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Sample records for cortical laminar-electrode recordings

  1. Estimation of Thalamocortical and Intracortical Network Models from Joint Thalamic Single-Electrode and Cortical Laminar-Electrode Recordings in the Rat Barrel System

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, Patrick; Devor, Anna; Indahl, Ulf G.; Ulbert, Istvan; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    A new method is presented for extraction of population firing-rate models for both thalamocortical and intracortical signal transfer based on stimulus-evoked data from simultaneous thalamic single-electrode and cortical recordings using linear (laminar) multielectrodes in the rat barrel system. Time-dependent population firing rates for granular (layer 4), supragranular (layer 2/3), and infragranular (layer 5) populations in a barrel column and the thalamic population in the homologous barreloid are extracted from the high-frequency portion (multi-unit activity; MUA) of the recorded extracellular signals. These extracted firing rates are in turn used to identify population firing-rate models formulated as integral equations with exponentially decaying coupling kernels, allowing for straightforward transformation to the more common firing-rate formulation in terms of differential equations. Optimal model structures and model parameters are identified by minimizing the deviation between model firing rates and the experimentally extracted population firing rates. For the thalamocortical transfer, the experimental data favor a model with fast feedforward excitation from thalamus to the layer-4 laminar population combined with a slower inhibitory process due to feedforward and/or recurrent connections and mixed linear-parabolic activation functions. The extracted firing rates of the various cortical laminar populations are found to exhibit strong temporal correlations for the present experimental paradigm, and simple feedforward population firing-rate models combined with linear or mixed linear-parabolic activation function are found to provide excellent fits to the data. The identified thalamocortical and intracortical network models are thus found to be qualitatively very different. While the thalamocortical circuit is optimally stimulated by rapid changes in the thalamic firing rate, the intracortical circuits are low-pass and respond most strongly to slowly varying

  2. Estimation of population firing rates and current source densities from laminar electrode recordings.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Klas H; Hagen, Espen; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2008-06-01

    This model study investigates the validity of methods used to interpret linear (laminar) multielectrode recordings. In computer experiments extracellular potentials from a synaptically activated population of about 1,000 pyramidal neurons are calculated using biologically realistic compartmental neuron models combined with electrostatic forward modeling. The somas of the pyramidal neurons are located in a 0.4 mm high and wide columnar cylinder, mimicking a stimulus-evoked layer-5 population in a neocortical column. Current-source density (CSD) analysis of the low-frequency part (<500 Hz) of the calculated potentials (local field potentials, LFP) based on the 'inverse' CSD method is, in contrast to the 'standard' CSD method, seen to give excellent estimates of the true underlying CSD. The high-frequency part (>750 Hz) of the potentials (multi-unit activity, MUA) is found to scale approximately as the population firing rate to the power 3/4 and to give excellent estimates of the underlying population firing rate for trial-averaged data. The MUA signal is found to decay much more sharply outside the columnar populations than the LFP.

  3. Three-dimensional localization of neurons in cortical tetrode recordings

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Schmid, Anita M.; Hu, Qin

    2011-01-01

    The recording radius and spatial selectivity of an extracellular probe are important for interpreting neurophysiological recordings but are rarely measured. Moreover, an analysis of the recording biophysics of multisite probes (e.g., tetrodes) can provide for source characterization and localization of spiking single units, but this capability has remained largely unexploited. Here we address both issues quantitatively. Advancing a tetrode (≈40-μm contact separation, tetrahedral geometry) in 5- to 10-μm steps, we repeatedly recorded extracellular action potentials (EAPs) of single neurons in the visual cortex. Using measured spatial variation of EAPs, the tetrodes' measured geometry, and a volume conductor model of the cortical tissue, we solved the inverse problem of estimating the location and the size of the equivalent dipole model of the spike generator associated with each neuron. Half of the 61 visual neurons were localized within a radius of ≈100 μm and 95% within ≈130 μm around the tetrode tip (i.e., a large fraction was much further than previously thought). Because of the combined angular sensitivity of the tetrode's leads, location uncertainty was less than one-half the cell's distance. We quantified the spatial dependence of the probability of cell isolation, the isolated fraction, and the dependence of the recording radius on probe size and equivalent dipole size. We also reconstructed the spatial configuration of sets of simultaneously recorded neurons to demonstrate the potential use of 3D dipole localization for functional anatomy. Finally, we found that the dipole moment vector, surprisingly, tended to point toward the probe, leading to the interpretation that the equivalent dipole represents a “local lobe” of the dendritic arbor. PMID:21613581

  4. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling vocalization with ECoG cortical activity recorded during vocal production in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Fujii, Naotaka; Averbeck, Bruno B; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2014-01-01

    Vocal production is an example of controlled motor behavior with high temporal precision. Previous studies have decoded auditory evoked cortical activity while monkeys listened to vocalization sounds. On the other hand, there have been few attempts at decoding motor cortical activity during vocal production. Here we recorded cortical activity during vocal production in the macaque with a chronically implanted electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrode array. The array detected robust activity in motor cortex during vocal production. We used a nonlinear dynamical model of the vocal organ to reduce the dimensionality of `Coo' calls produced by the monkey. We then used linear regression to evaluate the information in motor cortical activity for this reduced representation of calls. This simple linear model accounted for circa 65% of the variance in the reduced sound representations, supporting the feasibility of using the dynamical model of the vocal organ for decoding motor cortical activity during vocal production.

  6. Procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across cortical areas during sensory discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Adrián; Nácher, Verónica; Luna, Rogelio; Alvarez, Manuel; Zainos, Antonio; Cordero, Silvia; Camarillo, Liliana; Vázquez, Yuriria; Lemus, Luis; Romo, Ranulfo

    2008-01-01

    We report a procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across five cortical areas in behaving monkeys. The procedure consists of a commercially available microdrive adapted to a commercially available neural data collection system. The critical advantage of this procedure is that, in each cortical area, a configuration of seven microelectrodes spaced 250–500 μm can be inserted transdurally and each can be moved independently in the z axis. For each microelectrode, the data collection system can record the activity of up to five neurons together with the local field potential (LFP). With this procedure, we normally monitor the simultaneous activity of 70–100 neurons while trained monkeys discriminate the difference in frequency between two vibrotactile stimuli. Approximately 20–60 of these neurons have response properties previously reported in this task. The neuronal recordings show good signal-to-noise ratio, are remarkably stable along a 1-day session, and allow testing several protocols. Microelectrodes are removed from the brain after a 1-day recording session, but are reinserted again the next day by using the same or different x-y microelectrode array configurations. The fact that microelectrodes can be moved in the z axis during the recording session and that the x-y configuration can be changed from day to day maximizes the probability of studying simultaneous interactions, both local and across distant cortical areas, between neurons associated with the different components of this task. PMID:18946031

  7. Hemodynamic and Electrophysiological Connectivity in the Language System: Simultaneous Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrocorticography Recordings during Cortical Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Yosuke; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-01-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings during cortical stimulation to a temporal lobe epilepsy patient who underwent subdural electrode implantation. Using NIRS, changes in blood concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (HbO[subscript 2]) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) during cortical stimulation of the left…

  8. Hemodynamic and Electrophysiological Connectivity in the Language System: Simultaneous Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrocorticography Recordings during Cortical Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Yosuke; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-01-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings during cortical stimulation to a temporal lobe epilepsy patient who underwent subdural electrode implantation. Using NIRS, changes in blood concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (HbO[subscript 2]) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) during cortical stimulation of the left…

  9. Decoding spoken words using local field potentials recorded from the cortical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Spencer; Miller, Kai; Thomson, Kyle; Brown, Richard; House, Paul; Greger, Bradley

    2010-10-01

    Pathological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or damage to the brainstem can leave patients severely paralyzed but fully aware, in a condition known as 'locked-in syndrome'. Communication in this state is often reduced to selecting individual letters or words by arduous residual movements. More intuitive and rapid communication may be restored by directly interfacing with language areas of the cerebral cortex. We used a grid of closely spaced, nonpenetrating micro-electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of face motor cortex and Wernicke's area. From these LFPs we were successful in classifying a small set of words on a trial-by-trial basis at levels well above chance. We found that the pattern of electrodes with the highest accuracy changed for each word, which supports the idea that closely spaced micro-electrodes are capable of capturing neural signals from independent neural processing assemblies. These results further support using cortical surface potentials (electrocorticography) in brain-computer interfaces. These results also show that LFPs recorded from the cortical surface (micro-electrocorticography) of language areas can be used to classify speech-related cortical rhythms and potentially restore communication to locked-in patients.

  10. A possible basic cortical microcircuit called "cascaded inhibition." Results from cortical network models and recording experiments from striate simple cells.

    PubMed

    Wörgötter, F; Nelle, E; Li, B; Wang, L; Diao, Y

    1998-10-01

    The robust behavior, the degree of response linearity, and the aspect of contrast gain control in visual cortical simple cells are (amongst others) the result of the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory afferent and intracortical connections. The goal of this study was to suggest a simple intracortical connection pattern, which could also play a role in other cortical substructures, in order to generically obtain these desired effects within large physiological parameter ranges. To this end we explored the degree of linearity of spatial summation in visual simple cells experimentally and in different models based on half-wave rectifying cells ("push-pull models"). Visual cortical push-pull connection schemes originated from antagonistic motor-control models. Thus, this model class is widely applicable but normally requires a rather specific design. On the other hand we showed that a more generic version of a push-pull model, the so-called cascaded inhibitory intracortical connection scheme, which we implemented in a biologically realistic simulation, naturally explains much of the experimental data. We investigated the influence of the afferent and intracortical connection structure on the measured linearity of spatial summation in simple cells. The analysis made use of the relative modulation measure, which is easy to apply but is limited to moving sinusoidal grating stimuli. We introduced two basic push-pull models, where the order of threshold nonlinearity and linear summation is reversed. Very little difference is observed with the relative modulation measure for these models. Alterative models, like half-wave squaring models, were also briefly discussed. Of all model parameters, the ratio of excitation to inhibition in the simple cell exerts the most crucial influence on the relative modulation. Linearity deteriorates as soon as excitatory and inhibitory inputs are imbalanced and the relative modulation drops. This prediction was tested experimentally

  11. Chronic cortical and electromyographic recordings from a fully implantable device: preclinical experience in a nonhuman primate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryapolova-Webb, Elena; Afshar, Pedram; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Starr, Philip A.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Analysis of intra- and perioperatively recorded cortical and basal ganglia local field potentials in human movement disorders has provided great insight into the pathophysiology of diseases such as Parkinson's, dystonia, and essential tremor. However, in order to better understand the network abnormalities and effects of chronic therapeutic stimulation in these disorders, long-term recording from a fully implantable data collection system is needed. Approach. A fully implantable investigational data collection system, the Activa® PC + S neurostimulator (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN), has been developed for human use. Here, we tested its utility for extended intracranial recording in the motor system of a nonhuman primate. The system was attached to two quadripolar paddle arrays: one covering sensorimotor cortex, and one covering a proximal forelimb muscle, to study simultaneous cortical field potentials and electromyography during spontaneous transitions from rest to movement. Main results. Over 24 months of recording, movement-related changes in physiologically relevant frequency bands were readily detected, including beta and gamma signals at approximately 2.5 μV/\\sqrtHz and 0.7 μV/\\sqrt{Hz}, respectively. The system architecture allowed for flexible recording configurations and algorithm triggered data recording. In the course of physiological analyses, sensing artifacts were observed (˜1 μVrms stationary tones at fixed frequency), which were mitigated either with post-processing or algorithm design and did not impact the scientific conclusions. Histological examination revealed no underlying tissue damage; however, a fibrous capsule had developed around the paddles, demonstrating a potential mechanism for the observed signal amplitude reduction. Significance. This study establishes the usefulness of this system in measuring chronic brain and muscle signals. Use of this system may potentially be valuable in human trials of chronic brain

  12. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cortical and Subcortical Coordination of Visual Spatial Attention Revealed by Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Recording.

    PubMed

    Green, Jessica J; Boehler, Carsten N; Roberts, Kenneth C; Chen, Ling-Chia; Krebs, Ruth M; Song, Allen W; Woldorff, Marty G

    2017-08-16

    Visual spatial attention has been studied in humans with both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) individually. However, due to the intrinsic limitations of each of these methods used alone, our understanding of the systems-level mechanisms underlying attentional control remains limited. Here, we examined trial-to-trial covariations of concurrently recorded EEG and fMRI in a cued visual spatial attention task in humans, which allowed delineation of both the generators and modulators of the cue-triggered event-related oscillatory brain activity underlying attentional control function. The fMRI activity in visual cortical regions contralateral to the cued direction of attention covaried positively with occipital gamma-band EEG, consistent with activation of cortical regions representing attended locations in space. In contrast, fMRI activity in ipsilateral visual cortical regions covaried inversely with occipital alpha-band oscillations, consistent with attention-related suppression of the irrelevant hemispace. Moreover, the pulvinar nucleus of the thalamus covaried with both of these spatially specific, attention-related, oscillatory EEG modulations. Because the pulvinar's neuroanatomical geometry makes it unlikely to be a direct generator of the scalp-recorded EEG, these covariational patterns appear to reflect the pulvinar's role as a regulatory control structure, sending spatially specific signals to modulate visual cortex excitability proactively. Together, these combined EEG/fMRI results illuminate the dynamically interacting cortical and subcortical processes underlying spatial attention, providing important insight not realizable using either method alone.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Noninvasive recordings of changes in the brain's blood flow using functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrical activity using electroencephalography in humans have individually shown that shifting attention to a location in space

  14. Optical recording of cortical activity after in vitro perfusion of cerebral arteries with a voltage-sensitive dye.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Takashima, I; Iijima, T

    1999-08-07

    Cortical neuronal architecture and connectivity can be analyzed with high-resolution optical imaging after staining the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain preparation by circulating the voltage-sensitive dye RH795 via the arterial system. To establish this new technique, electrical field potentials evoked in the piriform and entorhinal cortices by lateral olfactory tract stimulation were correlated to the optical signal. The depth analysis of the optical response was performed by evaluating the contribution of the mono- and poly-synaptic components of the signal generated in different layers after applying a pair-pulse stimulation protocol. The tangential propagation of neuronal activity in olfactory cortices was evaluated by gathering several 4.2 x 4.2 mm images recorded from adjacent cortical areas. The real-time optical imaging technique applied to the isolated guinea pig brain can be successfully utilized to study the integrative properties of cortical neurons ensembles. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Estimating cortical column sensory networks in rodents from micro-electrocorticograph (μECoG) recordings.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Richner, Tom; Brodnick, Sarah; Thongpang, Sanitta; Williams, Justin; Van Veen, Barry

    2017-09-23

    Micro-electrocorticograph (μECoG) arrays offer the flexibility to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of the cortex, using high density electrodes that are sub-mm in diameter. Research to date has not provided conclusive evidence for the underlying signal generation of μECoG recorded LFPs, or if μECoG arrays can capture network activity from the cortex. We studied the pervading view of the LFP signal by exploring the spatial scale at which the LFP can be considered elemental. We investigated the underlying signal generation and ability to capture functional networks by implanting, μECoG arrays to record sensory-evoked potentials in four rats. The organization of the sensory cortex was studied by analyzing the sensory-evoked potentials with two distinct modeling techniques: (1) The volume conduction model, that models the electrode LFPs with an electrostatic representation, generated by a single cortical generator, and (2) the dynamic causal model (DCM), that models the electrode LFPs with a network model, whose activity is generated by multiple interacting cortical sources. The volume conduction approach modeled activity from electrodes separated < 1000 μm, with reasonable accuracy but a network model like DCM was required to accurately capture activity > 1500 μm. The extrinsic network component in DCM was determined to be essential for accurate modeling of observed potentials. These results all point to the presence of a sensory network, and that μECoG arrays are able to capture network activity in the neocortex. The estimated DCM network models the functional organization of the cortex, as signal generators for the μECoG recorded LFPs, and provides hypothesis-testing tools to explore the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials Recorded from Nucleus Hybrid Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eun Kyung; Chiou, Li-Kuei; Kirby, Benjamin; Karsten, Sue; Turner, Christopher; Abbas, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nucleus Hybrid CI users hear low-frequency sounds via acoustic stimulation and high frequency sounds via electrical stimulation. This within-subject study compares three different methods of coordinating programming of the acoustic and electrical components of the Hybrid device. Speech perception and cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP) were used to assess differences in outcome. The goals of this study were to determine (1) if the evoked potential measures could predict which programming strategy resulted either in better outcome on the speech perception task or was preferred by the listener, and (2) whether CAEPs could be used to predict which subjects benefitted most from having access to the electrical signal provided by the Hybrid implant. Design CAEPs were recorded from 10 Nucleus Hybrid CI users. Study participants were tested using three different experimental MAPs that differed in terms of how much overlap there was between the range of frequencies processed by the acoustic component of the Hybrid device and range of frequencies processed by the electrical component. The study design included allowing participants to acclimatize for a period of up to 4 weeks with each experimental program prior to speech perception and evoked potential testing. Performance using the experimental MAPs was assessed using both a closed-set consonant recognition task and an adaptive test that measured the signal to noise ratio that resulted in 50% correct identification of a set of 12 spondees presented in background noise (SNR-50). Long-duration, synthetic vowels were used to record both the cortical P1-N1-P2 “onset” response and the auditory “change” or ACC response. Correlations between the evoked potential measures and performance on the speech perception tasks are reported. Results Differences in performance using the three programming strategies were not large. Peak-to-peak amplitude of the AAC response was not found to be sensitive enough to

  17. Cortical Source Analysis of High-Density EEG Recordings in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    EEG is traditionally described as a neuroimaging technique with high temporal and low spatial resolution. Recent advances in biophysical modelling and signal processing make it possible to exploit information from other imaging modalities like structural MRI that provide high spatial resolution to overcome this constraint1. This is especially useful for investigations that require high resolution in the temporal as well as spatial domain. In addition, due to the easy application and low cost of EEG recordings, EEG is often the method of choice when working with populations, such as young children, that do not tolerate functional MRI scans well. However, in order to investigate which neural substrates are involved, anatomical information from structural MRI is still needed. Most EEG analysis packages work with standard head models that are based on adult anatomy. The accuracy of these models when used for children is limited2, because the composition and spatial configuration of head tissues changes dramatically over development3.  In the present paper, we provide an overview of our recent work in utilizing head models based on individual structural MRI scans or age specific head models to reconstruct the cortical generators of high density EEG. This article describes how EEG recordings are acquired, processed, and analyzed with pediatric populations at the London Baby Lab, including laboratory setup, task design, EEG preprocessing, MRI processing, and EEG channel level and source analysis.  PMID:25045930

  18. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  19. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  20. Motor-language coupling: direct evidence from early Parkinson's disease and intracranial cortical recordings.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Agustín; Cardona, Juan F; Dos Santos, Yamil Vidal; Blenkmann, Alejandro; Aravena, Pía; Roca, María; Hurtado, Esteban; Nerguizian, Mirna; Amoruso, Lucía; Gómez-Arévalo, Gonzalo; Chade, Anabel; Dubrovsky, Alberto; Gershanik, Oscar; Kochen, Silvia; Glenberg, Arthur; Manes, Facundo; Bekinschtein, Tristán

    2013-04-01

    Language and action systems are functionally coupled in the brain as demonstrated by converging evidence using Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and lesion studies. In particular, this coupling has been demonstrated using the action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE) in which motor activity and language interact. The ACE task requires participants to listen to sentences that described actions typically performed with an open hand (e.g., clapping), a closed hand (e.g., hammering), or without any hand action (neutral); and to press a large button with either an open hand position or closed hand position immediately upon comprehending each sentence. The ACE is defined as a longer reaction time (RT) in the action-sentence incompatible conditions than in the compatible conditions. Here we investigated direct motor-language coupling in two novel and uniquely informative ways. First, we measured the behavioural ACE in patients with motor impairment (early Parkinson's disease - EPD), and second, in epileptic patients with direct electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. In experiment 1, EPD participants with preserved general cognitive repertoire, showed a much diminished ACE relative to non-EPD volunteers. Moreover, a correlation between ACE performance and action-verb processing (kissing and dancing test - KDT) was observed. Direct cortical recordings (ECoG) in motor and language areas (experiment 2) demonstrated simultaneous bidirectional effects: motor preparation affected language processing (N400 at left inferior frontal gyrus and middle/superior temporal gyrus), and language processing affected activity in movement-related areas (motor potential at premotor and M1). Our findings show that the ACE paradigm requires ongoing integration of preserved motor and language coupling (abolished in EPD) and engages motor-temporal cortices in a bidirectional way. In addition, both experiments

  1. Assessment of cortical motor output: compound muscle action potential versus twitch force recording.

    PubMed

    Kiers, L; Clouston, P; Chiappa, K H; Cros, D

    1995-04-01

    To determine whether motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and area are accurate measurements of the magnitude of response to magnetic cortical stimulation, we simultaneously recorded the twitch and MEP in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of 8 normal subjects. Consecutive stimuli were delivered at increasing stimulus intensities (SI) or with increasing levels of background voluntary muscle contraction (BVC). There was stimulus to stimulus variability in MEP amplitude, area and twitch force. At low SI and at low levels of background contraction, there was a good correlation between twitch amplitude and MEP amplitude and area (r = 0.6-0.96, P < 0.005). Increasing either variable caused the correlation to decrease significantly (r = 0.02-0.31, P > 0.01). With increasing SI, MEP amplitude and area plateaued but twitch force continued to increase. A similar pattern was observed with higher levels of background muscle contraction although in some subjects a second increase in MEP amplitude and area was seen. Collision experiments demonstrated that the amplitude of the EMG activity resulting from repetitive motoneuron firing increased as SI was increased. This is due to multiple descending volleys which result in repetitive firing of some spinal motoneurons. Rapid, repetitive firing of some motor units is likely to result in phase cancellation and, therefore, the MEP amplitude, and to a lesser extent area, do not accurately reflect the net motor output.

  2. A system for recording neural activity chronically and simultaneously from multiple cortical and subcortical regions in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Joseph; Desrochers, Theresa M.; Fujii, Naotaka; Harlan, Ray; Tierney, Patrick L.; Shimazu, Hideki; Amemori, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    A major goal of neuroscience is to understand the functions of networks of neurons in cognition and behavior. Recent work has focused on implanting arrays of ∼100 immovable electrodes or smaller numbers of individually adjustable electrodes, designed to target a few cortical areas. We have developed a recording system that allows the independent movement of hundreds of electrodes chronically implanted in several cortical and subcortical structures. We have tested this system in macaque monkeys, recording simultaneously from up to 127 electrodes in 14 brain regions for up to one year at a time. A key advantage of the system is that it can be used to sample different combinations of sites over prolonged periods, generating multiple snapshots of network activity from a single implant. Used in conjunction with microstimulation and injection methods, this versatile system represents a powerful tool for studying neural network activity in the primate brain. PMID:22170970

  3. Analysis of the phase locking index for measuring of interdependency of cortical signals recorded in the EEG.

    PubMed

    Sazonov, Andrei V; Ho, Chin Keong; Bergmans, Jan W M; Arends, Johan B A M; Griep, Paul A M; Verbitskiy, Evgeny A; Cluitmans, Pierre J M; Boon, Paul A J M

    2007-01-01

    The phase locking index (PLI) was introduced to quantify in a statistical sense the phase synchronization of two signals. It has been commonly used to process biosignals. In this paper, we analyze the PLI for measuring the interdependency of cortical source signals (CSSs) recorded in the Electroencephalogram (EEG). The main focus of the analysis is the probability density function, which describes the sensitivity of the PLI to the joint noise ensemble in the CSSs. Since this function is mathematically intractable, we derive approximations and analyze them for a simple analytical model of the CSS mixture in the EEG. The accuracies of the approximate probability density functions (APDFs) are evaluated using simulations for the model. The APDFs are found sufficiently accurate and thus are applicable for practical intents and purposes. They can hence be used to determine the confidence intervals and significance levels for detection methods for interdependencies, e.g., between cortical signals recorded in the EEG.

  4. A 32-channel fully implantable wireless neurosensor for simultaneous recording from two cortical regions

    PubMed Central

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A.; Patterson, William R.; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully implantable, wireless, neurosensor for multiple-location neural interface applications. The device integrates two independent 16-channel intracortical microelectrode arrays and can simultaneously acquire 32 channels of broadband neural data from two separate cortical areas. The system-on-chip implantable sensor is built on a flexible Kapton polymer substrate and incorporates three very low power subunits: two cortical subunits connected to a common subcutaneous subunit. Each cortical subunit has an ultra-low power 16-channel preamplifier and multiplexer integrated onto a cortical microelectrode array. The subcutaneous epicranial unit has an inductively coupled power supply, two analog-to-digital converters, a low power digital controller chip, and microlaser-based infrared telemetry. The entire system is soft encapsulated with biocompatible flexible materials for in vivo applications. Broadband neural data is conditioned, amplified, and analog multiplexed by each of the cortical subunits and passed to the subcutaneous component, where it is digitized and combined with synchronization data and wirelessly transmitted transcutaneously using high speed infrared telemetry. PMID:22254801

  5. A 32-channel fully implantable wireless neurosensor for simultaneous recording from two cortical regions.

    PubMed

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully implantable, wireless, neurosensor for multiple-location neural interface applications. The device integrates two independent 16-channel intracortical microelectrode arrays and can simultaneously acquire 32 channels of broadband neural data from two separate cortical areas. The system-on-chip implantable sensor is built on a flexible Kapton polymer substrate and incorporates three very low power subunits: two cortical subunits connected to a common subcutaneous subunit. Each cortical subunit has an ultra-low power 16-channel preamplifier and multiplexer integrated onto a cortical microelectrode array. The subcutaneous epicranial unit has an inductively coupled power supply, two analog-to-digital converters, a low power digital controller chip, and microlaser-based infrared telemetry. The entire system is soft encapsulated with biocompatible flexible materials for in vivo applications. Broadband neural data is conditioned, amplified, and analog multiplexed by each of the cortical subunits and passed to the subcutaneous component, where it is digitized and combined with synchronization data and wirelessly transmitted transcutaneously using high speed infrared telemetry.

  6. Real-time Recordings of Migrating Cortical Neurons from GFP and Cre Recombinase Expressing Mice.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Sylvia; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2016-01-04

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain that requires elaborate cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often leads to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuron migration is thus fundamental to understanding the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. In this unit, protocols allowing detailed analysis of patterns of migration of both interneurons and projection neurons under different experimental conditions (i.e., loss or gain of function) are presented.

  7. Revealing unobserved factors underlying cortical activity with a rectified latent variable model applied to neural population recordings.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, Matthew R; Butts, Daniel A

    2017-03-01

    The activity of sensory cortical neurons is not only driven by external stimuli but also shaped by other sources of input to the cortex. Unlike external stimuli, these other sources of input are challenging to experimentally control, or even observe, and as a result contribute to variability of neural responses to sensory stimuli. However, such sources of input are likely not "noise" and may play an integral role in sensory cortex function. Here we introduce the rectified latent variable model (RLVM) in order to identify these sources of input using simultaneously recorded cortical neuron populations. The RLVM is novel in that it employs nonnegative (rectified) latent variables and is much less restrictive in the mathematical constraints on solutions because of the use of an autoencoder neural network to initialize model parameters. We show that the RLVM outperforms principal component analysis, factor analysis, and independent component analysis, using simulated data across a range of conditions. We then apply this model to two-photon imaging of hundreds of simultaneously recorded neurons in mouse primary somatosensory cortex during a tactile discrimination task. Across many experiments, the RLVM identifies latent variables related to both the tactile stimulation as well as nonstimulus aspects of the behavioral task, with a majority of activity explained by the latter. These results suggest that properly identifying such latent variables is necessary for a full understanding of sensory cortical function and demonstrate novel methods for leveraging large population recordings to this end.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The rapid development of neural recording technologies presents new opportunities for understanding patterns of activity across neural populations. Here we show how a latent variable model with appropriate nonlinear form can be used to identify sources of input to a neural population and infer their time courses. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these sources are

  8. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit “map” of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber–based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  9. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-07

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit "map" of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber-based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains.

  10. Optical Recording of Retinal and Visual Cortical Responses Evoked by Electrical Stimulation on the Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanai, Makoto; Sakaehara, Haruko; Sawai, Hajime; Song, Wen-Jie; Yagi, Tetsuya

    To develop a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using an implanted multielectrode array, it is important to study the response properties of retinal ganglion cells and of the visual cortex to localized retinal electrical stimulation. Optical imaging can reveal the spatio-temporal properties of neuronal activity. Therefore, we conducted a calcium imaging study to investigate response properties to local current stimulation in frog retinas, and a membrane potential imaging study to explore the visual cortical responses to retinal stimulation in guinea pigs. In the retina, local current stimuli evoked transient responses in the ganglion cells located near the stimulus electrode. The spatial pattern of the responding area was altered by changing the location of the stimulation. Local electrical stimulation to the retina also caused transient responses in the visual cortex. The responding cortical areas in the primary visual cortex were localized. A spatially different cortical response was observed to stimulation of a different position on the retina. These results suggest that the imaging study has great potential in revealing the spatio-temporal properties of the neuronal response for the retinal prosthesis.

  11. Demonstration of a setup for chronic optogenetic stimulation and recording across cortical areas in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Diaz-Botia, Camilo; Hanson, Tim; Ledochowitsch, Peter; Maharabiz, Michel M.; Sabes, Philip N.

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have shown the feasibility of using optogenetics in non-human primates (NHP), reliable largescale chronic interfaces have not yet been reported for such studies in NHP. Here we introduce a chronic setup that permits repeated, daily optogenetic stimulation and large-scale recording from the same sites in NHP cortex. The setup combines optogenetics with a transparent artificial dura (AD) and high-density micro-electrocorticography (μECoG). To obtain expression across large areas of cortex, we infused AAV5-CamKIIa-C1V1-EYFP viral vector using an infusion technique based on convection-enhanced delivery (CED) in primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices. By epifluorescent imaging through AD we were able to confirm high levels of expression covering about 110 mm2 of S1 and M1. We then incorporated a 192-channel μECoG array spanning 192 mm2 into the AD for simultaneous electrophysiological recording during optical stimulation. The array consists of patterned Pt-Au-Pt metal traces embedded in ~10 μm Parylene-C insulator. The parylene is sufficiently transparent to allow minimally attenuated optical access for optogenetic stimulation. The array was chronically implanted over the opsin-expressing areas in M1 and S1 for over two weeks. Optical stimulation was delivered via a fiber optic placed on the surface of the AD. With this setup, we recorded reliable evoked activity following light stimulation at several locations. Similar responses were recorded across tens of days, however a decline in the light-evoked signal amplitude was observed during this period due to the growth of dural tissue over the array. These results show the feasibility of a chronic interface for combined largescale optogenetic stimulation and cortical recordings across days.

  12. CORTICAL ENCODING OF SIGNALS IN NOISE: EFFECTS OF STIMULUS TYPE AND RECORDING PARADIGM

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Curtis J.; Bennett, Keri O.; Molis, Michelle R.; Leek, Marjorie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Perception-in-noise deficits have been demonstrated across many populations and listening conditions. Many factors contribute to successful perception of auditory stimuli in noise, including neural encoding in the central auditory system. Physiological measures such as cortical auditory evoked potentials can provide a view of neural encoding at the level of the cortex that may inform our understanding of listeners’ abilities to perceive signals in the presence of background noise. In order to understand signal-in-noise neural encoding better, we set out to determine the effect of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm on the P1-N1-P2 complex. Design Tones and speech stimuli were presented to nine individuals in quiet, and in three background noise types: continuous speech spectrum noise, interrupted speech spectrum noise, and four-talker babble at a signal-to-noise ratio of −3 dB. In separate sessions, cortical auditory evoked potentials were evoked by a passive homogenous paradigm (single repeating stimulus) and an active oddball paradigm. Results The results for the N1 component indicated significant effects of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm. While components P1 and P2 also had significant main effects of these variables, only P2 demonstrated significant interactions among these variables. Conclusions Signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm all must be carefully considered when interpreting signal-in-noise evoked potentials. Furthermore, these data confirm the possible usefulness of CAEPs as an aid to understanding perception-in-noise deficits. PMID:20890206

  13. Extracellular recordings from locally dense microelectrode arrays coupled to dissociated cortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Berdondini, L; Massobrio, P; Chiappalone, M; Tedesco, M; Imfeld, K; Maccione, A; Gandolfo, M; Koudelka-Hep, M; Martinoia, S

    2009-03-15

    High-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) enabled by recent developments of microelectronic circuits (CMOS-MEA) and providing spatial resolutions down to the cellular level open the perspective to access simultaneously local and overall neuronal network activities expressed by in vitro preparations. The short inter-electrode separation results in a gain of information on the micro-circuit neuronal dynamics and signal propagation, but requires the careful evaluation of the time resolution as well as the assessment of possible cross-talk artifacts. In this respect, we have realized and tested Pt high-density (HD)-MEAs featuring four local areas with 10microm inter-electrode spacing and providing a suitable noise level for the assessment of the high-density approach. First, simulated results show how possible artifacts (duplicated spikes) can be theoretically observed on nearby microelectrodes only for very high-shunt resistance values (e.g. R(sh)=50 kOmega generates up to 60% of false positives). This limiting condition is not compatible with typical experimental conditions (i.e. dense but not confluent cultures). Experiments performed on spontaneously active cortical neuronal networks show that spike synchronicity decreases by increasing the time resolution and analysis results show that the detected synchronous spikes on nearby electrodes are likely to be unresolved (in time) fast local propagations. Finally, functional connectivity analysis results show stronger local connections than long connections spread homogeneously over the whole network demonstrating the expected gain in detail provided by the spatial resolution.

  14. Topographic recordings of auditory evoked potentials to speech: subcortical and cortical responses.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Ludovic; Bouchet, Patrick; Jeanvoine, Arnaud; Valentin, Olivier; Thai-Van, Hung; Caclin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Topographies of speech auditory brainstem response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, have never been described. Yet, they could provide useful information to assess speech ABR generators and better characterize populations of interest (e.g., musicians, dyslexics). We present here a novel methodology of topographic speech ABR recording, using a 32-channel low sampling rate (5 kHz) EEG system. Quality of speech ABRs obtained with this conventional multichannel EEG system were compared to that of signals simultaneously recorded with a high sampling rate (13.3 kHz) EEG system. Correlations between speech ABRs recorded with the two systems revealed highly similar signals, without any significant difference between their signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Moreover, an advanced denoising method for multichannel data (denoising source separation) significantly improved SNR and allowed topography of speech ABR to be recovered. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  15. Evaluation of cortical local field potential diffusion in stereotactic electro-encephalography recordings: A glimpse on white matter signal.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Manuel R; Bickel, Stephan; Megevand, Pierre; Groppe, David M; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Lado, Fred A

    2017-02-15

    While there is a strong interest in meso-scale field potential recording using intracranial electroencephalography with penetrating depth electrodes (i.e. stereotactic EEG or S-EEG) in humans, the signal recorded in the white matter remains ignored. White matter is generally considered electrically neutral and often included in the reference montage. Moreover, re-referencing electrophysiological data is a critical preprocessing choice that could drastically impact signal content and consequently the results of any given analysis. In the present stereotactic electroencephalography study, we first illustrate empirically the consequences of commonly used references (subdermal, white matter, global average, local montage) on inter-electrode signal correlation. Since most of these reference montages incorporate white matter signal, we next consider the difference between signals recorded in cortical gray matter and white matter. Our results reveal that electrode contacts located in the white matter record a mixture of activity, with part arising from the volume conduction (zero time delay) of activity from nearby gray matter. Furthermore, our analysis shows that white matter signal may be correlated with distant gray matter signal. While residual passive electrical spread from nearby matter may account for this relationship, our results suggest the possibility that this long distance correlation arises from the white matter fiber tracts themselves (i.e. activity from distant gray matter traveling along axonal fibers with time lag larger than zero); yet definitive conclusions about the origin of the white matter signal would require further experimental substantiation. By characterizing the properties of signals recorded in white matter and in gray matter, this study illustrates the importance of including anatomical prior knowledge when analyzing S-EEG data.

  16. Comparing ERP concomitant with stimulus-induced and self-paced movements: intracerebral recordings at various cortical sites.

    PubMed

    Louvel, J; Turak, B; Buser, P

    2009-08-01

    To compare the shape, amplitude, and topographical distribution over sensorimotor and centroparietal cortex of two sets of ERP concomitant with the same type of movement (MCP), either visually-triggered (VT-MCP) or self-paced (SP-MCP). MCP were recorded in 21 patients with intractable partial seizures, undergoing presurgical evaluation using stereotaxically implanted multilead intracerebral electrodes. Each patient was tested during a single session with three successive experimental paradigms, each comprised of thirty trials: (1) a tone announcing a visual pattern, with no instruction to move; (2) same tone, and instruction to squeeze abruptly a joystick at a visual signal; (3) instruction to perform the same movement paced at will, without any "go" signal. Averaged ERP recorded during task (1) were subtracted from those recorded during task (2) giving the VT-MCP. All records were taken from various cortical sites devoid of overt pathological activity. MCP recorded from two main sites, perirolandic and centroparietal, were compared. Between all sites, VT-MCP and SP-MCP morphology differed only slightly. Ipsilateral and contralateral MCP were also very similar. By contrast, perirolandic MCP were mainly monophasic negative (N component 400 ms after visual stimulus), whereas centroparietal MCP tended to be biphasic, the late negativity being preceded by a positive P component, at 125 ms. MCP patterns were quasi-identical regardless of how they were elicited (visually-triggered or self-paced). On the other hand, perirolandic and centroparietal MCP had distinct shapes, suggesting that the mode of functioning of the generators at the two sites is different.

  17. A neural signal processor for an implantable multi-channel cortical recording microsystem.

    PubMed

    Sodagar, Amir M; Wise, Kensall D; Najafi, Khalil

    2006-01-01

    A 64-channel neural processor has been developed for use in an implantable neural recording microsystem. In the scan mode, the processor is capable of detecting positive, negative, and biphasic spikes with programmable thresholds. It collects action potential information from the input channels, tags the activities with the associated channel address, compresses and finally packs the activity information in a serial digital bit stream to be sent to an external host. In the monitor mode, two channels can be selected and viewed at high resolution for studies where the entire signal is of interest.

  18. A fully integrated mixed-signal neural processor for implantable multichannel cortical recording.

    PubMed

    Sodagar, Amir M; Wise, Kensall D; Najafi, Khalil

    2007-06-01

    A 64-channel neural processor has been developed for use in an implantable neural recording microsystem. In the Scan Mode, the processor is capable of detecting neural spikes by programmable positive, negative, or window thresholding. Spikes are tagged with their associated channel addresses and formed into 18-bit data words that are sent serially to the external host. In the Monitor Mode, two channels can be selected and viewed at high resolution for studies where the entire signal is of interest. The processor runs from a 3-V supply and a 2-MHz clock, with a channel scan rate of 64 kS/s and an output bit rate of 2 Mbps.

  19. EMG prediction from motor cortical recordings via a nonnegative point-process filter.

    PubMed

    Nazarpour, Kianoush; Ethier, Christian; Paninski, Liam; Rebesco, James M; Miall, R Chris; Miller, Lee E

    2012-07-01

    A constrained point-process filtering mechanism for prediction of electromyogram (EMG) signals from multichannel neural spike recordings is proposed here. Filters from the Kalman family are inherently suboptimal in dealing with non-Gaussian observations, or a state evolution that deviates from the Gaussianity assumption. To address these limitations, we modeled the non-Gaussian neural spike train observations by using a generalized linear model that encapsulates covariates of neural activity, including the neurons' own spiking history, concurrent ensemble activity, and extrinsic covariates (EMG signals). In order to predict the envelopes of EMGs, we reformulated the Kalman filter in an optimization framework and utilized a nonnegativity constraint. This structure characterizes the nonlinear correspondence between neural activity and EMG signals reasonably. The EMGs were recorded from 12 forearm and hand muscles of a behaving monkey during a grip-force task. In the case of limited training data, the constrained point-process filter improved the prediction accuracy when compared to a conventional Wiener cascade filter (a linear causal filter followed by a static nonlinearity) for different bin sizes and delays between input spikes and EMG output. For longer training datasets, results of the proposed filter and that of the Wiener cascade filter were comparable.

  20. Estimation of the cortical activity from simultaneous multi-subject recordings during the prisoner's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, L; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; De Vico Fallani, F; Salinari, S; Marciani, M G; Wilke, C; Doud, A; Yuan, H; He, B; Babiloni, F

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging questions open in Neuroscience today is the characterization of the brain responses during social interaction. A major limitation of the approaches used in most of the studies performed so far is that only one of the participating brains is measured each time. The "interaction" between cooperating, competing or communicating brains is thus not measured directly, but inferred by independent observations aggregated by cognitive models and assumptions that link behavior and neural activation. In this paper, we present the results of the simultaneous neuroelectric recording of 5 couples of subjects engaged in cooperative games (EEG hyperscanning). The simultaneous recordings of couples of interacting subjects allows to observe and model directly the neural signature of human interactions in order to understand the cerebral processes generating and generated by social cooperation or competition. We used a paradigm called Prisoner's dilemma derived from the game theory. Results collected in a population of 10 subjects suggested that the most consistently activated structure in social interaction paradigms is the orbitofrontal region (roughly described by the Brodmann area 10) during the condition of competition.

  1. Cortical gamma-oscillations modulated by visuomotor tasks -Intracranial recording in patients with epilepsy-

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Rothermel, Robert; Juhász, Csaba; Nishida, Masaaki; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We determined how visuomotor tasks modulated gamma-oscillations on electrocorticography in epileptic patients who underwent epilepsy surgery. Each visual-cue consisted of either a sentence or hand gesture instructing the subject to press or not to press the button. Regardless of the recorded hemisphere, viewing sentence and gesture cues elicited gamma-augmentation sequentially in the lateral-polar occipital and inferior occipital-temporal areas; subsequently, button-press movement elicited gamma-augmentation in the Rolandic area. The magnitudes of gamma-augmentation in the Rolandic and inferior occipital-temporal areas were larger when the hand contralateral to the recorded hemisphere was used for motor responses. A double dissociation was found in the left inferior occipital-temporal cortex in one subject; the lateral portion had greater gamma-augmentation elicited by a sentence-cue, whereas the medial portion had greater gamma-augmentation elicited by a gesture-cue. The present study has increased our understanding of the physiology of the human visuomotor system. PMID:20580900

  2. Model validation of untethered, ultrasonic neural dust motes for cortical recording.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongjin; Carmena, Jose M; Rabaey, Jan M; Maharbiz, Michel M; Alon, Elad

    2015-04-15

    A major hurdle in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) is the lack of an implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a substantial fraction of the user's lifetime. Recently, sub-mm implantable, wireless electromagnetic (EM) neural interfaces have been demonstrated in an effort to extend system longevity. However, EM systems do not scale down in size well due to the severe inefficiency of coupling radio-waves at those scales within tissue. This paper explores fundamental system design trade-offs as well as size, power, and bandwidth scaling limits of neural recording systems built from low-power electronics coupled with ultrasonic power delivery and backscatter communication. Such systems will require two fundamental technology innovations: (1) 10-100 μm scale, free-floating, independent sensor nodes, or neural dust, that detect and report local extracellular electrophysiological data via ultrasonic backscattering and (2) a sub-cranial ultrasonic interrogator that establishes power and communication links with the neural dust. We provide experimental verification that the predicted scaling effects follow theory; (127 μm)(3) neural dust motes immersed in water 3 cm from the interrogator couple with 0.002064% power transfer efficiency and 0.04246 ppm backscatter, resulting in a maximum received power of ∼0.5 μW with ∼1 nW of change in backscatter power with neural activity. The high efficiency of ultrasonic transmission can enable the scaling of the sensing nodes down to 10s of micrometer. We conclude with a brief discussion of the application of neural dust for both central and peripheral nervous system recordings, and perspectives on future research directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  4. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface for Recording Cortical Circuit Dynamics in Moving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims, and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable, and effective. Approach We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous, and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based MEA via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1Hz to 7.8kHz, ×200 gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized, and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) was transmitted by a wireless data link carried on an frequency shift key modulated signal at 3.2GHz and 3.8GHz to a receiver 1 meter away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7-hour continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2MHz. Main results Device verification and early validation was performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight on how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have

  5. Modulation of medial prefrontal cortical activity using in vivo recordings and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) serves major executive functions. mPFC output to subcortical brain areas such as the amygdala controls emotional processing and plays an important role in fear extinction. Impaired mPFC function correlates with extinction deficits in anxiety disorders such as PTSD and with cognitive decision-making deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders and persistent pain. Controlling mPFC output is a desirable therapeutic goal in neuropsychiatric disorders but functional differences of cell types (pyramidal cells and interneurons) and regions (infralimbic and prelimbic) represent a challenge. This electrophysiological study used optogenetics for the cell- and region-specific modulation of mPFC pyramidal output in the intact anesthetized animal. Results Extracellular single-unit recordings were made from infralimbic (IL) pyramidal cells, IL interneurons and prelimbic (PL) pyramidal cells 2–3 weeks after intra-IL injection of a viral vector encoding channel rhodopsin 2 (ChR2) under the control of the CaMKII promoter (rAAV5/CaMKIIa-ChR2(H134R)-EYFP) or a control vector that lacked the ChR2 sequence (rAAV5/CaMKIIa-EYFP). Optical stimulation with laser-generated blue light pulses delivered through an optical fiber to the IL increased spontaneous and evoked action potential firing of ChR2 expressing IL pyramidal cells but had no effect on IL interneurons that were distinguished from pyramidal cells based on their higher firing rate and shorter spike duration. Optical activation of IL pyramidal cells also inhibited PL pyramidal cells, suggesting that IL output controls PL output. The effects were light intensity-dependent and reversible. Confocal microscopy confirmed ChR2-EYFP or control vector expression in mPFC pyramidal cells but not in GABAergic cells. Conclusions The novelty of our study is the analysis of optogenetic effects on background and evoked activity of defined cell types in different mPFC regions. The electrophysiological

  6. The Touch and Zap Method for In Vivo Whole-Cell Patch Recording of Intrinsic and Visual Responses of Cortical Neurons and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Adrien E.; Marinazzo, Daniele; Gener, Thomas; Graham, Lyle J.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-cell patch recording is an essential tool for quantitatively establishing the biophysics of brain function, particularly in vivo. This method is of particular interest for studying the functional roles of cortical glial cells in the intact brain, which cannot be assessed with extracellular recordings. Nevertheless, a reasonable success rate remains a challenge because of stability, recording duration and electrical quality constraints, particularly for voltage clamp, dynamic clamp or conductance measurements. To address this, we describe “Touch and Zap”, an alternative method for whole-cell patch clamp recordings, with the goal of being simpler, quicker and more gentle to brain tissue than previous approaches. Under current clamp mode with a continuous train of hyperpolarizing current pulses, seal formation is initiated immediately upon cell contact, thus the “Touch”. By maintaining the current injection, whole-cell access is spontaneously achieved within seconds from the cell-attached configuration by a self-limited membrane electroporation, or “Zap”, as seal resistance increases. We present examples of intrinsic and visual responses of neurons and putative glial cells obtained with the revised method from cat and rat cortices in vivo. Recording parameters and biophysical properties obtained with the Touch and Zap method compare favourably with those obtained with the traditional blind patch approach, demonstrating that the revised approach does not compromise the recorded cell. We find that the method is particularly well-suited for whole-cell patch recordings of cortical glial cells in vivo, targeting a wider population of this cell type than the standard method, with better access resistance. Overall, the gentler Touch and Zap method is promising for studying quantitative functional properties in the intact brain with minimal perturbation of the cell's intrinsic properties and local network. Because the Touch and Zap method is performed semi

  7. Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.

    PubMed

    Hill, N Jeremy; Gupta, Disha; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Adamo, Matthew A; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-06-26

    Neuroimaging studies of human cognitive, sensory, and motor processes are usually based on noninvasive techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography or functional magnetic-resonance imaging. These techniques have either inherently low temporal or low spatial resolution, and suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and/or poor high-frequency sensitivity. Thus, they are suboptimal for exploring the short-lived spatio-temporal dynamics of many of the underlying brain processes. In contrast, the invasive technique of electrocorticography (ECoG) provides brain signals that have an exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio, less susceptibility to artifacts than EEG, and a high spatial and temporal resolution (i.e., <1 cm/<1 millisecond, respectively). ECoG involves measurement of electrical brain signals using electrodes that are implanted subdurally on the surface of the brain. Recent studies have shown that ECoG amplitudes in certain frequency bands carry substantial information about task-related activity, such as motor execution and planning, auditory processing and visual-spatial attention. Most of this information is captured in the high gamma range (around 70-110 Hz). Thus, gamma activity has been proposed as a robust and general indicator of local cortical function. ECoG can also reveal functional connectivity and resolve finer task-related spatial-temporal dynamics, thereby advancing our understanding of large-scale cortical processes. It has especially proven useful for advancing brain-computer interfacing (BCI) technology for decoding a user's intentions to enhance or improve communication and control. Nevertheless, human ECoG data are often hard to obtain because of the risks and limitations of the invasive procedures involved, and the need to record within the constraints of clinical settings. Still, clinical monitoring to localize epileptic foci offers a unique and valuable opportunity to collect human ECoG data. We describe our

  8. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  9. Functional brain network organisation of children between 2 and 5 years derived from reconstructed activity of cortical sources of high-density EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; Clayden, Jonathan D; Cross, J Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-11-15

    There is increasing interest in applying connectivity analysis to brain measures (Rubinov and Sporns, 2010), but most studies have relied on fMRI, which substantially limits the participant groups and numbers that can be studied. High-density EEG recordings offer a comparatively inexpensive easy-to-use alternative, but require channel-level connectivity analysis which currently lacks a common analytic framework and is very limited in spatial resolution. To address this problem, we have developed a new technique for studies of network development that overcomes the spatial constraint and obtains functional networks of cortical areas by using EEG source reconstruction with age-matched average MRI templates (He et al., 1999). In contrast to previously reported channel-level analysis, this approach provides information about the cortical areas most likely to be involved in the network as well as their functional relationship (Babiloni et al., 2005; De Vico Fallani et al., 2007). In this study, we applied source reconstruction with age-matched templates to task-free high-density EEG recordings in typically-developing children between 2 and 6 years of age (O'Reilly, 2012). Graph theory was then applied to the association strengths of 68 cortical regions of interest based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas. We found linear increases of mean node degree, mean clustering coefficient and maximum betweenness centrality between 2 years and 6 years of age. Characteristic path length was negatively correlated with age. The correlation of the network measures with age indicates network development towards more closely integrated networks similar to reports from other imaging modalities (Fair et al., 2008; Power et al., 2010). We also applied eigenvalue decomposition to obtain functional modules (Clayden et al., 2013). Connection strength within these modules did not change with age, and the modules resembled hub networks previously described for MRI (Hagmann et al., 2010; Power et al

  10. Persistent patterns of interconnection in time-varying cortical networks estimated from high-resolution EEG recordings in humans during a simple motor act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVico Fallani, F.; Latora, V.; Astolfi, L.; Cincotti, F.; Mattia, D.; Marciani, M. G.; Salinari, S.; Colosimo, A.; Babiloni, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this work, a novel approach based on the estimate of time-varying graph indices is proposed in order to capture the basic schemes of communication within the functional brain networks during a simple motor act. To achieve this, we used a cascade of computational tools able to estimate first the electrical activity of the cortical surface by using high-resolution EEG techniques. From the cortical signals of different regions of interests we estimated the time-varying functional connectivity patterns by means of the adaptive partial directed coherence. The time-varying connectivity estimation returns a series of networks evolving during the examined task which can be summarized and interpreted with the aid of mathematical indices based on graph theory. The combination of all these methods is demonstrated on a set of high-resolution EEG data recorded from a group of healthy subjects performing a simple foot movement. It can be anticipated that the combination of the time-varying connectivity with the theoretical graph analysis is able to reveal precious information about the interconnections of the cerebral network as the significant persistence of mutual links and three-node motifs.

