites at different levels from the alveolar crest, and assessed the differences between adolescents (12-18 years of age) and adults (19-50 years of age), males and females, upper and lower arch, anterior and posterior region of jaws and buccal and oral side. Study Design: In this retrospective study, 48 Computed Tomography scans, performed for oral surgery purposes were selected from dental records of 3,223 Caucasian orthodontic patients. The SimPlant software (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium) was used to measure cortical bone thickness and density at 13 interradicular sites and four bone levels ( 2,4,6 and 8 mm ). For the statistical analysis descriptive statistics, Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used. Results: Statistically significant differences in alveolar cortical bone thickness and density between age, gender, sites and sides were found (P<0.05). The Pearson correlation coefficient demonstrated a significant linear increasing of thickness and density from crest to base of alveolar crest (P≤0.05). Conclusion. Adults show a thicker alveolar cortical bone than adolescents. Alveolar cortical bone thickness and density were greater in males than in females, in mandible than in maxilla, in the posterior region than the anterior, in oral than buccal side. There is an increase of thickness and density from crest to base of alveolar crest. Key words:Orthodontics, cortical bone thickness, cortical bone density, mini-implant, computed tomography, temporary anchorage devices. PMID:24455090

  5. Penetration of piperacillin-tazobactam into cancellous and cortical bone tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Incavo, S J; Ronchetti, P J; Choi, J H; Wu, H; Kinzig, M; Sörgel, F

    1994-01-01

    The penetration characteristics of piperacillin-tazobactam into cortical and cancellous bone tissues were investigated in 10 patients undergoing total hip replacement. The concentration ratios of piperacillin/tazobactam were 9.4 +/- 1.8 in cancellous bone tissue and 8.0 +/- 2.2 in cortical bone tissue, which were close to the 8:1 ratio of drugs administered. The mean ratios of drug concentrations in bone and plasma for cancellous and cortical tissue were 23 and 18%, respectively, for piperacillin and 26 and 22%, respectively, for tazobactam. The concentrations of tazobactam achieved are sufficient to exert anti-beta-lactamase activity and supportive of clinical trials involving bone and joint infections, including those caused by beta-lactamase-producing pathogens. PMID:8031071

  6. Hierarchical analysis and multi-scale modelling of rat cortical and trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, Ramin; Entezari, Vahid; Spörri, Guy; Villa-Camacho, Juan C.; Krigbaum, Henry; Strawich, Elsa; Graham, Lila; Rey, Christian; Chiu, Hank; Müller, Ralph; Hashemi, Hamid Nayeb; Vaziri, Ashkan; Nazarian, Ara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the hierarchical arrangement of structural properties in cortical and trabecular bone and to determine a mathematical model that accurately predicts the tissue's mechanical properties as a function of these indices. By using a variety of analytical techniques, we were able to characterize the structural and compositional properties of cortical and trabecular bones, as well as to determine the suitable mathematical model to predict the tissue's mechanical properties using a continuum micromechanics approach. Our hierarchical analysis demonstrated that the differences between cortical and trabecular bone reside mainly at the micro- and ultrastructural levels. By gaining a better appreciation of the similarities and differences between the two bone types, we would be able to provide a better assessment and understanding of their individual roles, as well as their contribution to bone health overall. PMID:25808343

  7. Predicting cortical bone adaptation to axial loading in the mouse tibia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. F.; Javaheri, B.; Pitsillides, A. A.; Shefelbine, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models can contribute to a deeper understanding of the specific stages of bone mechanobiology and the process by which bone adapts to mechanical forces. The objective of this work was to predict, with spatial accuracy, cortical bone adaptation to mechanical load, in order to better understand the mechanical cues that might be driving adaptation. The axial tibial loading model was used to trigger cortical bone adaptation in C57BL/6 mice and provide relevant biological and biomechanical information. A method for mapping cortical thickness in the mouse tibia diaphysis was developed, allowing for a thorough spatial description of where bone adaptation occurs. Poroelastic finite-element (FE) models were used to determine the structural response of the tibia upon axial loading and interstitial fluid velocity as the mechanical stimulus. FE models were coupled with mechanobiological governing equations, which accounted for non-static loads and assumed that bone responds instantly to local mechanical cues in an on–off manner. The presented formulation was able to simulate the areas of adaptation and accurately reproduce the distributions of cortical thickening observed in the experimental data with a statistically significant positive correlation (Kendall's τ rank coefficient τ = 0.51, p < 0.001). This work demonstrates that computational models can spatially predict cortical bone mechanoadaptation to a time variant stimulus. Such models could be used in the design of more efficient loading protocols and drug therapies that target the relevant physiological mechanisms. PMID:26311315

  8. Propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro. The time-reversed Lamb waves were successfully launched at 200 kHz in 18 bovine tibiae through a time reversal process of Lamb waves. The group velocities of the time-reversed Lamb waves in the bovine tibiae were measured using the axial transmission technique. They showed a significant correlation with the cortical thickness and tended to follow the theoretical group velocity of the lowest order antisymmetrical Lamb wave fairly well, consistent with the behavior of the slow guided wave in long cortical bones.

  9. Nanoindentation testing and finite element simulations of cortical bone allowing for anisotropic elastic and inelastic mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Carnelli, Davide; Lucchini, Riccardo; Ponzoni, Matteo; Contro, Roberto; Vena, Pasquale

    2011-07-01

    Anisotropy is one of the most peculiar aspects of cortical bone mechanical behaviour, and the numerical approach can be successfully used to investigate aspects of bone tissue mechanics that analytical methods solve in approximate way or do not cover. In this work, nanoindentation experimental tests and finite element simulations were employed to investigate the elastic-inelastic anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. The model allows for anisotropic elastic and post-yield behaviour of the tissue. A tension-compression mismatch and direction-dependent yield stresses are allowed for. Indentation experiments along the axial and transverse directions were simulated with the purpose to predict the indentation moduli and hardnesses along multiple orientations. Results showed that the experimental transverse-to-axial ratio of indentation moduli, equal to 0.74, is predicted with a ∼3% discrepancy regardless the post-yield material behaviour; whereas, the transverse-to-axial hardness ratio, equal to 0.86, can be correctly simulated (discrepancy ∼6% w.r.t. the experimental results) only employing an anisotropic post-elastic constitutive model. Further, direct comparison between the experimental and simulated indentation tests evidenced a good agreement in the loading branch of the indentation curves and in the peak loads for a transverse-to-axial yield stress ratio comparable to the experimentally obtained transverse-to-axial hardness ratio. In perspective, the present work results strongly support the coupling between indentation experiments and FEM simulations to get a deeper knowledge of bone tissue mechanical behaviour at the microstructural level. The present model could be used to assess the effect of variations of constitutive parameters due to age, injury, and/or disease on bone mechanical performance in the context of indentation testing. PMID:21570077

  10. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-05-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous titanium is improved with a coating of osteostatin, an osteoinductive peptide that consists of the 107-111 domain of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), and the effects of this osteostatin coating on bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SLM-produced porous titanium received an alkali-acid-heat treatment and was coated with osteostatin through soaking in a 100 nM solution for 24 h or left uncoated. Osteostatin-coated scaffolds contained ∼0.1 μg peptide/g titanium, and in vitro 81% was released within 24 h. Human periosteum-derived osteoprogenitor cells cultured on osteostatin-coated scaffolds did not induce significant changes in osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type 1 [Col1], osteocalcin [OCN], runt-related transcription factor 2 [Runx2]), or angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) gene expression; however, it resulted in an upregulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression after 24 h and a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RankL):OPG mRNA ratio. In vivo, osteostatin-coated, porous titanium implants increased bone regeneration in critical-sized cortical bone defects (p=0.005). Bone regeneration proceeded until 12 weeks, and femurs grafted with osteostatin-coated implants and uncoated implants recovered, respectively, 66% and 53% of the original femur torque strength (97±31 and 77±53 N·mm, not significant). In conclusion, the osteostatin coating improved bone regeneration of porous titanium. This effect was initiated after a short burst release and might be related to the observed in vitro upregulation of OPG gene expression by osteostatin in osteoprogenitor

  11. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-05-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous titanium is improved with a coating of osteostatin, an osteoinductive peptide that consists of the 107-111 domain of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), and the effects of this osteostatin coating on bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SLM-produced porous titanium received an alkali-acid-heat treatment and was coated with osteostatin through soaking in a 100 nM solution for 24 h or left uncoated. Osteostatin-coated scaffolds contained ∼0.1 μg peptide/g titanium, and in vitro 81% was released within 24 h. Human periosteum-derived osteoprogenitor cells cultured on osteostatin-coated scaffolds did not induce significant changes in osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type 1 [Col1], osteocalcin [OCN], runt-related transcription factor 2 [Runx2]), or angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) gene expression; however, it resulted in an upregulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression after 24 h and a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RankL):OPG mRNA ratio. In vivo, osteostatin-coated, porous titanium implants increased bone regeneration in critical-sized cortical bone defects (p=0.005). Bone regeneration proceeded until 12 weeks, and femurs grafted with osteostatin-coated implants and uncoated implants recovered, respectively, 66% and 53% of the original femur torque strength (97±31 and 77±53 N·mm, not significant). In conclusion, the osteostatin coating improved bone regeneration of porous titanium. This effect was initiated after a short burst release and might be related to the observed in vitro upregulation of OPG gene expression by osteostatin in osteoprogenitor

  12. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects. PMID:19141951

  13. Condylar subchondral formation of cortical bone in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jie; Liu, Mu-Qing; Yap, Adrian U Jin; Fu, Kai-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated subchondral formation of cortical bone in the condyles of adolescents and young adults, and looked for age-related and sex-related differences in bony formation with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography data in 1438 subjects aged between 10 and 30 years. The scans were part of the hospital's clinical protocol for patients seeking orthodontic or orthognathic treatment. No patient had signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Central images of the coronal and sagittal planes of the condyle were acquired and scored. Subchondral formation of cortical bone was seen as a high-density compact linear image, and subjects were classified into complete, partial, and no formation. Subchondral formation of cortical bone was first seen at the ages of 13-14 in boys and 12-13 in girls. Complete cortical bony formation was seen after the age of 22 years for men and 21 for women. We conclude that cortical bone begins to form around the periphery of the condyles during adolescence (12-14 years). A continuous, homogeneous, and compact cortical bony layer is established in young adults by the age of 21-22, indicating full development of the mandibular condyle. The condylar bone developed gradually and was generally fully developed a year earlier in women than men.

  14. Reduced Bone Cortical Thickness in Boys with Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hediger, Mary L.; England, Lucinda J.; Molloy, Cynthia A.; Yu, Kai F.; Manning-Courtney, Patricia; Mills, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Bone development, casein-free diet use, supplements, and medications were assessed for 75 boys with autism or autism spectrum disorder, ages 4-8 years. Second metacarpal bone cortical thickness (BCT), measured on hand-wrist radiographs, and % deviations in BCT from reference medians were derived. BCT increased with age, but % deviations evidenced…

  15. Automated cortical bone segmentation for multirow-detector CT imaging with validation and application to human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Chen, Cheng; Letuchy, Elena M.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Burns, Trudy L.; Torner, James C; Levy, Steven M.; Saha, Punam K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cortical bone supports and protects human skeletal functions and plays an important role in determining bone strength and fracture risk. Cortical bone segmentation at a peripheral site using multirow-detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is useful for in vivo assessment of bone strength and fracture risk. Major challenges for the task emerge from limited spatial resolution, low signal-to-noise ratio, presence of cortical pores, and structural complexity over the transition between trabecular and cortical bones. An automated algorithm for cortical bone segmentation at the distal tibia from in vivo MD-CT imaging is presented and its performance and application are examined. Methods: The algorithm is completed in two major steps—(1) bone filling, alignment, and region-of-interest computation and (2) segmentation of cortical bone. After the first step, the following sequence of tasks is performed to accomplish cortical bone segmentation—(1) detection of marrow space and possible pores, (2) computation of cortical bone thickness, detection of recession points, and confirmation and filling of true pores, and (3) detection of endosteal boundary and delineation of cortical bone. Effective generalizations of several digital topologic and geometric techniques are introduced and a fully automated algorithm is presented for cortical bone segmentation. Results: An accuracy of 95.1% in terms of volume of agreement with manual outlining of cortical bone was observed in human MD-CT scans, while an accuracy of 88.5% was achieved when compared with manual outlining on postregistered high resolution micro-CT imaging. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98 was obtained in cadaveric repeat scans. A pilot study was conducted to describe gender differences in cortical bone properties. This study involved 51 female and 46 male participants (age: 19–20 yr) from the Iowa Bone Development Study. Results from this pilot study suggest that, on average after adjustment for height

  16. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  17. Progressive femoral cortical and cancellous bone density loss after uncemented tapered-design stem fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Tobias E; Haeberle, Lothar; Mueller, Lars P; Kress, Alexander; Voelk, Michael; Pfander, David; Forst, Raimund; Schmidt, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Background Aseptic implant loosening and periprosthetic bone loss are major problems after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We present an in vivo method of computed tomography (CT) assisted osteodensitometry after THA that differentiates between cortical and cancellous bone density (BD) and area around the femoral component. Method Cortical and cancellous periprosthetic femoral BD (mg CaHA/mL), area (mm2) and contact area between the prothesis and cortical bone were determined prospectively in 31 patients 10 days, 1 year, and 6 years after uncemented THA (mean age at implantation: 55 years) using CT-osteodensitometry. Results 6 years postoperatively, cancellous BD had decreased by as much as 41% and cortical BD by up to 27% at the metaphyseal portion of the femur; this decrease was progressive between the 1-year and 6-year examinations. Mild cortical hypertrophy was observed along the entire length of the diaphysis. No statistically significant changes in cortical BD were observed along the diaphysis of the stem. Interpretation Periprosthetic CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the technical ability to discriminate between cortical and cancellous bone structures with respect to strain-adapted remodeling. Continuous loss of cortical and cancellous BD at the femoral metaphysis, a homeostatic cortical strain configuration, and mild cortical hypertrophy along the diaphysis suggest a diaphyseal fixation of the implanted stem. CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the potential to become an effective instrument for quality control in THA by means of in vivo determination of periprosthetic BD, which may be a causal factor in implant loosening after THA. PMID:20180716

  18. A CBCT atlas of buccal cortical bone thickness in interradicular spaces

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Patrick B.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide a road map of buccal cortical bone thickness in interradicular locations where miniscrew implants are commonly placed. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography images from 100 study quadrants (50 maxillary and 50 mandibular) were studied. Cortical bone thickness was measured at the most mesial point, the midpoint, and the most distal point in interradicular areas from the canine to the first molar in both arches at 4 mm and 6 mm from the alveolar ridge. Indicator variables of whether the cortical bone thickness was thinner than 1 mm and thicker than 1.5 mm were constructed and analyzed in a general linear mixed model. Results Buccal cortical bone was significantly thinner at a point bisecting two teeth than the bone adjacent to the teeth (P < .0001). The site with the greatest percentage of measurements <1 mm (20%) was at the midpoint bisecting the mandibular canine and the first premolar. The site with the highest percentage of measurements >1.5 mm (50%) was in the mandible adjacent to the first molar (distal to the midpoint of the second premolar and first molar) at 6 mm from the alveolar crest. Conclusion Cortical bone thickness is significantly thinner centrally between two teeth than in the areas adjacent to the roots. PMID:25760885

  19. Temperature Values Variability in Piezoelectric Implant Site Preparation: Differences between Cortical and Corticocancellous Bovine Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lamazza, Luca; Garreffa, Girolamo; Laurito, Domenica; Lollobrigida, Marco; Palmieri, Luigi; De Biase, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Various parameters can influence temperature rise and detection during implant site preparation. The aim of this study is to investigate local temperature values in cortical and corticocancellous bovine bone during early stages of piezoelectric implant site preparation. Materials and Methods. 20 osteotomies were performed using a diamond tip (IM1s, Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy) on two different types of bovine bone samples, cortical and corticocancellous, respectively. A standardized protocol was designed to provide constant working conditions. Temperatures were measured in real time at a fixed position by a fiber optic thermometer. Results. Significantly higher drilling time (154.90 sec versus 99.00 sec; p < 0.0001) and temperatures (39.26°C versus 34.73°C; p = 0.043) were observed in the cortical group compared to the corticocancellous group. A remarkable variability of results characterized the corticocancellous blocks as compared to the blocks of pure cortical bone. Conclusion. Bone samples can influence heat generation during in vitro implant site preparation. When compared to cortical bone, corticocancellous samples present more variability in temperature values. Even controlling most experimental factors, the impact of bone samples still remains one of the main causes of temperature variability. PMID:27110567

  20. Drilling in cortical bone: a finite element model and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Lughmani, Waqas A; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Ashcroft, Ian

    2015-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill-bit breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. An experimental and computational study of drilling in cortical bone has been conducted. A 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling has been developed. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with geometrical considerations. An elastic-plastic material model is used to predict the behaviour of cortical bone during drilling. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Cortical Bone Morphological and Trabecular Bone Microarchitectural Changes in the Mandible and Femoral Neck of Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Wang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Ying-Ju; Wu, Jay; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study used microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate the effects of ovariectomy on the trabecular bone microarchitecture and cortical bone morphology in the femoral neck and mandible of female rats. Materials and Methods Twelve female Wister rats were divided into two groups: the control and ovariectomized groups. The rats in the ovariectomized group received ovariectomy at 8 weeks of age; all the rats were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age, and their mandibles and femurs were removed and scanned using micro-CT. Four microstructural trabecular bone parameters were measured for the region below the first mandibular molar and the femoral neck region: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (TbTh), trabecular separation (TbSp), and trabecular number (TbN). In addition, four cortical bone parameters were measured for the femoral neck region: total cross-sectional area (TtAr), cortical area (CtAr), cortical bone area fraction (CtAr/TtAr), and cortical thickness (CtTh). The CtTh at the masseteric ridge was used to assess the cortical bone morphology in the mandible. The trabecular bone microarchitecture and cortical bone morphology in the femoral necks and mandibles of the control group were compared with those of the ovariectomized group. Furthermore, Spearman’s correlation (rs) was conducted to analyze the correlation between the osteoporosis conditions of the mandible and femoral neck. Results Regarding the trabecular bone microarchitectural parameters, the BV/TV of the trabecular bone microarchitecture in the femoral necks of the control group (61.199±11.288%, median ± interquartile range) was significantly greater than that of the ovariectomized group (40.329±5.153%). Similarly, the BV/TV of the trabecular bone microarchitecture in the mandibles of the control group (51.704±6.253%) was significantly greater than that of the ovariectomized group (38.486±9.111%). Furthermore, the TbSp of the femoral necks in the ovariectomized group

  2. Empirical angle-dependent Biot and MBA models for acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Hughes, E R; Humphrey, V F; Leighton, T G; Choi, Min Joo

    2007-01-01

    The Biot and the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) models have been found useful to understand ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone. However, neither of the models, as previously applied to cancellous bone, allows for the angular dependence of acoustic properties with direction. The present study aims to account for the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone, by introducing empirical angle-dependent input parameters, as defined for a highly oriented structure, into the Biot and the MBA models. The anisotropy of the angle-dependent Biot model is attributed to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment. The angle-dependent MBA model employs a simple empirical way of using the parametric fit for the fast and the slow wave speeds. The angle-dependent models were used to predict both the fast and slow wave velocities as a function of propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone. The predictions were compared with those of the Schoenberg model for anisotropy in cancellous bone and in vitro experimental measurements from the literature. The angle-dependent models successfully predicted the angular dependence of phase velocity of the fast wave with direction. The root-mean-square errors of the measured versus predicted fast wave velocities were 79.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 36.1 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). They also predicted the fact that the slow wave is nearly independent of propagation angle for angles about 50 degrees , but consistently underestimated the slow wave velocity with the root-mean-square errors of 187.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 240.8 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). The study indicates that the angle-dependent models reasonably replicate the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

  3. Effect of microstructure on micromechanical performance of dry cortical bone tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-12-15

    The mechanical properties of bone depend on composition and structure. Previous studies have focused on macroscopic fracture behavior of bone. In the present study, we performed microindentation studies to understand the deformation properties and microcrack-microstructure interactions of dry cortical bone. Dry cortical bone tissues from lamb femurs were tested using Vickers indentation with loads of 0.245-9.8 N. We examined the effect of bone microstructure on deformation and crack propagation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the significant effect of cortical bone microstructure on indentation deformation and microcrack propagation. The indentation deformation of the dry cortical bone was basically plastic at any applied load with a pronounced viscoelastic recovery, in particular at lower loads. More microcracks up to a length of approximately 20 {mu}m occurred when the applied load was increased. At loads of 4.9 N and higher, most microcracks were found to develop from the boundaries of haversian canals, osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi. Some microcracks propagated from the parallel direction of the longitudinal interstitial lamellae. At loads 0.45 N and lower, no visible microcracks were observed.

  4. Effect of cryo-induced microcracks on microindentation of hydrated cortical bone tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Webb, Daryl; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-08-15

    Microcracks accumulate in cortical bone tissue as a consequence of everyday cyclic loading. However, it remains unclear to what extent microdamage accumulation contributes to an increase in fracture risk. A cryo-preparation technique was applied to induce microcracks in cortical bone tissue. Microcracks with lengths up to approximately 20 {mu}m, which were initiated mainly on the boundaries of haversian canals, were observed with cryo-scanning electron microscopy. A microindentation technique was applied to study the mechanical loading effect on the microcracked hydrated bone tissue. The microindentation patterns were section-scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to understand the deformation and bone damage mechanisms made by mechanical loading. The results show that there was no significant difference with respect to microhardness between the original and microcracked hydrated cortical bone tissues (ANOVA, p > 0.05). The cryo-induced microcracks in the bone tissue were not propagated further under the mechanical loads applied. The deformation mechanism of the microcracked cortical bone tissue was plastic deformation, not brittle fracture.

  5. An approach to the histomorphological and histochemical variations of the humerus cortical bone through human ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cambra-Moo, Oscar; Nacarino Meneses, Carmen; Rodríguez Barbero, Miguel Ángel; García Gil, Orosia; Rascón Pérez, Josefina; Rello-Varona, Santiago; D'Angelo, Manuel; Campo Martín, Manuel; González Martín, Armando

    2014-01-01

    For many years, clinical and non-clinical investigations have investigated cortical bone structure in an attempt to address questions related to normal bone development, mineralisation, pathologies and even evolutionary trends in our lineage (adaptations). Research in the fields of medicine, materials science, physical anthropology, palaeontology, and even archaeobiology has contributed interesting data. However, many questions remain regarding the histomorphological and histochemical variations in human cortical bone during different stages of life. In the present work, we describe a study of long bone cortex transformations during ontogeny. We analysed cross-sections of 15 human humeri histomorphologically and histochemically from perinatal to adult age, marking and quantifying the spatial distribution of bone tissue types using GIS software and analysing the mineral composition and crystallinity of the mineralised cortex using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our results allowed us to propose that human cortical bone undergoes three main ‘events’ through ontogeny that critically change the proportions and structure of the cortex. In early development, bone is not well mineralised and proportionally presents a wide cortex that narrows through the end of childhood. Before reaching complete maturity, the bone mineral area increases, allowing the bone to nearly reach the adult size. The medullary cavity is reduced, and the mineral areas have a highly ordered crystalline structure. The last event occurs in adulthood, when the ‘oldest’ individuals present a reduced mineralised area, with increasing non-mineralised cavities (including the medullary cavity) and reduced crystalline organisation. PMID:24660964

  6. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone after its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+ 16%, +25% and + 34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  7. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone After its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-(Prostaglandin E2) induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+16%, +25% and +34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  8. Alendronate treatment alters bone tissues at multiple structural levels in healthy canine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Claire; Bale, Hrishikesh; Gludovatz, Bernd; Wat, Amy; Tang, Simon Y; Wang, Mingyue; Busse, Björn; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Schaible, Eric; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoporosis, but have been associated with atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) in the long term, which raises a critical health problem for the aging population. Several clinical studies have suggested that the occurrence of AFFs may be related to the bisphosphonate-induced changes of bone turnover, but large discrepancies in the results of these studies indicate that the salient mechanisms responsible for any loss in fracture resistance are still unclear. Here the role of bisphosphonates is examined in terms of the potential deterioration in fracture resistance resulting from both intrinsic (plasticity) and extrinsic (shielding) toughening mechanisms, which operate over a wide range of length-scales. Specifically, we compare the mechanical properties of two groups of humeri from healthy beagles, one control group comprising eight females (oral doses of saline vehicle, 1 mL/kg/day, 3 years) and one treated group comprising nine females (oral doses of alendronate used to treat osteoporosis, 0.2mg/kg/day, 3 years). Our data demonstrate treatment-specific reorganization of bone tissue identified at multiple length-scales mainly through advanced synchrotron x-ray experiments. We confirm that bisphosphonate treatments can increase non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking at molecular scales, which critically restricts plasticity associated with fibrillar sliding, and hence intrinsic toughening, at nanoscales. We also observe changes in the intracortical architecture of treated bone at microscales, with partial filling of the Haversian canals and reduction of osteon number. We hypothesize that the reduced plasticity associated with BP treatments may induce an increase in microcrack accumulation and growth under cyclic daily loadings, and potentially increase the susceptibility of cortical bone to atypical (fatigue-like) fractures.

  9. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-09-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-microm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on

  10. A comparative study of young and mature bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Manilay, Zherrina; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Sadovnikov, Ernest; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructure of young and mature bovine femur bone were investigated by optical microscopy and compression testing in the longitudinal and transverse directions for untreated, deproteinized and demineralized cases. Optical microscopy revealed that mature bone has a more established and less porous microstructure compared to young bone. Mature bone was found to be stronger in both directions for the untreated and deproteinized cases. Mature untreated bone was also found to be stiffer and less tough compared to young bone in both directions. These results are related to the increase in mineralization of mature bone and significant microstructural differences. Young bone was found to be stronger in both directions for the demineralized case, which is attributed to alterations in the collagen network with age.

  11. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  12. Ultrashort echo time magnetization transfer (UTE-MT) imaging of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric Y; Bae, Won C; Shao, Hongda; Biswas, Reni; Li, Shihong; Chen, Jun; Patil, Shantanu; Healey, Robert; D'Lima, Darryl D; Chung, Christine B; Du, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging is one way to indirectly assess pools of protons with fast transverse relaxation. However, conventional MT imaging sequences are not applicable to short T2 tissues such as cortical bone. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with TE values as low as 8 µs can detect signals from different water components in cortical bone. In this study we aim to evaluate two-dimensional UTE-MT imaging of cortical bone and its application in assessing cortical bone porosity as measured by micro-computed tomography (μCT) and biomechanical properties. In total, 38 human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia bones were sectioned to produce 122 rectangular pieces of cortical bone for quantitative UTE-MT MR imaging, μCT, and biomechanical testing. Off-resonance saturation ratios (OSRs) with a series of MT pulse frequency offsets (Δf) were calculated and compared with porosity assessed with μCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation and linear regression. A moderately strong negative correlation was observed between OSR and μCT porosity (R(2)  = 0.46-0.51), while a moderate positive correlation was observed between OSR and yield stress (R(2)  = 0.25-0.30) and failure stress (R(2)  = 0.31-0.35), and a weak positive correlation (R(2)  = 0.09-0.12) between OSR and Young's modulus at all off-resonance saturation frequencies. OSR determined with the UTE-MT sequence provides quantitative information on cortical bone and is sensitive to μCT porosity and biomechanical function. PMID:25981914

  13. Hindlimb unloading has a greater effect on cortical compared with cancellous bone in mature female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of 28 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) on the mature female rat skeleton. In vivo proximal tibia bone mineral density and geometry of HU and cage control (CC) rats were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 28. Postmortem pQCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical testing were performed on tibiae and femora. After 28 days, HU animals had significantly higher daily food consumption (+39%) and lower serum estradiol levels (-49%, P = 0.079) compared with CC. Proximal tibia bone mineral content and cortical bone area significantly declined over 28 days in HU animals (-4.0 and 4.8%, respectively), whereas total and cancellous bone mineral densities were unchanged. HU animals had lower cortical bone formation rates and mineralizing surface at tibial midshaft, whereas differences in similar properties were not detected in cancellous bone of the distal femur. These results suggest that cortical bone, rather than cancellous bone, is more prominently affected by unloading in skeletally mature retired breeder female rats.

  14. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone.

  15. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone. PMID:22109098

  16. Age-dependent fatigue behaviour of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Diab, T; Sit, S; Kim, D; Rho, J; Vashishth, D

    2005-01-01

    Despite a general understanding that bone quality contributes to skeletal fragility, very little information exits on the age-dependent fatigue behavior of human bone. In this study four-point bending fatigue tests were conducted on aging bone in conjunction with the analysis of stiffness loss and preliminary investigation of nanoindentation based measurements of local tissue stiffness and histological evaluation of resultant tensile and compressive damage to identify the damage mechanism responsible for the increase in age-related bone fragility. The results obtained show that there is an exponential decrease in fatigue life with age, and old bone exhibits different modulus degradation profiles than young bone. In addition, this study provides preliminary evidence indicating that during fatigue loading, younger bone formed diffuse damage, lost local tissue stiffness on the tensile side. Older bone, in contrast, formed linear microcracks lost local tissue stiffness on the compressive side. Thus, the propensity of aging human bone to form more linear microcracks than diffuse damage may be a significant contributor to bone quality, and age related fragility in bone.

  17. Mandibular Inferior Cortical Bone Thickness on Panoramic Radiographs in Patients using Bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sandra R.; Chen, Curtis S. K.; Leroux, Brian G.; Lee, Peggy P.; Hollender, Lars G.; Lloid, Michelle; Drew, Shane Patrick; Schubert, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect dimensional changes in the mandibular cortical bone associated with bisphosphonate (BP) use and to correlate the measurements of the cortical bone with the cumulative dose of BP therapy. Methods Mandibular inferior cortical bone thickness (MICBT) was measured under the mental foramen from panoramic radiographs of subjects using BP with and without bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) and controls. Results The highest mean MICBT was observed in BRONJ subjects 6.81 (± 1.35 mm), when compared to subjects using BP 5.44 (± 1.09 mm) and controls 4.79 (± 0.85 mm; p<0.01). The mean MICBT of BRONJ subjects was significantly higher than that of subjects using BP without BRONJ. There was a correlation between MICBT and cumulative dose of zolendronate. Conclusion The MICBT on panoramic radiograph is a potentially useful tool for the detection of dimensional changes associated with BP therapy. PMID:25864820

  18. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kathryn A.; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is “a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences.” Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  19. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa R; Mitchell, Kathryn A; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is "a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences." Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  20. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kimberly D; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    Bone's ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of "putting the 'why' back into bone architecture." Remodeling is one of two mechanisms "how" bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the "why."

  1. Weibull analysis of fracture test data on bovine cortical bone: influence of orientation.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The fracture toughness, K IC, of a cortical bone has been experimentally determined by several researchers. The variation of K IC values occurs from the variation of specimen orientation, shape, and size during the experiment. The fracture toughness of a cortical bone is governed by the severest flaw and, hence, may be analyzed using Weibull statistics. To the best of the authors' knowledge, however, no studies of this aspect have been published. The motivation of the study is the evaluation of Weibull parameters at the circumferential-longitudinal (CL) and longitudinal-circumferential (LC) directions. We hypothesized that Weibull parameters vary depending on the bone microstructure. In the present work, a two-parameter Weibull statistical model was applied to calculate the plane-strain fracture toughness of bovine femoral cortical bone obtained using specimens extracted from CL and LC directions of the bone. It was found that the Weibull modulus of fracture toughness was larger for CL specimens compared to LC specimens, but the opposite trend was seen for the characteristic fracture toughness. The reason for these trends is the microstructural and extrinsic toughening mechanism differences between CL and LC directions bone. The Weibull parameters found in this study can be applied to develop a damage-mechanics model for bone. PMID:24385985

  2. Optical phase analysis in drilled cortical porcine bones using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavera R., César G.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Flores M., J. Mauricio; Luna H., Juan M.; Briones R., Manuel de J.; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A study in porcine femoral bones with and without the presence of cortical drilling is presented. An out of plane digital holographic interferometer is used to retrieve the optical phase during the controlled compression tests. These tests try to simulate physiological deformations in postmortem healthy bones and compare their mechanical response with those having a cortical hole. The cortical drilling technique is widely used in medical procedures to fix plaques and metallic frames to a bone recovering from a fracture. Several materials and drilling techniques are used for this purpose. In this work we analyze the superficial variations of the bone when different drilling diameters are used. By means of the optical phase it is possible to recover the superficial deformation of the tissue during a controlled deformation with high resolution. This information could give a better understand about the micro structural variations of the bone instead of a bulk response. As proof of principle, several tests were performed to register the modes and ranges of the displacements for compressive loads. From these tests notorious differences are observed between both groups of bones, having less structural stiffness the drilled ones as expected. However, the bone's characteristic to absorb and adjust itself due the load is also highly affected according to the number of holes. Results from different kind of samples (undrilled and drilled) are presented and discussed in this work.

  3. Changes in canine cortical and cancellous bone mechanical properties following immobilization and remobilization with exercise.

    PubMed

    Kaneps, A J; Stover, S M; Lane, N E

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess cortical and cancellous bone responses to unilateral limb immobilization and, subsequently, to remobilization with exercise, in a young adult canine model. Right forelimbs of 14 1-2-year old mongrel dogs were immobilized in a non-weight-bearing position by a bandage for 16 weeks. Six control dogs were untreated. At 16 weeks, seven immobilized and three control dogs were euthanized. The remaining seven immobilized dogs began a recovery protocol consisting of 16 weeks of kennel confinement (without the right forelimb bandaged) followed by 16 weeks of treadmill exercise conducted three times per week. These seven dogs and three control dogs were euthanized at 48 weeks. Bone mineral density of the proximal radii was determined with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and humeral middiaphyseal cross-sectional areas were determined with computed tomography. Humeri were tested in cranio-caudal three-point bending to failure. Cancellous bone cores from the lateral humeral condyles had wet apparent density determined and were tested to failure in compression. Mechanical properties, bone density, and cross-sectional areas were compared between immobilized (right forelimb), contralateral weight bearing (left forelimb), and control forelimbs with Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc tests. At 16 weeks, bone mineral density, cortical load, yield, and stiffness as well as cancellous bone failure stress, yield stress, and modulus were significantly lower (p < 0.02) for immobilized limbs than control limbs. Immobilized limb cancellous bone mechanical properties were 28%-74% of control values, and cortical bone mechanical properties were 71%-98% of control values. After 32 weeks of remobilization, cortical and cancellous bone mechanical properties were not different from control values except that cortical bone failure stress and modulus were significantly higher (p < 0.01) between remobilized and control limbs. In summary, 16 weeks of forelimb

  4. Volumetric Cortical Bone Porosity Assessment with MR Imaging: Validation and Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bashoor-Zadeh, Mahdieh; Li, Cheng; Sun, Wenli; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method to assess volumetric cortical bone porosity in clinically practical acquisition times by measuring the signal decay at only two echo times (TEs) as part of a single three-dimensional ultrashort TE (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) examination. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA guidelines. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. A marker of cortical bone porosity called porosity index was defined as the ratio of UTE image intensities at a long and short TE, and the results were compared with biexponential analysis. Porosity index of midtibia cortical bone samples obtained from 16 donors was compared with ground-truth porosity by using micro–computed tomographic (CT) imaging and bone mineral density by peripheral quantitative CT scanner. Reproducibility of porosity index were tested in volunteers, and clinical feasibility was evaluated in postmenopausal women. Interparameter associations were assessed by using Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Bone specimen porosity index was correlated with micro-CT imaging porosity (R2 = 0.79) and pore size (R2 = 0.81); age (R2 = 0.64); peripheral quantitative CT scanner density (R2 = 0.49, negatively); and pore water fraction (R2 = 0.62) and T2* (R2 = 0.64) by biexponential analysis. The reproducibility study yielded a coefficient of variation of 2.2% and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. The study that involved postmenopausal women showed a wide range of porosity index (15%–38%). Conclusion A two-point MR imaging method to assess cortical bone porosity in humans was conceived and validated. This approach has the potential for clinical use to assess changes in cortical bone porosity that result from disease or in response to therapy. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26203710

  5. The effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness on micromotion and peri-implant bone strain distribution in an immediately loaded implant: a nonlinear finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness at the implant-placement site on micromotion (relative displacement between the implant and bone) and the peri-implant bone strain distribution under immediate-loading conditions. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of the posterior mandible with an implant was constructed. Various bone parameters were simulated, including low or high cancellous bone density, low or high crestal cortical bone density, and crestal cortical bone thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mm. Delayed- and immediate-loading conditions were simulated. A buccolingual oblique load of 200 N was applied to the top of the abutment. Results The maximum extent of micromotion was approximately 100 μm in the low-density cancellous bone models, whereas it was under 30 μm in the high-density cancellous bone models. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum micromotion in the low-density cancellous bone models. The minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone was affected by the density of the crestal cortical bone and cancellous bone to the same degree for both delayed and immediate loading. In the low-density cancellous bone models under immediate loading, the minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone decreased with an increase in crestal cortical bone thickness. Conclusions Cancellous bone density may be a critical factor for avoiding excessive micromotion in immediately loaded implants. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum extent of micromotion and peri-implant bone strain in simulations of low-density cancellous bone under immediate loading. PMID:27382504

  6. Fracture toughening mechanism of cortical bone: an experimental and numerical approach.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Liu, Yang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2011-10-01

    In this investigation, the crack propagation mechanisms contributing to the toughness of cortical bone were studied using a combination of experimental and numerical approaches. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from bovine cortical bones to achieve crack propagation in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Stable crack extension experiments were conducted to distinguish the crack growth resistance curves, and virtual multidimensional internal bond (VMIB) modeling was adopted to simulate the fracture responses. Results from experiments indicated that cortical bone exhibited rising resistance curves (R-curves) for crack extension parallel and perpendicular to the bone axis; the transverse fracture toughness was significantly larger, indicating that the fracture properties of cortical bone are substantially anisotropic. Microscopic observations showed that the toughening mechanisms in the longitudinal and transverse directions were different. When the crack grew in the transverse direction, the crack deflected significantly, and crack bifurcations were found at the crack wake, while, in the longitudinal direction, the crack was straight and uncracked ligaments were observed. Numerical simulations also revealed that the fracture resistance in the transverse direction was greater than that in the longitudinal direction.

  7. Modeling deformation-induced fluid flow in cortical bone's canalicular-lacunar system.

    PubMed

    Gururaja, S; Kim, H J; Swan, C C; Brand, R A; Lakes, R S

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential role that load-induced fluid flow plays as a mechano-transduction mechanism in bone adaptation, a lacunar-canalicular scale bone poroelasticity model is developed and implemented. The model uses micromechanics to homogenize the pericanalicular bone matrix, a system of straight circular cylinders in the bone matrix through which bone fluids can flow, as a locally anisotropic poroelastic medium. In this work, a simplified two-dimensional model of a periodic array of lacunae and their surrounding systems of canaliculi is used to quantify local fluid flow characteristics in the vicinity of a single lacuna. When the cortical bone model is loaded, microscale stress, and strain concentrations occur in the vicinity of individual lacunae and give rise to microscale spatial variations in the pore fluid pressure field. Furthermore, loading of the bone matrix containing canaliculi generates fluid pressures in the contained fluids. Consequently, loading of cortical bone induces fluid flow in the canaliculi and exchange of fluid between canaliculi and lacunae. For realistic bone morphology parameters, and a range of loading frequencies, fluid pressures and fluid-solid drag forces in the canalicular bone are computed and the associated energy dissipation in the models compared to that measured in physical in vitro experiments on human cortical bone. The proposed model indicates that deformation-induced fluid pressures in the lacunar-canalicular system have relaxation times on the order of milliseconds as opposed to the much shorter times (hundredths of milliseconds) associated with deformation-induced pressures in the Haversian system.

  8. Implant design and its effects on osseointegration over time within cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Marin, Charles; Tovar, Nick; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-08-01

    Healing chambers present at the interface between implant and bone have become a target for improving osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to compare osseointegration of several implant healing chamber configurations at early time points and regions of interest within bone using an in vivo animal femur model. Six implants, each with a different healing chamber configuration, were surgically implanted into each femur of six skeletally mature beagle dogs (n = 12 implants per dog, total n = 72). The implants were harvested at 3 and 5 weeks post-implantation, non-decalcified processed to slides, and underwent histomorphometry with measurement of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) within healing chambers at both cortical and trabecular bone sites. Microscopy demonstrated predominantly woven bone at 3 weeks and initial replacement of woven bone by lamellar bone by 5 weeks. BIC and BAFO were both significantly increased by 5 weeks (p < 0.001), and significantly higher in cortical than trabecular bone (p < 0.001). The trapezoidal healing chamber design demonstrated a higher BIC than other configurations. Overall, a strong temporal and region-specific dependence of implant osseointegration in femurs was noted. Moreover, the findings suggest that a trapezoidal healing chamber configuration may facilitate the best osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1091-1097, 2016.

  9. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Igarashi, Aiko; Okuno, Takashi; Ohta, Genrei; Kosaka, Takuya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA). The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures. PMID:27194819

  10. Prostaglandin E2 Increased Rat Cortical Bone Mass When Administered Immediately Following Ovariectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S.S.; Zeng, Qing Qiang; Li, Mei; Lin, Bai Yun

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effects of ovariectomy and the simultaneous administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on rat tibial shaft cortical bone histomorphometry, thirty-five 3 month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were either ovariectomized (OVX), or sham ovariectomy (sham-OVX). The OVX rats were divided into three groups and treated with 0, 1 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 90 days. The double fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial shaft cross sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction) of all the subjects were used for histomorphometry analysis. No differences in cross-sectional area and cortical bone area were found between sham-OVX and OVX controls, but OVX increased marrow area, intracortical porosity area and endocortical eroded perimeter. Periosteal and endocortical bone formation rates decreased with aging yet OVX prevented these changes. These OVX-induced increases in marrow area and endocortical eroded perimeter were prevented by 1 mg PGE2/kg/day treatment and added bone to periosteal and endocortical surfaces and to the marrow cavity. At the 6 mg/kg/day dose level, PGE2-treated OVX rats increased total tissue area, cortical bone area, marrow trabmular bone area, minimal cortical width and intracortical porosity area, and decreased marrow area compared to basal, sham-OVX and OVX controls. In addition, periosteal bone formation was elevated in the 6 mg PGE2/kg/day-treated OVX rats compared to OVX controls. Endocortical eroded perimeter increased from basal and sham-OVX control levels, but decreased from OVX control levels in the 6 mg PGE2/kg/day-treated OVX rats. Our study confirmed that ovariectomy does not cause osteopenia in tibial shaft cortical bone in rats, but it does stimulate endocortical bone resorption and enlarges marrow area. The new findings from the present study demonstrate that PGE2 prevents the OVX-induced increases in endocortical bone resorption and marrow area and adds additional bone to periosteal and endocortical surfaces and to marrow

  11. Curcumin reduces trabecular and cortical bone in naive and lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Yee, John A; Cao, Jay

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of curcumin on bone microstructure in non-tumor-bearing and Lewis lung carcinoma-(LLC)-bearing female C57BL/6 mice. Morphometric analysis showed that dietary supplementation with curcumin (2% or 4%) significantly reduced the bone volume to total volume ratio, connectivity density and trabecular number, and significantly increased the structure model index (an indicator of the plate- and rod-like geometry of trabecular structure) and trabecular separation in vertebral bodies compared to controls in both non-tumor-bearing and LLC-bearing mice. Similar changes in trabecular bone were observed in the femoral bone in curcumin-fed mice. Curcumin significantly reduced the cortical bone area to total area ratio and cortical thickness in femoral mid-shaft, but not in vertebral bodies, in both non-tumor-bearing and LLC-bearing mice. Curcumin feeding reduced plasma concentrations of osteocalcin and increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphate 5b in mice regardless of the presence of LLC, indicating that curcumin disrupts the balance of bone remodeling. Our results demonstrated that curcumin reduced the trabecular bone volume and cortical bone density. The skeleton is a favored site of metastasis for many types of cancers, and curcumin has been investigated in clinical trials in patients with cancer for its chemopreventive effects. Our results suggest the possibility of a combined effect of cancer-induced osteolysis and curcumin-stimulated bone loss in patients using curcumin. The assessment of bone structural changes should be considered for those who participate in curcumin clinical trials to determine its effects on skeleton health, particularly for those with advanced malignancies.

  12. Calorie restriction aggravated cortical and trabecular bone architecture in ovariectomy-induced estrogen-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyejin; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han Sung; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that calorie restriction (CR) and estrogen deficiency (ovariectomy [OVX]) would aggravate bone biomarkers and structural parameters in rats. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to sham-operated groups and fed either an ad libitum diet (SHAM-AL) or a CR diet (SHAM-CR); ovariectomy-operated groups were fed an ad libitum diet (OVX-AL) or a CR diet (OVX-CR). For 8 weeks, the OVX-AL and SHAM-AL groups were fed the same diet, whereas CR groups were fed a diet containing 50% fewer calories. Bone-related biomarkers and structural parameters (OC; deoxypyridinoline [DPD]; N-terminal telopeptide, NTx; architecture and mineralization; and microcomputed tomography images) were analyzed at the end of the experiment. The serum OC levels of calorie-restricted groups (SHAM-CR and OVX-CR) were significantly lower than those of the AL groups (SHAM-AL and OVX-AL) (P < .05). Urinary DPD levels of calorie-restricted and ovariectomized groups were higher than those of their counterparts (P < .05), whereas urinary NTx levels of calorie-restricted groups were higher than those of AL groups (P < .05). In regard to trabecular bone, the calorie-restricted and ovariectomized groups had lower values of bone volume to total volume, trabecular number, and bone mineral density, but higher values of trabecular separation than those of their counterparts (P < .05). Regarding cortical bone, the calorie-restricted groups had reduced values of bone volume, mean polar moment of inertia, and cortical thickness compared to the AL groups (P < .05). In conclusion, severe CR with or without OVX during the growth period in rats is equally detrimental to bone; CR has detrimental effects on trabecular and cortical bone; and estrogen deficiency only had an effect on trabecular bone.

  13. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-06-01

    In this study, 18 female skeletally mature sheep were randomly allocated into three groups of six each. Group 1 (glucocorticoid-1) received prednisolone treatment (0.60 mg/kg/day, five times weekly) for 7 months. Group 2 (glucocorticoid-2) received the same treatment regime followed by observation of 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as controls. All sheep received a restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus. At sacrifice, cortical bone samples from the femur midshaft of each sheep were harvested, micro-CT scanned and subjected to three-point bending and tensile strength testing. Bone collagen and mineral were determined. Cortical porosity was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Apparent density was significantly decreased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 group. Collagen content was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Bone mineral content did not differ between the groups. Neither the three-point bending mechanical properties nor the tensile mechanical properties differed significantly between the groups, while there was a trend towards decreasing bending mechanical properties in the glucocorticoid-2 group. In conclusion, 7 months of glucocorticoid treatment with malnutrition had a significant impact on the cortical microarchitecture of the sheep femur midshaft. These observed changes occurred 3 months after glucocorticoid cessation, suggesting a delayed effect of glucocorticoid on cortical bone. Thus, changes in cortical bone beyond cancellous bone might further increase fracture risk in patients treated with glucocorticoids. This model might be used as a glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic model for orthopaedic biomaterial, joint prosthesis and medical device researches.

  14. Increased Resistance during Jump Exercise Does Not Enhance Cortical Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Ramon D.; Swift, Joshua M.; Gasier, Heath G.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Hogan, Harry A.; Fluckey, James D.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study sought to elucidate the effects of a low- and high-load jump resistance exercise (RE) training protocol on cortical bone of the tibia and femur mid-diaphyses. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 6-mos-old) were randomly assigned to high-load RE (HRE; n = 16), low-load RE (LRE; n = 15) or cage control (CC; n = 11) groups. Animals in the HRE and LRE groups performed 15 sessions of jump RE for 5 weeks. Load in the HRE group was progressively increased from 80g added to a weighted vest (50 repetitions) to 410g (16 repetitions). The LRE rats completed the same protocol as the HRE group (same number of repetitions) with only a 30g vest applied. RESULTS Low- and high-load jump RE resulted in 6–11% higher cortical bone mineral content (BMC) and cortical bone area compared to controls as determined by in vivo pQCT measurements. In the femur, however, only LRE demonstrated improvements in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; +11%) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI; +20%) versus CC group. Three-point bending to failure revealed a marked increase in tibial max force (25–29%), stiffness (19–22%), and energy to max force (35–55%), and a reduction in elastic modulus (−11–14%) in both LRE and HRE compared to controls. Dynamic histomorphometry assessed at the tibia mid-diaphysis determined that both LRE and HRE resulted in 20–30% higher periosteal mineralizing surface versus CC group. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR) were significantly greater in LRE animals (27%, 39%) than in the HRE group. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that jump training with minimal loading is equally, and sometimes more, effective at augmenting cortical bone integrity compared to overload training in skeletally mature rats. PMID:24743108

  15. Effect of ibandronate on bending strength and toughness of rodent cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Savaridas, T.; Wallace, R. J.; Dawson, S.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There remains conflicting evidence regarding cortical bone strength following bisphosphonate therapy. As part of a study to assess the effects of bisphosphonate treatment on the healing of rat tibial fractures, the mechanical properties and radiological density of the uninjured contralateral tibia was assessed. Methods Skeletally mature aged rats were used. A total of 14 rats received 1µg/kg ibandronate (iban) daily and 17 rats received 1 ml 0.9% sodium chloride (control) daily. Stress at failure and toughness of the tibial diaphysis were calculated following four-point bending tests. Results Uninjured cortical bone in the iban group had a significantly greater mean (standard deviation (sd)), p < 0.001, stress at failure of 219.2 MPa (sd 45.99) compared with the control group (169.46 MPa (sd 43.32)) following only nine weeks of therapy. Despite this, the cortical bone toughness and work to failure was similar. There was no significant difference in radiological density or physical dimensions of the cortical bone. Conclusions Iban therapy increases the stress at failure of uninjured cortical bone. This has relevance when normalising the strength of repair in a limb when comparing it with the unfractured limb. However, the 20% increase in stress at failure with iban therapy needs to be interpreted with caution as there was no corresponding increase in toughness or work to failure. Further research is required in this area, especially with the increasing clinical burden of low-energy diaphyseal femoral fractures following prolonged use of bisphosphonates. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:99–104 PMID:26062566

  16. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  17. Can cone beam CT predict the hardness of interradicular cortical bone?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Orthodontic mini implants can be inserted at the interradicular site. The bone quality at this site may affect the stability and anchorage of the implant. Bone density is clinically evaluated by Hounsfield units (HU) obtained from cone beam CT (CBCT). The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between HU, microhardness and cortical bone thickness of interradicular site at various segments (anterior/posterior) and aspects (buccal/lingual) of both jaws in a swine model. Materials and methods Eight mandible and maxilla swine bones were scanned by CBCT. The HU and thickness of the above-mentioned sites were determined. Then, a Knoop microhardness test was applied and the Knoop Hardness Number was obtained (KHN). Results The mandible parameters spread over a wider range than the maxilla. The buccal aspect of the maxilla had higher HU and KHN values than the mandible. The lingual aspect of the mandible had higher KHN values than the maxilla. Posterior segments had higher HU and KHN values. The thickness of the alveolar cortical bone was greater in the maxilla than in the mandible. Correlations were found between HU and KHN for 3 of the 4 sites (anterior or posterior, buccal or lingual) of the mandible only. No correlations were found for the maxilla. Upon pooling the HU and KHN data for the whole jaw, correlation was found for the maxilla as well. Conclusions Relying on HU values as a predictor of cortical bone hardness should be considered with caution. PMID:24735746

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of Izod impact test of cortical bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    Bones can only sustain loads until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Usually, the reasons for bone fracture are traumatic falls, sports injuries, and engagement in transport or industrial accidents. A proper treatment of bones and prevention of their fracture can be supported by in-depth understanding of deformation and fracture behavior of this tissue in such dynamic events. In this paper, a combination of experimental and numerical analysis was carried out in order to comprehend the fracture behavior of cortical bone tissue. Experimental tests were performed to study the transient dynamic behavior of cortical bone tissue under impact bending loading. The variability of absorbed energy for different cortex positions and notch depths was studied using Izod impact tests. Also, Extended Finite-Element Method implemented into the commercial finite-element software Abaqus was used to simulate the crack initiation and growth processes in a cantilever beam of cortical bone exposed to impact loading using the Izod loading scheme. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. The effects of testing methods on the flexural fatigue life of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L V; Gibeling, J C; Martin, R B; Gibson, V A; Stover, S M

    1999-01-01

    A flexural model of four-point bending fatigue that has been experimentally validated for human cortical bone under load control was used to determine how load and displacement control testing affects the fatigue behavior of human cortical bone in three-point and symmetric four-point bending. Under load control, it was predicted that three-point bending produced no significant differences in fatigue life when compared to four-point bending. However, three-point bending produced less stiffness loss with increasing cycles than four-point bending. In four-point bending, displacement control was predicted to produce about one and a half orders of magnitude greater fatigue life when compared to load control. This prediction agrees with experimental observations of equine cannon bone tested in load and displacement control (Gibson et al., 1998). Displacement controlled three-point bending was found to produce approximately a 25% greater fatigue life when compared to load control. The prediction of longer fatigue life under displacement control may have clinical relevance for the repair of damaged bone. The model can also be adapted to other geometric configurations, including modeling of whole long bones, and with appropriate fatigue data, other cortical bone types.

  20. Relating age and micro-architecture with apparent-level elastic constants: a micro-finite element study of female cortical bone from the anterior femoral midshaft.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, F E; Pankaj, P; Cooper, D M L; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G; Simpson, A H R W

    2011-06-01

    Homogenized elastic properties are often assumed for macro-finite element (FE) models used in orthopaedic biomechanics. The accuracy of material property assignments may have a strong effect on the ability of these models to make accurate predictions. For cortical bone, most macro-scale FE models assume isotropic elastic material behaviour and do not include variation of material properties due to bone micro-architecture. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the variation of apparent-level (homogenized) orthotropic elastic constants of cortical bone with age and indices of bone micro-architecture. Considerable age-dependent differences in porosity were noted across the cortical thickness in previous research. The second aim of the study was to quantify the resulting differences in elastic constants between the periosteum and endosteum. Specimens were taken from the anterior femoral midshaft of 27 female donors (age 53.4 +/- 23.6 years) and micro-FE (gFE) analysis was used to derive orthotropic elastic constants. The variation of orthotropic elastic constants (Young's moduli, shear moduli, and Poisson's ratios) with various cortical bone micro-architectural indices was investigated. The ratio of canal volume to tissue volume, Ca.V/TV, analogous to porosity, was found to be the strongest predictor (r2(ave) = 0.958) of the elastic constants. Age was less predictive (r2(ave) = 0.385) than Ca.V/TV. Elastic anisotropy increased with increasing Ca.V/TV, leading to lower elastic moduli in the transverse, typically less frequently loaded, directions. Increased Ca.V/TV led to a more substantial reduction in elastic constants at the endosteal aspect than at the periosteal aspect. The results are expected to be most applicable in similar midshaft locations of long bones; specific analysis of other sites would be necessary to evaluate elastic properties elsewhere. It was concluded that Ca.V/TV was the most predictive of cortical bone elastic constants and that

  1. The effects of immobilization on cortical bone in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niklowitz, W. J.; Bunch, T. E.; Young, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rhesus and pigtail monkeys were restrained for up to seven months in a hypogravic-hypodynamic environment for the purpose of studying the osteoporotic process and its reversibility, particularly in relation to humans. In vivo bending, radiography and tomography are among the techniques that were used. Bone deterioration within one month was detectable only in histological preparation, where resorption and subsequent cavity formation were demonstrated in addition to demineralization of the remaining hard tissue. Norland bone mineral analysis showed the greatest bone demineralization in the proximal tibia (23 percent to 31 percent after six months restraint), recovery did not even necessarily occur after 15 months. The largest bone stiffness decrease was 36 to 40 percent after a six months restraint; normal bending properties but not mineral content were restored after 8-1/2 months. Contrary to earlier studies, it is concluded that bone recovery, though a lengthy process, is possible: cortical bone in the tibia required 40 months.

  2. Using smooth particle hydrodynamics to investigate femoral cortical bone remodelling at the Haversian level.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J W; Das, R; Cleary, P W; Hunter, P J; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G

    2013-01-01

    In the neck of the femur, about 70% of the strength is contributed by the cortical bone, which is the most highly stressed part of the structure and is the site where failure is almost certainly initiated. A better understanding of cortical bone remodelling mechanisms can help discern changes at this anatomical site, which are essential if an understanding of the mechanisms by which hips weaken and become vulnerable to fracture is to be gained. The aims of this study were to (i) examine a hypothesis that low strain fields arise because of subject-specific Haversian canal distributions causing bone resorption and reduced bone integrity and (ii) introduce the use of a meshless particle-based computational modelling approach SPH to capture bone remodelling features at the level of the Haversian canals. We show that bone remodelling initiated by strain at the Haversian level is highly influenced by the subject-specific pore distribution, bone density, loading and osteocyte density. SPH is shown to be effective at capturing the intricate bone pore shapes that evolved over time.

  3. Hopkinson bar techniques for the intermediate strain rate testing of bovine cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, T. J.; Paul, G.; Ismail, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamic viscoelastic properties of bone is required to understand the mechanisms of macroscopic bone fracture in humans, and other terrestrial mammals, during impact loading events (e.g. falls, vehicle accidents, etc.). While the dynamic response of bone has been studied for several decades, high-quality data remain limited, and it is only within the last decade that techniques for conducting dynamic compression tests on bone at near-constant strain rates have been developed. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of published bone data in the intermediate strain rate (ISR) range (i.e. 1–100 s−1), which represents a regime in which many dynamic bone fractures occur. In this paper, preliminary results for the dynamic compression of bovine cortical bone in the ISR regime are presented. The results are obtained using two Hopkinson-bar-related techniques, namely the conventional split Hopkinson bar arrangement incorporating a novel cone-in-tube striker design, and the recently developed wedge bar apparatus. The experimental results show a rapid transition in the strain rate sensitive behaviour of bovine cortical bone in the ISR range. Finally, a new viscoelastic model is proposed that captures the observed transition behaviour. PMID:24711493

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow-derived counterparts.

    PubMed

    Blashki, Daniel; Murphy, Matthew B; Ferrari, Mauro; Simmons, Paul J; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit-fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit-fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-)/VLA-1(+)/Thy-1(+) enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone-derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone-derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies. PMID:27579159

  5. Genetic algorithms-based inversion of multimode guided waves for cortical bone characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochud, N.; Vallet, Q.; Bala, Y.; Follet, H.; Minonzio, J.-G.; Laugier, P.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in quantitative ultrasound has exploited the multimode waveguide response of long bones. Measurements of the guided modes, along with suitable waveguide modeling, have the potential to infer strength-related factors such as stiffness (mainly determined by cortical porosity) and cortical thickness. However, the development of such model-based approaches is challenging, in particular because of the multiparametric nature of the inverse problem. Current estimation methods in the bone field rely on a number of assumptions for pairing the incomplete experimental data with the theoretical guided modes (e.g. semi-automatic selection and classification of the data). The availability of an alternative inversion scheme that is user-independent is highly desirable. Thus, this paper introduces an efficient inversion method based on genetic algorithms using multimode guided waves, in which the mode-order is kept blind. Prior to its evaluation on bone, our proposal is validated using laboratory-controlled measurements on isotropic plates and bone-mimicking phantoms. The results show that the model parameters (i.e. cortical thickness and porosity) estimated from measurements on a few ex vivo human radii are in good agreement with the reference values derived from x-ray micro-computed tomography. Further, the cortical thickness estimated from in vivo measurements at the third from the distal end of the radius is in good agreement with the values delivered by site-matched high-resolution x-ray peripheral computed tomography.

  6. Ultrasonic wave velocity measurement in small polymeric and cortical bone specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A system was refined for the determination of the bulk ultrasonic wave propagation velocity in small cortical bone specimens. Longitudinal and shear wave propagations were measured using ceramic, piezoelectric 20 and 5 MHz transducers, respectively. Results of the pulse transmission technique were refined via the measurement of the system delay time. The precision and accuracy of the system were quantified using small specimens of polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene. These polymeric materials had known acoustic properties, similarity of propagation velocities to cortical bone, and minimal sample inhomogeneity. Dependence of longitudinal and transverse specimen dimensions upon propagation times was quantified. To confirm the consistency of longitudinal wave propagation in small cortical bone specimens (< 1.0 mm), cut-down specimens were prepared from a normal rat femur. Finally, cortical samples were prepared from each of ten normal rat femora, and Young's moduli (Eii), shear moduli (Gij), and Poisson ratios (Vij) were measured. For all specimens (bone, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene), strong linear correlations (R2 > 0.997) were maintained between propagation time and distance throughout the size ranges down to less than 0.4 mm. Results for polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene were accurate to within 5 percent of reported literature values. Measurement repeatability (precision) improved with an increase in the wave transmission distance (propagating dimension). No statistically significant effect due to the transverse dimension was detected.

  7. Physical activity when young provides lifelong benefits to cortical bone size and strength in men.

    PubMed

    Warden, Stuart J; Mantila Roosa, Sara M; Kersh, Mariana E; Hurd, Andrea L; Fleisig, Glenn S; Pandy, Marcus G; Fuchs, Robyn K

    2014-04-01

    The skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads during youth but is more at risk for failure during aging. Do the skeletal benefits of physical activity during youth persist with aging? To address this question, we used a uniquely controlled cross-sectional study design in which we compared the throwing-to-nonthrowing arm differences in humeral diaphysis bone properties in professional baseball players at different stages of their careers (n = 103) with dominant-to-nondominant arm differences in controls (n = 94). Throwing-related physical activity introduced extreme loading to the humeral diaphysis and nearly doubled its strength. Once throwing activities ceased, the cortical bone mass, area, and thickness benefits of physical activity during youth were gradually lost because of greater medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. However, half of the bone size (total cross-sectional area) and one-third of the bone strength (polar moment of inertia) benefits of throwing-related physical activity during youth were maintained lifelong. In players who continued throwing during aging, some cortical bone mass and more strength benefits of the physical activity during youth were maintained as a result of less medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. These data indicate that the old adage of "use it or lose it" is not entirely applicable to the skeleton and that physical activity during youth should be encouraged for lifelong bone health, with the focus being optimization of bone size and strength rather than the current paradigm of increasing mass. The data also indicate that physical activity should be encouraged during aging to reduce skeletal structural decay.

  8. Validation of speed of sound for the assessment of cortical bone maturity.

    PubMed

    Rose, E C; Hagenmüller, M; Jonas, I E; Rahn, B A

    2005-04-01

    Bone changes its structural and physical properties during maturation. In order to validate ultrasound measurements with regard to their usefulness in assessing cortical bone maturation, speed of sound (SOS) data were compared with mechanical properties (elastic modulus, bending strength, and cortical surface hardness), density and water content. Thirty pig mandibles were selected from three different age groups. Rectangular specimens of the buccal cortical bone of the body of the mandible were prepared. SOS was measured with pulsed ultrasound at a frequency of 2 MHz in all three dimensions, bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative computed tomography, breaking strength and apparent elastic modulus in a three-point bending test to failure, water content using the lyophilization technique, and micro-indentation hardness using a modified Vickers' technique. While SOS in all three directions, BMD, surface hardness, and bending strength increased significantly (P < 0.001), bone tissue water content decreased significantly (P < 0.001) with age. Changes in the elastic modulus were not significant. Changes in SOS in the antero-posterior and apico-occlusal directions can be partly explained by BMD. In a bucco-lingual direction the increase is inadequately explained by the physical parameters investigated, and has possibly to be attributed to structural differences. Maturation of the mandible implies changes in its architectural organization, in material composition, and in the mechanical properties of cortical bone. In vitro SOS measurements reflect different structural and physical properties that are all age dependent. It thus seems feasible that age-related changes in bone maturation could be monitored by SOS measurements.

  9. Collagen and mineral deposition in rabbit cortical bone during maturation and growth: effects on tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Hanna; Harjula, Terhi; Koistinen, Arto; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Seppänen, Kari; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the composition and mechanical properties of cortical bone during maturation and growth and in adult life in the rabbit. We hypothesized that the collagen network develops earlier than the mineralized matrix. Growth was monitored, and the rabbits were euthanized at birth (newborn), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 18 months of age. The collagen network was assessed biochemically (collagen content, enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links) in specimens from the mid-diaphysis of the tibia and femur and biomechanically (tensile testing) from decalcified whole tibia specimens. The mineralized matrix was analyzed using pQCT and 3-point bend tests from intact femur specimens. The collagen content and the Young's modulus of the collagen matrix increased significantly until the rabbits were 3 months old, and thereafter remained stable. The amount of HP and LP collagen cross-links increased continuously from newborn to 18 months of age, whereas PEN cross-links increased after 6 months of age. Bone mineral density and the Young's modulus of the mineralized bone increased until the rabbits were at least 6 months old. We concluded that substantial changes take place during the normal process of development in both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of rabbit cortical bone. In cortical bone, the collagen network reaches its mature composition and mechanical strength prior to the mineralized matrix.

  10. Influence of strain rate on the mechanical behaviour in tension of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, C.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Tesio, N.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bones when subjected to tension loading in a wide range of strain-rates is fundamental to develop protection systems. The paper presents the preliminary tests on the tensile behaviour of bovine cortical bone at medium and high strain rates. Two special apparatus, both installed at the DynaMat Laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, a Hydro-Pneumatic Machine and a Modified Hopkinson Bar respectively for medium and high strain-rate tests have been used. Flat shape specimens (having 10 mm of gauge length, 5 mm width and 3 mm thickness) have been obtained from 15 bovine femurs with the same age. The paper describes the preparation techniques of the samples and the experimental results obtained. The bovine cortical bone shown a quite important strain rate dependency.

  11. Machining characteristics of the haversian and plexiform components of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Conward, Michael; Samuel, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the characteristic differences observed while machining the haversian and plexiform components of a bovine cortical femoral bone. To this end micro-milling slotting experiments are performed on both the components by varying both the cutting velocity and the feed-per-tooth values. The scale of machining is chosen specifically to ensure sensitivity to the microstructural variations in the bone. The material properties of the microstructural components and their size-scale relative to the feed-per-tooth values are seen to dictate the failure mechanisms encountered during machining. The cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear are all uniquely affected by the plexiform and haversian components of the cortical bone. In general, plexiform bone requires a higher cutting force than the haversian bone. While a higher cutting velocity can lower the surface roughness of haversian bone, it typically results in the most surface damage. The cutting force and surface roughness values for both the components show strain rate sensitivity. The tool wear is seen to be the highest while cutting parallel to the lamellar structures seen in the plexiform bone. PMID:27041629

  12. Machining characteristics of the haversian and plexiform components of bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Conward, Michael; Samuel, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the characteristic differences observed while machining the haversian and plexiform components of a bovine cortical femoral bone. To this end micro-milling slotting experiments are performed on both the components by varying both the cutting velocity and the feed-per-tooth values. The scale of machining is chosen specifically to ensure sensitivity to the microstructural variations in the bone. The material properties of the microstructural components and their size-scale relative to the feed-per-tooth values are seen to dictate the failure mechanisms encountered during machining. The cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear are all uniquely affected by the plexiform and haversian components of the cortical bone. In general, plexiform bone requires a higher cutting force than the haversian bone. While a higher cutting velocity can lower the surface roughness of haversian bone, it typically results in the most surface damage. The cutting force and surface roughness values for both the components show strain rate sensitivity. The tool wear is seen to be the highest while cutting parallel to the lamellar structures seen in the plexiform bone.

  13. Trabecular and cortical bone deficits are present in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Andrea; Schall, Joan; Stallings, Virginia A; Zemel, Babette S

    2016-09-01

    Osteopenia and increased fracture rates are well-recognized in adults with CF, but neither the specific contributions of cortical and trabecular bone deficits to bone fragility nor their presence in youth with CF are well-characterized. This study sought to characterize cortical and trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), geometry, and biomechanical competence in children with CF and determine their relationship to growth, body composition, and disease severity. Peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT) measures of total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD, cortical, muscle, and fat cross-sectional areas (CSA), periosteal and endosteal circumferences, and the polar unweighted section modulus (Zp) of the tibia were converted to age- and tibial length-adjusted Z-scores in 97 CF and 199 healthy children (aged 8-21y). Effects of body composition and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1s, FEV1) upon pQCT outcomes were determined using linear regression. Children with CF (FEV1%-predicted: 84.4+19.7) had lower weight-, height-, BMI-, and whole body lean mass (LBM)-Z and tibial length. Females with CF had lower (p<0.01) total and trabecular vBMD; cortical, muscle, and fat CSA; Zp and periosteal circumference than females in the healthy reference group. These bone differences persisted after adjustment for BMI-Z and to a great extent following adjustment for muscle CSA. Males with CF had lower (p<0.01) cortical, muscle, and fat CSA and their trabecular vBMD deficit approached significance (p=0.069). Deficits were attenuated by adjustment for BMI-Z and to a greater extent adjustment for muscle CSA-Z. The relationship between FEV1%-predicted and pQCT outcomes persisted only in males following adjustment for age and BMI-Z. The CF cohort had lower tibial muscle CSA than expected for their LBM. In this relatively healthy, young CF cohort, deficits in trabecular and multiple cortical bone parameters were present. In females, deficits were greater

  14. Differing effects of denosumab and alendronate on cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Zebaze, Roger M; Libanati, Cesar; Austin, Matthew; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Hanley, David A; Zanchetta, Jose R; Thomas, Thierry; Boutroy, Stephanie; Bogado, Cesar E; Bilezikian, John P; Seeman, Ego

    2014-02-01

    Vertebral fractures and trabecular bone loss are hallmarks of osteoporosis. However, 80% of fractures are non-vertebral and 70% of all bone loss is cortical and is produced by intracortical remodeling. The resulting cortical porosity increases bone fragility exponentially. Denosumab, a fully human anti-RANKL antibody, reduces the rate of bone remodeling more than alendronate. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of denosumab and alendronate on cortical and trabecular bone. Postmenopausal women, mean age 61years (range 50 to 70), were randomized double blind to placebo (n=82), alendronate 70mg weekly (n=82), or denosumab 60mg every 6months (n=83) for 12months. Porosity of the compact-appearing cortex (CC), outer and inner cortical transitional zones (OTZ, ITZ), and trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) of distal radius were quantified in vivo from high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans. Denosumab reduced remodeling more rapidly and completely than alendronate, reduced porosity of the three cortical regions at 6months, more so by 12months relative to baseline and controls, and 1.5- to 2-fold more so than alendronate. The respective changes at 12months were [mean (95% CI)]; CC: -1.26% (-1.61, -0.91) versus -0.48% (-0.96, 0.00), p=0.012; OTZ: -1.97% (-2.37, -1.56) versus -0.81% (-1.45, -0.17), p=0.003; and ITZ: -1.17% (-1.38, -0.97) versus -0.78% (-1.04, -0.52), p=0.021. Alendronate reduced porosity of the three cortical regions at 6months relative to baseline and controls but further decreased porosity of only the ITZ at 12months. By 12months, CC porosity was no different than baseline or controls, OTZ porosity was reduced only relative to baseline, not controls, while ITZ porosity was reduced relative to baseline and 6months, but not controls. Each treatment increased trabecular BV/TV volume similarly: 0.25% (0.19, 0.30) versus 0.19% (0.13, 0.30), p=0.208. The greater reduction in cortical porosity by denosumab may be due

  15. Time Related Changes of Mineral and Collagen and Their Roles in Cortical Bone Mechanics of Ovariectomized Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Feng, Ya-Fei; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As cortical bone has a hierarchical structure, the macroscopic bone strength may be affected by the alterations of mineral crystal and collagen, which are main components of cortical bone. Limited studies focused on the time related alterations of these two components in osteoporosis, and their contributions to bone mechanics at tissue level and whole-bone level. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the time related changes of mineral and collagen in cortical bone of ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits, and to relate these changes to cortical bone nanomechanics and macromechanics. 40 Rabbits (7-month-old) were randomly allocated into two groups (OVX and sham). OVX group received bilateral ovariectomy operation. Sham group received sham-OVX operation. Cortical bone quality of five rabbits in each group were assessed by DXA, μCT, nanoindentation, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and biomechanical tests (3-point bending of femoral midshaft) at pre-OVX, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after OVX. As time increased from pre-OVX to 8 weeks, the mineral to matrix ratio decreased with time, while both collagen crosslink ratio and crystallinity increased with time in OVX group. Elastic modulus and hardness measured by nanoindentation, whole-bone strength measured by biomechanical tests all decreased in OVX group with time. Bone material properties measured by FTIR correlated well with nano or whole-bone level mechanics. However, bone mineral density (BMD), structure, tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties did not change with age in sham group. Our study demonstrated that OVX could affect the tissue-level mechanics and bone strength of cortical bone. And this influence was attributed to the time related alterations of mineral and collagen properties, which may help us to design earlier interventions and more effective treatment strategies on osteoporosis. PMID:26046792

  16. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2012-12-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper. The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model. Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model), but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE, as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA), osteoclasts (OCA), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme, which can hardly be monitored through experiment. In conclusion, the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass. More importantly, this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated. The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies. Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  17. Elastic properties of external cortical bone in the craniofacial skeleton of the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of elastic properties and of their variation in the cortical bone of the craniofacial skeleton is indispensable for creating accurate finite-element models to explore the biomechanics and adaptation of the skull in primates. In this study, we measured elastic properties of the external cortex of the rhesus monkey craniofacial skeleton, using an ultrasonic technique. Twenty-eight cylindrical cortical specimens were removed from each of six craniofacial skeletons of adult Macaca mulatta. Thickness, density, and a set of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic velocities were measured on each specimen to allow calculation of the elastic properties in three dimensions, according to equations derived from Newton's second law and Hooke's law. The axes of maximum stiffness were determined by fitting longitudinal velocities measured along the perimeter of each cortical specimen to a sinusoidal function. Results showed significant differences in elastic properties between different functional areas of the rhesus cranium, and that many sites have a consistent orientation of maximum stiffness among specimens. Overall, the cortical bones of the rhesus monkey skull can be modeled as orthotropic in many regions, and as transversely isotropic in some regions, e.g., the supraorbital region. There are differences from human crania, suggesting that structural differences in skeletal form relate to differences in cortical material properties across species. These differences also suggest that we require more comparative data on elastic properties in primate craniofacial skeletons to explore effectively the functional significance of these differences, especially when these differences are elucidated through modeling approaches, such as finite-element modeling.

  18. Combined estimation of thickness and velocities using ultrasound guided waves: a pioneering study on in vitro cortical bone samples.

    PubMed

    Foiret, Josquin; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Chappard, Christine; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports for the first time on inverse estimation of several bone properties from guided-wave measurements in human bone samples. Previously, related approaches have focused on ultrasonic estimation of a single bone property at a time. The method is based on two steps: the multi-Lamb mode response is analyzed using the singular value decomposition signal processing method recently introduced in the field, then an identification procedure is run to find thickness and anisotropic elastic properties of the considered specimen. Prior to the measurements on bone, the method is validated on cortical bone-mimicking phantoms. The repeatability and the trueness of the estimated parameters on bone-mimicking phantoms were found around a few percent. Estimation of cortical thickness on bone samples was in good agreement with cortical thickness derived from high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography data analysis of the samples.

  19. Bone turnover markers are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and larger size of the proximal femur and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Shigdel, Rajesh; Osima, Marit; Ahmed, Luai A; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Eriksen, Erik F; Zebaze, Roger; Bjørnerem, Åshild

    2015-12-01

    Bone turnover markers (BTM) predict bone loss and fragility fracture. Although cortical porosity and cortical thinning are important determinants of bone strength, the relationship between BTM and cortical porosity has, however, remained elusive. We therefore wanted to examine the relationship of BTM with cortical porosity and risk of non-vertebral fracture. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 age-matched fracture-free controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral neck areal bone mineral density (FN aBMD), femoral subtrochanteric bone architecture, and assessed serum levels of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). Fracture cases exhibited higher PINP and CTX levels, lower FN aBMD, larger total and medullary cross-sectional area (CSA), thinner cortices, and higher cortical porosity of the femoral subtrochanter than controls (p≤0.01). Each SD increment in PINP and CTX was associated with 0.21-0.26 SD lower total volumetric BMD, 0.10-0.14 SD larger total CSA, 0.14-0.18 SD larger medullary CSA, 0.13-0.18 SD thinner cortices, and 0.27-0.33 SD higher porosity of the total cortex, compact cortex, and transitional zone (all p≤0.01). Moreover, each SD of higher PINP and CTX was associated with increased odds for fracture after adjustment for age, height, and weight (ORs 1.49; 95% CI, 1.20-1.85 and OR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49, both p<0.05). PINP, but not CTX, remained associated with fracture after accounting for FN aBMD, cortical porosity or cortical thickness (OR ranging from 1.31 to 1.39, p ranging from 0.005 to 0.028). In summary, increased BTM levels are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, larger bone size and higher odds for fracture. We infer that this is produced by increased periosteal apposition, intracortical and endocortical remodeling; and that these changes in bone architecture are predisposing to

  20. Bone turnover markers are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and larger size of the proximal femur and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Shigdel, Rajesh; Osima, Marit; Ahmed, Luai A; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Eriksen, Erik F; Zebaze, Roger; Bjørnerem, Åshild

    2015-12-01

    Bone turnover markers (BTM) predict bone loss and fragility fracture. Although cortical porosity and cortical thinning are important determinants of bone strength, the relationship between BTM and cortical porosity has, however, remained elusive. We therefore wanted to examine the relationship of BTM with cortical porosity and risk of non-vertebral fracture. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 age-matched fracture-free controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral neck areal bone mineral density (FN aBMD), femoral subtrochanteric bone architecture, and assessed serum levels of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). Fracture cases exhibited higher PINP and CTX levels, lower FN aBMD, larger total and medullary cross-sectional area (CSA), thinner cortices, and higher cortical porosity of the femoral subtrochanter than controls (p≤0.01). Each SD increment in PINP and CTX was associated with 0.21-0.26 SD lower total volumetric BMD, 0.10-0.14 SD larger total CSA, 0.14-0.18 SD larger medullary CSA, 0.13-0.18 SD thinner cortices, and 0.27-0.33 SD higher porosity of the total cortex, compact cortex, and transitional zone (all p≤0.01). Moreover, each SD of higher PINP and CTX was associated with increased odds for fracture after adjustment for age, height, and weight (ORs 1.49; 95% CI, 1.20-1.85 and OR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49, both p<0.05). PINP, but not CTX, remained associated with fracture after accounting for FN aBMD, cortical porosity or cortical thickness (OR ranging from 1.31 to 1.39, p ranging from 0.005 to 0.028). In summary, increased BTM levels are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, larger bone size and higher odds for fracture. We infer that this is produced by increased periosteal apposition, intracortical and endocortical remodeling; and that these changes in bone architecture are predisposing to

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Blashki, Daniel; Murphy, Matthew B; Ferrari, Mauro; Simmons, Paul J; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies. PMID:27579159

  2. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A J; Bandstra, Eric R; Travis, Neil D; Nelson, Gregory A; Bourland, J Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J; Gridley, Daila S; Willey, Jeffrey S; Bateman, Ted A

    2008-01-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29-39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation. PMID:19122806

  3. Precision of cortical bone reconstruction based on 3D CT scans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Ye, Ming; Liu, Zhongtang; Wang, Chengtao

    2009-04-01

    The precision and accuracy of human cortical bone reconstruction using 3D CT scans was evaluated using machined bone segments. Both linear and angular errors were measured. Cadaver adult femoral and tibial cortical bone segments were obtained and machined in six orthogonal planes with a precision milling machine. CT scans were then obtained and the bone segments were reconstructed as digital replicas. Dimensional and angular measurements errors were evaluated for the machined bone segments and the results were compared with known dimensions based on milling machine settings to calculate errors due to scanning and model reconstruction. The model dimensional error in the coronal, sagittal and axial directions had a mean of 0.21 mm, with standard a deviation of 0.12 mm and a maximum error of 0.47 mm. The mean percent error was 0.74% and the maximum percent error was 1.9%. The angular error of models in the coronal, sagittal and axial directions was calculated, yielding a mean of 0.47 degrees with a standard deviation of 0.37 degrees and a maximum of 1.33 degrees. The error in the cross-sectional axial direction had a mean of 0.54 mm with a maximum error of 0.83 mm, depending on the slice interval. The main error source was of the image processing, which was about 70% of the total error. We found that machining cortical bone segments prior to CT scanning is an effective method for accuracy evaluation of CT-based bone reconstruction. This method can provide a reference for assessing the sensitivity, reliability and accuracy of CT-based applications in the study of movement, finite element modeling, and prosthesis construction.

  4. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  5. Cortical bone tissue resists fatigue fracture by deceleration and arrest of microcrack growth.

    PubMed

    Akkus, O; Rimnac, C M

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge of kinetics of fatigue crack growth of microcracks is important so as to understand the dynamics of bone adaptation, remodeling, and the etiology of fatigue-based failures of cortical bone tissue. In this respect, theoretical models (Taylor, J. Biomech., 31 (1998) 587-592; Taylor and Prendergast, Proc. Instn. Mech. Engrs. Part H 211 (1997) 369-375) of microcrack growth in cortical bone have predicted a decreasing microcrack growth rate with increasing microcrack length. However, these predictions have not been observed directly. This study investigated microcrack growth and arrest through observations of surface microcracks during cyclic loading (R=0.1, 50-80MPa) of human femoral cortical bone (male, n=4, age range: 37-40yr) utilizing a video microscopy system. The change in crack length and orientation of eight surface microcracks were measured with the number of fatigue cycles from four specimens. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in generally less than 10,000 cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate of all microcracks decreased with increasing crack length following initial identification, consistent with theoretical predictions. The growth rate of the microcracks was observed to be in the range of 5x10(-5) to 5x10(-7)mmcycle(-1). In addition, many of the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond 150 microm and a cyclic stress intensity factor of 0.5MNm(-3/2). The results of this study suggest that cortical bone tissue may resist fracture at the microscale by deceleration of fatigue crack growth and arrest of microcracks.

  6. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pratt, I V; Belev, G; Zhu, N; Chapman, L D; Cooper, D M L

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling. PMID:25489926

  7. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  8. MORPHOLOGY, LOCALIZATION AND ACCUMULATION OF IN VIVO MICRODAMAGE IN HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Tamim; Vashishth, Deepak

    2007-01-01

    In vivo, microdamage occurs in the form of linear microcracks and diffuse damage. However, it is unknown whether the age-related changes in bone quality predispose bone to form one type of damage morphology over the other during in vivo loading. In this study, histological and histomorphometrical analyses were conducted on transverse cross sections, obtained from the tibiae of aging human bone (age 19 to 89), to investigate the in vivo accumulation and localization of damage morphologies. The results demonstrate that old donor bone (83 ± 3 years) contains more linear microcracks than younger donor bone in the cortices predominantly subjected to compressive (p < 0.01) and tensile loading (p < 0.01). In contrast, young donor bone (40 ± 10 years) contains more diffuse damage than older donor bone in the cortex predominantly subjected to tensile loading (p < 0.01). The formation of damage morphology showed no correlation with bone geometry parameters and exhibited distinct preferences with bone microstructure. Linear microcracks formed in the interstitial bone (p < 0.01) and were either trapped or arrested by the microstructural interfaces (cement line and lamellar interface) (p < 0.05). Areas of diffuse damage, however, were preferentially associated with secondary osteonal bone (p < 0.01) and had no relationship with the microstructural interfaces (p < 0.01). Based upon these findings, we conclude that age-related changes in bone microstructure, but not bone geometry, play a key role in the propensity of old donors to form linear microcrack over diffuse damage under in vivo loading conditions. PMID:17097933

  9. Solid-State Quantitative (1)H and (31)P MRI of Cortical Bone in Humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a pivotal role for assessment of the musculoskeletal system. It is currently the clinical modality of choice for evaluation of soft tissues including cartilage, ligaments, tendons, muscle, and bone marrow. By comparison, the study of calcified tissue by MRI is still in its infancy. In this article, we review the potential of the modality for assessment of cortical bone properties known to be affected in degenerative bone disease, with focus on parameters related to matrix and mineral densities, and porosity, by means of emerging solid-state (1)H and (31)P MRI techniques. In contrast to soft tissues, the MRI signal in calcified tissues has very short lifetime, on the order of 100 μs to a few milliseconds, demanding customized imaging approaches that allow capture of the signal almost immediately after excitation. The technologies described are suited for quantitatively imaging human cortical bone in specimens as well as in vivo in patients on standard clinical imagers, yielding either concentrations in absolute units when measured against a reference standard, or more simply, in the form of surrogate biomarkers. The two major water fractions in cortical bone are those of collagen-bound and pore water occurring at an approximately 3:1 ratio. Collagen-bound water density provides a direct quantitative measure of osteoid density. While at an earlier stage of development, quantification of mineral phosphorus by (31)P MRI yields mineral density and, together with knowledge of matrix density, should allow quantification of the degree of bone mineralization. PMID:27048472

  10. Stochastic multiscale modelling of cortical bone elasticity based on high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Vittorio; Gagliardi, Davide; Desceliers, Christophe; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Peyrin, Françoise; Haïat, Guillaume; Naili, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment of bone quality requires predictive methods which could probe bone microstructure and provide information on bone mechanical properties. Multiscale modelling and simulation represent a fast and powerful way to predict bone mechanical properties based on experimental information on bone microstructure as obtained through X-ray-based methods. However, technical limitations of experimental devices used to inspect bone microstructure may produce blurry data, especially in in vivo conditions. Uncertainties affecting the experimental data (input) may question the reliability of the results predicted by the model (output). Since input data are uncertain, deterministic approaches are limited and new modelling paradigms are required. In this paper, a novel stochastic multiscale model is developed to estimate the elastic properties of bone while taking into account uncertainties on bone composition. Effective elastic properties of cortical bone tissue were computed using a multiscale model based on continuum micromechanics. Volume fractions of bone components (collagen, mineral, and water) were considered as random variables whose probabilistic description was built using the maximum entropy principle. The relevance of this approach was proved by analysing a human bone sample taken from the inferior femoral neck. The sample was imaged using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. 3-D distributions of Haversian porosity and tissue mineral density extracted from these images supplied the experimental information needed to build the stochastic models of the volume fractions. Thus, the stochastic multiscale model provided reliable statistical information (such as mean values and confidence intervals) on bone elastic properties at the tissue scale. Moreover, the existence of a simpler "nominal model", accounting for the main features of the stochastic model, was investigated. It was shown that such a model does exist, and its relevance

  11. Pore network microarchitecture influences human cortical bone elasticity during growth and aging.

    PubMed

    Bala, Yohann; Lefèvre, Emmanuelle; Roux, Jean-Paul; Baron, Cécile; Lasaygues, Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Follet, Hélène

    2016-10-01

    Cortical porosity is a major determinant of bone strength. Haversian and Volkmann׳s canals are׳seen' as pores in 2D cross-section but fashion a dynamic network of interconnected channels in 3D, a quantifiable footprint of intracortical remodeling. Given the changes in bone remodeling across life, we hypothesized that the 3D microarchitecture of the cortical pore network influences its stiffness during growth and ageing. Cubes of cortical bone of 2 mm side-length were harvested in the distal 1/3 of the fibula in 13 growing children (mean age±SD: 13±4 yrs) and 16 adults (age: 75±13 yrs). The cubes were imaged using desktop micro-CT (8.14µm isotropic voxel size). Pores were segmented as a solid to assess pore volume fraction, number, diameter, separation, connectivity and structure model index. Elastic coefficients were derived from measurements of ultrasonic bulk compression and shear wave velocities and apparent mass density. The pore volume fraction did not significantly differ between children and adults but originates from different microarchitectural patterns. Compared to children, adults had 42% (p=0.033) higher pore number that were more connected (Connective Density: +205%, p=0.001) with a 18% (p=0.007) lower pore separation. After accounting for the contribution of pore volume fraction, axial elasticity in traction-compression mode was significantly correlated with better connectivity in growing children and with pore separation among adults. The changes in intracortical remodeling across life alter the distribution, size and connectedness of the channels from which cortical void fraction originates. These alterations in pore network microarchitecture participate in changes in compressive and shear mechanical behavior, partly in a porosity-independent manner. The assessment of pore volume fraction (i.e., porosity) provides only a limited understanding of the role of cortical void volume fraction in its mechanical properties. PMID:27389322

  12. Experimental investigations of forces and torque in conventional and ultrasonically-assisted drilling of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Alam, K; Mitrofanov, A V; Silberschmidt, V V

    2011-03-01

    Bone drilling is widely used in orthopaedics and surgery; it is a technically demanding surgical procedure. Recent technological improvements in this area are focused on efforts to reduce forces in bone drilling. This study focuses on forces and a torque required for conventional and ultrasonically-assisted tool penetration into fresh bovine cortical bone. Drilling tests were performed with two drilling techniques, and the influence of drilling speed, feed rate and parameters of ultrasonic vibration on the forces and torque was studied. Ultrasonically-assisted drilling (UAD) was found to reduce a drilling thrust force and torque compared to conventional drilling (CD). The mechanism behind lower levels of forces and torque was explored, using high-speed filming of a drill-bone interaction zone, and was linked to the chip shape and character of its formation. It is expected that UAD will produce holes with minimal effort and avoid unnecessary damage and accompanying pain during the incision. PMID:21044856

  13. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity. PMID:26530337

  14. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity.