  11. Visualization of Cortical Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinvald, Amiram

    2003-03-01

    Recent progress in studies of cortical dynamics will be reviewed including the combination of real time optical imaging based on voltage sensitive dyes, single and multi- unit recordings, LFP, intracellular recordings and microstimulation. To image the flow of neuronal activity from one cortical site to the next, in real time, we have used optical imaging based on newly designed voltage sensitive dyes and a Fuji 128x 128 fast camera which we modified. A factor of 20-40 fold improvement in the signal to noise ratio was obtained with the new dye during in vivo imaging experiments. This improvements has facilitates the exploration of cortical dynamics without signal averaging in the millisecond time domain. We confirmed that the voltage sensitive dye signal indeed reflects membrane potential changes in populations of neurons by showing that the time course of the intracellular activity recorded intracellularly from a single neuron was highly correlated in many cases with the optical signal from a small patch of cortex recorded nearby. We showed that the firing of single cortical neurons is not a random process but occurs when the on-going pattern of million of neurons is similar to the functional architecture map which correspond to the tuning properties of that neuron. Chronic optical imaging, combined with electrical recordings and microstimulation, over a long period of times of more than a year, was successfully applied also to the study of higher brain functions in the behaving macaque monkey.

  12. Maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech recorded from frontocentral and temporal sites: three months to eight years of age

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan H.; Wagner, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current analysis was to examine the maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) from three months of age to eight years of age. The superior frontal positive-negative-positive sequence (P1, N2, P2) and the temporal site, negative-positive-negative sequence (possibly, Na, Ta, Tb of the T-complex) were examined. Event-related potentials were recorded from 63 scalp sites to a 250- ms vowel. Amplitude and latency of peaks were measured at left and right frontal sites (near Fz) and at left and right temporal sites (T7 and T8). In addition the largest peak (typically corresponding to P1) was selected from global field power (GFP). The results revealed a large positive peak (P1) easily identified at frontal sites across all ages. The N2 emerged after 6 months of age and the following P2 between 8 and 30 months of age. The latencies of these peaks decreased exponentially with the most rapid decrease observed for P1. For amplitude, only P1 showed a clear relationship with age, becoming more positive in a somewhat linear fashion. At the temporal sites only a negative peak, which might be Na, was clearly observed at both left and right sites in children older than 14 months and peaking between 100 and 200 ms. P1 measures at frontal sites and Na peak latencies were moderately correlated. The temporal negative peak latency showed a different maturational timecourse (linear in nature) than the P1 peak, suggesting at least partial independence. Distinct Ta (positive) and Tb (negative) peaks, following Na and peaking between 120 and 220 ms were not consistently found in most age groups of children, except Ta which was present in 7 year olds. Future research, which includes manipulation of stimulus factors, and use of modeling techniques will be needed to explain the apparent, protracted maturation of the temporal site measures in the current study. PMID:25219893

  13. Maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech recorded from frontocentral and temporal sites: three months to eight years of age.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Valerie L; Yu, Yan H; Wagner, Monica

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the current analysis was to examine the maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) from three months of age to eight years of age. The superior frontal positive-negative-positive sequence (P1, N2, P2) and the temporal site, negative-positive-negative sequence (possibly, Na, Ta, Tb of the T-complex) were examined. Event-related potentials were recorded from 63 scalp sites to a 250-ms vowel. Amplitude and latency of peaks were measured at left and right frontal sites (near Fz) and at left and right temporal sites (T7 and T8). In addition, the largest peak (typically corresponding to P1) was selected from global field power (GFP). The results revealed a large positive peak (P1) easily identified at frontal sites across all ages. The N2 emerged after 6 months of age and the following P2 between 8 and 30 months of age. The latencies of these peaks decreased exponentially with the most rapid decrease observed for P1. For amplitude, only P1 showed a clear relationship with age, becoming more positive in a somewhat linear fashion. At the temporal sites only a negative peak, which might be Na, was clearly observed at both left and right sites in children older than 14 months and peaking between 100 and 200 ms. P1 measures at frontal sites and Na peak latencies were moderately correlated. The temporal negative peak latency showed a different maturational timecourse (linear in nature) than the P1 peak, suggesting at least partial independence. Distinct Ta (positive) and Tb (negative) peaks, following Na and peaking between 120 and 220 ms were not consistently found in most age groups of children, except Ta which was present in 7 year olds. Future research, which includes manipulation of stimulus factors, and use of modeling techniques will be needed to explain the apparent, protracted maturation of the temporal site measures in the current study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortical commands in active touch.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The neocortex is an enormous network of extensively interconnected neurons. It has become clear that the computations performed by individual cortical neurons will critically depend on the quantitative composition of cortical activity. Here we discuss quantitative aspects of cortical activity and modes of cortical processing in the context of rodent active touch. Through in vivo whole-cell recordings one observes widespread subthreshold and very sparse evoked action potential (AP) activity in the somatosensory cortex both for passive whisker deflection in anaesthetized animals and during active whisker movements in awake animals. Neurons of the somatosensory cortex become either suppressed during whisking or activated by an efference copy of whisker movement signal that depolarize cells at certain phases of the whisking cycle. To probe the read out of cortical motor commands we applied intracellular stimulation in rat whisker motor cortex. We find that APs in individual cortical neurons can evoke long sequences of small whisker movements. The capacity of an individual neuron to evoke movements is most astonishing given the large number of neurons in whisker motor cortex. Thus, few cortical APs may suffice to control motor behaviour and such APs can be translated into action with the utmost precision. We conclude that there is very widespread subthreshold cortical activity and very sparse, highly specific cortical AP activity.

  15. Size and weight graded multi-ply laminar electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-Tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Rittko, Irvin R.

    1984-01-01

    An electrode is made comprising a porous backing sheet, and attached thereto a catalytically active layer having an electrolyte permeable side and a backing layer contacting side, where the active layer comprises a homogeneous mixture of active hydrophobic and hydrophilic agglomerates with catalyst disposed equally throughout the active layer, and where the agglomerate size increases from the electrolyte permeable side to the backing sheet contacting side.

  16. Spontaneous Decoding of the Timing and Content of Human Object Perception from Cortical Surface Recordings Reveals Complementary Information in the Event-Related Potential and Broadband Spectral Change

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Schalk, Gerwin; Hermes, Dora; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.

    2016-01-01

    The link between object perception and neural activity in visual cortical areas is a problem of fundamental importance in neuroscience. Here we show that electrical potentials from the ventral temporal cortical surface in humans contain sufficient information for spontaneous and near-instantaneous identification of a subject’s perceptual state. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) arrays were placed on the subtemporal cortical surface of seven epilepsy patients. Grayscale images of faces and houses were displayed rapidly in random sequence. We developed a template projection approach to decode the continuous ECoG data stream spontaneously, predicting the occurrence, timing and type of visual stimulus. In this setting, we evaluated the independent and joint use of two well-studied features of brain signals, broadband changes in the frequency power spectrum of the potential and deflections in the raw potential trace (event-related potential; ERP). Our ability to predict both the timing of stimulus onset and the type of image was best when we used a combination of both the broadband response and ERP, suggesting that they capture different and complementary aspects of the subject’s perceptual state. Specifically, we were able to predict the timing and type of 96% of all stimuli, with less than 5% false positive rate and a ~20ms error in timing. PMID:26820899

  17. Cortical Control of Zona Incerta

    PubMed Central

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Varga, Viktor; Bokor, Hajnalka; Pinault, Didier; Buzsáki, György; Acsády, László

    2009-01-01

    The zona incerta (ZI) is at the crossroad of almost all major ascending and descending fiber tracts and targets numerous brain centers from the thalamus to the spinal cord. Effective ascending drive of ZI cells has been described, but the role of descending cortical signals in patterning ZI activity is unknown. Cortical control over ZI function was examined during slow cortical waves (1-3 Hz), paroxysmal high-voltage spindles (HVSs), and 5-9 Hz oscillations in anesthetized rats. In all conditions, rhythmic cortical activity significantly altered the firing pattern of ZI neurons recorded extracellularly and labeled with the juxtacellular method. During slow oscillations, the majority of ZI neurons became synchronized to the depth-negative phase (“up state”) of the cortical waves to a degree comparable to thalamocortical neurons. During HVSs, ZI cells displayed highly rhythmic activity in tight synchrony with the cortical oscillations. ZI neurons responded to short epochs of cortical 5-9 Hz oscillations, with a change in the interspike interval distribution and with an increase in spectral density in the 5-9 Hz band as measured by wavelet analysis. Morphological reconstruction revealed that most ZI cells have mediolaterally extensive dendritic trees and very long dendritic segments. Cortical terminals established asymmetrical synapses on ZI cells with very long active zones. These data suggest efficient integration of widespread cortical signals by single ZI neurons and strong cortical drive. We propose that the efferent GABAergic signal of ZI neurons patterned by the cortical activity can play a critical role in synchronizing thalamocortical and brainstem rhythms. PMID:17301175

  18. Cortical Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased ...

  19. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  20. Mapping Cortical Responses to Somatosensory Stimuli in Human Infants with Simultaneous Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Event-Related Potential Recording123

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Lee, Amy; Cooper, Robert J.; Fitzgerald, Maria; Meek, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) have recently provided fundamental new information about how the newborn brain processes innocuous and noxious somatosensory information. However, results derived independently from these two techniques are not entirely consistent, raising questions about the relationship between hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses in the study of touch and pain processing in the newborn. To address this, we have recorded NIRS and EEG responses simultaneously for the first time in the human infant following noxious (time-locked clinically required heel lances) and innocuous tactile cutaneous stimulation in 30 newborn infants. The results show that both techniques can be used to record quantifiable and distinct innocuous and noxious evoked activity at a group level in the newborn cortex. Noxious stimulation elicits a peak hemodynamic response that is 10-fold larger than that elicited by an innocuous stimulus (HbO2: 2.0 vs 0.3 µm) and a distinct nociceptive-specific N3P3 waveform in electrophysiological recordings. However, a novel single-trial analysis revealed that hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses do not always co-occur at an individual level, although when they do (64% of noxious test occasions), they are significantly correlated in magnitude. These data show that, while hemodynamic and electrophysiological touch and pain brain activity in newborn infants are comparable in group analyses, important individual differences remain. These data indicate that integrated and multimodal brain monitoring is required to understand central touch and pain processing in the newborn. PMID:27200413

  1. Dual Cortical Plasticity After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Humanes-Valera, Desire; Foffani, Guglielmo; Alonso-Calviño, Elena; Fernández-López, Elena; Aguilar, Juan

    2017-05-01

    During cortical development, plasticity reflects the dynamic equilibrium between increasing and decreasing functional connectivity subserved by synaptic sprouting and pruning. After adult cortical deafferentation, plasticity seems to be dominated by increased functional connectivity, leading to the classical expansive reorganization from the intact to the deafferented cortex. In contrast, here we show a striking "decrease" in the fast cortical responses to high-intensity forepaw stimulation 1-3 months after complete thoracic spinal cord transection, as evident in both local field potentials and intracellular in vivo recordings. Importantly, this decrease in fast cortical responses co-exists with an "increase" in cortical activation over slower post-stimulus timescales, as measured by an increased forepaw-to-hindpaw propagation of stimulus-triggered cortical up-states, as well as by the enhanced slow sustained depolarization evoked by high-frequency forepaw stimuli in the deafferented hindpaw cortex. This coincidence of diminished fast cortical responses and enhanced slow cortical activation offers a dual perspective of adult cortical plasticity after spinal cord injury. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Lack of Cortical Correlates of Response Inhibition in 6-Year-Olds Born Extremely Preterm – Evidence from a Go/NoGo Task in Magnetoencephalographic Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Pihko, Elina; Lönnberg, Piia; Lauronen, Leena; Wolford, Elina; Andersson, Sture; Lano, Aulikki; Metsäranta, Marjo; Nevalainen, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    Children born extremely preterm (EPT) may have difficulties in response inhibition, but the neural basis of such problems is unknown. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) during a somatosensory Go/NoGo task in 6-year-old children born EPT (n = 22) and in children born full term (FT; n = 21). The children received tactile stimuli randomly to their left little (target) and index (non-target) finger and were instructed to squeeze a soft toy with the opposite hand every time they felt a stimulus on the little finger. Behaviorally, the EPT children performed worse than the FT children, both in responding to the target finger stimulation and in refraining from responding to the non-target finger stimulation. In MEG, after the non-target finger stimulation (i.e., during the response inhibition), the sensorimotor alpha oscillation levels in the contralateral-to-squeeze hemisphere were elevated in the FT children when compared with a condition with corresponding stimulation but no task (instead the children were listening to a story and not attending to the fingers). This NoGo task effect was absent in the EPT children. Further, in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the tactile stimulation, the post-stimulus suppression was less pronounced in the EPT than FT children. We suggest that the missing NoGo task effect and lower suppression of sensorimotor oscillations are markers of deficient functioning of the sensorimotor networks in the EPT children. PMID:28111544

  3. Nonlinear mechanisms of cortical oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Z J

    2000-01-01

    Not only theoretical consideration but also analyses of MEG or EEG recordings prove the nonlinear character of cortical dynamics. For instance, an averaged local Lyapunov Exponents (ILE) have positive value that is characteristic for chaotic dynamics. Also a test for nonlinearity (or determinism)--so called surrogate data test distinguishes between original- and randomized-phase time-series proving that recorded signals are nonlinear. These facts are a very strong experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that brain oscillators are governed by the deterministic, nonlinear, low-dimensional dynamics. The experimental manifestations of nonlinear cortical oscillations in the healthy and pathologically altered human brain and their deterministic character seems to be an important step in the understanding brain dynamics in the language of nonlinear systems theory. Clinical application may use nonlinear measures (especially ILE, and PD2i) for classification of pathologies and rough localization of the functional disturbance in the brain.

  4. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  9. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  10. A cortical-hippocampal-cortical loop of information processing during memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Gideon; Eban, Elad; Frank, Loren M

    2017-02-01

    Hippocampal replay during sharp-wave ripple events (SWRs) is thought to drive memory consolidation in hippocampal and cortical circuits. Changes in neocortical activity can precede SWR events, but whether and how these changes influence the content of replay remains unknown. Here we show that during sleep there is a rapid cortical-hippocampal-cortical loop of information flow around the times of SWRs. We recorded neural activity in auditory cortex (AC) and hippocampus of rats as they learned a sound-guided task and during sleep. We found that patterned activation in AC precedes and predicts the subsequent content of hippocampal activity during SWRs, while hippocampal patterns during SWRs predict subsequent AC activity. Delivering sounds during sleep biased AC activity patterns, and sound-biased AC patterns predicted subsequent hippocampal activity. These findings suggest that activation of specific cortical representations during sleep influences the identity of the memories that are consolidated into long-term stores.

  11. Dynamic cortical lateralization during olfactory discrimination learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yaniv; Putrino, David; Wilson, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Key points Odour discrimination and memory involve changes in the primary olfactory (piriform) cortex. The results obtained in the present study suggest that there is an asymmetry in piriform cortical change, with learning-related changes in cortical oscillations emerging with different time courses over the course of multiday training in the left and right piriform cortices in rats. There is an initial decrease in coherence between the left and right piriform cortices during the early stages of the odour discrimination task, which recovers as the animals approach criterion performance. This decreased coherence is expressed when the animals are performing the task relative to when they are in their home cage. The results suggest a transient cortical asymmetry during learning and raise new questions about the functions and mechanisms of cerebral lateralization. Abstract Bilateral cortical circuits are not necessarily symmetrical. Asymmetry, or cerebral lateralization, allows functional specialization of bilateral brain regions and has been described in humans for such diverse functions as perception, memory and emotion. There is also evidence for asymmetry in the human olfactory system, although evidence in non-human animal models is lacking. In the present study, we took advantage of the known changes in olfactory cortical local field potentials that occur over the course of odour discrimination training to test for functional asymmetry in piriform cortical activity during learning. Both right and left piriform cortex local field potential activities were recorded. The results obtained demonstrate a robust interhemispheric asymmetry in anterior piriform cortex activity that emerges during specific stages of odour discrimination learning, with a transient bias toward the left hemisphere. This asymmetry is not apparent during error trials. Furthermore, functional connectivity (coherence) between the bilateral anterior piriform cortices is learning- and context

  12. Altered cortical excitability in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Khedr, E M; El Fetoh, N A; El Bieh, E; Ali, A M; Karim, A A

    2014-09-01

    Recent EEG and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have reported hyperactivation of the right hemisphere in anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of the present study was to test this notion by examining cortical excitability in subjects with AN using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We investigated thirteen patients meeting the DSM IV diagnostic criteria for AN and 14 controls age and sex matched. Each subject was assessed clinically using the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), the Eating Attitude Test (EAT) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). TMS measures involved resting and active motor thresholds (RMT, AMT) as well as motor evoked potentials (MEP), cortical silent period duration (CSP), transcallosal inhibition (TCI), and short latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) were assessed. Cortical esophageal MEP latencies (CL) were also recorded. The RMT and MEP onset latency of the FDI and the esophagus as well as duration of the TCI were significantly reduced in anorexic patients compared to the control group. There were no significant differences neither in AMT nor CSP between patients and controls. Moreover, we found significant negative correlations between the EAT scores and RMT, and TCI duration. Although anorexic patients had significantly higher BDI score, there was no correlation between it and cortical excitability. Anorexic individuals are characterized by pathologically increased motor and esophageal cortical excitability that significantly correlates with clinical symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of Hierarchical Cortical Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Cortical information processing is structurally and functionally organized into hierarchical pathways, with primary sensory cortical regions providing modality specific information and associative cortical regions playing a more integrative role. Historically, there has been debate as to whether primary cortical regions mature earlier than associative cortical regions, or whether both primary and associative cortical regions mature simultaneously. Identifying whether primary and associative cortical regions mature hierarchically or simultaneously will not only deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate brain maturation, but it will also provide fundamental insight into aspects of adolescent behavior, learning, neurodevelopmental disorders and computational models of neural processing. This mini-review article summarizes the current evidence supporting the sequential and hierarchical nature of cortical maturation, and then proposes a new cellular model underlying this process. Finally, unresolved issues associated with hierarchical cortical maturation are also addressed. PMID:28959187

  14. Induction of bilateral plasticity in sensory cortical maps by small unilateral cortical infarcts in rats.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, S; Dinse, H R; Reinke, H; Witte, O W

    2003-02-01

    Behavioural impairments caused by brain lesions show a considerable, though often incomplete, recovery. It is hypothesized that cortical and subcortical plasticity of sensory representations contribute to this recovery. In the hindpaw representation of somatosensory cortex of adult rats we investigated the effects of focal unilateral cortical lesions on remote areas. Cortical lesions with a diameter of approximately 2 mm were induced in the parietal cortex by photothrombosis with the photosensitive dye Rose Bengal. Subsequently, animals were kept in standard cages for 7 days. On day seven, animals were anaesthetized and cutaneous receptive fields in the cortical hindpaw representations ipsi- and contralateral to the lesion were constructed from extracellular recordings of neurons in layer IV using glass microelectrodes. Receptive fields in the lesioned animals were compared to receptive fields measured in nonlesioned animals serving as controls. Quantitative analysis of receptive fields revealed a significant increase in size in the lesioned animals. This doubling in receptive field size was observed equally in the hemispheres ipsi- and contralateral to the lesion. The results indicate that the functional consequences of restricted cortical lesions are not limited to the area surrounding the lesion, but affect the cortical maps on the contralateral, nonlesioned hemisphere.

  15. Cortical source localization of infant cognition.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Greg D; Richards, John E

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and cortical source localization techniques. The current article provides an overview of a method developed for such analyses. The method consists of four steps: (1) recording high-density (e.g., 128-channel) EEG. (2) Analysis of individual participant raw segmented data with independent component analysis (ICA). (3) Estimation of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) that represent cortical sources for the observed ICA component clusters. (4) Calculation of component activations in relation to experimental factors. We discuss an example of research applying this technique to investigate the development of visual attention and recognition memory. We also describe the application of "realistic head modeling" to address some of the current limitations of infant cortical source localization.

  16. Naive coadaptive cortical control.

    PubMed

    Gage, Gregory J; Ludwig, Kip A; Otto, Kevin J; Ionides, Edward L; Kipke, Daryl R

    2005-06-01

    The ability to control a prosthetic device directly from the neocortex has been demonstrated in rats, monkeys and humans. Here we investigate whether neural control can be accomplished in situations where (1) subjects have not received prior motor training to control the device (naive user) and (2) the neural encoding of movement parameters in the cortex is unknown to the prosthetic device (naive controller). By adopting a decoding strategy that identifies and focuses on units whose firing rate properties are best suited for control, we show that naive subjects mutually adapt to learn control of a neural prosthetic system. Six untrained Long-Evans rats, implanted with silicon micro-electrodes in the motor cortex, learned cortical control of an auditory device without prior motor characterization of the recorded neural ensemble. Single- and multi-unit activities were decoded using a Kalman filter to represent an audio "cursor" (90 ms tone pips ranging from 250 Hz to 16 kHz) which subjects controlled to match a given target frequency. After each trial, a novel adaptive algorithm trained the decoding filter based on correlations of the firing patterns with expected cursor movement. Each behavioral session consisted of 100 trials and began with randomized decoding weights. Within 7 +/- 1.4 (mean +/- SD) sessions, all subjects were able to significantly score above chance (P < 0.05, randomization method) in a fixed target paradigm. Training lasted 24 sessions in which both the behavioral performance and signal to noise ratio of the peri-event histograms increased significantly (P < 0.01, ANOVA). Two rats continued training on a more complex task using a bilateral, two-target control paradigm. Both subjects were able to significantly discriminate the target tones (P < 0.05, Z-test), while one subject demonstrated control above chance (P < 0.05, Z-test) after 12 sessions and continued improvement with many sessions achieving over 90% correct targets. Dynamic analysis of

  17. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew Cn; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-02-04

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps.

  18. Retinal Atherosclerosis, Ophthalmologically Reported and Documented with OSA in 1987, is now Totally Reversed, and Recorded, Photographically. The Supposition then was that Equivalent Cortical Damage could Respond to the same Healing Protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Paul N.; O., D.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-10-01

    Documented retinal atherosclerosis, ``silver streaking'' of retinal capillaries, was reported and documented with OSA, in October 1987. That retinal damage, despite claims it usually progresses and is nonreversible, is now completely cleared. The original OSA presentation proposed that equivalent cortical damage was probably present throughout the brain at that time, as attested by failing short-term memory performance and transient ischemic attacks, TIAs, brief vision strokes. The supposition then was that ophthalmologic access to the retina, by some accounts the progenitor of all brain evolution, could provide a means of monitoring the actual circulatory state of inaccessible parts of the brain. To the extent that retinal health was naturopathically restored, and memory performance seems also to have significantly kept pace, is it a tenable premise that such protocols have rather general importance? Can applied optics help establish more appropriate diagnoses, and evaluate treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's disease?

  19. Early and Phasic Cortical Metabolic Changes in Vestibular Neuritis Onset

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients’ cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients’ subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  20. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  1. Spontaneously emerging cortical representations of visual attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenet, Tal; Bibitchkov, Dmitri; Tsodyks, Misha; Grinvald, Amiram; Arieli, Amos

    2003-10-01

    Spontaneous cortical activity-ongoing activity in the absence of intentional sensory input-has been studied extensively, using methods ranging from EEG (electroencephalography), through voltage sensitive dye imaging, down to recordings from single neurons. Ongoing cortical activity has been shown to play a critical role in development, and must also be essential for processing sensory perception, because it modulates stimulus-evoked activity, and is correlated with behaviour. Yet its role in the processing of external information and its relationship to internal representations of sensory attributes remains unknown. Using voltage sensitive dye imaging, we previously established a close link between ongoing activity in the visual cortex of anaesthetized cats and the spontaneous firing of a single neuron. Here we report that such activity encompasses a set of dynamically switching cortical states, many of which correspond closely to orientation maps. When such an orientation state emerged spontaneously, it spanned several hypercolumns and was often followed by a state corresponding to a proximal orientation. We suggest that dynamically switching cortical states could represent the brain's internal context, and therefore reflect or influence memory, perception and behaviour.

  2. Cortical mechanisms of mirror therapy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Holly E; Borrelli, Mimi R; Borchert, Robin J; Bradbury, David; Ward, Nick S

    2015-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a new form of stroke rehabilitation that uses the mirror reflection of the unaffected hand in place of the affected hand to augment movement training. The mechanism of mirror therapy is not known but is thought to involve changes in cerebral organization. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure changes in cortical activity during mirror training after stroke. In particular, we examined movement-related changes in the power of cortical oscillations in the beta (15-30 Hz) frequency range, known to be involved in movement. Ten stroke patients with upper limb paresis and 13 healthy controls were recorded using MEG while performing bimanual hand movements in 2 different conditions. In one, subjects looked directly at their affected hand (or dominant hand in controls), and in the other, they looked at a mirror reflection of their unaffected hand in place of their affected hand. The movement-related beta desynchronization was calculated in both primary motor cortices. Movement-related beta desynchronization was symmetrical during bilateral movement and unaltered by the mirror condition in controls. In the patients, movement-related beta desynchronization was generally smaller than in controls, but greater in contralesional compared to ipsilesional motor cortex. This initial asymmetry in movement-related beta desynchronization between hemispheres was made more symmetrical by the presence of the mirror. Mirror therapy could potentially aid stroke rehabilitation by normalizing an asymmetrical pattern of movement-related beta desynchronization in primary motor cortices during bilateral movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Sparse and powerful cortical spikes.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jason; Houweling, Arthur R; Brecht, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Activity in cortical networks is heterogeneous, sparse and often precisely timed. The functional significance of sparseness and precise spike timing is debated, but our understanding of the developmental and synaptic mechanisms that shape neuronal discharge patterns has improved. Evidence for highly specialized, selective and abstract cortical response properties is accumulating. Singe-cell stimulation experiments demonstrate a high sensitivity of cortical networks to the action potentials of some, but not all, single neurons. It is unclear how this sensitivity of cortical networks to small perturbations comes about and whether it is a generic property of cortex. The unforeseen sensitivity to cortical spikes puts serious constraints on the nature of neural coding schemes.

  4. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  5. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    PubMed

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  6. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  7. Adult Visual Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Charles D.; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The visual cortex has the capacity for experience dependent change, or cortical plasticity, that is retained throughout life. Plasticity is invoked for encoding information during perceptual learning, by internally representing the regularities of the visual environment, which is useful for facilitating intermediate level vision - contour integration and surface segmentation. The same mechanisms have adaptive value for functional recovery after CNS damage, such as that associated with stroke or neurodegenerative disease. A common feature to plasticity in primary visual cortex (V1) is an association field that links contour elements across the visual field. The circuitry underlying the association field includes a plexus of long range horizontal connections formed by cortical pyramidal cells. These connections undergo rapid and exuberant sprouting and pruning in response to removal of sensory input, which can account for the topographic reorganization following retinal lesions. Similar alterations in cortical circuitry may be involved in perceptual learning, and the changes observed in V1 may be representative of how learned information is encoded throughout the cerebral cortex. PMID:22841310

  8. Cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Phillip M; Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2008-11-06

    Congenital deafness leads to atypical organization of the auditory nervous system. However, the extent to which auditory pathways reorganize during deafness is not well understood. We recorded cortical auditory evoked potentials in normal hearing children and in congenitally deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. High-density EEG and source modeling revealed principal activity from auditory cortex in normal hearing and early implanted children. However, children implanted after a critical period of seven years revealed activity from parietotemporal cortex in response to auditory stimulation, demonstrating reorganized cortical pathways. Reorganization of central auditory pathways is limited by the age at which implantation occurs, and may help explain the benefits and limitations of implantation in congenitally deaf children.

  9. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human

    PubMed Central

    Koolen, N.; Dereymaeker, A.; Räsänen, O.; Jansen, K.; Vervisch, J.; Matic, V.; Naulaers, G.; De Vos, M.; Van Huffel, S.; Vanhatalo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44 weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates. PMID:26876605

  10. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

    PubMed

    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement.

  11. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  12. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, Keith B.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (<8 Hz; delta–theta) oscillations, similarly entrain to music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15–30 Hz)—often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition. PMID:26504238

  13. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise.

    PubMed

    Doelling, Keith B; Poeppel, David

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (<8 Hz; delta-theta) oscillations, similarly entrain to music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15-30 Hz)-often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition.

  14. Inferring Cortical Variability from Local Field Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuwei; Liu, Liu D.; McFarland, James M.; Pack, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    The responses of sensory neurons can be quite different to repeated presentations of the same stimulus. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between the trial-to-trial variability of cortical neuron responses and network activity that is reflected in local field potentials (LFPs). Spikes and LFPs were recorded with a multielectrode array from the middle temporal (MT) area of the visual cortex of macaques during the presentation of continuous optic flow stimuli. A maximum likelihood-based modeling framework was used to predict single-neuron spiking responses using the stimulus, the LFPs, and the activity of other recorded neurons. MT neuron responses were strongly linked to gamma oscillations (maximum at 40 Hz) as well as to lower-frequency delta oscillations (1–4 Hz), with consistent phase preferences across neurons. The predicted modulation associated with the LFP was largely complementary to that driven by visual stimulation, as well as the activity of other neurons, and accounted for nearly half of the trial-to-trial variability in the spiking responses. Moreover, the LFP model predictions accurately captured the temporal structure of noise correlations between pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons, and explained the variation in correlation magnitudes observed across the population. These results therefore identify signatures of network activity related to the variability of cortical neuron responses, and suggest their central role in sensory cortical function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The function of sensory neurons is nearly always cast in terms of representing sensory stimuli. However, recordings from visual cortex in awake animals show that a large fraction of neural activity is not predictable from the stimulus. We show that this variability is predictable given the simultaneously recorded measures of network activity, local field potentials. A model that combines elements of these signals with the stimulus processing of the neuron can predict neural

  15. Inferring Cortical Variability from Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuwei; Liu, Liu D; McFarland, James M; Pack, Christopher C; Butts, Daniel A

    2016-04-06

    The responses of sensory neurons can be quite different to repeated presentations of the same stimulus. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between the trial-to-trial variability of cortical neuron responses and network activity that is reflected in local field potentials (LFPs). Spikes and LFPs were recorded with a multielectrode array from the middle temporal (MT) area of the visual cortex of macaques during the presentation of continuous optic flow stimuli. A maximum likelihood-based modeling framework was used to predict single-neuron spiking responses using the stimulus, the LFPs, and the activity of other recorded neurons. MT neuron responses were strongly linked to gamma oscillations (maximum at 40 Hz) as well as to lower-frequency delta oscillations (1-4 Hz), with consistent phase preferences across neurons. The predicted modulation associated with the LFP was largely complementary to that driven by visual stimulation, as well as the activity of other neurons, and accounted for nearly half of the trial-to-trial variability in the spiking responses. Moreover, the LFP model predictions accurately captured the temporal structure of noise correlations between pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons, and explained the variation in correlation magnitudes observed across the population. These results therefore identify signatures of network activity related to the variability of cortical neuron responses, and suggest their central role in sensory cortical function. The function of sensory neurons is nearly always cast in terms of representing sensory stimuli. However, recordings from visual cortex in awake animals show that a large fraction of neural activity is not predictable from the stimulus. We show that this variability is predictable given the simultaneously recorded measures of network activity, local field potentials. A model that combines elements of these signals with the stimulus processing of the neuron can predict neural responses dramatically better

  16. Cortical-Cortical Interactions And Sensory Information Processing in Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-30

    Additionally, these cortical areas have been implicated from significantly elevated TOJ thresholds (worse performance) in subjects with dyslexia [5...of the fact that above-average TOJ thresholds occur in subjects with known damage to these same cortical areas ( dyslexia [5], dystonia [6-8], and

  17. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew CN; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19976.001 PMID:28160463

  18. Toward more versatile and intuitive cortical brain machine interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Kellis, Spencer; Klaes, Christian; Aflalo, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    Brain machine interfaces have great potential in neuroprosthetic applications to assist patients with brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. One type of BMI is a cortical motor prosthetic which is used to assist paralyzed subjects. Motor prosthetics to date have typically used the motor cortex as a source of neural signals for controlling external devices. The review will focus on several new topics in the arena of cortical prosthetics. These include using 1) recordings from cortical areas outside motor cortex; 2) local field potentials (LFPs) as a source of recorded signals; 3) somatosensory feedback for more dexterous control of robotics; and 4) new decoding methods that work in concert to form an ecology of decode algorithms. These new advances hold promise in greatly accelerating the applicability and ease of operation of motor prosthetics. PMID:25247368

  19. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG), and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review. PMID:24847217

  20. Evaluating mandibular cortical index quantitatively.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718-0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs.

  1. Evaluating Mandibular Cortical Index Quantitatively

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Methods Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718–0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. Results It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). Conclusions FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs. PMID:19212535

  2. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chelaru, Mircea I.; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The amount of information encoded by cortical circuits depends critically on the capacity of nearby neurons to exhibit trial-to-trial (noise) correlations in their responses. Depending on their sign and relationship to signal correlations, noise correlations can either increase or decrease the population code accuracy relative to uncorrelated neuronal firing. Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive. We addressed this issue by performing multiple-electrode recording in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkey. Despite the fact that positive noise correlations decayed exponentially with the difference in the orientation preference between cells, negative correlations were uniformly distributed across the population. Using a statistical model for Fisher Information estimation, we found that a mild increase in negative correlations causes a sharp increase in network accuracy even when mean correlations were held constant. To examine the variables controlling the strength of negative correlations, we implemented a recurrent spiking network model of V1. We found that increasing local inhibition and reducing excitation causes a decrease in the firing rates of neurons while increasing the negative noise correlations, which in turn increase the population signal-to-noise ratio and network accuracy. Altogether, these results contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism involved in the generation of negative correlations and their beneficial impact on cortical circuit function. PMID:25217468

  3. Selective adaptation in networks of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Eytan, Danny; Brenner, Naama; Marom, Shimon

    2003-10-15

    A key property of neural systems is their ability to adapt selectively to stimuli with different features. Using multisite electrical recordings from networks of cortical neurons developing ex vivo, we show that neurons adapt selectively to different stimuli invading the network. We focus on selective adaptation to frequent and rare stimuli; networks were stimulated at two sites with two different stimulus frequencies. When both stimuli were presented within the same period, neurons in the network attenuated their responsiveness to the more frequent input, whereas their responsiveness to the rarely delivered stimuli showed a marked average increase. The amplification of the response to rare stimuli required the presence of the other, more frequent stimulation source. By contrast, the decreased response to the frequent stimuli occurred regardless of the presence of the rare stimuli. Analysis of the response of single units suggests that both of these effects are caused by changes in synaptic transmission. By using synaptic blockers, we find that the increased responsiveness to the rarely stimulated site depends specifically on fast GABAergic transmission. Thus, excitatory synaptic depression, the inhibitory sub-network, and their balance play an active role in generating selective gain control. The observation that selective adaptation arises naturally in a network of cortical neurons developing ex vivo indicates that this is an inherent feature of spontaneously organizing cortical networks.

  4. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  5. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  6. Cortical stimulation parameters for functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Corley, Jacquelyn A; Nazari, Pouya; Rossi, Vincent J; Kim, Nora C; Fogg, Louis F; Hoeppner, Thomas J; Stoub, Travis R; Byrne, Richard W

    2017-02-01

    There is significant variation in how patients respond to cortical electrical stimulation. It has been hypothesized that individual demographic and pathologic factors, such as age, sex, disease duration, and MRI findings, may explain this discrepancy. The purpose of our study is to identify specific patient characteristics and their effect on cortical stimulation, and discover the extent of variation in behavioral responses that exists among patients with epilepsy. We retrospectively analyzed data from 92 patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had extra-operative cortical electrical stimulation. Mapping records were evaluated and information gathered about demographic data, as well as the thresholds of stimulation for motor, sensory, speech, and other responses; typical seizure behavior; and the induction of afterdischarges. Ninety-two patient cortical stimulation mapping reports were analyzed. The average of the minimum thresholds for motor response was 4.15mA±2.67. The average of the minimum thresholds for sensory response was 3.50mA±2.15. The average of the minimum thresholds for speech response was 4.48mA±2.42. The average of the minimum thresholds for afterdischarge was 4.33mA±2.37. Most striking were the degree of variability and wide range of thresholds seen between patients and within the different regions of the same patient. Wide ranges of thresholds exist for the different responses between patients and within different regions of the same patient. With multivariate analysis in these series, no clinical or demographic factors predicted physiological response or afterdischarge threshold levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Lifespan Differences in Cortical Dynamics of Auditory Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Viktor; Gruber, Walter; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2009-01-01

    Using electroencephalographic recordings (EEG), we assessed differences in oscillatory cortical activity during auditory-oddball performance between children aged 9-13 years, younger adults, and older adults. From childhood to old age, phase synchronization increased within and between electrodes, whereas whole power and evoked power decreased. We…

  8. Lifespan Differences in Cortical Dynamics of Auditory Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Viktor; Gruber, Walter; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2009-01-01

    Using electroencephalographic recordings (EEG), we assessed differences in oscillatory cortical activity during auditory-oddball performance between children aged 9-13 years, younger adults, and older adults. From childhood to old age, phase synchronization increased within and between electrodes, whereas whole power and evoked power decreased. We…

  9. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: cortical or non-cortical origin.

    PubMed

    van Strien, Teun W; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hilgevoord, Anthony A J; Linssen, Wim H J P; Groffen, Alexander J A; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2012-06-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by involuntary dystonia and/or chorea triggered by a sudden movement. Cases are usually familial with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of PKD focus on the controversy whether PKD has a cortical or non-cortical origin. A combined familial trait of PKD and benign familial infantile seizures has been reported as the infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA) syndrome. Here, we report a family diagnosed with ICCA syndrome with an Arg217STOP mutation. The index patient showed interictal EEG focal changes compatible with paroxysmal dystonic movements of his contralateral leg. This might support cortical involvement in PKD.

  10. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  11. Cortical language mapping using electrical cortical stimulation for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy: a report of six case studies.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Yu, Tao; Sun, Wei; Ni, Duanyu; Li, Yongjie

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this study was to summarize the results of language cortex mapping using electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy. Electrical currents were delivered through implanted subdural electrodes to six Mandarin-speaking patients before epilepsy surgery. The current intensities inducing any language disturbance during comprehension, repetition, and speech tasks were recorded, and individual cortical mapping was completed to guide subsequent resection, with the distance between mapped language sites and resected zones kept at a minimum of 0.5 cm. Language function was reassessed and followed up after surgery. Language cortices were successfully identified in three patients, but demonstrated great variability in distribution. There seemed to be no difference in the intensity threshold that induced language interference. None of the six patients exhibited language deficits postsurgery. Electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks is valid for identification of cortices underlying Mandarin processing. The great variability in language cortex distribution enhances the necessity of individual language cortical mapping in epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulvinar regulates information transmission between cortical areas based on attention demands#+

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.; Pinsk, Mark A.; Wang, Liang; Li, Xin; Kastner, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Selective attention mechanisms route behaviorally relevant information through large-scale cortical networks. While evidence suggests that populations of cortical neurons synchronize their activity to preferentially transmit information about attentional priorities, it is unclear how cortical synchrony across a network is accomplished. Based on its anatomical connectivity with the cortex, we hypothesized that the pulvinar, a thalamic nucleus, regulates cortical synchrony. We mapped pulvino-cortical networks within the visual system using diffusion tensor imaging and simultaneously recorded spikes and field potentials from these interconnected network sites in monkeys performing a visuo-spatial attention task. The pulvinar synchronized activity between interconnected cortical areas according to attentional allocation, suggesting not only a critical role for the thalamus in attentional selection, but more generally in regulating information transmission across visual cortex. PMID:22879517

  13. The pulvinar regulates information transmission between cortical areas based on attention demands.

    PubMed

    Saalmann, Yuri B; Pinsk, Mark A; Wang, Liang; Li, Xin; Kastner, Sabine

    2012-08-10

    Selective attention mechanisms route behaviorally relevant information through large-scale cortical networks. Although evidence suggests that populations of cortical neurons synchronize their activity to preferentially transmit information about attentional priorities, it is unclear how cortical synchrony across a network is accomplished. Based on its anatomical connectivity with the cortex, we hypothesized that the pulvinar, a thalamic nucleus, regulates cortical synchrony. We mapped pulvino-cortical networks within the visual system, using diffusion tensor imaging, and simultaneously recorded spikes and field potentials from these interconnected network sites in monkeys performing a visuospatial attention task. The pulvinar synchronized activity between interconnected cortical areas according to attentional allocation, suggesting a critical role for the thalamus not only in attentional selection but more generally in regulating information transmission across the visual cortex.

  14. Local and thalamic origins of correlated ongoing and sensory-evoked cortical activities

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kashi Malina, Katayun; Mohar, Boaz; Rappaport, Akiva N.; Lampl, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic inputs of cells in sensory cortices are outnumbered by local connections. Thus, it was suggested that robust sensory response in layer 4 emerges due to synchronized thalamic activity. To investigate the role of both inputs in the generation of correlated cortical activities, we isolated the thalamic excitatory inputs of cortical cells by optogenetically silencing cortical firing. In anaesthetized mice, we measured the correlation between isolated thalamic synaptic inputs of simultaneously patched nearby layer 4 cells of the barrel cortex. Here we report that in contrast to correlated activity of excitatory synaptic inputs in the intact cortex, isolated thalamic inputs exhibit lower variability and asynchronous spontaneous and sensory-evoked inputs. These results are further supported in awake mice when we recorded the excitatory inputs of individual cortical cells simultaneously with the local field potential in a nearby site. Our results therefore indicate that cortical synchronization emerges by intracortical coupling. PMID:27615520

  15. Cortical potentials associated with voluntary mandibular movements.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kohara, N; Kimura, J; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2000-07-01

    Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are negative potentials over the scalp, which gradually increase prior to voluntary movements, and might be applied to elucidate the cortical efferent function of the mandibular movements. We compared the MRCPs accompanying various mandibular movements to study the motor control mechanism underlying these movements. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 11 electrodes placed over the scalp (F3, Fz, F4, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, P3, Pz, and P4), according to the International 10-20 System, and electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained from surface electrodes over the masseter muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Ten healthy subjects were requested to make brisk and self-paced mandibular movements in 4 different directions (mouth-opening and -closing, and left and right lateral movements). We obtained MRCPs by averaging the EEG, using the visually determined EMG onset as a trigger signal. In all the movements, a slowly increasing, bilaterally widespread negativity starting 1.5 to 2.0 sec before the EMG onset (Bereitschaftspotential, or BP proper) was observed, with the maximum over the vertex region. The negative slope (NS') occurred about 300 to 700 msec before the EMG onset. The cortical maps of BP/NS' (BP and NS' combined), immediately prior to the mouth-opening and closing, showed a symmetrical distribution, whereas that for the lateral movements showed a tendency of predominance over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the direction of the movement. BP/NS' amplitudes at the onset of movement differed significantly or tended to do so between open, close, and lateral movements, suggesting that MRCP recordings may thus provide a means to explore the role of the cerebral cortex in the control of mandibular movements.

  16. Cognitive Plasticity and Cortical Modules.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Some organisms learn to calculate, accumulate knowledge, and communicate in ways that others do not. What factors determine which intellectual abilities a particular species or individual can easily acquire? I propose that cognitive-skill learning capacity reflects (a) the availability of specialized cortical circuits, (b) the flexibility with which cortical activity is coordinated, and (c) the customizability of cortical networks. This framework can potentially account for differences in learning capacity across species, individuals, and developmental stages. Understanding the mechanisms that constrain cognitive plasticity is fundamental to developing new technologies and educational practices that maximize intellectual advancements.

  17. Cognitive Plasticity and Cortical Modules

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Some organisms learn to calculate, accumulate knowledge, and communicate in ways that others do not. What factors determine which intellectual abilities a particular species or individual can easily acquire? I propose that cognitive-skill learning capacity reflects (a) the availability of specialized cortical circuits, (b) the flexibility with which cortical activity is coordinated, and (c) the customizability of cortical networks. This framework can potentially account for differences in learning capacity across species, individuals, and developmental stages. Understanding the mechanisms that constrain cognitive plasticity is fundamental to developing new technologies and educational practices that maximize intellectual advancements. PMID:19750239

  18. Leading role of thalamic over cortical neurons during postinhibitory rebound excitation

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, F.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.

    1998-01-01

    The postinhibitory rebound excitation is an intrinsic property of thalamic and cortical neurons that is implicated in a variety of normal and abnormal operations of neuronal networks, such as slow or fast brain rhythms during different states of vigilance as well as seizures. We used dual simultaneous intracellular recordings of thalamocortical neurons from the ventrolateral nucleus and neurons from the motor cortex, together with thalamic and cortical field potentials, to investigate the temporal relations between thalamic and cortical events during the rebound excitation that follows prolonged periods of stimulus-induced inhibition. Invariably, the rebound spike-bursts in thalamocortical cells occurred before the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons and preceded the peak of the depth-negative, rebound field potential in cortical areas. Also, the inhibitory-rebound sequences were more pronounced and prolonged in cortical neurons when elicited by thalamic stimuli, compared with cortical stimuli. The role of thalamocortical loops in the rebound excitation of cortical neurons was shown further by the absence of rebound activity in isolated cortical slabs. However, whereas thalamocortical neurons remained hyperpolarized after rebound excitation, because of the prolonged spike-bursts in inhibitory thalamic reticular neurons, the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons was prolonged, suggesting the role of intracortical excitatory circuits in this sustained activity. The role of intrathalamic events in triggering rebound cortical activity should be taken into consideration when analyzing information processes at the cortical level; at each step, corticothalamic volleys can set into action thalamic inhibitory neurons, leading to rebound spike-bursts that are transferred back to the cortex, thus modifying cortical activities. PMID:9811903

  19. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  20. Increasing the performance of cortically-controlled prostheses.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Krishna V; Santhanam, Gopal; Ryu, Stephen I; Afshar, Afsheen; Yu, Byron M; Gilja, Vikash; Linderman, Michael D; Kalmar, Rachel S; Cunningham, John P; Kemere, Caleb T; Batista, Aaron P; Churchland, Mark M; Meng, Teresa H

    2006-01-01

    Neural prostheses have received considerable attention due to their potential to dramatically improve the quality of life of severely disabled patients. Cortically-controlled prostheses are able to translate neural activity from cerebral cortex into control signals for guiding computer cursors or prosthetic limbs. Non-invasive and invasive electrode techniques can be used to measure neural activity, with the latter promising considerably higher levels of performance and therefore functionality to patients. We review here some of our recent experimental and computational work aimed at establishing a principled design methodology to increase electrode-based cortical prosthesis performance to near theoretical limits. Studies discussed include translating unprecedentedly brief periods of "plan" activity into high information rate (6.5 bits/s)control signals, improving decode algorithms and optimizing visual target locations for further performance increases, and recording from chronically implanted arrays in freely behaving monkeys to characterize neuron stability. Taken together, these results should substantially increase the clinical viability of cortical prostheses.