  15. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity. PMID:26530337

  16. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  17. Experimental multiscale measurements for the mechanical identification of a cortical bone by digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Manh-Tu; Allain, Jean-Marc; Gharbi, Hakim; Desceliers, Christophe; Soize, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The implementation of the experimental methodology by optical measurements of mechanical fields, the development of a test bench, the specimen preparation, the experimental measurements, and the digital image correlation (DIC) method, have already been the object of research in the context of biological materials. Nevertheless, in the framework of the experimental identification of a mesoscopic stochastic model of the random apparent elasticity field, measurements of one specimen is required at both the macroscopic scale and the mesoscopic scale under one single loading. The nature of the cortical bone induces some difficulties, as no single speckled pattern technique is available for simultaneously obtaining the displacement at the macroscopic scale and at the mesoscopic scale. In this paper, we present a multiscale experimental methodology based on (i) an experimental protocol for one specimen of a cortical bone, (ii) its measuring bench, (iii) optical field measurements by DIC method, (iv) the experimental results, and (v) the multiscale experimental identification by solving a statistical inverse problem.

  18. Design and validation of bending test method for characterization of miniature pediatric cortical bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne I; Jameson, John; Harris, Gerald

    2013-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder of bone fragility; however, the effects of this disorder on bone material properties are not well understood. No study has yet measured bone material strength in humans with osteogenesis imperfecta. Small bone specimens are often extracted during routine fracture surgeries in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. These specimens could provide valuable insight into the effects of osteogenesis imperfecta on bone material strength; however, their small size poses a challenge to their mechanical characterization. In this study, a validated miniature three-point bending test is described that enables measurement of the flexural material properties of pediatric cortical osteotomy specimens as small as 5 mm in length. This method was validated extensively using bovine bone, and the effect of span/depth aspect ratio (5 vs 6) on the measured flexural properties was examined. The method provided reasonable results for both Young's modulus and flexural strength in bovine bone. With a span/depth ratio of 6, the median longitudinal modulus and flexural strength results were 16.1 (range: 14.4-19.3)GPa and 251 (range: 219-293)MPa, respectively. Finally, the pilot results from two osteotomy specimens from children with osteogenesis imperfecta are presented. These results provide the first measures of bone material strength in this patient population.

  19. Quantifying trabecular bone material anisotropy and orientation using low resolution clinical CT images: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, S Majid; Cooper, David M L; Johnston, James D

    2016-09-01

    Accounting for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation can improve the accuracy of quantitative computed tomography-based finite element (FE) modeling of bone. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of quantifying trabecular material anisotropy and orientation using clinical computed tomography (CT). Forty four cubic volumes of interest were obtained from micro-CT images of the human radius. Micro-FE modeling was performed on the samples to obtain orthotropic stiffness entries as well as trabecular orientation. Simulated computed tomography images (0.32, 0.37, and 0.5mm isotropic voxel sizes) were created by resampling micro-CT images with added image noise. The gray-level structure tensor was used to derive fabric eigenvalues and eigenvectors in simulated CT images. For 'best case' comparison purposes, Mean Intercept Length was used to define fabric from micro-CT images. Regression was used in combination with eigenvalues, imaged density and FE to inversely derive the constants used in Cowin and Zysset-Curnier fabric-elasticity equations, and for comparing image derived fabric-elasticity stiffness entries to those obtained using micro-FE. Image derived eigenvectors (which indicated trabecular orientation) were then compared to orientation derived using micro-FE. When using clinically available voxel sizes, gray-level structure tensor derived fabric combined with Cowin's equations was able to explain 94-97% of the variance in orthotropic stiffness entries while Zysset-Curnier equations explained 82-88% of the variance in stiffness. Image derived orientation deviated by 4.4-10.8° from micro-FE derived orientation. Our results indicate potential to account for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation in subject-specific finite element modeling of bone using clinically available CT. PMID:27372175

  20. Quantifying trabecular bone material anisotropy and orientation using low resolution clinical CT images: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, S Majid; Cooper, David M L; Johnston, James D

    2016-09-01

    Accounting for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation can improve the accuracy of quantitative computed tomography-based finite element (FE) modeling of bone. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of quantifying trabecular material anisotropy and orientation using clinical computed tomography (CT). Forty four cubic volumes of interest were obtained from micro-CT images of the human radius. Micro-FE modeling was performed on the samples to obtain orthotropic stiffness entries as well as trabecular orientation. Simulated computed tomography images (0.32, 0.37, and 0.5mm isotropic voxel sizes) were created by resampling micro-CT images with added image noise. The gray-level structure tensor was used to derive fabric eigenvalues and eigenvectors in simulated CT images. For 'best case' comparison purposes, Mean Intercept Length was used to define fabric from micro-CT images. Regression was used in combination with eigenvalues, imaged density and FE to inversely derive the constants used in Cowin and Zysset-Curnier fabric-elasticity equations, and for comparing image derived fabric-elasticity stiffness entries to those obtained using micro-FE. Image derived eigenvectors (which indicated trabecular orientation) were then compared to orientation derived using micro-FE. When using clinically available voxel sizes, gray-level structure tensor derived fabric combined with Cowin's equations was able to explain 94-97% of the variance in orthotropic stiffness entries while Zysset-Curnier equations explained 82-88% of the variance in stiffness. Image derived orientation deviated by 4.4-10.8° from micro-FE derived orientation. Our results indicate potential to account for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation in subject-specific finite element modeling of bone using clinically available CT.

  1. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using cortical bone pins in combination with leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF).

    PubMed

    Toffler, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Two of the fundamental requisites for guided bone regeneration (GBR) are space maintenance and primary soft-tissue closure. Allogeneic cortical bone pins measuring 2 mm in diameter in customized lengths can protect surrounding graft materials, support bioresorbable membrane barriers, and resist wound compression from the overlying soft tissues. In addition, a second-generation platelet concentrate, leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF), may be incorporated into the augmentation procedure to provide multiple growth factors, accelerate wound healing, and aid in the maintenance of primary closure over the grafted materials. Highlighting two case reports, this article features a GBR technique that uses bone pins in combination with L-PRF membranes to provide both horizontal and vertical ridge augmentation at severely compromised implant sites.

  2. Tensile material properties of human tibia cortical bone effects of orientation and loading rate.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Manoogian, Sarah J; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify effects of both specimen orientation and loading rate on the tensile material properties for human tibia cortical bone in a controlled study. This study presents 25 human tibia cortical bone coupon tests obtained from the mid-diaphysis of two fresh frozen male human cadavers: 11 axial and 14 lateral. The primary component for the tension coupon testing was a high rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor. The specimen were loaded at a constant strain rate of approximately 0.05 strains/s, 0.5 strains/s, or 5.0 strains/s. Axial specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress and ultimate strain compared to lateral specimens for all loading rates, and a significantly larger modulus for low and high loading rates. This finding illustrates the anisentropic behavior of bone over a range of strain rates, which is attributed to the microstructure of the bone and the osteon orientation along the long axis of the bone. With respect to loading rate, both axial and lateral specimens showed significant increases in the modulus and significant decreases in ultimate strain with increased loading rate. Although not significant, axial specimens showed another traditional viscoelastic trend, with ultimate stress increasing with increased loading rate. PMID:19141952

  3. The Effect of Osteoporosis Treatments on Fatigue Properties of Cortical Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Garry R.; Chen, Julia T.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; MacLeay, Jennifer; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Boskey, Adele L.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for treatment of osteoporosis. Long-term use of bisphosphonates has been correlated to atypical femoral fractures (AFF). AFFs arise from fatigue damage to bone tissue that cannot be repaired due to pharmacologic treatments. Despite fatigue being the primary damage mechanism of AFFs, the effects of osteoporosis treatments on fatigue properties of cortical bone are unknown. To examine if fatigue-life differences occur in bone tissue after different pharmacologic treatments for osteoporosis, we tested bone tissue from the femurs of sheep given a metabolic acidosis diet to induce osteoporosis, followed by treatment with a selective estrogen reception modulator (raloxifene), a bisphosphonate (alendronate or zoledronate), or parathyroid hormone (teriparatide, PTH). Beams of cortical bone tissue were created and tested in four-point bending fatigue to failure. Tissues treated with alendronate had reduced fatigue life and less modulus loss at failure compared to other treatments, while tissue treated with PTH had a prolonged fatigue life. No loss of fatigue life occurred with zoledronate treatment despite its greater binding affinity and potency compared to alendronate. Tissue mineralization measured by microCT did not explain the differences seen in fatigue behavior. Increased fatigue life with PTH suggests that current treatment methods for AFF could have beneficial effects for restoring fatigue life. These results indicate that fatigue life differs with each type of osteoporosis treatment. PMID:25642445

  4. Effect of Aging on the Toughness of Human Cortical Bone: Evaluation by R-Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J

    2004-10-08

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties of bone, coupled with increased life expectancy, are responsible for increasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, an understanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age is essential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments to quantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughness properties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Because cortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crack extension, unlike most previous studies the toughness is evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone taken from wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, both the ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determined and are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreases some 40% over six decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growth toughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. The reduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging in the wake of the crack.

  5. Effect of a hypergravity environment on cortical bone elasticity in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining whether hypergravity can be used as a countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss. This study was conducted on 20 immature male rats in order to investigate possible elastic adaptations of cortical bone in rapidly growing rats exposed to chronic hypergravity. Ten rats were continuously centrifuged for 14 days at twice gravitational acceleration (2G) on a 12.75 foot radius centrifuge and 10 rats concurrently acted as stationary controls. The effect of hypergravity on the elastic characteristics of cortical bone was quantified via ultrasonic wave propagation. Propagation velocities of longitudinal and shear waves were measured through cubic cortical specimens from the posterior femoral diaphyses. Density was measured with an Archimedes' technique. The orthotropic elastic properties were calculated and used to compare the difference between groups. Results showed an average increase in both the Young's moduli (Eii, + 2.2%) and shear moduli (Gij, + 4.3%) with a statistically significant increase only in G12 (+15.7%, P = 0.046). The ratio of transverse to axial strain (Poisson's ratio, nuij) demonstrated statistically significant changes in nu12, nu21, nu13, and nu31 (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that although slight elastic changes were incurred via a hypergravity environment, the treatment level or duration in this study do not dramatically perturb the normal elastic behavior of cortical bone and that dramatic biomechanical differences noted in previous studies were due more to structural changes than material elasticity changes. Hypergravity applied post facto to a microgravity environment would offer further illucidation of this method as treatment for a degenerative spaceflight experience.

  6. The Resistance of Cortical Bone Tissue to Failure under Cyclic Loading is Reduced with Alendronate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0 mg/kg/day; Alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (−14%, ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×103 µm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (−20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×102 #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions. PMID:24704262

  7. The resistance of cortical bone tissue to failure under cyclic loading is reduced with alendronate.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Geissler, Joseph R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Fritton, J C

    2014-07-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most prescribed preventative treatment for osteoporosis. However, their long-term use has recently been associated with atypical fractures of cortical bone in patients who present with low-energy induced breaks of unclear pathophysiology. The effects of bisphosphonates on the mechanical properties of cortical bone have been exclusively studied under simple, monotonic, quasi-static loading. This study examined the cyclic fatigue properties of bisphosphonate-treated cortical bone at a level in which tissue damage initiates and is accumulated prior to frank fracture in low-energy situations. Physiologically relevant, dynamic, 4-point bending applied to beams (1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm) machined from dog rib (n=12/group) demonstrated mechanical failure and micro-architectural features that were dependent on drug dose (3 groups: 0, 0.2, 1.0mg/kg/day; alendronate [ALN] for 3 years) with cortical bone tissue elastic modulus (initial cycles of loading) reduced by 21% (p<0.001) and fatigue life (number of cycles to failure) reduced in a stress-life approach by greater than 3-fold with ALN1.0 (p<0.05). While not affecting the number of osteons, ALN treatment reduced other features associated with bone remodeling, such as the size of osteons (-14%; ALN1.0: 10.5±1.8, VEH: 12.2±1.6, ×10(3) μm2; p<0.01) and the density of osteocyte lacunae (-20%; ALN1.0: 11.4±3.3, VEH: 14.3±3.6, ×10(2) #/mm2; p<0.05). Furthermore, the osteocyte lacunar density was directly proportional to initial elastic modulus when the groups were pooled (R=0.54, p<0.01). These findings suggest that the structural components normally contributing to healthy cortical bone tissue are altered by high-dose ALN treatment and contribute to reduced mechanical properties under cyclic loading conditions.

  8. Investigation of hyperelastic models for nonlinear elastic behavior of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, M; Ghoreishi, M; Narooei, K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the hyperelastic models of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone were investigated and appropriate models were developed. Using uniaxial compression test data, the strain energy versus stretch was calculated and the appropriate hyperelastic strain energy functions were fitted on data in order to calculate the material parameters. To obtain the mechanical behavior in other loading conditions, the hyperelastic strain energy equations were investigated for pure shear and equi-biaxial tension loadings. The results showed the Mooney-Rivlin and Ogden models cannot predict the mechanical response of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone accurately, while the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models have a good agreement with the experimental results. To investigate the sensitivity of the hyperelastic models, a variation of 10% in material parameters was performed and the results indicated an acceptable stability for the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models. Finally, the uniaxial tension and compression of cortical femur bone were studied using the finite element method in VUMAT user subroutine of ABAQUS software and the computed stress-stretch curves were shown a good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26953961

  9. Automated classification of mandibular cortical bone on dental panoramic radiographs for early detection of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Fukui, Tatsumasa; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Findings on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) have shown that mandibular cortical index (MCI) based on the morphology of mandibular inferior cortex was significantly correlated with osteoporosis. MCI on DPRs can be categorized into one of three groups and has the high potential for identifying patients with osteoporosis. However, most DPRs are used only for diagnosing dental conditions by dentists in their routine clinical work. Moreover, MCI is not generally quantified but assessed subjectively. In this study, we investigated a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that automatically classifies mandibular cortical bone for detection of osteoporotic patients at early stage. First, an inferior border of mandibular bone was detected by use of an active contour method. Second, regions of interest including the cortical bone are extracted and analyzed for its thickness and roughness. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) differentiate cases into three MCI categories by features including the thickness and roughness. Ninety eight DPRs were used to evaluate our proposed scheme. The number of cases classified to Class I, II, and III by a dental radiologist are 56, 25 and 17 cases, respectively. Experimental result based on the leave-one-out cross-validation evaluation showed that the sensitivities for the classes I, II, and III were 94.6%, 57.7% and 94.1%, respectively. Distribution of the groups in the feature space indicates a possibility of MCI quantification by the proposed method. Therefore, our scheme has a potential in identifying osteoporotic patients at an early stage.

  10. Bone marrow ablation demonstrates that excess endogenous parathyroid hormone plays distinct roles in trabecular and cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2012-07-01

    Mice null for Cyp27b1, which encodes the 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice], lack 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] and have hypocalcemia and high parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Intermittent, exogenous PTH is anabolic for bone. To determine the effect of the chronic excess endogenous PTH on osteogenesis and bone turnover, bone marrow ablations (BMX) were performed in tibiae and femurs of 6-week-old 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice and in wild-type (WT) controls. Newly formed bone tissue was analyzed at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after BMX. BMX did not alter the higher levels of PTH in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice. In the marrow cavity, trabecular volume, osteoblast number, alkaline phosphatase-positive areas, type I collagen-positive areas, bone formation-related genes, and protein expression levels all increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. Osteoclast numbers and surface and ratio of RANKL/OPG-relative mRNA levels decreased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. In the cortex, alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and osteoclast numbers increased significantly after BMX in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, compared with WT. These results demonstrate that chronic excess endogenous PTH exerts an anabolic role in trabecular bone by stimulating osteogenic cells and reducing bone resorption, but plays a catabolic role in cortical bone by enhancing bone turnover with an increase in resorption. PMID:22640808

  11. The effects of immobilization on vascular canal orientation in rat cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Hayley M; Jokihaara, Jarkko; Leppänen, Olli V; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Cooper, David M L

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that bone is capable of adapting to changes in loading; however, little is known regarding how loading specifically affects the internal 3D microarchitecture of cortical bone. The aim of this study was to experimentally test the hypothesis that loading is a determinant of the 3D orientation of primary vascular canals in the rat tibial diaphysis. Left tibiae from 10 rats (30 weeks old) that had been immobilized (sciatic neurectomy) for 27 weeks, right SHAM-operated tibiae from these same rats (internal control) and right tibiae from 10 normal age-matched rats (external control) were scanned by micro-CT. Mean canal orientation (for the whole bone segment and by region), percent porosity, canal diameter and canal separation were quantitatively assessed in 3D. Canal orientation in the immobilized tibiae was significantly (P < 0.001) more radial (by 9.9°) compared to the external controls but did not differ from the internal controls (P = 0.310). Comparing the external and internal controls, orientation was significantly (P < 0.05) more radial in the internal control group (by 6.8°). No differences were found for percent porosity and canal separation. Canal diameter was significantly greater in the immobilized vs. internal (P < 0.001) and external control (P < 0.001) tibiae. The differences in orientation relative to the external controls indicated that the organization of cortical bone in the rat is affected by loading. Although the predicted difference in canal orientation was not detected between immobilized and internal control groups, the distributions of individual canal orientations, from which the mean values were derived, revealed distinctive patterns for all three groups. The internal controls exhibited an intermediate position between the immobilized and external controls, suggesting that paralysis on the contralateral side resulted in altered loading relative to the normal state represented by the external control. This was also

  12. The pitfall of treating low bone turnover: Effects on cortical porosity.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Maria Julia C L N; Karohl, Cristina; Elias, Rosilene M; Barreto, Fellype C; Barreto, Daniela Veit; Canziani, Maria Eugenia F; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Jorgetti, Vanda; Moyses, Rosa M A

    2016-10-01

    Although it is recognized that cortical bone contributes significantly to the mechanical strength of the skeleton, little is known about this compartment from bone biopsy studies, particularly in CKD patients. In addition, there is no prospective data on the effects of CKD-MBD therapy on cortical porosity (Ct.Po). This is a post hoc analysis on data from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of different phosphate binders on bone remodelling. Therapy was adjusted according to the first biopsy, and included sevelamer or calcium acetate, calcitriol and changes in calcium dialysate concentration. We measured Ct.Po at baseline and one year after. Fifty-two patients (46±13years old, 67% women and 60% white) were enrolled. Ct.Po was already high at baseline in 85% of patients [30% (17, 46)] and correlated with PTH (p=0.001). Low bone turnover was seen in 28 patients (54.9%). After one-year treatment, PTH increased in patients with low turnover, as intended. However, increased Ct.Po was seen in 49 patients (94%). This increase correlated with the delta of phosphate (p=0.015) and the delta of PTH (p=0.03); it was also higher among non-white patients than in white patients (p=0.039). The risk of increase in Ct.Po was 4.5 higher among non-white patients. Adjusted multiple regression analysis showed that the delta of Ct.Po was dependent on delta PTH and race (r(2)=0.193). We concluded that in an attempt to increase bone turnover, the increase in PTH levels might be associated with higher cortical porosity, particularly in non-white patients. Whether this finding leads to a high risk of fracture deserves further investigation.

  13. Numerical optimization of open-porous bone scaffold structures to match the elastic properties of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Wolf, Andreas; Bader, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of large segmental bone defects, especially in load bearing areas, is a complex procedure in orthopedic surgery. The usage of additive manufacturing processes enables the creation of customized bone implants with arbitrary open-porous structure satisfying both the mechanical and the biological requirements for a sufficient bone ingrowth. Aim of the present numerical study was to optimize the geometrical parameters of open-porous titanium scaffolds to match the elastic properties of human cortical bone with respect to an adequate pore size. Three different scaffold designs (cubic, diagonal and pyramidal) were numerically investigated by using an optimization approach. Beam elements were used to create the lattice structures of the scaffolds. The design parameters strut diameter and pore size ranged from 0.2 to 1.5mm and from 0 to 3.0mm, respectively. In a first optimization step, the geometrical parameters were varied under uniaxial compression to obtain a structural modulus of 15GPa (Young׳s modulus of cortical bone) and a pore size of 800µm was aimed to enable cell ingrowth. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the optimized structures under bending and torsion was investigated. Results for bending modulus were between 9.0 and 14.5GPa. In contrast, shear modulus was lowest for cubic and pyramidal design of approximately 1GPa. Here, the diagonal design revealed a modulus of nearly 20GPa. In a second step, large-sized bone scaffolds were created and placed in a biomechanical loading situation within a 30mm segmental femoral defect, stabilized with an osteosynthesis plate and loaded with physiological muscle forces. Strut diameter for the 17 sections of each scaffold was optimized independently in order to match the biomechanical stability of intact bone. For each design, highest strut diameter was found at the dorsal/medial site of the defect and smallest strut diameter in the center. In conclusion, we demonstrated the possibility of providing

  14. Type 1 diabetes in young rats leads to progressive trabecular bone loss, cessation of cortical bone growth, and diminished whole bone strength and fatigue life.

    PubMed

    Silva, Matthew J; Brodt, Michael D; Lynch, Michelle A; McKenzie, Jennifer A; Tanouye, Kristi M; Nyman, Jeffry S; Wang, Xiaodu

    2009-09-01

    People with diabetes have increased risk of fracture disproportionate to BMD, suggesting reduced material strength (quality). We quantified the skeletal effects of type 1 diabetes in the rat. Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats (12 wk of age) were injected with either vehicle (Control) or streptozotocin (Diabetic). Forelimbs were scanned at 0, 4, 8, and 12 wk using pQCT. Rats were killed after 12 wk. We observed progressive osteopenia in diabetic rats. Trabecular osteopenia was caused by bone loss: volumetric BMD decreased progressively with time in diabetic rats but was constant in controls. Cortical osteopenia was caused by premature arrest of cortical expansion: cortical area did not increase after 4-8 wk in diabetic rats but continued to increase in controls. Postmortem muCT showed a 60% reduction in proximal tibial trabecular BV/TV in diabetic versus control rats, whereas moments of inertia of the ulnar and femoral diaphysis were reduced approximately 30%. Monotonic bending tests indicated that ulna and femora from diabetic animals were approximately 25% less stiff and strong versus controls. Estimates of material properties indicated no changes in elastic modulus or ultimate stress but modest ( approximately 10%) declines in yield stress for diabetic bone. These changes were associated with a approximately 50% increase in the nonenzymatic collagen cross-link pentosidine. Last, cyclic testing showed diminished fatigue life in diabetic bones at the structural (force) level but not at the material (stress) level. In summary, type 1 diabetes, left untreated, causes trabecular bone loss and a reduction in diaphyseal growth. Diabetic bone has greatly increased nonenzymatic collagen cross-links but only modestly reduced material properties. The loss of whole bone strength under both monotonic and fatigue loading is attributed mainly to reduced bone size.

  15. Quantitative ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI of human cortical bone: correlation with porosity and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won C; Chen, Peter C; Chung, Christine B; Masuda, Koichi; D'Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, microcomputed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 µseconds was used together with bicomponent analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free, and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared with porosity assessed with µCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R(2)  = 0.23; p < 0.01) and free (R(2)  = 0.31; p < 0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R(2)  = 0.24; p < 0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R(2)  = 0.29; p < 0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001) and bound (R(2)  = 0.22; p < 0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R(2)  = 0 30; p < 0.001) and long (R(2)  = 0.17; p < 0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality.

  16. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Farman, H. H.; Windahl, S. H.; Westberg, L.; Isaksson, H.; Egecioglu, E.; Schele, E.; Ryberg, H.; Jansson, J. O.; Tuukkanen, J.; Koskela, A.; Xie, S. K.; Hahner, L.; Zehr, J.; Clegg, D. J.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα−/−). Female POMC-ERα−/− and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα−/− mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  17. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice.

  18. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm{sup 3}) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm{sup 3} and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0

  19. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis.

  20. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis. PMID:18037367

  1. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles. PMID:25219775

  2. Ultrasonic wave propagation in viscoelastic cortical bone plate coupled with fluids: a spectral finite element study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the ultrasonic wave propagation in the cortical layer of long bones which is known as being a functionally graded anisotropic material coupled with fluids. The viscous effects are taken into account. The geometrical configuration mimics the one of axial transmission technique used for evaluating the bone quality. We present a numerical procedure adapted for this purpose which is based on the spectral finite element method (FEM). By using a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, the vibroacoustic problem may be transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain in which, as radiation conditions may be exactly introduced in the infinite fluid halfspaces, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analysed using FEM. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed approach. We present some results to study the influence of the frequency on the first arriving signal velocity in (visco)elastic bone plate.

  3. The Role of Water Compartments in the Material Properties of Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Does, Mark D.; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2015-01-01

    Comprising ~20% of the volume, water is a key determinant of the mechanical behavior of cortical bone. It essentially exists in 2 general compartments: within pores and bound to the matrix. The amount of pore water – residing in vascular-lacunar-canalicular space – primarily reflects intracortical porosity (i.e., open spaces within the matrix largely due to Haversian canals and resorption sites), and as such, is inversely proportional to most mechanical properties of bone. Movement of water according to pressure gradients generated during dynamic loading likely confers hydraulic stiffening to the bone as well. Nonetheless, bound water is a primary contributor to mechanical behavior of bone in that it is responsible for giving collagen the ability to confer ductility or plasticity to bone (i.e., allows deformation to continue once permanent damage begins to form in the matrix) and decreases with age along with fracture resistance. Thus, dehydration by air-drying or by solvents with less hydrogen bonding capacity causes bone to become brittle, but interestingly, it also increases stiffness and strength across the hierarchical levels of organization. Despite the importance of matrix hydration to fracture resistance, little is known about why bound water decreases with age in hydrated human bone. Using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), both bound and pore water concentrations in bone can be measured ex vivo because the proton relaxation times differ between the two water compartments giving rise to two distinct signals. There are also emerging techniques to measure bound and pore water in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). NMR/MRI-derived bound water concentration is positively correlated with both strength and toughness of hydrated bone, and may become a useful clinical marker of fracture risk. PMID:25783011

  4. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  5. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Kawas, Neal P.; Lutz, Andre; Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Keyak, Joyce H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual's (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method's development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications - varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient's femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model's micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  6. Osteoblast-derived WNT16 represses osteoclastogenesis and prevents cortical bone fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Henning, Petra; Liu, Xianwen; Nagano, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Börjesson, Anna E; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen; Kindlund, Bert; Engdahl, Cecilia; Koskela, Antti; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Eriksson, Emma E; Zaman, Farasat; Hammarstedt, Ann; Isaksson, Hanna; Bally, Marta; Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Sandberg, Olof; Aspenberg, Per; Sävendahl, Lars; Feng, Jian Q; Tuckermann, Jan; Tuukkanen, Juha; Poutanen, Matti; Baron, Roland; Lerner, Ulf H; Gori, Francesca; Ohlsson, Claes

    2015-01-01

    The WNT16 locus is a major determinant of cortical bone thickness and nonvertebral fracture risk in humans. The disability, mortality and costs caused by osteoporosis-induced nonvertebral fractures are enormous. We demonstrate here that Wnt16-deficient mice develop spontaneous fractures as a result of low cortical thickness and high cortical porosity. In contrast, trabecular bone volume is not altered in these mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that WNT16 is osteoblast derived and inhibits human and mouse osteoclastogenesis both directly by acting on osteoclast progenitors and indirectly by increasing expression of osteoprotegerin (Opg) in osteoblasts. The signaling pathway activated by WNT16 in osteoclast progenitors is noncanonical, whereas the pathway activated in osteoblasts is both canonical and noncanonical. Conditional Wnt16 inactivation revealed that osteoblast-lineage cells are the principal source of WNT16, and its targeted deletion in osteoblasts increases fracture susceptibility. Thus, osteoblast-derived WNT16 is a previously unreported key regulator of osteoclastogenesis and fracture susceptibility. These findings open new avenues for the specific prevention or treatment of nonvertebral fractures, a substantial unmet medical need. PMID:25306233

  7. A Piece of the Puzzle: The Bone Health Index of the BoneXpert Software Reflects Cortical Bone Mineral Density in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Marschke, Laura; Bauer, Jens J.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Schweiger, Bernd; Führer-Sakel, Dagmar; Lahner, Harald; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Kiewert, Cordula; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Suspected osteopathology in chronically ill children often necessitates the assessment of bone mineral density. The most frequently used methods are dual-energy X-ray-absorption (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). The BoneXpert software provides an automated radiogrammatic method to assess skeletal age from digitalized X-rays of the left hand. Furthermore, the program calculates the Bone Health Index (BHI), a measure of cortical thickness and mineralization, which is obtained from indices of three metacarpal bones. In our study, we analyzed the manner in which BHI information provided by BoneXpert compares with DXA or pQCT measurements in youths. Study Design The BHI was retrospectively obtained using digitalized X-rays of the left hand and compared with the results of 203 corresponding DXA readings (Lunar Prodigy, GE Healthcare) of the lumbar vertebrae and femur as well as 117 pQCT readings (XCT 900, Stratec) of the distal radius. Results The BHI values showed a strong positive correlation with the DXA readings at each and all lumbar vertebrae (L1 –L4: r = 0.73; P < 0.0001). The age-adjusted Z-score of L1 –L4 and the height-adjusted score showed a positive correlation with the BHI-SDS (standard deviation score, r = 0.23; P < 0.002 and r = 0.27; P < 0.001, respectively). Total bone mineral density, as assessed via pQCT, also positively correlated with the BHI (r = 0.39; P < 0.0001), but the trabecular values displayed only a weak correlation. Conclusions The BHI obtained using BoneXpert can be a useful parameter in the assessment of bone health in children in most cases. This technique provides observer-independent information on cortical thickness and mineralization based on X-ray imaging of the hands. PMID:27014874

  8. Remodeling of heat-treated cortical bone allografts for posterior lumbar interbody fusion: serial 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Koichi; Hachiya, Yudo; Izawa, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Harumoto

    2012-12-01

    We have selected heat-treated bone allografts as the graft material since the Tokai Bone Bank, the first regional bone bank in Japan, was established in 1992. In this study, we examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD), and morphology observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological findings of bone grafts in cases followed up for 7-10 years after bone grafting to grasp the remodeling of heat-treated cortical bone allografts for posterior lumber interbody fusion (PLIF). BMD of bone grafts was reduced by half at 10 years after grafting. MRI revealed that bone grafts were indistinguishable initially in only 22.2% of cases, whereas after a lengthy period of 10 years distinguishable in many cases. Histologically, new bone formation at the graft-host interface was observed earlier, at 1 year after grafting, than that at the periphery of canals in the specimens. The laminated structure of the cortical bone eroded over time, and fragmented bone trabeculae were observed in the specimens at 8 years or longer after grafting, though necrotic bone still remained in some sites.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of cortical versus cancellous bone from mechanically-loaded murine tibiae reveals differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Ross, F Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical loading is an anabolic stimulus that increases bone mass, and thus a promising method to counteract osteoporosis-related bone loss. The mechanism of this anabolism remains unclear, and needs to be established for both cortical and cancellous envelopes individually. We hypothesized that cortical and cancellous bone display different gene expression profiles at baseline and in response to mechanical loading. To test this hypothesis, the left tibiae of 10-week-old female C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to one session of axial tibial compression (9N, 1200cycles, 4Hz triangle waveform) and euthanized 3 and 24h following loading. The right limb served as the contralateral control. We performed RNA-seq on marrow-free metaphyseal samples from the cortical shell and the cancellous core to determine differential gene expression at baseline (control limb) and in response to load. Differential expression was verified with qPCR. Cortical and cancellous bone exhibited distinctly different transcriptional profiles basally and in response to mechanical loading. More genes were differentially expressed with loading at 24h with more genes downregulated at 24h than at 3h in both tissues. Enhanced Wnt signaling dominated the response in cortical bone at 3 and 24h, but in cancellous bone only at 3h. In cancellous bone at 24h many muscle-related genes were downregulated. These findings reveal key differences between cortical and cancellous genetic regulation in response to mechanical loading. Future studies at different time points and multiple loading sessions will add to our knowledge of cortical and cancellous mechanotransduction with the potential to identify new targets for mouse genetic knockout studies and drugs to treat osteoporosis. PMID:26876048

  10. Relationship Between the Thickness of Cortical Bone at Maxillary Mid-palatal Area and Facial Height Using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Masume; Kaviani, Farzaneh; Saeedi, Arman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Orthodontic mini-implants have been incorporated into orthodontic treatment modalities. Adequate bone at mini-implant placement site can influence the success or failure of anchorage. The present study was to determine the thickness of cortical bone in the maxillary mid-palatal area at predetermined points for the placement of orthodontic mini-implants using Cone Beam CT technique in order to evaluate the relationship of these values with the facial height. Materials and Methods : A total of 161 patients, consisting of 63 males (39.13%) and 98 females (60.87%), were evaluated in the present study; 38% of the subjects had normal facial height, 29% had short face and 33% had long face. In order to determine which patient belongs to which facial height category, i.e. normal, long or short, two angular and linear evaluations were used: the angle between S-N and Go-Me lines and the S-Go/N-Me ratio. Twenty points were evaluated in all the samples. First the incisive foramen was located. The paracoronal cross-sections were prepared at distances of 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm from the distal wall of the incisive foramen and on each cross-section the mid-sagittal and para-sagittal areas were determined bilaterally at 3- and 6-mm distances (a total of 5 points). The thicknesses of the cortical plate of bone were determined at the predetermined points. Results : There was a significant relationship between the mean cortical bone thickness and facial height (p<0.01), with significantly less thickness in long faces compared to short faces. However, the thickness of cortical bone in normal faces was similar to that in long and short faces. Separate evaluation of the points showed that at point a16 subjects with short faces had thicker cortical bone compared to subjects with long and normal faces. At point b8 in long faces, the thickness of the cortical bone was significantly less than that in short and normal faces. At point d8, the thickness of the cortical bone in

  11. Accurate measurement of cortical bone elasticity tensor with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Simon; Grimal, Quentin; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) allows to accurately characterize the complete set of elastic constants of an anisotropic material from a set of measured mechanical resonant frequencies of a specimen. This method does not suffer from the drawbacks and limitations of the conventional sound velocity approach, but has been reported to fail to measure bone because of its strong viscoelastic damping. In this study, we take advantage of recent developments of RUS to overcome this limitation. The frequency response of a human cortical bone specimen (about 5 × 7 × 7 mm(3)) was measured between 100 and 280 kHz. Despite an important overlapping of the resonant peaks 20 resonant frequencies could be retrieved by using a dedicated signal processing method. The experimental frequencies were progressively matched to the frequencies predicted by a model of the sample whose elastic constants were adjusted. The determined diagonal elastic constants were in good agreement with concurrent sound velocity measurements performed in the principal directions of the specimen. This study demonstrates that RUS is suitable for an accurate measurement of cortical bone anisotropic elasticity. In particular, precision of measured Young and shear moduli is about 0.5%.

  12. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Siddula, Alankrita; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation) or ribose (ribosylation). Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women). More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples). Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar supplementation in food and

  13. Disease activity and severity in early inflammatory arthritis predict hand cortical bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Bunn, Diane K.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the influence of disease-related variables on hand cortical bone loss in women with early inflammatory arthritis (IA), and whether hand cortical bone mass predicts subsequent joint damage. Method. Adults aged ≥16 years with recent onset of IA were recruited to the Norfolk Arthritis Register between 1990 and 1998, and followed prospectively. At baseline, patients had their joints examined for swelling and tenderness and had CRP and disease activity 28-joint assessment score (DAS-28) measured. Radiographs of the hands were performed in a subgroup of patients at Year 1 and at follow-up, which were assessed using digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR). They were also evaluated for the presence of erosions using Larsen’s method. Linear mixed models were used to investigate whether disease-related factors predicted change in DXR–areal bone mineral density (BMDa). We also evaluated whether DXR–BMDa predicted the subsequent occurrence of erosive disease. Results. Two hundred and four women, mean (s.d.) age 55.1 (14.0) years, were included. Median follow-up between radiographs was 4 years. The mean within-subject change in BMDa was 0.024 g/cm2 equivalent to 1% decline per year. After adjustment for age, height and weight, compared with those within the lower tertile for CRP, those in the upper tertile had greater subsequent loss of bone. This was true also for DAS-28 and Larsen score. Among those without erosions on the initial radiograph (121), DXR–BMDa at baseline did not predict the new occurrence of erosions. Conclusion. Increased disease activity and severity are associated with accelerated bone loss. However, lower BMDa did not predict the new occurrence of erosive disease. PMID:20573690

  14. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance unambiguously quantifies pore and collagen-bound water in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Henry H.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2012-01-01

    Bone water (BW) plays a pivotal role in nutrient transport and conferring bone with its viscoelastic mechanical properties. BW is partitioned between the pore spaces of the Haversian and lacuno-canalicular system, and water predominantly bound to the matrix proteins (essentially collagen). The general model of BW is that the former predominantly experiences fast isotropic molecular reorientation, whereas water in the bone matrix undergoes slower anisotropic rotational diffusion. Here, we provide direct evidence for the correctness of this model and show that unambiguous quantification in situ of these two functionally and dynamically different BW fractions is possible. The approach chosen relies on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of deuterium (2H) that unambiguously separates and quantifies the two fractions on the basis of their distinguishing microdynamic properties. Twenty-four specimens of the human tibial cortex from six donors (3 male, 3 female, ages 27-83 years) were cored and 2H spectra recorded at 62 MHz (9.4 Tesla) on a Bruker Instruments DMX 400 spectrometer after exchange of native BW with 2H2O. Spectra consisted of a doublet signal resulting from quadrupole interaction of water bound to collagen. Doublet splittings were found to depend on the orientation of the osteonal axis with respect to the magnetic field direction (8.2 and 4.3 kHz for parallel and perpendicular orientation, respectively). In contrast, the isotropically reorienting pore-resident water yielded a single resonance line superimposed on the doublet. Nulling of the singlet resonance allowed separation of the two fractions. The results indicate that in human cortical bone 60-80% of detectable BW is collagen-bound. Porosity determined as the difference between total BW and collagen bound water fraction was found to strongly parallel μCT based measurements (R2 = 0.91). Our method provides means for direct validation of emerging relaxation-based measurements of cortical bone porosity by

  15. Osteogenic effect of a gastric pentadecapeptide, BPC-157, on the healing of segmental bone defect in rabbits: a comparison with bone marrow and autologous cortical bone implantation.

    PubMed

    Sebecić, B; Nikolić, V; Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Sosa, T; Patrlj, L; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Konjevoda, P; Jadrijević, S; Perović, D; Slaj, M

    1999-03-01

    Gastrectomy often results in increased likelihood of osteoporosis, metabolic aberration, and risk of fracture, and there is a need for a gastric peptide with osteogenic activity. A novel stomach pentadecapeptide, BPC-157, improves wound and fracture healing in rats in addition to having an angiogenic effect. Therefore, in the present study, using a segmental osteoperiosteal bone defect (0.8 cm, in the middle of the left radius) that remained incompletely healed in all control rabbits for 6 weeks (assessed in 2 week intervals), pentadecapeptide BPC-157 was further studied (either percutaneously given locally [10 microg/kg body weight] into the bone defect, or applied intramuscularly [intermittently, at postoperative days 7, 9, 14, and 16 at 10 microg/kg body weight] or continuously [once per day, postoperative days 7-21 at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg body weight]). For comparison, rabbits percutaneously received locally autologous bone marrow (2 mL, postoperative day 7). As standard treatment, immediately after its formation, the bone defect was filled with an autologous cortical graft. Saline-treated (2 mL intramuscularly [i.m.] and 2 mL locally into the bone defect), injured animals were used as controls. Pentadecapeptide BPC-157 significantly improved the healing of segmental bone defects. For instance, upon radiographic assessment, the callus surface, microphotodensitometry, quantitative histomorphometry (10 microg/kg body weight i.m. for 14 days), or quantitative histomorphometry (10 ng/kg body weight i.m. for 14 days) the effect of pentadecapeptide BPC-157 was shown to correspond to improvement after local application of bone marrow or autologous cortical graft. Moreover, a comparison of the number of animals with unhealed defects (all controls) or healed defects (complete bony continuity across the defect site) showed that besides pentadecapeptide intramuscular application for 14 days (i.e., local application of bone marrow or autologous cortical graft), also

  16. Selective laser melting-produced porous titanium scaffolds regenerate bone in critical size cortical bone defects.

    PubMed

    Van der Stok, Johan; Van der Jagt, Olav P; Amin Yavari, Saber; De Haas, Mirthe F P; Waarsing, Jan H; Jahr, Holger; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Patka, Peter; Verhaar, Jan A N; Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2013-05-01

    Porous titanium scaffolds have good mechanical properties that make them an interesting bone substitute material for large bone defects. These scaffolds can be produced with selective laser melting, which has the advantage of tailoring the structure's architecture. Reducing the strut size reduces the stiffness of the structure and may have a positive effect on bone formation. Two scaffolds with struts of 120-µm (titanium-120) or 230-µm (titanium-230) were studied in a load-bearing critical femoral bone defect in rats. The defect was stabilized with an internal plate and treated with titanium-120, titanium-230, or left empty. In vivo micro-CT scans at 4, 8, and 12 weeks showed more bone in the defects treated with scaffolds. Finally, 18.4 ± 7.1 mm(3) (titanium-120, p = 0.015) and 18.7 ± 8.0 mm(3) (titanium-230, p = 0.012) of bone was formed in those defects, significantly more than in the empty defects (5.8 ± 5.1 mm(3) ). Bending tests on the excised femurs after 12 weeks showed that the fusion strength reached 62% (titanium-120) and 45% (titanium-230) of the intact contralateral femurs, but there was no significant difference between the two scaffolds. This study showed that in addition to adequate mechanical support, porous titanium scaffolds facilitate bone formation, which results in high mechanical integrity of the treated large bone defects.

  17. Kerr-gated time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of equine cortical bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael D; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Goodship, Allen E; Draper, Edward R C

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy in equine cortical bone tissue is demonstrated. Using 400-nm pulsed laser excitation (1 ps at 1 kHz) it is shown that Kerr cell gating with a 4-ps window provides simultaneously time-resolved rejection of fluorescence and time-resolved Raman scatter enabling depth profiling through tissue. The Raman shifts are the same as those observed by conventional cw Raman spectroscopy using deep-red or near-infrared lasers. The time decay of Raman photons is shown to fit an inverse square root of time function, suggesting propagation by a diffusive mechanism. Using polystyrene behind a bone specimen, it is shown that the 400-nm laser light penetrates at least 0.31 mm below the surface of a fully mineralized bone tissue specimen and generates observable bone Raman scatter (approximately 415 to 430 nm) through most of this depth. These novel results demonstrate great promise for in vivo applications for studying diseased bone tissue, and ways to optimize the setup are discussed.

  18. Assessment of the relationship between standard probe and implantable fiber measurements of cortical bone blood flow: a canine study.

    PubMed

    Jain, R; Podworny, N; Anderson, G I; Schemitsch, E H

    1996-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used to assess cortical bone blood flow in various clinical situations, such as osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis. Standard metal-sheathed probes containing optical fibers, applied to cortical bone for perfusion measurements, require direct exposure of the bone surface for each measurement, making nonanesthetized assessments over time impractical. Implantable optical fibers offer a noninvasive method for evaluating cortical bone perfusion without repeated surgical exposure of the bone after initial surgical implantation of the fibers. In vitro studies have shown the reliability of laser Doppler (LD) fibers compared with those of the standard probe. This investigation studied the relationship between measurements of cortical bone perfusion obtained by implanted optical (LD) fibers and standard (LDF) probes in vivo. Midshaft tibial fractures were created in the right hindlimb of 11 adult, large (>25 kg) dogs and stabilized by low contact-dynamic compression plate fixation. Cortical bone blood flow was measured by LDF using standard probes and implantable fibers at five sites along the tibia prefracture, postfracture, immediately postplate application, and at 10 weeks postplating, immediately prior to euthanasia. The implantable fibers were secured onto the cortical bone via the plate and led through a percutaneous exit site. Histological examination of the inguinal and popliteal lymph nodes and soft tissue surrounding the fibers revealed mild inflammation. No significant correlation of blood flow assessed by the implantable fibers and standard probe occurred immediately postfracture (r < 0. 13, p > 0.62). However, a statistically significant correlation was seen postplate application at one of the measurement sites in the distal fracture fragment (r = 0.78, P < 0.003). The fibers remained intact and functional until an average of 3 weeks at which time they either fractured or were removed by the animals. This is the first in vivo

  19. Some studies on the composition of bovine cortical-bone sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, A. T. De B.; Herring, G. M.; Kent, P. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. An analysis of bovine bone sialoprotein, a homogeneous glycoprotein isolated from cortical bone, is presented. 2. Analytical results agree with earlier physical measurements indicating a molecular weight of about 23000. 3. Mild acid hydrolysis and treatment with neuraminidase showed that fucose and sialic acid occupy terminal positions on oligosaccharide chains. 4. Treatment of the sialic acid-free glycoprotein with β-galactosidase showed that much of the galactose occupies a sub-terminal location in the intact glycoprotein. 5. The polypeptide chain is rich in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine and glycine, and has no detectable free terminal amino group. 6. Glycopeptides were studied after proteolytic digestion. 7. It is considered that the carbohydrate moiety is highly branched and is probably linked by an acid- and alkali-stable glycosylamine bond involving aspartic acid. PMID:6049914

  20. Avalanche criticality during compression of porcine cortical bone of different ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baró, Jordi; Shyu, Peter; Pang, Siyuan; Jasiuk, Iwona M.; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Planes, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Crack events developed during uniaxial compression of cortical bones cut from femurs of developing pigs of several ages (4, 12, and 20 weeks) generate avalanches. These avalanches have been investigated by acoustic emission analysis techniques. The avalanche energies are power-law distributed over more than four decades. Such behavior indicates the absence of characteristic scales and suggests avalanche criticality. The statistical distributions of energies and waiting times depend on the pig age and indicate that bones become stronger, but less ductile, with increasing age. Crack propagation is equally age-dependent. Older pigs show, on average, larger cracks with a time distribution similar to those of aftershocks in earthquakes, while younger pigs show only statistically independent failure events.

  1. Fracture properties of growth plate cartilage compared to cortical and trabecular bone in ovine femora.

    PubMed

    Tschegg, E K; Celarek, A; Fischerauer, S F; Stanzl-Tschegg, S; Weinberg, A M

    2012-10-01

    Fracture mechanical parameters (notch tensile strength, specific fracture energy/crack resistance and specific crack initiation energy) of epiphyseal plate cartilage, trabecular bone (metaphysis) and cortical bone (diaphysis) were determined on ovine femur specimens. The fracture behaviour before and after crack initiation was recorded in force-displacement diagrams from wedge splitting tests. Crack propagation was stable both during and after the formation of a principal crack. This is the main advantage of the wedge-splitting method by Tschegg in comparison with tensile tests. Microscopy of the epiphyseal plate during fracture showed fibre elongation and tearing in the crack tip region. The results of this study can help to understand the mechanics of epiphyseal plate injuries and the obtained values can be used for computational simulations and models. PMID:23022566

  2. Avalanche criticality during compression of porcine cortical bone of different ages.

    PubMed

    Baró, Jordi; Shyu, Peter; Pang, Siyuan; Jasiuk, Iwona M; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K H; Planes, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Crack events developed during uniaxial compression of cortical bones cut from femurs of developing pigs of several ages (4, 12, and 20 weeks) generate avalanches. These avalanches have been investigated by acoustic emission analysis techniques. The avalanche energies are power-law distributed over more than four decades. Such behavior indicates the absence of characteristic scales and suggests avalanche criticality. The statistical distributions of energies and waiting times depend on the pig age and indicate that bones become stronger, but less ductile, with increasing age. Crack propagation is equally age-dependent. Older pigs show, on average, larger cracks with a time distribution similar to those of aftershocks in earthquakes, while younger pigs show only statistically independent failure events.

  3. Avalanche criticality during compression of porcine cortical bone of different ages.

    PubMed

    Baró, Jordi; Shyu, Peter; Pang, Siyuan; Jasiuk, Iwona M; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K H; Planes, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Crack events developed during uniaxial compression of cortical bones cut from femurs of developing pigs of several ages (4, 12, and 20 weeks) generate avalanches. These avalanches have been investigated by acoustic emission analysis techniques. The avalanche energies are power-law distributed over more than four decades. Such behavior indicates the absence of characteristic scales and suggests avalanche criticality. The statistical distributions of energies and waiting times depend on the pig age and indicate that bones become stronger, but less ductile, with increasing age. Crack propagation is equally age-dependent. Older pigs show, on average, larger cracks with a time distribution similar to those of aftershocks in earthquakes, while younger pigs show only statistically independent failure events. PMID:27300967

  4. Effect of trabecular bone loss on cortical strain rate during impact in an in vitro model of avian femur

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Tal; Gefen, Amit

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic hip fractures occur due to loss of cortical and trabecular bone mass and consequent degradation in whole bone strength. The direct cause of most fractures is a fall, and hence, characterizing the mechanical behavior of a whole osteopenic bone under impact is important. However, very little is known about the mechanical interactions between cortical and trabecular bone during impact, and it is specifically unclear to what extent epiphyseal trabecular bone contributes to impact resistance of whole bones. We hypothesized that trabecular bone serves as a structural support to the cortex during impact, and hence, loss of a critical mass of trabecular bone reduces internal constraining of the cortex, and, thereby, decreases the impact tolerance of the whole bone. Methods To test this hypothesis, we conducted cortical strain rate measurements in adult chicken's proximal femora subjected to a Charpy impact test, after removing different trabecular bone core masses to simulate different osteopenic severities. Results We found that removal of core trabecular bone decreased by ~10-fold the cortical strain rate at the side opposite to impact (p < 0.01), i.e. from 359,815 ± 1799 μm/m per second (mean ± standard error) for an intact (control) specimen down to 35,997 ± 180 μm/m per second where 67% of the total trabecular bone mass (~0.7 grams in adult chicken) were removed. After normalizing the strain rate by the initial weight of bone specimens, a sigmoid relation emerged between normalized strain rate and removed mass of trabecular bone, showing very little effect on the cortex strain rate if below 10% of the trabecular mass is removed, but most of the effect was already apparent for less than 30% trabecular bone loss. An analytical model of the experiments supported this behavior. Conclusion We conclude that in our in vitro avian model, loss of over 10% of core trabecular bone substantially altered the deformation response of whole bone to impact

  5. Age-related differences in post-yield damage in human cortical bone. Experiment and model.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Hayes, W C; Gibson, L J

    1996-11-01

    Very few quantitative comparisons between mechanical test behavior of cortical bone and microscopic evidence of damage have been reported. In this study, the hypothesis that age-related degradation of mechanical properties in human cortical bone is associated with increases in damage in the form of microcracks was investigated. The initial modulus and yield stress were 6% (not significant) and 10% (p = 0.05) lower, respectively, in specimens from elderly femora than in specimens from young adult femora. However, both groups showed a 34% decrease in modulus after being loaded to 1% strain. Microcracks were observed in cement lines and between lamellae and were parallel to the loading direction. There were 50% more cracks in longitudinal sections of tested specimens than in controls from elderly femora; however, there were no more cracks in tested specimens than in controls from young adult femora. In addition, there were twice as many cracks in controls and three times as many cracks in tested specimens from elderly femora than in those from young adult femora (p < 0.01). A microstructurally based model was developed which supported the mechanical test results and indicated that damage began to develop at about 1500 mu epsilon. The results suggest that older bone may have reduced mechanical properties due to the presence of more microcracks, and that older bone is more susceptible to developing microcracks at a given strain level. However, the mechanical test data indicate that specimens from young adult femora also sustained some king of damage as a result of mechanical loading, which requires further investigation.

  6. Prediction of lumbar spine bone mineral density from the mandibular cortical width in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatin, Ehsan; Ahmadi, Seyed Sina; Ataiekhorasgani, Masoud; Feizianfard, Mahboobe; Jafaripozve, Shahram; Jafaripozve, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases that is characterized by a generalized reduction of the bone mass. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with morbidity, but can be a predictable condition if early diagnosis is made.The diagnosis is based on the World Health Organization's (WHO) T-score criteria. Panoramic images have been also used to predict low bone mineral density. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prediction of lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) from the mandibular cortical width in postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: On the panoramic radiographic images, the mandibular cortical width (MCW) was measured by drawing a line parallel to the long axis of the mandible and another line tangential to the inferior border of mandible and a constructed line perpendicular to the tangent intersecting inferior border of mental foramen and analyzed the correlation of recorded MCW with BMD and T-score by using SPSS software and linear regression and bivariate correlation tests. Results: Bivariate correlation showed a significant correlation between BMD and MCW (r = 0.945) (P = 0. 000). There was also a significant correlation between T-score and MCW(r = 0.835) (P = 0. 000). To detect the accurate association between the BMD and MCW and also T-score and MCW, linear regression analyses tests showed two associations to predict the BMD and T-score from MCW with confidence interval of 95%. These associations were as follows: T-score= −7.087 + 1.497 × MCW BMD= 0.334 + 0.163 × MCW. Conclusion: The MCW is a good index to help the dentists to predict the osteoporosis by panoramic radiographs and have a significant role in patient screening and early diagnosis of osteoporosis. PMID:24520232

  7. In vitro ultrasonic and mechanic characterization of the modulus of elasticity of children cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Baron, Cécile; Pithioux, Martine; Launay, Franck; Chabrand, Patrick; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    The assessment of elastic properties in children's cortical bone is a major challenge for biomechanical engineering community, more widely for health care professionals. Even with classical clinical modalities such as X-ray tomography, MRI, and/or echography, inappropriate diagnosis can result from the lack of reference values for children bone. This study provides values for elastic properties of cortical bone in children using ultrasonic and mechanical measurements, and compares them with adult values. 18 fibula samples from 8 children (5-16 years old, mean age 10.6 years old ±4.4) were compared to 16 fibula samples from 3 elderly adults (more than 65 years old). First, the dynamic modulus of elasticity (Edyn) and Poisson's ratio (ν) are evaluated via an ultrasonic method. Second, the static modulus of elasticity (Esta) is estimated from a 3-point microbending test. The mean values of longitudinal and transverse wave velocities measured at 10 MHz for the children's samples are respectively 3.2mm/μs (±0.5) and 1.8mm/μs (±0.1); for the elderly adults' samples, velocities are respectively 3.5mm/μs (±0.2) and 1.9 mm/μs (±0.09). The mean Edyn and the mean Esta for the children's samples are respectively 15.5 GPa (±3.4) and 9.1 GPa (±3.5); for the elderly adults' samples, they are respectively 16.7 GPa (±1.9) and 5.8 GPa (±2.1). Edyn, ν and Esta are in the same range for children's and elderly adults' bone without any parametric statistical difference; a ranking correlation between Edyn and Esta is shown for the first time.

  8. Aspects of in vitro fatigue in human cortical bone: time and cycle dependent crack growth.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2005-05-01

    Although fatigue damage in bone induced by cyclic loading has been recognized as a problem of clinical significance, few fracture mechanics based studies have investigated how incipient cracks grow by fatigue in this material. In the present study, in vitro cyclic fatigue experiments were performed in order to quantify fatigue-crack growth behavior in human cortical bone. Crack-growth rates spanning five orders of magnitude were obtained for the extension of macroscopic cracks in the proximal-distal direction; growth-rate data could be well characterized by the linear-elastic stress-intensity range, using a simple (Paris) power law with exponents ranging from 4.4 to 9.5. Mechanistically, to discern whether such behavior results from "true" cyclic fatigue damage or is simply associated with a succession of quasi-static fracture events, cyclic crack-growth rates were compared to those measured under sustained (non-cyclic) loading. Measured fatigue-crack growth rates were found to exceed those "predicted" from the sustained load data at low growth rates ( approximately 3 x 10(-10) to 5 x 10(-7) m/cycle), suggesting that a "true" cyclic fatigue mechanism, such as alternating blunting and re-sharpening of the crack tip, is active in bone. Conversely, at higher growth rates ( approximately 5 x 10(-7) to 3 x 10(-5) m/cycle), the crack-growth data under sustained loads integrated over the loading cycle reasonably predicts the cyclic fatigue data, indicating that quasi-static fracture mechanisms predominate. The results are discussed in light of the occurrence of fatigue-related stress fractures in cortical bone.

  9. Periosteal PTHrP Regulates Cortical Bone Remodeling During Fracture Healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Nasiri, Ali R; Broadus, Arthur E; Tommasini, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is widely expressed in the fibrous outer layer of the periosteum (PO), and the PTH/PTHrP type I receptor (PTHR1) is expressed in the inner PO cambial layer. The cambial layer gives rise to the PO osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclasts (OCs) that model/remodel the cortical bone surface during development as well as during fracture healing. PTHrP has been implicated in the regulation of PO modeling during development, but nothing is known as regards a role of PTHrP in this location during fracture healing. We propose that PTHrP in the fibrous layer of the PO may be a key regulatory factor in remodeling bone formation during fracture repair. We first assessed whether PTHrP expression in the fibrous PO is associated with PO osteoblast induction in the subjacent cambial PO using a tibial fracture model in PTHrP-lacZ mice. Our results revealed that both PTHrP expression and osteoblast induction in PO were induced 3 days post-fracture. We then investigated a potential functional role of PO PTHrP during fracture repair by performing tibial fracture surgery in 10-week-old CD1 control and PTHrP conditional knockout (PTHrP cKO) mice that lack PO PTHrP. We found that callus size and formation as well as woven bone mineralization in PTHrP cKO mice were impaired compared to that in CD1 mice. Concordant with these findings, functional enzyme staining revealed impaired OB formation and OC activity in the cKO mice. We conclude that deleting PO PTHrP impairs cartilaginous callus formation, maturation and ossification as well as remodeling during fracture healing. These data are the initial genetic evidence suggesting that PO PTHrP may induce osteoblastic activity and regulate fracture healing on the cortical bone surface. PMID:26164475

  10. Mechanical loads and cortical bone geometry in healthy children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Zemel, Babette S; Shults, Justine; Howard, Krista M; Kibe, Lucy W; Leonard, Mary B

    2011-05-01

    Muscle and bone form a functional unit. While muscle size is a useful surrogate of mechanical load on bone, the independent contributions to bone strength of muscle force, muscle size, gravitational load (body weight), and physical activity have not been assessed. Three hundred twenty-one healthy participants (32% black, 47% male), aged 5-35 years were assessed. Peak dorsiflexion muscle torque (ft-lbs) of the ankle was assessed using isometric dynamometry. Tibia peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures included polar section modulus (Zp; mm(3)), periosteal and endosteal circumference (mm), cortical area (mm(2)), and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; mg/cm(3)) at the 38% site, and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA; mm(2)), at the 66% site. Physical activity (average hours per week) was assessed by questionnaire. Log linear regression was used to assess determinants of muscle specific force (MSF; torque relative to muscle CSA) and Zp adjusted for age and tibia length. MSF was greater in blacks than whites (p<0.05) and lower in females than males (p<0.001). Zp was greater in blacks than whites (p=0.002) in Tanner stages 1-4, but the difference was attenuated in Tanner 5 (interaction, p=0.02); R(2)=0.87. Muscle CSA, muscle torque, body weight, and physical activity were added to the model and each load covariate was independently and significantly (all, p<0.02) associated with Zp (R(2)=0.92), periosteal circumference, and cortical area. Inclusion of these measures attenuated but did not eliminate the significant race differences. Only muscle CSA was positively associated with endosteal circumference, while none of the load covariates were associated with vBMD. In conclusion, bone geometry is associated with several factors that define the mechanical load on bone, independent of age, tibia length, maturation, race, and sex. Race differences in Zp were not explained by these measures of mechanical load. Given that inclusion of muscle torque, body weight

  11. NPY Neuron-Specific Y2 Receptors Regulate Adipose Tissue and Trabecular Bone but Not Cortical Bone Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Lin, Shu; Wong, Iris P. L.; Baldock, Paul A.; Aljanova, Aygul; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Castillo, Lesley; Mitchell, Natalie F.; Ye, Ji-Ming; Zhang, Lei; Macia, Laurence; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Nguyen, Amy D.; Riepler, Sabrina J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Y2 receptor signalling is known to be important in neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated effects on energy homeostasis and bone physiology. Y2 receptors are located post-synaptically as well as acting as auto receptors on NPY-expressing neurons, and the different roles of these two populations of Y2 receptors in the regulation of energy homeostasis and body composition are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We thus generated two conditional knockout mouse models, Y2lox/lox and NPYCre/+;Y2lox/lox, in which Y2 receptors can be selectively ablated either in the hypothalamus or specifically in hypothalamic NPY-producing neurons of adult mice. Specific deletion of hypothalamic Y2 receptors increases food intake and body weight compared to controls. Importantly, specific ablation of hypothalamic Y2 receptors on NPY-containing neurons results in a significantly greater adiposity in female but not male mice, accompanied by increased hepatic triglyceride levels, decreased expression of liver cartinine palmitoyltransferase (CPT1) and increased expression of muscle phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). While food intake, body weight, femur length, bone mineral content, density and cortical bone volume and thickness are not significantly altered, trabecular bone volume and number were significantly increased by hypothalamic Y2 deletion on NPY-expressing neurons. Interestingly, in situ hybridisation reveals increased NPY and decreased proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of Y2 receptors in NPY neurons, consistent with a negative feedback mechanism between NPY expression and Y2 receptors on NPY-ergic neurons. Conclusions/Significance Taken together these data demonstrate the anti-obesogenic role of Y2 receptors in the brain, notably on NPY-ergic neurons, possibly via inhibition of NPY neurons and concomitant stimulation of POMC-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus

  12. Lack of deleterious effect of slow-release sodium fluoride treatment on cortical bone histology and quality in osteoporotic patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Antich, P. P.; Sakhaee, K.; Prior, J.; Gonzales, J.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate therapy on cortical bone histology, reflection ultrasound velocity (material strength) and back-scattered electron image analysis (BEI) in 26 osteoporotic patients before and following therapy. All measurements were made on transiliac crest bone biopsies obtained before and following 2 years of therapy in each patient. For all 26 patients there were no significant changes in cortical bone histomorphometric parameters. In 15 patients in whom bone material quality was assessed by reflection ultrasound, there was no change in velocity (4000 +/- 227 SD to 4013 +/- 240 m/s). BEI disclosed no mineralization defects or the presence of woven bone. Mean atomic number (density) of bone increased slightly, but significantly (9.261 +/- 0.311 to 9.457 +/- 0.223, P = 0.031). While these changes are less marked than those observed for cancellous bone, they indicate that this form of therapy does not adversely affect cortical bone remodelling.

  13. Discordant effects of vitamin D deficiency in trabecular and cortical bone architecture and strength in growing rodents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice M C; Anderson, Paul H; Sawyer, Rebecca K; Moore, Alison J; Forwood, Mark R; Steck, Roland; Morris, Howard A; O'Loughlin, Peter D

    2010-07-01

    We have previously shown that vitamin D deficiency in young male rats results in significant reduction in femoral trabecular bone volume (BV/TV). However, the effects of vitamin D deficiency and its impact on other relevant skeletal sites remain unclear. Ten week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed various levels of vitamin D3 (2, 4, 8, and 12 IU/day) with standard Ca (0.4%) until 30 weeks of age and achieved stable serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D) levels between 16 and 117 nmol/L. At time of death, femora, L2 vertebrae and tibiae were processed for bone histomorphometric analyses and tibial cortical strength by 3-point mechanical testing. A significant association between serum 25D and trabecular bone occurred for both the distal femoral metaphysis (R2=0.34, P<0.05) and L2 vertebrae (R2=0.24, P<0.05). Tibia mid-shaft cortical bone was not, however, changed in terms of total volume, periosteal surface or endosteal surface as a function of vitamin D status. Furthermore, no changes to mechanical and intrinsic properties of the cortices were observed. We conclude that cortical bone is maintained under conditions of vitamin D deficiency in preference to cancellous bone in young growing rats.

  14. Effect of aging on the toughness of human cortical bone:Evaluation by R-curves

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie,Robert O.

    2005-04-05

    Age-related deterioration of the fracture properties ofbone, coupled with increased life expectancy, is responsible forincreasing incidence of bone fracture in the elderly, and hence, anunderstanding of how its fracture properties degrade with age isessential. The present study describes ex vivo fracture experiments toquantitatively assess the effect of aging on the fracture toughnessproperties of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Becausecortical bone exhibits rising crack-growth resistance with crackextension, unlike most previous studies, the toughness is evaluated interms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, measured for bone takenfrom wide range of age groups (34-99 years). Using this approach, boththe ex vivo crack-initiation and crack-growth toughness are determinedand are found to deteriorate with age; the initiation toughness decreasessome 40 percent over 6 decades from 40 to 100 years, while the growthtoughness is effectively eliminated over the same age range. Thereduction in crack-growth toughness is considered to be associatedprimarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, inparticular, involving crack bridging in the wake of thecrack.

  15. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull.

    PubMed

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-11-21

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us.

  16. Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone Using Synchrotron Radiation Transmission X-Ray Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Garry R.; Kim, Grace; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Microdamage occurs in bone through repeated and excessive loading. Accumulation of microdamage weakens bone, leading to a loss of strength, stiffness and energy dissipation in the tissue. Imaging techniques used to examine microdamage have typically been limited to the microscale. In the current study microdamage was examined at the nanoscale using transmission x-ray microscopy with an x-ray negative stain, lead-uranyl acetate. Microdamage was generated in notched and unnotched beams of sheep cortical bone (2×2×20 mm), with monotonic and fatigue loading. Bulk sections were removed from beams and stained with lead-uranyl acetate to identify microdamage. Samples were sectioned to 50 microns and imaged using transmission x-ray microscopy producing projection images of microdamage with nanoscale resolution. Staining indicated microdamage occurred in both the tensile and compressive regions. A comparison between monotonic and fatigue loading indicated a statistically significant greater amount of stain present in fatigue loaded sections. Microdamage occurred in three forms: staining to existing bone structures, cross hatch damage and a single crack extending from the notch tip. Comparison to microcomputed tomography demonstrated differences in damage morphology and total damage between the microscale and nanoscale. This method has future applications for understanding the underlying mechanisms for microdamage formation as well as three-dimensional nanoscale examination of microdamage. PMID:23472121

  17. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, A.; Maev, R. Gr

    2013-11-01

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us.

  18. Propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in an acrylic plate as a cortical-bone-mimicking phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Choi, Bok Kyoung

    2014-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in an acrylic plate as a cortical-bone-mimicking phantom. The velocities of the guided waves in a 5-mm-thick acrylic plate were measured by using the axial transmission technique. A pure A0 Lamb mode could be successfully launched in the 5-mm-thick acrylic plate through a time reversal process of Lamb waves, consistent with the fact that the time reversal process can automatically compensate for the dispersive nature of Lamb waves. The experimental velocities of the slow guided wave (SGW) and the time-reversed Lamb wave were found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical group velocity of the A0 Lamb mode, suggesting that both the SGW and the time-reversed Lamb wave excited in the 5-mm-thick acrylic plate correspond to the A0 Lamb mode. These results suggest that the time reversal process of Lamb waves can be usefully applied to noninvasive characterization of long cortical bones.

  19. Overexpression of DMP1 Accelerates Mineralization and Alters Cortical Bone Biomechanical Properties in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ankush; Albazzaz, Michael; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Inoue, Nozomu; Miller, Lisa M.; Acerbo, Alvin; George, Anne; Sumner, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1) is a key regulator of biomineralization. Here, we examine changes in structural, geometric, and material properties of cortical bone in a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DMP1. Micro-computed tomography and three-point bending were performed on 90 femora of wild type and transgenic mice at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Fourier transform infrared imaging was performed at 2 months. We found that the transgenic femurs were longer (p<0.01), more robust in cross-section (p<0.05), stronger (p<0.05), but had less post-yield strain and displacement (p<0.01), and higher tissue mineral density (p<0.01) than the wild type femurs at 1 and 2 months. At 2 months, the transgenic femurs also had a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio (p<0.05) and lower carbonate substitution (p<0.05) compared to wild type femurs. These findings indicate that increased mineralization caused by overexpressing DMP1 led to increased structural cortical bone properties associated with decreased ductility during the early post-natal period. PMID:22100074

  20. Overexpression of DMP1 accelerates mineralization and alters cortical bone biomechanical properties in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia A.; Miller L.; Albazza, M.; Espinoza Orias, A.A.; Inoue, N.; Acerbo, A.; George, A.; Sumner, D.R.

    2011-09-29

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1) is a key regulator of biomineralization. Here, we examine changes in structural, geometric, and material properties of cortical bone in a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DMP1. Micro-computed tomography and three-point bending were performed on 90 femora of wild type and transgenic mice at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Fourier transform infrared imaging was performed at 2 months. We found that the transgenic femurs were longer (p < 0.01), more robust in cross-section (p < 0.05), stronger (p < 0.05), but had less post-yield strain and displacement (p < 0.01), and higher tissue mineral density (p < 0.01) than the wild type femurs at 1 and 2 months. At 2 months, the transgenic femurs also had a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio (p < 0.05) and lower carbonate substitution (p < 0.05) compared to wild type femurs. These findings indicate that increased mineralization caused by overexpressing DMP1 led to increased structural cortical bone properties associated with decreased ductility during the early post-natal period.

  1. Assessment of the effect of reduced compositional heterogeneity on fracture resistance of human cortical bone using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Ahmet; Curran, Erin; Ural, Ani

    2016-10-01

    The recent reports of atypical femoral fracture (AFF) and its possible association with prolonged bisphosphonate (BP) use highlighted the importance of a thorough understanding of mechanical modifications in bone due to bisphosphonate treatment. The reduced compositional heterogeneity is one of the modifications in bone due to extensive suppression of bone turnover. Although experimental evaluations suggested that compositional changes lead to a reduction in the heterogeneity of elastic properties, there is limited information on the extent of influence of reduced heterogeneity on fracture resistance of cortical bone. As a result, the goal of the current study is to evaluate the influence of varying the number of unique elastic and fracture properties for osteons, interstitial bone, and cement lines on fracture resistance across seven different human cortical bone specimens using finite element modeling. Fracture resistance of seven human cortical bone samples under homogeneous and three different heterogeneous material levels was evaluated using a compact tension test setup. The simulation results predicted that the crack volume was the highest for the models with homogeneous material properties. Increasing heterogeneity resulted in a lower amount of crack volume indicating an increase in fracture resistance of cortical bone. This reduction was observed up to a certain level of heterogeneity after which further beneficial effects of heterogeneity diminished suggesting a possible optimum level of heterogeneity for the bone tissue. The homogeneous models demonstrated limited areas of damage with extensive crack formation. On the other hand, the heterogeneity in the material properties led to increased damage volume and a more variable distribution of damage compared to the homogeneous models. This resulted in uncracked regions which tended to have less damage accumulation preventing extensive crack propagation. The results also showed that the percent osteonal area

  2. Assessment of the effect of reduced compositional heterogeneity on fracture resistance of human cortical bone using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Ahmet; Curran, Erin; Ural, Ani

    2016-10-01

    The recent reports of atypical femoral fracture (AFF) and its possible association with prolonged bisphosphonate (BP) use highlighted the importance of a thorough understanding of mechanical modifications in bone due to bisphosphonate treatment. The reduced compositional heterogeneity is one of the modifications in bone due to extensive suppression of bone turnover. Although experimental evaluations suggested that compositional changes lead to a reduction in the heterogeneity of elastic properties, there is limited information on the extent of influence of reduced heterogeneity on fracture resistance of cortical bone. As a result, the goal of the current study is to evaluate the influence of varying the number of unique elastic and fracture properties for osteons, interstitial bone, and cement lines on fracture resistance across seven different human cortical bone specimens using finite element modeling. Fracture resistance of seven human cortical bone samples under homogeneous and three different heterogeneous material levels was evaluated using a compact tension test setup. The simulation results predicted that the crack volume was the highest for the models with homogeneous material properties. Increasing heterogeneity resulted in a lower amount of crack volume indicating an increase in fracture resistance of cortical bone. This reduction was observed up to a certain level of heterogeneity after which further beneficial effects of heterogeneity diminished suggesting a possible optimum level of heterogeneity for the bone tissue. The homogeneous models demonstrated limited areas of damage with extensive crack formation. On the other hand, the heterogeneity in the material properties led to increased damage volume and a more variable distribution of damage compared to the homogeneous models. This resulted in uncracked regions which tended to have less damage accumulation preventing extensive crack propagation. The results also showed that the percent osteonal area

  3. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O'Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2015-07-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre or ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (AR(f/y);LysM-Cre or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, AR(f/y);LysM-Cre, ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre, or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts-not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on

  4. Comparison of mechanical and ultrasound elastic modulus of ovine tibial cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Grant, Caroline A; Wilson, Lance J; Langton, Christian; Epari, Devakar

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models of bones can be created by deriving geometry from an X-ray CT scan. Material properties such as the elastic modulus can then be applied using either a single or set of homogeneous values, or individual elements can have local values mapped onto them. Values for the elastic modulus can be derived from the CT density values using an elasticity versus density relationship. Many elasticity-density relationships have been reported in the literature for human bone. However, while ovine in vivo models are common in orthopaedic research, no work has been done to date on creating FE models of ovine bones. To create these models and apply relevant material properties, an ovine elasticity-density relationship needs to be determined. Using fresh frozen ovine tibias the apparent density of regions of interest was determined from a clinical CT scan. The bones were the sectioned into cuboid samples of cortical bone from the regions of interest. Ultrasound was used to determine the elastic modulus in each of three directions - longitudinally, radially and tangentially. Samples then underwent traditional compression testing in each direction. The relationships between apparent density and both ultrasound, and compression modulus in each direction were determined. Ultrasound testing was found to be a highly repeatable non-destructive method of calculating the elastic modulus, particularly suited to samples of this size. The elasticity-density relationships determined in the longitudinal direction were very similar between the compression and ultrasound data over the density range examined. A clear difference was seen in the elastic modulus between the longitudinal and transverse directions of the bone samples, and a transverse elasticity-density relationship is also reported.

  5. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Keyak, Joyce H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual’s (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method’s development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications – varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient’s femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model’s micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  6. The Behavior of Water in Collagen and Hydroxyapatite Sites of Cortical Bone: Fracture, Mechanical Wear, and Load Bearing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Singh, Chandan; Papaioannou, Antonios; Sinha, Neeraj; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cortical bone, which is largely comprised of collagen, hydroxyapatite, and water, are known to hinge on hydration. Recently, the characteristics of water in bone have drawn attention as potential markers of bone quality. We report on the dynamics, diffusion, population, and exchange of water in cortical bone by NMR relaxation and diffusion methodologies. Relaxation measurements over timescales ranging from 0.001 to 4.2 s reveal two distinguishable water environments. Systematic exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or collagenase reveals one peak in our 2D relaxation map belonging to water present in the hydroxyapatite rich environment, and a second peak with shorter relaxation times arising from a collagen rich site. Diffusion-T2 measurements allowed for direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of water in all observable reservoirs. Further, deuterium relaxation methods were applied to study cortical bone under an applied force, following mechanical wear or fracture. The tumbling correlation times of water reduce in all three cases, indicating that water dynamics may be used as a probe of bone quality. Lastly, changes in the relative populations and correlation times of water in bone under an applied force suggest that load bearing occurs largely in the collagen rich environment and is reversible. PMID:26659838

  7. Non Destructive Characterization of Cortical Bone Micro-Damage by Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haupert, Sylvain; Guérard, Sandra; Peyrin, Françoise; Mitton, David; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a nonlinear ultrasound technique, the so-called nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) technique, for detecting early microdamage accumulation in cortical bone induced by four-point bending fatigue. Small parallelepiped beam-shaped human cortical bone specimens were subjected to cyclic four-point bending fatigue in several steps. The specimens were prepared to control damage localization during four-point bending fatigue cycling and to unambiguously identify resonant modes for NRUS measurements. NRUS measurements were achieved to follow the evolution of the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior during fatigue-induced damage. After each fatigue step, a small number of specimens was removed from the protocol and set apart to quantitatively assess the microcrack number density and length using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-µCT). The results showed a significant effect of damage steps on the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior. No significant change in the overall length of microcracks was observed in damaged regions compared to the load-free control regions. Only an increased number of shortest microcracks, those in the lowest quartile, was noticed. This was suggestive of newly formed microcracks during the early phases of damage accumulation. The variation of nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior was significantly correlated to the variation of the density of short microcracks. Our results suggest that the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior is sensitive to early bone microdamage. Therefore NRUS technique can be used to monitor fatigue microdamage progression in in vitro experiments. PMID:24392089

  8. Development of a Three-Dimensional (3D) Printed Biodegradable Cage to Convert Morselized Corticocancellous Bone Chips into a Structured Cortical Bone Graft

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Lee, Demei; Chang, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable polymeric cage to convert corticocancellous bone chips into a structured strut graft for treating segmental bone defects. A total of 24 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent a left femoral segmental bone defect creation. Twelve rabbits in group A underwent three-dimensional (3D) printed cage insertion, corticocancellous chips implantation, and Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, while the other 12 rabbits in group B received bone chips implantation and K-wire fixation only. All rabbits received a one-week activity assessment and the initial image study at postoperative 1 week. The final image study was repeated at postoperative 12 or 24 weeks before the rabbit scarification procedure on schedule. After the animals were sacrificed, both femurs of all the rabbits were prepared for leg length ratios and 3-point bending tests. The rabbits in group A showed an increase of activities during the first week postoperatively and decreased anterior cortical disruptions in the postoperative image assessments. Additionally, higher leg length ratios and 3-point bending strengths demonstrated improved final bony ingrowths within the bone defects for rabbits in group A. In conclusion, through this bone graft converting technique, orthopedic surgeons can treat segmental bone defects by using bone chips but with imitate characters of structured cortical bone graft. PMID:27104525

  9. Development of a Three-Dimensional (3D) Printed Biodegradable Cage to Convert Morselized Corticocancellous Bone Chips into a Structured Cortical Bone Graft.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Lee, Demei; Chang, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng

    2016-04-20

    This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable polymeric cage to convert corticocancellous bone chips into a structured strut graft for treating segmental bone defects. A total of 24 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent a left femoral segmental bone defect creation. Twelve rabbits in group A underwent three-dimensional (3D) printed cage insertion, corticocancellous chips implantation, and Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, while the other 12 rabbits in group B received bone chips implantation and K-wire fixation only. All rabbits received a one-week activity assessment and the initial image study at postoperative 1 week. The final image study was repeated at postoperative 12 or 24 weeks before the rabbit scarification procedure on schedule. After the animals were sacrificed, both femurs of all the rabbits were prepared for leg length ratios and 3-point bending tests. The rabbits in group A showed an increase of activities during the first week postoperatively and decreased anterior cortical disruptions in the postoperative image assessments. Additionally, higher leg length ratios and 3-point bending strengths demonstrated improved final bony ingrowths within the bone defects for rabbits in group A. In conclusion, through this bone graft converting technique, orthopedic surgeons can treat segmental bone defects by using bone chips but with imitate characters of structured cortical bone graft.

  10. Elastic moduli of untreated, demineralized and deproteinized cortical bone: validation of a theoretical model of bone as an interpenetrating composite material.

    PubMed

    Hamed, E; Novitskaya, E; Li, J; Chen, P-Y; Jasiuk, I; McKittrick, J

    2012-03-01

    A theoretical experimentally based multi-scale model of the elastic response of cortical bone is presented. It portrays the hierarchical structure of bone as a composite with interpenetrating biopolymers (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) and minerals (hydroxyapatite), together with void spaces (porosity). The model involves a bottom-up approach and employs micromechanics and classical lamination theories of composite materials. Experiments on cortical bone samples from bovine femur include completely demineralized and deproteinized bones as well as untreated bone samples. Porosity and microstructure are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-computed tomography. Compression testing is used to measure longitudinal and transverse elastic moduli of all three bone types. The characterization of structure and properties of these three bone states provides a deeper understanding of the contributions of the individual components of bone to its elastic response and allows fine tuning of modeling assumptions. Very good agreement is found between theoretical modeling and compression testing results, confirming the validity of the interpretation of bone as an interpenetrating composite material.

  11. Maturation of cortical bone suppresses periosteal osteoprogenitor proliferation in a paracrine manner.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Jae; Yun, Chi-Young; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Kim, Jung Ryul; Park, Byung-Hyun; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-10-01

    Periosteum contains enriched pools of osteogenic progenitors and is highly proliferative, thus giving this tissue a pivotal role in maintaining the diameter of the diaphyseal cortex and in recovery from fractures. Although periosteal proliferation has not been detected in normal bone, intense periosteal proliferation has been observed in pathologic states such as fracture, inflammation, and bone tumors. However, the mechanism by which periosteal osteoprogenitor proliferation is regulated remains poorly understood. To investigate this regulation mechanism, osteoblast/osteocyte-specific conditional knockout mice were developed lacking Smad4 and Osx, two factors that are essential for osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. In Smad4 (Col) and Osx (Col) mice, osteocalcin, Dmp-1, and sclerostin expression were significantly decreased in the cortical bone. Interestingly, although Cre activity was not observed in the periosteum, the proliferation of periosteal osteoprogenitors was enhanced in Smad4 (Col) and Osx (Col) mice, as assessed by 5'-bromo-2'deoxyuridine incorporation and proliferating cell nuclear antigen localization. Since Wnt signaling is a major factor affecting periosteal proliferation, we evaluated Wnt signaling in the periosteum. The expression levels of β-catenin and Lef-1 were increased in the periosteal osteoprogenitors. Moreover, the mRNA levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1, Lef-1, and Axin2, all of which are Wnt target genes, were significantly increased in the periosteum of both Smad4 (Col) and Osx (Col) mice. These results indicated that extracellular proteins secreted by mature osteoblasts and osteocytes suppress the proliferation of periosteal osteoprogenitors by blocking Wnt signaling in a paracrine manner. Our data suggest a new concept of periosteal bone healing and periosteal bone formation.

  12. Dynamic testing of old and young baboon cortical bone with numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocron, S.; Nicolella, D.; Nicholls, A. E.; Bredbenner, T.; Havill, L.

    2012-08-01

    Cortical bone tensile mechanical properties at quasistatic and high rates (˜300s-1) were determined ex vivo using the right femurs of 12 female baboons, (Papio hamadryas spp.) from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute/Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio, Texas. The animals were divided into two age groups: a young age group (6.63 ± 0.6 years) and an old age group (26.96 ± 1.3 years). Seven specimens per group were monotonically loaded to failure to determine their mechanical properties. The quasistatic strength of the bone for the old group was just a little (but not significantly) lower than the young group. High strain rate tests performed with the Hopkinson bar indicate that baboon bone from the older group was significantly weaker under impact loads than that from the younger group. This observation is particularly important due to the similarities between baboon and human bone tissue. Typical strain rates for these tests ranged from 130s-1 to 250s-1. A full-size 3-D simulation of the Hopkinson bar test was performed to confirm that the bone specimen was under stress equilibrium and to evaluate the consistency of the modulus and strength inferred from the tests. Simulations were performed in which the modulus, strength and failure strain were varied to see the sensitivity of the results. Additionally, simplified simulations were performed to estimate the strain rate environment of a femur during a fall at an impact velocity of 5 m/s, similar to a free fall velocity from a height of 1.3 meters. The simulations confirm that strain rates obtained in the Hopkinson bar are relevant because they are similar to those expected inr such a fall.

  13. Effects of age and loading rate on equine cortical bone failure.

    PubMed

    Kulin, Robb M; Jiang, Fengchun; Vecchio, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Although clinical bone fractures occur predominantly under impact loading (as occurs during sporting accidents, falls, high-speed impacts or other catastrophic events), experimentally validated studies on the dynamic fracture behavior of bone, at the loading rates associated with such events, remain limited. In this study, a series of tests were performed on femoral specimens obtained post-mortem from equine donors ranging in age from 6 months to 28 years. Fracture toughness and compressive tests were performed under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions in order to determine the effects of loading rate and age on the mechanical behavior of the cortical bone. Fracture toughness experiments were performed using a four-point bending geometry on single and double-notch specimens in order to measure fracture toughness, as well as observe differences in crack initiation between dynamic and quasi-static experiments. Compressive properties were measured on bone loaded parallel and transverse to the osteonal growth direction. Fracture propagation was then analyzed using scanning electron and scanning confocal microscopy to observe the effects of microstructural toughening mechanisms at different strain rates. Specimens from each horse were also analyzed for dry, wet and mineral densities, as well as weight percent mineral, in order to investigate possible influences of composition on mechanical behavior. Results indicate that bone has a higher compressive strength, but lower fracture toughness when tested dynamically as compared to quasi-static experiments. Fracture toughness also tends to decrease with age when measured quasi-statically, but shows little change with age under dynamic loading conditions, where brittle "cleavage-like" fracture behavior dominates.

  14. A Surrogate Measure of Cortical Bone Matrix Density by Long T2 -Suppressed MRI.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Wehrli, Felix W

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance has the potential to image and quantify two pools of water within bone: free water within the Haversian pore system (transverse relaxation time, T2 > 1 ms), and water hydrogen-bonded to matrix collagen (T2 ∼ 300 to 400 μs). Although total bone water concentration quantified by MRI has been shown to scale with porosity, greater insight into bone matrix density and porosity may be gained by relaxation-based separation of bound and pore water fractions. The objective of this study was to evaluate a recently developed surrogate measurement for matrix density, single adiabatic inversion recovery (SIR) zero echo-time (ZTE) MRI, in human bone. Specimens of tibial cortical bone from 15 donors (aged 27 to 97 years; 8 female and 7 male) were examined at 9.4T field strength using two methods: (1) (1)H ZTE MRI, to capture total (1)H signal, and (2) (1)H SIR-ZTE MRI, to selectively image matrix-associated (1)H signal. Total water, bone matrix, and bone mineral densities were also quantified gravimetrically, and porosity was measured by micro-CT. ZTE apparent total water (1)H concentration was 32.7 ± 3.2 M (range 28.5 to 40.3 M), and was correlated positively with porosity (R(2) = 0.80) and negatively with matrix and mineral densities (R(2) =  0.90 and 0.82, respectively). SIR-ZTE apparent bound water (1)H concentration was 32.9 ± 3.9 M (range 24.4 to 39.8 M), and its correlations were opposite to those of apparent total water: negative with porosity (R(2) = 0.73) and positive with matrix density (R(2) = 0.74) and mineral density (R(2) = 0.72). Porosity was strongly correlated with gravimetric matrix density (R(2) = 0.91, negative) and total water density (R(2) = 0.92, positive). The strong correlations of SIR-ZTE-derived apparent bound water (1)H concentration with ground-truth measurements suggest that this quantitative solid-state MRI method provides a nondestructive surrogate measure of bone matrix density

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties of human cortical bone: influence of different processing methods.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Artur; Jastrzebska, Anna; Grazka, Ewelina; Marowska, Joanna; Gut, Grzegorz; Wojciechowski, Artur; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, Izabela

    2012-08-01

    increase in the ultimate strain. The results of our study suggest that there may be an association between mechanical properties of bone tissue grafts and the damage process of collagen structure during gamma irradiation. This collagen damage in cortical bone allografts containing water does not depends on the temperature of irradiation or defatting during processing if dose of gamma irradiation does not exceed 35 kGy. PMID:22538985

  16. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively.

  17. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively. PMID:26522955

  18. Ultrastructural elastic deformation of cortical bone tissue probed by NIR Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, William F.; Morris, Michael D.; Wallace, Joseph M.; Kohn, David H.

    2004-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used as a probe of ultrastructural (molecular) changes in both the mineral and matrix (protein and glycoprotein, predominantly type I collagen) components of murine cortical bone as it responds to loading in the elastic regime. At the ultrastructural level, crystal structure and protein secondary structure distort as the tissue is loaded. These structural changes are followed as perturbations to tissue spectra. We load tissue in a custom-made dynamic mechanical tester that fits on the stage of a Raman microprobe and can accept hydrated tissue specimens. As the specimen is loaded in tension and/or compression, the shifts in mineral P-O4 v1 and relative band heights in the Amide III band envelope are followed with the microprobe. Average load is measured using a load cell while the tissue is loaded under displacement control. Changes occur in both the mineral and matrix components of bone as a response to elastic deformation. We propose that the mineral apatitic crystal lattice is deformed by movement of calcium and other ions. The matrix is proposed to respond by deformation of the collagen backbone. Raman microspectroscopy shows that bone mineral is not a passive contributor to tissue strength. The mineral active response to loading may function as a local energy storage and dissipation mechanism, thus helping to protect tissue from catastrophic damage.

  19. Biomedical titanium alloys with Young's moduli close to that of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Liu, Yi; Nakai, Masaki; Liu, Huihong; Li, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Biomedical titanium alloys with Young's moduli close to that of cortical bone, i.e., low Young's modulus titanium alloys, are receiving extensive attentions because of their potential in preventing stress shielding, which usually leads to bone resorption and poor bone remodeling, when implants made of their alloys are used. They are generally β-type titanium alloys composed of non-toxic and allergy-free elements such as Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr referred to as TNTZ, which is highly expected to be used as a biomaterial for implants replacing failed hard tissue. Furthermore, to satisfy the demands from both patients and surgeons, i.e., a low Young's modulus of the whole implant and a high Young's modulus of the deformed part of implant, titanium alloys with changeable Young's modulus, which are also β-type titanium alloys, for instance Ti-12Cr, have been developed. In this review article, by focusing on TNTZ and Ti-12Cr, the biological and mechanical properties of the titanium alloys with low Young's modulus and changeable Young's modulus are described. In addition, the titanium alloys with shape memory and superelastic properties were briefly addressed. Surface modifications for tailoring the biological and anti-wear/corrosion performances of the alloys have also been briefly introduced.