  1. Somatosensory cortical plasticity in adult humans revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, A; Grossman, J A; Ribary, U; Joliot, M; Volkmann, J; Rapaport, D; Beasley, R W; Llinás, R R

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrode recordings in adult mammals have clearly demonstrated that somatosensory cortical maps reorganize following peripheral nerve injuries and functional modifications; however, such reorganization has never been directly demonstrated in humans. Using magnetoencephalography, we have been able to demonstrate the somatotopic organization of the hand area in normal humans with high spatial precision. Somatosensory cortical plasticity was detected in two adults who were studied before and after surgical separation of webbed fingers (syndactyly). The presurgical maps displayed shrunken and nonsomatotopic hand representations. Within weeks following surgery, cortical reorganization occurring over distances of 3-9 mm was evident, correlating with the new functional status of their separated digits. In contrast, no modification of the somatosensory map was observed months following transfer of a neurovascular skin island flap for sensory reconstruction of the thumb in two subjects in whom sensory transfer failed to occur. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8386377

  2. Orderly cortical representation of vowel categories presented by multiple exemplars.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Anna; Brattico, Elvira; Soloviev, Alexei; Klucharev, Vasily; Huotilainen, Minna

    2004-11-01

    This study aimed at determining how the human brain automatically processes phoneme categories irrespective of the large acoustic inter-speaker variability. Subjects were presented with 450 different speech stimuli, equally distributed across the [a], [i], and [u] vowel categories, and each uttered by a different male speaker. A 306-channel magnetoencephalogram (MEG) was used to record N1m, the magnetic counterpart of the N1 component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP). The N1m amplitude and source locations differed between vowel categories. We also found that the spectrum dissimilarities were reproduced in the cortical representations of the large set of the phonemes used in this study: vowels with similar spectral envelopes had closer cortical representations than those whose spectral differences were the largest. Our data further extend the notion of differential cortical representations in response to vowel categories, previously demonstrated by using only one or a few tokens representing each category.

  3. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  4. Cortical sensory plasticity in a model of migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Jeremy J; Toga, Arthur W; Prakash, Neal; Ju, Y Sungtaek; Brennan, K C

    2012-10-31

    The migraine attack is characterized by alterations in sensory perception, such as photophobia or allodynia, which have in common an uncomfortable amplification of the percept. It is not known how these changes arise. We evaluated the ability of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the proposed mechanism of the migraine aura, to shape the cortical activity that underlies sensory perception. We measured forepaw- and hindpaw-evoked sensory responses in rat, before and after CSD, using multielectrode array recordings and two-dimensional optical spectroscopy. CSD significantly altered cortical sensory processing on a timescale compatible with the duration of the migraine attack. Both electrophysiological and hemodynamic maps had a reduced surface area (were sharpened) after CSD. Electrophysiological responses were potentiated at the receptive field center but suppressed in surround regions. Finally, the normal adaptation of sensory-evoked responses was attenuated at the receptive field center. In summary, we show that CSD induces changes in the evoked cortical response that are consistent with known mechanisms of cortical plasticity. These mechanisms provide a novel neurobiological substrate to explain the sensory alterations of the migraine attack.

  5. Cortical sensory plasticity in a model of migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Jeremy J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Prakash, Neal; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Brennan, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The migraine attack is characterized by alterations in sensory perception, such as photophobia or allodynia, which have in common an uncomfortable amplification of the percept. It is not known how these changes arise. We evaluated the ability of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the proposed mechanism of the migraine aura, to shape the cortical activity that underlies sensory perception. We measured forepaw- and hindpaw-evoked sensory responses in rat, before and after CSD, using multi-electrode array recordings and 2-dimensional optical spectroscopy. CSD significantly altered cortical sensory processing on a timescale compatible with the duration of the migraine attack. Both electrophysiological and hemodynamic maps had a reduced surface area (were sharpened) after CSD. Electrophysiological responses were potentiated at the receptive field center, but suppressed in surround regions. Finally, the normal adaptation of sensory evoked responses was attenuated at the receptive field center. In summary, we show that CSD induces changes in the evoked cortical response that are consistent with known mechanisms of cortical plasticity. These mechanisms provide a novel neurobiological substrate to explain the sensory alterations of the migraine attack. PMID:23115163

  6. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing. PMID:27199638

  7. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing.

  8. Enhanced brainstem and cortical encoding of sound during synchronized movement.

    PubMed

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Schönwiesner, Marc; Caron-Desrochers, Laura; Lehmann, Alexandre

    2016-11-15

    Movement to a steady beat has been widely studied as a model of alignment of motor outputs on sensory inputs. However, how the encoding of sensory inputs is shaped during synchronized movements along the sensory pathway remains unknown. To investigate this, we simultaneously recorded brainstem and cortical electro-encephalographic activity while participants listened to periodic amplitude-modulated tones. Participants listened either without moving or while tapping in sync on every second beat. Cortical responses were identified at the envelope modulation rate (beat frequency), whereas brainstem responses were identified at the partials frequencies of the chord and at their modulation by the beat frequency (sidebands). During sensorimotor synchronization, cortical responses at beat frequency were larger than during passive listening. Importantly, brainstem responses were also enhanced, with a selective amplification of the sidebands, in particular at the lower-pitched tone of the chord, and no significant correlation with electromyographic measures at tapping frequency. These findings provide first evidence for an online gain in the cortical and subcortical encoding of sounds during synchronized movement, selective to behavior-relevant sound features. Moreover, the frequency-tagging method to isolate concurrent brainstem and cortical activities even during actual movements appears promising to reveal coordinated processes along the human auditory pathway.

  9. Muscle synergy patterns as physiological markers of motor cortical damage

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent C. K.; Turolla, Andrea; Agostini, Michela; Silvoni, Stefano; Bennis, Caoimhe; Kasi, Patrick; Paganoni, Sabrina; Bonato, Paolo; Bizzi, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The experimental findings herein reported are aimed at gaining a perspective on the complex neural events that follow lesions of the motor cortical areas. Cortical damage, whether by trauma or stroke, interferes with the flow of descending signals to the modular interneuronal structures of the spinal cord. These spinal modules subserve normal motor behaviors by activating groups of muscles as individual units (muscle synergies). Damage to the motor cortical areas disrupts the orchestration of the modules, resulting in abnormal movements. To gain insights into this complex process, we recorded myoelectric signals from multiple upper-limb muscles in subjects with cortical lesions. We used a factorization algorithm to identify the muscle synergies. Our factorization analysis revealed, in a quantitative way, three distinct patterns of muscle coordination—including preservation, merging, and fractionation of muscle synergies—that reflect the multiple neural responses that occur after cortical damage. These patterns varied as a function of both the severity of functional impairment and the temporal distance from stroke onset. We think these muscle-synergy patterns can be used as physiological markers of the status of any patient with stroke or trauma, thereby guiding the development of different rehabilitation approaches, as well as future physiological experiments for a further understanding of postinjury mechanisms of motor control and recovery. PMID:22908288

  10. Intraoperative Subcortical Fiber Mapping with Subcortico-Cortical Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Kanno, Aya; Ohtaki, Shunya; Akiyama, Yukinori; Ochi, Satoko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-01

    During brain surgery, there are difficulties associated with identifying subcortical fibers with no clear landmarks. We evaluated the usefulness of cortical evoked potentials with subcortical stimuli (subcortico-cortical evoked potential [SCEP]) in identifying subcortical fibers intraoperatively. We used SCEP to identify the pyramidal tract in 4 patients, arcuate fasciculus in 1 patient, and both in 2 patients during surgical procedures. After resection, a 1 × 4-electrode plate was placed on the floor of the removal cavity and 1-Hz alternating electrical stimuli were delivered to this electrode. A 4 × 5 recording electrode plate was placed on the central cortical areas to map the pyramidal tract and temporoparietal cortical areas for the arcuate fasciculus. SCEPs were obtained by averaging electrocorticograms time locked to the stimulus onset. The subcortical stimulation within 15 mm of the target fiber induced cortical evoked potentials in the corresponding areas, whereas the stimulation apart from 20 mm did not. Five patients showed transient worsening of neurologic symptoms after surgery. However, all patients recovered. SCEP was useful for identifying subcortical fibers and confirmed the preservation of these fibers. This technique is expected to contribute to the effectiveness and safety of resective surgery in patients with lesions close to eloquent areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lateral thinking, from the Hopfield model to cortical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Athena; Russo, Eleonora; Treves, Alessandro

    2012-01-24

    Self-organizing attractor networks may comprise the building blocks for cortical dynamics, providing the basic operations of categorization, including analog-to-digital conversion, association and auto-association, which are then expressed as components of distinct cognitive functions depending on the contents of the neural codes in each region. To assess the viability of this scenario, we first review how a local cortical patch may be modeled as an attractor network, in which memory representations are not artificially stored as prescribed binary patterns of activity as in the Hopfield model, but self-organize as continuously graded patterns induced by afferent input. Recordings in macaques indicate that such cortical attractor networks may express retrieval dynamics over cognitively plausible rapid time scales, shorter than those dominated by neuronal fatigue. A cortical network encompassing many local attractor networks, and incorporating a realistic description of adaptation dynamics, may be captured by a Potts model. This network model has the capacity to engage long-range associations into sustained iterative attractor dynamics at a cortical scale, in what may be regarded as a mathematical model of spontaneous lateral thought. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neural Coding.

  12. Observations on the cortical silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Y D; Berendse, H W; van Someren, E J W; Stoffers, D; Stam, C J; Wolters, E Ch

    2007-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a tool in the neurosciences to study motor functions and nervous disorders, amongst others. Single pulses of TMS applied over the primary motor cortex lead to a so-called cortical silent period in the recording from the corresponding muscle, i.e. a period of approximately 100ms with no muscle activity. We here show that in Parkinson's disease (PD), this cortical silent period in some cases is interrupted by short bursts of EMG activity. We describe in detail these interruptions in two patients with PD. These interruptions may number up to 3 per cortical silent period and show a consistent frequency across trials and hemispheres within a given patient; the two patients described here do differ, however, in the time-delay of the interruptions and hence the induced frequency. For one patient, the frequency of the interruptions proved to be around 13 Hz, the other patient showed a frequency of around 17 Hz. The results corroborate earlier findings of cortical oscillations elicited by pulses of TMS and may be related to abnormal oscillatory activity found in the cortical-subcortical motor system in PD.

  13. Spatial Heterogeneity of Cortical Excitability in Migraine Revealed by Multi-Frequency Neuromagnetic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; Leiken, Kimberly; Degrauw, Xinyao; Kay, Benjamin; Fujiwara, Hisako; Rose, Douglas F.; Allen, Janelle R.; Kacperski, Joanne E.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial heterogeneity of cortical excitability in adolescents with migraine, magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings at a sampling rate of 6000 Hz were obtained from 35 adolescents with an acute migraine and 35 age- and gender-matched healthy controls during an auditory-motor task. Neuromagnetic activation from low- to high-frequency ranges (5–1,000 Hz) was measured at both sensor and source levels. The heterogeneity of cortical excitability was quantified within each functional modality (auditory vs. motor) and hemispherical lateralization. MEG data showed that high-frequency, not low-frequency neuromagnetic signals, revealed heterogeneous cortical activation in migraine subjects as compared with controls (p < 0.001). The alteration of the heterogeneity of cortical excitability in migraine was independent of age and gender. The degree of the neuromagnetic heterogeneity of cortical activation was significantly correlated with headache frequency (r=0.71, p < 0.005). The alteration of cortical excitability in migraine is spatially heterogeneous and frequency dependent, which has not previously been reported. The finding may be critical for developing spatially targeted therapeutic strategies for normalizing cortical excitability with the purpose of reducing headache attacks. Perspective This article presents a new approach to quantitatively measuring the spatial heterogeneity of cortical excitability in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5–1000 Hz. The characteristics of the location and degree of cortical excitability may be critical for spatially targeted treatment for migraine. PMID:26970516

  14. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks.

    PubMed

    Chelaru, Mircea I; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The amount of information encoded by cortical circuits depends critically on the capacity of nearby neurons to exhibit trial-to-trial (noise) correlations in their responses. Depending on their sign and relationship to signal correlations, noise correlations can either increase or decrease the population code accuracy relative to uncorrelated neuronal firing. Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive. We addressed this issue by performing multiple-electrode recording in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkey. Despite the fact that positive noise correlations decayed exponentially with the difference in the orientation preference between cells, negative correlations were uniformly distributed across the population. Using a statistical model for Fisher Information estimation, we found that a mild increase in negative correlations causes a sharp increase in network accuracy even when mean correlations were held constant. To examine the variables controlling the strength of negative correlations, we implemented a recurrent spiking network model of V1. We found that increasing local inhibition and reducing excitation causes a decrease in the firing rates of neurons while increasing the negative noise correlations, which in turn increase the population signal-to-noise ratio and network accuracy. Altogether, these results contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism involved in the generation of negative correlations and their beneficial impact on cortical circuit function. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-04

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity.

  16. A Circuit for Motor Cortical Modulation of Auditory Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M.; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  17. Components of vestibular cortical function.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Flatz, Claudia; Brodoehl, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the functional response (e.g., nystagmus) to caloric vestibular stimulation is delayed and prolonged compared with the stimulus-response timing of other sensory systems. Imaging studies have used different models to predict cortical responses and to determine the areas of the brain that are involved. These studies have revealed a widespread network of vestibular brain regions. However, there is some disagreement regarding the brain areas involved, which may partly be caused by differences in the models used. This disagreement indicates the possible existence of multiple cortical components with different temporal characteristics that underlie cortical vestibular processing. However, data-driven methods have yet to be used to analyze the underlying hemodynamic components during and after vestibular stimulation. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 12 healthy subjects during caloric stimulation and analyzed these data using a model-free analysis method (ICA). We found seven independent stimulus-induced components that outline a robust pattern of cortical activation and deactivation. These independent components demonstrated significant differences in their time courses. No single-modeled response function was able to cover the entire range of these independent components. The response functions determined in the present study should improve model-based studies investigating vestibular cortical processing.

  18. Cortical disinhibition in diabetic patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Turgut, N; Altun, B U

    2009-12-01

    Motor cortex disinhibition has a role in the mechanism of neuropathic pain. The duration of the cortical silent period (CSP) is used as a measure of excitability in cortical inhibitory circuits. We investigated cortical disinhibition in diabetic patients with and without neuropathic pain. We studied diabetic patients with (n = 20) and without (n = 50) neuropathic pain, and control subjects (n = 30). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed on the right hemisphere at rest, and surface electromyography was recorded from the left first dorsal interosseous muscle for evaluation of motor evoked potential (MEP) latency and amplitude. CSP was recorded from the left FDI, and TMS was then delivered while the subject was performing a voluntary contraction. We showed a low resting motor threshold, a short CSP duration, and a low CSP duration/MEP amplitude ratio in patients with neuropathic pain (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Our findings demonstrate that diabetic patients with neuropathic pain have a cortical disinhibition.

  19. Cortical network architecture for context processing in primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Zenas C; Nagasaka, Yasuo; Fujii, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Context is information linked to a situation that can guide behavior. In the brain, context is encoded by sensory processing and can later be retrieved from memory. How context is communicated within the cortical network in sensory and mnemonic forms is unknown due to the lack of methods for high-resolution, brain-wide neuronal recording and analysis. Here, we report the comprehensive architecture of a cortical network for context processing. Using hemisphere-wide, high-density electrocorticography, we measured large-scale neuronal activity from monkeys observing videos of agents interacting in situations with different contexts. We extracted five context-related network structures including a bottom-up network during encoding and, seconds later, cue-dependent retrieval of the same network with the opposite top-down connectivity. These findings show that context is represented in the cortical network as distributed communication structures with dynamic information flows. This study provides a general methodology for recording and analyzing cortical network neuronal communication during cognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06121.001 PMID:26416139

  20. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy. PMID:26343530

  1. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2016-02-15

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy.

  2. Cortical transients preceding voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, J W

    2009-12-01

    The process of initiating a voluntary muscular movement evidently involves a focusing of diffuse brain activity onto a highly specific location in the primary motor cortex. Even the very simple stereotypic movements used to study the 'contingent negative variation' and the 'readiness potential' begin with EEG indicative of widely distributed brain activity. In natural settings the involvement of diffuse cortical networks is undoubtedly even more important. Eventually, however, activity must coalesce onto specific neurons for the intended movement to ensue. Here we examine that focusing process from a mathematical point of view. Using a digital simulation, we solve the global equations for cortical dynamics and model the flow from diffuse onset to localized spike. From this perspective the interplay between global and local effects is seen as a necessary consequence of a basic cortical architecture which supports wave propagation. Watching the process evolve over time allows us to estimate some characteristic amplitudes and delays.

  3. Cortical myoclonus in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P D; Bhatia, K P; Brown, P; Davis, M B; Pires, M; Quinn, N P; Luthert, P; Honovar, M; O'Brien, M D; Marsden, C D

    1994-11-01

    We describe three patients with Huntington's disease, from two families, in whom myoclonus was the predominant clinical feature. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in two cases and by DNA analysis in all three. These patients all presented before the age of 30 years and were the offspring of affected fathers. Neurophysiological studies documented generalised and multifocal action myoclonus of cortical origin that was strikingly stimulus sensitive, without enlargement of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential. The myoclonus improved with piracetam therapy in one patient and a combination of sodium valproate and clonazepam in the other two. Cortical reflex myoclonus is a rare but disabling component of the complex movement disorder of Huntington's disease, which may lead to substantial diagnostic difficulties.

  4. Records Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    All Federal Agencies are required to prescribe an appropriate records maintenance program so that complete records are filed or otherwise preserved, records can be found when needed, the identification and retention of permanent records are facilitated, and permanent and temporary records are physically segregated, or for electronic records, segregable.

  5. Neural correlate of subjective sensory experience gradually builds up across cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    de Lafuente, Victor; Romo, Ranulfo

    2006-01-01

    When a sensory stimulus is presented, many cortical areas are activated, but how does the representation of a sensory stimulus evolve in time and across cortical areas during a perceptual judgment? We investigated this question by analyzing the responses from single neurons, recorded in several cortical areas of parietal and frontal lobes, while trained monkeys reported the presence or absence of a mechanical vibration of varying amplitude applied to the skin of one fingertip. Here we show that the strength of the covariations between neuronal activity and perceptual judgments progressively increases across cortical areas as the activity is transmitted from the primary somatosensory cortex to the premotor areas of the frontal lobe. This finding suggests that the neuronal correlates of subjective sensory experience gradually build up across somatosensory areas of the parietal lobe and premotor cortices of the frontal lobe. PMID:16924098

  6. Cortical information flow during flexible sensorimotor decisions.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Markus; Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

    2015-06-19

    During flexible behavior, multiple brain regions encode sensory inputs, the current task, and choices. It remains unclear how these signals evolve. We simultaneously recorded neuronal activity from six cortical regions [middle temporal area (MT), visual area four (V4), inferior temporal cortex (IT), lateral intraparietal area (LIP), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and frontal eye fields (FEF)] of monkeys reporting the color or motion of stimuli. After a transient bottom-up sweep, there was a top-down flow of sustained task information from frontoparietal to visual cortex. Sensory information flowed from visual to parietal and prefrontal cortex. Choice signals developed simultaneously in frontoparietal regions and travelled to FEF and sensory cortex. This suggests that flexible sensorimotor choices emerge in a frontoparietal network from the integration of opposite flows of sensory and task information.

  7. Hippocampal-cortical interaction in decision making

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jai Y.; Frank, Loren M.

    2014-01-01

    When making a decision it is often necessary to consider the available alternatives in order to choose the most appropriate option. This deliberative process, where the pros and cons of each option are considered, relies on memories of past actions and outcomes. The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are required for memory encoding, memory retrieval and decision making, but it is unclear how these areas support deliberation. Here we examine the potential neural substrates of these processes in the rat. The rat is a powerful model to investigate the network mechanisms underlying deliberation in the mammalian brain given the anatomical and functional conservation of its hippocampus and prefrontal cortex to other mammalian systems. Importantly, it is amenable to large scale neural recording while performing laboratory tasks that exploit its natural decisionmaking behavior. Focusing on findings in the rat, we discuss how hippocampal-cortical interactions could provide a neural substrate for deliberative decision making. PMID:24530374

  8. Influence of bromazepam on cortical interhemispheric coherence.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Isabel; Puga, Fernanda; Veiga, Heloisa; Cagy, Maurício; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2007-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most commonly prescribed medications due to their therapeutic efficacy in reducing anxiety and inducing sleep. Consequently, they have been widely employed in the pharmacological treatment of several disorders. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed the effects of bromazepam in electroencephalographic activity (EEG). The present study aimed at investigating the modulatory effects of this drug on brain dynamics. Specifically, the effects of bromazepam (3mg) on EEG coherence were tested in a double-blind experiment. The sample, consisting of 10 healthy subjects (5 male and 5 female), was submitted to ten minutes of EEG recording. The electrophysiological measure (coherence) was analyzed across three experimental conditions: bromazepam, placebo 1, and placebo 2. Results indicate that bromazepam significantly increases cortical interhemispheric coherence.

  9. Hippocampal-cortical interaction in decision making.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jai Y; Frank, Loren M

    2015-01-01

    When making a decision it is often necessary to consider the available alternatives in order to choose the most appropriate option. This deliberative process, where the pros and cons of each option are considered, relies on memories of past actions and outcomes. The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are required for memory encoding, memory retrieval and decision making, but it is unclear how these areas support deliberation. Here we examine the potential neural substrates of these processes in the rat. The rat is a powerful model to investigate the network mechanisms underlying deliberation in the mammalian brain given the anatomical and functional conservation of its hippocampus and prefrontal cortex to other mammalian systems. Importantly, it is amenable to large scale neural recording while performing laboratory tasks that exploit its natural decision-making behavior. Focusing on findings in the rat, we discuss how hippocampal-cortical interactions could provide a neural substrate for deliberative decision making.

  10. Effects of alprazolam on cortical activity and tremors in patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Jaime; González de la Aleja, Jesús; Gallego, Juan A; Romero, Juan P; Saíz-Díaz, Rosana A; Benito-León, Julián; Rocon, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is characterised by postural and action tremors with a frequency of 4-12 Hz. Previous studies suggest that the tremor activity originates in the cerebello-thalamocortical pathways. Alprazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that attenuates tremors in ET. The mechanisms that mediate the therapeutic action of alprazolam are unknown; however, in healthy subjects, benzodiazepines increase cortical beta activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of alprazolam both on beta and tremor-related cortical activity and on alterations in tremor presentation in ET patients. Therefore, we characterised the dynamics of tremor and cortical activity in ET patients after alprazolam intake. We recorded hand tremors and contralateral cortical activity in four recordings before and after a single dose of alprazolam. We then computed the changes in tremors, cortico-muscular coherence, and cortical activity at the tremor frequency and in the beta band. Alprazolam significantly attenuated tremors (EMG: 76.2 ± 22.68%), decreased cortical activity in the tremor frequency range and increased cortical beta activity in all patients (P<0.05). At the same time, the cortico-muscular coherence at the tremor frequency became non-significant (P<0.05). We also found a significant correlation (r = 0.757, P<0.001) between the reduction in tremor severity and the increased ratio of cortical activity in the beta band to the activity observed in the tremor frequency range. This study provides the first quantitative analysis of tremor reduction following alprazolam intake. We observed that the tremor severity decreased in association with an increased ratio of beta to tremor-related cortical activity. We hypothesise that the increase in cortical beta activity may act as a blocking mechanism and may dampen the pathological oscillatory activity, which in turn attenuates the observed tremor.

  11. Effects of Alprazolam on Cortical Activity and Tremors in Patients with Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Jaime; González de la Aleja, Jesús; Gallego, Juan A.; Romero, Juan P.; Saíz-Díaz, Rosana A.; Benito-León, Julián; Rocon, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is characterised by postural and action tremors with a frequency of 4–12 Hz. Previous studies suggest that the tremor activity originates in the cerebello-thalamocortical pathways. Alprazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that attenuates tremors in ET. The mechanisms that mediate the therapeutic action of alprazolam are unknown; however, in healthy subjects, benzodiazepines increase cortical beta activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of alprazolam both on beta and tremor-related cortical activity and on alterations in tremor presentation in ET patients. Therefore, we characterised the dynamics of tremor and cortical activity in ET patients after alprazolam intake. Methods We recorded hand tremors and contralateral cortical activity in four recordings before and after a single dose of alprazolam. We then computed the changes in tremors, cortico-muscular coherence, and cortical activity at the tremor frequency and in the beta band. Results Alprazolam significantly attenuated tremors (EMG: 76.2±22.68%), decreased cortical activity in the tremor frequency range and increased cortical beta activity in all patients (P<0.05). At the same time, the cortico-muscular coherence at the tremor frequency became non-significant (P<0.05). We also found a significant correlation (r = 0.757, P<0.001) between the reduction in tremor severity and the increased ratio of cortical activity in the beta band to the activity observed in the tremor frequency range. Conclusions This study provides the first quantitative analysis of tremor reduction following alprazolam intake. We observed that the tremor severity decreased in association with an increased ratio of beta to tremor-related cortical activity. We hypothesise that the increase in cortical beta activity may act as a blocking mechanism and may dampen the pathological oscillatory activity, which in turn attenuates the observed tremor. PMID:24667763

  12. Detecting a Cortical Fingerprint of Parkinson's Disease for Closed-Loop Neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Kevin; Naros, Georgios; Braun, Christoph; Weiss, Daniel; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD) mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz) have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network. In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) have been studied in PD patients. Whereas, the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that—unlike healthy subjects—PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients. PMID:27065781

  13. Detecting a Cortical Fingerprint of Parkinson's Disease for Closed-Loop Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Kern, Kevin; Naros, Georgios; Braun, Christoph; Weiss, Daniel; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD) mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz) have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network. In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) have been studied in PD patients. Whereas, the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that-unlike healthy subjects-PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients.

  14. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  15. Cortical deactivation induced by subcortical network dysfunction in limbic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Modi, Badri; Mishra, Asht M.; DeSalvo, Matthew; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2009-01-01

    Normal human consciousness may be impaired by two possible routes: direct reduced function in widespread cortical regions, or indirect disruption of subcortical activating systems. The route through which temporal lobe limbic seizures impair consciousness is not known. We recently developed an animal model which, like human limbic seizures, exhibits neocortical deactivation including cortical slow waves and reduced cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF). We now find through functional MRI (fMRI) that electrically-stimulated hippocampal seizures in rats cause increased activity in subcortical structures including the septal area and mediodorsal thalamus, along with reduced activity in frontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex. Direct recordings from the hippocampus, septum, and medial thalamus demonstrated fast poly-spike activity associated with increased neuronal firing and CBF, while frontal cortex showed slow oscillations with decreased neuronal firing and CBF. Stimulation of septal area, but not hippocampus or medial thalamus, in the absence of a seizure resulted in cortical deactivation with slow oscillations and behavioral arrest, resembling changes seen during limbic seizures. Transecting the fornix, the major route from hippocampus to subcortical structures, abolished the negative cortical and behavioral effects of seizures. Cortical slow oscillations and behavioral arrest could be reconstituted in fornix-lesioned animals by inducing synchronous activity in the hippocampus and septal area, implying involvement of a downstream region converged upon by both structures. These findings suggest that limbic seizures may cause neocortical deactivation indirectly, through impaired subcortical function. If confirmed, subcortical networks may represent a target for therapies aimed at preserving consciousness in human temporal lobe seizures. PMID:19828814

  16. Wireless Cortical Brain-Machine Interface for Whole-Body Navigation in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Tseng, Po-He; Yin, Allen; Lehew, Gary; Schwarz, David; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Several groups have developed brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) that allow primates to use cortical activity to control artificial limbs. Yet, it remains unknown whether cortical ensembles could represent the kinematics of whole-body navigation and be used to operate a BMI that moves a wheelchair continuously in space. Here we show that rhesus monkeys can learn to navigate a robotic wheelchair, using their cortical activity as the main control signal. Two monkeys were chronically implanted with multichannel microelectrode arrays that allowed wireless recordings from ensembles of premotor and sensorimotor cortical neurons. Initially, while monkeys remained seated in the robotic wheelchair, passive navigation was employed to train a linear decoder to extract 2D wheelchair kinematics from cortical activity. Next, monkeys employed the wireless BMI to translate their cortical activity into the robotic wheelchair’s translational and rotational velocities. Over time, monkeys improved their ability to navigate the wheelchair toward the location of a grape reward. The navigation was enacted by populations of cortical neurons tuned to whole-body displacement. During practice with the apparatus, we also noticed the presence of a cortical representation of the distance to reward location. These results demonstrate that intracranial BMIs could restore whole-body mobility to severely paralyzed patients in the future.

  17. Wireless Cortical Brain-Machine Interface for Whole-Body Navigation in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Tseng, Po-He; Yin, Allen; Lehew, Gary; Schwarz, David; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Several groups have developed brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) that allow primates to use cortical activity to control artificial limbs. Yet, it remains unknown whether cortical ensembles could represent the kinematics of whole-body navigation and be used to operate a BMI that moves a wheelchair continuously in space. Here we show that rhesus monkeys can learn to navigate a robotic wheelchair, using their cortical activity as the main control signal. Two monkeys were chronically implanted with multichannel microelectrode arrays that allowed wireless recordings from ensembles of premotor and sensorimotor cortical neurons. Initially, while monkeys remained seated in the robotic wheelchair, passive navigation was employed to train a linear decoder to extract 2D wheelchair kinematics from cortical activity. Next, monkeys employed the wireless BMI to translate their cortical activity into the robotic wheelchair’s translational and rotational velocities. Over time, monkeys improved their ability to navigate the wheelchair toward the location of a grape reward. The navigation was enacted by populations of cortical neurons tuned to whole-body displacement. During practice with the apparatus, we also noticed the presence of a cortical representation of the distance to reward location. These results demonstrate that intracranial BMIs could restore whole-body mobility to severely paralyzed patients in the future. PMID:26938468

  18. Subcortical orientation biases explain orientation selectivity of visual cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasagar, Trichur R; Jayakumar, Jaikishan; Lloyd, Errol; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2015-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of carnivores and primates shows an orderly progression of domains of neurons that are selective to a particular orientation of visual stimuli such as bars and gratings. We recorded from single-thalamic afferent fibers that terminate in these domains to address the issue whether the orientation sensitivity of these fibers could form the basis of the remarkable orientation selectivity exhibited by most cortical cells. We first performed optical imaging of intrinsic signals to obtain a map of orientation domains on the dorsal aspect of the anaesthetized cat's area 17. After confirming using electrophysiological recordings the orientation preferences of single neurons within one or two domains in each animal, we pharmacologically silenced the cortex to leave only the afferent terminals active. The inactivation of cortical neurons was achieved by the superfusion of either kainic acid or muscimol. Responses of single geniculate afferents were then recorded by the use of high impedance electrodes. We found that the orientation preferences of the afferents matched closely with those of the cells in the orientation domains that they terminated in (Pearson's r = 0.633, n = 22, P = 0.002). This suggests a possible subcortical origin for cortical orientation selectivity. PMID:25855249

  19. Retino-cortical information transmission achievable with a retina implant.

    PubMed

    Eger, Marcus; Wilms, Marcus; Eckhorn, Reinhard; Schanze, Thomas; Hesse, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Blind subjects with photoreceptor degeneration perceive phosphenes when their intact retinal ganglion cells are stimulated electrically. Is this approach suitable for transmitting enough information to the visual cortex for partially restoring vision? We stimulated the retina of anesthetized cats electrically and visually while recording the responses in the visual cortex. Transmission of retino-cortical information T was quantified by information theory. T was 20-160 bit/s (per stimulation and recording site) with random electrical or visual impulse stimulation at rates between 20 and 40 s-1. While increasing spatial density of independent electrical stimulation channels T did not saturate with 7 electrodes/mm2 retina. With seven electrodes up to 500 bit/s was transmitted to 15 cortical recording sites. Electrical stimulation basically employs temporal stimulus patterns. They are intimately linked with intensity/contrast information coded by the spike density of retinal ganglion cells. From the cortical information spread we estimated the spatial resolution as 0.5mm cortex corresponding to 0.5-1.0 degrees visual angle. If the human cortex can receive and decode the information transmitted by a retina implant, our quantitative results measured in cats suggest that visuo-motor coordination and object recognition in many in- and out-door situations will be possible.

  20. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator.

    PubMed

    Minderer, Matthias; Liu, Wenrui; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Kügler, Sebastian; Helmchen, Fritjof; Margolis, David J

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal precision, and furthermore, can be measured repeatedly in separate imaging sessions over multiple weeks. This method opens new possibilities for the longitudinal study of stability and plasticity of cortical sensory representations.

  1. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-09-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96-704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3-4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  2. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96–704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3–4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices. PMID:12960378

  3. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm) is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas. PMID:26820514

  4. Motor cortical thresholds and cortical silent periods in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Ozkiziltan, Safa; Baklan, Baris

    2004-10-01

    We studied motor cortical thresholds (TIs) and cortical silent periods (SPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 110 epileptic patients. Sixty-two had primary generalised, 48 had partial type seizures. Fifteen out 110 patients were analysed both before and after anticonvulsant medication. Our aims were to evaluate the TI levels and the duration of SPs in patients with epilepsy and to determine the reliability of TMS in patients with epilepsy. There was no negative effect of TMS on the clinical status and EEG findings in patients with epilepsy. TIs obtained from patients with partial epilepsy were higher than those obtained from both controls and primary epileptics. The duration of SP in patients with primary epileptics was more prolonged than those obtained from controls. There was no correlation between EEG lateralisation and both SP duration and TI values. In de novo patient group, SP duration was significantly prolonged after anticonvulsant medication. We concluded that TMS is a reliable electrophysiological investigation in patients with epilepsy. The analysis of SP duration may be an appropriate investigation in monitoring the effect of anticonvulsant medication on the cortical inhibitory activity.

  5. Cortical event-related potentials in preclinical familial Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Golob, E J; Ringman, J M; Irimajiri, R; Bright, S; Schaffer, B; Medina, L D; Starr, A

    2009-11-17

    To define changes in cortical function in persons inheriting familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations before the onset of cognitive decline. Twenty-six subjects with a family history of FAD were divided into 2 subgroups according to genotype (FAD mutation carriers, n = 15; FAD noncarriers, n = 11). Subjects were given standardized tests of cognitive function and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR). Sensory (P50, N100, P200) and cognitive (N200, P300) event-related potentials were recorded during an auditory discrimination task. Amplitudes and latencies of cortical potentials were compared among FAD mutation carriers and noncarriers. FAD mutation carriers and noncarriers did not significantly differ in age or on measures of cognitive function, but FAD carriers had a greater incidence of 0.5 CDR scores (1/10 noncarriers, 5/15 carriers). Relative to noncarriers, FAD mutation carriers had significantly longer latencies of the N100, P200, N200, and P300 components, and smaller slow wave amplitudes. Subanalyses of subjects having CDR scores of 0.0 also showed latency increases in FAD mutation carriers. Auditory sensory and cognitive cortical potentials in persons with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations are abnormal approximately 10 years before dementia will be manifest. Longer event-related potential latencies suggest slowing of cortical information processing in FAD mutation carriers.

  6. Dynamic reconfiguration of cortical functional connectivity across brain states.

    PubMed

    Stitt, Iain; Hollensteiner, Karl J; Galindo-Leon, Edgar; Pieper, Florian; Fiedler, Eva; Stieglitz, Thomas; Engler, Gerhard; Nolte, Guido; Engel, Andreas K

    2017-08-18

    Throughout each day, the brain displays transient changes in state, as evidenced by shifts in behavior and vigilance. While the electrophysiological correlates of brain states have been studied for some time, it remains unclear how large-scale cortico-cortical functional connectivity systematically reconfigures across states. Here, we investigate state-dependent shifts in cortical functional connectivity by recording local field potentials (LFPs) during spontaneous behavioral transitions in the ferret using chronically implanted micro-electrocorticographic (µECoG) arrays positioned over occipital, parietal, and temporal cortical regions. To objectively classify brain state, we describe a data-driven approach that projects time-varying LFP spectral properties into brain state space. Distinct brain states displayed markedly different patterns of cross-frequency phase-amplitude coupling and inter-electrode phase synchronization across several LFP frequency bands. The largest across-state differences in functional connectivity were observed between periods of presumed slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement-sleep/active-state, which were characterized by the contrasting phenomena of cortical network fragmentation and global synchronization, respectively. Collectively, our data provide strong evidence that large-scale functional interactions in the brain dynamically reconfigure across behavioral states.

  7. Cortical functional connectivity under different auditory attentional efforts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiangfei; Tong, Shanbao

    2012-01-01

    Auditory attentional effort (AAE) could be tuned to different levels in a top-down manner, while its neural correlates are still poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate the cortical connectivity under different levels of AAE. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded from nine subjects (male/female=6=3) in an auditory discrimination task under low or high AAE. Behavioral results showed that subjects paid more attention under high AAE and detected the probe stimuli better than low AAE. Partial directed coherence (PDC) was used to study the cortical functional connectivity within the first 300 ms post-stimulus period which includes the N100 and P200 components in the event-related potential (ERP). Majority of the cortical connections were strengthened with the increase of AAE. The right hemispheric dominance of connectivity in maintaining auditory attention was found under low AAE, which disappeared when the AAE was increased, indicating that the right hemispheric dominance previously reported might be due to a relatively lower AAE. Besides, most cortical connections under high AAE were found to be from the parietal cortex to the prefrontal cortex, which suggested the initiative role of parietal cortex in maintaining a high AAE.

  8. Spontaneous cortical activity is transiently poised close to criticality

    PubMed Central

    Monier, Cyril; Kumar, Arvind; Deco, Gustavo; Frégnac, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity displays a large repertoire of dynamics across the sleep-wake cycle and even during anesthesia. It was suggested that criticality could serve as a unifying principle underlying the diversity of dynamics. This view has been supported by the observation of spontaneous bursts of cortical activity with scale-invariant sizes and durations, known as neuronal avalanches, in recordings of mesoscopic cortical signals. However, the existence of neuronal avalanches in spiking activity has been equivocal with studies reporting both its presence and absence. Here, we show that signs of criticality in spiking activity can change between synchronized and desynchronized cortical states. We analyzed the spontaneous activity in the primary visual cortex of the anesthetized cat and the awake monkey, and found that neuronal avalanches and thermodynamic indicators of criticality strongly depend on collective synchrony among neurons, LFP fluctuations, and behavioral state. We found that synchronized states are associated to criticality, large dynamical repertoire and prolonged epochs of eye closure, while desynchronized states are associated to sub-criticality, reduced dynamical repertoire, and eyes open conditions. Our results show that criticality in cortical dynamics is not stationary, but fluctuates during anesthesia and between different vigilance states. PMID:28542191

  9. Iliac cortical thickness in the neonate – the gradient effect

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Craig A; Black, Sue M

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of the neonatal ilium are beginning to reveal that a recognizable structural patterning of trabecular bone is present in the absence of any direct stance-related weight transfer. However, little is known about the organization of compact bone in the ilium and the way in which it is laid down during the earliest stages of development. This study investigates cortical bone thickness across both gluteal and pelvic iliac shells in the human neonatal ilium. Measurements of specific regions of interest on the iliac cortices were recorded using reconstructed micro-computed tomography scans from 30 neonatal ilia. Analysis of gluteal and pelvic cortical thicknesses revealed a distinctive patterning consistent with the expected bone distribution achieved through early bone modelling and remodelling. The analysis of this pattern is important for understanding the relationship between trabecular bone patterning and cortical bone structure in the earliest stages of pelvic development prior to locomotive influences and its response to the specific functional forces acting during this period. PMID:19549003

  10. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    PubMed

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  11. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  12. Laminar cortical necrosis in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-10-01

    Laminar cortical necrosis, defined as focal or diffuse necrosis of one or more cortical lamina, represents an increasingly recognized neuropathological endpoint of vascular, endocrine, immunologic, metabolic, or toxic conditions, of which mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are the third most frequent after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia. To investigate the prevalence of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs, types of MIDs associated with laminar cortical necrosis, and the morphological characteristics on imaging and autopsy. Medline literature review for the terms "laminar cortical necrosis", "cortical signal change", "mitochondrial" and all acronyms of syndromatic MIDs. Among 139 hits for "laminar cortical necrosis", 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (7%). Among the ten hits five were case series and the other five single case reports. The syndromic MID most frequently associated with laminar cortical necrosis is the MELAS syndrome, but was also described in a single patient each with Leigh syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and mitochondrial spinocerebellar ataxia. The morphological and pathohistological features of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs were not at variance from those in non-mitochondrial disorders. In MIDs laminar cortical necrosis represents the histopathological and imaging endpoint of a stroke-like lesion. Though laminar cortical necrosis may have a wide pathophysiological background the histological and imaging characteristics do not vary between the different underlying conditions.

  13. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Inhibitory control of correlated intrinsic variability in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Carsen; Pachitariu, Marius; Steinmetz, Nicholas A; Okun, Michael; Bartho, Peter; Harris, Kenneth D; Sahani, Maneesh; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical networks exhibit intrinsic dynamics that drive coordinated, large-scale fluctuations across neuronal populations and create noise correlations that impact sensory coding. To investigate the network-level mechanisms that underlie these dynamics, we developed novel computational techniques to fit a deterministic spiking network model directly to multi-neuron recordings from different rodent species, sensory modalities, and behavioral states. The model generated correlated variability without external noise and accurately reproduced the diverse activity patterns in our recordings. Analysis of the model parameters suggested that differences in noise correlations across recordings were due primarily to differences in the strength of feedback inhibition. Further analysis of our recordings confirmed that putative inhibitory neurons were indeed more active during desynchronized cortical states with weak noise correlations. Our results demonstrate that network models with intrinsically-generated variability can accurately reproduce the activity patterns observed in multi-neuron recordings and suggest that inhibition modulates the interactions between intrinsic dynamics and sensory inputs to control the strength of noise correlations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19695.001 PMID:27926356

  15. Extrathalamic Modulation of Cortical Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    and c7rtico-cortical systems. For example, we have shown that primate LC-NA neurons are more acti during waking than sleep and exhibit bursts of...infusion needle. Infusion of the alpha-adrenergic agonist clonidine (CLON), in concentrations ranging from 5-20 uM (67-270pg/50 nl injection...ind hippocampal EEG (HEEG) typically exhibit activity similar to that of a lightly sleeping animal. However, periods of "waking" EEG are sometimes

  16. Functional calcium imaging in developing cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Hjorth, J J Johannes; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2011-10-22

    A hallmark pattern of activity in developing nervous systems is spontaneous, synchronized network activity. Synchronized activity has been observed in intact spinal cord, brainstem, retina, cortex and dissociated neuronal culture preparations. During periods of spontaneous activity, neurons depolarize to fire single or bursts of action potentials, activating many ion channels. Depolarization activates voltage-gated calcium channels on dendrites and spines that mediate calcium influx. Highly synchronized electrical activity has been measured from local neuronal networks using field electrodes. This technique enables high temporal sampling rates but lower spatial resolution due to integrated read-out of multiple neurons at one electrode. Single cell resolution of neuronal activity is possible using patch-clamp electrophysiology on single neurons to measure firing activity. However, the ability to measure from a network is limited to the number of neurons patched simultaneously, and typically is only one or two neurons. The use of calcium-dependent fluorescent indicator dyes has enabled the measurement of synchronized activity across a network of cells. This technique gives both high spatial resolution and sufficient temporal sampling to record spontaneous activity of the developing network. A key feature of newly-forming cortical and hippocampal networks during pre- and early postnatal development is spontaneous, synchronized neuronal activity (Katz & Shatz, 1996; Khaziphov & Luhmann, 2006). This correlated network activity is believed to be essential for the generation of functional circuits in the developing nervous system (Spitzer, 2006). In both primate and rodent brain, early electrical and calcium network waves are observed pre- and postnatally in vivo and in vitro (Adelsberger et al., 2005; Garaschuk et al., 2000; Lamblin et al., 1999). These early activity patterns, which are known to control several developmental processes including neuronal differentiation

  17. [Infantile cortical hyperostosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Martínez, Luz Elena; Cortés, José; de Uña, Armando; Vega, Valentina; Acosta, Mario

    Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis, or Caffey-Silverman disease, is a rare condition characterised by generalised bone proliferation mediated by an acute inflammatory process. Diagnosis can be made through clinical evaluation and X-ray studies. The course is generally self-limiting and prognosis is excellent. To present the case of a 4-month child with clinical and radiological symptoms compatible with Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis. A 4-month old male who presented with crying and irritability associated with swelling of the face, arms and legs was admitted to the Emergency Room of National Institute of Pediatrics. Bilateral mandibular swelling extending to periauricular region was observed, with no signs of inflammation. X-ray studies showed a periosteal reaction in the jaw, left femur and tibia, and radius bilateral. Clinical observation combined with analgesics and antipyretics was the only medical intervention. Four to six months after discharge from hospital, the symptoms disappeared, confirming the good prognosis of this condition. Infantile cortical hyperostosis is a collagenopathy, which must be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute bone inflammatory processes, irritability and fever. It is important to understand and identify this disease and clinical-radiological correlation is remarkable. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [Parietal Cortices and Body Information].

    PubMed

    Naito, Eiichi; Amemiya, Kaoru; Morita, Tomoyo

    2016-11-01

    Proprioceptive signals originating from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of both the human body schema and the body image. In this chapter, we introduce various types of bodily illusions that are elicited by proprioceptive inputs, and we discuss distinct functions implemented by different parietal cortices. First, we illustrate the primary importance of the motor network in the processing of proprioceptive (kinesthetic) signals originating from muscle spindles. Next, we argue that the right inferior parietal cortex, in concert with the inferior frontal cortex (both regions connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus-SLF III), may be involved in the conscious experience of body image. Further, we hypothesize other functions of distinct parietal regions: the association between internal hand motor representation with external object representation in the left inferior parietal cortex, visuo-kinesthetic processing in the bilateral posterior parietal cortices, and the integration of somatic signals from different body parts in the higher-order somatosensory parietal cortices. Our results indicate that a distinct parietal region, in concert with its anatomically and functionally connected frontal regions, probably plays specialized roles in the processing of body-related information.

  19. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentially absent on DIV 2 and developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking activity was primarily sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time in culture, with bursting parameters, synchrony and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity and principal components analysis using these features demonstrated a general segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using a combination of random forest classifiers and Support Vector Machines, we demonstrated that 4 features (CV of within burst ISI, CV of IBI, network spike rate and burst rate) were sufficient to predict the age (either DIV 5, 7, 9 or 12) of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification problem to a binary decision, we found that classification improved dramatically, e.g. 95% accuracy for discriminating DIV 5 vs DIV 12 wells. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells that might be needed for conducting comparisons of different treatments using mwMEA plates. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to

  20. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  1. A simulated actuator driven by motor cortical signals.

    PubMed

    Lukashin, A V; Amirikian, B R; Georgopoulos, A P

    1996-11-04

    One problem in motor control concerns the mechanism whereby the central nervous system translates the motor cortical command encoded in cell activity into a coordinated contraction of limb muscles to generate a desired motor output. This problem is closely related to the design of adaptive systems that transform neuronal signals chronically recorded from the motor cortex into the physiologically appropriate motor output of multijoint prosthetic limbs. In this study we demonstrated how this transformation can be carried out by an artificial neural network using as command signals the actual impulse activity obtained from recordings in the motor cortex of monkeys during the performance of a task that required the exertion of force in different directions. The network receives experimentally measured brain signals and recodes them into motor actions of a simulated actuator that mimics the primate arm. The actuator responds to the motor cortical commands with surprising fidelity, generating forces in close quantitative agreement with those exerted by trained monkeys, in both the temporal and spatial domains. Moreover, we show that the time-varying motor output may be controlled by the impulse activity of as few as 15 motor cortical cells. These results outline a potentially implementable computation scheme that utilizes raw neuronal signals to drive artificial mechanical systems.

  2. Cortical gamma-oscillations modulated by auditory-motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Rothermel, Robert; Juhász, Csaba; Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Human activities often involve hand-motor responses following external auditory-verbal commands. It has been believed that hand movements are predominantly driven by the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, whereas auditory-verbal information is processed in both superior temporal gyri. It remains unknown whether cortical activation in the superior temporal gyrus during an auditory-motor task is affected by laterality of hand-motor responses. Here, event-related gamma-oscillations were intracranially recorded as quantitative measures of cortical activation; we determined how cortical structures were activated by auditory-cued movement using each hand in 15 patients with focal epilepsy. Auditory-verbal stimuli elicited augmentation of gamma-oscillations in a posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus, whereas hand-motor responses elicited gamma-augmentation in the pre- and post-central gyri. The magnitudes of such gamma-augmentation in the superior temporal, pre-central and post-central gyri were significantly larger when the hand contralateral to the recorded hemisphere was required to be used for motor responses, compared to when the ipsilateral hand was. The superior temporal gyrus in each hemisphere might play a greater pivotal role when the contralateral hand needs to be used for motor responses, compared to when the ipsilateral hand does. PMID:20143383

  3. Cortical hyperexcitability and the split-hand plus phenomenon: pathophysiological insights in ALS.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong Seok; Menon, Parvathi; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-06-01

    Preferential involvement of thenar muscles compared to flexor pollicis longus (FPL), termed 'the split-hand plus sign', appears to be a clinical feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an attempt to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this clinical phenomenon, threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques were utilized to assess whether cortical mechanisms may be a significant contributing influence. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken on 17 ALS patients, with motor evoked potentials (MEP) recorded from thenar muscles and FPL. Split-hand plus index (SHPI) was derived by dividing motor amplitudes recorded over APB with those recorded over FPL. Results showed the SHPI was significantly reduced in ALS (SHPIALS 0.87 ± 0.12; SHPICONTROLS 1.7 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). Cortical studies disclosed significant increases in MEP amplitudes recorded over thenar muscles (p < 0.05) but not FPL (p = 0.11), and were significantly correlated with the SHPI (R = -0.83, p < 0.01). The cortical silent period duration was reduced from thenar muscles (p < 0.01). Although there was a ubiquitous reduction in short-interval intracortical inhibition (APB, p < 0.01; FPL < 0.05), this reduction was more prominent over the thenar muscles. In conclusion, findings from the present study suggest that cortical dysfunction in the form of hyperexcitability contributes to the pathophysiological basis of the split-hand plus sign in ALS.