  20. Biomedical titanium alloys with Young’s moduli close to that of cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Liu, Yi; Nakai, Masaki; Liu, Huihong; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical titanium alloys with Young’s moduli close to that of cortical bone, i.e., low Young’s modulus titanium alloys, are receiving extensive attentions because of their potential in preventing stress shielding, which usually leads to bone resorption and poor bone remodeling, when implants made of their alloys are used. They are generally β-type titanium alloys composed of non-toxic and allergy-free elements such as Ti–29Nb–13Ta–4.6Zr referred to as TNTZ, which is highly expected to be used as a biomaterial for implants replacing failed hard tissue. Furthermore, to satisfy the demands from both patients and surgeons, i.e., a low Young’s modulus of the whole implant and a high Young’s modulus of the deformed part of implant, titanium alloys with changeable Young’s modulus, which are also β-type titanium alloys, for instance Ti–12Cr, have been developed. In this review article, by focusing on TNTZ and Ti–12Cr, the biological and mechanical properties of the titanium alloys with low Young’s modulus and changeable Young’s modulus are described. In addition, the titanium alloys with shape memory and superelastic properties were briefly addressed. Surface modifications for tailoring the biological and anti-wear/corrosion performances of the alloys have also been briefly introduced. PMID:27252887

  1. Microstructure and compressive mechanical properties of cortical bone in children with osteogenesis imperfecta treated with bisphosphonates compared with healthy children.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by a change in bone tissue quality, but little data are available to describe the factors involved at the macroscopic scale. To better understand the effect of microstructure alterations on the mechanical properties at the sample scale, we studied the structural and mechanical properties of six cortical bone samples from children with OI treated with bisphosphonates and compared them to the properties of three controls. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution computed tomography and compression testing were used to assess these properties. More resorption cavities and a higher osteocyte lacunar density were observed in OI bone compared with controls. Moreover, a higher porosity was measured for OI bones along with lower macroscopic Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate stress. The microstructure was impaired in OI bones; the higher porosity and osteocyte lacunar density negatively impacted the mechanical properties and made the bone more prone to fracture.

  2. Analysis of cortical bone porosity using synchrotron radiation microtomography to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Salata, C.; Mantuano, A.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    Microporosities play important biologic and mechanical roles on health. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to cortical bone changes. In the present work, the femur diaphysis of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D morphometric parameters using synchrotron radiation microtomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur diaphysis of rats.

  3. A splice donor site mutation in HOXD13 underlies synpolydactyly with cortical bone thinning.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiuyan; Ji, Chunyan; Cao, Lihua; Wu, Yuhong; Shang, Yuyang; Wang, Wei; Luo, Yang

    2013-12-15

    Synpolydactyly 1(SPD1) is a dominantly inherited distal limb anomaly that is characterized by incomplete digit separation and increased number of digits. SPD1 is most commonly caused by polyalanine repeat expansions and mutations in the homeodomain of the HOXD13. We report a splice donor site mutation in HOXD13 associated in most cases with cortical bone thinning. In vitro study of transcripts and truncated protein analysis indicated that c.781+1G>A mutation results in truncated HOXD13 protein p.G190fsX4. Luciferase assay indicated that the truncated HOXD13 protein failed to bind to DNA. The mechanism for this phenotype was truncated protein loss of function.

  4. A large amount of microdamages in the cortical bone around fracture site in a patient of atypical femoral fracture after long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku; Hitora, Toshiaki; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2014-07-01

    A breast cancer patient developed an atypical femoral fracture after 9 years of bisphosphonate therapy for the treatment of multiple bone metastases. We histopathologically analyzed the femoral cortical bone at the fracture site and the iliac cancellous bone. Four months prior to the fracture, the patient had experienced pain in the right femur and underwent plain radiography and bone scintigraphy which revealed cortical thickening and radioisotope accumulation at each site, respectively. The patient had also experienced a non-traumatic fracture at the same site on the contralateral side 2 years earlier. Based on these findings, atypical femoral fracture was diagnosed and intramedullary nailing performed. A cortical bone specimen taken from near the fracture site during surgery showed marked microdamages, and analysis of the iliac cancellous bone specimen revealed severely suppressed bone turnover. These findings suggest that microdamage and severely suppressed bone turnover are associated with atypical femoral fracture reported in this patient with long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

  5. Cortical bone histomorphology of known‐age skeletons from the Kirsten collection, Stellenbosch university, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Jarred; Beresheim, Amy; Alblas, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Normal human bone tissue changes predictably as adults get older, but substantial variability in pattern and pace remains unexplained. Information is needed regarding the characteristics of histological variables across diverse human populations. Methods Undecalcified thin sections from mid‐thoracic ribs of 213 skeletons (138 M, 75 F, 17–82 years, mean age 48 years), are used to explore the efficacy of an established age‐at‐death estimation method and methodological approach (Cho et al.: J Forensic Sci 47 (2002) 12‐18) and expand on it. The ribs are an age‐balanced sample taken from skeletonized cadavers collected from 1967 to 1999 in South Africa, each with recorded sex, age, cause of death and government‐defined population group (129 “Colored,” 49 “Black,” 35 “White”). Results The Ethnicity Unknown equation performs better than those developed for European‐Americans and African‐Americans, in terms of accuracy and bias. A new equation based solely on the study sample does not improve accuracy. Osteon population densities (OPD) show predicted values, yet secondary osteon areas (On.Ar) are smaller than expected for non‐Black subgroups. Relative cortical area (Ct.Ar/Tt.Ar) is low among non‐Whites. Conclusions Results from this highly diverse sample show that population‐specific equations do not increase estimate precision. While within the published range of error for the method (±24.44 years), results demonstrate a systematic under‐aging of young adults and over‐aging of older adults. The regression approach is inappropriate. The field needs fresh approaches to statistical treatment and to factors behind cortical bone remodeling. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:137–147, 2016. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26865244

  6. Duration-dependent effects of clinically relevant oral alendronate doses on cortical bone toughness in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Burr, David B.; Liu, Ziyue; Allen, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been shown to significantly reduce bone toughness in vertebrae within one year when given at clinical doses to dogs. Although BPs also reduce toughness in cortical bone when given at high doses, their effect on cortical bone material properties when given at clinical doses is less clear. In part, this may be due to the use of small sample sizes that were powered to demonstrate differences in bone mineral density rather than bone’s material properties. Our lab has conducted several studies in which dogs were treated with alendronate at a clinically relevant dose. The goal of this study was to examine these published and unpublished data collectively to determine whether there is a significant time-dependent effect of alendronate on toughness of cortical bone. This analysis seemed particularly relevant given the recent occurrence of atypical femoral fractures in humans. Differences in the toughness of ribs taken from dogs derived from five separate experiments were measured. The dogs were orally administered saline (CON, 1 ml/kg/day) or alendronate (ALN) at a clinical dose (0.2 mg/kg/day). Treatment duration ranged from 3 months to 3 years. Groups were compared using ANOVA, and time trends analyzed with linear regression analysis. Linear regressions of the percent difference in toughness between CON and ALN at each time point revealed a significant reduction in toughness with longer exposure to ALN. The downward trend was primarily driven by a downward trend in post-yield toughness, whereas toughness in the pre-yield region was not changed relative to CON. These data suggest that a longer duration of treatment with clinical doses of ALN results in deterioration of cortical bone toughness in a time-dependent manner. As the duration of treatment is lengthened, the cortical bone exhibits increasingly brittle behavior. This may be important in assessing the role that long-term BP treatments play in the risk of atypical fractures of femoral

  7. A new anisotropy index on trabecular bone radiographic images using the fast Fourier transform

    PubMed Central

    Brunet-Imbault, Barbara; Lemineur, Gerald; Chappard, Christine; Harba, Rachid; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Background The degree of anisotropy (DA) on radiographs is related to bone structure, we present a new index to assess DA. Methods In a region of interest from calcaneus radiographs, we applied a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). All the FFT spectra involve the horizontal and vertical components corresponding respectively to longitudinal and transversal trabeculae. By visual inspection, we measured the spreading angles: Dispersion Longitudinal Index (DLI) and Dispersion Transverse Index (DTI) and calculated DA = 180/(DLI+DTI). To test the reliability of DA assessment, we synthesized images simulating radiological projections of periodic structures with elements more or less disoriented. Results Firstly, we tested synthetic images which comprised a large variety of structures from highly anisotropic structure to the almost isotropic, DA was ranging from 1.3 to 3.8 respectively. The analysis of the FFT spectra was performed by two observers, the Coefficients of Variation were 1.5% and 3.1 % for intra-and inter-observer reproducibility, respectively. In 22 post-menopausal women with osteoporotic fracture cases and 44 age-matched controls, DA values were respectively 1.87 ± 0.15 versus 1.72 ± 0.18 (p = 0.001). From the ROC analysis, the Area Under Curve (AUC) were respectively 0.65, 0.62, 0.64, 0.77 for lumbar spine, femoral neck, total femoral BMD and DA. Conclusion The highest DA values in fracture cases suggest that the structure is more anisotropic in osteoporosis due to preferential deletion of trabeculae in some directions. PMID:15927072

  8. The effect of the cathepsin K inhibitor ONO-5334 on trabecular and cortical bone in postmenopausal osteoporosis: the OCEAN study.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Klaus; Nagase, Shinichi; Fuerst, Thomas; Small, Maria; Kuwayama, Tomohiro; Deacon, Stephen; Eastell, Richard; Genant, Harry K

    2014-03-01

    ONO-5334 (Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan) inhibits cathepsin K and has been shown to increase areal bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip and spine in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) allows the study of the cortical and trabecular bone separately and provides structural information such as cortical thickness. We investigated the impact of 2 years of cathepsin K inhibition on these different bone compartments with ONO-5334. The clinical study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo, and active controlled parallel group study conducted in 13 centers in six European countries. The original study period of 12 months was extended by another 12 months. A total of 147 subjects (age 55-75 years) of the QCT substudy who participated in the extension period were included. Subjects had been randomized into one of five treatment arms: placebo; ONO-5334 50 mg twice per day (BID); ONO-5334 100 mg once daily (QD); ONO-5334 300 mg QD; or alendronate 70 mg once weekly (QW). QCT was obtained to evaluate bone structure at the lumbar spine and proximal femur. After 24 months ONO-5334 showed statistically significant increases versus placebo for integral, trabecular, and cortical BMD at the spine and the hip (for ONO-5334 300 mg QD, BMD increases were 10.5%, 7.1%, and 13.4% for integral, cortical, and trabecular BMD at the spine, respectively, and 6.2%, 3.4%, and 14.6% for integral, cortical, and trabecular total femur BMD, respectively). Changes in cortical and trabecular BMD in the spine and hip were similar for alendronate as for ONO-5334. Integral volume did not demonstrate statistically significant changes under ONO-5334 treatment, thus there was no evidence of periosteal apposition, neither at the spine nor at the femur. Cortical thickness changes were not statistically significant for ONO-5334 in the spine and hip, with exception of a 2.1% increase after month 24 in the intertrochanter for ONO-5334 300 mg QD. Over 2

  9. Image-guided Raman spectroscopic recovery of canine cortical bone contrast in situ

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Schulmerich, Matthew; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Pogue, Brian W.; Morris, Michael D.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering provides valuable biochemical and molecular markers for studying bone tissue composition with use in predicting fracture risk in osteoporosis. Raman tomography can image through a few centimeters of tissue but is limited by low spatial resolution. X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging can provide high-resolution image-guidance of the Raman spectroscopic characterization, which enhances the quantitative recovery of the Raman signals, and this technique provides additional information to standard imaging methods. This hypothesis was tested in data measured from Teflon® tissue phantoms and from a canine limb. Image-guided Raman spectroscopy (IG-RS) of the canine limb using CT images of the tissue to guide the recovery recovered a contrast of 145:1 between the cortical bone and background. Considerably less contrast was found without the CT image to guide recovery. This study presents the first known IG-RS results from tissue and indicates that intrinsically high contrasts (on the order of a hundred fold) are available. PMID:18679495

  10. Bone microarchitecture at muscle attachment sites: The relationship between macroscopic scores of entheses and their cortical and trabecular microstructural design.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Ksenija; Milovanovic, Petar; Hahn, Michael; Busse, Björn; Amling, Michael; Djuric, Marija

    2015-05-01

    The studies of entheses in bioarchaeology attempted to reconstruct the habitual physical activities of past populations. However, the studies of microarchitecture of the underlying bone are still lacking despite well-known potential of bone internal microarchitecture to reflect mechanical loading. It is unknown whether different morphological expressions of entheseal changes (ECs) correlate with the microstructural characteristics of the underlining bone. This study analyzed bone microstructural characteristics at the entheses. Our focus was on examining the possible successive nature of the three-stage scale of entheseal macroscopic changes by comparing EC scores with the microarchitectural features at the attachment sites. The study was based on the hypothesis that mechanical loading influences the microarchitecture of the bone at the attachment site. The bone samples were taken from 24 adult male skeletons from medieval cemeteries in Serbia, with different macroscopic expression score of EC. We evaluated the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of four entheses of the lower limbs (origin of the soleus muscle and the insertions of the adductor magnus, gluteus maximus, and iliopsoas muscles). The specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography (Scanco µCT 40). Our data showed a lack of consistent correlation between stages of the macroscopic scoring systems with microarchitecture at the entheses, only cortical thickness was significantly different between EC stages. Analyzing relationship between trabecular and cortical bone microstructure we found correlations between cortical and trabecular variables only in Stage C. Results of our study suggest that macroscopic EC might not represent distinct successive phases in bone adaptation to mechanical loading. PMID:25546406

  11. Uncemented Total Hip Replacement Stem Loosening after Long Term Compressive Stress Application: A Simulated FEA Study of Cortical Bone Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    The purpose of this study is to predict with the use of FEA, the differing predisposition to cortical bone resorption and subsequent distal migration of an un-cemented femoral hip replacement stem subjected to long term biomechanical high compressive stresses, while varying the load angles, the material properties of the stem, and the stem length. A two-dimensional hip model was constructed to estimate the minimum principle stresses (P3) and migration magnitudes. Bone remodeling at the interface between the bone and the prosthesis was performed by comparison of the local compressive stress to physiological stress values governing bone resorption. With respect to load angles, migrations of the hip prosthesis did not occur with load angles between 63° and 74° load angle in relation to the longitudinal axis of the bony femur, as the compressive stress generated on the cortical bone was under the criteria threshold for bone resorption (-50MPa). In addition, the magnitude of migration (17%decrease) was relatively more sensitive to changes in stem length than those (92%decrease) of changes of material properties. In conclusion, using an FEA model for bone remodeling, based on the high compressive stresses exerted on distal cortical bone, it is possible to estimate migration magnitudes of cementless hip prostheses in the long term. The load angles have been shown to be an important parameter affecting the migration magnitudes and furthermore, it can be demonstrated that the stiffer materials and reduction of stem length can decrease the migration of cementless hip prosthesis in the long term.

  12. Exercise during growth and young adulthood is independently associated with cortical bone size and strength in old Swedish men.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Martin; Sundh, Daniel; Ohlsson, Claes; Karlsson, Magnus; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have reported an association between exercise during youth and increased areal bone mineral density at old age. The primary aim of this study was to investigate if exercise during growth was independently associated with greater cortical bone size and whole bone strength in weight-bearing bone in old men. The tibia and radius were measured using both peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) (XCT-2000; Stratec) at the diaphysis and high-resolution pQCT (HR-pQCT) (XtremeCT; Scanco) at the metaphysis to obtain cortical bone geometry and finite element-derived bone strength in distal tibia and radius, in 597 men, 79.9 ± 3.4 (mean ± SD) years old. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information about previous and current physical activity. In order to determine whether level of exercise during growth and young adulthood or level of current physical activity were independently associated with bone parameters in both tibia and radius, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) analyses were used. Adjusting for covariates and current physical activity, we found that men in the group with the highest level of exercise early in life (regular exercise at a competitive level) had higher tibial cortical cross-sectional area (CSA; 6.3%, p < 0.001) and periosteal circumference (PC; 1.6%, p = 0.011) at the diaphysis, and higher estimated bone strength (failure load: 7.5%, p < 0.001; and stiffness: 7.8%, p < 0.001) at the metaphysis than men in the subgroup with the lowest level of exercise during growth and young adulthood. Subjects in the group with the highest level of current physical activity had smaller tibial endosteal circumference (EC; 3.6%, p = 0.012) at the diaphysis than subjects with a lower current physical activity, when adjusting for covariates and level of exercise during growth and young adulthood. These findings indicate that exercise during growth can increase the cortical bone size via periosteal

  13. The high bone mass phenotype is characterised by a combined cortical and trabecular bone phenotype: Findings from a pQCT case–control study☆

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Celia L.; Sayers, Adrian; Lazar, Victor; Steel, Sue; Dennison, Elaine M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Rittweger, Jörn; Tobias, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    High bone mass (HBM), detected in 0.2% of DXA scans, is characterised by a mild skeletal dysplasia largely unexplained by known genetic mutations. We conducted the first systematic assessment of the skeletal phenotype in unexplained HBM using pQCT in our unique HBM population identified from screening routine UK NHS DXA scans. pQCT measurements from the mid and distal tibia and radius in 98 HBM cases were compared with (i) 65 family controls (constituting unaffected relatives and spouses), and (ii) 692 general population controls. HBM cases had substantially greater trabecular density at the distal tibia (340 [320, 359] mg/cm3), compared to both family (294 [276, 312]) and population controls (290 [281, 299]) (p < 0.001 for both, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height, alcohol, smoking, malignancy, menopause, steroid and estrogen replacement use). Similar results were obtained at the distal radius. Greater cortical bone mineral density (cBMD) was observed in HBM cases, both at the midtibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001). Total bone area (TBA) was higher in HBM cases, at the distal and mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.05 versus family controls), suggesting greater periosteal apposition. Cortical thickness was increased at the mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001), implying reduced endosteal expansion. Together, these changes resulted in greater predicted cortical strength (strength strain index [SSI]) in both tibia and radius (p < 0.001). We then examined relationships with age; tibial cBMD remained constant with increasing age amongst HBM cases (adjusted β − 0.01 [− 0.02, 0.01], p = 0.41), but declined in family controls (− 0.05 [− 0.03, − 0.07], p < 0.001) interaction p = 0.002; age-related changes in tibial trabecular BMD, CBA and SSI were also divergent. In contrast, at the radius HBM cases and controls showed parallel age-related declines in cBMD and trabecular BMD. HBM is characterised by increased trabecular BMD and

  14. Liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass but is dispensable for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in female mice.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Windahl, Sara H; Saxon, Leanne; Sjögren, Klara; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes

    2016-07-01

    Low circulating IGF-I is associated with increased fracture risk. Conditional depletion of IGF-I produced in osteoblasts or osteocytes inhibits the bone anabolic effect of mechanical loading. Here, we determined the role of endocrine IGF-I for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in young adult and old female mice with adult, liver-specific IGF-I inactivation (LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice, serum IGF-I reduced by ≈70%) and control mice. The right tibia was subjected to short periods of axial cyclic compressive loading three times/wk for 2 wk, and measurements were performed using microcomputed tomography and mechanical testing by three-point bending. In the nonloaded left tibia, the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice had lower cortical bone area and increased cortical porosity, resulting in reduced bone mechanical strength compared with the controls. Mechanical loading induced a similar response in LI-IGF-I(-/-) and control mice in terms of cortical bone area and trabecular bone volume fraction. In fact, mechanical loading produced a more marked increase in cortical bone mechanical strength, which was associated with a less marked increase in cortical porosity, in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice compared with the control mice. In conclusion, liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass, cortical porosity, and mechanical strength under normal (nonloaded) conditions. However, despite an ∼70% reduction in circulating IGF-I, the osteogenic response to mechanical loading was not attenuated in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice.

  15. Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Janovic, Aleksa; Saveljic, Igor; Vukicevic, Arso; Nikolic, Dalibor; Rakocevic, Zoran; Jovicic, Gordana; Filipovic, Nenad; Djuric, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the occlusal load distribution through the mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition is essential because alterations in magnitude and/or direction of occlusal forces may cause remarkable changes in cortical and trabecular bone structure. Previous analyses by strain gauge technique, photoelastic and, more recently, finite element (FE) methods provided no direct evidence for occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone compartments individually. Therefore, we developed an improved three-dimensional FE model of the human skull in order to clarify the distribution of occlusal forces through the cortical and trabecular bone during habitual masticatory activities. Particular focus was placed on the load transfer through the anterior and posterior maxilla. The results were presented in von Mises stress (VMS) and the maximum principal stress, and compared to the reported FE and strain gauge data. Our qualitative stress analysis indicates that occlusal forces distribute through the mid-facial skeleton along five vertical and two horizontal buttresses. We demonstrated that cortical bone has a priority in the transfer of occlusal load in the anterior maxilla, whereas both cortical and trabecular bone in the posterior maxilla are equally involved in performing this task. Observed site dependence of the occlusal load distribution may help clinicians in creating strategies for implantology and orthodontic treatments. Additionally, the magnitude of VMS in our model was significantly lower in comparison to previous FE models composed only of cortical bone. This finding suggests that both cortical and trabecular bone should be modeled whenever stress will be quantitatively analyzed.

  16. Quantification of Alterations in Cortical Bone Geometry Using Site Specificity Software in Mouse models of Aging and the Responses to Ovariectomy and Altered Loading.

    PubMed

    Galea, Gabriel L; Hannuna, Sion; Meakin, Lee B; Delisser, Peter J; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into the effect of (re)modeling stimuli on cortical bone in rodents normally rely on analysis of changes in bone mass and architecture at a narrow cross-sectional site. However, it is well established that the effects of axial loading produce site-specific changes throughout bones' structure. Non-mechanical influences (e.g., hormones) can be additional to or oppose locally controlled adaptive responses and may have more generalized effects. Tools currently available to study site-specific cortical bone adaptation are limited. Here, we applied novel site specificity software to measure bone mass and architecture at each 1% site along the length of the mouse tibia from standard micro-computed tomography (μCT) images. Resulting measures are directly comparable to those obtained through μCT analysis (R (2) > 0.96). Site Specificity analysis was used to compare a number of parameters in tibiae from young adult (19-week-old) versus aged (19-month-old) mice; ovariectomized and entire mice; limbs subjected to short periods of axial loading or disuse induced by sciatic neurectomy. Age was associated with uniformly reduced cortical thickness and site-specific decreases in cortical area most apparent in the proximal tibia. Mechanical loading site-specifically increased cortical area and thickness in the proximal tibia. Disuse uniformly decreased cortical thickness and decreased cortical area in the proximal tibia. Ovariectomy uniformly reduced cortical area without altering cortical thickness. Differences in polar moment of inertia between experimental groups were only observed in the proximal tibia. Aging and ovariectomy also altered eccentricity in the distal tibia. In summary, site specificity analysis provides a valuable tool for measuring changes in cortical bone mass and architecture along the entire length of a bone. Changes in the (re)modeling response determined at a single site may not reflect the response at different locations within the same

  17. Autogenous cortical bone and bioactive glass grafting for treatment of intraosseous periodontal defects

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Mahmut; Keles, Gonca Cayir; Cetinkaya, Burcu Ozkan; Balli, Umut; Pamuk, Ferda; Uckan, Sina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this 6-month prospective randomized clinical study was to compare the effectiveness of autogenous cortical bone (ACB) and bioactive glass (BG) grafting for the regenerative treatment of intraosseous periodontal defects. Methods: Via a split-mouth design, 15 chronic periodontitis patients (7 men, 8 women; mean age, 43.47 ± 1.45 years) who had probing pocket depths (PPDs) of ⩾6 mm following initial periodontal therapy were randomly assigned to receive 2 treatments in contralateral areas of the dentition: ACB grafting and BG grafting. The parameters compared in the patients were preoperative and 6-month postoperative PPDs, clinical attachment levels (CALs), and radiographic alveolar bone heights. Results: Both treatment modalities resulted in significant changes in postoperative measurements when compared to preoperative values (p < 0.01). PPDs were decreased, CALs were increased, and radiographic alveolar bone heights were increased by 5.00 ± 0.28, 4.60 ± 0.21, and 5.80 ± 0.43 mm in patients treated with ACB grafting and 5.13 ± 0.32, 4.67 ± 0.27, and 5.33 ± 0.36 mm in patients treated with BG grafting, respectively. Differences between the treatments were not statistically significant (P>.05). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, both ACB and BG grafting led to significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters 6 months postoperatively. These results suggest that either an ACB graft, which is completely safe with no associated concerns about disease transmission and immunogenic reactions, or a BG graft, which has an unlimited supply, can be selected for regenerative periodontal treatment. PMID:23408239

  18. Hibernation does not reduce cortical bone density, area or second moments of inertia in woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed

    Doherty, Alison H; Frampton, Jason D; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2012-06-01

    Long periods of inactivity in most mammals result in bone loss that may not be completely recoverable during an individual's lifetime regardless of future activity. Prolonged inactivity is normal during hibernation, but it remains uncertain whether hibernating mammals suffer decreased bone properties after hibernation that affects survival. We test the hypothesis that relative cortical area (C(A) ), apparent density, bone area fraction (B.Ar/T.Ar), and moments of inertia do not differ between museum samples of woodchucks (Marmota monax) collected before and after hibernation. We used peripheral quantitative computed tomography to examine bone geometry in the femur, tibia, humerus and mandible. We see little evidence for changes in bone measures with hibernation supporting our hypothesis. In fact, when including subadults to increase sample sizes and controlling age statistically, we observed a trend toward increased bone properties following hibernation. Diaphyses were significantly denser in the humerus, femur, and tibia after hibernation, and relative mandibular cortical area was significantly larger. Similarly, relative mechanical indices were significantly larger in the mandible after hibernation. Although tests of individual measures in many cases were not significantly different prehibernation versus posthibernation, the overall pattern of average increase posthibernation was significant for relative C(A) and densities as well as relative diaphyseal mechanical indices when examining outcomes collectively. The exception to this pattern was a reduction in metaphyseal trabecular bone following hibernation. Individually, only humeral B.Ar/T.Ar was significantly reduced, but the average reduction in trabecular measures post-hibernation was significant when examined collectively. Because the sample included subadults, we suggest that much of the increased bone relates to their continued growth during hibernation. Our results indicate that woodchucks are more

  19. Nano-structural, compositional and micro-architectural signs of cortical bone fragility at the superolateral femoral neck in elderly hip fracture patients vs. healthy aged controls.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Petar; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djonic, Danijela; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Hahn, Michael; Nikolic, Slobodan; Amling, Michael; Busse, Bjoern; Djuric, Marija

    2014-07-01

    To unravel the origins of decreased bone strength in the superolateral femoral neck, we assessed bone structural features across multiple length scales at this cortical fracture initiating region in postmenopausal women with hip fracture and in aged-matched controls. Our combined methodological approach encompassed atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization of cortical bone nano-structure, assessment of mineral content/distribution via quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), measurement of bone material properties by reference point indentation, as well as evaluation of cortical micro-architecture and osteocyte lacunar density. Our findings revealed a wide range of differences between the fracture group and the controls, suggesting a number of detrimental changes at various levels of cortical bone hierarchical organization that may render bone fragile. Namely, mineral crystals at external cortical bone surfaces of the fracture group were larger (65.22nm±41.21nm vs. 36.75nm±18.49nm, p<0.001), and a shift to a higher mineral content and more homogenous mineralization profile as revealed via qBEI were found in the bone matrix of the fracture group. Fracture cases showed nearly 35% higher cortical porosity and showed significantly reduced osteocyte lacunar density compared to controls (226±27 vs. 247±32#/mm(2), p=0.05). Along with increased crystal size, a shift towards higher mineralization and a tendency to increased cortical porosity and reduced osteocyte lacunar number delineate that cortical bone of the superolateral femoral neck bears distinct signs of fragility at various levels of its structural organization. These results contribute to the understanding of hierarchical bone structure changes in age-related fragility.

  20. Mechanical and material properties of cortical and trabecular bone from cannabinoid receptor-1-null (Cnr1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Aysha B; Goodyear, Simon R; Ross, Ruth A; Aspden, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is known for its regulatory effects on bone metabolism through the cannabinoid receptors, Cnr1 and Cnr2. In this study we analysed the mechanical and material properties of long bones from Cnr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background. Tibiae and femora from 5- and 12-week-old mice were subjected to three-point bending to measure bending stiffness and yield strength. Elastic modulus, density and mineral content were measured in the diaphysis. Second moment of area (MOA2), inner and outer perimeters of the cortical shaft and trabecular fractional bone volume (BV/TV) were measured using micro-CT. In Cnr1(-/-) males and females at both ages the bending stiffness was reduced due to a smaller MOA2. Bone from Cnr1(-/-) females had a greater modulus than wild-type controls, although no differences were observed in males. BV/TV of 12-week-old Cnr1(-/-) females was greater than controls, although no difference was seen at 5-weeks. On the contrary, Cnr1(-/-) males had the same BV/TV as controls at 12-weeks while they had significantly lower values at 5-weeks. This study shows that deleting Cnr1 decreases the amount of cortical bone in both males and females at 12-weeks, but increases the amount of trabecular bone only in females.

  1. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bi-component analysis: bound and free water evaluation of bovine cortical bone subject to sequential drying.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Reni; Bae, Won; Diaz, Eric; Masuda, Koichi; Chung, Christine B; Bydder, Graeme M; Du, Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Recent proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy studies have shown that cortical bone exists as different components which have distinct transverse relaxation times (T2s). However, cortical bone shows zero or near zero signal with all conventional MR sequences on clinical scanners and the different water components cannot be assessed with this approach. In order to detect signal in this situation a two-dimensional (2D) non-slice selective ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequence with a nominal TE of 8 μs was used together with bi-component analysis to quantify bound and free water in bovine cortical bone at 3T. Total water concentration was quantified using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. 2D and 3D UTE imaging were performed on 14 bovine bone samples which were subjected to sequential air drying to evaluate free water loss, followed by oven drying to evaluate bound water loss. Sequential bone weight loss was measured concurrently using a precision balance. Bone porosity was measured with micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging. UTE measured free water loss was higher than the volume of cortical pores measured with μCT, but lower than the gravimetric bone water loss measured during air drying. UTE assessed bound water loss was about 82% of gravimetric bone water loss during oven drying. On average bovine cortical bone showed about 13% free water and 87% bound water. There was a high correlation (R=0.91; P<0.0001) between UTE MR measured free water loss and gravimetric bone weight loss during sequential air drying, and a significant correlation (R=0.69; P<0.01) between UTE bound water loss and gravimetric bone weight loss during oven drying. These results show that UTE bi-component analysis can reliably quantify bound and free water in cortical bone. The technique has potential applications for the in vivo evaluation of bone porosity and organic matrix.

  2. Benefits of mineralized bone cortical allograft for immediate implant placement in extraction sites: an in vivo study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mineralized bone cortical allograft (MBCA), with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane derived from bovine pericardium, on alveolar bone remodeling after immediate implant placement in a dog model. Methods Six mongrel dogs were included. The test and control sites were randomly selected. Four biradicular premolars were extracted from the mandible. In control sites, implants without an allograft or membrane were placed immediately in the fresh extraction sockets. In the test sites, an MBCA was placed to fill the gap between the bone socket wall and implant, with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane. Specimens were collected after 1 and 3 months. The amount of residual particles and new bone quality were evaluated by histomorphometry. Results Few residual graft particles were observed to be closely embedded in the new bone without any contact with the implant surface. The allograft combined with a resorbable collagen membrane limited the resorption of the buccal wall in height and width. The histological quality of the new bone was equivalent to that of the original bone. The MBCA improved the quality of new bone formation, with few residual particles observed at 3 months. Conclusions The preliminary results of this animal study indicate a real benefit in obtaining new bone as well as in enhancing osseointegration due to the high resorbability of cortical allograft particles, in comparison to the results of xenografts or other biomaterials (mineralized or demineralized cancellous allografts) that have been presented in the literature. Furthermore, the use of an MBCA combined with a collagen membrane in extraction and immediate implant placement limited the extent of post-extraction resorption. PMID:27800212

  3. Eldecalcitol improves mechanical strength of cortical bones by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in the senescence-accelerated SAM/P6 mice - a comparison with alfacalcidol.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Ayako; Sakai, Sadaoki; Saito, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2014-10-01

    Eldecalcitol (ELD), a 2β-hydroxypropyloxy derivative of 1α,25(OH)2D3, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption that has demonstrated a greater effect at reducing the risk of fracture in osteoporotic patients than alfacalcidol (ALF). In the present study, we used the senescence-accelerated mouse strain P6 (SAM/P6), which has low bone mass caused by osteoblast dysfunction, to evaluate the effect of ELD on cortical bone in comparison with ALF. Four-month-old SAM/P6 mice were given either ELD (0.025 or 0.05μg/kg) or ALF (0.2 or 0.4μg/kg) by oral gavage 5 times/week for 6 weeks. Both ELD and ALF increased serum calcium (Ca) in a dose-dependent manner. Serum Ca levels in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group were comparable to those of the ALF 0.2μg/kg group. ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly improved the bone biomechanical properties of the femur compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.001) and the ALF 0.2μg/kg group (p<0.05) evaluated by 3-point bending test. The cortical area of the mid-femur in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group but not the ALF 0.2μg/kg group was significantly higher than those of the vehicle control group (p<0.001). Bone histomorphometry revealed that in the femoral endocortical surface, the suppression of bone resorption parameters (N.Oc/BS) and bone formation parameters (MS/BS) by ELD (0.05μg/kg) was greater than that by ALF (0.2μg/kg). In contrast, in the femoral periosteal surface, ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly increased bone formation parameters (BFR/BS, MS/BS) compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively), whereas ALF 0.2μg/kg did not alter these parameters. These results indicate that ELD improved the biomechanical properties of femoral cortical bone not only by inhibiting endocortical bone resorption but also by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in SAM/P6 mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  4. Development of a strain rate dependent material model of human cortical bone for computer-aided reconstruction of injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Zahra; Zioupos, Peter; Graw, Matthias; Peldschus, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided methods such as finite-element simulation offer a great potential in the forensic reconstruction of injury mechanisms. Numerous studies have been performed on understanding and analysing the mechanical properties of bone and the mechanism of its fracture. Determination of the mechanical properties of bones is made on the same basis used for other structural materials. The mechanical behaviour of bones is affected by the mechanical properties of the bone material, the geometry, the loading direction and mode and of course the loading rate. Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of cortical bone has been well demonstrated in literature studies, but as many of these were performed on animal bones and at non-physiological strain rates it is questionable how these will apply in the human situations. High strain-rates dominate in a lot of forensic applications in automotive crashes and assault scenarios. There is an overwhelming need to a model which can describe the complex behaviour of bone at lower strain rates as well as higher ones. Some attempts have been made to model the viscoelastic and viscoplastic properties of the bone at high strain rates using constitutive mathematical models with little demonstrated success. The main objective of the present study is to model the rate dependent behaviour of the bones based on experimental data. An isotropic material model of human cortical bone with strain rate dependency effects is implemented using the LS-DYNA material library. We employed a human finite element model called THUMS (Total Human Model for Safety), developed by Toyota R&D Labs and the Wayne State University, USA. The finite element model of the human femur is extracted from the THUMS model. Different methods have been employed to develop a strain rate dependent material model for the femur bone. Results of one the recent experimental studies on human femur have been employed to obtain the numerical model for cortical femur. A

  5. Development of a strain rate dependent material model of human cortical bone for computer-aided reconstruction of injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Zahra; Zioupos, Peter; Graw, Matthias; Peldschus, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided methods such as finite-element simulation offer a great potential in the forensic reconstruction of injury mechanisms. Numerous studies have been performed on understanding and analysing the mechanical properties of bone and the mechanism of its fracture. Determination of the mechanical properties of bones is made on the same basis used for other structural materials. The mechanical behaviour of bones is affected by the mechanical properties of the bone material, the geometry, the loading direction and mode and of course the loading rate. Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of cortical bone has been well demonstrated in literature studies, but as many of these were performed on animal bones and at non-physiological strain rates it is questionable how these will apply in the human situations. High strain-rates dominate in a lot of forensic applications in automotive crashes and assault scenarios. There is an overwhelming need to a model which can describe the complex behaviour of bone at lower strain rates as well as higher ones. Some attempts have been made to model the viscoelastic and viscoplastic properties of the bone at high strain rates using constitutive mathematical models with little demonstrated success. The main objective of the present study is to model the rate dependent behaviour of the bones based on experimental data. An isotropic material model of human cortical bone with strain rate dependency effects is implemented using the LS-DYNA material library. We employed a human finite element model called THUMS (Total Human Model for Safety), developed by Toyota R&D Labs and the Wayne State University, USA. The finite element model of the human femur is extracted from the THUMS model. Different methods have been employed to develop a strain rate dependent material model for the femur bone. Results of one the recent experimental studies on human femur have been employed to obtain the numerical model for cortical femur. A

  6. Trabecular and Cortical Bone of Growing C3H Mice Is Highly Responsive to the Removal of Weightbearing.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sankaran, Jeyantt Srinivas; Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic make-up strongly influences the skeleton's susceptibility to the loss of weight bearing with some inbred mouse strains experiencing great amounts of bone loss while others lose bone at much smaller rates. At young adulthood, female inbred C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are largely resistant to catabolic pressure induced by unloading. Here, we tested whether the depressed responsivity to unloading is inherent to the C3H genetic make-up or whether a younger age facilitates a robust skeletal response to unloading. Nine-week-old, skeletally immature, female C3H mice were subjected to 3wk of hindlimb unloading (HLU, n = 12) or served as normal baseline controls (BC, n = 10) or age-matched controls (AC, n = 12). In all mice, cortical and trabecular architecture of the femur, as well as levels of bone formation and resorption, were assessed with μCT, histomorphometry, and histology. Changes in bone marrow progenitor cell populations were determined with flow cytometry. Following 21d of unloading, HLU mice had 52% less trabecular bone in the distal femur than normal age-matched controls. Reflecting a loss of trabecular tissue compared to baseline controls, trabecular bone formation rates (BFR/BS) in HLU mice were 40% lower than in age-matched controls. Surfaces undergoing osteoclastic resorption were not significantly different between groups. In the mid-diaphysis, HLU inhibited cortical bone growth leading to 14% less bone area compared to age-matched controls. Compared to AC, BFR/BS of HLU mice were 53% lower at the endo-cortical surface and 49% lower at the periosteal surface of the mid-diaphysis. The enriched osteoprogenitor cell population (OPC) comprised 2% of the bone marrow stem cells in HLU mice, significantly different from 3% OPC in the AC group. These data show that bone tissue in actively growing C3H mice is lost rapidly, or fails to grow, during the removal of functional weight bearing-in contrast to the insignificant response previously demonstrated in female

  7. Cortical bone resorption rate in elderly persons: Estimates from long-term in vivo measurements of 90Sr in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    The rate of cortical bone resorption was assessed from long-term in vivo measurements of 90Sr content in the skeleton for men aged 50-80 years and for women 0-30 years after menopause. Measurements of 90Sr were conducted with a whole body counter for residents of the Techa Riverside communities (Southern Urals, Russia), who ingested large amounts of 90Sr as a result of releases of liquid radioactive wastes into the river from the Mayak plutonium facility in early 1950s. The results of this study showed an increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption in both men and women, as based on the use of accidentally ingested 90Sr as a tracer for bone metabolism. In men there was a continuous gradual increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after 55 years from 2.8 to 4.5%/year by the age of 75 years. In women, there was a doubled increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after menopause of up to 6%/year; then the rate remained unchanged for 10-12 years with a subsequent gradual decline down to 5-5.5%/year. Comparison of the rate of cortical bone resorption in men and women older than 55 years showed that women expressed significantly higher levels of cortical bone resorption.

  8. Aged Male Rats Regenerate Cortical Bone with Reduced Osteocyte Density and Reduced Secretion of Nitric Oxide After Mechanical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tayim, Riyad J.; McElderry, John-David; Morris, Michael D.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading is integral to the repair of bone damage. Osteocytes are mechanosensors in bone and participate in signaling through gap junction channels, which are primarily comprised of connexin 43 (Cx43). Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) have anabolic and catabolic effects on bone, and the secretion of these molecules occurs after mechanical stimulation. The effect of age on the repair of bone tissue after damage and on the ability of regenerated bone to transduce mechanical stimulation into a cellular response is unexplored. The goal of this study was to examine (1) osteocytes and their mineralized matrix within regenerated bone from aged and mature animals and (2) the ability of regenerated bone explants from aged and mature animals to transduce cyclic mechanical loading into a cellular response through NO and PGE2 secretion. Bilateral cortical defects were created in the diaphysis of aged (21-month-old) or mature (6-month-old) male rats, and new bone tissue was allowed to grow into a custom implant of controlled geometry. Mineralization and mineral-to-matrix ratio were significantly higher in regenerated bone from aged animals, while lacunar and osteocyte density and phosphorylated (pCx43) and total Cx43 protein were significantly lower, relative to mature animals. Regenerated bone from mature rats had increased pCx43 protein and PGE2 secretion with loading and greater NO secretion relative to aged animals. Reduced osteocyte density and Cx43 in regenerated bone in aged animals could limit the establishment of gap junctions as well as NO and PGE2 secretion after loading, thereby altering bone formation and resorption in vivo. PMID:24370615

  9. Medicarpin, a Natural Pterocarpan, Heals Cortical Bone Defect by Activation of Notch and Wnt Canonical Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandra Prakash; Kureel, Jyoti; Mansoori, Mohd Nizam; Shukla, Priyanka; John, Aijaz A.; Singh, Kavita; Purohit, Dipak; Awasthi, Pallavi; Singh, Divya; Goel, Atul

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the bone regeneration and healing effect of Medicarpin (med) in cortical bone defect model that heals by intramembranous ossification. For the study, female Sprague–Dawley rats were ovariectomized and rendered osteopenic. A drill hole injury was generated in mid femoral bones of all the animals. Med treatment was commenced the day after and continued for 15 days. PTH was taken as a reference standard. Fifteen days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed. Bones were collected for histomorphometry studies at the injury site by micro-computed tomography (μCT) and confocal microscopy. RNA and protein was harvested from newly generated bone. For immunohistochemistry, 5μm sections of decalcified femur bone adjoining the drill hole site were cut. By μCT analysis and calcein labeling of newly generated bone it was found that med promotes bone healing and new bone formation at the injury site and was comparable to PTH in many aspects. Med treatment led to increase in the Runx-2 and osteocalcin signals indicating expansion of osteoprogenitors at the injury site as evaluated by qPCR and immunohistochemical localization. It was observed that med promoted bone regeneration by activating canonical Wnt and notch signaling pathway. This was evident by increased transcript and protein levels of Wnt and notch signaling components in the defect region. Finally, we confirmed that med treatment leads to elevated bone healing in pre-osteoblasts by co localization of beta catenin with osteoblast marker alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion, med treatment promotes new bone regeneration and healing at the injury site by activating Wnt/canonical and notch signaling pathways. This study also forms a strong case for evaluation of med in delayed union and non-union fracture cases. PMID:26657206

  10. Experimental investigations and finite element simulation of cutting heat in vibrational and conventional drilling of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Meng; Zhao, Xiangrui; Zhu, Gang; McClean, Colin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fan, Yubo

    2014-11-01

    Heat generated during bone drilling could cause irreversible thermal damage, which can lead to bone necrosis or even osteomyelitis. In this study, vibrational drilling was applied to fresh bovine bones to investigate the cutting heat in comparison with conventional drilling through experimental investigation and finite element analysis (FEA). The influence of vibrational frequency and amplitude on cutting heat generation and conduction were studied. The experimental results showed that, compared with the conventional drilling, vibrational drilling could significantly reduce the cutting temperature in drilling of cortical bone (P<0.05): the cutting temperature tended to decrease with increasing vibrational frequency and amplitude. The FEA results also showed that the vibrational amplitude holds a significant effect on the cutting heat conduction.