  4. 'Blue' voltage-sensitive dyes for studying spatiotemporal dynamics in the brain: visualizing cortical waves.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xinling; Wu, Jian-Young

    2017-07-01

    Among many distinct contributions made by Amiram Grinvald's group, the "Blue dyes" is a special gift for visualizing cortical population neuronal activity. The excitation wavelength of blue dyes has minimal overlap with the absorption of hemoglobin, and hence has minimal pulsation artifacts. This advantage leads to high signal-to-noise ratio optical recordings of cortical activity, with sensitivity as good as that of local field potential recordings. High sensitivity imaging allows for recording of spontaneous and evoked activity in single trials without spatial or temporal averaging, and has benefitted many scientists in their research projects. Single trial recording is particularly important for studying the cortex, because spontaneous and ongoing activities interact with sensory evoked events, creating rich dynamics in the wave patterns. Signal averaging in space and time would diminish the dynamic components in the patterns. Here, we discuss how the blue dyes help to achieve high-sensitivity voltage-sensitive dye imaging of spontaneous and evoked cortical activities. Spontaneous cortical activity has a constantly changing spatial pattern and temporal frequency, making it impossible to average in space and time. Amiran Grinvald's invention of blue dyes made it possible to examine the spatiotemporal patterns of cortical dynamics, about 15 years before the first useful genetically coded voltage proteins became available.

  5. Neuroimaging of focal cortical dysplasia: neuropathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nadia; Citterio, Alberto; Galli, Carlo; Tassi, Laura; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Scialfa, G; Spreafico, Roberto

    2003-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a well-known cause of intractable epilepsy with early onset of seizures, and is potentially amenable to surgical therapy. It was first described by Taylor in 1971 as a peculiar malformative disorganisation of the neocortex characterised at histology by loss of cortical lamination and accompanied by giant, dysmorphic neurones and, most frequently, by "balloon cells" littered throughout the cortex and sub-cortical white matter. While in the past decades the term "cortical dysplasia" has referred to various malformations of cortical development, such as agyria, pachygyria, polymicrogyria, heterotopia and hemimegalencephaly, it is now widely accepted that the entity identified by Taylor should be considered separately, from both histological and neuroimaging standpoints. More recently, the recognition of various histological subtypes of focal cortical dysplasia characterised by different degrees of cortical disruption with or without cytological abnormalities has generated several classifications that are still unsatisfactory. With better magnetic resonance capability, subtle and very small focal cortical dysplasias may now be visualised and the differential magnetic resonance aspects of the histological subgroups can be established. We will discuss the problem of histopathological classification and magnetic resonance imaging differentiation of the various subtypes of focal cortical dysplasia in the light of personal data collected from a large series of epileptic patients who underwent surgery and had a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  6. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  7. Endocannabinoid Modulation of Cortical Up-States and NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Pava, Matthew J.; den Hartog, Carolina R.; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.; Woodward, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Up-/down-state transitions are a form of network activity observed when sensory input into the cortex is diminished such as during non-REM sleep. Up-states emerge from coordinated signaling between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses and are modulated by systems that affect the balance between inhibition and excitation. We hypothesized that the endocannabinoid (EC) system, a neuromodulatory system intrinsic to the cortical microcircuitry, is an important regulator of up-states and sleep. To test this hypothesis, up-states were recorded from layer V/VI pyramidal neurons in organotypic cultures of wild-type or CB1R knockout (KO) mouse prefrontal cortex. Activation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) with exogenous agonists or by blocking metabolism of endocannabinoids, anandamide or 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, increased up-state amplitude and facilitated action potential discharge during up-states. The CB1 agonist also produced a layer II/III-selective reduction in synaptic GABAergic signaling that may underlie its effects on up-state amplitude and spiking. Application of CB1 antagonists revealed that an endogenous EC tone regulates up-state duration. Paradoxically, the duration of up-states in CB1 KO cultures was increased suggesting that chronic absence of EC signaling alters cortical activity. Consistent with increased cortical excitability, CB1 KO mice exhibited increased wakefulness as a result of reduced NREM sleep and NREM bout duration. Under baseline conditions, NREM delta (0.5–4 Hz) power was not different in CB1 KO mice, but during recovery from forced sleep deprivation, KO mice had reduced NREM delta power and increased sleep fragmentation. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the EC system actively regulates cortical up-states and important features of NREM sleep such as its duration and low frequency cortical oscillations. PMID:24520411

  8. Magnetic source imaging of cortical dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boyajian, Robert A; Amo, Carlos; Otis, Shirley M; Romine, John S; Smith, Richard A

    2008-06-01

    The goal was to determine whether magnetic source imaging could identify a signature for cortical involvement in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and to determine whether the method might provide insight into functional abnormalities associated with the disease process. Spontaneous brain activity recordings from whole-head 148-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) were employed to look for localized dipolar sources of focal delta-theta (1-7 Hz) discharges in patients with ALS without dementia. Localized slow wave dipoles were mapped and counted by anatomic brain region, defined by MRI, and correlated against the revised ALS functional rating scale (a functional measure of ALS disability). In a substudy, defects in cortical activations mediating purposeful movement were investigated in an ALS patient with probable motor apraxia of an upper limb. MEG revealed localized slow wave dipole sources in 7/7 ALS patients, including two recently diagnosed patients (0/8 age-similar controls). Systematic brain mapping of dipole source generators was possible in all seven ALS patients. The slow wave bursts were being generated from frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, but not from occipital areas. The density of slow wave dipoles in cingulate gyrus correlated with the severity of upper-extremity disability as judged by the functional ALS measure. Further magnetic source imaging in the substudy patient with unilateral limb apraxia revealed abnormal central processing of purposeful movement with absent M2 in the contralateral secondary motor areas generating slow waves. This exploratory study documents widespread cortical dysfunction in patients with ALS, including those with recent onset of their disease. MEG is likely to be a powerful new tool for researching the contribution of cortical dysfunction to the motor disability that characterizes the disease process.

  9. Endocannabinoid modulation of cortical up-states and NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Pava, Matthew J; den Hartog, Carolina R; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J; Woodward, John J

    2014-01-01

    Up-/down-state transitions are a form of network activity observed when sensory input into the cortex is diminished such as during non-REM sleep. Up-states emerge from coordinated signaling between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses and are modulated by systems that affect the balance between inhibition and excitation. We hypothesized that the endocannabinoid (EC) system, a neuromodulatory system intrinsic to the cortical microcircuitry, is an important regulator of up-states and sleep. To test this hypothesis, up-states were recorded from layer V/VI pyramidal neurons in organotypic cultures of wild-type or CB1R knockout (KO) mouse prefrontal cortex. Activation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) with exogenous agonists or by blocking metabolism of endocannabinoids, anandamide or 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, increased up-state amplitude and facilitated action potential discharge during up-states. The CB1 agonist also produced a layer II/III-selective reduction in synaptic GABAergic signaling that may underlie its effects on up-state amplitude and spiking. Application of CB1 antagonists revealed that an endogenous EC tone regulates up-state duration. Paradoxically, the duration of up-states in CB1 KO cultures was increased suggesting that chronic absence of EC signaling alters cortical activity. Consistent with increased cortical excitability, CB1 KO mice exhibited increased wakefulness as a result of reduced NREM sleep and NREM bout duration. Under baseline conditions, NREM delta (0.5-4 Hz) power was not different in CB1 KO mice, but during recovery from forced sleep deprivation, KO mice had reduced NREM delta power and increased sleep fragmentation. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the EC system actively regulates cortical up-states and important features of NREM sleep such as its duration and low frequency cortical oscillations.

  10. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  11. Minimization of cochlear implant artifact in cortical auditory evoked potentials in children.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, D; Roux, S; Robier, A; Bonnet-Brilhault, F; Lescanne, E; Bruneau, N

    2012-11-01

    In congenitally deaf children fit with a cochlear implant, little is known about the maturation of the auditory cortex. Cortical auditory evoked potentials are a useful methodology to study the auditory cortical system of children with cochlear implants. Nevertheless, these recordings are contaminated by a cochlear implant artifact. The objective of this study was to use independent component analysis to minimize the artifact of the cochlear implant to study cortical auditory evoked potentials. Prospective study. A total of 5 children ranging in age from 21 to 49 months who were fitted with a cochlear implant for at least 6 months were included in this study. The stimuli were pure tones (750 Hz, 200 ms duration, 70 dB SPL) presented with an irregular interstimulus interval (1000-2000 ms) via loud speakers. The cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded from 17 Ag-AgCl electrodes referenced to the nose. The peak latency and amplitude of each deflection culminating at the fronto-central and temporal sites were analyzed. The P100-N250 peak latencies and amplitudes of the cortical auditory evoked potentials recorded from children fitted with cochlear implants. Scalp map potentials distributions were done for each child for the N250 wave. The use of independent component analysis permitted to minimize the cochlear implant artifact for the five children. Cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded at fronto-central and temporal sites. Scalp map potentials distributions for the N2 wave showed activation of temporal generators contralateral at the CI for the five children. This preliminary electrophysiological study confirms the value and the limits of independent component analysis. It could allow longitudinal studies in cochlear implant users to examine the maturation of auditory cortex. It could also be used to identify objective cortical electrophysiological measures to help the fitting of CIs in children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Population based models of cortical drug response: insights from anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Liley, David T. J.

    2008-01-01

    A great explanatory gap lies between the molecular pharmacology of psychoactive agents and the neurophysiological changes they induce, as recorded by neuroimaging modalities. Causally relating the cellular actions of psychoactive compounds to their influence on population activity is experimentally challenging. Recent developments in the dynamical modelling of neural tissue have attempted to span this explanatory gap between microscopic targets and their macroscopic neurophysiological effects via a range of biologically plausible dynamical models of cortical tissue. Such theoretical models allow exploration of neural dynamics, in particular their modification by drug action. The ability to theoretically bridge scales is due to a biologically plausible averaging of cortical tissue properties. In the resulting macroscopic neural field, individual neurons need not be explicitly represented (as in neural networks). The following paper aims to provide a non-technical introduction to the mean field population modelling of drug action and its recent successes in modelling anaesthesia. PMID:19003456

  13. A cortical region consisting entirely of face-selective cells.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tootell, Roger B H; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2006-02-03

    Face perception is a skill crucial to primates. In both humans and macaque monkeys, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reveals a system of cortical regions that show increased blood flow when the subject views images of faces, compared with images of objects. However, the stimulus selectivity of single neurons within these fMRI-identified regions has not been studied. We used fMRI to identify and target the largest face-selective region in two macaques for single-unit recording. Almost all (97%) of the visually responsive neurons in this region were strongly face selective, indicating that a dedicated cortical area exists to support face processing in the macaque.

  14. Hierarchical computation in the canonical auditory cortical circuit

    PubMed Central

    Atencio, Craig A.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory cortical anatomy has identified a canonical microcircuit underlying computations between and within layers. This feed-forward circuit processes information serially from granular to supragranular and to infragranular layers. How this substrate correlates with an auditory cortical processing hierarchy is unclear. We recorded simultaneously from all layers in cat primary auditory cortex (AI) and estimated spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) and associated nonlinearities. Spike-triggered averaged STRFs revealed that temporal precision, spectrotemporal separability, and feature selectivity varied with layer according to a hierarchical processing model. STRFs from maximally informative dimension (MID) analysis confirmed hierarchical processing. Of two cooperative MIDs identified for each neuron, the first comprised the majority of stimulus information in granular layers. Second MID contributions and nonlinear cooperativity increased in supragranular and infragranular layers. The AI microcircuit provides a valid template for three independent hierarchical computation principles. Increases in processing complexity, STRF cooperativity, and nonlinearity correlate with the synaptic distance from granular layers. PMID:19918079

  15. [Evaluation of the motor behavior in rats with cortical ablation].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pina, R; Bueno-Nava, A; Alfaro-Rodriguez, A; Durand-Rivera, J A

    The cortical ablation has been used as an experimental model in order to study the basic mechanisms of functional recovery. However, there is not data concerning to the injury effects on the motor and somatosensorial behavioral manifestations that allow us to categorize such sequels as a hemiplegic model. We used 35 male Wistar rats (280-300 g) allocated in two groups: control (n = 17) and brain injured by cortical ablation (n = 18). Previously trained, basal recordings of the footprint and motor and somatosensorial assessment were performed in the rats before surgery. The behavioral tests were performed again 6 hours after surgery and the spontaneous ambulatory activity was also evaluated. It was observed a decrease in the stride's length and an increase in the stride's angle and in the motor deficit, while the somatosensorial assessment and spontaneous ambulatory activity were not affected. These findings are discussed in function of the motor features of the hemiparetic sequels in humans.

  16. Self-organizing model of motor cortical activities during drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Siming H.; Si, Jennie; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    1996-05-01

    The population vector algorithm has been developed to combine the simultaneous direction- related activities of a population of motor cortical neurons to predict the trajectory of the arm movement. In our study, we consider a self-organizing model of a neural representation of the arm trajectory based on neuronal discharge rates. Self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM) is used to select the optimal set of weights in the model to determine the contribution of individual neuron to the overall movement. The correspondence between the movement directions and the discharge patterns of the motor cortical neurons is established in the output map. The topology preserving property of the SOFM is used to analyze real recorded data of a behavior monkey. The data used in this analysis were taken while the monkey was drawing spirals and doing the center out movement. Using such a statistical model, the monkey's arm moving directions could be well predicted based on the motor cortex neuronal firing information.

  17. Intra-lesional stereo-EEG activity in Taylor 's focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Francione, Stefano; Nobili, Lino; Cardinale, Francesco; Citterio, Alberto; Galli, Carlo; Tassi, Laura

    2003-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia are a frequent histological finding in epilepsy surgery series. Among the different types of focal cortical dysplasia, distinctive anatomical, electrical and clinical details have been identified for Taylor's focal cortical dysplasia, and in a recent article we reported a better post-surgical outcome in Taylor's focal cortical dysplasia than in other histological subtypes of cortical dysplasias. In the present study, we analysed the intra-lesional electrical activity directly recorded inside Taylor's focal cortical dysplasia during a stereo-EEG diagnostic procedure in 21 patients selected from among the 27 cases in which post-operative neuropathological examination demonstrated this kind of lesion. Our data show the existence of a peculiar interictal pattern characterised by the presence of repetitive and rhythmic spike and poly-spike and wave, frequently associated with short bursts of fusiform micro poly-spikes. Moreover, an almost pathognomonic ictal pattern (mid-amplitude 14-18 Hz rhythmic activity followed by a low voltage recruiting fast activity) is present in 12 of these 21 patients. These electrical peculiarities suggest a high level of epileptogenicity of Taylor's focal cortical dysplasia and could possibly explain the high percentage of post-surgical success among patients with this kind of lesion. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  18. The Role of Thalamic Population Synchrony in the Emergence of Cortical Feature Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sean T.; Kremkow, Jens; Jin, Jianzhong; Wang, Yushi; Wang, Qi; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2014-01-01

    In a wide range of studies, the emergence of orientation selectivity in primary visual cortex has been attributed to a complex interaction between feed-forward thalamic input and inhibitory mechanisms at the level of cortex. Although it is well known that layer 4 cortical neurons are highly sensitive to the timing of thalamic inputs, the role of the stimulus-driven timing of thalamic inputs in cortical orientation selectivity is not well understood. Here we show that the synchronization of thalamic firing contributes directly to the orientation tuned responses of primary visual cortex in a way that optimizes the stimulus information per cortical spike. From the recorded responses of geniculate X-cells in the anesthetized cat, we synthesized thalamic sub-populations that would likely serve as the synaptic input to a common layer 4 cortical neuron based on anatomical constraints. We used this synchronized input as the driving input to an integrate-and-fire model of cortical responses and demonstrated that the tuning properties match closely to those measured in primary visual cortex. By modulating the overall level of synchronization at the preferred orientation, we show that efficiency of information transmission in the cortex is maximized for levels of synchronization which match those reported in thalamic recordings in response to naturalistic stimuli, a property which is relatively invariant to the orientation tuning width. These findings indicate evidence for a more prominent role of the feed-forward thalamic input in cortical feature selectivity based on thalamic synchronization. PMID:24415930

  19. Local cortical dynamics of burst suppression in the anaesthetized brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura D; Ching, Shinung; Weiner, Veronica S; Peterfreund, Robert A; Eskandar, Emad N; Cash, Sydney S; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2013-09-01

    Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern that consists of a quasi-periodic alternation between isoelectric 'suppressions' lasting seconds or minutes, and high-voltage 'bursts'. It is characteristic of a profoundly inactivated brain, occurring in conditions including hypothermia, deep general anaesthesia, infant encephalopathy and coma. It is also used in neurology as an electrophysiological endpoint in pharmacologically induced coma for brain protection after traumatic injury and during status epilepticus. Classically, burst suppression has been regarded as a 'global' state with synchronous activity throughout cortex. This assumption has influenced the clinical use of burst suppression as a way to broadly reduce neural activity. However, the extent of spatial homogeneity has not been fully explored due to the challenges in recording from multiple cortical sites simultaneously. The neurophysiological dynamics of large-scale cortical circuits during burst suppression are therefore not well understood. To address this question, we recorded intracranial electrocorticograms from patients who entered burst suppression while receiving propofol general anaesthesia. The electrodes were broadly distributed across cortex, enabling us to examine both the dynamics of burst suppression within local cortical regions and larger-scale network interactions. We found that in contrast to previous characterizations, bursts could be substantially asynchronous across the cortex. Furthermore, the state of burst suppression itself could occur in a limited cortical region while other areas exhibited ongoing continuous activity. In addition, we found a complex temporal structure within bursts, which recapitulated the spectral dynamics of the state preceding burst suppression, and evolved throughout the course of a single burst. Our observations imply that local cortical dynamics are not homogeneous, even during significant brain inactivation. Instead, cortical and, implicitly

  20. The possible role of spike patterns in cortical information processing.

    PubMed

    Tiesinga, Paul H E; Toups, J Vincent

    2005-06-01

    When the same visual stimulus is presented across many trials, neurons in the visual cortex receive stimulus-related synaptic inputs that are reproducible across trials (S) and inputs that are not (N). The variability of spike trains recorded in the visual cortex and their apparent lack of spike-to-spike correlations beyond that implied by firing rate fluctuations, has been taken as evidence for a low S/N ratio. A recent re-analysis of in vivo cortical data revealed evidence for spike-to-spike correlations in the form of spike patterns. We examine neural dynamics at a higher S/N in order to determine what possible role spike patterns could play in cortical information processing. In vivo-like spike patterns were obtained in model simulations. Superpositions of multiple sinusoidal driving currents were especially effective in producing stable long-lasting patterns. By applying current pulses that were either short and strong or long and weak, neurons could be made to switch from one pattern to another. Cortical neurons with similar stimulus preferences are located near each other, have similar biophysical properties and receive a large number of common synaptic inputs. Hence, recordings of a single neuron across multiple trials are usually interpreted as the response of an ensemble of these neurons during one trial. In the presence of distinct spike patterns across trials there is ambiguity in what would be the corresponding ensemble, it could consist of the same spike pattern for each neuron or a set of patterns across neurons. We found that the spiking response of a neuron receiving these ensemble inputs was determined by the spike-pattern composition, which, in turn, could be modulated dynamically as a means for cortical information processing.

  1. Coordinate Synaptic Mechanisms Contributing to Olfactory Cortical Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Best, Aaron R.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Anterior piriform cortex (aPCX) neurons rapidly filter repetitive odor stimuli despite relatively maintained input from mitral cells. This cortical adaptation is correlated with short-term depression of afferent synapses, in vivo. The purpose of this study was to elucidate mechanisms underlying this nonassociative neural plasticity using in vivo and in vitro preparations and to determine its role in cortical odor adaptation. Lateral olfactory tract (LOT)-evoked responses were recorded in rat aPCX coronal slices. Extracellular and intracellular potentials were recorded before and after simulated odor stimulation of the LOT. Results were compared with in vivo intracellular recordings from aPCX layer II/III neurons and field recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats stimulated with odorants. The onset, time course, and extent of LOT synaptic depression during both in vitro electrical and in vivo odorant stimulation methods were similar. Similar to the odor specificity of cortical odor adaptation in vivo, there was no evidence of heterosynaptic depression between independent inputs in vitro. In vitro evidence suggests at least two mechanisms contribute to this activity-dependent synaptic depression: a rapidly recovering presynaptic depression during the initial 10–20 sec of the post-train recovery period and a longer lasting (~120 sec) depression that can be blocked by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) II/III antagonist (RS)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG) and by the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol. Importantly, in line with the in vitro findings, both adaptation of odor responses in the β (15–35 Hz) spectral range and the associated synaptic depression can also be blocked by intracortical infusion of CPPG in vivo. PMID:14736851

  2. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  3. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  4. Disorders of cortical formation: MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, A A K; Kandell, A Y; Elsorogy, L G; Elmongy, A; Basett, A A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the embryologic stages of the cerebral cortex, illustrate the classification of disorders of cortical formation, and finally describe the main MR imaging features of these disorders. Disorders of cortical formation are classified according to the embryologic stage of the cerebral cortex at which the abnormality occurred. MR imaging shows diminished cortical thickness and sulcation in microcephaly, enlarged dysplastic cortex in hemimegalencephaly, and ipsilateral focal cortical thickening with radial hyperintense bands in focal cortical dysplasia. MR imaging detects smooth brain in classic lissencephaly, the nodular cortex with cobblestone cortex with congenital muscular dystrophy, and the ectopic position of the gray matter with heterotopias. MR imaging can detect polymicrogyria and related syndromes as well as the types of schizencephaly. We concluded that MR imaging is essential to demonstrate the morphology, distribution, and extent of different disorders of cortical formation as well as the associated anomalies and related syndromes.

  5. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  6. MR appearance of distal femoral cortical irregularity (cortical desmoid)

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Shin, Kyoo-Ho

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to describe the MR appearance of distal femoral cortical irregularity (DFCI). With plain radiographs and MR images of 100 knees, the presence of DFCIs was determined, and the shapes of DFCIs were classified into three subgroups: concave, convex, and divergent cortical shapes. Radiographic and MR shapes of DFCIs were compared. DFCIs were shown in various shapes on both the radiographs and the MR images. Forty-four DFCIs were found both on radiograph and by MR image. An additional 14 DFCIs were identifiable only on MR images. However, the majority of DFCIs showed an association between radiographic and MR shapes. MRI revealed that all 58 DFCIs were located at the attachment site of the media gastrocnemius muscle. DFCIs were enhanced in three of the four patients who underwent postcontrast MR study. A good understanding of radiographic and MR findings of the DFCI may be of great help in the differential diagnosis of distal femoral lesions. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Trait anger predicts relative left frontal cortical activation to anger-inducing stimuli.

    PubMed

    Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2007-11-01

    Building on past research that has suggested that relatively greater left frontal cortical activity is associated with approach-related anger and that individuals who are high in trait anger are more likely to evidence angry responses, the present research tested whether individuals high in trait anger would be more likely to evidence relatively greater left frontal cortical activity in response to anger-eliciting pictorial stimuli. In the experiment, participants were exposed to pictures intended to evoke anger, fear/disgust, positive, or neutral affective reactions. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded continuously, and alpha power was derived from the EEG to measure cortical activity. Trait anger was measured using the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire [Buss, A.H., Perry, M., 1992. The aggression questionnaire. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 452-459]. Results revealed that trait anger was positively related to greater relative left frontal cortical activity to anger-evoking pictures but not to other types of pictures.

  8. Reversal of cortical information flow during visual imagery as compared to visual perception.

    PubMed

    Dentico, Daniela; Cheung, Bing Leung; Chang, Jui-Yang; Guokas, Jeffrey; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry

    2014-10-15

    The role of bottom-up and top-down connections during visual perception and the formation of mental images was examined by analyzing high-density EEG recordings of brain activity using two state-of-the-art methods for assessing the directionality of cortical signal flow: state-space Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling. We quantified the directionality of signal flow in an occipito-parieto-frontal cortical network during perception of movie clips versus mental replay of the movies and free visual imagery. Both Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed an increased top-down signal flow in parieto-occipital cortices during mental imagery as compared to visual perception. These results are the first direct demonstration of a reversal of the predominant direction of cortical signal flow during mental imagery as compared to perception.

  9. Familiarity with Speech Affects Cortical Processing of Auditory Distance Cues and Increases Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Matthew G.; Mercado, Eduardo; Gramann, Klaus; Makeig, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Several acoustic cues contribute to auditory distance estimation. Nonacoustic cues, including familiarity, may also play a role. We tested participants’ ability to distinguish the distances of acoustically similar sounds that differed in familiarity. Participants were better able to judge the distances of familiar sounds. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings collected while participants performed this auditory distance judgment task revealed that several cortical regions responded in different ways depending on sound familiarity. Surprisingly, these differences were observed in auditory cortical regions as well as other cortical regions distributed throughout both hemispheres. These data suggest that learning about subtle, distance-dependent variations in complex speech sounds involves processing in a broad cortical network that contributes both to speech recognition and to how spatial information is extracted from speech. PMID:22911734

  10. Cortical sensorimotor alterations in Unverricht-Lundborg disease patients without generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Silén, Teija; Karjalainen, Tero; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Forss, Nina

    2002-04-26

    We investigated cortical functions of two Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) patients suffering from myoclonic jerks, but no generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Somatosensory cortical responses were recorded to median nerve stimuli and coherence was calculated between cortical and muscle signals during isometric contraction of hand muscle. In contrast to ULD patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, responses of the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex were only slightly enhanced in the left and normal in the right hemisphere, and no early responses were observed in the ipsilateral SI. Cortex-muscle coherence was remarkably enhanced. We conclude that in ULD patients without generalized tonic-clonic seizures, both the excitability of the SI and transcallosal conduction are relatively normal, probably decreasing susceptibility to generalized seizures. Disturbed cortical control of muscle contraction indicates selective alteration of the motor cortex activation.

  11. Reversal of cortical information flow during visual imagery as compared to visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Dentico, Daniela; Cheung, Bing Leung; Chang, Jui-Yang; Guokas, Jeffrey; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The role of bottom-up and top-down connections during visual perception and the forming of mental images was examined by analyzing high-density EEG recordings of brain activity using two state-of-the-art methods for assessing the directionality of cortical signal flow: state-space Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling. We quantified the directionality of signal flow in an occipito-parieto-frontal cortical network during perception of movie clips versus mental replay of the movies and free visual imagery. Both Granger causality and dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed increased top-down signal flow in parieto-occipital cortices during mental imagery as compared to visual perception. These results are the first direct demonstration of a reversal of the predominant direction of cortical signal flow during mental imagery as compared to perception. PMID:24910071

  12. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    PubMed

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  13. Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Gemba, Hisae

    2004-01-23

    Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) were investigated electrophysiologically in the monkey. Cortical field potentials evoked by the thalamic stimulation were recorded with electrodes chronically implanted on the cortical surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm cortical depth in the PPC. The stimulation of the nucleus lateralis posterior (LP), nucleus ventralis posterior lateralis pars caudalis (VPLc), and nucleus pulvinaris lateralis (Pul.l) and medialis (Pul.m) induced surface-negative, depth-positive potentials in the PPC. The LP and VPLc projected mainly to the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the anterior bank of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the Pul.m mainly to the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the posterior bank of the IPS. The Pul.l had projections to all of the SPL, the IPL and both the banks. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with motor functions.

  14. Continuous monitoring of cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry in ventilated patients with head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, P J; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J D

    1994-01-01

    A method for monitoring cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in the neurointensive care unit is described. Out of 22 patients with head injuries, reliable and long term recordings were obtained in 16. Laser Doppler flowmetry registered changes in cortical microcirculatory flow in response to spontaneous waves of raised intracranial pressure, and to therapeutic manoeuvres that altered the cerebral perfusion pressure. Comparisons of variations in flux signal with cerebral perfusion pressure provided an indication of the autoregulatory state of the cortical microcirculation, and analysis of raw LDF data demonstrated an autoregulatory breakpoint of cerebral perfusion pressure of 58 mm Hg, below which cortical perfusion failed. Although middle cerebral artery flow velocities were generally tightly coupled with LDF signal changes, episodes of uncoupling were seen. The potential uses and limitations of LDF in the neurointensive care setting are discussed. Images PMID:7964816

  15. Posttraumatic cortical defect of femur.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Srivastava, Deep N; Malhotra, Rajesh; Palaniswamy, Aravindh

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic cortical defect of bone is a rare entity which occurs in a maturing skeleton following green stick or torus fracture. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and they are detected incidentally on radiograph. These lesions usually require no treatment. However, the appearance of these lesions can mimic various pathological conditions affecting bone. Knowledge about this entity is important as it avoids unnecessary investigations. We present this case as the occurrence of this entity in femur is very rare and the child was symptomatic.

  16. Cortical rewiring and information storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chklovskii, D. B.; Mel, B. W.; Svoboda, K.

    2004-10-01

    Current thinking about long-term memory in the cortex is focused on changes in the strengths of connections between neurons. But ongoing structural plasticity in the adult brain, including synapse formation/elimination and remodelling of axons and dendrites, suggests that memory could also depend on learning-induced changes in the cortical `wiring diagram'. Given that the cortex is sparsely connected, wiring plasticity could provide a substantial boost in storage capacity, although at a cost of more elaborate biological machinery and slower learning.

  17. Imprinting and Recalling Cortical Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent emergent building blocks of neural circuits. They could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations in visual cortex of awake mice generates artificially induced ensembles which recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexistent ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  18. Communication and wiring in the cortical connectome

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Julian M. L.; Kisvárday, Zoltán F.

    2012-01-01

    In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimize communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction) and temporal (routing) costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fiber tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for cortical wiring patterns

  19. [Posterior cortical atrophy (Benson-syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Anikó; Szilvássy, Ildikó; Kovács, Krisztina; Boór, Krisztina; Gács, Gyula

    2010-01-30

    We present the characteristics of posterior cortical atrophy--a very rare cortical dementia--in a 69 year old woman's case. Our patient's symptoms began with a visual problem which was initially explained by ophthalmological disorder. After neurological exam visual agnosia was diagnosed apart from other cognitive disorder (alexia without agraphia, acalculia, prosopagnosia, constructional disorder, clock-time recognition disorder, dressing apraxia, visuospatial disorientation). The brain MRI showed bilateral asymmetric parieto-occipital atrophy which is characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

  20. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam.

  1. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  2. Cortical auditory disorders: clinical and psychoacoustic features.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M F; Geehan, G R

    1988-01-01

    The symptoms of two patients with bilateral cortical auditory lesions evolved from cortical deafness to other auditory syndromes: generalised auditory agnosia, amusia and/or pure word deafness, and a residual impairment of temporal sequencing. On investigation, both had dysacusis, absent middle latency evoked responses, acoustic errors in sound recognition and matching, inconsistent auditory behaviours, and similarly disturbed psychoacoustic discrimination tasks. These findings indicate that the different clinical syndromes caused by cortical auditory lesions form a spectrum of related auditory processing disorders. Differences between syndromes may depend on the degree of involvement of a primary cortical processing system, the more diffuse accessory system, and possibly the efferent auditory system. Images PMID:2450968

  3. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C.; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.; Litke, Alan M.; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a “rich club.” We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  4. PET-based confirmation of orientation sensitivity of TMS-induced cortical activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Todd D; Salinas, Felipe S; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T; Mogul, David J

    2013-11-01

    Currently, it is difficult to predict precise regions of cortical activation in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Most analytical approaches focus on applied magnetic field strength in the target region as the primary factor, placing activation on the gyral crowns. However, imaging studies support M1 targets being typically located in the sulcal banks. To more thoroughly investigate this inconsistency, we sought to determine whether neocortical surface orientation was a critical determinant of regional activation. MR images were used to construct cortical and scalp surfaces for 18 subjects. The angle (θ) between the cortical surface normal and its nearest scalp normal for ~50,000 cortical points per subject was used to quantify cortical location (i.e., gyral vs. sulcal). TMS-induced activations of primary motor cortex (M1) were compared to brain activations recorded during a finger-tapping task using concurrent positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging. Brain activations were primarily sulcal for both the TMS and task activations (P < 0.001 for both) compared to the overall cortical surface orientation. Also, the location of maximal blood flow in response to either TMS or finger-tapping correlated well using the cortical surface orientation angle or distance to scalp (P < 0.001 for both) as criteria for comparison between different neocortical activation modalities. This study provides further evidence that a major factor in cortical activation using TMS is the orientation of the cortical surface with respect to the induced electric field. The results show that, despite the gyral crown of the cortex being subjected to a larger magnetic field magnitude, the sulcal bank of M1 had larger cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses during TMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    PubMed Central

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Chung, Jun Young; Biggins, John S.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain—the cerebral cortex—has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highly convoluted. Furthermore, this dependence on two simple geometric parameters that characterize the brain also allows us to qualitatively explain how variations in these parameters lead to anatomical anomalies in such situations as polymicrogyria, pachygyria, and lissencephalia. PMID:25136099

  6. Pusher syndrome: its cortical correlate.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Janzen, Jelena; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Fechir, Marcel; Müller, Notger; Dieterich, Marianne

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral stroke can lead to a disorder of postural balance that manifests as a pushing away toward the contralesional side. It is called "pusher syndrome" (PS). The aims of this study were first to assess the anatomical cortical regions that induce PS and second to clarify whether tilt of the subjective visual vertical (SVV)--a sign of vestibular otolith dysfunction--is associated with PS. Sixty-six patients with acute unilateral strokes (28 left-sided lesions, 38 right-sided lesions) were tested for PS, for tilts of the SVV, for hemineglect and for the anatomical lesion site by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based voxelwise lesion-behavior mapping analysis. Our data indicated no significant voxels; however, there was a trend towards an association between lesions of the posterior part of the insula, the operculum and the superior temporal gyrus--key areas of the multisensory vestibular cortical network--and the extent of pushing in patients with right-sided lesions, whereas the rather anterior part of the insula, the operculum as well as the internal capsule reaching to the lateral thalamus seemed to be involved in PS in left-sided lesion patients. These data might point toward a link between the systems responsible for postural control and for processing vestibular otolith information. These findings indicate that vestibular information might be fundamental in right-sided lesion patients for maintaining body posture in space.

  7. Cortical control of facial expression.

    PubMed

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system.

  8. Cortical Specializations Underlying Fast Computations.

    PubMed

    Volgushev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The time course of behaviorally relevant environmental events sets temporal constraints on neuronal processing. How does the mammalian brain make use of the increasingly complex networks of the neocortex, while making decisions and executing behavioral reactions within a reasonable time? The key parameter determining the speed of computations in neuronal networks is a time interval that neuronal ensembles need to process changes at their input and communicate results of this processing to downstream neurons. Theoretical analysis identified basic requirements for fast processing: use of neuronal populations for encoding, background activity, and fast onset dynamics of action potentials in neurons. Experimental evidence shows that populations of neocortical neurons fulfil these requirements. Indeed, they can change firing rate in response to input perturbations very quickly, within 1 to 3 ms, and encode high-frequency components of the input by phase-locking their spiking to frequencies up to 300 to 1000 Hz. This implies that time unit of computations by cortical ensembles is only few, 1 to 3 ms, which is considerably faster than the membrane time constant of individual neurons. The ability of cortical neuronal ensembles to communicate on a millisecond time scale allows for complex, multiple-step processing and precise coordination of neuronal activity in parallel processing streams, while keeping the speed of behavioral reactions within environmentally set temporal constraints.

  9. Cortical thickness in untreated transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Junque, Carme; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Segovia, Santiago; Carrillo, Beatriz; Rametti, Giuseppina; Guillamon, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Sex differences in cortical thickness (CTh) have been extensively investigated but as yet there are no reports on CTh in transsexuals. Our aim was to determine whether the CTh pattern in transsexuals before hormonal treatment follows their biological sex or their gender identity. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging on 94 subjects: 24 untreated female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs), 18 untreated male-to-female transsexuals (MtFs), and 29 male and 23 female controls in a 3-T TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed to obtain CTh and volumetric subcortical measurements with FreeSurfer software. CTh maps showed control females have thicker cortex than control males in the frontal and parietal regions. In contrast, males have greater right putamen volume. FtMs had a similar CTh to control females and greater CTh than males in the parietal and temporal cortices. FtMs had larger right putamen than females but did not differ from males. MtFs did not differ in CTh from female controls but had greater CTh than control males in the orbitofrontal, insular, and medial occipital regions. In conclusion, FtMs showed evidence of subcortical gray matter masculinization, while MtFs showed evidence of CTh feminization. In both types of transsexuals, the differences with respect to their biological sex are located in the right hemisphere.

  10. Linking contemporary high resolution magnetic resonance imaging to the von Economo legacy: A study on the comparison of MRI cortical thickness and histological measurements of cortical structure.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Lianne H; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2015-08-01

    The cerebral cortex is a distinctive part of the mammalian nervous system, displaying a spatial variety in cyto-, chemico-, and myelinoarchitecture. As part of a rich history of histological findings, pioneering anatomists von Economo and Koskinas provided detailed mappings on the cellular structure of the human cortex, reporting on quantitative aspects of cytoarchitecture of cortical areas. Current day investigations into the structure of human cortex have embraced technological advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess macroscale thickness and organization of the cortical mantle in vivo. However, direct comparisons between current day MRI estimates and the quantitative measurements of early anatomists have been limited. Here, we report on a simple, but nevertheless important cross-analysis between the histological reports of von Economo and Koskinas on variation in thickness of the cortical mantle and MRI derived measurements of cortical thickness. We translated the von Economo cortical atlas to a subdivision of the commonly used Desikan-Killiany atlas (as part of the FreeSurfer Software package and a commonly used parcellation atlas in studies examining MRI cortical thickness). Next, values of "width of the cortical mantle" as provided by the measurements of von Economo and Koskinas were correlated to cortical thickness measurements derived from high-resolution anatomical MRI T1 data of 200+ subjects of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Cross-correlation revealed a significant association between group-averaged MRI measurements of cortical thickness and histological recordings (r = 0.54, P < 0.001). Further validating such a correlation, we manually segmented the von Economo parcellation atlas on the standardized Colin27 brain dataset and applied the obtained three-dimensional von Economo segmentation atlas to the T1 data of each of the HCP subjects. Highly consistent with our findings for the mapping to the Desikan-Killiany regions, cross

  11. Oscillatory Hierarchy Controlling Cortical Excitability and Stimulus Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; McGinnis, T.; O'Connell, N.; Mills, A.; Knuth, K. H.; Chen, C.; Karmos, G.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations have been recorded in sensory cortices of cats and monkeys, and are thought to aid in perceptual binding. Gamma activity has also been recorded in the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, where it has been shown, that field gamma power is modulated at theta frequency. Since the power of gamma activity in the sensory cortices is not constant (gamma-bursts). we decided to examine the relationship between gamma power and the phase of low frequency oscillation in the auditory cortex of the awake macaque. Macaque monkeys were surgically prepared for chronic awake electrophysiological recording. During the time of the experiments. linear array multielectrodes were inserted in area AI to obtain laminar current source density (CSD) and multiunit activity profiles. Instantaneous theta and gamma power and phase was extracted by applying the Morlet wavelet transformation to the CSD. Gamma power was averaged for every 1 degree of low frequency oscillations to calculate power-phase relation. Both gamma and theta-delta power are largest in the supragranular layers. Power modulation of gamma activity is phase locked to spontaneous, as well as stimulus-related local theta and delta field oscillations. Our analysis also revealed that the power of theta oscillations is always largest at a certain phase of delta oscillation. Auditory stimuli produce evoked responses in the theta band (Le., there is pre- to post-stimulus addition of theta power), but there is also indication that stimuli may cause partial phase re-setting of spontaneous delta (and thus also theta and gamma) oscillations. We also show that spontaneous oscillations might play a role in the processing of incoming sensory signals by 'preparing' the cortex.

  12. Interactions between thalamic and cortical rhythms during semantic memory recall in human

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Scott D.; Moo, Lauren R.; Kraut, Michael A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Hart, John

    2002-01-01

    Human scalp electroencephalographic rhythms, indicative of cortical population synchrony, have long been posited to reflect cognitive processing. Although numerous studies employing simultaneous thalamic and cortical electrode recording in nonhuman animals have explored the role of the thalamus in the modulation of cortical rhythms, direct evidence for thalamocortical modulation in human has not, to our knowledge, been obtained. We simultaneously recorded from thalamic and scalp electrodes in one human during performance of a cognitive task and found a spatially widespread, phase-locked, low-frequency rhythm (7–8 Hz) power decrease at thalamus and scalp during semantic memory recall. This low-frequency rhythm power decrease was followed by a spatially specific, phase-locked, fast-rhythm (21–34 Hz) power increase at thalamus and occipital scalp. Such a pattern of thalamocortical activity reflects a plausible neural mechanism underlying semantic memory recall that may underlie other cognitive processes as well. PMID:11972063

  13. Intraoperative imaging of cortical cerebral perfusion by time-resolved thermography and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerald; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to cortical perfusion imaging is demonstrated using high-sensitivity thermography in conjunction with multivariate statistical data analysis. Local temperature changes caused by a cold bolus are imaged and transferred to a false color image. A cold bolus of 10 ml saline at ice temperature is injected systemically via a central venous access. During the injection, a sequence of 735 thermographic images are recorded within 2 min. The recorded data cube is subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) to select slight changes of the cortical temperature caused by the cold bolus. PCA reveals that 11 s after injection the temperature of blood vessels is shortly decreased followed by an increase to the temperature before the cold bolus is injected. We demonstrate the potential of intraoperative thermography in combination with multivariate data analysis to image cortical cerebral perfusion without any markers. We provide the first in vivo application of multivariate thermographic imaging.

  14. Dynamics of auditory cortical activity during behavioural engagement and auditory perception

    PubMed Central

    Carcea, Ioana; Insanally, Michele N.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural engagement can enhance sensory perception. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which behavioural states affect stimulus perception remain poorly understood. Here we record from single units in auditory cortex of rats performing a self-initiated go/no-go auditory task. Self-initiation transforms cortical tuning curves and bidirectionally modulates stimulus-evoked activity patterns and improves auditory detection and recognition. Trial self-initiation decreases the rate of spontaneous activity in the majority of recorded cells. Optogenetic disruption of cortical activity before and during tone presentation shows that these changes in evoked and spontaneous activity are important for sound perception. Thus, behavioural engagement can prepare cortical circuits for sensory processing by dynamically changing sound representation and by controlling the pattern of spontaneous activity. PMID:28176787

  15. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole; Ostrem, Jill L.; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S.; Luciano, Marta San; Galifianakis, Nicholas; Starr, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied to the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the β rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive β phase locking of motor cortex neurons. PMID:25867121

  16. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole C; Ostrem, Jill L; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S; San Luciano, Marta; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Starr, Philip A

    2015-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied for the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients, neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the beta rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as that of the reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive beta phase locking of motor cortex neurons.

  17. Dynamics of auditory cortical activity during behavioural engagement and auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Carcea, Ioana; Insanally, Michele N; Froemke, Robert C

    2017-02-08

    Behavioural engagement can enhance sensory perception. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which behavioural states affect stimulus perception remain poorly understood. Here we record from single units in auditory cortex of rats performing a self-initiated go/no-go auditory task. Self-initiation transforms cortical tuning curves and bidirectionally modulates stimulus-evoked activity patterns and improves auditory detection and recognition. Trial self-initiation decreases the rate of spontaneous activity in the majority of recorded cells. Optogenetic disruption of cortical activity before and during tone presentation shows that these changes in evoked and spontaneous activity are important for sound perception. Thus, behavioural engagement can prepare cortical circuits for sensory processing by dynamically changing sound representation and by controlling the pattern of spontaneous activity.

  18. Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Wagstyl, Konrad; Ronan, Lisa; Goodyer, Ian M.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    MRI, enabling in vivo analysis of cortical morphology, offers a powerful tool in the assessment of brain development and pathology. One of the most ubiquitous measures used—the thickness of the cortex—shows abnormalities in a number of diseases and conditions, but the functional and biological correlates of such alterations are unclear. If the functional connotations of structural MRI measures are to be understood, we must strive to clarify the relationship between measures such as cortical thickness and their cytoarchitectural determinants. We therefore sought to determine whether patterns of cortical thickness mirror a key motif of the cortex, specifically its structural hierarchical organisation. We delineated three sensory hierarchies (visual, somatosensory and auditory) in two species—macaque and human—and explored whether cortical thickness was correlated with specific cytoarchitectural characteristics. Importantly, we controlled for cortical folding which impacts upon thickness and may obscure regional differences. Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex. We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure–function relationships. The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:25725468

  19. Temporal accuracy of human cortico-cortical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The precision in space and time of interactions among multiple cortical sites was evaluated by examining repeating precise spatiotemporal patterns of instances in which cortical currents showed brief amplitude undulations. The amplitudes of the cortical current dipoles were estimated by applying a variant of synthetic aperture magnetometry to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of subjects tapping to metric auditory rhythms of drum beats. Brief amplitude undulations were detected in the currents by template matching at a rate of 2–3 per second. Their timing was treated as point processes, and precise spatiotemporal patterns were searched for. By randomly teetering these point processes within a time window W, we estimated the accuracy of the timing of these brief amplitude undulations and compared the results with those obtained by applying the same analysis to traces composed of random numbers. The results demonstrated that the timing accuracy of patterns was better than 3 ms. Successful classification of two different cognitive processes based on these patterns suggests that at least some of the repeating patterns are specific to a cognitive process. PMID:26843604

  20. Broadband cortical desynchronization underlies the human psychedelic state.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Moran, Rosalyn J; Brookes, Matthew J; Williams, Tim M; Errtizoe, David; Sessa, Ben; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Bolstridge, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Feilding, Amanda; Friston, Karl J; Nutt, David J

    2013-09-18

    Psychedelic drugs produce profound changes in consciousness, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms for this remain unclear. Spontaneous and induced oscillatory activity was recorded in healthy human participants with magnetoencephalography after intravenous infusion of psilocybin--prodrug of the nonselective serotonin 2A receptor agonist and classic psychedelic psilocin. Psilocybin reduced spontaneous cortical oscillatory power from 1 to 50 Hz in posterior association cortices, and from 8 to 100 Hz in frontal association cortices. Large decreases in oscillatory power were seen in areas of the default-mode network. Independent component analysis was used to identify a number of resting-state networks, and activity in these was similarly decreased after psilocybin. Psilocybin had no effect on low-level visually induced and motor-induced gamma-band oscillations, suggesting that some basic elements of oscillatory brain activity are relatively preserved during the psychedelic experience. Dynamic causal modeling revealed that posterior cingulate cortex desynchronization can be explained by increased excitability of deep-layer pyramidal neurons, which are known to be rich in 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that the subjective effects of psychedelics result from a desynchronization of ongoing oscillatory rhythms in the cortex, likely triggered by 5-HT2A receptor-mediated excitation of deep pyramidal cells.

  1. Cortical development, electroencephalogram rhythms, and the sleep/wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-06-15

    During adulthood, electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are used to distinguish wake, non-rapid eye movement sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep states. The close association between behavioral states and EEG rhythms is reached late during development, after birth in humans and by the end of the second postnatal week in rats and mice. This critical time is also when cortical activity switches from a discontinuous to a continuous pattern. We review the major cellular and network changes that can account for this transition. After this close link is established, new evidence suggests that the slow waves of non-rapid eye movement sleep may function as markers to track cortical development. However, before the EEG can be used to identify behavioral states, two distinct sleep phases--quiet sleep and active sleep--are identified based on behavioral criteria and muscle activity. During this early phase of development, cortical activity is far from being disorganized, despite the presence of long periods of neuronal silence and the poor modulation by behavioral states. Specific EEG patterns, such as spindle bursts and gamma oscillations, have been identified very early on and are believed to play a significant role in the refinement of brain circuits. Because most early EEG patterns do not map to a specific behavioral state, their contribution to the presumptive role of sleep in brain maturation remains to be established and should be a major focus for future research.

  2. Circadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah L.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Ly, Julien Q. M.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Borsu, Chloé; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Massimini, Marcello; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe; Moran, Rosalyn J.; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders have recently been characterized as dysfunctions arising from a ‘final common pathway’ of imbalanced excitation to inhibition within cortical networks. How the regulation of a cortical E/I ratio is affected by sleep and the circadian rhythm however, remains to be established. Here we addressed this issue through the analyses of TMS-evoked responses recorded over a 29 h sleep deprivation protocol conducted in young and healthy volunteers. Spectral analyses of TMS-evoked responses in frontal cortex revealed non-linear changes in gamma band evoked oscillations, compatible with an influence of circadian timing on inhibitory interneuron activity. In silico inferences of cell-to-cell excitatory and inhibitory connectivity and GABA/Glutamate receptor time constant based on neural mass modeling within the Dynamic causal modeling framework, further suggested excitation/inhibition balance was under a strong circadian influence. These results indicate that circadian changes in EEG spectral properties, in measure of excitatory/inhibitory connectivity and in GABA/glutamate receptor function could support the maintenance of cognitive performance during a normal waking day, but also during overnight wakefulness. More generally, these findings demonstrate a slow daily regulation of cortical excitation/inhibition balance, which depends on circadian-timing and prior sleep-wake history. PMID:27651114

  3. Plasticity of recurring spatiotemporal activity patterns in cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Radhika; Chao, Zenas C.; Potter, Steve M.

    2007-09-01

    How do neurons encode and store information for long periods of time? Recurring patterns of activity have been reported in various cortical structures and were suggested to play a role in information processing and memory. To study the potential role of bursts of action potentials in memory mechanisms, we investigated patterns of spontaneous multi-single-unit activity in dissociated rat cortical cultures in vitro. Spontaneous spikes were recorded from networks of approximately 50 000 neurons and glia cultured on a grid of 60 extracellular substrate- embedded electrodes (multi-electrode arrays). These networks expressed spontaneous culture- wide bursting from approximately one week in vitro. During bursts, a large portion of the active electrodes showed elevated levels of firing. Spatiotemporal activity patterns within spontaneous bursts were clustered using a correlation-based clustering algorithm, and the occurrences of these burst clusters were tracked over several hours. This analysis revealed spatiotemporally diverse bursts occurring in well-defined patterns, which remained stable for several hours. Activity evoked by strong local tetanic stimulation resulted in significant changes in the occurrences of spontaneous bursts belonging to different clusters, indicating that the dynamical flow of information in the neuronal network had been altered. The diversity of spatiotemporal structure and long-term stability of spontaneous bursts together with their plastic nature strongly suggests that such network patterns could be used as codes for information transfer and the expression of memories stored in cortical networks.

  4. Temporomandibular disorder modifies cortical response to tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Mary Beth; Folger, Stephen; Tommerdahl, Mark; Hollins, Mark; McGlone, Francis; Essick, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) suffer from persistent facial pain and exhibit abnormal sensitivity to tactile stimulation. To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying TMD, we investigated cortical correlates of this abnormal sensitivity to touch. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recorded cortical responses evoked by low frequency vibration of the index finger in subjects with TMD and in healthy controls (HC). Distinct subregions of contralateral SI, SII, and insular cortex responded maximally for each group. Although the stimulus was inaudible, primary auditory cortex was activated in TMDs. TMDs also showed greater activation bilaterally in anterior cingulate cortex and contralaterally in the amygdala. Differences between TMDs and HCs in responses evoked by innocuous vibrotactile stimulation within SI, SII, and the insula paralleled previously reported differences in responses evoked by noxious and innocuous stimulation, respectively, in healthy individuals. This unexpected result may reflect a disruption of the normal balance between central resources dedicated to processing innocuous and noxious input, manifesting itself as increased readiness of the pain matrix for activation by even innocuous input. Activation of the amygdala in our TMD group could reflect the establishment of aversive associations with tactile stimulation due to the persistence of pain. Perspective This article presents evidence that central processing of innocuous tactile stimulation is abnormal in TMD. Understanding the complexity of sensory disruption in chronic pain could lead to improved methods for assessing cerebral cortical function in these patients. PMID:20462805

  5. Global Neuromagnetic Cortical Fields Have Non-Zero Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David M.; Nikolaev, Andrey R.; Jurica, Peter; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Mathiak, Klaus; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Globally coherent patterns of phase can be obscured by analysis techniques that aggregate brain activity measures across-trials, whether prior to source localization or for estimating inter-areal coherence. We analyzed, at single-trial level, whole head MEG recorded during an observer-triggered apparent motion task. Episodes of globally coherent activity occurred in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands of the signal in the form of large-scale waves, which propagated with a variety of velocities. Their mean speed at each frequency band was proportional to temporal frequency, giving a range of 0.06 to 4.0 m/s, from delta to beta. The wave peaks moved over the entire measurement array, during both ongoing activity and task-relevant intervals; direction of motion was more predictable during the latter. A large proportion of the cortical signal, measurable at the scalp, exists as large-scale coherent motion. We argue that the distribution of observable phase velocities in MEG is dominated by spatial filtering considerations in combination with group velocity of cortical activity. Traveling waves may index processes involved in global coordination of cortical activity. PMID:26953886

  6. Diverse cortical codes for scene segmentation in primate auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Malone, Brian J; Scott, Brian H; Semple, Malcolm N

    2015-04-01

    The temporal coherence of amplitude fluctuations is a critical cue for segmentation of complex auditory scenes. The auditory system must accurately demarcate the onsets and offsets of acoustic signals. We explored how and how well the timing of onsets and offsets of gated tones are encoded by auditory cortical neurons in awake rhesus macaques. Temporal features of this representation were isolated by presenting otherwise identical pure tones of differing durations. Cortical response patterns were diverse, including selective encoding of onset and offset transients, tonic firing, and sustained suppression. Spike train classification methods revealed that many neurons robustly encoded tone duration despite substantial diversity in the encoding process. Excellent discrimination performance was achieved by neurons whose responses were primarily phasic at tone offset and by those that responded robustly while the tone persisted. Although diverse cortical response patterns converged on effective duration discrimination, this diversity significantly constrained the utility of decoding models referenced to a spiking pattern averaged across all responses or averaged within the same response category. Using maximum likelihood-based decoding models, we demonstrated that the spike train recorded in a single trial could support direct estimation of stimulus onset and offset. Comparisons between different decoding models established the substantial contribution of bursts of activity at sound onset and offset to demarcating the temporal boundaries of gated tones. Our results indicate that relatively few neurons suffice to provide temporally precise estimates of such auditory "edges," particularly for models that assume and exploit the heterogeneity of neural responses in awake cortex.

  7. Delayed and Temporally Imprecise Neurotransmission in Reorganizing Cortical Microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Samuel J.; Cheetham, Claire E.; Liu, Yan; Bennett, Sophie H.; Albieri, Giorgia; Jorstad, Anne A.; Knott, Graham W.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission is modified at cortical connections throughout life. Varying the amplitude of the postsynaptic response is one mechanism that generates flexible signaling in neural circuits. The timing of the synaptic response may also play a role. Here, we investigated whether weakening and loss of an entire connection between excitatory cortical neurons was foreshadowed in the timing of the postsynaptic response. We made electrophysiological recordings in rat primary somatosensory cortex that was undergoing experience-dependent loss of complete local excitatory connections. The synaptic latency of pyramid–pyramid connections, which typically comprise multiple synapses, was longer and more variable. Connection strength and latency were not correlated. Instead, prolonged latency was more closely related to progression of connection loss. The action potential waveform and axonal conduction velocity were unaffected, suggesting that the altered timing of neurotransmission was attributable to a synaptic mechanism. Modeling studies indicated that increasing the latency and jitter at a subset of synapses reduced the number of action potentials fired by a postsynaptic neuron. We propose that prolonged synaptic latency and diminished temporal precision of neurotransmission are hallmarks of impending loss of a cortical connection. PMID:26085628

  8. The up and down states of cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Maryam; Levine, Alex J.; Mehta, Mayank; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2011-03-01

    The cortical networks show a collective activity of alternating active and silent states known as up and down states during slow wave sleep or anesthesia. The mechanism of this spontaneous activity as well as the anesthesia or sleep are still not clear. Here, using a mean field approach, we present a simple model to study the spontaneous activity of a homogenous cortical network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that are recurrently connected. A key new ingredient in this model is that the activity-dependant synaptic depression is considered only for the excitatory neurons. We find depending on the strength of the synaptic depression and synaptic efficacies, the phase space contains strange attractors or stable fixed points at active or quiescent regimes. At the strange attractor phase, we can have oscillations similar to up and down states with flat and noisy up states. Moreover, we show that by increasing the synaptic efficacy corresponding to the connections between the excitatory neurons, the characteristics of the up and down states change in agreement with the changes that we observe in the intracellular recordings of the membrane potential from the entorhinal cortex by varying the depth of anesthesia. Thus, we propose that by measuring the value of this synaptic efficacy, one can quantify the depth of anesthesia which is clinically very important. These findings provide a simple, analytical understanding of the spontaneous cortical dynamics.

  9. Modeling Higher-Order Correlations within Cortical Microcolumns

    PubMed Central

    Köster, Urs; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha; Gray, Charles M.; Olshausen, Bruno A.

    2014-01-01

    We statistically characterize the population spiking activity obtained from simultaneous recordings of neurons across all layers of a cortical microcolumn. Three types of models are compared: an Ising model which captures pairwise correlations between units, a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM) which allows for modeling of higher-order correlations, and a semi-Restricted Boltzmann Machine which is a combination of Ising and RBM models. Model parameters were estimated in a fast and efficient manner using minimum probability flow, and log likelihoods were compared using annealed importance sampling. The higher-order models reveal localized activity patterns which reflect the laminar organization of neurons within a cortical column. The higher-order models also outperformed the Ising model in log-likelihood: On populations of 20 cells, the RBM had 10% higher log-likelihood (relative to an independent model) than a pairwise model, increasing to 45% gain in a larger network with 100 spatiotemporal elements, consisting of 10 neurons over 10 time steps. We further removed the need to model stimulus-induced correlations by incorporating a peri-stimulus time histogram term, in which case the higher order models continued to perform best. These results demonstrate the importance of higher-order interactions to describe the structure of correlated activity in cortical networks. Boltzmann Machines with hidden units provide a succinct and effective way to capture these dependencies without increasing the difficulty of model estimation and evaluation. PMID:24991969

  10. Modeling higher-order correlations within cortical microcolumns.

    PubMed

    Köster, Urs; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha; Gray, Charles M; Olshausen, Bruno A

    2014-07-01

    We statistically characterize the population spiking activity obtained from simultaneous recordings of neurons across all layers of a cortical microcolumn. Three types of models are compared: an Ising model which captures pairwise correlations between units, a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM) which allows for modeling of higher-order correlations, and a semi-Restricted Boltzmann Machine which is a combination of Ising and RBM models. Model parameters were estimated in a fast and efficient manner using minimum probability flow, and log likelihoods were compared using annealed importance sampling. The higher-order models reveal localized activity patterns which reflect the laminar organization of neurons within a cortical column. The higher-order models also outperformed the Ising model in log-likelihood: On populations of 20 cells, the RBM had 10% higher log-likelihood (relative to an independent model) than a pairwise model, increasing to 45% gain in a larger network with 100 spatiotemporal elements, consisting of 10 neurons over 10 time steps. We further removed the need to model stimulus-induced correlations by incorporating a peri-stimulus time histogram term, in which case the higher order models continued to perform best. These results demonstrate the importance of higher-order interactions to describe the structure of correlated activity in cortical networks. Boltzmann Machines with hidden units provide a succinct and effective way to capture these dependencies without increasing the difficulty of model estimation and evaluation.

  11. Cortical myoclonus during IV thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bentes, Carla; Peralta, Rita; Viana, Pedro; Morgado, Carlos; Melo, Teresa P.; Ferro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient with an acute middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke developing subtle involuntary movements of the paretic upper limb with cortical origin during rt-PA perfusion. Despite the multiple potential pathophysiological mechanisms for the relationship between thrombolysis and epileptic activity, seizures during this procedure are scarcely reported. Our hypothesis is that subtle and transient clinical seizures, like those described in our patient, may not be detected or are misdiagnosed as nonepileptic involuntary movements. We aimed to draw attention to the recognition challenge of this paroxysmal motor behavior, highlighting this clinical and neurophysiological identification using video recording and back-average analysis of the EEG. PMID:25667903

  12. Cortical Odor Processing in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.; Xu, Wenjin; Sadrian, Benjamin; Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Cohen, Yaniv; Barnes, Dylan C.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a rich cortical representation, including a large archicortical component present in most vertebrates, and in mammals neocortical components including the entorhinal and orbitofrontal cortices. Together, these cortical components contribute to normal odor perception and memory. They help transform the physicochemical features of volatile molecules inhaled or exhaled through the nose into the perception of odor objects with rich associative and hedonic aspects. This chapter focuses on how olfactory cortical areas contribute to odor perception and begins to explore why odor perception is so sensitive to disease and pathology. Odor perception is disrupted by a wide range of disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, depression, autism, and early life exposure to toxins. This olfactory deficit often occurs despite maintained functioning in other sensory systems. Does the unusual network of olfactory cortical structures contribute to this sensitivity? PMID:24767487

  13. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    PubMed

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas

    The convolutions of the human brain are a symbol of its functional complexity. But how does the outer surface of the brain, the layered cortex of neuronal gray matter get its folds? In this talk, we ask to which extent folding of the brain can be explained as a purely mechanical consequence of unpatterned growth of the cortical layer relative to the sublayers. Modeling the growing brain as a soft layered solid leads to elastic instabilities and the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri consistent with observations across species in both normal and pathological situations. Furthermore, we apply initial geometries obtained from fetal brain MRI to address the question of how the brain geometry and folding patterns may be coupled via mechanics.

  15. Cortical Cartography and Caret Software

    PubMed Central

    Van Essen, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret’s development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping – from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret’s distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. PMID:22062192

  16. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features. PMID:27413248

  17. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  18. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  19. Stimulus Dependence of Correlated Variability across Cortical Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Douglas A; Cohen, Marlene R

    2016-07-13

    The way that correlated trial-to-trial variability between pairs of neurons in the same brain area (termed spike count or noise correlation, rSC) depends on stimulus or task conditions can constrain models of cortical circuits and of the computations performed by networks of neurons (Cohen and Kohn, 2011). In visual cortex, rSC tends not to depend on stimulus properties (Kohn and Smith, 2005; Huang and Lisberger, 2009) but does depend on cognitive factors like visual attention (Cohen and Maunsell, 2009; Mitchell et al., 2009). However, neurons across visual areas respond to any visual stimulus or contribute to any perceptual decision, and the way that information from multiple areas is combined to guide perception is unknown. To gain insight into these issues, we recorded simultaneously from neurons in two areas of visual cortex (primary visual cortex, V1, and the middle temporal area, MT) while rhesus monkeys viewed different visual stimuli in different attention conditions. We found that correlations between neurons in different areas depend on stimulus and attention conditions in very different ways than do correlations within an area. Correlations across, but not within, areas depend on stimulus direction and the presence of a second stimulus, and attention has opposite effects on correlations within and across areas. This observed pattern of cross-area correlations is predicted by a normalization model where MT units sum V1 inputs that are passed through a divisive nonlinearity. Together, our results provide insight into how neurons in different areas interact and constrain models of the neural computations performed across cortical areas. Correlations in the responses of pairs of neurons within the same cortical area have been a subject of growing interest in systems neuroscience. However, correlated variability between different cortical areas is likely just as important. We recorded simultaneously from neurons in primary visual cortex and the middle

  20. Stimulus Dependence of Correlated Variability across Cortical Areas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene R.

    2016-01-01

    The way that correlated trial-to-trial variability between pairs of neurons in the same brain area (termed spike count or noise correlation, rSC) depends on stimulus or task conditions can constrain models of cortical circuits and of the computations performed by networks of neurons (Cohen and Kohn, 2011). In visual cortex, rSC tends not to depend on stimulus properties (Kohn and Smith, 2005; Huang and Lisberger, 2009) but does depend on cognitive factors like visual attention (Cohen and Maunsell, 2009; Mitchell et al., 2009). However, neurons across visual areas respond to any visual stimulus or contribute to any perceptual decision, and the way that information from multiple areas is combined to guide perception is unknown. To gain insight into these issues, we recorded simultaneously from neurons in two areas of visual cortex (primary visual cortex, V1, and the middle temporal area, MT) while rhesus monkeys viewed different visual stimuli in different attention conditions. We found that correlations between neurons in different areas depend on stimulus and attention conditions in very different ways than do correlations within an area. Correlations across, but not within, areas depend on stimulus direction and the presence of a second stimulus, and attention has opposite effects on correlations within and across areas. This observed pattern of cross-area correlations is predicted by a normalization model where MT units sum V1 inputs that are passed through a divisive nonlinearity. Together, our results provide insight into how neurons in different areas interact and constrain models of the neural computations performed across cortical areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Correlations in the responses of pairs of neurons within the same cortical area have been a subject of growing interest in systems neuroscience. However, correlated variability between different cortical areas is likely just as important. We recorded simultaneously from neurons in primary visual cortex

  1. Presymptomatic cortical thinning in familial Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Lehmann, Manja; Ryan, Natalie S.; Liang, Yuying; Macpherson, Kirsty; Modat, Marc; Rossor, Martin N.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a cortical signature pattern of cortical thinning in familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and assess its utility in detecting and tracking presymptomatic neurodegeneration. Methods: We recruited 43 FAD mutation carriers—36 PSEN1, 7 APP (20 symptomatic, 23 presymptomatic)—and 42 healthy controls to a longitudinal clinical and MRI study. T1-weighted MRI scans were acquired at baseline in all participants; 55 individuals (33 mutation carriers; 22 controls) had multiple (mean 2.9) follow-up scans approximately annually. Cortical thickness was measured using FreeSurfer. A cortical thinning signature was identified from symptomatic FAD participants. We then examined cortical thickness changes in this signature region in presymptomatic carriers and assessed associations with cognitive performance. Results: The cortical signature included 6 regions: entorhinal cortex, inferior parietal cortex, precuneus, superior parietal cortex, superior frontal cortex, and supramarginal gyrus. There were significant differences in mean cortical signature thickness between mutation carriers and controls 3 years before predicted symptom onset. The earliest significant difference in a single region, detectable 4 years preonset, was in the precuneus. Rate of change in cortical thickness became significantly different in the cortical signature at 5 years before predicted onset, and in the precuneus at 8 years preonset. Baseline mean signature thickness predicted rate of subsequent thinning and correlated with presymptomatic cognitive change. Conclusions: The FAD cortical signature appears to be similar to that described for sporadic AD. All component regions showed significant presymptomatic thinning. A composite signature may provide more robust results than a single region and have utility as an outcome measure in presymptomatic trials. PMID:27733562

  2. Acute effects of electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate in the cat: an evaluation of safety.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, J A; Flecknell, P A; Kenyon, B R; Koh, T H; Miller, S

    1990-01-01

    The influence of repeated high intensity electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate has been investigated in the cat, to evaluate the safety of the method. The observations have been made in preparations under propofol anaesthesia before, during and after periods of anoxia. Electromagnetic stimulation of the brain evoked activity in descending motor pathways and was recorded by activity in the median nerve and by muscle twitches. Following repeated series of high intensity stimulation there were no systematic changes in somatosensory evoked potentials or background EEG, nor were there signs of epileptogenic activity during electromagnetic stimulation, before, during or after periods of anoxia. No systematic changes in cortical blood flow, blood pressure or heart rate were observed during electromagnetic stimulation, before or after periods of anoxia. In conclusion, no acute adverse consequences following electromagnetic stimulation in the normal and anoxic cat brain were demonstrated. PMID:2380732

  3. Modeling the effect of locus coeruleus firing on cortical state dynamics and single-trial sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Safaai, Houman; Neves, Ricardo; Eschenko, Oxana; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal responses to sensory stimuli are not only driven by feedforward sensory pathways but also depend upon intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation. To understand how these factors together regulate cortical dynamics, we recorded simultaneously spontaneous and somatosensory-evoked multiunit activity from primary somatosensory cortex and from the locus coeruleus (LC) (the neuromodulatory nucleus releasing norepinephrine) in urethane-anesthetized rats. We found that bursts of ipsilateral-LC firing preceded by few tens of milliseconds increases of cortical excitability, and that the 1- to 10-Hz rhythmicity of LC discharge appeared to increase the power of delta-band (1–4 Hz) cortical synchronization. To investigate quantitatively how LC firing might causally influence spontaneous and stimulus-driven cortical dynamics, we then constructed and fitted to these data a model describing the dynamical interaction of stimulus drive, ongoing synchronized cortical activity, and noradrenergic neuromodulation. The model proposes a coupling between LC and cortex that can amplify delta-range cortical fluctuations, and shows how suitably timed phasic LC bursts can lead to enhanced cortical responses to weaker stimuli and increased temporal precision of cortical stimulus-evoked responses. Thus, the temporal structure of noradrenergic modulation may selectively and dynamically enhance or attenuate cortical responses to stimuli. Finally, using the model prediction of single-trial cortical stimulus-evoked responses to discount single-trial state-dependent variability increased by ∼70% the sensory information extracted from cortical responses. This suggests that downstream circuits may extract information more effectively after estimating the state of the circuit transmitting the sensory message. PMID:26417078

  4. TDCS increases cortical excitability: direct evidence from TMS-EEG.

    PubMed

    Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Rosanova, Mario; Mattavelli, Giulia; Convento, Silvia; Pisoni, Alberto; Opitz, Alexander; Bolognini, Nadia; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Despite transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly used in experimental and clinical settings, its precise mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. At a neuronal level, tDCS modulates the resting membrane potential in a polarity-dependent fashion: anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability in the stimulated region, while cathodal decreases it. So far, the neurophysiological underpinnings of the immediate and delayed effects of tDCS, and to what extent the stimulation of a given cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions, remain unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electroencephalography (EEG) in order to explore local and global cortical excitability modulation during and after active and sham tDCS. Single pulse TMS was delivered over the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC), before, during, and after 15 min of tDCS over the right PPC, while EEG was recorded from 60 channels. For each session, indexes of global and local cerebral excitability were obtained, computed as global and local mean field power (Global Mean Field Power, GMFP and Local Mean Field Power, LMFP) on mean TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) for three temporal windows: 0-50, 50-100, and 100-150 msec. The global index was computed on all 60 channels. The local indexes were computed in six clusters of electrodes: left and right in frontal, parietal and temporal regions. GMFP increased, compared to baseline, both during and after active tDCS in the 0-100 msec temporal window. LMFP increased after the end of stimulation in parietal and frontal clusters bilaterally, while no difference was found in the temporal clusters. In sum, a diffuse rise of cortical excitability occurred, both during and after active tDCS. This evidence highlights the spreading of the effects of anodal tDCS over remote cortical regions of stimulated and contralateral hemispheres.

  5. Individual Movement Variability Magnitudes Are Explained by Cortical Neural Variability.

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Donchin, Opher; Dinstein, Ilan

    2017-09-13

    Humans exhibit considerable motor variability even across trivial reaching movements. This variability can be separated into specific kinematic components such as extent and direction that are thought to be governed by distinct neural processes. Here, we report that individual subjects (males and females) exhibit different magnitudes of kinematic variability, which are consistent (within individual) across movements to different targets and regardless of which arm (right or left) was used to perform the movements. Simultaneous fMRI recordings revealed that the same subjects also exhibited different magnitudes of fMRI variability across movements in a variety of motor system areas. These fMRI variability magnitudes were also consistent across movements to different targets when performed with either arm. Cortical fMRI variability in the posterior-parietal cortex of individual subjects explained their movement-extent variability. This relationship was apparent only in posterior-parietal cortex and not in other motor system areas, thereby suggesting that individuals with more variable movement preparation exhibit larger kinematic variability. We therefore propose that neural and kinematic variability are reliable and interrelated individual characteristics that may predispose individual subjects to exhibit distinct motor capabilities.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural activity and movement kinematics are remarkably variable. Although intertrial variability is rarely studied, here, we demonstrate that individual human subjects exhibit distinct magnitudes of neural and kinematic variability that are reproducible across movements to different targets and when performing these movements with either arm. Furthermore, when examining the relationship between cortical variability and movement variability, we find that cortical fMRI variability in parietal cortex of individual subjects explained their movement extent variability. This enabled us to explain why some subjects

  6. Multilevel Cortical Processing of Somatosensory Novelty: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Naeije, Gilles; Vaulet, Thibaut; Wens, Vincent; Marty, Brice; Goldman, Serge; De Tiège, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of 16 healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 ± 3 years) were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation) and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation) stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local vs. global) levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31, 6 ± 2 years) also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped. Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55–130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory (cSII) cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and supplementary motor area (SMA). The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV) attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing. PMID:27313523

  7. Electromyographic activation reveals cortical and sub-cortical dissociation during emergence from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hight, Darren F; Voss, Logan J; García, Paul S; Sleigh, Jamie W

    2016-07-21

    During emergence from anesthesia patients regain their muscle tone (EMG). In a typical population of surgical patients the actual volatile gas anesthetic concentrations in the brain (CeMAC) at which EMG activation occurs remains unknown, as is whether EMG activation at higher CeMACs is correlated with subsequent severe pain, or with cortical activation. Electroencephalographic (EEG) and EMG activity was recorded from the forehead of 273 patients emerging from general anesthesia following surgery. We determined CeMAC at time of EMG activation and at return of consciousness. Pain was assessed immediately after return of consciousness using an 11 point numerical rating scale. The onset of EMG activation during emergence was associated with neither discernible muscle movement nor with the presence of exogenous stimulation in half the patients. EMG activation could be modelled as two distinct processes; termed high- and low-CeMAC (occurring higher or lower than 0.07 CeMAC). Low-CeMAC activation was typically associated with simultaneous EMG activation and consciousness, and the presence of a laryngeal mask. In contrast, high-CeMAC EMG activation occurred independently of return of consciousness, and was not associated with severe post-operative pain, but was more common in the presence of an endotracheal tube. Patients emerging from general anesthesia with an endotracheal tube in place are more likely to have an EMG activation at higher CeMAC concentrations. These activations are not associated with subsequent high-pain, nor with cortical arousal, as evidenced by continuing delta waves in the EEG. Conversely, patients emerging from general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask demonstrate marked neural inertia-EMG activation occurs at a low CeMAC, and is closely temporally associated with return of consciousness.

  8. Estimation of Cortical Connectivity From EEG Using State-Space Models

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Bing Leung Patrick; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    A state-space formulation is introduced for estimating multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) models of cortical connectivity from noisy, scalp recorded EEG. A state equation represents the MVAR model of cortical dynamics while an observation equation describes the physics relating the cortical signals to the measured EEG and the presence of spatially correlated noise. We assume the cortical signals originate from known regions of cortex, but that the spatial distribution of activity within each region is unknown. An expectation maximization algorithm is developed to directly estimate the MVAR model parameters, the spatial activity distribution components, and the spatial covariance matrix of the noise from the measured EEG. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that this integrated approach is less sensitive to noise than two-stage approaches in which the cortical signals are first estimated from EEG measurements, and next an MVAR model is fit to the estimated cortical signals. The method is further demonstrated by estimating conditional Granger causality using EEG data collected while subjects passively watch a movie. PMID:20501341

  9. Characterization of cortical source generators based on electroencephalography during tonic pain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Mark, Esben Bolvig; Olesen, Søren Schou; Gram, Mikkel; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the cortical source generators evoked by experimental tonic pain. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded on two separate days during rest and with immersion of the hand in ice water for 2 minutes (cold pressor test). Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography source localization was performed in 31 healthy volunteers to characterize the cortical source generators. Reliability was high in all eight frequency bands during rest and cold pressor conditions (intraclass coefficients =0.47-0.83 in the cingulate and insula). Tonic pain increased cortical activities in the delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), beta1 (12-18 Hz), beta2 (18-24 Hz), beta3 (24-32 Hz), and gamma (32-60 Hz) bands (all P<0.011) in widespread areas mainly in the limbic system, whereas decreased cortical activities were found in cingulate and pre- and postcentral gyri in the alpha2 (10-12 Hz) band (P=0.007). The pain intensity was correlated with cingulate activity in the beta2, beta3, and gamma bands (all P<0.04). Source localization of EEG is a reliable method to estimate cortical source generators. Activities in different brain regions, mainly in the limbic system, showed fluctuations in various frequency bands. Cingulate changes were correlated with pain intensity. This method might add information to the objective assessment of the cortical pain response in future experimental pain studies.

  10. Estimation of cortical connectivity from EEG using state-space models.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bing Leung Patrick; Riedner, Brady Alexander; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry D

    2010-09-01

    A state-space formulation is introduced for estimating multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) models of cortical connectivity from noisy, scalp-recorded EEG. A state equation represents the MVAR model of cortical dynamics, while an observation equation describes the physics relating the cortical signals to the measured EEG and the presence of spatially correlated noise. We assume that the cortical signals originate from known regions of cortex, but the spatial distribution of activity within each region is unknown. An expectation-maximization algorithm is developed to directly estimate the MVAR model parameters, the spatial activity distribution components, and the spatial covariance matrix of the noise from the measured EEG. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that this integrated approach is less sensitive to noise than two-stage approaches in which the cortical signals are first estimated from EEG measurements, and next, an MVAR model is fit to the estimated cortical signals. The method is further demonstrated by estimating conditional Granger causality using EEG data collected while subjects passively watch a movie.

  11. Localizing cortical sources of event-related potentials in infants’ covert orienting

    PubMed Central

    Richards, John E.

    2006-01-01

    This study used cortical source analysis to locate potential cortical sources of event-related potentials (ERPs) during covert orienting in infants aged 14 and 20 weeks. The infants were tested in a spatial cueing procedure. The reaction time to localize the target showed response facilitation for valid trials relative to invalid or neutral trials. High-density EEG (126 channels) was recorded during the task, and independent component analysis and equivalent current dipole analysis was used to estimate the cortical sources of the EEG during the task. There was a larger P1 ERP component on the valid trials than the other trials (P1 validity effect). The cortical source analysis suggested that this occurred due to activity in Brodmann’s areas 18 and 19. A presaccadic ERP component occurred over the frontal scalp areas (−65 ms) and was larger to a target in a cued location than in uncued locations. A potential cortical source for this ERP component was the superior frontal gyrus on the inferior portion of the prefrontal cortex. Increases from 14 to 20 weeks in amplitude of the P1 validity effect and the presaccadic ERP could be modeled by an increase in activation in the corresponding cortical areas. PMID:15819757

  12. Multimodal analysis of cortical chemoarchitecture and macroscale fMRI resting‐state functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Scholtens, Lianne H.; Turk, Elise; Mantini, Dante; Vanduffel, Wim; Feldman Barrett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cerebral cortex is well known to display a large variation in excitatory and inhibitory chemoarchitecture, but the effect of this variation on global scale functional neural communication and synchronization patterns remains less well understood. Here, we provide evidence of the chemoarchitecture of cortical regions to be associated with large‐scale region‐to‐region resting‐state functional connectivity. We assessed the excitatory versus inhibitory chemoarchitecture of cortical areas as an ExIn ratio between receptor density mappings of excitatory (AMPA, M1) and inhibitory (GABAA, M2) receptors, computed on the basis of data collated from pioneering studies of autoradiography mappings as present in literature of the human (2 datasets) and macaque (1 dataset) cortex. Cortical variation in ExIn ratio significantly correlated with total level of functional connectivity as derived from resting‐state functional connectivity recordings of cortical areas across all three datasets (human I: P = 0.0004; human II: P = 0.0008; macaque: P = 0.0007), suggesting cortical areas with an overall more excitatory character to show higher levels of intrinsic functional connectivity during resting‐state. Our findings are indicative of the microscale chemoarchitecture of cortical regions to be related to resting‐state fMRI connectivity patterns at the global system's level of connectome organization. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3103–3113, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27207489

  13. Active cortical innervation protects striatal neurons from slow degeneration in culture.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Segal, Menahem

    2011-03-01

    Spiny striatal GABAergic neurons receive most of their excitatory input from the neocortex. In culture, striatal neurons form inhibitory connections, but the lack of intrinsic excitatory afferents prevents the development of spontaneous network activity. Addition of cortical neurons to the striatal culture provides the necessary excitatory input to the striatal neurons, and in the presence of these neurons, striatal cultures do express spontaneous network activity. We have confirmed that cortical neurons provide excitatory drive to striatal neurons in culture using paired recording from cortical and striatal neurons. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks action potential discharges, the connections between cortical and striatal neurons are still formed, and in fact synaptic currents generated between them when TTX is removed are far larger than in control, undrugged cultures. Interestingly, the continuous presence of TTX in the co-culture caused striatal cell death. These observations indicate that the mere presence of cortical neurons is not sufficient to preserve striatal neurons in culture, but their synchronous activity, triggered by cortical excitatory synapses, is critical for the maintenance of viability of striatal neurons. These results have important implications for understanding the role of activity in neurodegenerative diseases of the striatum.

  14. Cortical blood flow in controlled hypotension as measured by thermal diffusion 1

    PubMed Central

    Carter, L. Philip; Atkinson, James R.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal diffusion flow probe which gave a continuous, dynamic, quantitative record of cortical blood flow (CBF) was used to assess CBF in experimental animals with controlled hypotension. Acute hypotension was produced by trimethaphan camsylate, halothane, and sodium nitroprusside. Halothane produced less reduction in CBF per drop in blood pressure than the other two agents. Images PMID:4772724

  15. The Beat Goes on: Rhythmic Modulation of Cortical Potentials by Imagined Tapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Allen; Albert, Robert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Band, Guido; van der Molen, Maurits

    2006-01-01

    A frequency analysis was used to tag cortical activity from imagined rhythmic movements. Participants synchronized overt and imagined taps with brief visual stimuli presented at a constant rate, alternating between left and right index fingers. Brain potentials were recorded from across the scalp and topographic maps made of their power at the…

  16. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentiall...

  17. Decoding and Cortical Source Localization for Intended Movement Direction With MEG

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Sudre, Gustavo P.; Xu, Yang; Kass, Robert E.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Degenhart, Alan D.; Bagic, Anto I.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables a noninvasive interface with the brain that is potentially capable of providing movement-related information similar to that obtained using more invasive neural recording techniques. Previous studies have shown that movement direction can be decoded from multichannel MEG signals recorded in humans performing wrist movements. We studied whether this information can be extracted without overt movement of the subject, because the targeted users of brain-controlled interface (BCI) technology are those with severe motor disabilities. The objectives of this study were twofold: 1) to decode intended movement direction from MEG signals recorded during the planning period before movement onset and during imagined movement and 2) to localize cortical sources modulated by intended movement direction. Ten able-bodied subjects performed both overt and imagined wrist movement while their cortical activities were recorded using a whole head MEG system. The intended movement direction was decoded using linear discriminant analysis and a Bayesian classifier. Minimum current estimation (MCE) in combination with a bootstrapping procedure enabled source-space statistical analysis, which showed that the contralateral motor cortical area was significantly modulated by intended movement direction, and this modulation was the strongest ∼100 ms before the onset of overt movement. These results suggest that it is possible to study cortical representation of specific movement information using MEG, and such studies may aid in presurgical localization of optimal sites for implanting electrodes for BCI systems. PMID:20739599

  18. Cortical Response Variability as a Developmental Index of Selective Auditory Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Dana L.; Slater, Jessica; Abecassis, Victor; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Attention induces synchronicity in neuronal firing for the encoding of a given stimulus at the exclusion of others. Recently, we reported decreased variability in scalp-recorded cortical evoked potentials to attended compared with ignored speech in adults. Here we aimed to determine the developmental time course for this neural index of auditory…

  19. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentiall...

  20. Cortical connectivity patterns during imagination of limb movements in normal subjects and in a spinal cord injured patient.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Mattiocco, Marco; De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Ursino, Mauro; Zavaglia, Melissa; Gao, Shangkai; Wei, Wu; Babiloni, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    The problem of the definition and evaluation of brain connectivity has become a central one in neuroscience during the latest years, as a way to understand the organization and interaction of cortical areas during the execution of cognitive or motor tasks. In this paper we propose the use of the DTF method on cortical signals estimated from high resolution EEG recordings. An application of the proposed technique to the estimation of cortical connectivity pattern in normal subjects and in one spinal cord injured patient is also provided.

  1. The effect of spasticity on cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials: changes of cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials after botulinum toxin type A injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Sook; Park, Chang Il; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Yong Rae

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the changes in cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) after botulinum toxin type A injection to determine what effect spasticity has on cortical SEPs. Intervention study and before-after trial. University-affiliated hospital in Korea. Twelve children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), 7 children with spastic diplegic CP, and 8 patients with traumatic brain injury. All participants had botulinum toxin type A injected into the muscles of the spastic limb. SEPs were recorded before and 7 days after the botulinum toxin type A injection. Spasticity of the affected spastic limb was also measured. The short latency and amplitude of waves in SEPs were measured. The SEP results were divided into 3 groups: flat (no evoked potential), abnormal (evoked but delayed in latency), and normal (clear waveform with normal latency). The normal response of cortical SEP increased after injection. The SEPs exhibited more frequent improvement in the limbs, with greater improvement of spasticity in grade (>1.0 grade) and in patients of younger age (<3y) after injection (P<.05). The observed improvement of cortical SEPs with associated reduction of spasticity that occurred after the botulinum toxin type A injection indicates that spasticity itself can be considered a factor affecting cortical SEPs. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  2. Real-time prediction of hand trajectory by ensembles of cortical neurons in primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessberg, Johan; Stambaugh, Christopher R.; Kralik, Jerald D.; Beck, Pamela D.; Laubach, Mark; Chapin, John K.; Kim, Jung; Biggs, S. James; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2000-11-01

    Signals derived from the rat motor cortex can be used for controlling one-dimensional movements of a robot arm. It remains unknown, however, whether real-time processing of cortical signals can be employed to reproduce, in a robotic device, the kind of complex arm movements used by primates to reach objects in space. Here we recorded the simultaneous activity of large populations of neurons, distributed in the premotor, primary motor and posterior parietal cortical areas, as non-human primates performed two distinct motor tasks. Accurate real-time predictions of one- and three-dimensional arm movement trajectories were obtained by applying both linear and nonlinear algorithms to cortical neuronal ensemble activity recorded from each animal. In addition, cortically derived signals were successfully used for real-time control of robotic devices, both locally and through the Internet. These results suggest that long-term control of complex prosthetic robot arm movements can be achieved by simple real-time transformations of neuronal population signals derived from multiple cortical areas in primates.

  3. Slower postnatal growth is associated with delayed cerebral cortical maturation in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Vinall, Jillian; Grunau, Ruth E; Brant, Rollin; Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Synnes, Anne R; Miller, Steven P

    2013-01-16

    Slower postnatal growth is an important predictor of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants born preterm. However, the relationship between postnatal growth and cortical development remains largely unknown. Therefore, we examined the association between neonatal growth and diffusion tensor imaging measures of microstructural cortical development in infants born very preterm. Participants were 95 neonates born between 24 and 32 weeks gestational age studied twice with diffusion tensor imaging: scan 1 at a median of 32.1 weeks (interquartile range, 30.4 to 33.6) and scan 2 at a median of 40.3 weeks (interquartile range, 38.7 to 42.7). Fractional anisotropy and eigenvalues were recorded from 15 anatomically defined cortical regions. Weight, head circumference, and length were recorded at birth and at the time of each scan. Growth between scans was examined in relation to diffusion tensor imaging measures at scans 1 and 2, accounting for gestational age, birth weight, sex, postmenstrual age, known brain injury (white matter injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and cerebellar hemorrhage), and neonatal illness (patent ductus arteriosus, days intubated, infection, and necrotizing enterocolitis). Impaired weight, length, and head growth were associated with delayed microstructural development of the cortical gray matter (fractional anisotropy: P < 0.001), but not white matter (fractional anisotropy: P = 0.529), after accounting for prenatal growth, neonatal illness, and brain injury. Avoiding growth impairment during neonatal care may allow cortical development to proceed optimally and, ultimately, may provide an opportunity to reduce neurological disabilities related to preterm birth.

  4. Local Slow Waves in Superficial Layers of Primary Cortical Areas during REM Sleep.

    PubMed

    Funk, Chadd M; Honjoh, Sakiko; Rodriguez, Alexander V; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-02-08

    Sleep is traditionally constituted of two global behavioral states, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM), characterized by quiescence and reduced responsiveness to sensory stimuli [1]. NREM sleep is distinguished by slow waves and spindles throughout the cerebral cortex and REM sleep by an "activated," low-voltage fast electroencephalogram (EEG) paradoxically similar to that of wake, accompanied by rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. However, recent evidence has shown that cortical activity patterns during wake and NREM sleep are not as global as previously thought. Local slow waves can appear in various cortical regions in both awake humans [2] and rodents [3-5]. Intracranial recordings in humans [6] and rodents [4, 7] have shown that NREM sleep slow waves most often involve only a subset of brain regions that varies from wave to wave rather than occurring near synchronously across all cortical areas. Moreover, some cortical areas can transiently "wake up" [8] in an otherwise sleeping brain. Yet until now, cortical activity during REM sleep was thought to be homogenously wake-like. We show here, using local laminar recordings in freely moving mice, that slow waves occur regularly during REM sleep, but only in primary sensory and motor areas and mostly in layer 4, the main target of relay thalamic inputs, and layer 3. This finding may help explain why, during REM sleep, we remain disconnected from the environment even though the bulk of the cortex shows wake-like, paradoxical activation.

  5. Correlation between Cortical State and Locus Coeruleus Activity: Implications for Sensory Coding in Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fazlali, Zeinab; Ranjbar-Slamloo, Yadollah; Adibi, Mehdi; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical state modulates the background activity of cortical neurons, and their evoked response to sensory stimulation. Multiple mechanisms are involved in switching between cortical states including various neuromodulatory systems. Locus Coeruleus (LC) is one of the major neuromodulatory nuclei in the brainstem with widespread projections throughout the brain and modulates the activity of cells and networks. Here, we quantified the link between the LC spontaneous activity, cortical state and sensory processing in the rat vibrissal somatosensory “barrel” cortex (BC). We simultaneously recorded unit activity from LC and BC along with prefrontal electroencephalogram (EEG) while presenting brief whisker deflections under urethane anesthesia. The ratio of low to high frequency components of EEG (referred to as the L/H ratio) was employed to identify cortical state. We found that the spontaneous activity of LC units exhibited a negative correlation with the L/H ratio. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that changes in LC firing preceded changes in the cortical state: the correlation of the LC firing profile with the L/H ratio was maximal at an average lag of −1.2 s. We further quantified BC neuronal responses to whisker stimulation during the synchronized and desynchronized states. In the desynchronized state, BC neurons showed lower stimulus detection threshold, higher response fidelity, and shorter response latency. The most prominent change was observed in the late phase of BC evoked activity (100–400 ms post stimulus onset): almost every BC unit exhibited a greater late response during the desynchronized state. Categorization of the BC evoked responses based on LC activity (into high and low LC discharge rates) resulted in highly similar response profiles compared to categorization based on the cortical state (low and high L/H ratios). These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the LC neuromodulatory system in desynchronization of cortical state

  6. Relationship between brainstem, cortical and behavioral measures relevant to pitch salience in humans

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Smalt, Christopher J.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2012-01-01

    Neural representation of pitch-relevant information at both the brainstem and cortical levels of processing is influenced by language or music experience. However, the functional roles of brainstem and cortical neural mechanisms in the hierarchical network for language processing, and how they drive and maintain experience-dependent reorganization are not known. In an effort to evaluate the possible interplay between these two levels of pitch processing, we introduce a novel electrophysiological approach to evaluate pitch-relevant neural activity at the brainstem and auditory cortex concurrently. Brainstem frequency-following responses and cortical pitch responses were recorded from participants in response to iterated rippled noise stimuli that varied in stimulus periodicity (pitch salience). A control condition using iterated rippled noise devoid of pitch was employed to ensure pitch specificity of the cortical pitch response. Neural data were compared with behavioral pitch discrimination thresholds. Results showed that magnitudes of neural responses increase systematically and that behavioral pitch discrimination improves with increasing stimulus periodicity, indicating more robust encoding for salient pitch. Absence of cortical pitch response in the control condition confirms that the cortical pitch response is specific to pitch. Behavioral pitch discrimination was better predicted by brainstem and cortical responses together as compared to each separately. The close correspondence between neural and behavioral data suggest that neural correlates of pitch salience that emerge in early, preattentive stages of processing in the brainstem may drive and maintain with high fidelity the early cortical representations of pitch. These neural representations together contain adequate information for the development of perceptual pitch salience. PMID:22940428

  7. Comparative characterization of the basic forebrain cortical zones in Emys orbicularis (Linnaeus) and Testudo horsfieldi (Gray).

    PubMed

    Davydova, T V; Goncharova, N V

    1979-01-01

    The neuronal and synaptic organization of forebrain basic cortical zones in Testudo horsfieldi and Emys orbicularis and their dendritic spines have been studied using Nissle, Golgi and electron microscopic methods. It has been shown by comparison of the results that the two spicies have marked differences in the structural organization of the forebrain cortical zones. The cortical formation in Testudo horsfieldi is different from that of Emys orbicularis in a greater diversity of neuronal types, smaller size of neurons, smaller cell density in each cortical zones, the presence of horizontal dendritic terminals in dorsomedial dorsal cortex, the absence of the large neurons in dorsomedial medial cortex, ect. Moreover, in both species the dorsomedial dorsal cortex in comparison with medial and lateral cortex is characterized by a marked complexity of the structural organization (diverse neuronal composition, the presence of the stellate cells, the highest cell density, the smallest neuronal size). The investigation of spines in the different dendritic levels (proximal, middle and distal) of neurons in three cortical basic zones has been shown that in both species it has been observed the tendency to increasing of the spine density from proximal to distal part of dendrite. at all dendritic levels noninvaginated forms of spines predominated. Invaginated spines were recorded at the proximal and middle levels of dendrites and contain more organelles and inclusions than noninvaginated spines. In Testudo horsfieldi and Emys orbicularis differences of spine thin structure and spine density in the cortical basic zones were revealed. Moreover, in both species the spines of dorsomedial dorsal cortex were more numerous, more variable in shape, more abundant in organelles. It was there that a bush-like distribution of spines was found which in evidently a special form of synaptic organization of cortical neurons. The above features of this cortical zone indicates a higher degree

  8. Emergence of Metastable State Dynamics in Interconnected Cortical Networks with Propagation Delays

    PubMed Central

    Kutchko, Katrina M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the large number of thin-diameter and unmyelinated axons that connect different cortical areas is unknown. The pronounced propagation delays in these axons may prevent synchronization of cortical networks and therefore hinder efficient information integration and processing. Yet, such global information integration across cortical areas is vital for higher cognitive function. We hypothesized that delays in communication between cortical areas can disrupt synchronization and therefore enhance the set of activity trajectories and computations interconnected networks can perform. To evaluate this hypothesis, we studied the effect of long-range cortical projections with propagation delays in interconnected large-scale cortical networks that exhibited spontaneous rhythmic activity. Long-range connections with delays caused the emergence of metastable, spatio-temporally distinct activity states between which the networks spontaneously transitioned. Interestingly, the observed activity patterns correspond to macroscopic network dynamics such as globally synchronized activity, propagating wave fronts, and spiral waves that have been previously observed in neurophysiological recordings from humans and animal models. Transient perturbations with simulated transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) confirmed the multistability of the interconnected networks by switching the networks between these metastable states. Our model thus proposes that slower long-range connections enrich the landscape of activity states and represent a parsimonious mechanism for the emergence of multistability in cortical networks. These results further provide a mechanistic link between the known deficits in connectivity and cortical state dynamics in neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and autism, as well as suggest non-invasive brain stimulation as an effective treatment for these illnesses. PMID:24204238

  9. On the cerebral origin of EEG responses to TMS: insights from severe cortical lesions.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, Olivia; Sarasso, Simone; Casarotto, Silvia; Boly, Mélanie; Schnakers, Caroline; Napolitani, Martino; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Ledoux, Didier; Tshibanda, Jean-Flory; Massimini, Marcello; Laureys, Steven; Rosanova, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) represents a valuable tool to probe cortical excitability and connectivity. Although several procedures have been devised to abolish TMS-related artifacts, direct evidence that it is possible to record TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) that purely reflect cortical responses to TMS are still lacking. To demonstrate that when TMS is delivered on a human head with intact nerves, scalp and ocular muscles, TEPs are present only if a functional portion of cortex is targeted and is absent otherwise. We performed extensive navigated TMS/EEG mappings in three vegetative state patients and in eight healthy controls. Patients were selected based on the extension of their cortical lesions as revealed by structural/functional imaging: the cerebral cortex was globally damaged in Patient 1 due to cerebral anoxia, Patient 2 showed a traumatic damage affecting one cerebral hemisphere, while Patient 3 was characterized by one left sided and one right-sided focal ischemic lesion. In Patient 1, TMS performed at any targeted cortical site did not elicit statistically significant TEPs. In Patient 2, TEPs were absent when the damaged hemisphere was targeted, while were present over the healthy side. In Patient 3, significant TEPs were absent when cortical lesions were targeted and present otherwise. Significant TEPs were always present in healthy controls. These findings suggest that, provided that appropriate experimental procedures are employed, TEPs are genuine cortical responses detectable only when preserved cortical tissue is stimulated. Hence, a dependable assessment of cortical excitability and connectivity in brain-injured patients requires the use of neuronavigated TMS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L; Mangano, Francesco T; Gelfand, Michael J; Rozhkov, Leonid; Miles, Lili; Greiner, Hansel M

    2016-09-01

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children.

  11. Relationships between the Firing of Identified Striatal Interneurons and Spontaneous and Driven Cortical Activities In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharott, Andrew; Doig, Natalie M.; Mallet, Nicolas; Magill, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum is comprised of medium-sized spiny projection neurons (MSNs) and several types of interneuron, and receives massive glutamatergic input from the cerebral cortex. Understanding of striatal function requires definition of the electrophysiological properties of neurochemically identified interneurons sampled in the same context of ongoing cortical activity in vivo. To address this, we recorded the firing of cholinergic interneurons (expressing choline acetyltransferase; ChAT) and GABAergic interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV) or nitric oxide synthase (NOS), as well as MSNs, in anesthetized rats during cortically defined brain states. Depending on the cortical state, these interneurons were partly distinguished from each other, and MSNs, on the basis of firing rate and/or pattern. During slow-wave activity (SWA), ChAT+ interneurons, and some PV+ and NOS+ interneurons, were tonically active; NOS+ interneurons fired prominent bursts but, contrary to investigations in vitro, these were not typical low-threshold spike bursts. Identified MSNs, and other PV+ and NOS+ interneurons, were phasically active. Contrasting with ChAT+ interneurons, whose firing showed poor brain state dependency, PV+ and NOS+ interneurons displayed robust firing increases and decreases, respectively, upon spontaneous or driven transitions from SWA to cortical activation. The firing of most neurons was phase locked to cortical slow oscillations, but only PV+ and ChAT+ interneurons also fired in time with cortical spindle and gamma oscillations. Complementing this diverse temporal coupling, each interneuron type exhibited distinct responses to cortical stimulation. Thus, these striatal interneuron types have distinct temporal signatures in vivo, including relationships to spontaneous and driven cortical activities, which likely underpin their specialized contributions to striatal microcircuit function. PMID:22993438

  12. Cortical Feedback Control of Olfactory Bulb Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alison M.; Sturgill, James F.; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  13. Cortical Alterations in Medication-Overuse Headache.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Franz; Schaer, Marie; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Luechinger, Roger; Michels, Lars; Kaya, Marihan; Kollias, Spyridon; Sándor, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    Using surface-based morphometry we aimed to provide a detailed examination of cortical alterations in medication-overuse headache (MOH), by disentangling between altered cortical thickness and gyrification (folding). In MOH, pain modulation is probably dysfunctional at the cortical and subcortical level, resulting in a disequilibrium between pain inhibition and facilitation. Both increased and decreased cortical volumes have been reported in individuals with MOH. There is however no detailed examination to date that distinguishes between altered cortical thickness and gyrification. Such distinction would help to identify the nature and timing of neurodevelopmental mechanisms at play in affected individuals. We investigated cortical thickness and gyrification in 29 patients with MOH according to International Headache Society criteria and 29 age- and gender-matched controls, using high-resolution structural MRIs of the brain analyzed with FreeSurfer. This is a secondary analysis of data from a previously published voxel-based morphometry study. In patients with MOH compared to controls, reduced cortical thickness was observed in the left prefrontal cortex. We also observed higher local gyrification in one cluster extending from the fusiform cortex to adjacent medial temporal regions, and in another cluster in the right occipital pole. Higher gyrification in the right occipital pole predicted poor response after detoxification. Corroborating previous volumetric results, our study adds information on the putative neurobiological mechanisms involved in MOH, suggesting neurodevelopmental changes in MOH. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  14. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  15. Acute Cortical Transhemispheric Diaschisis after Unilateral Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Le Prieult, Florie; Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Imbrosci, Barbara; Mittmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Focal neocortical brain injuries lead to functional alterations, which can spread beyond lesion-neighboring brain areas. The undamaged hemisphere and its associated disturbances after a unilateral lesion, so-called transhemispheric diaschisis, have been progressively disclosed over the last decades; they are strongly involved in the pathophysiology and, potentially, recovery of brain injuries. Understanding the temporal dynamics of these transhemispheric functional changes is crucial to decipher the role of the undamaged cortex in the processes of functional reorganization at different stages post-lesion. In this regard, little is known about the acute-subacute processes after 24-48 h in the brain hemisphere contralateral to injury. In the present study, we performed a controlled cortical impact to produce a unilateral traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the motor and somatosensory cortex of mice. In vitro extracellular multi-unit recordings from large neuronal populations, together with single-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cortical network contralateral to the lesion, revealed a strong, but transient, neuronal hyperactivity as early as 24-48 h post-TBI. This abnormal excitable state in the intact hemisphere was not accompanied by alterations in neuronal intrinsic properties, but it was associated with an impairment of the phasic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission and an increased expression of GABAA receptor subunits related to tonic inhibition exclusively in the contralateral hemisphere. These data unravel a series of early transhemispheric functional alterations after diffuse unilateral cortical injury, which may compensate and stabilize the disrupted brain functions. Therefore, our findings support the hypothesis that the undamaged hemisphere could play a significant role in early functional reorganization processes after a TBI.