  11. Interactive effects of nutrition, environment, and rat-strain on cortical and vertebral bone geometry and biomechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Li, K.-C.; Salem, G. J.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to generate comparative data on the sensitivity of cortical- and vertebral-bone adaptations in two different rat strains maintained at conditions typical for spaceborne experiments conducted by U.S.A. and USSR. The effects of cage environment, diet, and rat-strain on the cortical (humerus) and vertebral (T7) bones of male Taconic-Sprague-Dawley and Czechoslovakian-Wistar rats were investigated using different flight-simulation cages (one rat/cage for U.S.A.; ten rats/cage for USSR conditions) and fed either U.S.A. or USSR diet. The results showed significant effects of these factors on the humeral and vertebral geometry and mechanical properties, as well as significant interactive effects on the mechanical properties of the humerus.

  12. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  13. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  14. Effect of age on mechanical properties of the collagen phase in different orientations of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Leng, Huijie; Reyes, Michael J; Dong, Xuanliang N; Wang, Xiaodu

    2013-08-01

    The collagen phase plays an important role in mechanical behaviors of cortical bone. However, aging effects on the mechanical behavior of the collagen phase is still poorly understood. In this study, micro-tensile tests were performed on demineralized human cortical bone samples from young, middle-aged, and elderly donors and aging effects on the mechanical properties of the collagen phase in different orientations (i.e. longitudinal and transverse directions of bone) were examined. The results of this study indicated that the elastic modulus and ultimate strength of the demineralized bone specimens decreased with aging in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. However, the failure strain exhibited no significant changes in both orientations regardless of aging. These results suggest that the stiffness and strength of the collagen phase in bone are deteriorated with aging in both longitudinal and transverse directions. However, the aging effect is not reflected in the failure strain of the collagen phase in both longitudinal and transverse orientations, implying that the maximum sustainable deformation of the collagen phase is independent of aging and orientation.

  15. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  16. Probabilistic model of the human cortical bone with mechanical alterations in ultrasonic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desceliers, C.; Soize, C.; Naili, S.; Haiat, G.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical materials are among the most complex mechanical systems. Most often, their microstructure is heterogeneous and random. This is the case for the human cortical bones which are considered in this paper. For such systems, a gradient of porosity can be observed in the thickness direction but, in this case, none of the usual theories of porous materials can be applied. For this reason, a simplified model with gradient for the elasticity tensor is presented. The predictability of this model is improved by taking into account uncertainties. We propose a prior stochastic model of the tensor-valued elasticity field corresponding to an extension of a previous work in which the random elasticity field was constant in space. This extension consists in introducing two ingredients: the introduction of a spatial gradient for the mean elasticity tensor and spatial statistical fluctuations in the thickness direction. The stochastic model which is constructed shows that the observed responses are effectively sensitive with respect to the values of the gradient and to the level of statistical fluctuations. In this sense, this stochastic model will be well adapted to perform its identification solving a stochastic inverse problem that is not the purpose of the present paper.

  17. Cortical bone trajectory screws for the middle-upper thorax: An anatomico-radiological study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Xue, En-Xing; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Qing-An

    2016-08-01

    To quantify the reference data concerning the morphometrics of the middle-upper thorax to guide the placement of cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screws.Eighty patients were studied on computed tomography (CT) scans. The reference anatomical parameters were measured. Next, 20 cadaveric specimens were implanted with CBT screws based on CT measurements. These specimens were then judged directly from the cadaveric vertebrae and X-ray.The maximum length of the trajectory, the maximum diameter, and the cephaled angle exhibited a slight increase trend while the transverse and sagittal angles of the pedicle tended to decrease from T3 to T8. We recommend that the width of CBT screw for middle-upper thoracic spine is 5.0 mm, the length is 25 to 35 mm. The cadaveric anatomical study revealed that 5/240 screws penetrated in the medial or lateral areas, 5/240 screws penetrated in the superior or inferior pedicle wall, and 2/240 screws did not fit into the superior endplate of the pedicle.The CBT screws are safe for the middle-upper thorax. This study provides a theoretical basis for clinical surgery. PMID:27583893

  18. Trabecular and Cortical Bone of Growing C3H Mice Is Highly Responsive to the Removal of Weightbearing

    PubMed Central

    Judex, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic make-up strongly influences the skeleton’s susceptibility to the loss of weight bearing with some inbred mouse strains experiencing great amounts of bone loss while others lose bone at much smaller rates. At young adulthood, female inbred C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are largely resistant to catabolic pressure induced by unloading. Here, we tested whether the depressed responsivity to unloading is inherent to the C3H genetic make-up or whether a younger age facilitates a robust skeletal response to unloading. Nine-week-old, skeletally immature, female C3H mice were subjected to 3wk of hindlimb unloading (HLU, n = 12) or served as normal baseline controls (BC, n = 10) or age-matched controls (AC, n = 12). In all mice, cortical and trabecular architecture of the femur, as well as levels of bone formation and resorption, were assessed with μCT, histomorphometry, and histology. Changes in bone marrow progenitor cell populations were determined with flow cytometry. Following 21d of unloading, HLU mice had 52% less trabecular bone in the distal femur than normal age-matched controls. Reflecting a loss of trabecular tissue compared to baseline controls, trabecular bone formation rates (BFR/BS) in HLU mice were 40% lower than in age-matched controls. Surfaces undergoing osteoclastic resorption were not significantly different between groups. In the mid-diaphysis, HLU inhibited cortical bone growth leading to 14% less bone area compared to age-matched controls. Compared to AC, BFR/BS of HLU mice were 53% lower at the endo-cortical surface and 49% lower at the periosteal surface of the mid-diaphysis. The enriched osteoprogenitor cell population (OPC) comprised 2% of the bone marrow stem cells in HLU mice, significantly different from 3% OPC in the AC group. These data show that bone tissue in actively growing C3H mice is lost rapidly, or fails to grow, during the removal of functional weight bearing—in contrast to the insignificant response previously demonstrated in

  19. Marked disparity between trabecular and cortical bone loss with age in healthy men. Measurement by vertebral computed tomography and radial photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, D.E.; Orwoll, E.S.; Jones, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    To define age-related changes in bone mineral content in normal men, we measured radial (proximal and distal) and vertebral bone mineral content in 62 men aged 30 to 92 years. Radial bone mineral content (largely cortical bone) was measured by single photon absorptiometry, and trabecular vertebral content (T12, L1 to L3) by computed tomography. Radial bone mineral content fell gradually (2% to 3.4% per decade) with age, but vertebral trabecular content fell more rapidly (12% per decade). Body size was not associated with the rate of bone loss from the distal radial and vertebral sites, but men with lower surface areas lost bone more rapidly at the predominantly cortical proximal radial site. The fact that radial cortical bone mineral content falls much less rapidly than vertebral trabecular content with age and is also associated with surface area indicates that trabecular and cortical bone compartments may be independently modulated. Age-related bone loss should not be considered a homogeneous process.

  20. Long-term results of the use of autogenous cortical bone columellas to replace the stapes at stapedectomy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Miklós; Pytel, József; Vóna, Ida; Gerlinger, Imre

    2011-05-01

    The first author has been using an autogenous cortical bone columella to replace the stapes removed during stapedectomy since 1965. The audiograms of 21 of the 271 patients operated on with this method between 1965 and 1989 (i.e. 7.7% of the possible candidates) were available 20-35 (average 26.8) years postoperatively. The operation could be regarded as successful in 20 and unsuccessful in 1 patient in the long run. The audiological data are presented individually as averages of the values obtained at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 kHz. The averaged data (n = 21): preoperative air conduction, 58.27; bone conduction, 24.46; and air-bone gap, 33.81 dB. Postoperative best air conduction, 19.07; bone conduction, 14.10; and air-bone gap, 4.97 dB. Postoperative recent air conduction, 45.77; bone conduction, 38.45; and air-bone gap, 7.32 dB. The best values were measured 1-8 (average 1.57) years postoperatively. In relation to the postoperative best value, the recent value of the air-bone gap had deteriorated by 2.35 dB, and that of the bone conduction by 24.35 dB. The small air-bone gap indicates that the deterioration of the hearing is mainly caused by the deterioration of the function of the inner ear and not by that of the conductive apparatus. The progression of the deterioration differs individually (0.3-1.6, average 0.93 dB/year) and accelerates with age. This finding seems to be a problem that does not depend on the operative technique. The data show that the autogenous bone columella ensures the same good and lasting results as the alloplastic solutions; moreover, there is no problem with the incus-prosthesis connection.

  1. Quantification of Age-Related Tissue-Level Failure Strains of Rat Femoral Cortical Bones Using an Approach Combining Macrocompressive Test and Microfinite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Jiazi; Jia, Zhengbin; Hu, Yanjuan

    2016-04-01

    Bone mechanical properties vary with age; meanwhile, a close relationship exists among bone mechanical properties at different levels. Therefore, conducting multilevel analyses for bone structures with different ages are necessary to elucidate the effects of aging on bone mechanical properties at different levels. In this study, an approach that combined microfinite element (micro-FE) analysis and macrocompressive test was established to simulate the failure of male rat femoral cortical bone. Micro-FE analyses were primarily performed for rat cortical bones with different ages to simulate their failure processes under compressive load. Tissue-level failure strains in tension and compression of these cortical bones were then back-calculated by fitting the experimental stress-strain curves. Thus, tissue-level failure strains of rat femoral cortical bones with different ages were quantified. The tissue-level failure strain exhibited a biphasic behavior with age: in the period of skeletal maturity (1-7 months of age), the failure strain gradually increased; when the rat exceeded 7 months of age, the failure strain sharply decreased. In the period of skeletal maturity, both the macro- and tissue-levels mechanical properties showed a large promotion. In the period of skeletal aging (9-15 months of age), the tissue-level mechanical properties sharply deteriorated; however, the macromechanical properties only slightly deteriorated. The age-related changes in tissue-level failure strain were revealed through the analysis of male rat femoral cortical bones with different ages, which provided a theoretical basis to understand the relationship between rat cortical bone mechanical properties at macro- and tissue-levels and decrease of bone strength with age. PMID:26902102

  2. Quantification of Age-Related Tissue-Level Failure Strains of Rat Femoral Cortical Bones Using an Approach Combining Macrocompressive Test and Microfinite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Jiazi; Jia, Zhengbin; Hu, Yanjuan

    2016-04-01

    Bone mechanical properties vary with age; meanwhile, a close relationship exists among bone mechanical properties at different levels. Therefore, conducting multilevel analyses for bone structures with different ages are necessary to elucidate the effects of aging on bone mechanical properties at different levels. In this study, an approach that combined microfinite element (micro-FE) analysis and macrocompressive test was established to simulate the failure of male rat femoral cortical bone. Micro-FE analyses were primarily performed for rat cortical bones with different ages to simulate their failure processes under compressive load. Tissue-level failure strains in tension and compression of these cortical bones were then back-calculated by fitting the experimental stress-strain curves. Thus, tissue-level failure strains of rat femoral cortical bones with different ages were quantified. The tissue-level failure strain exhibited a biphasic behavior with age: in the period of skeletal maturity (1-7 months of age), the failure strain gradually increased; when the rat exceeded 7 months of age, the failure strain sharply decreased. In the period of skeletal maturity, both the macro- and tissue-levels mechanical properties showed a large promotion. In the period of skeletal aging (9-15 months of age), the tissue-level mechanical properties sharply deteriorated; however, the macromechanical properties only slightly deteriorated. The age-related changes in tissue-level failure strain were revealed through the analysis of male rat femoral cortical bones with different ages, which provided a theoretical basis to understand the relationship between rat cortical bone mechanical properties at macro- and tissue-levels and decrease of bone strength with age.

  3. Sterilization by gamma radiation impairs the tensile fatigue life of cortical bone by two orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Ozan; Belaney, Ryan M

    2005-09-01

    Cortical bone grafts are utilized frequently for skeletal reconstruction, spinal fusion and tumor surgery. Due to its efficacy and convenience terminal sterilization by gamma radiation is often essential to minimize disease transmission and infection. However, the impairment in the material properties of bone tissue secondary to gamma radiation sterilization is a concern since the mechanical functionality of a bone graft is of primary importance. While the extent of this impairment is well investigated for monotonic loading conditions, there does not seem to exist any information on the effects of gamma radiation sterilization on cortical bone's fatigue properties, the physiologically relevant mode of loading. In this study we investigated the degradation in the high-cycle and low-cycle tensile fatigue lives of cortical bone tissue secondary to gamma radiation sterilization at a dose of 36.4 kGy which approximately falls in the higher end of the standard dose range used in tissue banking. The high-cycle and the low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted under load control at initial strain levels of 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Monotonic tensile tests were also conducted to compare the impairment of fatigue properties with the impairment of monotonic properties. Results demonstrated that the impairment in both the high-cycle and the low-cycle fatigue lives were two orders of magnitude following sterilization, a change much more pronounced than that observed for monotonic loading. In conclusion, the results suggest that the impairment of the mechanical function of gamma radiation sterilized allografts is even worse in fatigue than monotonically. Therefore, grafts should be designed to minimize functional strains and avoid stress raisers to prevent premature fatigue failures.

  4. Deletion of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Osteoprogenitor Cells Increases Trabecular but Not Cortical Bone Mass in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Kristy M.; Fujita, Koji; Fraser, Daniel; McGregor, Ulrike; Drake, Matthew T.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Monroe, David G.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of ERα in regulating bone metabolism has been extensively studied, ERβ has been largely dismissed as a relevant modulator of bone mass. Previous studies examining ERβ utilized a germline knockout mouse expressing transcript variants of ERβ and displaying systemic hormonal changes that confounded interpretation of the skeletal phenotype. Thus, we used a conditional ERβ mouse model to achieve deletion of ERβ specifically in early osteoprogenitor cells using the Prx1-Cre driver. We observed marked increases in the trabecular bone volume fraction (of 58% [p <0.003] and 93% [p <0.0003] in 6- and 12-week-old female ERβPrx1–CKO mice, respectively) but no changes in cortical bone. Serum estradiol and IGF-I levels were unaltered in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Bone formation and resorption indices by histomorphometry and serum assays were unchanged in these mice, suggesting that alterations in bone turnover may have occurred early in development. However, the ratio of colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-OBs) to CFU-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) was increased in bone marrow cultures from ERβPrx1–CKO compared with control mice, indicating increased differentiation of osteoblast precursor cells into osteoblasts in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Detailed quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of 128 genes in 16 prespecified pathways revealed significant downregulation of 11 pathways in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Thus, deletion of ERβ specifically in osteoblast lineage cells, in the absence of all splice variants, increases trabecular bone mass and modulates multiple pathways related to bone metabolism. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ERβ in bone may provide a novel approach to treat osteoporosis. PMID:26418452

  5. Histomorphometric Assessment of Cancellous and Cortical Bone Material Distribution in the Proximal Humerus of Normal and Osteoporotic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Christoph M.; Schmidutz, Florian; Helfen, Tobias; Richards, R. Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Milz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder predominantly affecting postmenopausal women but also men at an advanced age. Both genders may suffer from low-energy fractures of, for example, the proximal humerus when reduction of the bone stock or/and quality has occurred. The aim of the current study was to compare the amount of bone in typical fracture zones of the proximal humerus in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic individuals. The amount of bone in the proximal humerus was determined histomorphometrically in frontal plane sections. The donor bones were allocated to normal and osteoporotic groups using the T-score from distal radius DXA measurements of the same extremities. The T-score evaluation was done according to WHO criteria. Regional thickness of the subchondral plate and the metaphyseal cortical bone were measured using interactive image analysis. At all measured locations the amount of cancellous bone was significantly lower in individuals from the osteoporotic group compared to the non-osteoporotic one. The osteoporotic group showed more significant differences between regions of the same bone than the non-osteoporotic group. In both groups the subchondral cancellous bone and the subchondral plate were least affected by bone loss. In contrast, the medial metaphyseal region in the osteoporotic group exhibited higher bone loss in comparison to the lateral side. This observation may explain prevailing fracture patterns, which frequently involve compression fractures and certainly has an influence on the stability of implants placed in this medial region. It should be considered when planning the anchoring of osteosynthesis materials in osteoporotic patients with fractures of the proximal humerus. PMID:26705200

  6. Effects of Chronic Heavy Alcohol Consumption and Endurance Exercise on Cancellous and Cortical Bone Microarchitecture in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Teresa L.; Gaddini, Gino; Branscum, Adam J.; Olson, Dawn A.; Caroline-Westerlind, Kim; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone health is influenced by numerous lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise. Alcohol is a major non-essential constituent of diet and has dose and context-dependent effects on bone. Endurance exercise is associated with increased risk for stress fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term independent and combined effects of chronic heavy alcohol consumption and endurance exercise (treadmill running) on bone mass and microarchitecture in young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Six-month-old male rats were randomized into 4 groups (9–13 rats/group): sedentary+control diet, sedentary+ethanol diet, exercise+control diet, or exercise+ethanol diet. Ethanol-fed rats consumed a liquid diet (ethanol comprised 35% of caloric intake) ad libitum. Control rats were pair-fed the same diet with isocaloric substitution of ethanol with maltose-dextran. Exercise was conducted on a motorized treadmill (15% grade for 30 min) 5 days/week for 16 weeks. Femur and 12th thoracic vertebra were analyzed for bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) using densitometry and cortical and cancellous bone architecture using microcomputed tomography. Results Ethanol consumption resulted in lower femur length, BMC, and BMD, and lower midshaft femur cortical volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia. In addition, trabecular thickness was lower in vertebra of ethanol-fed rats. Endurance exercise had no independent effect on any endpoints evaluated. A significant interaction between endurance exercise and ethanol was detected for several cancellous endpoints in the distal femur metaphysis. Ethanol-consuming rats that exercised had lower distal femur metaphysis bone volume/tissue volume, trabecular connectivity density, and trabecular thickness compared to exercising rats that consumed control diet. Conclusions The results obtained in this model suggest that chronic heavy alcohol consumption may reduce skeletal integrity by reducing

  7. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100–150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1–10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications. PMID:26782020

  8. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100-150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1-10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications.

  9. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100-150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1-10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications.

  10. Selective detection and complete identification of triglycerides in cortical bone by high-resolution (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-07-28

    Using (1)H-based magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we report an atomistic-level characterization of triglycerides in compact cortical bone. By suppressing contributions from immobile molecules present in bone, we show that a (1)H-based constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak (CTUC) two-dimensional COSY-type experiment that correlates the chemical shifts of protons can selectively detect a mobile triglyceride layer as the main component of small lipid droplets embedded on the surface of collagen fibrils. High sensitivity and resolution afforded by this NMR approach could be potentially utilized to investigate the origin of triglycerides and their pathological roles associated with bone fractures, diseases, and aging. PMID:27374353

  11. Core binding factor β of osteoblasts maintains cortical bone mass via stabilization of Runx2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Eun; Park, Na-Rae; Che, Xiangguo; Han, Min-Su; Jeong, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Park, Clara Yongjoo; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kim, Jung-Eun; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Choi, Je-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ), the partner protein of Runx family transcription factors, enhances Runx function by increasing the binding of Runx to DNA. Null mutations of Cbfb result in embryonic death, which can be rescued by restoring fetal hematopoiesis but only until birth, where bone formation is still nearly absent. Here, we address a direct role of Cbfβ in skeletal homeostasis by generating osteoblast-specific Cbfβ-deficient mice (Cbfb(Δob/Δob) ) from Cbfb-floxed mice crossed with mice expressing Cre from the Col1a1 promoter. Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice showed normal growth and development but exhibited reduced bone mass, particularly of cortical bone. The reduction of bone mass in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice is similar to the phenotype of mice with haploinsufficiency of Runx2. Although the number of osteoblasts remained unchanged, the number of active osteoblasts decreased in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice and resulted in lower mineral apposition rate. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression of osteogenic markers, including Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, and osteopontin, was significantly repressed in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice compared with wild-type mice. Cbfβ deficiency also reduced Runx2 protein levels in osteoblasts. The mechanism was revealed by forced expression of Cbfβ, which increased Runx2 protein levels in vitro by inhibiting polyubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation. Collectively, these findings indicate that Cbfβ stabilizes Runx2 in osteoblasts by forming a complex and thus facilitates the proper maintenance of bone mass, particularly cortical bone.

  12. Osteoporosis drug effects on cortical and trabecular bone microstructure: a review of HR-pQCT analyses.

    PubMed

    Lespessailles, Eric; Hambli, Ridha; Ferrari, Serge

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new non-invasive analytical techniques and particularly the advent of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) it is possible to assess cortical and trabecular bone changes under the effects of ageing, diseases and treatments. In the present study, we reviewed the treatment-related effects on bone parameters assessed by HRpQCT imaging. We identified 12 full-length articles published in peer-reviewed journals describing treatment-induced changes assessed by HRpQCT. The design of these studies varied a lot in terms of duration and methodology: some of them were open-labelled, others were double-blind, placebo-controlled or double-blind, double-dummy, active controlled. In addition, the sample size in these studies ranged from 11 to 324 patients. Motion artifacts occurring during data acquisition were sometimes a real challenge particularly at the radius leading sometimes to exclude the analysis at the radius due to the uninterpretability of microstructural parameters. Responses to therapies were treatment-specific and divergent effects in cortical and trabecular bone with antiresorptive or anabolic agents were observed. Standardization of bone microarchitecture parameters (including porosity) and bone strength estimates by finite element analysis (FEA) are mandatory. The additional value of microarchitecture and FEA estimates changes with therapies in terms of improvement in fracture outcomes which have to be adequately assessed in clinical trials with fracture end point. Data from these reviewed studies advance our understanding of the microstructural consequences of osteoporosis and highlight potential differences in bone quality outcomes within therapies. PMID:27617082

  13. Bone lead (Pb) content at the tibia is associated with thinner distal tibia cortices and lower volumetric bone density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andy K O; Beattie, Karen A; Bhargava, Aakash; Cheung, Marco; Webber, Colin E; Chettle, David R; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Conflicting evidence suggests that bone lead or blood lead may reduce areal bone mineral density (BMD). Little is known about how lead at either compartment affects bone structure. This study examined postmenopausal women (N=38, mean age 76 ± 8, body mass index (BMI): 26.74 ± 4.26 kg/m(2)) within the Hamilton cohort of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), measuring bone lead at 66% of the non-dominant leg and at the calcaneus using (109)Cadmium X-ray fluorescence. Volumetric BMD and structural parameters were obtained from peripheral quantitative computed tomography images (200 μm in-plane resolution, 2.3 ± 0.5mm slice thickness) of the same 66% site and of the distal 4% site of the tibia length. Blood lead was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry and blood-to-bone lead partition coefficients (PBB, log ratio) were computed. Multivariable linear regression examined each of bone lead at the 66% tibia, calcaneus, blood lead and PBB as related to each of volumetric BMD and structural parameters, adjusting for age and BMI, diabetes or antiresorptive therapy. Regression coefficients were reported along with 95% confidence intervals. Higher amounts of bone lead at the tibia were associated with thinner distal tibia cortices (-0.972 (-1.882, -0.061) per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral) and integral volumetric BMD (-3.05 (-6.05, -0.05) per μg Pb/g of bone mineral). A higher PBB was associated with larger trabecular separation (0.115 (0.053, 0.178)), lower trabecular volumetric BMD (-26.83 (-50.37, -3.29)) and trabecular number (-0.08 (-0.14, -0.02)), per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral after adjusting for age and BMI, and remained significant while accounting for diabetes or use of antiresorptives. Total lead exposure activities related to bone lead at the calcaneus (8.29 (0.11, 16.48)) and remained significant after age and antiresorptives-adjustment. Lead accumulated in bone can have a mild insult on bone structure; but greater partitioning of lead

  14. Bone lead (Pb) content at the tibia is associated with thinner distal tibia cortices and lower volumetric bone density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andy K O; Beattie, Karen A; Bhargava, Aakash; Cheung, Marco; Webber, Colin E; Chettle, David R; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-10-01

    Conflicting evidence suggests that bone lead or blood lead may reduce areal bone mineral density (BMD). Little is known about how lead at either compartment affects bone structure. This study examined postmenopausal women (N=38, mean age 76 ± 8, body mass index (BMI): 26.74 ± 4.26 kg/m(2)) within the Hamilton cohort of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), measuring bone lead at 66% of the non-dominant leg and at the calcaneus using (109)Cadmium X-ray fluorescence. Volumetric BMD and structural parameters were obtained from peripheral quantitative computed tomography images (200 μm in-plane resolution, 2.3 ± 0.5mm slice thickness) of the same 66% site and of the distal 4% site of the tibia length. Blood lead was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry and blood-to-bone lead partition coefficients (PBB, log ratio) were computed. Multivariable linear regression examined each of bone lead at the 66% tibia, calcaneus, blood lead and PBB as related to each of volumetric BMD and structural parameters, adjusting for age and BMI, diabetes or antiresorptive therapy. Regression coefficients were reported along with 95% confidence intervals. Higher amounts of bone lead at the tibia were associated with thinner distal tibia cortices (-0.972 (-1.882, -0.061) per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral) and integral volumetric BMD (-3.05 (-6.05, -0.05) per μg Pb/g of bone mineral). A higher PBB was associated with larger trabecular separation (0.115 (0.053, 0.178)), lower trabecular volumetric BMD (-26.83 (-50.37, -3.29)) and trabecular number (-0.08 (-0.14, -0.02)), per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral after adjusting for age and BMI, and remained significant while accounting for diabetes or use of antiresorptives. Total lead exposure activities related to bone lead at the calcaneus (8.29 (0.11, 16.48)) and remained significant after age and antiresorptives-adjustment. Lead accumulated in bone can have a mild insult on bone structure; but greater partitioning of lead

  15. Bone lead (Pb) content at the tibia is associated with thinner distal tibia cortices and lower volumetric bone density in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andy K.O.; Beattie, Karen A.; Bhargava, Aakash; Cheung, Marco; Webber, Colin E.; Chettle, David R.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting evidence suggests that bone lead or blood lead may reduce areal bone mineral density (BMD). Little is known about how lead at either compartment affects bone structure. This study examined postmenopausal women (N = 38, mean age 76 ± 8, body mass index (BMI): 26.74 ± 4.26 kg/m2) within the Hamilton cohort of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), measuring bone lead at 66% of the non-dominant leg and at the calcaneus using 109Cadmium X-ray fluorescence. Volumetric BMD and structural parameters were obtained from peripheral quantitative computed tomography images (200 μm in-plane resolution, 2.3 ± 0.5 mm slice thickness) of the same 66% site and of the distal 4% site of the tibia length. Blood lead was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry and blood-to-bone lead partition coefficients (PBB, log ratio) were computed. Multivariable linear regression examined each of bone lead at the 66% tibia, calcaneus, blood lead and PBB as related to each of volumetric BMD and structural parameters, adjusting for age and BMI, diabetes or antiresorptive therapy. Regression coefficients were reported along with 95% confidence intervals. Higher amounts of bone lead at the tibia were associated with thinner distal tibia cortices (−0.972 (−1.882, −0.061) per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral) and integral volumetric BMD (−3.05 (−6.05, −0.05) per μg Pb/g of bone mineral). A higher PBB was associated with larger trabecular separation (0.115 (0.053, 0.178)), lower trabecular volumetric BMD (−26.83 (−50.37, −3.29)) and trabecular number (−0.08 (−0.14, −0.02)), per 100 μg Pb/g of bone mineral after adjusting for age and BMI, and remained significant while accounting for diabetes or use of antiresorptives. Total lead exposure activities related to bone lead at the calcaneus (8.29 (0.11, 16.48)) and remained significant after age and antiresorptives-adjustment. Lead accumulated in bone can have a mild insult on bone structure; but

  16. 'Universal' microstructural patterns in cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular bone materials: micromechanics-based prediction of anisotropic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian

    2007-02-21

    Bone materials are characterized by an astonishing variability and diversity. Still, because of 'architectural constraints' due to once chosen material constituents and their physical interaction, the fundamental hierarchical organization or basic building plans of bone materials remain largely unchanged during biological evolution. Such universal patterns of microstructural organization govern the mechanical interaction of the elementary components of bone (hydroxyapatite, collagen, water; with directly measurable tissue-independent elastic properties), which are here quantified through a multiscale homogenization scheme delivering effective elastic properties of bone materials: at a scale of 10nm, long cylindrical collagen molecules, attached to each other at their ends by approximately 1.5nm long crosslinks and hosting intermolecular water inbetween, form a contiguous matrix called wet collagen. At a scale of several hundred nanometers, wet collagen and mineral crystal agglomerations interpenetrate each other, forming the mineralized fibril. At a scale of 5-10microm, the extracellular solid bone matrix is represented as collagen fibril inclusions embedded in a foam of largely disordered (extrafibrillar) mineral crystals. At a scale above the ultrastructure, where lacunae are embedded in extracellular bone matrix, the extravascular bone material is observed. Model estimates predicted from tissue-specific composition data gained from a multitude of chemical and physical tests agree remarkably well with corresponding acoustic stiffness experiments across a variety of cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular materials. Besides from reconciling the well-documented, seemingly opposed concepts of 'mineral-reinforced collagen matrix' and 'collagen-reinforced mineral matrix' for bone ultrastructure, this approach opens new possibilities in the exploitation of computer tomographic data for nano-to-macro mechanics of bone organs.

  17. Post-yield nanomechanics of human cortical bone in compression using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X.N.; Almer, J.D.; Wang, X.

    2011-02-24

    The ultrastructural response to applied loads governs the post-yield deformation and failure behavior of bone, and is correlated with bone fragility fractures. Combining a novel progressive loading protocol and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, this study investigated the correlation of the local deformation (i.e., internal strains of the mineral and collagen phases) with the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. The results indicated that the internal strains of the longitudinally oriented collagen fibrils and mineral crystals increased almost linearly with respect to the macroscopic strain prior to yielding, but markedly decreased first and then gradually leveled off after yielding. Similar changes were also observed in the applied stress before and after yielding of bone. However, the collagen to mineral strain ratio remained nearly constant throughout the loading process. In addition, the internal strains of longitudinal mineral and collagen phases did not exhibit a linear relationship with either the modulus loss or the plastic deformation of bulk bone tissue. Finally, the time-dependent response of local deformation in the mineral phase was observed after yielding. Based on the results, we speculate that the mineral crystals and collagen fibrils aligned with the loading axis only partially explain the post-yield deformation, suggesting that shear deformation involving obliquely oriented crystals and fibrils (off axis) is dominant mechanism of yielding for human cortical bone in compression.

  18. Deterioration of trabecular plate-rod and cortical microarchitecture and reduced bone stiffness at distal radius and tibia in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Stein, Emily M; Zhou, Bin; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Yu, Y Eric; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X Edward

    2016-07-01

    Postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures have abnormal bone microarchitecture at the distal radius and tibia by HR-pQCT, independent of areal BMD. However, whether trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture is altered in women with vertebral fractures is unknown. This study aims to characterize the abnormalities of trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture, cortex, and bone stiffness in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures. HR-pQCT images of distal radius and tibia were acquired from 45 women with vertebral fractures and 45 control subjects without fractures. Trabecular and cortical compartments were separated by an automatic segmentation algorithm and subjected to individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) analysis for measuring trabecular plate and rod morphology and cortical bone evaluation for measuring cortical thickness and porosity, respectively. Whole bone and trabecular bone stiffness were estimated by finite element analysis. Fracture and control subjects did not differ according to age, race, body mass index, osteoporosis risk factors, or medication use. Women with vertebral fractures had thinner cortices, and larger trabecular area compared to the control group. By ITS analysis, fracture subjects had fewer trabecular plates, less axially aligned trabeculae and less trabecular connectivity at both the radius and the tibia. Fewer trabecular rods were observed at the radius. Whole bone stiffness and trabecular bone stiffness were 18% and 22% lower in women with vertebral fractures at the radius, and 19% and 16% lower at the tibia, compared with controls. The estimated failure load of the radius and tibia were also reduced in the fracture subjects by 13% and 14%, respectively. In summary, postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures had both trabecular and cortical microstructural deterioration at the peripheral skeleton, with a preferential loss of trabecular plates and cortical thinning. These microstructural deficits translated into lower

  19. Healing of fractures with freeze-dried cortical bone plates. Comparison with compression plating.

    PubMed

    Malinin, T; Latta, L L; Wagner, J L; Brown, M D

    1984-11-01

    The healing of fractures of the radius with internal fixation by stainless-steel compression plates was compared with fractures fixed with freeze-dried bone-plate allografts. Fractures fixed with metallic plates gained slightly less than half the biomechanical strength of the contralateral control bone and healed without noticeable external callus formation. Bone-plated fractures regained three-fourths of the biomechanical strength of controls and healed by forming an external callus. Bone-plate allografts were eventually incorporated in the host bone. Allograft plates were vascularized and remodeled into cancellous bone in the process of incorporation in the host bones.

  20. The relative contributions of non-enzymatic glycation and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of aging bone

    PubMed Central

    Tang, S.Y.; Vashishth, D.

    2010-01-01

    The risk of fracture increases with age due to the decline of bone mass and bone quality. One of the age-related changes in bone quality occurs through the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) due to non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). However as a number of other changes including increased porosity occur with age and affect bone fragility, the relative contribution of AGEs on the fracture resistance of aging bone is unknown. Using a high-resolution nonlinear finite element model that incorporate cohesive elements and micro-computed tomography-based 3d meshes, we investigated the contribution of AGEs and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of human bone. The results show that NEG caused a 52% reduction in propagation fracture toughness (R-curve slope). The combined effects of porosity and AGEs resulted in an 88% reduction in propagation toughness. These findings are consistent with previous experimental results. The model captured the age-related changes in the R-curve toughening by incorporating bone quantity and bone quality changes, and these simulations demonstrate the ability of the cohesive models to account for the irreversible dynamic crack growth processes affected by the changes in post-yield material behavior. By decoupling the matrix-level effects due to NEG and intracortical porosity, we are able to directly determine the effects of NEG on fracture toughness. The outcome of this study suggests that it may be important to include the age-related changes in the material level properties by using finite element analysis towards the prediction of fracture risk. PMID:21056419

  1. Manipulation of Ovarian Function Significantly Influenced Trabecular and Cortical Bone Volume, Architecture and Density in Mice at Death

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jeffrey B.; Terry, Boston C.; Merchant, Samer S.; Mason, Holly M.; Nazokkarmaher, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Previously, transplantation of ovaries from young, cycling mice into old, postreproductive-age mice increased life span and decreased cardiomyopathy at death. We anticipated that the same factors that increased life span and decreased cardiomyopathy could also influence the progression of orthopedic disease. At 11 months of age, prepubertally ovariectomized and ovary-intact mice (including reproductively cycling and acyclic mice) received new 60-day-old ovaries. At death, epiphyseal bone in the proximal tibia and the distal femur and mid-shaft tibial and femoral diaphyseal bone was analyzed with micro-computed tomography. For qualitative analysis of osteophytosis, we also included mineralized connective tissue within the stifle joint. Prepubertal ovariectomy had the greatest influence on bone volume, ovarian transplantation had the greatest influence on bone architecture and both treatments influenced bone density. Ovarian transplantation increased cortical, but not trabecular bone density and tended to increase osteophytosis and heterotopic mineralization, except in acyclic recipients. These effects may have been dictated by the timing of the treatments, with ovariectomy appearing to influence early development and ovarian transplantation limited to influencing only the postreproductive period. However, major differences observed between cycling, acyclic and ovariectomized recipients of new ovaries may have been, in part due to differences in the levels of hormone receptors present and the responsiveness of specific bone processes to hormone signaling. Changes that resulted from these treatments may represent a compensatory response to normal age-associated, negative, orthopedic changes. Alternatively, differences between treatments may simply be the 'preservation' of unblemished orthopedic conditions, prior to the influence of negative, age-associated effects. These findings may suggest that in women, tailoring hormone replacement therapy to the patient's current

  2. On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-01-10

    In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

  3. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized ``tuning'' of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Birch, Helen L.; Gikas, Panagiotis D.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E.

    2014-11-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by <5% along the mid-shaft but decreases by >10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  4. A numerical study on the propagation of Rayleigh and guided waves in cortical bone according to Mindlin's Form II gradient elastic theory.

    PubMed

    Papacharalampopoulos, Alexios; Vavva, Maria G; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2011-08-01

    Cortical bone is a multiscale heterogeneous natural material characterized by microstructural effects. Thus guided waves propagating in cortical bone undergo dispersion due to both material microstructure and bone geometry. However, above 0.8 MHz, ultrasound propagates rather as a dispersive surface Rayleigh wave than a dispersive guided wave because at those frequencies, the corresponding wavelengths are smaller than the thickness of cortical bone. Classical elasticity, although it has been largely used for wave propagation modeling in bones, is not able to support dispersion in bulk and Rayleigh waves. This is possible with the use of Mindlin's Form-II gradient elastic theory, which introduces in its equation of motion intrinsic parameters that correlate microstructure with the macrostructure. In this work, the boundary element method in conjunction with the reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville transform are employed for the numerical determination of time-frequency diagrams corresponding to the dispersion curves of Rayleigh and guided waves propagating in a cortical bone. A composite material model for the determination of the internal length scale parameters imposed by Mindlin's elastic theory is exploited. The obtained results demonstrate the dispersive nature of Rayleigh wave propagating along the complex structure of bone as well as how microstructure affects guided waves.

  5. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  6. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  7. Cortical bone fenestrations with continuous antibiotic irrigation to mediate hematogenous tibial osteomyelitis in children.

    PubMed

    Hung, Nguyen Ngoc

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of drainage and continuous antibiotic irrigation of the medullary canal to mediate hematogenous osteomyelitis of the tibia in children. Data were analyzed from 376 patients (388 tibiae) treated from January 1982 to December 2004. The average age at the time of surgery was 5 years and 9 months. The diagnosis of mediate hematogenous osteomyelitis was based on clinical examination, plain radiographs, scintigraphy, ultrasound, and bacterial cultures. Treatment included two groups: (i) group I [from January 1981 to September 1984 in 108 patients (112 tibiae)] who were operated on according to traditional surgical procedure (pus drainage), (ii) group II [from October 1984 to December 2004 in 268 patients (276 tibiae)] who were operated on according to cortical bone fenestrations with continuous antibiotic irrigation. Postoperative antibiotic(s) with the intravenous antibiotic therapy were administered for 2 weeks and oral antibiotic therapy for 4 weeks. The total time of antibiotic therapy was 6 weeks. There were 152 (40.4%) female and 224 (59.6%) male patients. Unilateral involvement was the most common, with the left tibia affected in 119 (31.6%) patients, and the right in 245 (65.2%). Both tibiae were involved in 12 (3.2%) patients. The average age at the time of operation was 5 years 9 months (range: 22 days-13 years, 7 months). All patients were classified as having a mediate stage of osteomyelitis. We attained good results in 50.9% of the patients in the group I, fair results in 7.1%, and poor results in 42% with pathologic fracture in eight tibiae. In group II, there were good results in 77.9%, fair results in 21.4%, and poor results in 0.7% tibiae with the development of chronic osteomyelitis and without pathologic fracture. In conclusion, this technique is generally safe and effective. We suggest that similar management might also be applied for hematogenous osteomyelitis of femur and humerus. PMID:20634722

  8. A High Fat Diet Increases Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue (MAT) But Does Not Alter Trabecular or Cortical Bone Mass in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Casey R; Horowitz, Mark C; Berry, Ryan; MacDougald, Ormond A; Anunciado-Koza, Rea; Koza, Robert A; Rosen, Clifford J

    2015-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with high bone mineral density (BMD) but a greater propensity to fracture. Some obese individuals have increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT), but the impact of MAT on bone turnover remains controversial, as do changes in BMD associated with a high fat diet (HFD). In this study we hypothesized that MAT volume would increase in response to HFD but would be independent of changes in BMD. Hence, we fed C57BL/6J (B6) male mice at 3 weeks of age either a high fat diet (60 kcal %) or regular diet (10 kcal %) for 12 weeks (n = 10/group). We measured MAT volume by osmium staining and micro-CT (µCT) as well as bone parameters by µCT, histomorphometry, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We also performed a short-term pilot study using 13-week-old B6 males and females fed a HFD (58 kcal %) for 2 weeks (n = 3/sex). Both long- and short-term HFD feedings were associated with high MAT volume, however, femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone formation rate and cortical bone mass were not altered in the long-term study. In the short-term pilot study, areal BMD was unchanged after 2 weeks of HFD. We conclude that, for B6 mice fed a HFD starting at wean or 13 weeks of age, MAT increases whereas bone mass is not altered. More studies are needed to define the mechanism responsible for the rapid storage of energy in the marrow and its distinction from other adipose depots. PMID:25663195

  9. Inflammatory response and bone healing capacity of two porous calcium phosphate ceramics in critical size cortical bone defects.

    PubMed

    Chatterjea, Anindita; van der Stok, Johan; Danoux, Charlène B; Yuan, Huipin; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Weinans, Harrie; de Boer, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, two open porous calcium phosphate ceramics, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), and hydroxyapatite (HA) were compared in a critical-sized femoral defect in rats. Previous comparisons of these two ceramics showed significantly greater osteoinductive potential of β-TCP upon intramuscular implantation and a better performance in a spinal fusion model in dogs. Results of the current study also showed significantly more bone formation in defects grafted with β-TCP compared to HA; however, both the ceramics were not capable of increasing bone formation to such extend that it bridges the defect. Furthermore, a more pronounced degradation of β-TCP was observed as compared to HA. Progression of inflammation and initiation of new bone formation were assessed for both materials at multiple time points by histological and fluorochrome-based analyses. Until 12 days postimplantation, a strong inflammatory response in absence of new bone formation was observed in both ceramics, without obvious differences between the two materials. Four weeks postimplantation, signs of new bone formation were found in both β-TCP and HA. At 6 weeks, inflammation had subsided in both ceramics while bone deposition continued. In conclusion, the two ceramics differed in the amount of bone formed after 8 weeks of implantation, whereas no differences were found in the duration of the inflammatory phase after implantation or initiation of new bone formation.

  10. Assessment of cortical and trabecular bone changes in two models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Hannah M; Larson, Blair E; Coatney, Garrett A; Button, Keith D; DeCamp, Charlie E; Fajardo, Ryan S; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone is thought to play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The goal of this study was to document changes in tibial and femoral subchondral bone that occur as a result of two lapine models of anterior cruciate ligament injury, a modified ACL transection model and a closed-joint traumatic compressive impact model. Twelve weeks post-injury bones were scanned via micro-computed tomography. The subchondral bone of injured limbs from both models showed decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density. Surgical transection animals showed significant bone changes primarily in the medial hemijoint of femurs and tibias, while significant changes were noted in both the medial and lateral hemijoints of both bones for traumatic impact animals. It is believed that subchondral bone changes in the medial hemijoint were likely caused by compromised soft tissue structures seen in both models. Subchondral bone changes in the lateral hemijoint of traumatic impact animals are thought to be due to transmission of the compressive impact force through the joint. The joint-wide bone changes shown in the traumatic impact model were similar to clinical findings from studies investigating the progression of osteoarthritis in humans.

  11. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Demonstrates Similar Nanostructure in Cortical Bone from Young Adult Animals of Different Species.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Turunen, Mikael Juhani; Mathavan, Neashan; Lages, Sebastian; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Olsson, Ulf; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Despite the vast amount of studies focusing on bone nanostructure that have been performed for several decades, doubts regarding the detailed structure of the constituting hydroxyapatite crystal still exist. Different experimental techniques report somewhat different sizes and locations, possibly due to different requirements for the sample preparation. In this study, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the nanostructure of femur samples from young adult ovine, bovine, porcine, and murine cortical bone, including three different orthogonal directions relative to the long axis of the bone. The radially averaged scattering from all samples reveals a remarkable similarity in the entire q range, which indicates that the nanostructure is essentially the same in all species. Small differences in the data from different directions confirm that the crystals are elongated in the [001] direction and that this direction is parallel to the long axis of the bone. A model consisting of thin plates is successfully employed to describe the scattering and extract the plate thicknesses, which are found to be in the range of 20-40 Å for most samples but 40-60 Å for the cow samples. It is demonstrated that the mineral plates have a large degree of polydispersity in plate thickness. Additionally, and equally importantly, the scattering data and the model are critically evaluated in terms of model uncertainties and overall information content.

  12. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Demonstrates Similar Nanostructure in Cortical Bone from Young Adult Animals of Different Species.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Turunen, Mikael Juhani; Mathavan, Neashan; Lages, Sebastian; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Olsson, Ulf; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Despite the vast amount of studies focusing on bone nanostructure that have been performed for several decades, doubts regarding the detailed structure of the constituting hydroxyapatite crystal still exist. Different experimental techniques report somewhat different sizes and locations, possibly due to different requirements for the sample preparation. In this study, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the nanostructure of femur samples from young adult ovine, bovine, porcine, and murine cortical bone, including three different orthogonal directions relative to the long axis of the bone. The radially averaged scattering from all samples reveals a remarkable similarity in the entire q range, which indicates that the nanostructure is essentially the same in all species. Small differences in the data from different directions confirm that the crystals are elongated in the [001] direction and that this direction is parallel to the long axis of the bone. A model consisting of thin plates is successfully employed to describe the scattering and extract the plate thicknesses, which are found to be in the range of 20-40 Å for most samples but 40-60 Å for the cow samples. It is demonstrated that the mineral plates have a large degree of polydispersity in plate thickness. Additionally, and equally importantly, the scattering data and the model are critically evaluated in terms of model uncertainties and overall information content. PMID:26914607

  13. Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Holly D.; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon Y.; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-scale, fracture properties, evaluated using insitu scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with insitu tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay. PMID:21885114

  14. Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly; Zimmermann, Elizabeth; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert

    2011-08-19

    Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-­ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-­scale, fracture properties, evaluated using in-situ scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with in-situ tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-­induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-­scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-­micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-­scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay.

  15. Correlates of trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral density of the radius and tibia in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Kamil E; Zmuda, Joseph M; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Horwitz, Mara J; Boudreau, Robert; Evans, Rhobert W; Ensrud, Kristine E; Petit, Moira A; Gordon, Christopher L; Cauley, Jane A

    2010-05-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) can estimate volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and distinguish trabecular from cortical bone. Few comprehensive studies have examined correlates of vBMD in older men. This study evaluated the impact of demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and medical factors on vBMD in 1172 men aged 69 to 97 years and enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to measure vBMD of the radius and tibia. The multivariable linear regression models explained up to 10% of the variance in trabecular vBMD and up to 9% of the variance in cortical vBMD. Age was not correlated with radial trabecular vBMD. Correlates associated with both cortical and trabecular vBMD were age (-), caffeine intake (-), total calcium intake (+), nontrauma fracture (-), and hypertension (+). Higher body weight was related to greater trabecular vBMD and lower cortical vBMD. Height (-), education (+), diabetes with thiazolidinedione (TZD) use (+), rheumatoid arthritis (+), using arms to stand from a chair (-), and antiandrogen use (-) were associated only with trabecular vBMD. Factors associated only with cortical vBMD included clinic site (-), androgen use (+), grip strength (+), past smoker (-), and time to complete five chair stands (-). Certain correlates of trabecular and cortical vBMD differed among older men. An ascertainment of potential risk factors associated with trabecular and cortical vBMD may lead to better understanding and preventive efforts for osteoporosis in men.

  16. Accounting for beta-particle energy loss to cortical bone via paired-image radiation transport (PIRT).

    PubMed

    Shah, Amish P; Rajon, Didier A; Patton, Phillip W; Jokisch, Derek W; Bolch, Wesley E

    2005-05-01

    Current methods of skeletal dose assessment in both medical physics (radionuclide therapy) and health physics (dose reconstruction and risk assessment) rely heavily on a single set of bone and marrow cavity chord-length distributions in which particle energy deposition is tracked within an infinite extent of trabecular spongiosa, with no allowance for particle escape to cortical bone. In the present study, we introduce a paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model which provides a more realistic three-dimensional (3D) geometry for particle transport in the skeletal site at both microscopic and macroscopic levels of its histology. Ex vivo CT scans were acquired of the pelvis, cranial cap, and individual ribs excised from a 66-year male cadaver (BMI of 22.7 kg m(-2)). For the three skeletal sites, regions of trabecular spongiosa and cortical bone were identified and segmented. Physical sections of interior spongiosa were taken and subjected to microCT imaging. Voxels within the resulting microCT images were then segmented and labeled as regions of bone trabeculae, endosteum, active marrow, and inactive marrow through application of image processing algorithms. The PIRT methodology was then implemented within the EGSNRC radiation transport code whereby electrons of various initial energies are simultaneously tracked within both the ex vivo CT macroimage and the CT microimage of the skeletal site. At initial electron energies greater than 50-200 keV, a divergence in absorbed fractions to active marrow are noted between PIRT model simulations and those estimated under existing techniques of infinite spongiosa transport. Calculations of radionuclide S values under both methodologies imply that current chord-based models may overestimate the absorbed dose to active bone marrow in these skeletal sites by 0% to 27% for low-energy beta emitters (33P, 169Er, and 177Lu), by approximately 4% to 49% for intermediate-energy beta emitters (153Sm, 186Re, and 89Sr), and by

  17. Optical clearing in transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of murine cortical bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of optical clearing with glycerol on the Raman spectra of bone tissue acquired transcutaneously on right and left tibiae from four mice was studied. Multiple transcutaneous measurements were obtained from each limb; glycerol was then applied as an optical clearing agent, and additional transcutaneous measurements were taken. Glycerol reduces the noise in the raw spectra (p=0.0037) and significantly improves the cross-correlation between the recovered bone factor and the exposed bone measurement in a low signal-to-noise region of the bone spectra (p=0.0245). PMID:18465957

  18. Microstructural and Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Human Cortical Bone with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2016-04-01

    The molecular basis of bone disease osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and the mineralization of hydroxyapatite in OI bone have been of significant research interest. To further investigate the mechanism of OI disease and bone mineralization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) are used in the present study to describe the structural and compositional differences between OI and healthy bone. OI bone exhibits more porous, fibrous features, abnormal collagen fibrils, and abnormal mineral deposits. Likewise, photoacoustic-FTIR experiments indicate an aberrant collagen structure and an altered mineral structure in OI. In contrast, there is neither significant difference in the non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) composition observed nor apparent change in the crystal structure between OI and healthy bone minerals as shown in XRD and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results. This observation indicates that the biomineralization process is more controlled by the bone cells and non-collagenous phosphorylated proteins. The present study also confirms that there is an orientational influence on the stoichiometry of the mineral in OI bone. Also, a larger volume of the hydrated layer in the transverse plane than the longitudinal plane of the mineral crystal structure is proposed. The appearance of a new C-S band in the FTIR spectra in OI bone suggests the substitution of glycine by cysteine in collagen molecules or/and an increased amount of cysteine-rich osteonectin that relates to mineral nucleation and mineral crystal formation.

  19. Correlation between longitudinal, circumferential, and radial moduli in cortical bone: effect of mineral content.

    PubMed

    Macione, J; Depaula, C A; Guzelsu, N; Kotha, S P

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that changes in the longitudinal elastic properties of bone due to changes in mineral content are related to the longitudinal strength of bone tissue. Changes in mineral content are expected to affect bone tissue mechanical properties along all directions, albeit to different extents. However, changes in tissue mechanical properties along the different directions are expected to be correlated to one another. In this study, we investigate if radial, circumferential, and longitudinal moduli are related in bone tissue with varying mineral content. Plexiform bovine femoral bone samples were treated in fluoride ion solutions for a period of 3 and 12 days to obtain bones with 20% and 32% lower effective mineral contents. Transmission ultrasound velocities were obtained in the radial, circumferential, and longitudinal axes of bone and combined with measured densities to obtain corresponding tensorial moduli. Results indicate that moduli decreased with fluoride ion treatments and were significantly correlated to one another (r(2) radial vs. longitudinal = 0.80, r(2) circumferential vs. longitudinal = 0.90, r(2) radial vs. circumferential = 0.85). Densities calculated from using ultrasound parameters, acoustic impedance and transmission velocities, were moderately correlated to those measured by the Archimedes principle (r(2)=0.54, p<0.01). These results suggest that radial and circumferential ultrasound measurements could be used to determine the longitudinal properties of bone and that ultrasound may not be able to predict in vitro densities of bones containing unbonded mineral. PMID:20416555

  20. Morc3 mutant mice exhibit reduced cortical area and thickness, accompanied by altered haematopoietic stem cells niche and bone cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Gaurav; Teguh, Dian; Kenny, Jacob; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Morc3, a member of a highly conserved nuclear matrix protein super-family plays an important part in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, epigenetic regulation and cellular senescence. However, its role in bone homeostasis is not known. In the present study, a phenotype-driven ENU mouse mutagenesis screen revealed that Morc3mut +/− mice exhibit reduced cortical area and thickness with increased cortical porosity. Morc3mut +/− mice displayed reduced osteoclast numbers and surface per bone surface as well as osteocyte numbers, concomitant with altered gene expressions such as Rankl/Opg and Sost in ex vivo long bones. In vitro experiments revealed a significant increase in the number of Sca-1+/c-kit+ haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and a significant reduction in senescence associated β-galactosidase activity in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). In addition, we observed a decrease in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption accompanied by upregulation of STAT1 expression in osteoclast lineage cells. Strikingly, Morc3 protein localization within the nuclear membrane was shifted to the cytoplasm in Morc3mut +/− osteoclasts. Further, Morc3mut +/− mice displayed increased osteoblast differentiation and altered gene expression. Collectively, our data show that Morc3 is a previously unreported regulator of cortical bone homeostasis and haematopoietic stem cells niche, accompanied by altered bone cell differentiation. PMID:27188231

  1. High-calcium diet modulates effects of long-term prolactin exposure on the cortical bone calcium content in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Tudpor, Kukiat; Thongchote, Kanogwun; Saengamnart, Wasana; Puntheeranurak, Supaporn; Krishnamra, Nateetip

    2007-02-01

    High physiological prolactin induced positive calcium balance by stimulating intestinal calcium absorption, reducing renal calcium excretion, and increasing bone calcium deposition in female rats. Although prolactin-induced increase in trabecular bone calcium deposition was absent after ovariectomy, its effects on cortical bones were still controversial. The present investigation, therefore, aimed to study the effect of in vivo long-term high physiological prolactin induced by either anterior pituitary (AP) transplantation or 2.5 mg/kg prolactin injection on cortical bones in ovariectomized rats. Since the presence of prolactin receptors (PRLR) in different bones of normal adult rats has not been reported, we first determined mRNA expression of both short- and long-form PRLRs at the cortical sites (tibia and femur) and trabecular sites (calvaria and vertebrae) by using the RT-PCR. Our results showed the mRNA expression of both PRLR isoforms with predominant long form at all sites. However, high prolactin levels induced by AP transplantation in normal rats did not have any effect on the femoral bone mineral density or bone mineral content. By using (45)Ca kinetic study, 2.5 mg/kg prolactin did not alter bone formation, bone resorption, calcium deposition, and total calcium content in tibia and femur of adult ovariectomized rats. AP transplantation also had no effect on the cortical total calcium content in adult ovariectomized rats. Because previous work showed that the effects of prolactin were age dependent and could be modulated by high-calcium diet, interactions between prolactin and these two parameters were investigated. The results demonstrated that 2.0% wt/wt high-calcium diet significantly increased the tibial total calcium content in 9-wk-old young AP-grafted ovariectomized rats but decreased the tibial total calcium content in 22-wk-old adult rats. As for the vertebrae, the total calcium contents in both young and adult rats were not changed by high

  2. EPR dosimetry of cortical bone and tooth enamel irradiated with X and gamma rays: Study of energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Links, J.M. ); Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G.; Seltzer, S.M. )

    1994-04-01

    Previous investigators have reported that the radiation-induced EPR signal intensity in compact or cortical bone increases up to a factor of two with decreasing photon energy for a given absorbed dose. If the EPR signal intensity was dependent on energy, it could limit the application of EPR spectrometry and the additive reirradiation method to obtain dose estimates. We have recently shown that errors in the assumptions governing conversion of measured exposure to absorbed dose can lead to similar [open quotes]apparent[close quotes] energy-dependence results. We hypothesized that these previous results were due to errors in the estimated dose in bone, rather than the effects of energy dependence per se. To test this hypothesis we studied human adult cortical bone from male and female donors ranging in age from 23 to 95 years, and bovine tooth enamel, using 34 and 138 keV average energy X-ray beams and [sup 137]Cs (662 keV) and [sup 60]Co (1250 keV) [gamma] rays. In a femur from a 47-year-old male (subject 1), there was a difference of borderline significance at the [alpha] = 0.05 level in the mean radiation-induced hydroxyapatite signal intensities as a function of photon energy. No other statistically significant differences in EPR signal intensity as a function of photon energy were observed in this subject, or in the tibia from a 23-year-old male (subject 2) and the femur from a 75-year-old female (subject 3). However, there was a trend toward a decrease (12-15%) in signal intensity at the lowest energy compared with the highest energy in subjects 1 and 3. Further analysis of the data from subject 1 revealed that this trend, which is in the opposite direction of previous reports but is consistent with theory, is statistically significant. There were no efforts of energy dependence in the tooth samples. 16 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. MO-G-17A-03: MR-Based Cortical Bone Segmentation for PET Attenuation Correction with a Non-UTE 3D Fast GRE Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Pan, T; Hwang, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of identifying cortical bone on MR images with a short-TE 3D fast-GRE sequence for attenuation correction of PET data in PET/MR. Methods: A water-fat-bone phantom was constructed with two pieces of beef shank. MR scans were performed on a 3T MR scanner (GE Discovery™ MR750). A 3D GRE sequence was first employed to measure the level of residual signal in cortical bone (TE{sub 1}/TE{sub 2}/TE{sub 3}=2.2/4.4/6.6ms, TR=20ms, flip angle=25°). For cortical bone segmentation, a 3D fast-GRE sequence (TE/TR=0.7/1.9ms, acquisition voxel size=2.5×2.5×3mm{sup 3}) was implemented along with a 3D Dixon sequence (TE{sub 1}/TE{sub 2}/TR=1.2/2.3/4.0ms, acquisition voxel size=1.25×1.25×3mm{sup 3}) for water/fat imaging. Flip angle (10°), acquisition bandwidth (250kHz), FOV (480×480×144mm{sup 3}) and reconstructed voxel size (0.94×0.94×1.5mm{sup 3}) were kept the same for both sequences. Soft tissue and fat tissue were first segmented on the reconstructed water/fat image. A tissue mask was created by combining the segmented water/fat masks, which was then applied on the fast-GRE image (MRFGRE). A second mask was created to remove the Gibbs artifacts present in regions in close vicinity to the phantom. MRFGRE data was smoothed with a 3D anisotropic diffusion filter for noise reduction, after which cortical bone and air was separated using a threshold determined from the histogram. Results: There is signal in the cortical bone region in the 3D GRE images, indicating the possibility of separating cortical bone and air based on signal intensity from short-TE MR image. The acquisition time for the 3D fast-GRE sequence was 17s, which can be reduced to less than 10s with parallel imaging. The attenuation image created from water-fat-bone segmentation is visually similar compared to reference CT. Conclusion: Cortical bone and air can be separated based on intensity in MR image with a short-TE 3D fast-GRE sequence. Further research is required

  4. Vitamin D supplementation prevents hypocalcemia and cortical bone loss associated with chronic feeding in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary cholecalciferol supplementation alone or combined with calcium has shown great promise in improving bone health, which has been attributed to endocrine actions involved in calcium regulation and/or paracrine/autocrine actions within bone. Indeed, we and others have suggested that dietary su...

  5. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  6. The Content of the 14 Metals in Cancellous and Cortical Bone of the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kowalski, Artur; Rogala, Piotr; Strzyżewski, Wojciech; Łabędź, Wojciech; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Novotny, Karel; Kanicky, Viktor; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone) of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers), alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol), and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men). The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity. PMID:26357659

  7. The Content of the 14 Metals in Cancellous and Cortical Bone of the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kowalski, Artur; Rogala, Piotr; Strzyżewski, Wojciech; Łabędź, Wojciech; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Novotny, Karel; Kanicky, Viktor; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone) of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers), alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol), and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men). The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity. PMID:26357659

  8. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Contact Pattern between the Cortical Bone and Femoral Prosthesis after Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hajime; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The cementless stem Excia (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) implant has a rectangular cross-sectional shape with back-and-forth flanges and a plasma-sprayed, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating from the middle to proximal portion to increase initial fixation and early bone formation. Here, the conformity of the Excia stem to the femoral canal morphology was three-dimensionally assessed using computed tomography. Forty-three patients (45 hips) were examined after primary total hip arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 27 ± 3 months (range: 24–36 months). Spot welds occurred at zone 2 in 16 hips and at zone 6 in 24 hips, with 83% (20/24 hips) of those occurring within 3 months after surgery. First- (n = 12 hips), second- (n = 32), and third- (n = 1) degree stress shielding were observed. The stem was typically in contact with the cortical bone in the anterolateral mid-portion (100%) and posteromedial distal portions (85%). Stress shielding did not progress, even in cases where the stems were in contact with the distal portions. The anterior flange was in contact with the bone in all cases. The stability of the mid-lateral portion with the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating and the anterior flange may have inhibited the progression of stress shielding beyond the second degree. PMID:26881087

  9. Does the cortical bone resorption rate change due to 90Sr-radiation exposure? Analysis of data from Techa Riverside residents

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstykh, E I; Shagina, N B; Degteva, M O; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, Bruce A

    2011-08-01

    The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of 90Sr into the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Techa Riverside residents ingested an average of about 3,000 kBq of 90Sr. The 90Sr-body burden of approximately 15,000 individuals has been measured in the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine in 1974-1997 with use of a special whole-body counter (WBC). Strontium-90 had mainly deposited in the cortical part of the skeleton by 25 years following intake, and 90Sr elimination occurs as a result of cortical bone resorption. The effect of 90Sr-radiation exposure on the rate of cortical bone resorption was studied. Data on 2,022 WBC measurements were selected for 207 adult persons, who were measured three or more times before they were 50-55 years old. The individual-resorption rates were calculated with the rate of strontium recirculation evaluated as 0.0018 year-1. Individual absorbed doses in red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface (BS) were also calculated. Statistically significant negative relationships of cortical bone resorption rate were discovered related to 90Sr-body burden and dose absorbed in the RBM or the BS. The response appears to have a threshold of about 1.5-Gy RBM dose. The radiation induced decrease in bone resorption rate may not be significant in terms of health. However, a decrease in bone remodeling rate can be among several causes of an increased level of degenerative dystrophic bone pathology in exposed persons.

  10. Irradiation conditions for fiber laser bonding of HAp-glass ceramics with bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Yamada, Satoshi; Kanaoka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Orthopedic implants are widely used to repair bones and to replace articulating joint surfaces. It is important to develop an instantaneous technique for the direct bonding of bone and implant materials. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the laser bonding of bone with an implant material like ceramics. Ceramic specimens (10 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness) were sintered with hydroxyapatite and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass powders mixed in 40:60 wt% proportions. A small hole was bored at the center of a ceramic specimen. The ceramic specimen was positioned onto a bovine bone specimen and a 5 mm diameter area of the ceramic specimen was irradiated using a fiber laser beam (1070-1080 nm wavelength). As a result, the bone and the ceramic specimens bonded strongly under the irradiation conditions of a 400 W laser power and a 1.0 s exposure time. The maximum shear strength was 5.3 ± 2.3 N. A bonding substance that penetrated deeply into the bone specimen was generated around the hole in the ceramic specimen. On using the fiber laser, the ceramic specimen instantaneously bonded to the bone specimen. Further, the irradiation conditions required for the bonding were investigated.

  11. Segmentation of nanotomographic cortical bone images for quantitative characterization of the osteoctyte lacuno-canalicular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Diaz, A.; Holler, M.; Pallu, S.; Achiou, Z.; Jennane, R.; Toumi, H.; Lespessailles, E.; Kewish, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    A newly developed data processing method able to characterize the osteocytes lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is presented. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in the bone, living in spaces called lacunae embedded inside the bone matrix and connected to each other with an extensive network of canals that allows for the exchange of nutrients and for mechanotransduction functions. The geometrical three-dimensional (3D) architecture is increasingly thought to be related to the macroscopic strength or failure of the bone and it is becoming the focus for investigating widely spread diseases such as osteoporosis. To obtain 3D LCN images non-destructively has been out of reach until recently, since tens-of-nanometers scale resolution is required. Ptychographic tomography was validated for bone imaging in [1], showing clearly the LCN. The method presented here was applied to 3D ptychographic tomographic images in order to extract morphological and geometrical parameters of the lacuno-canalicular structures.

  12. Parametric study of control mechanism of cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanan; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The control mechanism of mechanical bone remodeling at cellular level was investigated by means of an extensive parametric study on a theoretical model described in this paper. From a perspective of control mechanism, it was found that there are several control mechanisms working simultaneously in bone remodeling which is a complex process. Typically, an extensive parametric study was carried out for investigating model parameter space related to cell differentiation and apoptosis which can describe the fundamental cell lineage behaviors. After analyzing all the combinations of 728 permutations in six model parameters, we have identified a small number of parameter combinations that can lead to physiologically realistic responses which are similar to theoretically idealized physiological responses. The results presented in the work enhanced our understanding on mechanical bone remodeling and the identified control mechanisms can help researchers to develop combined pharmacological-mechanical therapies to treat bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis.

  13. Effects of alendronate and strontium ranelate on cancellous and cortical bone mass in glucocorticoid-treated adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Cai, D H; Li, Q N; Chen, H; Deng, W M; He, L; Yang, L

    2010-06-01

    We studied the effects of alendronate (Aln) and strontium ranelate (SrR) administration on cancellous and cortical bone in glucocorticoid (GC)-treated rats. Thirty-two 3.5-month male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: age-matched normal control (Nrm), methylprednisolone (Met; 5.0 mg/kg/day, sc, for 5 days/week), Met plus Aln orally (1.0 mg/kg/day), and Met plus SrR orally (900 mg/kg/day). The study period was 9 weeks. DXA was used to evaluate the femoral diaphysis and fifth lumbar vertebra (L5). Histomorphometry was performed in the proximal tibial metaphysis and tibial diaphysis. Met significantly decreased body weight and bone mineral density (BMD) compared with Nrm. Aln and SrR significantly increased body weight and BMD compared with Met. SrR resulted in significantly higher BMD than Aln. Met markedly decreased BV/TV, Tb.Th, and Tb.N and increased Tb.Sp compared with Nrm. Aln and SrR showed significantly increased of BV/TV, Tb.Th, and Tb.N and improved bone architecture. Moreover, Met reduced %Ct.Ar, enlarged %Ma.Ar, and decreased bone formation indices in the periosteum as well as increased ES/BS in the endosteum compared with Nrm. Aln significantly decreased endosteal ES/BS compared with Met. SrR significantly increased %Ct.Ar and bone formation indices in the periosteum as well as the endosteum and decreased endosteal ES/BS compared with Met. Furthermore, SrR led to a significantly higher cancellous and endocortical MS/BS and endocortical bone formation compared with Aln. Our findings suggest SrR at a dose of 900 mg/kg has a greater effect than Aln at 1.0 mg/kg, according to BMD and histomorphometric analysis, in preventing GC-induced osteopenia. Therefore, SrR might be applicable as a bone therapeutic agent to treat secondary osteoporosis in the clinic. PMID:20390406

  14. Effects of Habitual Physical Activity and Fitness on Tibial Cortical Bone Mass, Structure and Mass Distribution in Pre-pubertal Boys and Girls: The Look Study.

    PubMed

    Duckham, Rachel L; Rantalainen, Timo; Ducher, Gaele; Hill, Briony; Telford, Richard D; Telford, Rohan M; Daly, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Targeted weight-bearing activities during the pre-pubertal years can improve cortical bone mass, structure and distribution, but less is known about the influence of habitual physical activity (PA) and fitness. This study examined the effects of contrasting habitual PA and fitness levels on cortical bone density, geometry and mass distribution in pre-pubertal children. Boys (n = 241) and girls (n = 245) aged 7-9 years had a pQCT scan to measure tibial mid-shaft total, cortical and medullary area, cortical thickness, density, polar strength strain index (SSIpolar) and the mass/density distribution through the bone cortex (radial distribution divided into endo-, mid- and pericortical regions) and around the centre of mass (polar distribution). Four contrasting PA and fitness groups (inactive-unfit, inactive-fit, active-unfit, active-fit) were generated based on daily step counts (pedometer, 7-days) and fitness levels (20-m shuttle test and vertical jump) for boys and girls separately. Active-fit boys had 7.3-7.7 % greater cortical area and thickness compared to inactive-unfit boys (P < 0.05), which was largely due to a 6.4-7.8 % (P < 0.05) greater cortical mass in the posterior-lateral, medial and posterior-medial 66 % tibial regions. Cortical area was not significantly different across PA-fitness categories in girls, but active-fit girls had 6.1 % (P < 0.05) greater SSIpolar compared to inactive-fit girls, which was likely due to their 6.7 % (P < 0.05) greater total bone area. There was also a small region-specific cortical mass benefit in the posterior-medial 66 % tibia cortex in active-fit girls. Higher levels of habitual PA-fitness were associated with small regional-specific gains in 66 % tibial cortical bone mass in pre-pubertal children, particularly boys.

  15. Optimization of process parameters for drilled hole quality characteristics during cortical bone drilling using Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet; Jain, Vivek; Gupta, Dheeraj; Ghai, Aman

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery involves drilling of bones to get them fixed at their original position. The drilling process used in orthopaedic surgery is most likely to the mechanical drilling process and there is all likelihood that it may harm the already damaged bone, the surrounding bone tissue and nerves, and the peril is not limited at that. It is very much feared that the recovery of that part may be impeded so that it may not be able to sustain life long. To achieve sustainable orthopaedic surgery, a surgeon must try to control the drilling damage at the time of bone drilling. The area around the holes decides the life of bone joint and so, the contiguous area of drilled hole must be intact and retain its properties even after drilling. This study mainly focuses on optimization of drilling parameters like rotational speed, feed rate and the type of tool at three levels each used by Taguchi optimization for surface roughness and material removal rate. The confirmation experiments were also carried out and results found with the confidence interval. Scanning electrode microscopy (SEM) images assisted in getting the micro level information of bone damage.

  16. Optimization of process parameters for drilled hole quality characteristics during cortical bone drilling using Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet; Jain, Vivek; Gupta, Dheeraj; Ghai, Aman

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery involves drilling of bones to get them fixed at their original position. The drilling process used in orthopaedic surgery is most likely to the mechanical drilling process and there is all likelihood that it may harm the already damaged bone, the surrounding bone tissue and nerves, and the peril is not limited at that. It is very much feared that the recovery of that part may be impeded so that it may not be able to sustain life long. To achieve sustainable orthopaedic surgery, a surgeon must try to control the drilling damage at the time of bone drilling. The area around the holes decides the life of bone joint and so, the contiguous area of drilled hole must be intact and retain its properties even after drilling. This study mainly focuses on optimization of drilling parameters like rotational speed, feed rate and the type of tool at three levels each used by Taguchi optimization for surface roughness and material removal rate. The confirmation experiments were also carried out and results found with the confidence interval. Scanning electrode microscopy (SEM) images assisted in getting the micro level information of bone damage. PMID:27254280

  17. Mineralization- and remodeling-unrelated improvement of the post-yield properties of rat cortical bone by high doses of olpadronate.

    PubMed

    Capozza, R F; Mondelo, N; Reina, P S; Nocciolino, L; Meta, M; Roldan, E J; Ferretti, J L; Cointry, G R

    2013-06-01

    Some pharmacologic effects on bone modeling may not be evident in studies of remodeling skeletons. This study analyzes some effects of olpadronate on cortical bone modeling and post-yield properties in femurs diaphyses (virtually only-modeling bones) of young rats by mid-diaphyseal pQCT scans and bending tests. We studied 20/22 male/female animals traetad orally with olpadronate (45-90 mg/kg/d, 3 months) and 8/9 untreated controls. Both OPD doses enhanced diaphyseal cross-sectional moments of inertia (CSMI) with no change in cortical vBMD and elastic modulus. Yield stiffness and strength were mildly increased. Post-yield strength, deflection and energy absorption were strikingly enhanced. Ultimate strength was enhanced mainly because of effects on bone mass/geometry and post-yield properties. The large improvement of post-yield properties could be explained by improvements in bone geometry. Improvements in bone mass/geometry over weight-bearing needs suggest an enhanced modeling-related response to mechanical stimuli. Effects on tissue microstructural factors (not measured) could not be excluded. Results reveal novel olpadronate effects on bone strength and toughness unrelated to tissue mineralization and stiffness, even at high doses. Further studies could establish whether this could also occur in modeling-remodeling skeletons. If so, they could counteract the negative impact of anti-remodeling effects of bisphosphonates on bone strength.

  18. Imaging the 3D structure of secondary osteons in human cortical bone using phase-retrieval tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, B. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.; Thomas, C. D. L.; Clement, J. G.; Peele, A. G.

    2011-08-01

    By applying a phase-retrieval step before carrying out standard filtered back-projection reconstructions in tomographic imaging, we were able to resolve structures with small differences in density within a densely absorbing sample. This phase-retrieval tomography is particularly suited for the three-dimensional segmentation of secondary osteons (roughly cylindrical structures) which are superimposed upon an existing cortical bone structure through the process of turnover known as remodelling. The resulting images make possible the analysis of the secondary osteon structure and the relationship between an osteon and the surrounding tissue. Our observations have revealed many different and complex 3D structures of osteons that could not be studied using previous methods. This work was carried out using a laboratory-based x-ray source, which makes obtaining these sorts of images readily accessible.

  19. Investigation of the effect of movement and irrigation systems on temperature in the conventional drilling of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Loffredo Neto, Henrique; Mardegan, Fábio E C

    2013-12-01

    We have compared the results of the external irrigation technique with those of a double irrigation technique with continuous intermittent movement. Maximum thermal measurements were made in the cortical part of 10 samples of bovine ribs during osteotomy to simulate the preparation of a surgical bed for the installation of dental implants at a depth of 10 mm. Twenty specimens were drilled for each group: external irrigation and continuous movement (control group 1, CG1); external irrigation and intermittent movement (control group 2, CG2); double irrigation and continuous movement (test group 1, TG1); and double irrigation and intermittent movement (test group 2, TG2). The double irrigation technique gave significantly better results regardless of the drilling movement used. Thermal increases between samples was 19.2% in group CG1, 10.4% in CG2, 5.4% in TG1, and 3.4% in TG2. The double irrigation technique produced a significantly smaller increase in temperature in the cortical bone during both types of drilling (p=0.001), which illustrated its greater efficiency compared with that of the external irrigation technique.

  20. Ratio between mature and immature enzymatic cross-links correlates with post-yield cortical bone behavior: An insight into greenstick fractures of the child fibula.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Gineyts, Evelyne; Pithioux, Martine; Baron, Cécile; Boivin, Georges; Lasaygues, Philippe; Chabrand, Patrick; Follet, Hélène

    2015-10-01

    As a determinant of skeletal fragility, the organic matrix is responsible for the post-yield and creep behavior of bone and for its toughness, while the mineral apatite acts on stiffness. Specific to the fibula and ulna in children, greenstick fractures show a plastic in vivo mechanical behavior before bone fracture. During growth, the immature form of collagen enzymatic cross-links gradually decreases, to be replaced by the mature form until adolescence, subsequently remaining constant throughout adult life. However, the link between the cortical bone organic matrix and greenstick fractures in children remains to be explored. Here, we sought to determine: 1) whether plastic bending fractures can occur in vitro, by testing cortical bone samples from children's fibula and 2) whether the post-yield behavior (ωp plastic energy) of cortical bone before fracture is related to total quantity of the collagen matrix, or to the quantity of mature and immature enzymatic cross-links and the quantity of non-enzymatic cross-links. We used a two-step approach; first, a 3-point microbending device tested 22 fibula machined bone samples from 7 children and 3 elderly adults until fracture. Second, biochemical analysis by HPLC was performed on the sample fragments. When pooling two groups of donors, children and elderly adults, results show a rank correlation between total energy dissipated before fracture and age and a linear correlation between plastic energy dissipated before fracture and ratio of immature/mature cross-links. A collagen matrix with more immature cross-links (i.e. a higher immature/mature cross-link ratio) is more likely to plastically deform before fracture. We conclude that this ratio in the sub-nanostructure of the organic matrix in cortical bone from the fibula may go some way towards explaining the variance in post-yield behavior. From a clinical point of view, therefore, our results provide a potential explanation of the presence of greenstick fractures in

  1. Short-term and long-term site-specific effects of tennis playing on trabecular and cortical bone at the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Tournaire, Nicolas; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Courteix, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical loading during growth magnifies the normal increase in bone diameter occurring in long bone shafts, but the response to loading in long bone ends remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of tennis playing during growth at the distal radius, comparing the bone response at trabecular and cortical skeletal sites. The influence of training duration was examined by studying bone response in short-term (children) and long-term (young adults) perspectives. Bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the radius were measured by DXA in 28 young (11.6 +/- 1.4 years old) and 47 adult tennis players (22.3 +/- 2.7 years old), and 70 age-matched controls (12 children, 58 adults) at three sites: the ultradistal region (trabecular), the mid-distal region, and the third-distal region (cortical). At the ultradistal radius, young and adult tennis players displayed similar side-to-side differences, the asymmetry in BMC reaching 16.3% and 13.8%, respectively (P < 0.0001). At the mid- and third-distal radius, the asymmetry was much greater in adults than in children (P < 0.0001) for all the bone parameters (mid-distal radius, +6.6% versus +15.6%; third-distal radius, +6.9% versus +13.3%, for BMC). Epiphyseal bone enduring longitudinal growth showed a great capacity to respond to mechanical loading in children. Prolonging tennis playing into adulthood was associated with further increase in bone mineralization at diaphyseal skeletal sites. These findings illustrate the benefits of practicing impact-loading sports during growth and maintaining physical activity into adulthood to enhance bone mass accrual and prevent fractures later in life.

  2. The effect of normal development and of severe undernutrition on some minor components of cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    McCance, R. A.; Southgate, D. A. T.; Spencer, P. J.; Weston, P. D.

    1966-01-01

    1. The amounts of calcium, magnesium, sodium and citric acid in the bones of undernourished pigs 1 year old were compared with the amounts in the bones of smaller newborn animals, normal animals of the same weight aged 4 weeks and of the same age weighing 170kg. 2. The differences that were found between 4 weeks and 1 year of age in the normal animals were expected as effects of aging. However, between birth and 4 weeks of age the changes in composition were in the opposite direction to those between 4 weeks and 1 year. 3. Undernutrition produced a bone that resembled chemically that of an animal 1 year old. PMID:5968547

  3. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    PubMed

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model

  4. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: Applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Lingzhi E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu; Traughber, Melanie; Su, Kuan-Hao; Pereira, Gisele C.; Grover, Anu; Traughber, Bryan; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr. E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequence is a promising MR pulse sequence for imaging cortical bone which is otherwise difficult to image using conventional MR sequences and also poses strong attenuation for photons in radiation therapy and PET imaging. The authors report here a systematic characterization of cortical bone signal decay and a scanning time optimization strategy for the UTE sequence through k-space undersampling, which can result in up to a 75% reduction in acquisition time. Using the undersampled UTE imaging sequence, the authors also attempted to quantitatively investigate the MR properties of cortical bone in healthy volunteers, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using such a technique for generating bone-enhanced images which can be used for radiation therapy planning and attenuation correction with PET/MR. Methods: An angularly undersampled, radially encoded UTE sequence was used for scanning the brains of healthy volunteers. Quantitative MR characterization of tissue properties, including water fraction and R2{sup ∗} = 1/T2{sup ∗}, was performed by analyzing the UTE images acquired at multiple echo times. The impact of different sampling rates was evaluated through systematic comparison of the MR image quality, bone-enhanced image quality, image noise, water fraction, and R2{sup ∗} of cortical bone. Results: A reduced angular sampling rate of the UTE trajectory achieves acquisition durations in proportion to the sampling rate and in as short as 25% of the time required for full sampling using a standard Cartesian acquisition, while preserving unique MR contrast within the skull at the cost of a minimal increase in noise level. The R2{sup ∗} of human skull was measured as 0.2–0.3 ms{sup −1} depending on the specific region, which is more than ten times greater than the R2{sup ∗} of soft tissue. The water fraction in human skull was measured to be 60%–80%, which is significantly less than the >90% water fraction in

  5. Curcumin reduces trabecular and cortical bone in naive and Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with curcumin on bone microstructural changes in female C57BL/6 mice in the presence or absence of Lewis lung carcinoma. Morphometric analysis showed that in tumor-bearing mice curcumin at 2% and 4% dietary levels (w/w) significa...

  6. Curcumin deteriorates trabecular and cortical bone in mice bearing metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target of metastasis for many malignancies; curcumin has been studied for its role in cancer prevention including early phase clinical trials for its efficacy and safe use with cancer patients. The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with curcumin (2% a...

  7. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in slab phantoms with cortical bone equivalent heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N.; Duch, M. A.; Panettieri, V.; Weber, L.; Eudaldo, T.; Ginjaume, M.; Ribas, M.

    2007-08-15

    To evaluate the dose values predicted by several calculation algorithms in two treatment planning systems, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements by means of various detectors were performed in heterogeneous layer phantoms with water- and bone-equivalent materials. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), plane parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers, and beam profiles with films. The MC code used for the simulations was the PENELOPE code. Three different field sizes (10x10, 5x5, and 2x2 cm{sup 2}) were studied in two phantom configurations and a bone equivalent material. These two phantom configurations contained heterogeneities of 5 and 2 cm of bone, respectively. We analyzed the performance of four correction-based algorithms and one based on convolution superposition. The correction-based algorithms were the Batho, the Modified Batho, the Equivalent TAR implemented in the Cadplan (Varian) treatment planning system (TPS), and the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam from the Helax-TMS (Nucletron) TPS. The convolution-superposition algorithm was the Collapsed Cone implemented in the Helax-TMS. All the correction-based calculation algorithms underestimated the dose inside the bone-equivalent material for 18 MV compared to MC simulations. The maximum underestimation, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS), was about 15% for the Helax-TMS Pencil Beam (Helax-TMS PB) for a 2x2 cm{sup 2} field inside the bone-equivalent material. In contrast, the Collapsed Cone algorithm yielded values around 3%. A more complex behavior was found for 6 MV where the Collapsed Cone performed less well, overestimating the dose inside the heterogeneity in 3%-5%. The rebuildup in the interface bone-water and the penumbra shrinking in high-density media were not predicted by any of the calculation algorithms except the Collapsed Cone, and only the MC simulations matched the experimental values

  8. The influence of bone density and anisotropy in finite element models of distal radius fracture osteosynthesis: Evaluations and comparison to experiments.

    PubMed

    Synek, A; Chevalier, Y; Baumbach, S F; Pahr, D H

    2015-11-26

    Continuum-level finite element (FE) models can be used to analyze and improve osteosynthesis procedures for distal radius fractures (DRF) from a biomechanical point of view. However, previous models oversimplified the bone material and lacked thorough experimental validation. The goal of this study was to assess the influence of local bone density and anisotropy in FE models of DRF osteosynthesis for predictions of axial stiffness, implant plate stresses, and screw loads. Experiments and FE analysis were conducted in 25 fresh frozen cadaveric radii with DRFs treated by volar locking plate osteosynthesis. Specimen specific geometries were captured using clinical quantitative CT (QCT) scans of the prepared samples. Local bone material properties were computed based on high resolution CT (HR-pQCT) scans of the intact radii. The axial stiffness and individual screw loads were evaluated in FE models, with (1) orthotropic inhomogeneous (OrthoInhom), (2) isotropic inhomogeneous (IsoInhom), and (3) isotropic homogeneous (IsoHom) bone material and compared to the experimental axial stiffness and screw-plate interface failures. FE simulated and experimental axial stiffness correlated significantly (p<0.0001) for all three model types. The coefficient of determination was similar for OrthoInhom (R(2)=0.807) and IsoInhom (R(2)=0.816) models but considerably lower for IsoHom models (R(2)=0.500). The peak screw loads were in qualitative agreement with experimental screw-plate interface failure. Individual loads and implant plate stresses of IsoHom models differed significantly (p<0.05) from OrthoInhom and IsoInhom models. In conclusion, including local bone density in FE models of DRF osteosynthesis is essential whereas local bone anisotropy hardly effects the models׳ predictive abilities.

  9. Age-specific profiles of tissue-level composition and mechanical properties in murine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    There is growing evidence that bone composition and tissue-level mechanical properties are significant determinants of skeletal integrity. In the current study, Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation testing were co-localized to analyze tissue-level compositional and mechanical properties in skeletally mature young (4 or 5 months) and old (19 months) murine femora at similar spatial scales. Standard multivariate linear regression analysis revealed age-dependent patterns in the relationships between mechanical and compositional properties at the tissue scale. However, changes in bone material properties with age are often complex and nonlinear, and can be missed with linear regression and correlation-based methods. A retrospective data mining approach was implemented using non-linear multidimensional visualization and classification to identify spectroscopic and nanoindentation metrics that best discriminated bone specimens of different age-classes. The ability to classify the specimens into the correct age group increased by using combinations of Raman and nanoindentation variables (86-96% accuracy) as compared to using individual measures (59-79% accuracy). Metrics that best classified 4 or 5 month and 19 month specimens (2-age classes) were mineral to matrix ratio, crystallinity, modulus and plasticity index. Metrics that best distinguished between 4, 5 and 19 month specimens (3-age classes) were mineral to matrix ratio, crystallinity, modulus, hardness, cross-linking, carbonate to phosphate ratio, creep displacement and creep viscosity. These findings attest to the complexity of mechanisms underlying bone tissue properties and draw attention to the importance of considering non-linear interactions between tissue-level composition and mechanics that may work together to influence material properties with age. The results demonstrate that a few non-linearly combined compositional and mechanical metrics provide better discriminatory information than a single metric

  10. Small body size and extreme cortical bone remodeling indicate phyletic dwarfism in Magyarosaurus dacus (Sauropoda: Titanosauria)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Koen; Csiki, Zoltan; Rogers, Kristina Curry; Weishampel, David B.; Redelstorff, Ragna; Carballido, Jose L.; Sander, P. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Sauropods were the largest terrestrial tetrapods (>105 kg) in Earth's history and grew at rates that rival those of extant mammals. Magyarosaurus dacus, a titanosaurian sauropod from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Romania, is known exclusively from small individuals (<103 kg) and conflicts with the idea that all sauropods were massive. The diminutive M. dacus was a classical example of island dwarfism (phyletic nanism) in dinosaurs, but a recent study suggested that the small Romanian titanosaurs actually represent juveniles of a larger-bodied taxon. Here we present strong histological evidence that M. dacus was indeed a dwarf (phyletic nanoid). Bone histological analysis of an ontogenetic series of Magyarosaurus limb bones indicates that even the smallest Magyarosaurus specimens exhibit a bone microstructure identical to fully mature or old individuals of other sauropod taxa. Comparison of histologies with large-bodied sauropods suggests that Magyarosaurus had an extremely reduced growth rate, but had retained high basal metabolic rates typical for sauropods. The uniquely decreased growth rate and diminutive body size in Magyarosaurus were adaptations to life on a Cretaceous island and show that sauropod dinosaurs were not exempt from general ecological principles limiting body size. PMID:20435913

  11. Dynamic permeability of the lacunar–canalicular system in human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Benalla, M.; Palacio-Mancheno, P. E.; Fritton, S. P.; Cardoso, L.

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the experimental determination of the permeability of a small sample of a fluid-saturated hierarchically structured porous material is described and applied to the determination of the lacunar–canalicular permeability (KLC) in bone. The interest in the permeability of the lacunar–canalicular pore system (LCS) is due to the fact that the LCS is considered to be the site of bone mechanotransduction due to the loading-driven fluid flow over cellular structures. The permeability of this space has been estimated to be anywhere from 10−17 to 10−25 m2. However, the vascular pore system and LCS are intertwined, rendering the permeability of the much smaller-dimensioned LCS challenging to measure. In this study, we report a combined experimental and analytical approach that allowed the accurate determination of the KLC to be on the order of 10−22 m2 for human osteonal bone. It was found that the KLC has a linear dependence on loading frequency, decreasing at a rate of 2 × 10−24 m2/Hz from 1 to 100 Hz, and using the proposed model, the porosity alone was able to explain 86 % of the KLC variability. PMID:24146291

  12. American Society of Biomechanics Journal of Biomechanics Award 2013: cortical bone tissue mechanical quality and biological mechanisms possibly underlying atypical fractures.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Joseph R; Bajaj, Devendra; Fritton, J Christopher

    2015-04-13

    The biomechanics literature contains many well-understood mechanisms behind typical fracture types that have important roles in treatment planning. The recent association of "atypical" fractures with long-term use of drugs designed to prevent osteoporosis has renewed interest in the effects of agents on bone tissue-level quality. While this class of fracture was recognized prior to the introduction of the anti-resorptive bisphosphonate drugs and recently likened to stress fractures, the mechanism(s) that lead to atypical fractures have not been definitively identified. Thus, a causal relationship between these drugs and atypical fracture has not been established. Physicians, bioengineers and others interested in the biomechanics of bone are working to improve fracture-prevention diagnostics, and the design of treatments to avoid this serious side-effect in the future. This review examines the mechanisms behind the bone tissue damage that may produce the atypical fracture pattern observed increasingly with long-term bisphosphonate use. Our recent findings and those of others reviewed support that the mechanisms behind normal, healthy excavation and tunnel filling by bone remodeling units within cortical tissue strengthen mechanical integrity. The ability of cortical bone to resist the damage induced during cyclic loading may be altered by the reduced remodeling and increased tissue age resulting from long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Development of assessments for such potential fractures would restore confidence in pharmaceutical treatments that have the potential to spare millions in our aging population from the morbidity and death that often follow bone fracture.

  13. Multi-level characterization of human femoral cortices and their underlying osteocyte network reveal trends in quality of young, aged, osteoporotic and antiresorptive-treated bone.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Petar; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Riedel, Christoph; vom Scheidt, Annika; Herzog, Lydia; Krause, Matthias; Djonic, Danijela; Djuric, Marija; Püschel, Klaus; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O; Busse, Björn

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of bone's hierarchical structure in aging, disease and treatment conditions is imperative to understand the architectural and compositional modifications to the material and its mechanical integrity. Here, cortical bone sections from 30 female proximal femurs - a frequent fracture site - were rigorously assessed to characterize the osteocyte lacunar network, osteon density and patterns of bone matrix mineralization by backscatter-electron imaging and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in relation to mechanical properties obtained by reference-point indentation. We show that young, healthy bone revealed the highest resistance to mechanical loading (indentation) along with higher mineralization and preserved osteocyte-lacunar characteristics. In contrast, aging and osteoporosis significantly alter bone material properties, where impairment of the osteocyte-lacunar network was evident through accumulation of hypermineralized osteocyte lacunae with aging and even more in osteoporosis, highlighting increased osteocyte apoptosis and reduced mechanical competence. But antiresorptive treatment led to fewer mineralized lacunae and fewer but larger osteons signifying rejuvenated bone. In summary, multiple structural and compositional changes to the bone material were identified leading to decay or maintenance of bone quality in disease, health and treatment conditions. Clearly, antiresorptive treatment reflected favorable effects on the multifunctional osteocytic cells that are a prerequisite for bone's structural, metabolic and mechanosensory integrity.

  14. A novel underuse model shows that inactivity but not ovariectomy determines the deteriorated material properties and geometry of cortical bone in the tibia of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Kozai, Yusuke; Ito, Yumi; Furuhama, Takami; Naruse, Kouji; Nonaka, Kiichi; Nagai, Yumiko; Yamato, Hideyuki; Kashima, Isamu; Ohya, Keiichi; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2011-07-01

    Our goal in this study was to determine to what extent the physiologic consequences of ovariectomy (OVX) in bones are exacerbated by a lack of daily activity such as walking. We forced 14-week-old female rats to be inactive for 15 weeks with a unique experimental system that prevents standing and walking while allowing other movements. Tibiae, femora, and 4th lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), microfocused X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), histology, histomorphometry, Raman spectroscopy, and the three-point bending test. Contrary to our expectation, the exacerbation was very much limited to the cancellous bone parameters. Parameters of femur and tibia cortical bone were affected by the forced inactivity but not by OVX: (1) cross-sectional moment of inertia was significantly smaller in Sham-Inactive rat bones than that of their walking counterparts; (2) the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes per unit cross-sectional area was larger in Sham-Inactive rat bones than in Sham-Walking rat bones; and (3) material properties such as ultimate stress of inactive rat tibia was lower than that of their walking counterparts. Of note, the additive effect of inactivity and OVX was seen only in a few parameters, such as the cancellous bone mineral density of the lumbar vertebrae and the structural parameters of cancellous bone in the lumbar vertebrae/tibiae. It is concluded that the lack of daily activity is detrimental to the strength and quality of cortical bone in the femur and tibia of rats, while lack of estrogen is not. Our inactive rat model, with the older rats, will aid the study of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the etiology of which may be both hormonal and mechanical. PMID:21127921

  15. μCT-Based Measurement of Cortical Bone Graft-to-Host Union

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, David G.; Shaikh, Saad; Papuga, Mark Owen; Lerner, Amy L.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Awad, Hani A.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of structural bone grafts risk of failure requires noninvasive quantitative predictors of functional strength. We hypothesized that a quantitative graft-to-host union biometric would correlate significantly with biomechanical properties as a surrogate for the risk of fracture. To test this, we developed a novel algorithm to compute the union between host callus and graft, which was termed the union ratio. We compared the union ratio of live autografts to devitalized allografts implanted into the mid-diaphysis of mouse femurs for 6 and 9 wk. Surprisingly, the autograft union ratio decreased from 0.228 ± 0.029 at 6 wk to 0.15 ± 0.011 at 9 wk (p < 0.05) and did not correlate with the torsional properties of the autografts . The allograft union ratio was 0.105 ± 0.023 at 6 wk but increased to 0.224 ± 0.029 at 9 wk (p < 0.05). As a single variable, the union ratio correlated significantly with ultimate torque (R 2 = 0.58) and torsional rigidity (R 2 = 0.51) of the allografts. Multivariable regression analyses of allografts that included the union ratio, the graft bone volume, the maximum and minimum polar moment of inertia, and their first-order interaction terms with the union ratio as independent variables resulted in significant correlations with the ultimate torque and torsional rigidity (adjusted R 2 = 0.80 and 0.89, respectively). These results suggest that, unlike live autografts, the union between the devitalized allograft and host contributes significantly to the strength of grafted bone. The union ratio has important clinical implications as a novel biometric for noninvasive assessment of functional strength and failure risk. PMID:19063685

  16. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and risedronate was superior to PGE2 alone in maintaining newly added bone in the cortical bone site after withdrawal in older intact rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. F.; Lin, B. Y.; Jee, W. S.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, Y. Y.; Ke, H. Z.; Li, X. J.

    1997-01-01

    The objects of this study were (1) to determine the effects of risedronate (Ris) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) alone and in combination, on tibial diaphyses of older intact female rats; and (2) to observe the fate of any extra bone if formed after withdrawal of the treatment. Nine-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 6 mg of PGE2/kg/day, 1 or 5 micrograms of Ris/kg twice a week, or 6 mg of PGE2/kg/day plus 1 or 5 micrograms of Ris/kg twice a week for the first 60 days and followed by vehicle injections for another 60 days. Cross-sections of double fluorescent labeled, undecalcified tibial diaphyses proximal to the tibiofibular junction were processed for histomorphometry. We found that: (1) neither the 1 microgram nor the 5 micrograms of Ris treatment in the 60-day on/60-day off group showed any histomorphometric differences from age-related controls; (2) while the 60 days of PGE2 treatment added extra cortical bone (6%) on the tibial shaft (due to stimulation of periosteal, endocortical, and marrow trabecular bone formation), the new endocortical and most of the new marrow trabecular bone were lost when treatment was withdrawn; however, the new periosteal bone remained; (3) PGE2 with Ris added the same amount of new bone to tibial diaphysis as did PGE2 alone and upon withdrawal, new marrow trabecular bone was lost but new periosteal and endocortical bones were preserved in PGE2 + 1 microgram of Ris on/off group. In contrast, all the new bone was maintained in the PGE2 + 5 micrograms of Ris on/off group; (4) PGE2 + Ris cotreatment failed to block the increase in cortical bone porosity induced by PGE2; and (5) in the PGE2 alone and PGE2 + 1 microgram of Ris on/off groups bone turnover was higher than that in the PGE2 + 5 micrograms of Ris on/off group. These results indicate that on/off treatment with PGE2 and Ris is superior to PGE2 alone in that it forms the same amount of new bone during treatment, but preserves more cortical bone during

  17. Sclerostin Immunoreactivity Increases in Cortical Bone Osteocytes and Decreases in Articular Cartilage Chondrocytes in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-03-01

    Sclerostin is a 24-kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been identified as a negative modulator of new bone formation and may play a major role in age-related decline in skeletal function. Although serum levels of sclerostin markedly increase with age, relatively little is known about whether cells in the skeleton change their expression of sclerostin with aging. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we explored sclerostin immunoreactivity (sclerostin-IR) in the femurs of 4-, 9-, and 24-month-old adult C3H/HeJ male mice. In the femur, the only two cell types that expressed detectable levels of sclerostin-IR were bone osteocytes and articular cartilage chondrocytes. At three different sites along the diaphysis of the femur, only a subset of osteocytes expressed sclerostin-IR and the percentage of osteocytes that expressed sclerostin-IR increased from approximately 36% to 48% in 4- vs. 24-month-old mice. In marked contrast, in the same femurs, there were ~40% fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes of articular cartilage that expressed sclerostin-IR when comparing 24- vs. 4-month-old mice. Understanding the mechanism(s) that drive these divergent changes in sclerostin-IR may provide insight into understanding and treating the age-related decline of the skeleton.

  18. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  19. Difference in Bone Mineral Density Change at the Lateral Femoral Cortices according to Administration of Different Bisphosphonate Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjun; Bang, Hyun Hee; Yoo, Hanna; Lim, Hyunsun; Jung, Woo Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background To retrospectively assess whether the response of subtrochanteric lateral cortex (STLC) is different according to the bisphosphonate agents in terms of bone mineral density (BMD) change. Methods A total of 149 subjects, who had 2- to 4-year interval follow-up of BMD using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), were included in this retrospective study divided into following 3 groups: control group (no consumption of any anti-osteoporotic drugs, n=38), alendronate group (naïve alendronate users, n=48), risedronate group (naïve risedronate users, n=63). BMD was measured at the STLC and subtrochanteric medial cortex (STMC) in each patient by drawing rectangular ROIs at the bone cortices. The percent change of BMD at the STLC were compared between the aforementioned 3 groups by using analysis of covariance model to control five independent variables of age, body mass index, percent change of STMC, hip axis length, time interval between DXA examinations. Results The least square mean values±standard deviation of the percent change of BMD in the control, alendronate, and risedronate groups were 1.46±1.50, 2.23±1.26, and 6.96±1.11, respectively. The risedronate group showed significantly higher change of BMD percentage compared with the control (adjusted P=0.012) or alendronate (adjusted P=0.016) groups. Conclusions The percent change of BMD at the STLC in the risedronate user group was greater than the alendronate and control groups. The implication of these changes needs to be further verified. PMID:27294080

  20. Evaluation of cortical bone mass, thickness and density by z-scores in osteopenic conditions and in relation to menopause and estrogen treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Meema, S.; Meema, H.E.

    1982-08-01

    Z-scores express, differences from normals in standard deviation units, and are particularly useful for comparison of changes where normal values are age- and sex-dependent. We determined z-scores for bone mineral mass, cortical thickness, and bone mineral density in the radius in various conditions and diseases in both sexes. In the males, z-scores were calculated for age, but in the females z-scores for menopausal status (years postmenopausal exclusive of years on estrogen treatment) were found to be more appropriate. With few exceptions, changes in a disease were of a similar order in both sexes. For bone minerals mass few mean z-scores were significantly increased, but diseases with significantly decreased mean z-scores were numerous. The usefulness of z-scores in diagnosis and study of metabolic bone disease is discussed.

  1. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL PROCESSING AND OXIDE ETHYLENE STERILIZATION ON CORTICAL AND CANCELLOUS RAT BONE: A LIGHT AND ELECTRON SCANNING MICROSCOPY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; da Silva, Juliano Voltarelli F.; Frezarim Thomazini, José Armendir; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, under microscopic examination, the structural changes displayed by the trabecular and cortical bones after being processed chemically and sterilized by ethylene oxide. Methods: Samples of cancellous and cortical bones obtained from young female albinus rats (Wistar) were assigned to four groups according to the type of treatment: Group I- drying; Group II- drying and ethylene oxide sterilization; III- chemical treatment; IV- chemical treatment and ethylene oxide sterilization. Half of this material was analyzed under ordinary light microscope and the other half using scanning electron microscopy. Results: In all the samples, regardless the group, there was good preservation of the general morphology. For samples submitted to the chemical processing there was better preservation of the cellular content, whereas there was amalgamation of the fibres when ethylene oxide was used. Conclusion: Treatment with ethylene oxide caused amalgamation of the fibers, possibly because of heating and the chemical treatment contributed to a better cellular preservation of the osseous structure. PMID:26998450

  2. Heterogeneity of blood flow in tibial cortical bone: An experimental investigation using microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Willans, S.M.; McCarthy, I.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The distribution of tibial blood flow was measured by injecting approximately (600-1000) x 10(3) 15 mu microspheres, labelled with either tin-113 (113Sn) or cobalt-57 (57Co) into femoral arteries of five mature greyhounds. The diaphyseal cortex, stripped of periosteum and devoid of marrow, was sawn into 40 pieces (10 transverse sections x 4 anatomical quarters/section). Relative deposition densities of the 113Sn microspheres in 40 pieces of cortex were found. These values, together with their associated masses, proved, from a statistical point of view, that flow rate heterogeneity was substantial in the diaphysis. In particular, for the diaphyseal cortex, distribution of relative deposition densities (flow rates) in six bones was found to be positively-skewed with a relative dispersion ((SD/mean) x 100) of approximately 40%.

  3. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Khumsarn, Nattida; Patanaporn, Virush; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Results Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. Conclusion In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns. PMID:27358819

  4. Radiological Evaluation of the Initial Fixation between Cortical Bone Trajectory and Conventional Pedicle Screw Technique for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique versus conventional pedicle screws (PS) in radiographs of postsurgical lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented the holding strength of CBT technique for spondylolisthesis cases. Methods From October 2009 to June 2014, 21 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis were surgically treated in our institution. Ten were treated with conventional PS technique and 11 of with CBT technique. Mean lumbar lordosis and percent slippage were evaluated preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively using radiographs. We also investigated percent loss of slip reduction. Results There were statistically significant differences between preoperative percent slippage and postoperative slippage in both PS and CBT procedures over 1 year, and both techniques showed good slip reduction. On the other hand, lumbar lordosis did not change significantly in either the PS or CBT groups over 1 year. Conclusions CBT technique showed similarly good initial fixation compared with the PS procedure in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:27114765

  5. BS-SEM evaluation of the tissular interactions between cortical bone and calcium-phosphate covered titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, M C; Franch, J; Carvalho, P; Belmonte, A M; Tusell, J; Franch, B; Fernandez, J M; Clèries, L; Morenza, J L

    2001-01-01

    The improvement of the reliability of the contact between the osseous tissues and the implant materials has been tested by recovering the metallic implants with ceramic materials, usually calcium phosphates. In our study, the calcium phosphate recovering layers were deposited by means of a pulsed-laser deposition technique. Our aim was to to evaluate the tissue interactions established between cortical bone and titanium implants covered by five different layers, ranging from amorphous calcium phosphate to crystalline hydroxyapatite, obtained by altering the parameters of the laser ablation process. The surgical protocol of the study consisted in the simultaneous implantation of the five types of implants in both the tibial dyaphisis of three Beagle dogs, sacrificed respectively one, two and three months after the last surgical procedures. After the sacrifice, the samples were submitted to a scheduled procedure of embedding in plastic polymers without prior decalcification, in order to perform the ultrastructural studies: scanning microscopy with secondary and backscattered electrons (BS-SEM). Our observations show that both in terms of the calcified tissues appearing as a response to the presence of the different coatings and of time of recovering, the implants coated with crystalline calcium phosphate layers by laser ablation present a better result than the amorphous-calcium-phosphate-coated implants. Moreover, the constant presence of chondroid tissue, related with the mechanical induction by forces applied on the recovering area, strongly suggests that the mechanisms implied in osteointegration are related to endomembranous, rather than endochondral ossification processes.

  6. Quantitative histological evaluation of early fracture healing of cortical bones immobilized by stainless steel and composite plates.

    PubMed

    Akeson, W H; Woo, S L; Coutts, R D; Matthews, J V; Gonsalves, M; Amiel, D

    1975-11-24

    Internal fixation devices of less bending stiffness than conventional plates made of stainless steel or vitallium were compared with conventional plates in a study of fracture healing. The material for this investigation was a fine graphite fiber reinforced methyl methacrylate resin composite with a modulus of elasticity approximately ten times less than that of stainless steel. Osteotomies were performed on canine radii. Internal fixation was accomplished by means of a composite plate on the left side, and a stainless steel plate on the right. Clinical assessment, as well as biomechanical and quantitative histological techniques, were used to compare osteotomy healing of the two sides. At four months, all osteotomies had healed and the bioengineering tests showed radii from the two sides had equivalent strength. However, significantly less cortical porosity was found in the side with the composite plate (6.8 per cent), as compared to that of the stainless steel plated side (14 per cent). These results suggest that a less stiff fixation plate may have some advantage in the treatment of long bone fracture if there is no implant failure, and if union rates are equivalent.

  7. Partial removal of pore and loosely bound water by low-energy drying decreases cortical bone toughness in young and old donors.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Gorochow, Lacey E; Adam Horch, R; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Manhard, Mary Katherine; Does, Mark D

    2013-06-01

    With an ability to quantify matrix-bound and pore water in bone, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry can potentially be implemented in clinical imaging to assess the fracture resistance of bone in a way that is independent of current X-ray techniques, which assess bone mineral density as a correlate of bone strength. Working towards that goal, we quantified the effect of partial dehydration in air on the mechanical and NMR properties of human cortical bone in order to understand whether NMR is sensitive to water-bone interactions at low energy and whether such interactions contribute to the age-related difference in the toughness of bone. Cadaveric femurs were collected from male and female donors falling into two age groups: 21-60 years of age (young) and 74-99 years of age (old). After extracting two samples from the medial cortex of the mid-shaft, tensile tests were conducted on Wet specimens and paired, Partially Dry (PtlD) specimens (prepared by low-energy drying in air to remove ∼3% of original mass before testing). Prior analysis by micro-computed tomography found that there were no differences in intra-cortical porosity between the Wet and PtlD specimens nor did an age-related difference in porosity exist. PtlD specimens from young and old donors had significantly less toughness than Wet specimens, primarily due to a dehydration-related decrease in post-yield strain. The low-energy drying protocol did not affect the modulus and yield strength of bone. Subsequent dehydration of the PtlD specimens in a vacuum oven at 62°C and then 103°C, with quantification of water loss at each temperature, revealed an age-related shift from more loosely bound water to more tightly bound water. NMR detected a change in both bound and pore water pools with low-energy air-drying, and both pools were effectively removed when bone was oven-dried at 62°C, irrespective of donor age. Although not strictly significant due to variability in the drying and testing

  8. Partial removal of pore and loosely bound water by low-energy drying decreases cortical bone toughness in young and old donors.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Gorochow, Lacey E; Adam Horch, R; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Manhard, Mary Katherine; Does, Mark D

    2013-06-01

    With an ability to quantify matrix-bound and pore water in bone, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry can potentially be implemented in clinical imaging to assess the fracture resistance of bone in a way that is independent of current X-ray techniques, which assess bone mineral density as a correlate of bone strength. Working towards that goal, we quantified the effect of partial dehydration in air on the mechanical and NMR properties of human cortical bone in order to understand whether NMR is sensitive to water-bone interactions at low energy and whether such interactions contribute to the age-related difference in the toughness of bone. Cadaveric femurs were collected from male and female donors falling into two age groups: 21-60 years of age (young) and 74-99 years of age (old). After extracting two samples from the medial cortex of the mid-shaft, tensile tests were conducted on Wet specimens and paired, Partially Dry (PtlD) specimens (prepared by low-energy drying in air to remove ∼3% of original mass before testing). Prior analysis by micro-computed tomography found that there were no differences in intra-cortical porosity between the Wet and PtlD specimens nor did an age-related difference in porosity exist. PtlD specimens from young and old donors had significantly less toughness than Wet specimens, primarily due to a dehydration-related decrease in post-yield strain. The low-energy drying protocol did not affect the modulus and yield strength of bone. Subsequent dehydration of the PtlD specimens in a vacuum oven at 62°C and then 103°C, with quantification of water loss at each temperature, revealed an age-related shift from more loosely bound water to more tightly bound water. NMR detected a change in both bound and pore water pools with low-energy air-drying, and both pools were effectively removed when bone was oven-dried at 62°C, irrespective of donor age. Although not strictly significant due to variability in the drying and testing

  9. Distinct Relationships of Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Fat With Cortical Bone: Findings From a Cross-Sectional Study of Young Adult Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Deere, K.; Sayers, A.; Viljakainen, H. T.; Lawlor, D. A.; Sattar, N.; Kemp, J. P.; Fraser, W. D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intracellular fat within muscle and visceral tissue has been suggested to adversely influence bone development. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate associations between im fat, as reflected by muscle density as measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and cortical bone parameters in young adults. Design/Setting/Participants: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1703 males and 2243 females aged 17.8 years from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Outcome Measures: We measured cortical bone parameters from midtibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans. Results: Muscle density (inversely related to im fat) was inversely associated with periosteal circumference (PC) (beta = −0.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), −0.1, −0.04]), cortical bone mineral density (BMDC) (beta = −0.21 [95% CI, −0.26, −0.17]), and cortical thickness (CT) (beta = −0.37 [95% CI, −0.42, −0.33]) (males and females combined, adjusted for age, height, gender, and muscle cross-sectional area). In contrast, sc fat area was positively associated with PC (beta = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.07, 0.12]), but no association was seen with BMDC or CT. To examine the role of candidate intermediary metabolic pathways, analyses were repeated after adjustment for insulin, C-reactive protein, and β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen. Whereas similar associations were observed after adjustment for insulin and C-reactive protein, the association between muscle density and BMDC was partially attenuated by adjustment for β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (beta = −0.14 [95% CI, −0.20, −0.08]). Conclusion: Although im and sc fat were both positively associated with cortical bone mass, the nature of these relationships differed in that im fat was predominantly associated with CT and BMDC, whereas sc fat was mainly associated with PC. These relationships were largely independent of candidate metabolic pathways, such as altered bone

  10. The role of inter-prosthetic distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density in the development of inter-prosthetic fractures of the femur: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Weiser, L; Korecki, M A; Sellenschloh, K; Fensky, F; Püschel, K; Morlock, M M; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2014-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for a patient to have ipsilateral hip and knee replacements. The inter-prosthetic (IP) distance, the distance between the tips of hip and knee prostheses, has been thought to be associated with an increased risk of IP fracture. Small gap distances are generally assumed to act as stress risers, although there is no real biomechanical evidence to support this. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of IP distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density on the likelihood of an IP femoral fracture. A total of 18 human femur specimens were randomised into three groups by bone density and cortical thickness. For each group, a defined IP distance of 35 mm, 80 mm or 160 mm was created by choosing the appropriate lengths of component. The maximum fracture strength was determined using a four-point bending test. The fracture force of all three groups was similar (p = 0.498). There was a highly significant correlation between the cortical area and the fracture strength (r = 0.804, p < 0.001), whereas bone density showed no influence. This study suggests that the IP distance has little influence on fracture strength in IP femoral fractures: the thickness of the cortex seems to be the decisive factor.

  11. The role of inter-prosthetic distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density in the development of inter-prosthetic fractures of the femur: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Weiser, L; Korecki, M A; Sellenschloh, K; Fensky, F; Püschel, K; Morlock, M M; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2014-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for a patient to have ipsilateral hip and knee replacements. The inter-prosthetic (IP) distance, the distance between the tips of hip and knee prostheses, has been thought to be associated with an increased risk of IP fracture. Small gap distances are generally assumed to act as stress risers, although there is no real biomechanical evidence to support this. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of IP distance, cortical thickness and bone mineral density on the likelihood of an IP femoral fracture. A total of 18 human femur specimens were randomised into three groups by bone density and cortical thickness. For each group, a defined IP distance of 35 mm, 80 mm or 160 mm was created by choosing the appropriate lengths of component. The maximum fracture strength was determined using a four-point bending test. The fracture force of all three groups was similar (p = 0.498). There was a highly significant correlation between the cortical area and the fracture strength (r = 0.804, p < 0.001), whereas bone density showed no influence. This study suggests that the IP distance has little influence on fracture strength in IP femoral fractures: the thickness of the cortex seems to be the decisive factor. PMID:25274925

  12. Fracture mechanics of human cortical bone: The relationship of geometry, microstructure and composition with the fracture of the tibia, femoral shaft and the femoral neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeni, Yener Nail

    influence of bone quality, i.e., mineralization, water content, osteon size, area and number, microdamage and crystallinity differed between different locations, age groups and fracture mode. Fracture toughness was also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as cortical index and Singh index, significance level being dependent upon bone location, fracture mode and age. Several mechanistic models to predict how bone microstructure influences bone fracture toughness were proposed based on experimental results and available literature.

  13. Ratio between mature and immature enzymatic cross-links correlates with post-yield cortical bone behavior: An insight into greenstick fractures of the child fibula.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Gineyts, Evelyne; Pithioux, Martine; Baron, Cécile; Boivin, Georges; Lasaygues, Philippe; Chabrand, Patrick; Follet, Hélène

    2015-10-01

    As a determinant of skeletal fragility, the organic matrix is responsible for the post-yield and creep behavior of bone and for its toughness, while the mineral apatite acts on stiffness. Specific to the fibula and ulna in children, greenstick fractures show a plastic in vivo mechanical behavior before bone fracture. During growth, the immature form of collagen enzymatic cross-links gradually decreases, to be replaced by the mature form until adolescence, subsequently remaining constant throughout adult life. However, the link between the cortical bone organic matrix and greenstick fractures in children remains to be explored. Here, we sought to determine: 1) whether plastic bending fractures can occur in vitro, by testing cortical bone samples from children's fibula and 2) whether the post-yield behavior (ωp plastic energy) of cortical bone before fracture is related to total quantity of the collagen matrix, or to the quantity of mature and immature enzymatic cross-links and the quantity of non-enzymatic cross-links. We used a two-step approach; first, a 3-point microbending device tested 22 fibula machined bone samples from 7 children and 3 elderly adults until fracture. Second, biochemical analysis by HPLC was performed on the sample fragments. When pooling two groups of donors, children and elderly adults, results show a rank correlation between total energy dissipated before fracture and age and a linear correlation between plastic energy dissipated before fracture and ratio of immature/mature cross-links. A collagen matrix with more immature cross-links (i.e. a higher immature/mature cross-link ratio) is more likely to plastically deform before fracture. We conclude that this ratio in the sub-nanostructure of the organic matrix in cortical bone from the fibula may go some way towards explaining the variance in post-yield behavior. From a clinical point of view, therefore, our results provide a potential explanation of the presence of greenstick fractures in

  14. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shihong; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Yi

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can

  15. Fetal and neonatal exposure to the endocrine disruptor, methoxychlor, reduces lean body mass and bone mineral density and increases cortical porosity.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Heather S; Uzumcu, Mehmet; Buckendahl, Patricia; Dunn, Michael G; Shupper, Peter; Shapses, Sue A

    2014-12-01

    Endogenous estrogen has beneficial effects on mature bone and negatively affects the developing skeleton, whereas the effect of environmental estrogens is not known. Methoxychlor (MXC) is a synthetic estrogen known as a persistent organochlorine and used as a pesticide. Methoxychlor and its metabolites display estrogenic, anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity and may therefore influence bone. Fifty-eight male fetal and neonatal rats were exposed to either: a negative control (DMSO), 0.020, 100 mg/kg MXC, or 1 mg/kg β-estradiol-3-benzoate (EB; positive control). Rats were treated daily for 11 days, from embryonic day 19 to postnatal day (PND) 7 or for 4 days during the postnatal period (PND 0-7). All rats were analyzed at PND-84. Total body, femur, spine, and tibia areal bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), lean body mass (LBM) and fat were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone geometry and volumetric (v) BMD were measured using micro-computed tomography and biomechanical properties using three-point bending were assessed. Rats exposed to EB or MXC (at either the high and/or low dose), independent of exposure interval showed lower body weight, LBM, tibia and femur BMD and length, and total body BMD and BMC than DMSO control group (p ≤ 0.05). Methoxychlor and EB exposure increased cortical porosity compared to DMSO controls. Trabecular vBMD, number and separation, and cortical polar moment of inertia and cross-sectional area were lower due to EB exposure compared to control (p < 0.05). Early MXC exposure compromises cortical porosity and bone size at maturity, and could ultimately increase the risk of fracture with aging.

  16. Fetal and neonatal exposure to the endocrine disruptor, methoxychlor, reduces lean body mass and bone mineral density and increases cortical porosity.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Heather S; Uzumcu, Mehmet; Buckendahl, Patricia; Dunn, Michael G; Shupper, Peter; Shapses, Sue A

    2014-12-01

    Endogenous estrogen has beneficial effects on mature bone and negatively affects the developing skeleton, whereas the effect of environmental estrogens is not known. Methoxychlor (MXC) is a synthetic estrogen known as a persistent organochlorine and used as a pesticide. Methoxychlor and its metabolites display estrogenic, anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity and may therefore influence bone. Fifty-eight male fetal and neonatal rats were exposed to either: a negative control (DMSO), 0.020, 100 mg/kg MXC, or 1 mg/kg β-estradiol-3-benzoate (EB; positive control). Rats were treated daily for 11 days, from embryonic day 19 to postnatal day (PND) 7 or for 4 days during the postnatal period (PND 0-7). All rats were analyzed at PND-84. Total body, femur, spine, and tibia areal bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), lean body mass (LBM) and fat were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone geometry and volumetric (v) BMD were measured using micro-computed tomography and biomechanical properties using three-point bending were assessed. Rats exposed to EB or MXC (at either the high and/or low dose), independent of exposure interval showed lower body weight, LBM, tibia and femur BMD and length, and total body BMD and BMC than DMSO control group (p ≤ 0.05). Methoxychlor and EB exposure increased cortical porosity compared to DMSO controls. Trabecular vBMD, number and separation, and cortical polar moment of inertia and cross-sectional area were lower due to EB exposure compared to control (p < 0.05). Early MXC exposure compromises cortical porosity and bone size at maturity, and could ultimately increase the risk of fracture with aging. PMID:25326143

  17. Mapping anisotropy of the proximal femur for enhanced image based finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Enns-Bray, William S; Owoc, Jan S; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Boyd, Steven K

    2014-10-17

    Finite element (FE) models of bone derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) rely on realistic material properties to accurately predict bone strength. QCT cannot resolve bone microarchitecture, therefore QCT-based FE models lack the anisotropy apparent within the underlying bone tissue. This study proposes a method for mapping femoral anisotropy using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) scans of human cadaver specimens. Femur HR-pQCT images were sub-divided into numerous overlapping cubic sub-volumes and the local anisotropy was quantified using a 'direct-mechanics' method. The resulting directionality reflected all the major stress lines visible within the trabecular lattice, and provided a realistic estimate of the alignment of Harvesian systems within the cortical compartment. QCT-based FE models of the proximal femur were constructed with isotropic and anisotropic material properties, with directionality interpolated from the map of anisotropy. Models were loaded in a sideways fall configuration and the resulting whole bone stiffness was compared to experimental stiffness and ultimate strength. Anisotropic models were consistently less stiff, but no statistically significant differences in correlation were observed between material models against experimental data. The mean difference in whole bone stiffness between model types was approximately 26%, suggesting that anisotropy can still effect considerable change in the mechanics of proximal femur models. The under prediction of whole bone stiffness in anisotropic models suggests that the orthotropic elastic constants require further investigation. The ability to map mechanical anisotropy from high-resolution images and interpolate information into clinical-resolution models will allow testing of new anisotropic material mapping strategies.

  18. A three-scale finite element investigation into the effects of tissue mineralisation and lamellar organisation in human cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, T J; McCarthy, C T; McNamara, L M

    2012-08-01

    Bone is an exceptional material that is lightweight for efficient movement but also exhibits excellent strength and stiffness imparted by a composite material of organic proteins and mineral crystals that are intricately organised on many scales. Experimental and computational studies have sought to understand the role of bone composition and organisation in regulating the biomechanical behaviour of bone. However, due to the complex hierarchical arrangement of the constituent materials, the reported experimental values for the elastic modulus of trabecular and cortical tissue have conflicted greatly. Furthermore, finite element studies of bone have largely made the simplifying assumption that material behaviour was homogeneous or that tissue variability only occurred at the microscale, based on grey values from micro-CT scans. Thus, it remains that the precise role of nanoscale tissue constituents and microscale tissue organisation is not fully understood and more importantly that these have never been incorporated together to predict bone fracture or implant outcome in a multiscale finite element framework. In this paper, a three-scale finite element homogenisation scheme is presented which enables the prediction of homogenised effective properties of tissue level bone from its fundamental nanoscale constituents of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals and organic collagen proteins. Two independent homogenisation steps are performed on representative volume elements which describe the local morphological arrangement of both the nanostructural and microstructural levels. This three-scale homogenisation scheme predicts differences in the tissue level properties of bone as a function of mineral volume fraction, mineral aspect ratio and lamellar orientation. These parameters were chosen to lie within normal tissue ranges derived from experimental studies, and it was found that the predicted stiffness properties at the lamellar level correlate well with experimental

  19. Inter-individual changes in cortical bone three-dimensional microstructure and elastic coefficient have opposite effects on radial sound speed.

    PubMed

    Eneh, Chibuzor T M; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge about simultaneous contributions of tissue microstructure and elastic properties on ultrasound speed in cortical bone is limited. In a previous study, porosities and elastic coefficients of cortical bone in human femurs were shown to change with age. In the present study, influences of inter-individual and site-dependent variation in cortical bone microstructure and elastic properties on radial speed of sound (SOS; at 4, 6, and 8 MHz) were investigated using three-dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain modeling. Models with fixed (nominal model) and sample-specific (sample-specific model) values of radial elastic coefficients were compared. Elastic coefficients and microstructure for samples (n = 24) of human femoral shafts (n = 6) were derived using scanning acoustic microscopy and micro-computed tomography images, respectively. Porosity-related SOS varied more extensively in nominal models than in sample-specific models. Linear correlation between pore separation and SOS was similar (R = 0.8, p < 0.01, for 4 MHz) for both models. The determination coefficient (R(2)= 0.75, p < 0.05) between porosity and radial SOS, especially at 4 MHz, was highest in the posterior quadrant. The determination coefficient was lower for models with sample-specific values of radial elastic coefficient implemented (R(2) < 0.33, p < 0.05), than for nominal models (0.48 < R(2)< 0.63, p < 0.05). This information could be useful in in vivo pulse-echo cortical thickness measurements applying constant SOS. PMID:26723306

  20. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  1. Significance of the Pars Interarticularis in the Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Technique: An In Vivo Insertional Torque Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose Cortical bone trajectory (CBT), a more medial-to-lateral and shorter path than the traditional one for spinal fusion, is thought to be effective for severely degenerated vertebrae because screws are primarily stabilized at the posterior elements. We evaluated the efficacy of this approach through in vivo insertional torque measurement. Overview of Literature There has been only one prior in vivo study on CBT insertional torque. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, a total of 22 patients underwent posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. The maximum insertional torque, which covers the radial strength needed for insertion, was measured for 113 screws, 8 of which were inserted for L5 spondylolysis. The insertional torque for cases with (n=8) and without (n=31) spondylolysis of L5 were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). To evaluate vertebral degeneration, we classified 53 vertebrae without spondylolysis by lumbar radiography using semiquantitative methods; the insertional torque for the 105 screws used was compared on the basis of this classification. Additionally, differences in insertional torque among cases grouped by age, sex, and lumbar level were evaluated for these 105 screws using ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results The mean insertional torque was significantly lower for patients with spondylolysis than for those without spondylolysis (4.25 vs. 8.24 in-lb). There were no statistical differences in insertional torque according to vertebral grading or level. The only significant difference in insertional torque between age and sex groups was in men <75 years and women ≥75 years (10 vs. 5.5 in-lb). Conclusions Although CBT should be used with great caution in patient with lysis who are ≥75 years, it is well suited for dealing with severely degenerated vertebrae because the pars interarticularis plays a very important role in the implementation of this technique. PMID:27790318

  2. Radioprotective effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine free radical scavenger on compressive mechanical properties of the gamma sterilized cortical bone of bovine femur.

    PubMed

    Allaveisi, Farzaneh; Hashemi, Bijan; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2015-03-01

    Gamma sterilization of bone allografts is used as a gold standard method to provide safety against disease transmission. However, it is well documented that high dose levels of ionizing radiation can degrade bone mechanical properties. This effect, which is attributed to the formation of free radicals through radiolysis of the water content of collagen, can lead to post-implantation difficulties such as pre-failure and/or secondary fractures of bone allografts. Recently, treatment of irradiated allografts with free radical scavengers is used to protect them against radiation-induced damages. This study aimed to investigate the radioprotective role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) during the gamma sterilization of the cortical bone of bovine femurs using the compressive test. Totally, 195 cubic specimens with a dimension of 5 × 5 × 3 cubic mm were divided into 13 groups including a control and 12 experimental groups exposed to 18, 36, and 70 kGy at three different NAC concentrations (1.25, 12.5, and 25 mM for 18 kGy; 5, 50, and 100 mM for 36 kGy; 10, 100, and 200 mM for 70 kGy). The mechanical behavior of the sterilized specimens was studied using the uniaxial compressive test. The results indicated a concentration-dependent radioprotection effect of NAC on the plastic properties of the cortical bones. The concentration dependency of NAC was in turn related to radiation dose levels. In conclusion, treatment of bone specimens with a characteristic concentration of NAC during exposure to specific radiation dose levels can provide an efficient radioprotection window for preserving the mechanical stability of gamma sterilized allografts. PMID:24737302

  3. American Society of Biomechanics Journal of Biomechanics Award 2013: Cortical bone tissue mechanical quality and biological mechanisms possibly underlying atypical fractures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Joseph R.; Bajaj, Devendra; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics literature contains many well-understood mechanisms behind typical fracture types that have important roles in treatment planning. The recent association of “atypical” fractures with long-term use of drugs designed to prevent osteoporosis has renewed interest in the effects of agents on bone tissue-level quality. While this class of fracture was recognized prior to the introduction of the anti-resorptive bisphosphonate drugs and recently likened to stress fractures, the mechanism(s) that lead to atypical fractures have not been definitively identified. Thus, a causal relationship between these drugs and atypical fracture has not been established. Physicians, bioengineers and others interested in the biomechanics of bone are working to improve fracture-prevention diagnostics, and the design of treatments to avoid this serious side-effect in the future. This review examines the mechanisms behind the bone tissue damage that may produce the atypical fracture pattern observed increasingly with long-term bisphosphonate use. Our recent findings and those of others reviewed support that the mechanisms behind normal, healthy excavation and tunnel filling by bone remodeling units within cortical tissue strengthen mechanical integrity. The ability of cortical bone to resist the damage induced during cyclic loading may be altered by the reduced remodeling and increased tissue age resulting from long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Development of assessments for such potential fractures would restore confidence in pharmaceutical treatments that have the potential to spare millions in our aging population from the morbidity and death that often follow bone fracture. PMID:25683519

  4. Effects of parathyroid hormone on cortical porosity, non-enzymatic glycation and bone tissue mechanics in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G M; Tiwari, S; Hofbauer, C; Picke, A-K; Rauner, M; Huber, G; Peña, J A; Damm, T; Barkmann, R; Morlock, M M; Hofbauer, L C; Glüer, C-C

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases skeletal fragility; however, the contributing mechanisms and the efficacy of bone-forming agents are unclear. We studied diabetes and parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment effects on cortical porosity (Ct.Po), non-enzymatic glycation (NEG) and bone mechanics in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Eleven-week old ZDF diabetic (DB) and non-diabetic (ND) rats were given 75μg/kg PTH (1-84) or vehicle 5days per week over 12weeks. The right femora and L4 vertebrae were excised, micro-CT scanned, and tested in 3-point bending and uniaxial compression, respectively. NEG of the samples was determined using fluorescence. Diabetes increased Ct.Po (vertebra (vert): +40.6%, femur (fem): +15.5% vs. ND group, p<0.05) but had no effect on NEG. PTH therapy reduced vertebral NEG in the ND animals only (-73% vs untreated group, p<0.05), and increased femoral NEG in the DB vs. ND groups (+63%, p<0.05). PTH therapy had no effect on Ct.Po. Diabetes negatively affected bone tissue mechanics where reductions in vertebral maximum strain (-22%) and toughness (-42%) were observed in the DB vs. ND group (p<0.05). PTH improved maximum strain in the vertebra of the ND animals (+21%, p<0.05) but did not have an effect in the DB group. PTH increased femoral maximum strain (+21%) and toughness (+28%) in ND and decreased femoral maximum stress (-13%) and toughness (-27%) in the DB animals (treated vs. untreated, p<0.05). Ct.Po correlated negatively with maximum stress (fem: R=-0.35, p<0.05, vert: R=-0.57, p<0.01), maximum strain (fem: R=-0.35, p<0.05, vert: R=-0.43, p<0.05) and toughness (fem: R=-0.34, p<0.05, vert: R=-0.55, p<0.01), and NEG correlated negatively with toughness at the femur (R=-0.34, p<0.05) and maximum strain at the vertebra (R=-0.49, p<0.05). Diabetes increased cortical porosity and reduced bone mechanics, which were not improved with PTH treatment. PTH therapy alone may worsen diabetic bone mechanics through formation of new bone with high AGEs

  5. Mid-thigh cortical bone structural parameters, muscle mass and strength, and association with lower limb fractures in older men and women (AGES-Reykjavik Study).

    PubMed

    Johannesdottir, Fjola; Aspelund, Thor; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur G; Lang, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Gunnar

    2012-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between muscle and bone parameters in the mid-thigh in older people using data from a single axial computed tomographic section through the mid-thigh. Additionally, we studied the association of these variables with incident low-trauma lower limb fractures. A total of 3,762 older individuals (1,838 men and 1,924 women), aged 66-96 years, participants in the AGES-Reykjavik study, were studied. The total cross-sectional muscular area and knee extensor strength declined with age similarly in both sexes. Muscle parameters correlated most strongly with cortical area and total shaft area (adjusted for age, height, and weight) but explained <10 % of variability in those bone parameters. The increment in medullary area (MA) and buckling ratio (BR) with age was almost fourfold greater in women than men. The association between MA and muscle parameters was nonsignificant. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 113 women and 66 men sustained incident lower limb fractures. Small muscular area, low knee extensor strength, large MA, low cortical thickness, and high BR were significantly associated with fractures in both sexes. Our results show that bone and muscle loss proceed at different rates and with different gender patterns. PMID:22451219

  6. Mid-thigh cortical bone structural parameters, muscle mass and strength, and association with lower limb fractures in older men and women (AGES-Reykjavik Study).

    PubMed

    Johannesdottir, Fjola; Aspelund, Thor; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur G; Lang, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Gunnar

    2012-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between muscle and bone parameters in the mid-thigh in older people using data from a single axial computed tomographic section through the mid-thigh. Additionally, we studied the association of these variables with incident low-trauma lower limb fractures. A total of 3,762 older individuals (1,838 men and 1,924 women), aged 66-96 years, participants in the AGES-Reykjavik study, were studied. The total cross-sectional muscular area and knee extensor strength declined with age similarly in both sexes. Muscle parameters correlated most strongly with cortical area and total shaft area (adjusted for age, height, and weight) but explained <10 % of variability in those bone parameters. The increment in medullary area (MA) and buckling ratio (BR) with age was almost fourfold greater in women than men. The association between MA and muscle parameters was nonsignificant. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 113 women and 66 men sustained incident lower limb fractures. Small muscular area, low knee extensor strength, large MA, low cortical thickness, and high BR were significantly associated with fractures in both sexes. Our results show that bone and muscle loss proceed at different rates and with different gender patterns.

  7. Histomorphometric Assessment of Cancellous and Cortical Bone Material Distribution in the Proximal Humerus of Normal and Osteoporotic Individuals: Significantly Reduced Bone Stock in the Metaphyseal and Subcapital Regions of Osteoporotic Individuals.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Christoph M; Schmidutz, Florian; Helfen, Tobias; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Milz, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder predominantly affecting postmenopausal women but also men at an advanced age. Both genders may suffer from low-energy fractures of, for example, the proximal humerus when reduction of the bone stock or/and quality has occurred.The aim of the current study was to compare the amount of bone in typical fracture zones of the proximal humerus in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic individuals.The amount of bone in the proximal humerus was determined histomorphometrically in frontal plane sections. The donor bones were allocated to normal and osteoporotic groups using the T-score from distal radius DXA measurements of the same extremities. The T-score evaluation was done according to WHO criteria. Regional thickness of the subchondral plate and the metaphyseal cortical bone were measured using interactive image analysis.At all measured locations the amount of cancellous bone was significantly lower in individuals from the osteoporotic group compared to the non-osteoporotic one. The osteoporotic group showed more significant differences between regions of the same bone than the non-osteoporotic group. In both groups the subchondral cancellous bone and the subchondral plate were least affected by bone loss. In contrast, the medial metaphyseal region in the osteoporotic group exhibited higher bone loss in comparison to the lateral side.This observation may explain prevailing fracture patterns, which frequently involve compression fractures and certainly has an influence on the stability of implants placed in this medial region. It should be considered when planning the anchoring of osteosynthesis materials in osteoporotic patients with fractures of the proximal humerus.

  8. Compressive mechanical compatibility of anisotropic porous Ti6Al4V alloys in the range of physiological strain rate for cortical b