  16. Movement, confusion, and orienting in frontal cortices.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2011-10-20

    In this issue, two studies, by Ehrlich et al. and Hill et al., address the role of the frontal motor cortices in behavior of the rat and suggest a potential role for this structure in high-level control of diverse behaviors. Hill et al. show that motor cortical neurons predict whisker movements even without sensory feedback and that their activity reflects efferent control. Surprisingly, Ehrlich et al. report the participation of this same cortical region in the preparation and execution of orienting behaviors.

  17. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Patlak, Clifford S.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of osmotic transients and an experimental evaluation both of rapid time resolution of lumen to bath osmosis and of bidirectional steady-state osmosis in isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules exposed to antidiuretic hormone (ADH). For the case of a membrane in series with unstirred layers, there may be considerable differences between initial and steady-state osmotic flows (i.e., the osmotic transient phenomenon), because the solute concentrations at the interfaces between membrane and unstirred layers may vary with time. A numerical solution of the equation of continuity provided a means for computing these time-dependent values, and, accordingly, the variation of osmotic flow with time for a given set of parameters including: Pf (cm s–1), the osmotic water permeability coefficient, the bulk phase solute concentrations, the unstirred layer thickness on either side of the membrane, and the fractional areas available for volume flow in the unstirred layers. The analyses provide a quantitative frame of reference for evaluating osmotic transients observed in epithelia in series with asymmetrical unstirred layers and indicate that, for such epithelia, Pf determinations from steady-state osmotic flows may result in gross underestimates of osmotic water permeability. In earlier studies, we suggested that the discrepancy between the ADH-dependent values of Pf and PDDw (cm s–1, diffusional water permeability coefficient) was the consequence of cellular constraints to diffusion. In the present experiments, no transients were detectable 20–30 s after initiating ADH-dependent lumen to bath osmosis; and steady-state ADH-dependent osmotic flows from bath to lumen and lumen to bath were linear and symmetrical. An evaluation of these data in terms of the analytical model indicates: First, cellular constraints to diffusion in cortical collecting tubules could be rationalized in terms of a 25-fold reduction in the area of the

  18. Video recording.

    PubMed

    Porter, R J; Sato, S; Long, R L

    1985-01-01

    Two video techniques are commonly used for biomedical monitoring. The simplest technique uses 2 or 3 video cameras with a special-effects generator. The more advanced method uses one video camera with a reformatter, a special-effects generator and a time-code generator. The main components of a video recording system are the camera, tape recorder, monitor, special-effects generator, reformatter, audio system and time-code generator. Video recordings can be edited electronically, but the quality of the copies is dependent on the type of editing equipment and the technical expertise available. Video recording has helped to improve the diagnosis and treatment of seizures and has been widely used in clinical epilepsy research. Video monitoring is now generally available in large medical centers for the diagnosis of difficult patients.

  19. Subthalamic stimulation modulates cortical motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Klotz, Rosa; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Scholten, Marlieke; Naros, Georgios; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Bunjes, Friedemann; Meisner, Christoph; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic modulations of large-scale network activity and synchronization are inherent to a broad spectrum of cognitive processes and are disturbed in neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson's disease. Here, we set out to address the motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease and its modulation with subthalamic stimulation. To this end, 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease with subthalamic nucleus stimulation were analysed on externally cued right hand finger movements with 1.5-s interstimulus interval. Simultaneous recordings were obtained from electromyography on antagonistic muscles (right flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) together with 64-channel electroencephalography. Time-frequency event-related spectral perturbations were assessed to determine cortical and muscular activity. Next, cross-spectra in the time-frequency domain were analysed to explore the cortico-cortical synchronization. The time-frequency modulations enabled us to select a time-frequency range relevant for motor processing. On these time-frequency windows, we developed an extension of the phase synchronization index to quantify the global cortico-cortical synchronization and to obtain topographic differentiations of distinct electrode sites with respect to their contributions to the global phase synchronization index. The spectral measures were used to predict clinical and reaction time outcome using regression analysis. We found that movement-related desynchronization of cortical activity in the upper alpha and beta range was significantly facilitated with 'stimulation on' compared to 'stimulation off' on electrodes over the bilateral parietal, sensorimotor, premotor, supplementary-motor, and prefrontal areas, including the bilateral inferior prefrontal areas. These spectral modulations enabled us to predict both clinical and reaction time improvement from subthalamic stimulation. With 'stimulation on', interhemispheric cortico-cortical

  20. COMMUNICATION: Electrophysiological response dynamics during focal cortical infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiganos, Terry C., Jr.; Jensen, Winnie; Rousche, Patrick J.

    2006-12-01

    While the intracellular processes of hypoxia-induced necrosis and the intercellular mechanisms of post-ischemic neurotoxicity associated with stroke are well documented, the dynamic electrophysiological (EP) response of neurons within the core or periinfarct zone remains unclear. The present study validates a method for continuous measurement of the local EP responses during focal cortical infarction induced via photothrombosis. Single microwire electrodes were acutely implanted into the primary auditory cortex of eight rats. Multi-unit neural activity, evoked via a continuous 2 Hz click stimulus, was recorded before, during and after infarction to assess neuronal function in response to local, permanent ischemia. During sham infarction, the average stimulus-evoked peak firing rate over 20 min remained stable at 495.5 ± 14.5 spikes s-1, indicating temporal stability of neural function under normal conditions. Stimulus-evoked peak firing was reliably reduced to background levels (firing frequency in the absence of stimulus) following initiation of photothrombosis over a period of 439 ± 92 s. The post-infarction firing patterns exhibited unique temporal degradation of the peak firing rate, suggesting a variable response to ischemic challenge. Despite the inherent complexity of cerebral ischemia secondary to microvascular occlusion, complete loss of EP function consistently occurred 300-600 s after photothrombosis. The results suggest that microwire recording during photothrombosis provides a simple and highly efficacious strategy for assessing the electrophysiological dynamics of cortical infarction.

  1. Pontine norepinephrine content after motor cortical ablation in rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pina, Rigoberto; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Montes, Sergio; Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Maciel, Angélica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that norepinephrine (NE) plays an important role in recovery after brain damage. However, the role of the pons, the site where the norepinephrinergic locus coeruleus (LC) is located, has not been elucidated. In order to study the changes in the pontine NE content in either noninjured, injured or recovered rats, we used 35 animals trained to walk across to a walkway where their footprints were recorded. Subsequently, 17 trained rats were sham-operated while 18 were injured by means of an ablation of the right motor cortex representative of the hindlimb. From the injured rats, 6 were sacrificed 6 hr before surgery in order to obtain the pons, while all the remaining rats were recorded in the walkway 6, 24 and 48 hr post-surgery. Then, rats were sacrificed by decapitation, the pons was removed and each hemisphere was prepared for the chromatographic analysis of NE. Results showed that after cortical brain damage, the length of the stride decreased while the angle of the stride increased 6 hr post-surgery. Recovery was observed after 24 hr. NE increased in the pons after 6 hr and returned to normal levels when rats had recovered. This suggests that cortical damage elicits NE changes in the LC that could reorganize the system to lead the recovery process. Such findings must be taken in account when pharmacotherapy with antidepressants or antipsychotics that act on norepinephrine-containing neuronal systems are prescribed in patients after stroke.

  2. Rich club neurons dominate Information Transfer in local cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John

    2015-03-01

    The performance of complex networks depends on how they route their traffic. It is unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks of hundreds of closely-spaced neurons. To address this, it is necessary to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512 electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz, simultaneously from up to 700 neurons in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 hr at a time. We used transfer entropy to quantify directed information transfer (IT) between pairs of neurons. We found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates as reported in in-vivo. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to synaptic strengths. 20% of the neurons accounted for 70% of the total IT coming into, and going out of the network and were defined as rich nodes. These rich nodes were more densely and strongly connected to each other expected by chance, forming a rich club. This highly uneven distribution of IT has implications for the efficiency and robustness of local cortical networks, and gives clues to the plastic processes that shape them. JSPS.

  3. The impact of cortical deafferentation on the neocortical slow oscillation.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-04-16

    Slow oscillation is the main brain rhythm observed during deep sleep in mammals. Although several studies have demonstrated its neocortical origin, the extent of the thalamic contribution is still a matter of discussion. Using electrophysiological recordings in vivo on cats and computational modeling, we found that the local thalamic inactivation or the complete isolation of the neocortical slabs maintained within the brain dramatically reduced the expression of slow and fast oscillations in affected cortical areas. The slow oscillation began to recover 12 h after thalamic inactivation. The slow oscillation, but not faster activities, nearly recovered after 30 h and persisted for weeks in the isolated slabs. We also observed an increase of the membrane potential fluctuations recorded in vivo several hours after thalamic inactivation. Mimicking this enhancement in a network computational model with an increased postsynaptic activity of long-range intracortical afferents or scaling K(+) leak current, but not several other Na(+) and K(+) intrinsic currents was sufficient for recovering the slow oscillation. We conclude that, in the intact brain, the thalamus contributes to the generation of cortical active states of the slow oscillation and mediates its large-scale synchronization. Our study also suggests that the deafferentation-induced alterations of the sleep slow oscillation can be counteracted by compensatory intracortical mechanisms and that the sleep slow oscillation is a fundamental and intrinsic state of the neocortex.

  4. The Impact of Cortical Deafferentation on the Neocortical Slow Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Slow oscillation is the main brain rhythm observed during deep sleep in mammals. Although several studies have demonstrated its neocortical origin, the extent of the thalamic contribution is still a matter of discussion. Using electrophysiological recordings in vivo on cats and computational modeling, we found that the local thalamic inactivation or the complete isolation of the neocortical slabs maintained within the brain dramatically reduced the expression of slow and fast oscillations in affected cortical areas. The slow oscillation began to recover 12 h after thalamic inactivation. The slow oscillation, but not faster activities, nearly recovered after 30 h and persisted for weeks in the isolated slabs. We also observed an increase of the membrane potential fluctuations recorded in vivo several hours after thalamic inactivation. Mimicking this enhancement in a network computational model with an increased postsynaptic activity of long-range intracortical afferents or scaling K+ leak current, but not several other Na+ and K+ intrinsic currents was sufficient for recovering the slow oscillation. We conclude that, in the intact brain, the thalamus contributes to the generation of cortical active states of the slow oscillation and mediates its large-scale synchronization. Our study also suggests that the deafferentation-induced alterations of the sleep slow oscillation can be counteracted by compensatory intracortical mechanisms and that the sleep slow oscillation is a fundamental and intrinsic state of the neocortex. PMID:24741059

  5. Mechanisms underlying cortical activity during value-guided choice.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Laurence T; Kolling, Nils; Soltani, Alireza; Woolrich, Mark W; Rushworth, Matthew F S; Behrens, Timothy E J

    2012-01-08

    When choosing between two options, correlates of their value are represented in neural activity throughout the brain. Whether these representations reflect activity that is fundamental to the computational process of value comparison, as opposed to other computations covarying with value, is unknown. We investigated activity in a biophysically plausible network model that transforms inputs relating to value into categorical choices. A set of characteristic time-varying signals emerged that reflect value comparison. We tested these model predictions using magnetoencephalography data recorded from human subjects performing value-guided decisions. Parietal and prefrontal signals matched closely with model predictions. These results provide a mechanistic explanation of neural signals recorded during value-guided choice and a means of distinguishing computational roles of different cortical regions whose activity covaries with value.

  6. Adrenal cortical and medullary imaging.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J E

    1995-07-01

    Adrenal disease can be manifested by endocrine dysfunction or anatomic abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging modalities. With the advent of newer and more reliable in vitro assays and a better understanding of the spectrum of adrenal pathology, the physician can now adopt a more accurate and cost-effective approach to the diagnosis of adrenal disease. Both functional and anatomic imaging modalities can play an important role in the evaluation of the incidental adrenal mass, the early detection of adrenal metastases, differentiation of the various causes of Cushings's syndrome, selection of patients for potentially curative surgery in primary aldosteronism and adrenal hyperandrogenism, and localization of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. The usefulness of the adrenal cortical radiopharmaceutical, 131I-6-beta-iodomethylnorcholesterol (NP-59), and the adrenal medullary radiopharmaceuticals, 131I and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), is detailed for these various clinical settings and the role of NP-59 and MIBG is contrasted to that of the cross-sectional modalities, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Incidental adrenal masses are common, but malignancies are few. Imaging studies select those patients who require a further evaluation by biopsy examination or adrenalectomy. In the hyperfunctioning endocrine states, such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism, adrenal androgenism, and pheochromocytoma, correlation of biochemical findings with both functional and anatomic imaging is necessary to avoid inappropriate and ineffective surgical intervention, yet not miss an opportunity for curative resection. Lastly, MIBG and MRI are complementary in the detection and staging of neuroblastoma.

  7. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  8. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  9. Cortical circuits for perceptual inference.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Kiebel, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    This paper assumes that cortical circuits have evolved to enable inference about the causes of sensory input received by the brain. This provides a principled specification of what neural circuits have to achieve. Here, we attempt to address how the brain makes inferences by casting inference as an optimisation problem. We look at how the ensuing recognition dynamics could be supported by directed connections and message-passing among neuronal populations, given our knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic neuronal connections. We assume that the brain models the world as a dynamic system, which imposes causal structure on the sensorium. Perception is equated with the optimisation or inversion of this internal model, to explain sensory input. Given a model of how sensory data are generated, we use a generic variational approach to model inversion to furnish equations that prescribe recognition; i.e., the dynamics of neuronal activity that represents the causes of sensory input. Here, we focus on a model whose hierarchical and dynamical structure enables simulated brains to recognise and predict sequences of sensory states. We first review these models and their inversion under a variational free-energy formulation. We then show that the brain has the necessary infrastructure to implement this inversion and present stimulations using synthetic birds that generate and recognise birdsongs.

  10. Multiresolution Diffeomorphic Mapping for Cortical Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingzhen; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the convoluted folding pattern of the cerebral cortex, accurate alignment of cortical surfaces remains challenging. In this paper, we present a multiresolution diffeomorphic surface mapping algorithm under the framework of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM). Our algorithm takes advantage of multiresolution analysis (MRA) for surfaces and constructs cortical surfaces at multiresolution. This family of multiresolution surfaces are used as natural sparse priors of the cortical anatomy and provide the anchor points where the parametrization of deformation vector fields is supported. This naturally constructs tangent bundles of diffeomorphisms at different resolution levels and hence generates multiresolution diffeomorphic transformation. We show that our construction of multiresolution LDDMM surface mapping can potentially reduce computational cost and improves the mapping accuracy of cortical surfaces.

  11. Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Nikola T.; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery. PMID:24179228

  12. Cortical high-density counterstream architectures.

    PubMed

    Markov, Nikola T; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kennedy, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery.

  13. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, S; Aziz, Q; Rothwell, J C; Hobson, A; Thompson, D G

    1998-02-01

    1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus. 2. Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles. 3. Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli. 4. Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies. 5. Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site

  14. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Shaheen; Aziz, Qasim; Rothwell, John C; Hobson, Anthony; Thompson, David G

    1998-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus.Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles.Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli.Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies.Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site-specific manner by sensory

  15. Cortical pathways to the mammalian amygdala.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J

    1998-06-01

    The amygdaloid nuclear complex is critical for producing appropriate emotional and behavioral responses to biologically relevant sensory stimuli. It constitutes an essential link between sensory and limbic areas of the cerebral cortex and subcortical brain regions, such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, and striatum, that are responsible for eliciting emotional and motivational responses. This review summarizes the anatomy and physiology of the cortical pathways to the amygdala in the rat, cat and monkey. Although the basic anatomy of these systems in the cat and monkey was largely delineated in studies conducted during the 1970s and 1980s, detailed information regarding the cortico-amygdalar pathways in the rat was only obtained in the past several years. The purpose of this review is to describe the results of recent studies in the rat and to compare the organization of cortico-amygdalar projections in this species with that seen in the cat and monkey. In all three species visual, auditory, and somatosensory information is transmitted to the amygdala by a series of modality-specific cortico-cortical pathways ("cascades") that originate in the primary sensory cortices and flow toward higher order association areas. The cortical areas in the more distal portions of these cascades have stronger and more extensive projections to the amygdala than the more proximal areas. In all three species olfactory and gustatory/visceral information has access to the amygdala at an earlier stage of cortical processing than visual, auditory and somatosensory information. There are also important polysensory cortical inputs to the mammalian amygdala from the prefrontal and hippocampal regions. Whereas the overall organization of cortical pathways is basically similar in all mammalian species, there is anatomical evidence which suggests that there are important differences in the extent of convergence of cortical projections in the primate versus the nonprimate amygdala.

  16. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called "Discrete Results" (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of "Discrete Results" is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel "Discrete Results" concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast-spiking (FS

  17. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  18. CLADA: cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for the assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for the measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm(3) isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post-mortem tissue. CLADA's sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation=0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images.

  19. CLADA: Cortical Longitudinal Atrophy Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower-resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5mm3 voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm3 isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm3 voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post- mortem tissue. CLADA’s sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1 mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation = 0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images. PMID:20674750

  20. The Impact of Cortical Lesions on Thalamo-Cortical Network Dynamics after Acute Ischaemic Stroke: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, Joeri B. G.; Finnigan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The neocortex and thalamus provide a core substrate for perception, cognition, and action, and are interconnected through different direct and indirect pathways that maintain specific dynamics associated with functional states including wakefulness and sleep. It has been shown that a lack of excitation, or enhanced subcortical inhibition, can disrupt this system and drive thalamic nuclei into an attractor state of low-frequency bursting and further entrainment of thalamo-cortical circuits, also called thalamo-cortical dysrhythmia (TCD). The question remains however whether similar TCD-like phenomena can arise with a cortical origin. For instance, in stroke, a cortical lesion could disrupt thalamo-cortical interactions through an attenuation of the excitatory drive onto the thalamus, creating an imbalance between excitation and inhibition that can lead to a state of TCD. Here we tested this hypothesis by comparing the resting-state EEG recordings of acute ischaemic stroke patients (N = 21) with those of healthy, age-matched control-subjects (N = 17). We observed that these patients displayed the hallmarks of TCD: a characteristic downward shift of dominant α-peaks in the EEG power spectra, together with increased power over the lower frequencies (δ and θ-range). Contrary to general observations in TCD, the patients also displayed a broad reduction in β-band activity. In order to explain the genesis of this stroke-induced TCD, we developed a biologically constrained model of a general thalamo-cortical module, allowing us to identify the specific cellular and network mechanisms involved. Our model showed that a lesion in the cortical component leads to sustained cell membrane hyperpolarization in the corresponding thalamic relay neurons, that in turn leads to the de-inactivation of voltage-gated T-type Ca2+-channels, switching neurons from tonic spiking to a pathological bursting regime. This thalamic bursting synchronises activity on a population level through

  1. Cortical Depth Dependence of the Diffusion Anisotropy in the Human Cortical Gray Matter In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625×0.625×3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo. PMID:24608869

  2. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  3. The cortical and sub-cortical network of sensory evoked response in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, M; Hellriegel, H; Groppa, S; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects during electrical stimulation of right median nerve at wrist. The multitaper method was used to estimate the power and coherence spectrum followed by the source analysis method dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) to find the highest coherent source for the basic frequency 3 Hz and the complete cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects. The highest coherent source for the basic frequency was in the posterior parietal cortex for all the subjects. The cortical and sub-cortical network comprised of the primary sensory motor cortex (SI), secondary sensory motor cortex (SII), frontal cortex and medial pulvinar nucleus in the thalamus. The cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence was found successfully with a 64-channel EEG system. The sensory evoked coherence is involved with a thalamo-cortical network in healthy subjects.

  4. Cortical thinning in former professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Mayinger, Michael; Muehlmann, Marc; Kaufmann, David; Lin, Alexander P; Steffinger, Denise; Fisch, Barbara; Rauchmann, Boris-Stephan; Immler, Stefanie; Karch, Susanne; Heinen, Florian R; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian; Stern, Robert A; Zafonte, Ross; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-09-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. Soccer players are at high risk for repetitive subconcussive head impact when heading the ball. Whether this leads to long-term alterations of the brain's structure associated with cognitive decline remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate cortical thickness in former professional soccer players using high-resolution structural MR imaging. Fifteen former male professional soccer players (mean age 49.3 [SD 5.1] years) underwent high-resolution structural 3 T MR imaging, as well as cognitive testing. Fifteen male, age-matched former professional non-contact sport athletes (mean age 49.6 [SD 6.4] years) served as controls. Group analyses of cortical thickness were performed using voxel-based statistics. Soccer players demonstrated greater cortical thinning with increasing age compared to controls in the right inferolateral-parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex. Cortical thinning was associated with lower cognitive performance as well as with estimated exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact. Neurocognitive evaluation revealed decreased memory performance in the soccer players compared to controls. The association of cortical thinning and decreased cognitive performance, as well as exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact, further supports the hypothesis that repetitive subconcussive head impact may play a role in early cognitive decline in soccer players. Future studies are needed to elucidate the time course of changes in cortical thickness as well as their association with impaired cognitive function and possible underlying neurodegenerative process.

  5. Development and evolution of cortical fields.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yoko; Pierani, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    The neocortex is the brain structure that has been subjected to a major size expansion, in its relative size, during mammalian evolution. It arises from the cortical primordium through coordinated growth of neural progenitor cells along both the tangential and radial axes and their patterning providing spatial coordinates. Functional neocortical areas are ultimately consolidated by environmental influences such as peripheral sensory inputs. Throughout neocortical evolution, cortical areas have become more sophisticated and numerous. This increase in number is possibly involved in the complexification of neocortical function in primates. Whereas extensive divergence of functional cortical fields is observed during evolution, the fundamental mechanisms supporting the allocation of cortical areas and their wiring are conserved, suggesting the presence of core genetic mechanisms operating in different species. We will discuss some of the basic molecular mechanisms including morphogen-dependent ones involved in the precise orchestration of neurogenesis in different cortical areas, elucidated from studies in rodents. Attention will be paid to the role of Cajal-Retzius neurons, which were recently proposed to be migrating signaling units also involved in arealization, will be addressed. We will further review recent works on molecular mechanisms of cortical patterning resulting from comparative analyses between different species during evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P < 0.001). The elastic moduli demonstrated significant differences between sites, and a distinct pattern where E3  > E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Reduced Cortical Thickness in Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Jiaojian; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2011-01-01

    Mental retardation is a developmental disorder associated with impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in adaptive behaviors. Many studies have addressed white matter abnormalities in patients with mental retardation, while the changes of the cerebral cortex have been studied to a lesser extent. Quantitative analysis of cortical integrity using cortical thickness measurement may provide new insights into the gray matter pathology. In this study, cortical thickness was compared between 13 patients with mental retardation and 26 demographically matched healthy controls. We found that patients with mental retardation had significantly reduced cortical thickness in multiple brain regions compared with healthy controls. These regions include the bilateral lingual gyrus, the bilateral fusiform gyrus, the bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, the bilateral temporal pole, the left inferior temporal gyrus, the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the right precentral gyrus. The observed cortical thickness reductions might be the anatomical substrates for the impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in adaptive behaviors in patients with mental retardation. Cortical thickness measurement might provide a sensitive prospective surrogate marker for clinical trials of neuroprotective medications. PMID:22216343

  8. Attention Increases Spike Count Correlations between Visual Cortical Areas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene R.

    2016-01-01

    Visual attention, which improves perception of attended locations or objects, has long been known to affect many aspects of the responses of neuronal populations in visual cortex. There are two nonmutually exclusive hypotheses concerning the neuronal mechanisms that underlie these perceptual improvements. The first hypothesis, that attention improves the information encoded by a population of neurons in a particular cortical area, has considerable physiological support. The second hypothesis is that attention improves perception by selectively communicating relevant visual information. This idea has been tested primarily by measuring interactions between neurons on very short timescales, which are mathematically nearly independent of neuronal interactions on longer timescales. We tested the hypothesis that attention changes the way visual information is communicated between cortical areas on longer timescales by recording simultaneously from neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) and the middle temporal area (MT) in rhesus monkeys. We used two independent and complementary approaches. Our correlative experiment showed that attention increases the trial-to-trial response variability that is shared between the two areas. In our causal experiment, we electrically microstimulated V1 and found that attention increased the effect of stimulation on MT responses. Together, our results suggest that attention affects both the way visual stimuli are encoded within a cortical area and the extent to which visual information is communicated between areas on behaviorally relevant timescales. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual attention dramatically improves the perception of attended stimuli. Attention has long been thought to act by selecting relevant visual information for further processing. It has been hypothesized that this selection is accomplished by increasing communication between neurons that encode attended information in different cortical areas. We recorded simultaneously

  9. Attention Increases Spike Count Correlations between Visual Cortical Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Douglas A; Cohen, Marlene R

    2016-07-13

    Visual attention, which improves perception of attended locations or objects, has long been known to affect many aspects of the responses of neuronal populations in visual cortex. There are two nonmutually exclusive hypotheses concerning the neuronal mechanisms that underlie these perceptual improvements. The first hypothesis, that attention improves the information encoded by a population of neurons in a particular cortical area, has considerable physiological support. The second hypothesis is that attention improves perception by selectively communicating relevant visual information. This idea has been tested primarily by measuring interactions between neurons on very short timescales, which are mathematically nearly independent of neuronal interactions on longer timescales. We tested the hypothesis that attention changes the way visual information is communicated between cortical areas on longer timescales by recording simultaneously from neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) and the middle temporal area (MT) in rhesus monkeys. We used two independent and complementary approaches. Our correlative experiment showed that attention increases the trial-to-trial response variability that is shared between the two areas. In our causal experiment, we electrically microstimulated V1 and found that attention increased the effect of stimulation on MT responses. Together, our results suggest that attention affects both the way visual stimuli are encoded within a cortical area and the extent to which visual information is communicated between areas on behaviorally relevant timescales. Visual attention dramatically improves the perception of attended stimuli. Attention has long been thought to act by selecting relevant visual information for further processing. It has been hypothesized that this selection is accomplished by increasing communication between neurons that encode attended information in different cortical areas. We recorded simultaneously from neurons in primary

  10. Decoupling of sleep-dependent cortical and hippocampal interactions in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Keith G; Bartsch, Ullrich; McCarthy, Andrew P; Edgar, Dale M; Tricklebank, Mark D; Wafford, Keith A; Jones, Matt W

    2012-11-08

    Rhythmic neural network activity patterns are defining features of sleep, but interdependencies between limbic and cortical oscillations at different frequencies and their functional roles have not been fully resolved. This is particularly important given evidence linking abnormal sleep architecture and memory consolidation in psychiatric diseases. Using EEG, local field potential (LFP), and unit recordings in rats, we show that anteroposterior propagation of neocortical slow-waves coordinates timing of hippocampal ripples and prefrontal cortical spindles during NREM sleep. This coordination is selectively disrupted in a rat neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia: fragmented NREM sleep and impaired slow-wave propagation in the model culminate in deficient ripple-spindle coordination and disrupted spike timing, potentially as a consequence of interneuronal abnormalities reflected by reduced parvalbumin expression. These data further define the interrelationships among slow-wave, spindle, and ripple events, indicating that sleep disturbances may be associated with state-dependent decoupling of hippocampal and cortical circuits in psychiatric diseases.

  11. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Allen W; Mohajerani, Majid H; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H

    2015-07-20

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections.

  12. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Allen W.; Mohajerani, Majid H.; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections. PMID:26190168

  13. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  14. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  15. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  16. Resonant antidromic cortical circuit activation as a consequence of high-frequency subthalamic deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Arbuthnott, G W; Jutras, M J; Goldberg, J A; Jaeger, D

    2007-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) for many patients. The most effective stimulation consists of high-frequency biphasic stimulation pulses around 130 Hz delivered between two active sites of an implanted depth electrode to the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Multiple studies have shown that a key effect of STN-DBS that correlates well with clinical outcome is the reduction of synchronous and oscillatory activity in cortical and basal ganglia networks. We hypothesized that antidromic cortical activation may provide an underlying mechanism responsible for this effect, because stimulation is usually performed in proximity to cortical efferent pathways. We show with intracellular cortical recordings in rats that STN-DBS did in fact lead to antidromic spiking of deep layer cortical neurons. Furthermore, antidromic spikes triggered a dampened oscillation of local field potentials in cortex with a resonant frequency around 120 Hz. The amplitude of antidromic activation was significantly correlated with an observed suppression of slow wave and beta band activity during STN-DBS. These findings were seen in ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane anesthesia in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Thus antidromic resonant activation of cortical microcircuits may make an important contribution toward counteracting the overly synchronous and oscillatory activity characteristic of cortical activity in PD.

  17. Relationships between behavior, brainstem and cortical encoding of seen and heard speech in musicians and non-musicians

    PubMed Central

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Strait, Dana; Kraus, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Musicians have a variety of perceptual and cortical specializations compared to non-musicians. Recent studies have shown that potentials evoked from primarily brainstem structures are enhanced in musicians, compared to non-musicians. Specifically, musicians have more robust representations of pitch periodicity and faster neural timing to sound onset when listening to sounds or both listening to and viewing a speaker. However, it is not known whether musician-related enhancements at the subcortical level are correlated with specializations in the cortex. Does musical training shape the auditory system in a coordinated manner or in disparate ways at cortical and subcortical levels? To answer this question, we recorded simultaneous brainstem and cortical evoked responses in musician and non-musician subjects. Brainstem response periodicity was related to early cortical response timing across all subjects, and this relationship was stronger in musicians. Peaks of the brainstem response evoked by sound onset and timbre cues were also related to cortical timing. Neurophysiological measures at both levels correlated with musical skill scores across all subjects. In addition, brainstem and cortical measures correlated with the age musicians began their training and the years of musical practice. Taken together, these data imply that neural representations of pitch, timing and timbre cues and cortical response timing are shaped in a coordinated manner, and indicate corticofugal modulation of subcortical afferent circuitry. PMID:18562137

  18. Relationships between behavior, brainstem and cortical encoding of seen and heard speech in musicians and non-musicians.

    PubMed

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Strait, Dana; Kraus, Nina

    2008-07-01

    Musicians have a variety of perceptual and cortical specializations compared to non-musicians. Recent studies have shown that potentials evoked from primarily brainstem structures are enhanced in musicians, compared to non-musicians. Specifically, musicians have more robust representations of pitch periodicity and faster neural timing to sound onset when listening to sounds or both listening to and viewing a speaker. However, it is not known whether musician-related enhancements at the subcortical level are correlated with specializations in the cortex. Does musical training shape the auditory system in a coordinated manner or in disparate ways at cortical and subcortical levels? To answer this question, we recorded simultaneous brainstem and cortical evoked responses in musician and non-musician subjects. Brainstem response periodicity was related to early cortical response timing across all subjects, and this relationship was stronger in musicians. Peaks of the brainstem response evoked by sound onset and timbre cues were also related to cortical timing. Neurophysiological measures at both levels correlated with musical skill scores across all subjects. In addition, brainstem and cortical measures correlated with the age musicians began their training and the years of musical practice. Taken together, these data imply that neural representations of pitch, timing and timbre cues and cortical response timing are shaped in a coordinated manner, and indicate corticofugal modulation of subcortical afferent circuitry.

  19. Low-frequency hippocampal–cortical activity drives brain-wide resting-state functional MRI connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Russell W.; Leong, Alex T. L.; Ho, Leon C.; Gao, Patrick P.; Wong, Eddie C.; Dong, Celia M.; Wang, Xunda; He, Jufang; Chan, Ying-Shing; Lim, Lee Wei; Wu, Ed X.

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus, including the dorsal dentate gyrus (dDG), and cortex engage in bidirectional communication. We propose that low-frequency activity in hippocampal–cortical pathways contributes to brain-wide resting-state connectivity to integrate sensory information. Using optogenetic stimulation and brain-wide fMRI and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI), we determined the large-scale effects of spatiotemporal-specific downstream propagation of hippocampal activity. Low-frequency (1 Hz), but not high-frequency (40 Hz), stimulation of dDG excitatory neurons evoked robust cortical and subcortical brain-wide fMRI responses. More importantly, it enhanced interhemispheric rsfMRI connectivity in various cortices and hippocampus. Subsequent local field potential recordings revealed an increase in slow oscillations in dorsal hippocampus and visual cortex, interhemispheric visual cortical connectivity, and hippocampal–cortical connectivity. Meanwhile, pharmacological inactivation of dDG neurons decreased interhemispheric rsfMRI connectivity. Functionally, visually evoked fMRI responses in visual regions also increased during and after low-frequency dDG stimulation. Together, our results indicate that low-frequency activity robustly propagates in the dorsal hippocampal–cortical pathway, drives interhemispheric cortical rsfMRI connectivity, and mediates visual processing. PMID:28760982

  20. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain’s frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain’s response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. Approach. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. Main results. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant’s accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Significance. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  1. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity.

    PubMed

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain's frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain's response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant's accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  2. Cortical hyperexcitability in response to preserved spinothalamic inputs immediately after spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Yague, J G; Foffani, G; Aguilar, J

    2011-02-01

    Chronic injury of the main somatosensory pathways ascending along the spinal cord - the dorsal columns and the spinothalamic tract - can produce both changes in the organization of cortical somatotopic maps and neuropathic pain. Little is known, however, about the early neurophysiological changes occurring immediately after injury. We bilaterally recorded the neural activity of the hindpaw representation of the primary somatosensory cortex evoked by stimuli delivered to the hindpaws before and immediately after a thoracic spinal cord hemisection in anesthetized rats. This unilateral spinal cord injury allowed us to separately investigate the cortical effects of deafferenting the dorsal column (stimuli ipsilateral to the hemisection) or the spinothalamic tract (stimuli contralateral to the hemisection). The hemisection produced immediate bilateral changes in the cortical responses evoked by stimuli delivered to the hindpaw ipsilateral to the hemisection (deafferented dorsal column): an expected loss of classical short-latency cortical responses, accompanied by an unexpected appearance of long-latency activations. At the population level, these activations reflected a progressive stimulus-induced transition of the hindpaw somatosensory cortex from up-and-down states to a sustained activated state. At the single-cell level, these cortical activations resembled the "wind-up" typically observed - with the same type of stimuli - in the dorsal horn cells originating the spinothalamic tract. Virtually no changes were observed in the responses evoked by stimuli delivered to the hindpaw contralateral to the hemisection (deafferented spinothalamic tract). These results suggest that spinal cord hemisection immediately produces an abnormal hyperexcitability of the primary somatosensory cortex in response to preserved spinothalamic inputs from the hindpaw. This immediate cortical hyperexcitability could be important to understand the long-term development of cortical

  3. Motor Cortical Plasticity to Training Started in Childhood: The Example of Piano Players

    PubMed Central

    Inuggi, Alberto; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J.; Spagnolo, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Nuara, Arturo; Houdayer, Elise; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence suggest that motor training is associated with early and late changes of the cortical motor system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility to study plastic rearrangements of the motor system in physiological and pathological conditions. We used TMS to characterize long-term changes in upper limb motor cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition associated with bimanual skill training in pianists who started playing in an early age. Ipsilateral silent period (iSP) and cortical TMS mapping of hand muscles were obtained from 30 strictly right-handed subjects (16 pianists, 14 naïve controls), together with electromyographic recording of mirror movements (MMs) to voluntary hand movements. In controls, motor cortical representation of hand muscles was larger on the dominant (DH) than on the non-dominant hemisphere (NDH). On the contrary, pianists showed symmetric cortical output maps, being their DH less represented than in controls. In naïve subjects, the iSP was smaller on the right vs left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) indicating a weaker inhibition from the NDH to the DH. In pianists, interhemispheric inhibition was more symmetric as their DH was better inhibited than in controls. Electromyographic MMs were observed only in naïve subjects (7/14) and only to voluntary movement of the non-dominant hand. Subjects with MM had a lower iSP area on the right APB compared with all the others. Our findings suggest a more symmetrical motor cortex organization in pianists, both in terms of muscle cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition. Although we cannot disentangle training-related from preexisting conditions, it is possible that long-term bimanual practice may reshape motor cortical representation and rebalance interhemispheric interactions, which in naïve right-handed subjects would both tend to favour the dominant hemisphere. PMID:27336584

  4. Does the Thalamo-Cortical Synchrony Play a Role in Seizure Termination?

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Elisa; Bénar, Christian; Bonini, Francesca; Carron, Romain; Colombet, Bruno; Régis, Jean; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying seizure termination are still unclear despite their therapeutic importance. We studied thalamo-cortical connectivity and synchrony in human mesial temporal lobe seizures in order to analyze their role in seizure termination. Twenty-two seizures from 10 patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing pre-surgical evaluation were analyzed using intracerebral recordings [stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)]. We performed a measure of SEEG signal interdependencies (non-linear correlation), to estimate the functional connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions. Then, we derived synchronization indices, namely global, thalamic, mesio-temporal, and thalamo-mesio temporal index at the onset and the end of seizures. In addition, an estimation of thalamic “outputs and inputs” connectivity was proposed. Thalamus was consistently involved in the last phase of all analyzed seizures and thalamic synchronization index was significantly more elevated at the end of seizure than at the onset. The global synchronization index at the end of seizure negatively correlated with seizure duration (p = 0.045) and in the same way the thalamic synchronization index showed an inverse tendency with seizure duration. Six seizures out of twenty-two displayed a particular thalamo-cortical spike-and-wave pattern at the end. They were associated to higher values of all synchronization indices and outputs from thalamus (p = 0.0079). SWP seizures displayed a higher and sustained increase of cortical and thalamo-cortical synchronization with a stronger participation of thalamic outputs. We suggest that thalamo-cortical oscillations might contribute to seizure termination via modulation of cortical synchronization. In the subgroup of SWP seizures, thalamus may exert a control on temporal lobe structures by inducing a stable hypersynchronization that ultimately leads to seizure termination. PMID:26388834

  5. A mathematical model of dysfunction of the thalamo-cortical loop in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rosjat, Nils; Popovych, Svitlana; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2014-10-18

    Recent experimental results suggest that impairment of auditory information processing in the thalamo-cortical loop is crucially related to schizophrenia. Large differences between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls were found in the cortical EEG signals. We derive a phenomenological mathematical model, based on coupled phase oscillators with continuously distributed frequencies to describe the neural activity of the thalamo-cortical loop. We examine the influence of the bidirectional coupling strengths between the thalamic and the cortical area with regard to the phase-locking effects observed in the experiments. We extend this approach to a model consisting of a thalamic area coupled to two cortical areas, each comprising a set of nonidentical phase oscillators. In the investigations of our model, we applied the Ott-Antonsen theory and the Pikovsky-Rosenblum reduction methods to the original system. The results derived from our mathematical model satisfactorily reproduce the experimental data obtained by EEG measurements. Furthermore, they show that modifying the coupling strength from the thalamic region to a cortical region affects the duration of phase synchronization, while a change in the feedback to the thalamus affects the strength of synchronization in the cortex. In addition, our model provides an explanation in terms of nonlinear dynamics as to why brain waves desynchronize after a given phase reset. Our model can explain functional differences seen between EEG records of healthy subjects and schizophrenia patients on a system theoretic basis. Because of this and its predictive character, the model may be considered to pave the way towards an early and reliable clinical detection of schizophrenia that is dependent on the interconnections between the thalamic and cortical regions. In particular, the model parameter that describes the strength of this connection can be used for a diagnostic classification of schizophrenia patients.

  6. Performance of a concurrent cognitive task modifies pre- and post-perturbation-evoked cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, George; Boe, Shaun G; Marlin, Amanda; McIlroy, William E

    2017-02-16

    Preparation for postural instability engages cortical resources that serve to optimize compensatory balance responses. Engagement of these cortical resources in cognitive dual-task activities may impact the ability to appropriately prepare and optimize responses to instability. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive dual-task activities influenced cortical activity preceding and following postural instability. Postural instability was induced using a lean-and-release paradigm in 10 healthy participants. Perturbations were either temporally predictable (PRED) or unpredictable (UNPRED) and presented with (COG) or without a cognitive dual-task, presented in blocks of trials. The electroencephalogram was recorded from multiple frontal electrode sites. EEG data were averaged over 25-35 trials across conditions. Area under the curve of pre-perturbation cortical activity and peak latency and amplitude of post-perturbation cortical activity were quantified at the Cz site and compared across conditions. Performance of the concurrent cognitive task reduced the mean (SE) magnitude of pre-perturbation cortical activity in advance of predictable bouts of postural instability (PRED: 18.7(3.0)mVms; PRED-COG; 14.0(2.3)mVms). While the level of cognitive load influenced the amplitude of the post-perturbation N1 potential in the predictable conditions, there were no changes in N1 with a cognitive dual task during unpredictable conditions (PRED: -32.1(3.2)µV; PRED-COG: -50.8(8.4)µV; UNPRED: -65.0(12.2)µV; UNPRED-COG: -64.2(12.7)µV). Performance of the cognitive task delayed and reduced the magnitude of the initial gastrocnemius response. The findings indicate that pre- and post-perturbation cortical activity is affected by a cognitive distractor when postural instability is temporally predictable. Distraction also influences associated muscle responses.

  7. Reduced modulation of scanpaths in response to task demands in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Pertzov, Yoni; Yong, Keir X X; Nicholas, Jennifer; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-02-01

    A difficulty in perceiving visual scenes is one of the most striking impairments experienced by patients with the clinico-radiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy (PCA). However whilst a number of studies have investigated perception of relatively simple experimental stimuli in these individuals, little is known about multiple object and complex scene perception and the role of eye movements in posterior cortical atrophy. We embrace the distinction between high-level (top-down) and low-level (bottom-up) influences upon scanning eye movements when looking at scenes. This distinction was inspired by Yarbus (1967), who demonstrated how the location of our fixations is affected by task instructions and not only the stimulus' low level properties. We therefore examined how scanning patterns are influenced by task instructions and low-level visual properties in 7 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 8 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease, and 19 healthy age-matched controls. Each participant viewed 10 scenes under four task conditions (encoding, recognition, search and description) whilst eye movements were recorded. The results reveal significant differences between groups in the impact of test instructions upon scanpaths. Across tasks without a search component, posterior cortical atrophy patients were significantly less consistent than typical Alzheimer's disease patients and controls in where they were looking. By contrast, when comparing search and non-search tasks, it was controls who exhibited lowest between-task similarity ratings, suggesting they were better able than posterior cortical atrophy or typical Alzheimer's disease patients to respond appropriately to high-level needs by looking at task-relevant regions of a scene. Posterior cortical atrophy patients had a significant tendency to fixate upon more low-level salient parts of the scenes than controls irrespective of the viewing task. The study provides a detailed characterisation of

  8. Effects of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on long-latency reflexes and cortical relay time.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Sair, Ahmet; Parlaz, Ahu; Deneri, Ersin

    2011-06-01

    Long-latency reflexes (LLRs) of hand muscles include a transcortical component. Cortical relay time estimated by the subtraction of motor and somatosensory evoked potentials from LLR reflects the physiology of the central neural pathway of LLR. It is believed that 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex can decrease cortical excitability for approximately 15 minutes at intracortical level. The aim of the study was to analyze LLR and cortical relay time before and after 1-Hz rTMS. Long-latency reflex and H reflex obtained from the thenar muscles by electrical stimulation of the median nerve of 16 healthy subjects. Additionally, motor evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials were also recorded. Cortical relay time was calculated by the subtraction of motor evoked potential and somatosensory evoked potential latencies from LLR. These electrophysiologic recordings were performed before and after 15 minutes of 1-Hz rTMS over the motor area for the thenar muscles in the primary motor cortex. The amplitudes of LLR and motor evoked potential were significantly decreased after rTMS, but the H reflex of the thenar muscle and somatosensory evoked potentials were unchanged. The major finding of our study was a shortened duration of cortical relay time after rTMS. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the LLR of the thenar muscles has a transcortical pathway and cortical relay time that can give some information about the physiology of the intracortical pathway of LLR.

  9. Estimation of neural dynamics from MEG/EEG cortical current density maps: application to the reconstruction of large-scale cortical synchrony.

    PubMed

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Cosmelli, Diego; Varela, Francisco J

    2002-09-01

    There is a growing interest in elucidating the role of specific patterns of neural dynamics--such as transient synchronization between distant cell assemblies--in brain functions. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography (EEG) recordings consist in the spatial integration of the activity from large and multiple remotely located populations of neurons. Massive diffusive effects and poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) preclude the proper estimation of indices related to cortical dynamics from nonaveraged MEG/EEG surface recordings. Source localization from MEG/EEG surface recordings with its excellent time resolution could contribute to a better understanding of the working brain. We propose a robust and original approach to the MEG/EEG distributed inverse problem to better estimate neural dynamics of cortical sources. For this, the surrogate data method is introduced in the MEG/EEG inverse problem framework. We apply this approach on nonaveraged data with poor SNR using the minimum norm estimator and find source localization results weakly sensitive to noise. Surrogates allow the reduction of the source space in order to reconstruct MEG/EEG data with reduced biases in both source localization and time-series dynamics. Monte Carlo simulations and results obtained from real MEG data indicate it is possible to estimate non invasively an important part of cortical source locations and dynamic and, therefore, to reveal brain functional networks.

  10. Fast increase of motor cortical inhibition following postural changes in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Loriga, Rita; Pompa, Maria Novella; Versace, Viviana; Souchard, Philippe

    2012-11-14

    Postural reactions are associated with changes in the excitability of the motor system. In the present study we investigated the presence of neurophysiological changes of motor cortical areas targeting muscles of the inferior limbs following treatment with a physiotherapy technique aimed to treat postural dysfunctions by stretching postural muscles, global postural reeducation (GPR). Twenty healthy subjects were evaluated with paired-transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex and recording of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from peripheral muscles of the inferior limb before and after two GPR manoeuvres applied in different experiments (1 and 2). The effects of GPR were posture- and task-specific: indeed, a GPR manoeuvre applied in standing subjects increased inhibition in cortical areas controlling flexor muscles (Biceps Femoris: p<0.05) while increasing the excitation of cortical areas controlling extensor muscles (Tibialis Anterior: p<0.05). On the other hand, following a GPR manoeuvre applied in subjects in supine position, increased inhibition in cortical areas controlling flexor muscles (Biceps Femoris and Soleus) was not paralleled by excitation of extensor ones (F=12.2; p=0.005). These findings provide a neurophysiological basis to the clinical benefits associated to physiotherapy and suggest potential applications of treatments based on postural changes on motor cortical disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Robust Cortical Entrainment to the Speech Envelope Relies on the Spectro-temporal Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nai; Chatterjee, Monita; Simon, Jonathan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Speech recognition is robust to background noise. One underlying neural mechanism is that the auditory system segregates speech from the listening background and encodes it reliably. Such robust internal representation has been demonstrated in auditory cortex by neural activity entrained to the temporal envelope of speech. A paradox, however, then arises, as the spectro-temporal fine structure rather than the temporal envelope is known to be the major cue to segregate target speech from background noise. Does the reliable cortical entrainment in fact reflect a robust internal “synthesis” of the attended speech stream rather than direct tracking of the acoustic envelope? Here, we test this hypothesis by degrading the spectro-temporal fine structure while preserving the temporal envelope using vocoders. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings reveal that cortical entrainment to vocoded speech is severely degraded by background noise, in contrast to the robust entrainment to natural speech. Furthermore, cortical entrainment in the delta-band (1–4 Hz) predicts the speech recognition score at the level of individual listeners. These results demonstrate that reliable cortical entrainment to speech relies on the spectro-temporal fine structure, and suggest that cortical entrainment to the speech envelope is not merely a representation of the speech envelope but a coherent representation of multiscale spectro-temporal features that are synchronized to the syllabic and phrasal rhythms of speech. PMID:24188816

  12. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing.

    PubMed

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-10-15

    When two tones with slightly different frequencies are presented to both ears, they interact in the central auditory system and induce the sensation of a beating sound. At low difference frequencies, we perceive a single sound, which is moving across the head between the left and right ears. The percept changes to loudness fluctuation, roughness, and pitch with increasing beat rate. To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate between 3 Hz and 60 Hz. Binaural beat responses were analyzed as neuromagnetic oscillations following the trajectory of the stimulus rate. Responses were largest in the 40-Hz gamma range and at low frequencies. Binaural beat responses at 3 Hz showed opposite polarity in the left and right auditory cortices. We suggest that this difference in polarity reflects the opponent neural population code for representing sound location. Binaural beats at any rate induced gamma oscillations. However, the responses were largest at 40-Hz stimulation. We propose that the neuromagnetic gamma oscillations reflect postsynaptic modulation that allows for precise timing of cortical neural firing. Systematic phase differences between bilateral responses suggest that separate sound representations of a sound object exist in the left and right auditory cortices. We conclude that binaural processing at the cortical level occurs with the same temporal acuity as monaural processing whereas the identification of sound location requires further interpretation and is limited by the rate of object representations. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Cortical differentiation of speech and nonspeech sounds at 100 ms: implications for dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Salmelin, Riitta

    2005-07-01

    Neurophysiological measures indicate cortical sensitivity to speech sounds by 150 ms after stimulus onset. In this time window dyslexic subjects start to show abnormal cortical processing. We investigated whether phonetic analysis is reflected in the robust auditory cortical activation at approximately 100 ms (N100m), and whether dyslexic subjects show abnormal N100m responses to speech or nonspeech sounds. We used magnetoencephalography to record auditory responses of 10 normally reading and 10 dyslexic adults. The speech stimuli were synthetic Finnish speech sounds (/a/, /u/, /pa/, /ka/). The nonspeech stimuli were complex nonspeech sounds and simple sine wave tones, composed of the F1+F2+F3 and F2 formant frequencies of the speech sounds, respectively. All sounds evoked a prominent N100m response in the bilateral auditory cortices. The N100m activation was stronger to speech than nonspeech sounds in the left but not in the right auditory cortex, in both subject groups. The leftward shift of hemispheric balance for speech sounds is likely to reflect analysis at the phonetic level. In dyslexic subjects the overall interhemispheric amplitude balance and timing were altered for all sound types alike. Dyslexic individuals thus seem to have an unusual cortical organization of general auditory processing in the time window of speech-sensitive analysis.

  14. Rate and Temporal Coding Convey Multisensory Information in Primary Sensory Cortices.

    PubMed

    Bieler, Malte; Sieben, Kay; Cichon, Nicole; Schildt, Sandra; Röder, Brigitte; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L

    2017-01-01

    Optimal behavior and survival result from integration of information across sensory systems. Modulation of network activity at the level of primary sensory cortices has been identified as a mechanism of cross-modal integration, yet its cellular substrate is still poorly understood. Here, we uncover the mechanisms by which individual neurons in primary somatosensory (S1) and visual (V1) cortices encode visual-tactile stimuli. For this, simultaneous extracellular recordings were performed from all layers of the S1 barrel field and V1 in Brown Norway rats in vivo and units were clustered and assigned to pyramidal neurons (PYRs) and interneurons (INs). We show that visual-tactile stimulation modulates the firing rate of a relatively low fraction of neurons throughout all cortical layers. Generally, it augments the firing of INs and decreases the activity of PYRs. Moreover, bimodal stimulation shapes the timing of neuronal firing by strengthening the phase-coupling between neuronal discharge and theta-beta band network oscillations as well as by modulating spiking onset. Sparse direct axonal projections between neurons in S1 and V1 seem to time the spike trains between the two cortical areas and, thus, may act as a substrate of cross-modal modulation. These results indicate that few cortical neurons mediate multisensory effects in primary sensory areas by directly encoding cross-modal information by their rate and timing of firing.

  15. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Puccini, Gabriel D; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Compte, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  16. Stability of muscle synergies for voluntary actions after cortical stroke in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent C. K.; Piron, Lamberto; Agostini, Michela; Silvoni, Stefano; Turolla, Andrea; Bizzi, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Production of voluntary movements relies critically on the functional integration of several motor cortical areas, such as the primary motor cortex, and the spinal circuitries. Surprisingly, after almost 40 years of research, how the motor cortices specify descending neural signals destined for the downstream interneurons and motoneurons has remained elusive. In light of the many recent experimental demonstrations that the motor system may coordinate muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies, we hypothesize that the motor cortices may function to select and activate fixed muscle synergies specified by the spinal or brainstem networks. To test this hypothesis, we recorded electromyograms (EMGs) from 12–16 upper arm and shoulder muscles from both the unaffected and the stroke-affected arms of stroke patients having moderate-to-severe unilateral ischemic lesions in the frontal motor cortical areas. Analyses of EMGs using a nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm revealed that in seven of eight patients the muscular compositions of the synergies for both the unaffected and the affected arms were strikingly similar to each other despite differences in motor performance between the arms, and differences in cerebral lesion sizes and locations between patients. This robustness of muscle synergies that we observed supports the notion that descending cortical signals represent neuronal drives that select, activate, and flexibly combine muscle synergies specified by networks in the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Our conclusion also suggests an approach to stroke rehabilitation by focusing on those synergies with altered activations after stroke. PMID:19880747

  17. Laterality of motor cortical function measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Park, Susanna B; Howells, James; Huynh, William; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Matamala, José M; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Threshold tracking paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TTTMS) examines cortical function and is useful for diagnosis of motor neuron disorders. Differences in cortical function have been identified between dominant and non-dominant limbs using constant stimulus methods, but they remain unclear, potentially due to methodological differences. In this study we aimed to clarify differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant limbs using TTTMS. Single-pulse TMS, TTTMS, and nerve conduction studies were performed in 25 healthy, right-handed participants by recording from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. There were no side-to-side differences observed in resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, central motor conduction time, cortical silent period, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, CMAP latency, F-wave latency, or neurophysiological index. These findings suggest that, when using TTTMS, there are no differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Muscle Nerve 55: 424-427, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Desynchronization of the Rat Cortical Network and Excitation of White Matter Neurons by Neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Case, Lovisa; Lyons, David J; Broberger, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Cortical network activity correlates with vigilance state: Deep sleep is characterized by slow, synchronized oscillations, whereas desynchronized, stochastic discharge is typical of the waking state. Neuropeptides, such as orexin and substance P but also neurotensin (NT), promote arousal. Relatively little is known about if NT can directly affect the cortical network, and if so, through which mechanisms and cellular targets. Here, we addressed these issues using rat in vitro cortex preparations. Following NT application specifically to deeper layers, slow oscillation activity was attenuated with a significant reduction in UP state frequency. The cortical response to thalamic stimulation exhibited enhanced temporal precision in the presence of NT, consistent with the transition in vivo from sleep to wakefulness. These changes were associated with a relative shift toward inhibition in the excitation/inhibition balance. Whole-cell recordings from layer 6 revealed presynaptically driven NT-induced inhibition of pyramidal neurons and excitation of fast-spiking interneurons. Deeper in the cortex, neurons within the white matter (WM) were strongly depolarized by NT application. The colocalization of NT and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivities in deep layer fibers throughout the cortical mantle indicates mediation via dopaminergic systems. These data suggest a cortical mechanism for NT-induced wakefulness and support a role for WM neurons in state control. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Rate and Temporal Coding Convey Multisensory Information in Primary Sensory Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Kay; Cichon, Nicole; Schildt, Sandra; Röder, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Optimal behavior and survival result from integration of information across sensory systems. Modulation of network activity at the level of primary sensory cortices has been identified as a mechanism of cross-modal integration, yet its cellular substrate is still poorly understood. Here, we uncover the mechanisms by which individual neurons in primary somatosensory (S1) and visual (V1) cortices encode visual-tactile stimuli. For this, simultaneous extracellular recordings were performed from all layers of the S1 barrel field and V1 in Brown Norway rats in vivo and units were clustered and assigned to pyramidal neurons (PYRs) and interneurons (INs). We show that visual-tactile stimulation modulates the firing rate of a relatively low fraction of neurons throughout all cortical layers. Generally, it augments the firing of INs and decreases the activity of PYRs. Moreover, bimodal stimulation shapes the timing of neuronal firing by strengthening the phase-coupling between neuronal discharge and theta–beta band network oscillations as well as by modulating spiking onset. Sparse direct axonal projections between neurons in S1 and V1 seem to time the spike trains between the two cortical areas and, thus, may act as a substrate of cross-modal modulation. These results indicate that few cortical neurons mediate multisensory effects in primary sensory areas by directly encoding cross-modal information by their rate and timing of firing. PMID:28374008

  20. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Troutman, Susan L.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of varying the osmolality of luminal solutions on the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-independent water and solute permeability properties of isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules. In the absence of ADH, the osmotic water permeability coefficient (cm s–1) Pfl→b, computed from volume flows from hypotonic lumen to isotonic bath, was 20 ± 4 x 10–4 (SEM); the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, computed from volume flows from isotonic bath to hypertonic lumen, was 88 ± 15 x 10–4 cm s–1. We also measured apparent urea permeability coefficients (cm s–1) from 14C-urea fluxes from lumen to bath (PDDureal→b) and from bath to lumen (PDDureab→l). For hypotonic luminal solutions and isotonic bathing solutions, PDDureal→b was 0.045 ± 0.004 x 10–4 and was unaffected by ADH. The ADH-independent values of PDDureal→b and Pureab→l were, respectively, 0.216 ± 0.022 x 10–4 cm s–1 and 0.033 ± 0.002 x 10–4 cm s–1 for isotonic bathing solutions and luminal solutions made hypertonic with urea, i.e., there was an absolute increase in urea permeability and asymmetry of urea fluxes. Significantly, PDDureal→b did not rise when luminal hypertonicity was produced by sucrose; and, bathing fluid hypertonicity did not alter tubular permeability to water or to urea. We interpret these data to indicate that luminal hypertonicity increased the leakiness of tight junctions to water and urea but not sucrose. Since the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, when tight junctions were open to urea, was approximately half of the value of Pfl→b in the presence of ADH, when tight junctions were closed to urea, we conclude that tight junctions are negligible paracellular shunts for lumen to bath osmosis with ADH. These findings, together with those in the preceding paper, are discussed in terms of a solubility-diffusion model for water permeation in which ADH increases water solubility in luminal

  1. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Krause, Matthew R.; Mazer, James A.

    2012-01-01

    During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010), the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009), sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory responses. PMID:22783169

  2. Hippocampal structure predicts cortical indices of reactivation of related items.

    PubMed

    Walker, John A; Low, Kathy A; Fletcher, Mark A; Cohen, Neal J; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2017-01-27

    One of the key components of relational memory is the ability to bind together the constituent elements of a memory experience, and this ability is thought to be supported by the hippocampus. Previously we had shown that these relational bindings can be used to reactivate the cortical processors of an absent item in the presence of a relationally bound associate (Walker et al., 2014). Specifically, we recorded the event-related optical signal (EROS) when presenting the scene of a face-scene pair during a preview period immediately preceding a test display, and demonstrated reactivation of a face-processing cortical area (the superior temporal sulcus, STS) for scenes that had been previously paired with faces, relative to scenes that had not. Here we combined the EROS measures during the same preview paradigm with anatomical estimates of hippocampal integrity (structural MRI measures of hippocampal volume and diffusion tensor imaging measures of mean fractional anisotropy and diffusivity) to provide evidence that the hippocampus is mediating this reactivation phenomenon. The study was run in a sample of older adults aged 55-87, taking advantage of the high amount of hippocampal variability present in aging. We replicated the functional reactivation of STS during the preview period, specific to scenes previously paired with faces. Crucially, we also found that this phenomenon is correlated with structural hippocampus integrity. Both STS reactivation and hippocampal structure predicted subsequent recognition performance. These data support the theory that relational memory is sustained by an interaction between hippocampal and cortical sensory processing regions, and that these functions may be at the basis of episodic memory changes in normal aging.

  3. Neural network model of cortical EEG response to olfactory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, George L.; Van Toller, Steve

    1995-04-01

    We describe three experiments attempting to model differences in cortical EEG following stimulation with different odors. The data used in these experiments was obtained in previous studies, described briefly here. Subjects sit in an environmentally stabilized low odor cubicle. Twenty-eight electrodes are placed on the scalp and connect the subject to a neurosciences brain imager, which digitizes cortical EEG response. In a given trial, a specific odor is introduced, and the response recorded. In the first experiment, alpha wave data from a subset of ten electrodes and a single subject was used. In the original experiment, the subject was presented with a number of odors and the resulting brain electrical activity was resolved into 16 time slices (5 preceding presentation, 4 during presentation and 7 following presentation). Only data from frames 6, 7 and 8 (during presentation) was used here. A model was constructed to discriminate morning from afternoon responses. The network used measurements from 10 electrodes as input, and backpropagation was used for training. During training, the network was presented with responses to just one odor. Generalization was demonstrated for five other odors. The weights in the network have been analyzed and indicate a role for a specific group of electrode sites in this discrimination. The second experiment involved constructing a network to discriminate cortical EEG responses to two odors. In the original experiment from which we drew our data, fourteen subjects were presented with each odor once. Data from only the frame at first presentation of the odor were used here. Data from three subjects (chosen pseudo-randomly) was selected for use in the generalization phase and dropped from the training set. Output targets were constructed that took account of subjective ratings of `pleasantness.' A feed-forward network with twenty-eight input units was trained using data from the eleven remaining subjects, using conjugate gradient

  4. Radiological aspects of prenatal-onset cortical hyperostosis [Caffey Dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S

    2012-04-01

    Cortical hyperostosis is a bone disease that may, at times, occur with a prenatal onset. This study seeks to present the characteristic patterns of prenatal-onset cortical hyperostosis (PCH) with regard to the radiographic features, and tries to ascertain whether PCH is a separate entity from infantile cortical hyperostosis (ICH), known as classic Caffey Disease. This retrospective study identified cases with PCH based upon abnormal radiographic and chondro-osseous morphological and clinical findings, as available, from the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry between 1987 and 2009. Outcomes and clinical information were also identified from medical records. Based upon radiographic results, we found 20 individuals with PCH, of whom 10 neonatally survived, and 10 died. Hyperostosis of the mandible was found in 18/20, and of the skull base in 16/20 cases. Hyperostosis of the ribs was found in 17/20 cases, of the scapulae in 14/20, and of the clavicles in 4/20. Hyperostosis of the ileum was found in 11/20 cases, and of the long bones in all 20/20 cases, of which three cases had fibula sparing. No hyperostosis of the hands, feet, and spine was found. Our results suggest that, based upon clinical features and radiographic expression, ICH and PCH represent two separate entities, and that ICH should continue to be referred to as Caffey Disease and that PCH should be called Caffey Dysplasia. The findings of symmetrical hyperostosis of the mandible, ribs, scapulae, ilea, and long bones in any combination should suggest the diagnosis of PCH. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortical and subcortical mechanisms of brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Martuzzi, Roberto; Schurger, Aaron; Blefari, Maria Laura; Del Millán, José R; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-03-21

    Technical advances in the field of Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) enable users to control a variety of external devices such as robotic arms, wheelchairs, virtual entities and communication systems through the decoding of brain signals in real time. Most BMI systems sample activity from restricted brain regions, typically the motor and premotor cortex, with limited spatial resolution. Despite the growing number of applications, the cortical and subcortical systems involved in BMI control are currently unknown at the whole-brain level. Here, we provide a comprehensive and detailed report of the areas active during on-line BMI control. We recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants controlled an EEG-based BMI inside the scanner. We identified the regions activated during BMI control and how they overlap with those involved in motor imagery (without any BMI control). In addition, we investigated which regions reflect the subjective sense of controlling a BMI, the sense of agency for BMI-actions. Our data revealed an extended cortical-subcortical network involved in operating a motor-imagery BMI. This includes not only sensorimotor regions but also the posterior parietal cortex, the insula and the lateral occipital cortex. Interestingly, the basal ganglia and the anterior cingulate cortex were involved in the subjective sense of controlling the BMI. These results inform basic neuroscience by showing that the mechanisms of BMI control extend beyond sensorimotor cortices. This knowledge may be useful for the development of BMIs that offer a more natural and embodied feeling of control for the user. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. VEP indices of cortical lateral interactions in epilepsy treatment.

    PubMed

    Conte, Mary M; Victor, Jonathan D

    2009-05-01

    We extend Spekreijse's strategy for analyzing lateral interactions in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to clinical neurophysiologic testing of patients with epilepsy. Stimuli consisted of the radial windmill/dartboard pattern [Ratliff, F., & Zemon, V. (1982). Some new methods for the analysis of lateral interactions that influence the visual evoked potential. In: Bodis-Wollner (Ed.), Evoked potentials, Vol. 388. (pp. 113-124). New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.] and conventional checkerboards. The fundamental and 2nd-harmonic components of the steady-state responses were used to calculate indices reflecting facilitatory (FI) and suppressive (SI) cortical interactions. We carried out two studies. In the first, VEPs in 38 patients receiving antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy were compared to those of age-matched controls. For three AEDs (tiagabine, topiramate, and felbamate), addition of the drug did not change the FI and SI compared to baseline values or those of normal controls. However, the addition of gabapentin was associated with an increase of the FI, and this change was reversed when the medication was withdrawn. This suggested a medication-specific change in cortical lateral interactions. The second study focused on the effects of neurostimulation therapy. Eleven epilepsy patients receiving chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) treatment were tested. By comparing VEPs recorded with the stimulator on (Stim-ON) and turned off (Stim-OFF) in the same session, we determined that VNS did not have a short-acting effect on lateral interactions. However, when compared with normal controls, the VNS patients had a significantly smaller SI (p<.05), but no difference in the FI, demonstrating the presence of a chronic effect. We conclude that with the appropriate stimuli, VEPs can be used as a measure of cortical lateral interactions in normals and epileptic patients, and demonstrate specific changes in these interactions associated with certain treatment

  7. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    PubMed Central

    van Wassenhove, Virginie; Grzeczkowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al., 2010). Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient color changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the “where” and the “when” of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or center of the screen. Participants counted color changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right, or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants' attention directed to visual inputs. Second, color changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (“when” prediction) seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of “when” a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that “where” predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds. PMID:25705174

  8. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John D.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input–output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  9. Transcranial electric stimulation entrains cortical neuronal populations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Simal; Sirota, Anton; Belluscio, Mariano A.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Stark, Eran; Koch, Christof; Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Low intensity electric fields have been suggested to affect the ongoing neuronal activity in vitro and in human studies. However, the physiological mechanism of how weak electrical fields affect and interact with intact brain activity is not well understood. We performed in vivo extracellular and intracellular recordings from the neocortex and hippocampus of anaesthetized rats and extracellular recordings in behaving rats. Electric fields were generated by sinusoid patterns at slow frequency (0.8, 1.25 or 1.7 Hz) via electrodes placed on the surface of the skull or the dura. Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) reliably entrained neurons in widespread cortical areas, including the hippocampus. The percentage of TES phase-locked neurons increased with stimulus intensity and depended on the behavioral state of the animal. TES-induced voltage gradient, as low as 1 mV/mm at the recording sites, was sufficient to phase-bias neuronal spiking. Intracellular recordings showed that both spiking and subthreshold activity were under the combined influence of TES forced fields and network activity. We suggest that TES in chronic preparations may be used for experimental and therapeutic control of brain activity. PMID:20739569

  10. Quantitative radiology: radiogrammetry of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Dequeker, J

    1976-11-01

    Based on personal experience and data in the literature, an overview is given of radiogrammetry of cortical bone of the second metacarpal. There is a within- and between-observer error which amounts respectively to 1.2 and 1.5% for the outer diameter and 4.8 and 6.4% for the inner diameter. The systematic + or-- trend between observers indicates that one observer working according to certain defined rules obtains the most reliable results. There is a large variability in amount of bone within one age and sex group which is partly due to skeletal size differences, are insufficient since skeletal size differences still exist. The variability is reduced when the data are divided into strata of skeletal size. Since cortical area shows the best correlation with outer diameter within each age group and since cortical area represents best the ash content of the bones the values of this index are most suited to be grouped according to outer diameter. In differentiating pathological from physiological bone loss this procedure is an improvement on the previously published indices of amount of bone. When comparing different populations this method has advantages since skeletal size differences are eliminated. Comparing seven populations it was found that populations living in the United States of America have more bone for a given skeletal size than populations in Europe or Nigeria. Bone loss with age is a general phenomenon but differences in rate of loss are observed between the sexes and between ethnic different populations. The decrease of bone mass is faster after the age of 50 years in woman than in men. Blacks living in the United States loose less bone with age than whites. Radiogrammetry of cortical bone in groups gives useful information on bond remodelling during ageing and in pathological conditions. At an individual level, however, it is difficult to evaluate changes on a short term basis with radiogrammetry. Radiogrammetry of cortical bone is a simple and

  11. Cortical hierarchy governs rat claustrocortical circuit organization.

    PubMed

    White, Michael G; Cody, Patrick A; Bubser, Michael; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Mathur, Brian N

    2017-04-15

    The claustrum is a telencephalic gray matter structure with various proposed functions, including sensory integration and attentional allocation. Underlying these concepts is the reciprocal connectivity of the claustrum with most, if not all, areas of the cortex. What remains to be elucidated to inform functional hypotheses further is whether a pattern exists in the strength of connectivity between a given cortical area and the claustrum. To this end, we performed a series of retrograde neuronal tract tracer injections into rat cortical areas along the cortical processing hierarchy, from primary sensory and motor to frontal cortices. We observed that the number of claustrocortical projections increased as a function of processing hierarchy; claustrum neurons projecting to primary sensory cortices were scant and restricted in distribution across the claustrum, whereas neurons projecting to the cingulate cortex were densely packed and more evenly distributed throughout the claustrum. This connectivity pattern suggests that the claustrum may preferentially subserve executive functions orchestrated by the cingulate cortex. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1347-1362, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cortical Gyrification Patterns Associated with Trait Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Miskovich, Tara A.; Pedersen, Walker S.; Belleau, Emily L.; Shollenbarger, Skyler; Lisdahl, Krista M.; Larson, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    Dispositional anxiety is a stable personality trait that is a key risk factor for internalizing disorders, and understanding the neural correlates of trait anxiety may help us better understand the development of these disorders. Abnormal cortical folding is thought to reflect differences in cortical connectivity occurring during brain development. Therefore, assessing gyrification may advance understanding of cortical development and organization associated with trait anxiety. Previous literature has revealed structural abnormalities in trait anxiety and related disorders, but no study to our knowledge has examined gyrification in trait anxiety. We utilized a relatively novel measure, the local gyrification index (LGI), to explore differences in gyrification as a function of trait anxiety. We obtained structural MRI scans using a 3T magnetic resonance scanner on 113 young adults. Results indicated a negative correlation between trait anxiety and LGI in the left superior parietal cortex, specifically the precuneus, reflecting less cortical complexity among those high on trait anxiety. Our findings suggest that aberrations in cortical gyrification in a key region of the default mode network is a correlate of trait anxiety and may reflect disrupted local parietal connectivity. PMID:26872350

  13. Automatic parcellation of longitudinal cortical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alassaf, Manal H.; Hahn, James K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel automatic method to parcellate the cortical surfaces of the neonatal brain longitudinal atlas at different stages of development. A labeled brain atlas of newborn at 41 weeks gestational age (GA) is used to propagate labels of anatomical regions of interest to an unlabeled spatio-temporal atlas, which provides a dynamic model of brain development at each week between 28-44 GA weeks. First, labels from the cortical volume of the labeled newborn brain are propagated to an age-matched cortical surface from the spatio-temporal atlas. Then, labels are propagated across the cortical surfaces of each week of the spatio-temporal atlas by registering successive cortical surfaces using a novel approach and an energy optimization function. This procedure incorporates local and global, spatial and temporal information when assigning the labels to each surface. The result is a complete parcellation of 17 neonatal brain surfaces of the spatio-temporal atlas with similar points per labels distributions across weeks.

  14. Micromechanics of osteonal cortical bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Guo, X E; Liang, L C; Goldstein, S A

    1998-02-01

    Microcracks have been associated with age-related bone tissue fragility and fractures. The objective of this study was to develop a simple osteonal cortical bone model and apply linear elastic fracture mechanics theory to understand the micromechanics of the fracture process in osteonal cortical bone and its dependence on material properties. The linear fracture mechanics of our composite model of cortical bone, consisting of an osteon and interstitial bone tissue, was characterized in terms of a stress intensity factor (SIF) near the tip of a microcrack. The interaction between a microcrack and an osteon was studied for different types of osteons and various spacing between the crack and the osteon. The results of the analysis indicate that the fracture mechanics of osteonal cortical bone is dominated by the modulus ratio between the osteon and interstitial bone tissue: A soft osteon promotes microcrack propagation toward the osteon (and cement line) while a stiff one repels the microcrack from the osteon (and cement line). These findings suggest that newly formed, low-stiffness osteons may toughen cortical bone tissue by promoting crack propagation toward osteons. A relatively accurate empirical formula also was obtained to provide an easy estimation of the influence of osteons on the stress intensity factor.

  15. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices

    PubMed Central

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001 PMID:24843007

  16. Role of cortical bone in hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In this review, I consider the varied mechanisms in cortical bone that help preserve its integrity and how they deteriorate with aging. Aging affects cortical bone in two ways: extrinsically through its effects on the individual that modify its mechanical loading experience and 'milieu interieur'; and intrinsically through the prolonged cycle of remodelling and renewal extending to an estimated 20 years in the proximal femur. Healthy femoral cortex incorporates multiple mechanisms that help prevent fracture. These have been described at multiple length scales from the individual bone mineral crystal to the scale of the femur itself and appear to operate hierarchically. Each cortical bone fracture begins as a sub-microscopic crack that enlarges under mechanical load, for example, that imposed by a fall. In these conditions, a crack will enlarge explosively unless the cortical bone is intrinsically tough (the opposite of brittle). Toughness leads to microscopic crack deflection and bridging and may be increased by adequate regulation of both mineral crystal size and the heterogeneity of mineral and matrix phases. The role of osteocytes in optimising toughness is beginning to be worked out; but many osteocytes die in situ without triggering bone renewal over a 20-year cycle, with potential for increasing brittleness. Furthermore, the superolateral cortex of the proximal femur thins progressively during life, so increasing the risk of buckling during a fall. Besides preserving or increasing hip BMD, pharmaceutical treatments have class-specific effects on the toughness of cortical bone, although dietary and exercise-based interventions show early promise.

  17. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  18. Pre-SMA actively engages in conflict processing in human: a combined study of epicortical ERPs and direct cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Usami, Kiyohide; Matsumoto, Riki; Kunieda, Takeharu; Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsuhashi, Masao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2013-04-01

    Previous non-invasive studies have proposed that the deeply seated region of the medial frontal cortex engages in conflict processing in humans, but its core region has remained to be elucidated. By means of direct cortical stimulation, which excels other techniques in temporal and spatial resolutions and in the capacity of producing transient, functional impairment even in the deeply located cortices, we attempted to obtain direct evidence that the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) actively engages in conflict processing. Subject was a patient with right frontal lobe epilepsy who underwent invasive presurgical evaluation with subdural electrodes placed on the medial and lateral frontal cortices. During a conflict task--modified Eriksen flanker task, direct cortical stimulation was delivered time-locked to the task at the inferior part of the medial superior frontal gyrus (inferior medial SFG), the superior part of the medial SFG, and the middle frontal gyrus. By adopting the session of sham stimulation that was employed as a within-block control, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the medial and lateral frontal cortices. The inferior medial SFG showed a significant ERP difference between trials with more and less conflict, while the other frontal cortices did not. Among the three stimulus sites, only stimulation of the inferior medial SFG significantly prolonged reaction time in trials with more conflict. Anatomically, the inferior medial SFG corresponded with the pre-SMA (Brodmann area 8). It was located 1-2 cm rostral to the vertical anterior commissure line where cortical stimulation elicited arrest of motion (the supplementary negative motor area). Functionally, this area corresponded to the dorso-rostral portion of the activation loci in previous neuroimaging studies focusing on conflict processing. By combining epicortical ERP recording and direct cortical stimulation in a human brain, this study, for the first time, presented one direct

  19. Axono-cortical evoked potentials: A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Mandonnet, E; Dadoun, Y; Poisson, I; Madadaki, C; Froelich, S; Lozeron, P

    2016-04-01

    Awake surgery is currently considered the best method to tailor intraparenchymatous resections according to functional boundaries. However, the exact mechanisms by which electrical stimulation disturbs behavior remain largely unknown. In this case report, we describe a new method to explore the propagation toward cortical sites of a brief pulse applied to an eloquent white matter pathway. We present a patient, operated on in awake condition for removal of a cavernoma of the left ventral premotor cortex. At the end of the resection, the application of 60Hz stimulation in the white matter of the operculum induced anomia. Stimulating the same site at a frequency of 1Hz during 70seconds allowed to record responses on electrodes put over Broca's area and around the inferior part of central sulcus. Axono-cortical evoked potentials were then obtained by averaging unitary responses, time-locked to the stimulus. We then discuss the origin of these evoked axono-cortical potentials and the likely pathway connecting the stimulation site to the recorded cortical sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential representation of arm movement direction in relation to cortical anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Ball, Tonio; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Mehring, Carsten

    2009-02-01

    Information about arm movement direction in neuronal activity of the cerebral cortex can be used for movement control mediated by a brain-machine interface (BMI). Here we provide a topographic analysis of the information related to arm movement direction that can be extracted from single trials of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals recorded from the human frontal and parietal cortex based on a precise assignment of ECoG recording channels to the subjects' individual cortical anatomy and function. To this aim, each electrode contact was identified on structural MRI scans acquired while the electrodes were implanted and was thus related to the brain anatomy of each patient. Cortical function was assessed by direct cortical electrical stimulation. We show that activity from the primary motor cortex, in particular from the region showing hand and arm motor responses upon electrical stimulation, carries most directional information. The premotor, posterior parietal and lateral prefrontal cortex contributed gradually less, but still significant information. This gradient was observed for decoding from movement-related potentials, and from spectral amplitude modulations in low frequencies and in the high gamma band. Our findings thus demonstrate a close topographic correlation between cortical functional anatomy and direction-related information in humans that might be used for brain-machine interfacing.

  1. Differential representation of arm movement direction in relation to cortical anatomy and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Tonio; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Mehring, Carsten

    2009-02-01

    Information about arm movement direction in neuronal activity of the cerebral cortex can be used for movement control mediated by a brain-machine interface (BMI). Here we provide a topographic analysis of the information related to arm movement direction that can be extracted from single trials of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals recorded from the human frontal and parietal cortex based on a precise assignment of ECoG recording channels to the subjects' individual cortical anatomy and function. To this aim, each electrode contact was identified on structural MRI scans acquired while the electrodes were implanted and was thus related to the brain anatomy of each patient. Cortical function was assessed by direct cortical electrical stimulation. We show that activity from the primary motor cortex, in particular from the region showing hand and arm motor responses upon electrical stimulation, carries most directional information. The premotor, posterior parietal and lateral prefrontal cortex contributed gradually less, but still significant information. This gradient was observed for decoding from movement-related potentials, and from spectral amplitude modulations in low frequencies and in the high gamma band. Our findings thus demonstrate a close topographic correlation between cortical functional anatomy and direction-related information in humans that might be used for brain-machine interfacing.

  2. The Estimation of Cortical Activity for Brain-Computer Interface: Applications in a Domotic Context

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, F.; Cincotti, F.; Marciani, M.; Salinari, S.; Astolfi, L.; Tocci, A.; Aloise, F.; Fallani, F. De Vico; Bufalari, S.; Mattia, D.

    2007-01-01

    In order to analyze whether the use of the cortical activity, estimated from noninvasive EEG recordings, could be useful to detect mental states related to the imagination of limb movements, we estimate cortical activity from high-resolution EEG recordings in a group of healthy subjects by using realistic head models. Such cortical activity was estimated in region of interest associated with the subject's Brodmann areas by using a depth-weighted minimum norm technique. Results showed that the use of the cortical-estimated activity instead of the unprocessed EEG improves the recognition of the mental states associated to the limb movement imagination in the group of normal subjects. The BCI methodology presented here has been used in a group of disabled patients in order to give them a suitable control of several electronic devices disposed in a three-room environment devoted to the neurorehabilitation. Four of six patients were able to control several electronic devices in this domotic context with the BCI system. PMID:18350134

  3. The estimation of cortical activity for brain-computer interface: applications in a domotic context.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, F; Cincotti, F; Marciani, M; Salinari, S; Astolfi, L; Tocci, A; Aloise, F; De Vico Fallani, F; Bufalari, S; Mattia, D

    2007-01-01

    In order to analyze whether the use of the cortical activity, estimated from noninvasive EEG recordings, could be useful to detect mental states related to the imagination of limb movements, we estimate cortical activity from high-resolution EEG recordings in a group of healthy subjects by using realistic head models. Such cortical activity was estimated in region of interest associated with the subject's Brodmann areas by using a depth-weighted minimum norm technique. Results showed that the use of the cortical-estimated activity instead of the unprocessed EEG improves the recognition of the mental states associated to the limb movement imagination in the group of normal subjects. The BCI methodology presented here has been used in a group of disabled patients in order to give them a suitable control of several electronic devices disposed in a three-room environment devoted to the neurorehabilitation. Four of six patients were able to control several electronic devices in this domotic context with the BCI system.

  4. Evaluating interhemispheric cortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in chronic stroke: A TMS-EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Borich, Michael R.; Wheaton, Lewis A.; Brodie, Sonia M.; Lakhani, Bimal; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    TMS-evoked cortical responses can be measured using simultaneous electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to directly quantify cortical connectivity in the human brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interhemispheric cortical connectivity between the primary motor cortices (M1s) in participants with chronic stroke and controls using TMS-EEG. Ten participants with chronic stroke and four controls were tested. TMS-evoked responses were recorded at rest and during a typical TMS assessment of transcallosal inhibition (TCI). EEG recordings from peri-central gyral electrodes (C3 and C4) were evaluated using imaginary phase coherence (IPC) analyses to quantify levels of effective interhemispheric connectivity. Significantly increased TMS-evoked beta (15–30 Hz frequency range) IPC was observed in the stroke group during ipsilesional M1 stimulation compared to controls during TCI assessment but not at rest. TMS-evoked beta IPC values were associated with TMS measures of transcallosal inhibition across groups. These results suggest TMS-evoked EEG responses can index abnormal effective interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke. PMID:26940237

  5. Cortical auditory evoked potential (P1): a potential objective indicator for auditory rehabilitation outcome.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Mirahan T; Said, Nithreen M

    2012-12-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials are a non-invasive tool that can provide objective information on maturation of the auditory pathways. This work was designed to study the role of cortical auditory evoked potential (P1) in assessment of the benefits of amplification and aural rehabilitation in hearing impaired children. The study consisted of 31 children classified into 2 groups. Study group included 18 hearing impaired children ranging in age 4-14 years old and classified into two subgroups according to adequacy of aural rehabilitation. A control group consisted of 13 normal hearing children ranging in age from 5 to 13 years. All children were subjected to history taking, basic audiological evaluation, intelligence quotient and language assessment. Cortical auditory evoked potential (P1) was measured using synthesized speech syllable /da/ as a recording stimulus that was presented binaurally via a loudspeaker. P1 was recorded in all children with significantly prolonged latencies in hearing impaired children with inadequate rehabilitation. P1 latency was correlated to hearing loss duration in hearing impaired children with inadequate aural rehabilitation. Auditory experience was correlated with P1 latency in hearing impaired children with adequate aural rehabilitation. Cortical auditory evoked potential (P1) might provide a clinical tool to monitor aural rehabilitation outcome and to guide intervention choices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating interhemispheric cortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in chronic stroke: A TMS-EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Borich, Michael R; Wheaton, Lewis A; Brodie, Sonia M; Lakhani, Bimal; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-04-08

    TMS-evoked cortical responses can be measured using simultaneous electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to directly quantify cortical connectivity in the human brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interhemispheric cortical connectivity between the primary motor cortices (M1s) in participants with chronic stroke and controls using TMS-EEG. Ten participants with chronic stroke and four controls were tested. TMS-evoked responses were recorded at rest and during a typical TMS assessment of transcallosal inhibition (TCI). EEG recordings from peri-central gyral electrodes (C3 and C4) were evaluated using imaginary phase coherence (IPC) analyses to quantify levels of effective interhemispheric connectivity. Significantly increased TMS-evoked beta (15-30Hz frequency range) IPC was observed in the stroke group during ipsilesional M1 stimulation compared to controls during TCI assessment but not at rest. TMS-evoked beta IPC values were associated with TMS measures of transcallosal inhibition across groups. These results suggest TMS-evoked EEG responses can index abnormal effective interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A model for functional recovery and cortical reintegration after hemifacial composite tissue allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Washington, Kia M; Solari, Mario G; Sacks, Justin M; Horibe, Elaine K; Unadkat, Jignesh V; Carvell, George E; Simons, Daniel J; Lee, W P Andrew

    2009-02-01

    The ability to achieve optimal functional recovery is important in both face and hand transplantation. The purpose of this study was to develop a functional rat hemifacial transplant model optimal for studying both functional outcome and cortical reintegration in composite tissue allotransplantation. Five syngeneic transplants with motor and sensory nerve appositions (group 1) and five syngeneic transplants without nerve appositions (group 2) were performed. Five allogeneic transplants were performed with motor and sensory nerve appositions (group 3). Lewis (RT1) rats were used for syngeneic transplants and Brown-Norway (RT1) donors and Lewis (RT1) recipients were used for allogeneic transplants. Allografts received cyclosporine A monotherapy. Functional recovery was assessed by recordings of nerve conduction velocity and cortical neural activity evoked by facial nerve and sensory (tactile) stimuli, respectively. All animals in groups 1 and 3 showed evidence of motor function return on nerve conduction testing, whereas animals in group 2, which did not have nerve appositions, did not show electrical activity on electromyographic analysis (p < 0.001). All animals in groups 1 and 3 showed evidence of reafferentation on recording from the somatosensory cortex after whisker stimulation. Animals in group 2 did not show a cortical response on stimulation of the whiskers (p < 0.001). The authors have established a hemiface transplant model in the rat that has several modalities for the comprehensive study of motor and sensory recovery and cortical reintegration after composite tissue allotransplantation.

  8. Delay of late-venous phase cortical vein filling in acute ischemic stroke patients: Associations with collateral status.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Sonu; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark; Nilsson, Michael; Attia, John R; Stanwell, Peter; Levi, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of the venous system may be useful in stroke prognostication and patient selection for acute intervention strategies. We report a novel phenomenon, delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling, observed on dynamic computed tomography angiography obtained using multidetector computed tomography scanner, in acute ischemic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling and assess its association to baseline collateral status. Dynamic computed tomography angiography images of acute ischemic stroke patients, being assessed for reperfusion therapy, were prospectively studied. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was defined by late venous phase opacification of cortical veins despite contrast clearance from contralateral cortical veins on dynamic computed tomography angiography. Time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement was recorded. A total of 117 patients (mean age = 70.6 ± 13.3 years; males = 48%) with hemispheric ischemic stroke who underwent acute dynamic computed tomography angiography were included in the study. Overall, 56 (48%) demonstrated delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Poor collateralization (OR = 13.50; 95% CI = (4.2, 43); p ≤ 0.0001) and longer time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = (1.96, 5.3); p  ≤ 0.0001) were positively associated with delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was independently associated with poor baseline collateral status (75% vs. 15%, p ≤ 0.0001; OR = 14.38; 95% CI = (4.33, 47.8); p ≤ 0.0001). Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling is frequently seen in patients with acute ischemic stroke and is associated with poor baseline collateralization.

  9. Frequency Changes in a Continuous Tone: Auditory Cortical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Michalewski, Henry J.; Zeng, Fan-Gang; Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Objective We examined auditory cortical potentials in normal hearing subjects to spectral changes in continuous low and high frequency pure tones. Methods Cortical potentials were recorded to increments of frequency from continuous 250 Hz or 4000 Hz tones. The magnitude of change was random and varied from 0% to 50% above the base frequency. Results Potentials consisted of N100, P200 and a slow negative wave (SN). N100 amplitude, latency and dipole magnitude with frequency increments were significantly greater for low compared to high frequencies. Dipole amplitudes were greater in the right than left hemisphere for both base frequencies. The SN amplitude to frequency changes between 4 to 50% was not significantly related to the magnitude of spectral change. Conclusions Modulation of N100 amplitude and latency elicited by spectral change is more pronounced with low compared to high frequencies. Significance These data provide electrophysiological evidence that central processing of spectral changes in the cortex differs for low and high frequencies. Some of these differences may be related to both temporal- and spectral-based coding at the auditory periphery. Central representation of frequency change may be related to the different temporal windows of integration across frequencies. PMID:18635394

  10. Fearful faces heighten the cortical representation of contextual threat

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Perception of facial expressions is typically investigated by presenting isolated face stimuli. In everyday life, however, faces are rarely seen without a surrounding visual context that affects perception and interpretation of the facial expression. Conversely, fearful faces may act as a cue, heightening the sensitivity of the visual system to effectively detect potential threat in the environment. In the present study, we used steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEPs) to examine the mutual effects of facial expressions (fearful, neutral, happy) and affective visual context (pleasant, neutral, threat). By assigning two different flicker frequencies (12 vs. 15 Hz) to the face and the visual context scene, cortical activity to the concurrent stimuli was separated, which represents a novel approach to independently tracking the cortical processes associated with the face and the context. Twenty healthy students viewed flickering faces overlaid on flickering visual scenes, while performing a simple change-detection task at fixation, and high-density EEG was recorded. Arousing background scenes generally drove larger ssVEP amplitudes than neutral scenes. Importantly, background and expression interacted: When viewing fearful facial expressions, the ssVEP in response to threat context was amplified compared to other backgrounds. Together, these findings suggest that fearful faces elicit vigilance for potential threat in the visual periphery. PMID:24125792

  11. Fearful faces heighten the cortical representation of contextual threat.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Matthias J; Keil, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Perception of facial expressions is typically investigated by presenting isolated face stimuli. In everyday life, however, faces are rarely seen without a surrounding visual context that affects perception and interpretation of the facial expression. Conversely, fearful faces may act as a cue, heightening the sensitivity of the visual system to effectively detect potential threat in the environment. In the present study, we used steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEPs) to examine the mutual effects of facial expressions (fearful, neutral, happy) and affective visual context (pleasant, neutral, threat). By assigning two different flicker frequencies (12 vs. 15Hz) to the face and the visual context scene, cortical activity to the concurrent stimuli was separated, which represents a novel approach to independently tracking the cortical processes associated with the face and the context. Twenty healthy students viewed flickering faces overlaid on flickering visual scenes, while performing a simple change-detection task at fixation, and high-density EEG was recorded. Arousing background scenes generally drove larger ssVEP amplitudes than neutral scenes. Importantly, background and expression interacted: When viewing fearful facial expressions, the ssVEP in response to threat context was amplified compared to other backgrounds. Together, these findings suggest that fearful faces elicit vigilance for potential threat in the visual periphery. © 2013.

  12. The organization of two novel cortical interneuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangfu; Lee, Alice J.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering interneuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain functions yet remains as a challenging task in neurobiology. Using simultaneous quadruple-octuple in vitro and dual in vivo whole-cell recordings, we found two previously unknown interneuronal circuits that link cortical layer 1–3 (L1-3) interneurons and L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat neocortex. L1 single-bouquet cells (SBCs) preferentially form unidirectional inhibitory connections on L2/3 interneurons that inhibit the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of ~1% of L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, L1 elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs) frequently form mutual inhibitory and electric connections with L2/3 interneurons, and these L1-3 interneurons inhibit the distal apical dendrite of >60% of L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Functionally, SBC→L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits disinhibit and ENGC↔L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits inhibit the initiation of dendritic complex spikes in L5 pyramidal neurons. As dendritic complex spikes can serve coincidence detection, these cortical interneuronal circuits may be essential for salience selection. PMID:23313910

  13. Altered Cortical Ensembles in Mouse Models of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Peterka, Darcy S; Gogos, Joseph A; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-04-05

    In schizophrenia, brain-wide alterations have been identified at the molecular and cellular levels, yet how these phenomena affect cortical circuit activity remains unclear. We studied two mouse models of schizophrenia-relevant disease processes: chronic ketamine (KET) administration and Df(16)A(+/-), modeling 22q11.2 microdeletions, a genetic variant highly penetrant for schizophrenia. Local field potential recordings in visual cortex confirmed gamma-band abnormalities similar to patient studies. Two-photon calcium imaging of local cortical populations revealed in both models a deficit in the reliability of neuronal coactivity patterns (ensembles), which was not a simple consequence of altered single-neuron activity. This effect was present in ongoing and sensory-evoked activity and was not replicated by acute ketamine administration or pharmacogenetic parvalbumin-interneuron suppression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that schizophrenia is an "attractor" disease and demonstrate that degraded neuronal ensembles are a common consequence of diverse genetic, cellular, and synaptic alterations seen in chronic schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Functional cortical network in alpha band correlates with social bargaining.

    PubMed

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals' alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts.

  15. Statistics of natural scenes and the cortical representation of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, G. A.; Rao, A. R.; Xiao, Y.; Kaplan, E.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the spatial correlational structure of orientation and color information in natural images. We compare these with the spatial correlation structure of optical recordings of macaque monkey primary visual cortex, in response to oriented and color stimuli. We show that the correlation of orientation falls off rapidly over increasing distance. By using a color metric based on the a-b coordinates in the CIE-Lab color space, we show that color information, on the other hand, is more highly correlated over larger distances. We also show that orientation and color information are statistically independent in natural images. We perform a similar spatial correlation analysis of the cortical responses to orientation and color. We observe a similar behavior to that of natural images, in that the correlation of orientation-specific responses falls off; more rapidly than the correlation of color-specific responses. Our findings suggest that: (a) orientation and color information should be processed in separate channels, and (b) the organization of cortical color responses at a lower spatial frequency compared to orientation is a reflection of the statistical structure of visual world.

  16. Functional Cortical Network in Alpha Band Correlates with Social Bargaining

    PubMed Central

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals’ alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts. PMID:25286240

  17. Cortical function in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pan; Zhang, Huihong; Han, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common causes of dementia; however, their overlapping clinical syndromes and involved brain regions make a differential diagnosis difficult. We aimed to identify the differences in the cognition and motor cortex excitability between AD and bvFTD patients. Methods Twenty-seven AD patients and 30 bvFTD patients were included in the study. Each participant received a neurological evaluation. Cognitive event-related potentials (P300) were recorded during an auditory oddball task. Next, the excitability of the motor cortex, including the resting, facilitated motor threshold (RMT and FMT) and cortical silent period (CSP), were assessed during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Results The bvFTD patients exhibited significantly longer P300 latencies compared with AD patients. There was a significant negative correlation between cognition and P300 latency in the bvFTD group. The AD patients showed significantly reduced RMT and FMT values compared to the bvFTD group; however, no significant correlation was found between AD severity and the excitability of the motor cortex. Conclusions Cognition and motor cortical functions are different between AD and bvFTD patients. Noninvasive electrophysiological examinations have the potential to identify unique pathophysiological features that can be used to differentially diagnose AD and bvFTD patients. PMID:28123831

  18. Far cortical locking screws in distal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, John D; Tanner, Stephanie L; Jeray, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Distal femur fractures routinely heal by secondary bone healing, which relies on interfragmentary motion. Periarticular locking plates are commonly used for fixation in distal femur fractures but are associated with a high nonunion rate, likely due to the stiffness of the constructs. Far cortical locking (FCL) screws are designed to allow micromotion at the near cortex while maintaining purchase in only the far cortex. Although clinical data are limited, these screws have been shown in biomechanical studies to provide excellent interfragmentary motion, and animal models have shown increased callus formation compared with traditional locking screws. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical effects that FCL screws have on healing in distal femur fractures treated with locked constructs. In this retrospective case series, 15 patients with a distal femur fracture treated with MotionLoc screws (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) were analyzed. Serial radiographs were evaluated for callus presence and time to union. All fractures were either 33-A3 or 33-C2 according to the AO classification system, and 5 (33%) were open. Bone loss was recorded in 2 patients. There were no nonunions, and average time to union was 24 weeks. There were no implant failures, and all 5 open fractures, including the 2 with bone loss, healed without intervention. There was 1 reoperation due to painful hardware. Although this is a small case series, these results are promising. Far cortical locking screws may provide the answer to the high nonunion rate associated with distal femur fractures treated with traditional locked constructs.

  19. Signal analysis of auditory evoked cortical fields in fetal magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Schneider, U; Schleussner, E; Haueisen, J; Nowak, H; Seewald, H J

    2001-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) using auditory evoked cortical fields (AEF) is an absolutely non-invasive method of passive measurement which utilizes magnetic fields caused by specific cortical activity. By applying the exceptionally sensitive SQUID technology to record these fields of dipolar configuration produced by the fetal brain, MEG as an investigational tool could provide new insights into the development of the human brain in utero. The major constraint to this application is a very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that has to be attributed to a variety of factors including the magnetic signals generated by the fetal and maternal hearts which inevitably obscure a straightforward signal analysis. By applying a new algorithm of specific heart artefact reduction based on the relative regularity of the heart signals, we were able to increase the chance of extracting a fetal AEF from the raw data by the means of averaging techniques and principle component analysis. Results from 27 pregnant, healthy women (third trimester of their uncomplicated pregnancy) indicate an improved detection rate and the reproducibility of the fetal MEG. We evaluate and discuss a-priori criteria for signal analyses which will enable us to systematically analyze additional limiting factors, to further enhance the efficiency of this method and to promote the assessment of its possible clinical value in the future.

  20. Mitochondrial activity and brain functions during cortical depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Sonn, Judith

    2008-12-01

    Cortical depolarization (CD) of the cerebral cortex could be developed under various pathophysiological conditions. In animal models, CD was recorded under partial or complete ischemia as well as when cortical spreading depression (SD) was induced externally or by internal stimulus. The development of CD in patients and the changes in various metabolic parameters, during CD, was rarely reported. Brain metabolic, hemodynamic, ionic and electrical responses to the CD event are dependent upon the O2 balance in the tissue. When the O2 balance is negative (i.e. ischemia), the CD process will be developed due to mitochondrial dysfunction, lack of energy and the inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase. In contradiction, when oxygen is available (i.e. normoxia) the development of CD after induction of SD will accelerate mitochondrial respiration for retaining ionic homeostasis and normal brain functions. We used the multiparametric monitoring approach that enable real time monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state, microcirculatory blood flow and oxygenation, extracellular K+, Ca2+, H+ levels, DC steady potential and electrocorticogram (ECoG). This monitoring approach, provide a unique tool that has a significant value in analyzing the pathophysiology of the brain when SD developed under normoxia, ischemia, or hypoxia. We applied the same monitoring approach to patients suffered from severe head injury or exposed to neurosurgical procedures.

  1. Cortical encoding of speech acoustics: Effects of noise and amplification.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla-Mathew, Abin; Purdy, Suzanne C; Welch, David

    2015-01-01

    To investigate speech stimuli and background-noise-dependent changes in cortical auditory-evoked potentials (CAEPs) in unaided and aided conditions, and determine amplification effects on CAEPs. CAEPs to naturally produced syllables in quiet and in multi-talker babble were recorded, with and without a hearing aid in the right ear. At least 300 artifact-free trials for each participant were required to measure latencies and amplitudes of CAEPs. Acoustic characteristics of the hearing-aid-transduced stimuli were measured using in-the-canal probe microphone measurements to determine unaided versus aided SNR and to compare stimulus acoustic characteristics to CAEP findings. Ten participants with normal hearing, aged 19 to 35 years. CAEP latencies and amplitudes showed significant effects of speech contrast, background noise, and amplification. N1 and P2 components varied differently across conditions. In general, cortical processing in noise was influenced by SNR and the spectrum of the speech stimuli. Hearing-aid-induced spectral and temporal changes to the speech stimuli affected P1-N1-P2 components. Amplification produced complex effects on latencies and amplitudes across speech stimuli and CAEP components, and for quiet versus noise conditions. CAEP components reflect spectral and temporal characteristics of speech stimuli and acoustic changes induced by background noise and amplification.

  2. Motor cortical representation of hand translation and rotation during reaching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chan, Sherwin S; Heldman, Dustin A; Moran, Daniel W

    2010-01-20

    Previous studies have shown that hand translation is well represented by neuronal activity in the proximal arm area of primary motor cortex (M1). However, little is known about cortical representation of hand rotation in M1. In this study, single-unit activity was recorded from monkeys while they performed a "center-out with rotation" task. When reaching for a target, subjects had to match four separate kinematic parameters: three-dimensional location and one-dimensional orientation of the target. Among the 512 neurons modulated by hand movement, 446 were tuned to hand translation, 326 were tuned to hand rotation, and 260 neurons were tuned to both hand translation and hand rotation. Approximately half of the neurons that encoded both translation and rotation did so in a nonlinear manner. This nonlinear interaction can be modeled as a gain-field type of encoding whereby hand rotational velocity modulated the hand translational cosine tuning curves in a multiplicative manner. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that both hand translation and hand rotation can be decoded simultaneously from a population of motor cortical neurons.

  3. Nonmonotonic Synaptic Excitation and Imbalanced Inhibition Underlying Cortical Intensity Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangying K.; Li, Pingyang; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Intensity-tuned neurons, characterized by their nonmonotonic response-level function, may play important roles in the encoding of sound intensity-related information. The synaptic mechanisms underlying intensity-tuning remain yet unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell recordings in rat auditory cortex revealed that intensity-tuned neurons, mostly clustered in a posterior zone, receive imbalanced tone-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Excitatory inputs exhibit nonmonotonic intensity-tuning, whereas with tone intensity increments, the temporally-delayed inhibitory inputs increase monotonically in strength. In addition, this delay reduces with the increase of intensity, resulting in an enhanced suppression of excitation at high intensities and a significant sharpening of intensity-tuning. In contrast, non-intensity-tuned neurons exhibit covaried excitatory and inhibitory inputs and the relative time interval between them is stable with intensity increments, resulting in monotonic response-level function. Thus, cortical intensity-tuning is primarily determined by excitatory inputs, and shaped by cortical inhibition through a dynamic control of excitatory and inhibitory timing. PMID:17114053

  4. Somatosensory cortical representation in the Australian ghost bat, Macroderma gigas.

    PubMed

    Wise, L Z; Pettigrew, J D; Calford, M B

    1986-06-08

    Bats of the two suborders Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera have a modified hand in which the digits of the forelimb are caudally oriented to form the wing. In a previous study of a megachiropteran species, this modification of body plan was found to be reflected in the somatosensory cortical representation such that the orientation of the digit representation was reversed compared with walking mammals. This finding suggests that the precise details of arrangement of topographical maps are functionally significant and do not merely reflect an order imposed by peripheral innervation. Recent evidence for separate origins of Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera raises the question of whether the cortical somatosensory representation in Microchiroptera will also have a reversal of digit orientation compared with walking mammals. We recorded multiunit activity from the somatosensory cortex of a microchiropteran bat, Macroderma gigas. We found two orderly representations of the body surface, SI and SII, in both of which the digit orientation was opposite to the head orientation in accordance with adaptation for flight, and reversed with respect to equivalent maps in other mammals. We also found minor variations in body surface representation compared with Megachiroptera, in line with their proposed independent evolution.

  5. Prefrontal cortical microcircuits bind perception to executive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2013-07-01

    During the perception-to-action cycle, our cerebral cortex mediates the interactions between the environment and the perceptual-executive systems of the brain. At the top of the executive hierarchy, prefrontal cortical microcircuits are assumed to bind perceptual and executive control information to guide goal-driven behavior. Here, we tested this hypothesis by comparing simultaneously recorded neuron firing in prefrontal cortical layers and the caudate-putamen of rhesus monkeys, trained in a spatial-versus-object, rule-based match-to-sample task. We found that during the perception and executive selection phases, cell firing in the localized prefrontal layers and caudate-putamen region exhibited similar location preferences on spatial-trials, but less on object- trials. Then, we facilitated the perceptual-executive circuit by stimulating the prefrontal infra-granular-layers with patterns previously derived from supra-granular-layers, and produced stimulation-induced spatial preference in percent correct performance on spatial trials, similar to neural tuning. These results show that inter-laminar prefrontal microcircuits play causal roles to the perception-to-action cycle.

  6. Neuromagnetic evidence of broader auditory cortical tuning in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Donald C.; Slason, Erin; Teale, Peter D.; Reite, Martin L.

    2007-01-01

    Deficits in basic auditory perception have been described in schizophrenia. Previous electrophysiological imaging research has documented a structure-function disassociation in the auditory system and altered tonotopic mapping in schizophrenia. The present study examined auditory cortical tuning in patients with schizophrenia. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 15 comparison subjects were recorded in a magnetoencephalographic (MEG) experiment of auditory tuning. Auditory cortical tuning at 1 kHz was examined by delivering 1 kHz pure tones in conjunction with pure tones at 5 frequencies surrounding and including 1 kHz. Source reconstruction data were examined for evidence of frequency specificity for the M100 component. There was a significant broadening of tuning in the schizophrenia group evident for the source amplitude of the M100. The frequently reported reduction in anterior-posterior source asymmetry for individuals with schizophrenia was replicated in this experiment. No relationships between symptom severity ratings and MEG measures were observed. This finding suggests that the frequency specificity of the M100 auditory evoked field is disturbed in schizophrenia, and may help explain the relatively poor behavioral performance of schizophrenia patients on simple frequency discrimination tasks. PMID:17851045

  7. Visuomotor expertise and dimensional complexity of cerebral cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Haufler, Amy J; Lo, Li-Chuan; Mayer-Kress, Gottfried; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2008-04-01

    This study employed the correlation dimension (D2) to examine whether visuomotor expertise was inversely related to the complexity of cerebral cortical activity. Expert rifle shooters (N = 15) and novices (N = 21) completed 40 shots in the standing position during which the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded at 10 sites (F3, F4, C3, C4, T3, T4, P3, P4, O1, and O2) during a 5-s aiming period prior to trigger pull. D2 was derived for each trial and averaged across shots. A 2 x 2 x 5 (group x cerebral hemisphere x region) ANOVA was employed to contrast D2, while correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between D2 and target shooting accuracy as well as variability of shot placement. As predicted, experts exhibited lower D2 (5.02 +/- 0.16 vs 5.49 +/- 0.13, respectively) and greater accuracy of shot placement ((339.8 +/- 44.7 vs 90.7 +/- 38.9 points out of 400 possible, respectively). Experts also exhibited an inverse relationship between D2 and shooting accuracy, while, in contrast, novices revealed a positive relationship. The results suggest that refinement and efficiency of cerebral cortical activity facilitates visuomotor performance. Lower complexity may be associated with less neuromotor "noise" in the brain, thus reducing interference with intended action.

  8. Sleep Promotes Cortical Response Potentiation Following Visual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aton, Sara J.; Suresh, Aneesha; Broussard, Christopher; Frank, Marcos G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep has been hypothesized to globally reduce synaptic strength. However, recent findings suggest that in the context of learning and memory consolidation, sleep may promote synaptic potentiation. We tested the requirement for sleep in a naturally occurring form of experience-dependent synaptic potentiation in the adult mouse visual cortex (V1), which is initiated by patterned visual experience. Design: Visual responses were recorded in individual V1 neurons before and after presentation of an oriented grating stimulus, and after subsequent sleep or sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: We find that V1 response potentiation—associated with a shift in orientation preference in favor of the presented stimulus—occurs only after sleep and only during the entrained circadian sleep phase, and is blocked by sleep deprivation. Induction of plasticity following stimulus presentation is associated with an increase in principal neuron firing in V1, which is present in all behavioral states and occurs regardless of time of day. Sleep dependent potentiation is proportional to phase-locking of neuronal activity with thalamocortical spindle oscillations. Conclusions: Our results suggest that sleep can promote cortical synaptic potentiation in vivo, and that this potentiation may be mediated by slow wave sleep spindles. Citation: Aton SJ, Suresh A, Broussard C, Frank MG. Sleep promotes cortical response potentiation following visual experience. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1163-1170. PMID:25061244

  9. The organization of two new cortical interneuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangfu; Lee, Alice J; Stornetta, Ruth L; Zhu, J Julius

    2013-02-01

    Deciphering the interneuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain functions, yet it remains a challenging task in neurobiology. Using simultaneous quadruple-octuple in vitro and dual in vivo whole-cell recordings, we found two previously unknown interneuronal circuits that link cortical layer 1-3 (L1-3) interneurons and L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat neocortex. L1 single-bouquet cells (SBCs) preferentially formed unidirectional inhibitory connections on L2/3 interneurons that inhibited the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of ∼1% of L5 pyramidal neurons located in the same column. In contrast, L1 elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs) frequently formed mutual inhibitory and electric connections with L2/3 interneurons, and these L1-3 interneurons inhibited the distal apical dendrite of >60% of L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Functionally, SBC→L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits disinhibited and ENGC↔L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits inhibited the initiation of dendritic complex spikes in L5 pyramidal neurons. As dendritic complex spikes can serve coincidence detection, these cortical interneuronal circuits may be essential for salience selection.

  10. Cortical and spinal evoked potential response to electrical stimulation in human rectum

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Brian; Lovely, Lisa; Tsodikov, Alex; Minecan, Danielle; Hong, Shaungson; Wiley, John W

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study a novel technique to record spinal and cortical evoked potentials (EPs) simultaneously in response to electrical stimulation in the human rectum. METHODS: Eight male and nine female healthy volunteers participated. Stimulating electrodes were attached to the rectal mucosa at 15 cm and 12 cm above the dentate line. Recording skin electrodes were positioned over vertebrae L4 through S2. The electrical stimulus was a square wave of 0.2 ms duration and the intensity of the stimulus varied between 0 and 100 mA. EP responses were recorded using a Nicolet Viking IV programmable signal conditioner. RESULTS: Simultaneous recording of cortical and spinal EPs was obtained in > 80% of the trials. The EP responses increased with the intensity of the electrical stimulation, were reproducible overtime, and were blocked by application of Lidocaine jelly at the site of stimulation. The morphology (N1/P1), mean ± SD for latency (spinal N1, 4.6 ± 0.4 ms; P1, 6.8 ± 0.5 ms; cortical N1, 136.1 ± 4.2 ms; P1, 233.6 ± 12.8 ms) and amplitude (N1/P1, spinal, 38 ± 7 μV; cortical 19 ± 3 μV) data for the EP responses were consistent with those in the published literature. Reliable and reproducible EP recordings were obtained with the attachment of the electrodes to the rectal mucosa at predetermined locations between 16 and 8 cm above the anal verge, and the distance between the attachment sites of the electrodes (the optimal distance being approximately 3.0 cm between the two electrodes). CONCLUSION: This technique can be used to assess potential abnormalities in primary afferent neural pathways innervating the rectum in several neurodegenerative and functional pain disorders. PMID:21086561

  11. Deep brain and cortical stimulation for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sprengers, Mathieu; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Marson, Anthony G; Boon, Paul

    2017-07-18

    Despite optimal medical treatment, including epilepsy surgery, many epilepsy patients have uncontrolled seizures. Since the 1970s interest has grown in invasive intracranial neurostimulation as a treatment for these patients. Intracranial stimulation includes both deep brain stimulation (DBS) (stimulation through depth electrodes) and cortical stimulation (subdural electrodes). This is an updated version of a previous Cochrane review published in 2014. To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of DBS and cortical stimulation for refractory epilepsy based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register on 29 September 2015, but it was not necessary to update this search, because records in the Specialized Register are included in CENTRAL. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 11, 5 November 2016), PubMed (5 November 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (5 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (5 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved articles. We also contacted device manufacturers and other researchers in the field. No language restrictions were imposed. RCTs comparing deep brain or cortical stimulation versus sham stimulation, resective surgery, further treatment with antiepileptic drugs or other neurostimulation treatments (including vagus nerve stimulation). Four review authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted the relevant data and assessed trial quality and overall quality of evidence. The outcomes investigated were seizure freedom, responder rate, percentage seizure frequency reduction, adverse events, neuropsychological outcome and quality of life. If additional data were needed, the study investigators were contacted. Results were analysed and reported separately for different intracranial targets for reasons of clinical heterogeneity

  12. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices studied by magnetoencephelography.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kuniharu

    2013-09-01

    From the viewpoint of statistical inverse problems, identification of transfer functions in feedback models is applied for neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices, and brain communication among active regions can be expressed in terms of transfer functions. However, brain activities have been investigated mainly by averaged waveforms in the conventional magnetoencephalography analysis, and thus brain communication among active regions has not yet been identified. It is shown that brain communication among two more than three brain regions is determined, when fluctuations related to concatenate averaged waveforms can be obtained by using a suitable blind source separation method. In blind identification of feedback model, some transfer functions or their impulse responses between output variables of current dipoles corresponding to active regions are identified from reconstructed time series data of fluctuations by the method of inverse problem. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices in 5 Hz median nerve stimuli can be shown by cerebral communication among active regions of somatosensory cortices in terms of impulse responses of feedback model.

  13. Decision by division: making cortical maps

    PubMed Central

    Rakic, Pasko; Ayoub, Albert E.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Dominguez, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    In the past three decades, mounting evidence has revealed that specification of the basic cortical neuronal classes starts at the time of their final mitotic divisions in the embryonic proliferative zones. This early cell determination continues during the migration of the newborn neurons across the widening cerebral wall, and it is in the cortical plate that they attain their final positions and establish species-specific cytoarchitectonic areas. Here, the development and evolutionary expansion of the neocortex is viewed in the context of the radial unit and protomap hypotheses. A broad spectrum of findings gave insight into the pathogenesis of cortical malformations and the biological bases for the evolution of the modern human neocortex. We examine the history and evidence behind the concept of early specification of neurons and provide the latest compendium of genes and signaling molecules involved in neuronal fate determination and specification. PMID:19380167

  14. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  15. Organizing Principles of Cortical Layer 6

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Farran

    2009-01-01

    Neurons in the deepest layer of mammalian cerebral cortex are morphologically and physiological diverse and are situated in a strategic position to modulate neuronal activity locally and in other structures. The variety of neuronal circuits within which layer 6 neurons participate differs across species and cortical regions. However even amidst this diversity, common organizational features emerge. Examination of the anatomical and physiological characteristics of different classes of layer 6 neuron, each specialized to participate in distinct circuits, provides insight into the functional contributions of layer 6 neurons toward cortical information processing. PMID:20179784

  16. Elemental mercury poisoning probably causes cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Mona; Kulkarni, Girish; Ashraf, Valappil V; Pal, Pramod K; Chickabasavaiah, Yasha; Shankar, Susarla K; Govindappa, Srikanth S; Satishchandra, Parthasarthy; Muthane, Uday B

    2007-10-15

    Mercury toxicity causes postural tremors, commonly referred to as "mercurial tremors," and cerebellar dysfunction. A 23-year woman, 2 years after injecting herself with elemental mercury developed disabling generalized myoclonus and ataxia. Electrophysiological studies confirmed the myoclonus was probably of cortical origin. Her deficits progressed over 2 years and improved after subcutaneous mercury deposits at the injection site were surgically cleared. Myoclonus of cortical origin has never been described in mercury poisoning. It is important to ask patients presenting with jerks about exposure to elemental mercury even if they have a progressive illness, as it is a potentially reversible condition as in our patient.

  17. Posterior cortical atrophy: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Howard S; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2006-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a striking clinical syndrome in which a dementing illness begins with visual symptoms. Initially, the problem may seem to be loss of elementary vision, but over time the patient develops features of visual agnosia, topographical difficulty, optic ataxia, simultanagnosia, ocular apraxia (Balint's syndrome), alexia, acalculia, right-left confusion, and agraphia (Gerstmann's syndrome), and later a more generalized dementia. Occasional patients have visual hallucinations and signs of Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. A number of different neuropathologic disorders are associated with posterior cortical atrophy.

  18. Cortical Networks for Visual Self-Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed.

  19. Variation-based sparse cortical current density imaging in estimating cortical sources with MEG data.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wenbo; Dickens, Deanna L

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the performance of a new sparse neuroimaging method, i.e., Variation-Based Sparse Cortical Current Density (VB-SCCD) using magnetoencephalography (MEG) data to reconstruct extended cortical sources and their spatial distributions on the cortical surface. We conducted Monte Carlo simulation studies to compare the performance of the VB-SCCD method with different number of cortical sources and different number of MEG sensors. Our simulation data suggests that the VB-SCCD method is able to reconstruct extended cortical sources with the overall accuracy, while it has significantly reduced performance when cortical sources are radially oriented to MEG sensors. It has higher accuracy when the number of sensors is large and the source configuration is simple. We further assess the performance of VB-SCCD in real MEG data from an epilepsy patient and reconstructed cortical sources behind interictal spikes from the patient which are consistent with the clinical evaluation outcomes. This data indicate its promising applications in clinical problems related to neurological disorders.

  20. The evolution of the neocortex in mammals: intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the cortical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Sarah J; Krubitzer, Leah

    2006-01-01

    The neocortex is that portion of the brain that is involved in volitional motor control, perception, cognition and a number of other complex behaviours exhibited by mammals, including humans. Indeed, the increase in the size of the cortical sheet and cortical field number is one of the hallmarks of human brain evolution. Fossil records and comparative studies of the neocortex indicate that early mammalian neocortices were composed of only a few parts or cortical fields, and that in some lineages such as primates, the neocortex expanded dramatically. More significantly, the number of cortical fields increased and the connectivity between cortical fields became more complex. While we do not know the exact transformation between this type of increase in cortical field number and connectivity; and the emergence of complex behaviours like those mentioned above, we know that species that have large neocorticies with multiple parts generally have more complex behaviours, both overt and covert. Although a number of inroads have been made into understanding how neurons in the neocortex respond to a variety of stimuli, the micro and macro circuitry of particular neocortical fields, and the molecular developmental events that construct current organization, very little is known about how more cortical fields are added in evolution. In particular, we do not know the rules of change, nor the constraints imposed on evolving nervous systems that dictate the particular phenotype that will ultimately emerge. One reason why these issues are unresolved is that the brain is a compromise between existing genetic constraints and the need to adapt. Thus, the functions that the brain generates are absolutely imperfect, although functionally optimized. This makes it very difficult to determine the rules of construction, to generate viable computational models of brain evolution, and to predict the direction of changes that may occur over time. Despite these obstacles, it is still possible

  1. Discovering Cortical Folding Patterns in Neonatal Cortical Surfaces Using Large-Scale Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yu; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2017-01-01

    The cortical folding of the human brain is highly complex and variable across individuals. Mining the major patterns of cortical folding from modern large-scale neuroimaging datasets is of great importance in advancing techniques for neuroimaging analysis and understanding the inter-individual variations of cortical folding and its relationship with cognitive function and disorders. As the primary cortical folding is genetically influenced and has been established at term birth, neonates with the minimal exposure to the complicated postnatal environmental influence are the ideal candidates for understanding the major patterns of cortical folding. In this paper, for the first time, we propose a novel method for discovering the major patterns of cortical folding in a large-scale dataset of neonatal brain MR images (N = 677). In our method, first, cortical folding is characterized by the distribution of sulcal pits, which are the locally deepest points in cortical sulci. Because deep sulcal pits are genetically related, relatively consistent across individuals, and also stable during brain development, they are well suitable for representing and characterizing cortical folding. Then, the similarities between sulcal pit distributions of any two subjects are measured from spatial, geometrical, and topological points of view. Next, these different measurements are adaptively fused together using a similarity network fusion technique, to preserve their common information and also catch their complementary information. Finally, leveraging the fused similarity measurements, a hierarchical affinity propagation algorithm is used to group similar sulcal folding patterns together. The proposed method has been applied to 677 neonatal brains (the largest neonatal dataset to our knowledge) in the central sulcus, superior temporal sulcus, and cingulate sulcus, and revealed multiple distinct and meaningful folding patterns in each region. PMID:28229131

  2. Cortically projecting basal forebrain parvalbumin neurons regulate cortical gamma band oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae; Thankachan, Stephen; McKenna, James T; McNally, James M; Yang, Chun; Choi, Jee Hyun; Chen, Lichao; Kocsis, Bernat; Deisseroth, Karl; Strecker, Robert E; Basheer, Radhika; Brown, Ritchie E; McCarley, Robert W

    2015-03-17

    Cortical gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30-80 Hz, typically ∼40 Hz) are involved in higher cognitive functions such as feature binding, attention, and working memory. GBO abnormalities are a feature of several neuropsychiatric disorders associated with dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). GBO vary according to the state of arousal, are modulated by attention, and are correlated with conscious awareness. However, the subcortical cell types underlying the state-dependent control of GBO are not well understood. Here we tested the role of one cell type in the wakefulness-promoting basal forebrain (BF) region, cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing PV, whose virally transduced fibers we found apposed cortical PV interneurons involved in generating GBO. Optogenetic stimulation of BF PV neurons in mice preferentially increased cortical GBO power by entraining a cortical oscillator with a resonant frequency of ∼40 Hz, as revealed by analysis of both rhythmic and nonrhythmic BF PV stimulation. Selective saporin lesions of BF cholinergic neurons did not alter the enhancement of cortical GBO power induced by BF PV stimulation. Importantly, bilateral optogenetic inhibition of BF PV neurons decreased the power of the 40-Hz auditory steady-state response, a read-out of the ability of the cortex to generate GBO used in clinical studies. Our results are surprising and novel in indicating that this presumptively inhibitory BF PV input controls cortical GBO, likely by synchronizing the activity of cortical PV interneurons. BF PV neurons may represent a previously unidentified therapeutic target to treat disorders involving abnormal GBO, such as schizophrenia.

  3. Sparse cortical source localization using spatio-temporal atoms.

    PubMed

    Korats, Gundars; Ranta, Radu; Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of sparse localization of cortical sources from scalp EEG recordings. Localization algorithms use propagation model under spatial and/or temporal constraints, but their performance highly depends on the data signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work we propose a dictionary based sparse localization method which uses a data driven spatio-temporal dictionary to reconstruct the measurements using Single Best Replacement (SBR) and Continuation Single Best Replacement (CSBR) algorithms. We tested and compared our methods with the well-known MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC algorithms on simulated realistic data. Tests were carried out for different noise levels. The results show that our method has a strong advantage over MUSIC-type methods in case of synchronized sources.

  4. Memories of attachment hamper EEG cortical connectivity in dissociative patients.

    PubMed

    Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Trentini, Cristina; Vergano, Carola Maggiora; Liotti, Giovanni; Brunetti, Riccardo; Testani, Elisa; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated cortical connectivity modifications by electroencephalography (EEG) lagged coherence analysis, in subjects with dissociative disorders and in controls, after retrieval of attachment memories. We asked thirteen patients with dissociative disorders and thirteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls to retrieve personal attachment-related autobiographical memories through adult attachment interviews (AAI). EEG was recorded in the closed eyes resting state before and after the AAI. EEG lagged coherence before and after AAI was compared in all subjects. In the control group, memories of attachment promoted a widespread increase in EEG connectivity, in particular in the high-frequency EEG bands. Compared to controls, dissociative patients did not show an increase in EEG connectivity after the AAI. Conclusions: These results shed light on the neurophysiology of the disintegrative effect of retrieval of traumatic attachment memories in dissociative patients.

  5. A cognitive neuroprosthetic that uses cortical stimulation for somatosensory feedback

    PubMed Central

    Klaes, Christian; Shi, Ying; Kellis, Spencer; Minxha, Juri; Revechkis, Boris; Andersen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Present day cortical brain machine interfaces (BMI) have made impressive advances using decoded brain signals to control extracorporeal devices. Although BMIs are used in a closed-loop fashion, sensory feedback typically is visual only. However medical case studies have shown that the loss of somesthesis in a limb greatly reduces the agility of the limb even when visual feedback is available (for review see Robles-De-La-Torre, 2006). To overcome this limitation, this study tested a closed-loop BMI that utilizes intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to provide ‘tactile’ sensation to a non-human primate (NHP). Using stimulation electrodes in Brodmann area 1 of somatosensory cortex (BA1) and recording electrodes in the anterior intraparietal area (AIP), the parietal reach region (PRR) and dorsal area 5 (area 5d), it was found that this form of feedback can be used in BMI tasks. PMID:25242377

  6. Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Ibrahim, Ronny K.; Mathur, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii) investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants) showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants’ 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual’s objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location) and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ). The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by the

  7. Facilitated early cortical processing of nude human bodies.

    PubMed

    Alho, Jussi; Salminen, Nelli; Sams, Mikko; Hietanen, Jari K; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging has identified specialized neural systems supporting human body perception. Responses to nude vs. clothed bodies within this system are amplified. However, it remains unresolved whether nude and clothed bodies are processed by same cerebral networks or whether processing of nude bodies recruits additional affective and arousal processing areas. We recorded simultaneous MEG and EEG while participants viewed photographs of clothed and nude bodies. Global field power revealed a peak ∼145ms after stimulus onset to both clothed and nude bodies, and ∼205ms exclusively to nude bodies. Nude-body-sensitive responses were centered first (100-200ms) in the extrastriate and fusiform body areas, and subsequently (200-300ms) in affective-motivational areas including insula and anterior cingulate cortex. We conclude that visibility of sexual features facilitates early cortical processing of human bodies, the purpose of which is presumably to trigger sexual behavior and ultimately ensure reproduction.

  8. Cortical Stimulation Concurrent With Skilled Motor Training Improves Forelimb Function and Enhances Motor Cortical Reorganization Following Controlled Cortical Impact.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Stephanie C; Clayton, Elyse Renee; Donlan, Nicole A; Kozlowski, Dorothy Annette; Jones, Theresa A; Adkins, DeAnna Lynn

    2016-02-01

    Electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function following stroke in humans, rats, and nonhuman primates, especially when paired with rehabilitative training (RT). Previously, we found in rodent stroke models that epidural electrical cortical stimulation (CS) of the ipsilesional motor cortex (MC) combined with motor RT enhances motor function and motor cortical plasticity. It was unknown whether CS following experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) would have similar effects. To test the effects of CS combined with motor training after moderate/severe TBI on behavioral outcome and motor cortical organization. Following unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) over the caudal forelimb area of the MC in adult male rats, forelimb reach training was administered daily for 9 weeks concurrently with subthreshold, 100-Hz monopolar CS or no-stimulation control procedures. The rate and magnitude of behavioral improvements and changes in forelimb movement representations in the injured MC as revealed by intracortical microstimulation were measured. CCI resulted in severe motor impairments persisting throughout the 9 weeks of training in both groups, but CS-treated animals had significantly greater behavioral improvements. CS also increased wrist motor cortical representation, one of the main movements used in the training task, when compared with RT alone. However, the overall recovery level was modest, leaving animals still extremely impaired. These data suggest that CS may be useful for improving rehabilitation efficacy after TBI but also raise the possibility that the CS parameters that are highly effective following stroke are suboptimal after moderate/severe TBI. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Inhibitory Plasticity in a Lateral Band Improves Cortical Detection of Natural Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Leon, Edgar E.; Lin, Frank G.; Liu, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The interplay between excitation and inhibition in the auditory cortex is crucial for the processing of acoustic stimuli. However, the precise role that inhibition plays in the distributed cortical encoding of natural vocalizations has not been well studied. We recorded single units (SU) and local field potentials (LFP) in the awake mouse auditory cortex while presenting pup isolation calls to animals that either do (mothers) or do not (virgins) recognize the sounds as behaviorally relevant. In both groups, we observed substantial call-evoked inhibition. However, in mothers this was earlier, longer, stronger, and more stereotyped compared to virgins. This difference was most apparent for recording sites tuned to tone frequencies lower than the pup calls’ high-ultrasonic frequency range. We hypothesize that this auditory cortical inhibitory plasticity improves pup call detection in a relatively specific manner by increasing the contrast between call-evoked responses arising from high-ultrasonic and lateral frequency neural populations. PMID:19524529

  10. Slow cortical DC-potential responses to sweet and bitter tastes in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, B; Marshall, L; Nitsche, M; Hallschmid, M; Eulitz, C; Born, J

    2000-12-01

    Processing of hedonic stimulus quality is assumed to be accompanied by a tuning of cortical arousal and excitability. In this pilot study in 11 healthy humans scalp-recorded DC potentials were assessed during application of a sweet (sucrose) and bitter (quinine hydrochloride) taste, i.e., primary reinforcers of positive and negative quality. Muscular, ocular, and skin potential activity were controlled. Application of sucrose induced a widespread positive DC-potential shift with an amplitude of 40-50 microV and persisting for more than 120-s post-stimulus onset. Following administration of quinine hydrochloride, this positive shift was reduced, most distinctly between 48- and 88-s post-stimulus onset. The reduction appeared to be most consistent at anterior midline recording sites (Fz, Cz). It is assumed that the higher DC-potential positivity during sweetness than during bitterness points to a differential tuning of cortical excitability by a widespread decrease in depolarization of apical dendrites.

  11. Different cortical involvement pattern of generalized and localized spasms: A MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Gupta, Ajay; Wang, Zhong I.; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Mosher, John C.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    We report successful magnetoencephalography (MEG) recording in a child who had generalized epileptic spasms (ES) as well as ES involving legs only during the recording. MEG source localization results demonstrated that 1) the origin of the interictal epileptiform discharges and of both types of ES were the same, i.e. right parietal region, and 2) the two types of ES involved different cortical spread patterns, i.e. epileptic involvement localized to right parietal region in spasms of legs, and rapid diffuse involvement in generalized spasms. The MEG in this case provided new insight about the mechanisms of the two types of ES, i.e. both were generated from the same focus and, in generalized ES, abnormal excitation spread to cortical areas diffusely. PMID:21944062

  12. Biomechanical in vitro validation of intramedullary cortical button fixation for distal biceps tendon repair: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Siebenlist, Sebastian; Lenich, Andreas; Buchholz, Arne; Martetschläger, Frank; Eichhorn, Stefan; Heinrich, Petra; Fingerle, Alexander; Doebele, Stefan; Sandmann, Gunther H; Millett, Peter J; Stöckle, Ulrich; Elser, Florian

    2011-08-01

    Extramedullary cortical button-based fixation for distal biceps tendon ruptures exhibits maximum load to failure in vitro but cannot restore the anatomic footprint and has the potential risk for injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation repair provides superior fixation strength to the bone when compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair. Controlled laboratory study. The technique of intramedullary cortical button fixation with 1 or 2 buttons was compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair using 12 paired human cadaveric elbows. All specimens underwent computed tomography analysis to determine intramedullary dimensions of the radial tuberosity as well as the thickness of the anterior and posterior cortices before biomechanical testing. Maximum load to failure and failure modes were recorded. For baseline measurements, the native tendon was tested for maximum load to failure. The intramedullary area of the radial tuberosity provides sufficient space for single or double intramedullary cortical button implantation. The mean thickness of the anterior cortex was 1.13 ± 0.15 mm, and for the posterior cortex it was 1.97 ± 0.48 mm (P < .001). We found the highest loads to failure for double intramedullary cortical button fixation with a mean load to failure of 455 ± 103 N, versus 275 ± 44 N for single intramedullary cortical button fixation (P < .001) and 305 ± 27 N for single extramedullary cortical button-based technique (P = .003). There were no statistically significant differences between single intramedullary and single extramedullary button fixation repair (P = .081). The mean load to failure for the native tendon was 379 ± 87 N. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides the highest load to failure in the specimens tested. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides reliable fixation strength to the bone for distal biceps tendon repair and

  13. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity during Language: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojemann, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from recordings of human temporal cortical single neuron activity during several measures of language, including object naming and word reading are reviewed and related to changes in activity in the same neurons during recent verbal memory and verbal associative learning measures, in studies conducted during awake neurosurgery for the treatment of epilepsy. The proportion of neurons changing activity with language tasks was similar in either hemisphere. Dominant hemisphere activity was characterized by relative inhibition, some of which occurred during overt speech, possibly to block perception of one’s own voice. However, the majority seems to represent a dynamic network becoming active with verbal memory encoding and especially verbal learning, but inhibited during performance of overlearned language tasks. Individual neurons are involved in different networks for different aspects of language, including naming or reading and naming in different languages. The majority of the changes in activity were tonic sustained shifts in firing. Patterned phasic activity for specific language items was very infrequently recorded. Human single neuron recordings provide a unique perspective on the biologic substrate for language, for these findings are in contrast to many of the findings from other techniques for investigating this. PMID:24961418

  14. Cortical Hemisphere Registration Via Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Curve Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Miller, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    We present large deformation diffeomorphic metric curve mapping (LDDMM-Curve) for registering cortical hemispheres. We showed global cortical hemisphere matching and evaluated the mapping accuracy in five subregions of the cortex in fourteen MRI scans. PMID:18051058

  15. The Cortical Topography of Local Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael; Huber, Reto; Esser, Steve; Riedner, Brady A.; Massimini, Marcello; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Ghilardi, M. Felice; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    In a recent series of experiments, we demonstrated that a visuomotor adaptation task, 12 hours of left arm immobilization, and rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) during waking can each induce local changes in the topography of electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave activity (SWA) during subsequent non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, the poor spatial resolution of EEG and the difficulty of relating scalp potentials to the activity of the underlying cortex limited the interpretation of these results. In order to better understand local cortical regulation of sleep, we used source modeling to show that plastic changes in specific cortical areas during waking produce correlated changes in SWA during sleep in those same areas. We found that implicit learning of a visuomotor adaptation task induced an increase in SWA in right premotor and sensorimotor cortices when compared to a motor control. These same areas have previously been shown to be selectively involved in the performance of this task. We also found that arm immobilization resulted in a decrease in SWA in sensorimotor cortex. Inducing cortical potentiation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) caused an increase in SWA in the targeted area and a decrease in SWA in the contralateral cortex. Finally, we report the first evidence that these modulations in SWA may be related to the dynamics of individual slow waves. We conclude that there is a local, plasticity dependent component to sleep regulation and confirm previous inferences made from the scalp data. PMID:21906021

  16. Cortical Memory Mechanisms and Language Origins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Garcia, Ricardo R.; Bosman, Conrado; Brunetti, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    We have previously proposed that cortical auditory-vocal networks of the monkey brain can be partly homologized with language networks that participate in the phonological loop. In this paper, we suggest that other linguistic phenomena like semantic and syntactic processing also rely on the activation of transient memory networks, which can be…

  17. A case of cortical deafness and anarthria.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Nakamura, Masako; Takayama, Yoshihiro; Momose, Hiromitsu

    2004-03-01

    Generally, cortical deafness is not complicated by anarthria and cortical anarthria does not affect auditory perception. We report a case of simultaneous progressive cortical deafness and anarthria. At the age of 70 years, the patient, a woman, noticed hearing problems when using the telephone, which worsened rapidly over the next 2 years. She was then referred to our hospital for further examinations of her hearing problems. Auditory tests revealed threshold elevation in the low and middle frequencies on pure-tone audiometry, a maximum speech discrimination of 25% and normal otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem, middle- and long-latency responses. An articulation test revealed abnormal pronunciation. Because of these problems only written and not verbal communication was possible; her ability to read and write was unimpaired. She showed no other neurological problems. Brain MRI demonstrated atrophic changes of the auditory cortex and Wernicke's language center and PET suggested low uptake of (18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose around the Sylvian fissures in both hemispheres. Neurologically, the patient was suspected of having progressive aphasia or frontotemporal dementia. Her cortical deafness and anarthria are believed to be early signs of this entity.

  18. Diffeomorphic spectral matching of cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Herve; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    Accurate matching of cortical surfaces is necessary in many neuroscience applications. In this context diffeomorphisms are often sought, because they facilitate further statistical analysis and atlas building. Present methods for computing diffeomorphisms are based on optimizing flows or on inflating surfaces to a common template, but they are often computationally expensive. It typically takes several hours on a conventional desktop computer to match a single pair of cortical surfaces having a few hundred thousand vertices. We propose a very fast alternative based on an application of spectral graph theory on a novel association graph. Our symmetric approach can generate a diffeomorphic correspondence map within a few minutes on high-resolution meshes while avoiding the sign and multiplicity ambiguities of conventional spectral matching methods. The eigenfunctions are shared between surfaces and provide a smooth parameterization of surfaces. These properties are exploited to compute differentials on highly folded cortical surfaces. Diffeomorphisms can thus be verified and invalid surface folding detected. Our method is demonstrated to attain a vertex accuracy that is at least as good as that of FreeSurfer and Spherical Demons but in only a fraction of their processing time. As a practical experiment, we construct an unbiased atlas of cortical surfaces with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than current methods.

  19. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  20. [Infantile cortical hyperostosis. Apropos of 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Arnal, J M; Moneo, M I; Baldellou, A

    1988-02-01

    Retrospective analysis of eight patients suffering from infantile cortical hyperostosis shows clearly autosomic dominant inheritance of the disease, the strong variation in the clinical expressivity, and therefore the need for an in deep work-up of the patient and his relatives in the presence of any suspicious symptom.

  1. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Karube, Fuyuki; Nomura, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) size is not uniform. Thus, cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit. PMID:27199670

  2. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    PubMed

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (<1 cm(2)). Over 259 language sites detected, 43 (17%) were exclusively involved in Arabic number reading (no sentence or word number reading interference detected in these sites). Specific Arabic number reading interferences were mainly found in three regions: the Broca area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p < 0.0001), and the temporal-basal area (Brodmann area 37; p < 0.05). Diverse types of interferences were observed (reading arrest, phonemic or semantic paraphasia). Error patterns were fairly similar across temporal, parietal, and frontal stimulation sites, except for phonemic paraphasias, which were found only in supramarginal gyrus. Our findings strongly support the fact that the acquisition through education of specific symbolic entities, such as Arabic numbers, could result in the segregation and the specialization of anatomically distinct brain areas.

  3. Stroke rehabilitation using noninvasive cortical stimulation: aphasia.

    PubMed

    Mylius, Veit; Zouari, Hela G; Ayache, Samar S; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Poststroke aphasia results from the lesion of cortical areas involved in the motor production of speech (Broca's aphasia) or in the semantic aspects of language comprehension (Wernicke's aphasia). Such lesions produce an important reorganization of speech/language-specific brain networks due to an imbalance between cortical facilitation and inhibition. In fact, functional recovery is associated with changes in the excitability of the damaged neural structures and their connections. Two main mechanisms are involved in poststroke aphasia recovery: the recruitment of perilesional regions of the left hemisphere in case of small lesion and the acquisition of language processing ability in homotopic areas of the nondominant right hemisphere when left hemispheric language abilities are permanently lost. There is some evidence that noninvasive cortical stimulation, especially when combined with language therapy or other therapeutic approaches, can promote aphasia recovery. Cortical stimulation was mainly used to either increase perilesional excitability or reduce contralesional activity based on the concept of reciprocal inhibition and maladaptive plasticity. However, recent studies also showed some positive effects of the reinforcement of neural activities in the contralateral right hemisphere, based on the potential compensatory role of the nondominant hemisphere in stroke recovery.

  4. Cortical input in control of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Michou, Emilia; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2009-06-01

    This review presents a current synopsis of newer research in cortical control of swallowing and its relationship to advancing knowledge in the field of human swallowing neurophysiology. The intent is to highlight recent findings and to stimulate potential research questions not yet investigated. Advances in human brain imaging have led to a wealth of newer insights into the cortical and subcortical control of human swallowing. This includes a better understanding of the hemispheric contributions to swallowing control and the mechanisms that underlie recovery or compensation after neurological injury. Through advances in imaging and neuroimaging techniques, our knowledge of the neuroanatomy and physiology of swallowing has increased dramatically over the last decade. Integration and interconnection of the diverse swallowing cortical network and how sensory input influences swallowing cortical activation has started to provide a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underpin this exquisite yet fundamental sensorimotor function. Experimental paradigms for swallowing neural reorganization have begun to provide evidence for their translation into clinical practice for dysphagia rehabilitation.

  5. Brain cortical characteristics of lifetime cognitive ageing.

    PubMed

    Cox, Simon R; Bastin, Mark E; Ritchie, Stuart J; Dickie, David Alexander; Liewald, Dave C; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Redmond, Paul; Royle, Natalie A; Pattie, Alison; Valdés Hernández, Maria; Corley, Janie; Aribisala, Benjamin S; McIntosh, Andrew M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2017-09-06

    Regional cortical brain volume is the product of surface area and thickness. These measures exhibit partially distinct trajectories of change across the brain's cortex in older age, but it is unclear which cortical characteristics at which loci are sensitive to cognitive ageing differences. We examine associations between change in intelligence from age 11 to 73 years and regional cortical volume, surface area, and thickness measured at age 73 years in 568 community-dwelling older adults, all born in 1936. A relative positive change in intelligence from 11 to 73 was associated with larger volume and surface area in selective frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital regions (r < 0.180, FDR-corrected q < 0.05). There were no significant associations between cognitive ageing and a thinner cortex for any region. Interestingly, thickness and surface area were phenotypically independent across bilateral lateral temporal loci, whose surface area was significantly related to change in intelligence. These findings suggest that associations between regional cortical volume and cognitive ageing differences are predominantly driven by surface area rather than thickness among healthy older adults. Regional brain surface area has been relatively underexplored, and is a potentially informative biomarker for identifying determinants of cognitive ageing differences.

  6. Cortical operation of the ventral striatal switchboard

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Garret D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary How does the ventral striatum (VS) prioritize and process afferent input? In this issue, Calhoon and O’Donnell demonstrate that cortical projections to the VS can attenuate hippocampal and thalamic VS input, suggesting that the cortex can uniquely control VS circuit dynamics. PMID:23583104

  7. Cortical Folding Patterns and Predicting Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Niranjini; Busa, Evelina; Augustinack, Jean; Hinds, Oliver; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is made up of a mosaic of structural areas, frequently referred to as Brodmann areas (BAs). Despite the widespread use of cortical folding patterns to perform ad hoc estimations of the locations of the BAs, little is understood regarding 1) how variable the position of a given BA is with respect to the folds, 2) whether the location of some BAs is more variable than others, and 3) whether the variability is related to the level of a BA in a putative cortical hierarchy. We use whole-brain histology of 10 postmortem human brains and surface-based analysis to test how well the folds predict the locations of the BAs. We show that higher order cortical areas exhibit more variability than primary and secondary areas and that the folds are much better predictors of the BAs than had been previously thought. These results further highlight the significance of cortical folding patterns and suggest a common mechanism for the development of the folds and the cytoarchitectonic fields. PMID:18079129

  8. Cortical Memory Mechanisms and Language Origins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Garcia, Ricardo R.; Bosman, Conrado; Brunetti, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    We have previously proposed that cortical auditory-vocal networks of the monkey brain can be partly homologized with language networks that participate in the phonological loop. In this paper, we suggest that other linguistic phenomena like semantic and syntactic processing also rely on the activation of transient memory networks, which can be…

  9. Cortical correlates of acquired deafness to dissonance.

    PubMed

    Brattico, Elvira; Tervaniemi, Mari; Valimaki, Vesa; Van Zuijen, Titia; Peretz, Isabelle

    2003-11-01

    Patient I.R., who had bilateral lesions in the auditory cortex but intact hearing, did not distinguish dissonant from consonant musical excerpts in behavioral testing. We additionally found that the electrical brain responses did not differentiate musical intervals in terms of their dissonance/consonance, consistent with the idea that this phenomenon depends on the integrity of cortical functions.

  10. Central cortical cleanup and zonular deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Antonios, Rafic S; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of the cortex has been advocated to prevent posterior capsular opacification but carries the risk of zonular dehiscence, hence there is a need for a safe maximal cortical cleanup technique in eyes with severe diffuse zonulopathy in subjects above age 90. Methods We used bimanual central cortical cleaning by elevating central fibers and aspirating them toward the periphery. Peripheral cortical fibers were removed passively only when they became loose due to copious irrigation. A one-piece foldable implant was inserted without a capsular tension ring. Postoperative corticosteroid drops were used. Results This technique was safely performed in a dozen eyes with severe pseudo-exfoliation or brunescent cataract with weak zonules. Posterior capsular rupture, iritis, vitreous loss, and lens subluxation were not observed. Moderate capsular phimosis occurred but with maintained central vision. Conclusion The dogma of “complete cortical cleanup” in severe zonulopathy needs to be revisited in favor of a clear visual axis with maximal preservation of the damaged zonules. This technique is ideal in patients above age 90 where posterior capsular opacification and late dislocation of intraocular lens–capsule bag complex are unlikely to occur until several years postoperatively. PMID:27784979

  11. Exploring the Nature of Cortical Recurrent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Kenji; Kalra, Rita; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Fast rhythmic activity of neural population has been frequently observed in cortical circuits, and suggested to be associated with various cognitive functions including working memory and selective attention. However, precisely how recurrent synaptic interactions, that are prominent in these circuits, shape and/or modulate such population rhythm has not been fully elucidated. We have addressed this issue by combining electrophysiological and computational approaches.

  12. Cortical Mechanisms of Attention, Discrimination, and Motor Response to Somaesthetic Stimuli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    rats. These animals are trained to place their forepaw on a bar and move it up or down immediately upon detecting a vibratory stimulus imposed on the...chronically implanted in the forepaw/forelimb areas of the somatosensory (SI) and motor (MI) cortices in awake behaving rats. These animals are...and discriminating up to 64 single neurons simultaneously from one animal . These are recorded through arrays of 25 or 50uM stainless steel microwire

  13. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  14. Trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume maturation in normal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J.; Mateos-Pérez, J.M.; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of developmental trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual typically-developing subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models, with statistical correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory. Analyses were performed with and without controlling for total brain volume. These data are provided for reference and comparison with other databases. Further discussion and interpretation on cortical developmental trajectories can be found in the associated Ducharme et al.׳s article “Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – the importance of quality control procedures” (Ducharme et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26702424

  15. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  16. Whisker stimulation metabolically activates thalamus following cortical transplantation but not following cortical ablation.

    PubMed

    Ciricillo, S P; Hill, M P; Gonzalez, M F; Smalley, S; Morton, M T; Sharp, F R

    1994-04-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was assessed during whisker stimulation by 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Whisker stimulation increased local cerebral glucose utilization in brainstem, thalamus and whisker sensory cortex in normal rats. Whereas whisker stimulation increased glucose metabolism in brainstem, whisker stimulation failed to increase glucose metabolism in thalamus of rats that had whisker sensory cortex ablated 5 h to five weeks previously. The failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus after cortical ablations was probably not due to decreased cortical input to thalamus because whisker stimulation activated thalamus after large cortical tetrodotoxin injections. Failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus at early times (5 h and one day) after cortical ablations was not due to thalamic neuronal death, since it takes days to weeks for axotomized thalamic neurons to die. The failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus at early times after cortical ablations was likely due to the failure of trigeminal brainstem neurons that project to thalamus to activate axotomized thalamic neurons. This might occur because of synaptic retraction, glial stripping or inhibition of trigeminal brainstem synapses onto thalamic neurons. The thalamic neuronal death that occurs over the days and weeks following cortical ablations was associated with thalamic hypometabolism. This is consistent with the idea that the thalamic neurons die because of the absence of a cortically derived trophic factor, since the excitotoxic thalamic cell death that occurs following cortical kainate injections is associated with thalamic hypermetabolism. The glucose metabolism of parts of the host thalamus was higher and the glucose metabolism in surrounding nuclei lower than the normal side of thalamus in rats that sat quietly and had fetal cortex transplants placed into cavities in whisker sensory cortex five to 16 weeks previously. Whisker stimulation in these subjects

  17. ERK Is Involved in the Reorganization of Somatosensory Cortical Maps in Adult Rats Submitted to Hindlimb Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Erwan; Stevens, Laurence; Cochon, Laetitia; Falempin, Maurice; Bastide, Bruno; Canu, Marie-Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU) in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV). By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059) through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading. PMID:21408155

  18. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stehberg, Jimmy; Dang, Phat T.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2014-01-01

    Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI)