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Sample records for cortical microtubules stomata

  1. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  2. Gravity-induced reorientation of cortical microtubules observed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, R; Wymer, C L; Lloyd, C W; Nick, P

    1999-05-01

    Cortical microtubules play an important role during morphogenesis by determining the direction of cellulose deposition. Although many triggers are known that can induce the reorientation of cortical plant microtubules, the reorientation mechanism has remained obscure. In our approach, we used gravitropic stimulation which is a strong trigger for microtubule reorientation in epidermal cells of maize coleoptiles. To visualize the gravitropically induced microtubule reorientation in living cells, we injected rhodamine-conjugated tubulin into epidermal cells of intact maize coleoptiles that were exposed to gravitropic stimulation. From these in vivo observations, we propose a reorientation mechanism consisting of four different stages: (1) a transitional stage with randomly organized microtubules; (2) emergence of a few microtubules in a slightly oblique orientation; (3) co-alignment: neighbouring microtubules adopt the oblique orientation resulting in parallel organized microtubules; and (4) the angle of these parallel, organized microtubules increases gradually. Thus, the overall reorientation process could include selective stabilization/ disassembly of microtubules (stage 2) as well as movement of individual microtubules (stages 3 and 4). PMID:11536906

  3. Cortical microtubules in sweet clover columella cells developed in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Electron micrographs of columella cells from sweet clover seedlings grown and fixed in microgravity revealed longitudinal and cross sectioned cortical microtubules. This is the first report demonstrating the presence and stability of this network in plants in microgravity.

  4. Microtubule bundling plays a role in ethylene-mediated cortical microtubule reorientation in etiolated Arabidopsis hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Mao, Tonglin

    2016-05-15

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is known to regulate plant growth under etiolated conditions (the 'triple response'). Although organization of cortical microtubules is essential for cell elongation, the underlying mechanisms that regulate microtubule organization by hormone signaling, including ethylene, are ambiguous. In the present study, we demonstrate that ethylene signaling participates in regulation of cortical microtubule reorientation. In particular, regulation of microtubule bundling is important for this process in etiolated hypocotyls. Time-lapse analysis indicated that selective stabilization of microtubule-bundling structures formed in various arrays is related to ethylene-mediated microtubule orientation. Bundling events and bundle growth lifetimes were significantly increased in oblique and longitudinal arrays, but decreased in transverse arrays in wild-type cells in response to ethylene. However, the effects of ethylene on microtubule bundling were partially suppressed in a microtubule-bundling protein WDL5 knockout mutant (wdl5-1). This study suggests that modulation of microtubule bundles that have formed in certain orientations plays a role in reorienting microtubule arrays in response to ethylene-mediated etiolated hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:27044753

  5. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons.

    PubMed

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides 'minus-end-out' microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein.

  6. Organization of cortical microtubules in graviresponding maize roots.

    PubMed

    Blancaflor, E B; Hasenstein, K H

    1993-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling of cortical microtubules (MTs) was used to investigate the relationship between MT arrangement and changes in growth rate of the upper and lower sides of horizontally placed roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit). Cap cells and cells of the elongation zone of roots grown vertically in light or darkness showed MT arrangements that were transverse (perpendicular) to the growth direction. Microtubules of cells basal to the elongation zone typically showed oblique orientation. Two hours after horizontal reorientation, cap cells of gravicompetent, light-grown and curving roots contained MTs parallel to the gravity vector. The MT arrangement on the upper side of the elongation zone remained transverse but the MTs of the outer four to five layers of cortical cells along the lower side of the elongation zone showed reorientation parallel to the axis of the root. The MTs of the lower epidermis retained their transverse orientation. Dark-grown roots did not curve and did not show reorientation of MTs in cells of the root cap or elongation zone. The data indicate that MT depolymerization and reorientation is correlated with reduction in growth rate, and that MT reorientation is one of the steps of growth control of graviresponding roots. PMID:11537991

  7. Organization of cortical microtubules in graviresponding maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1993-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling of cortical microtubules (MTs) was used to investigate the relationship between MT arrangement and changes in growth rate of the upper and lower sides of horizontally placed roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit). Cap cells and cells of the elongation zone of roots grown vertically in light or darkness showed MT arrangements that were transverse (perpendicular) to the growth direction. Microtubules of cells basal to the elongation zone typically showed oblique orientation. Two hours after horizontal reorientation, cap cells of gravicompetent, light-grown and curving roots contained MTs parallel to the gravity vector. The MT arrangement on the upper side of the elongation zone remained transverse but the MTs of the outer four to five layers of cortical cells along the lower side of the elongation zone showed reorientation parallel to the axis of the root. The MTs of the lower epidermis retained their transverse orientation. Dark-grown roots did not curve and did not show reorientation of MTs in cells of the root cap or elongation zone. The data indicate that MT depolymerization and reorientation is correlated with reduction in growth rate, and that MT reorientation is one of the steps of growth control of graviresponding roots.

  8. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  9. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  10. Microtubules are essential for guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, William; Ehrhardt, David; Briggs, Winslow

    2012-05-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells. Guard cells expressing GFP-tubulin showed consistent changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata opened or closed. Guard cells showed fewer microtubule structures as stomata closed, whether induced by transfer to darkness, ABA, hydrogen peroxide, or sodium hydrogen carbonate. Guard cells kept in the dark (closed stomata) showed increases in microtubule structures and stomatal aperture on light treatment. GFP-EB1, marking microtubule growing plus ends, showed no change in number of plus ends or velocity of assembly on stomatal closure. Since the number of growing plus ends and the rate of plus-end growth did not change when microtubule structure numbers declined, microtubule instability and/or rearrangement must be responsible for the apparent loss of microtubules. Guard cells with closed stomata showed more cytosolic GFP-fluorescence than those with open stomata as cortical microtubules became disassembled, although with a large net loss in total fluorescence. Microtubule-targeted drugs blocked guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis. Oryzalin disrupted guard-cell microtubules and prevented stomatal opening and taxol stabilized guard-cell microtubules and delayed stomatal closure. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the transgenes for fluorescent-labeled proteins did not disrupt normal stomatal function. These dynamic changes in guard-cell microtubules combined with our inhibitor studies provide evidence for an active role of microtubules in guard-cell function.

  11. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides ‘minus-end-out’ microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10140.001 PMID:26615019

  12. A GFP-MAP4 reporter gene for visualizing cortical microtubule rearrangements in living epidermal cells

    PubMed

    Marc; Granger; Brincat; Fisher; Kao; McCubbin; Cyr

    1998-11-01

    Microtubules influence morphogenesis by forming distinct geometrical arrays in the cell cortex, which in turn affect the deposition of cellulose microfibrils. Although many chemical and physical factors affect microtubule orientation, it is unclear how cortical microtubules in elongating cells maintain their ordered transverse arrays and how they reorganize into new geometries. To visualize these reorientations in living cells, we constructed a microtubule reporter gene by fusing the microtubule binding domain of the mammalian microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4) gene with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, and transient expression of the recombinant protein in epidermal cells of fava bean was induced. The reporter protein decorates microtubules in vivo and binds to microtubules in vitro. Confocal microscopy and time-course analysis of labeled cortical arrays along the outer epidermal wall revealed the lengthening, shortening, and movement of microtubules; localized microtubule reorientations; and global microtubule reorganizations. The global microtubule orientation in some cells fluctuates about the transverse axis and may be a result of a cyclic self-correcting mechanism to maintain a net transverse orientation during cellular elongation. PMID:9811799

  13. An ensemble of specifically targeted proteins stabilizes cortical microtubules in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; He, Yudou; Benmerzouga, Imaan; Sullivan, William J.; Morrissette, Naomi S.; Murray, John M.; Hu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Although all microtubules within a single cell are polymerized from virtually identical subunits, different microtubule populations carry out specialized and diverse functions, including directional transport, force generation, and cellular morphogenesis. Functional differentiation requires specific targeting of associated proteins to subsets or even subregions of these polymers. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii, an important human parasite, contains at least five distinct tubulin-based structures. In this work, we define the differential localization of proteins along the cortical microtubules of T. gondii, established during daughter biogenesis and regulated by protein expression and exchange. These proteins distinguish cortical from mitotic spindle microtubules, even though the assembly of these subsets is contemporaneous during cell division. Finally, proteins associated with cortical microtubules collectively protect the stability of the polymers with a remarkable degree of functional redundancy. PMID:26680740

  14. An ensemble of specifically targeted proteins stabilizes cortical microtubules in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; He, Yudou; Benmerzouga, Imaan; Sullivan, William J; Morrissette, Naomi S; Murray, John M; Hu, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Although all microtubules within a single cell are polymerized from virtually identical subunits, different microtubule populations carry out specialized and diverse functions, including directional transport, force generation, and cellular morphogenesis. Functional differentiation requires specific targeting of associated proteins to subsets or even subregions of these polymers. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii, an important human parasite, contains at least five distinct tubulin-based structures. In this work, we define the differential localization of proteins along the cortical microtubules of T. gondii, established during daughter biogenesis and regulated by protein expression and exchange. These proteins distinguish cortical from mitotic spindle microtubules, even though the assembly of these subsets is contemporaneous during cell division. Finally, proteins associated with cortical microtubules collectively protect the stability of the polymers with a remarkable degree of functional redundancy. PMID:26680740

  15. Astral Microtubule Pivoting Promotes Their Search for Cortical Anchor Sites during Mitosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Baumgärtner, Stephan; Tolić, Iva M.

    2014-01-01

    Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast. PMID:24721997

  16. Depolymerization of dendritic microtubules following incubation of cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, R D; Gray, E G; Sullivan, K; Barron, J

    1982-07-20

    Electron microscopical examination indicated that incubation of slices of rat cerebral cortex in Krebs buffer at room temperature of 37 degrees C led to a rapid and more or less complete depolymerization of dendritic microtubules. The loss of dendritic microtubules did not appear to be a consequence of anoxia. Myelinated axons showed only a partial loss of microtubules and the microtubules of preterminal axons were unaffected by incubation. These results indicate differential labilities of axonal and dendritic microtubules under these conditions of incubation. Such an effect of the incubation of slices in Krebs buffer indicates a need for caution in the interpretation of experiments on slice preparations.

  17. Motor-mediated cortical versus astral microtubule organization in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5-100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  18. Motor-mediated Cortical versus Astral Microtubule Organization in Lipid-monolayered Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5–100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  19. Essential and nonredundant roles for Diaphanous formins in cortical microtubule capture and directed cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Pascale; Hasan, Salma; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Baudelet, Emilie; Camoin, Luc; Audebert, Stéphane; Goode, Bruce L.; Badache, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Formins constitute a large family of proteins that regulate the dynamics and organization of both the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Previously we showed that the formin mDia1 helps tether microtubules at the cell cortex, acting downstream of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. Here we further study the contributions of mDia1 and its two most closely related formins, mDia2 and mDia3, to cortical microtubule capture and ErbB2-dependent breast carcinoma cell migration. We find that depletion of each of these three formins strongly disrupts chemotaxis without significantly affecting actin-based structures. Further, all three formins are required for formation of cortical microtubules in a nonredundant manner, and formin proteins defective in actin polymerization remain active for microtubule capture. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis, we identify differential binding partners of the formin-homology domain 2 (FH2) of mDia1, mDia2, and mDia3, which may explain their nonredundant roles in microtubule capture. The FH2 domain of mDia1 specifically interacts with Rab6-interacting protein 2 (Rab6IP2). Further, mDia1 is required for cortical localization of Rab6IP2, and concomitant depletion of Rab6IP2 and IQGAP1 severely disrupts cortical capture of microtubules, demonstrating the coinvolvement of mDia1, IQGAP1, and Rab6IP2 in microtubule tethering at the leading edge. PMID:24403606

  20. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  1. Anillin interacts with microtubules and is part of the astral pathway that defines cortical domains.

    PubMed

    van Oostende Triplet, Chloe; Jaramillo Garcia, Melina; Haji Bik, Husni; Beaudet, Daniel; Piekny, Alisa

    2014-09-01

    Cytokinesis occurs by the ingression of an actomyosin ring that separates the cell into two daughter cells. The mitotic spindle, comprising astral and central spindle microtubules, couples contractile ring ingression with DNA segregation. Cues from the central spindle activate RhoA, the upstream regulator of the contractile ring. However, additional cues from the astral microtubules also reinforce the localization of active RhoA. Using human cells, we show that astral and central spindle microtubules independently control the localization of contractile proteins during cytokinesis. Astral microtubules restrict the accumulation and localization of contractile proteins during mitosis, whereas the central spindle forms a discrete ring by directing RhoA activation in the equatorial plane. Anillin stabilizes the contractile ring during cytokinesis. We show that human anillin interacts with astral microtubules and that this interaction is competed by the cortical recruitment of anillin by active RhoA. Anillin restricts the localization of myosin to the equatorial cortex and that of NuMA (part of the microtubule-tethering complex that regulates spindle position) to the polar cortex. The sequestration of anillin by astral microtubules might alter the organization of cortical proteins to polarize cells for cytokinesis. PMID:24994938

  2. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-04-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  3. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone’s expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  4. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  5. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  6. Novel thioredoxin-like proteins are components of a protein complex coating the cortical microtubules of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wetzel, Laura; Zhang, Ying; Nagayasu, Eiji; Ems-McClung, Stephanie; Florens, Laurence; Hu, Ke

    2013-12-01

    Microtubules are versatile biopolymers that support numerous vital cellular functions in eukaryotes. The specific properties of microtubules are dependent on distinct microtubule-associated proteins, as the tubulin subunits and microtubule structure are exceptionally conserved. Highly specialized microtubule-containing assemblies are often found in protists, which are rich sources for novel microtubule-associated proteins. A protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, possesses several distinct tubulin-containing structures, including 22 microtubules closely associated with the cortical membrane. Early ultrastructural studies have shown that the cortical microtubules are heavily decorated with associating proteins. However, little is known about the identities of these proteins. Here, we report the discovery of a novel protein, TrxL1 (for Thioredoxin-Like protein 1), and an associating complex that coats the cortical microtubules. TrxL1 contains a thioredoxin-like fold. To visualize its localization in live parasites by fluorescence, we replaced the endogenous TrxL1 gene with an mEmeraldFP-TrxL1 fusion gene. Structured illumination-based superresolution imaging of this parasite line produced a detailed view of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Despite its stable association with the cortical microtubules in the parasite, TrxL1 does not seem to bind to microtubules directly. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that TrxL1 associates with a protein complex containing SPM1, a previously reported microtubule-associated protein in T. gondii. We also found that SPM1 recruits TrxL1 to the cortical microtubules. Besides SPM1, several other novel proteins are found in the TrxL1-containing complex, including TrxL2, a close homolog of TrxL1. Thus, our results reveal for the first time a microtubule-associated complex in T. gondii.

  7. TONNEAU2/FASS Regulates the Geometry of Microtubule Nucleation and Cortical Array Organization in Interphase Arabidopsis Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Angela; Ehrhardt, David W.; Kirik, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Organization of microtubules into ordered arrays involves spatial and temporal regulation of microtubule nucleation. Here, we show that acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in plant cells involves a previously unknown regulatory step that determines the geometry of microtubule nucleation. Dynamic imaging of interphase cortical microtubules revealed that the ratio of branching to in-bundle microtubule nucleation on cortical microtubules is regulated by the Arabidopsis thaliana B′′ subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, which is encoded by the TONNEAU2/FASS (TON2) gene. The probability of nucleation from γ-tubulin complexes localized at the cell cortex was not affected by a loss of TON2 function, suggesting a specific role of TON2 in regulating the nucleation geometry. Both loss of TON2 function and ectopic targeting of TON2 to the plasma membrane resulted in defects in cell shape, suggesting the importance of TON2-mediated regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in cell morphogenesis. Loss of TON2 function also resulted in an inability for cortical arrays to reorient in response to light stimulus, suggesting an essential role for TON2 and microtubule branching nucleation in reorganization of microtubule arrays. Our data establish TON2 as a regulator of interphase microtubule nucleation and provide experimental evidence for a novel regulatory step in the process of microtubule-dependent nucleation. PMID:22395485

  8. Microtubule-dependent motility and orientation of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum in elongating characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Ilse; Menzel, Diedrik; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2009-03-01

    Motility of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is predominantly microtubule- dependent in animal cells but thought to be entirely actomyosin-dependent in plant cells. Using live cell imaging and transmission electron microscopy to examine ER motility and structural organization in giant internodal cells of characean algae, we discovered that at the onset of cell elongation, the cortical ER situated near the plasma membrane formed a tight meshwork of predominantly transverse ER tubules that frequently coaligned with microtubules. Microtubule depolymerization increased mesh size and decreased the dynamics of the cortical ER. In contrast, perturbing the cortical actin array with cytochalasins did not affect the transverse orientation but decreased mesh size and increased ER dynamics. Our data suggest that myosin-dependent ER motility is confined to the ER strands in the streaming endoplasm, while the more sedate cortical ER uses microtubule-based mechanisms for organization and motility during early stages of cell elongation. We show further that the ER has an inherent, NEM-sensitive dynamics which can be altered via interaction with the cytoskeleton and that tubule formation and fusion events are cytoskeleton-independent.

  9. The dynamics of plus end polarization and microtubule assembly during Xenopus cortical rotation.

    PubMed

    Olson, David J; Oh, Denise; Houston, Douglas W

    2015-05-15

    The self-organization of dorsally-directed microtubules during cortical rotation in the Xenopus egg is essential for dorsal axis formation. The mechanisms controlling this process have been problematic to analyze, owing to difficulties in visualizing microtubules in living egg. Also, the order of events occurring at the onset of cortical rotation have not been satisfactorily visualized in vivo and have been inferred from staged fixed samples. To address these issues, we have characterized the dynamics of total microtubule and plus end behavior continuously throughout cortical rotation, as well as in oocytes and unfertilized eggs. Here, we show that the nascent microtubule network forms in the cortex but associates with the deep cytoplasm at the start of rotation. Importantly, plus ends remain cortical and become increasingly more numerous and active prior to rotation, with dorsal polarization occurring rapidly after the onset of rotation. Additionally, we show that vegetally localized Trim36 is required to attenuate dynamic plus end growth, suggesting that vegetal factors are needed to locally coordinate growth in the cortex.

  10. Patterns of cortical microtubules formed in epidermis of Beta vulgaris L. roots under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G. V.

    1999-01-01

    Changes of cortical microtubules (MTs) from the normal transverse arrangement were observed in epidermal cells of Beta vulgaris roots under clinorotation. We hypothesize that the epidermis is sensitive to clinorotation and that the microtubular cytoskeleton plays a key role in the ensuing growth response.

  11. Differential Responsiveness of Cortical Microtubule Orientation to Suppression of Cell Expansion among the Developmental Zones of Arabidopsis thaliana Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Rigas, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone. PMID:24324790

  12. Differential responsiveness of cortical microtubule orientation to suppression of cell expansion among the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Rigas, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone. PMID:24324790

  13. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis. PMID:27611066

  14. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  15. [Microtubules in epidermal and cortical root cells of Brassica rapa during clinorotation].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Ia M

    2006-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy the organization of tubulin cytoskeleton including endoplasmic and cortical microtubules (CMTs) has been studied in epidermal and cortical cells of the different growth zones of main root of Brassica rapa L. 6-days-old seedlings in control conditions and under clinorotation. It was shown that changes in CMTs orientation occured only in the distal elongation zone (DEZ). In the control, CMT arrays oriented transversely to the root long axis. Under clinorotation appearance of the shorter randomly organized CMTs was observed. Simultaneously, a significant decrease in the cell length in the central elongation zone (CEZ) under clinorotation was detected. It is suggested that the decline of anisotropic growth typical for CEZ cells is connected with CMTs disorientation under clinorotation.

  16. Dimethyl sulfoxide can initiate cell divisions of arrested callus protoplasts by promoting cortical microtubule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Günther; Hoffmann, Franz

    1984-01-01

    A serious problem in the technology of plant cell culture is that isolated protoplasts from many species are reluctant to divide. We have succeeded in inducing consecutive divisions in a “naturally” arrested system—i.e., protoplasts from a hibiscus cell line, which do not divide under standard conditions—and in an artificially arrested system—i.e., colchicine-inhibited callus protoplasts of Nicotiana glutinosa, which do readily divide in the absence of colchicine. In both cases, the reinstallation of a net of cortical microtubules, which had been affected either by colchicine or by the protoplast isolation procedure, resulted in continuous divisions of the formerly arrested protoplasts. Several compounds known to support microtubule assembly in vitro were tested for their ability to promote microtubule assembly in vivo. Best results were obtained by addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to the culture medium. Unlimited amounts of callus could be produced with the dimethyl sulfoxide method from protoplasts which never developed a single callus in control experiments. Images PMID:16593508

  17. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  18. Cortical microtubule nucleation can organise the cytoskeleton of Drosophila oocytes to define the anteroposterior axis

    PubMed Central

    Khuc Trong, Philipp; Doerflinger, Hélène; Dunkel, Jörn; St Johnston, Daniel; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    Many cells contain non-centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs), but the assembly, organisation and function of these arrays are poorly understood. We present the first theoretical model for the non-centrosomal MT cytoskeleton in Drosophila oocytes, in which bicoid and oskar mRNAs become localised to establish the anterior-posterior body axis. Constrained by experimental measurements, the model shows that a simple gradient of cortical MT nucleation is sufficient to reproduce the observed MT distribution, cytoplasmic flow patterns and localisation of oskar and naive bicoid mRNAs. Our simulations exclude a major role for cytoplasmic flows in localisation and reveal an organisation of the MT cytoskeleton that is more ordered than previously thought. Furthermore, modulating cortical MT nucleation induces a bifurcation in cytoskeletal organisation that accounts for the phenotypes of polarity mutants. Thus, our three-dimensional model explains many features of the MT network and highlights the importance of differential cortical MT nucleation for axis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06088.001 PMID:26406117

  19. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    PubMed Central

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  20. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time.

    PubMed

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1(+), a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. PMID:24928430

  1. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots.

    PubMed

    Blancaflor, E B; Hasenstein, K H

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation. PMID:11541297

  2. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  3. Calcium-dependent depletion zones in the cortical microtubule array coincide with sites of, but do not regulate, wall ingrowth papillae deposition in epidermal transfer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-ming; Talbot, Mark J.; McCurdy, David W.; Patrick, John W.; Offler, Christina E.

    2015-01-01

    Trans-differentiation to a transfer-cell morphology is characterized by the localized deposition of wall ingrowth papillae that protrude into the cytosol. Whether the cortical microtubule array directs wall ingrowth papillae formation was investigated using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system in which their adaxial epidermal cells were spontaneously induced to trans-differentiate to transfer cells. During deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, the aligned cortical microtubule arrays in precursor epidermal cells were reorganized into a randomized array characterized by circular depletion zones. Concurrence of the temporal appearance, spatial pattern, and size of depletion zones and wall ingrowth papillae was consistent with each papilla occupying a depletion zone. Surprisingly, microtubules appeared not to regulate construction of wall ingrowth papillae, as neither depolymerization nor stabilization of cortical microtubules changed their deposition pattern or morphology. Moreover, the size and spatial pattern of depletion zones was unaltered when the formation of wall ingrowth papillae was blocked by inhibiting cellulose biosynthesis. In contrast, the depletion zones were absent when the cytosolic calcium plumes, responsible for directing wall ingrowth papillae formation, were blocked or dissipated. Thus, we conclude that the depletion zones within the cortical microtubule array result from localized depolymerization of microtubules initiated by elevated cytosolic Ca2+ levels at loci where wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. The physiological significance of the depletion zones as a mechanism to accommodate the construction of wall ingrowth papillae without compromising maintenance of the plasma membrane–microtubule inter-relationship is discussed. PMID:26136268

  4. Calcium-dependent depletion zones in the cortical microtubule array coincide with sites of, but do not regulate, wall ingrowth papillae deposition in epidermal transfer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-ming; Talbot, Mark J; McCurdy, David W; Patrick, John W; Offler, Christina E

    2015-09-01

    Trans-differentiation to a transfer-cell morphology is characterized by the localized deposition of wall ingrowth papillae that protrude into the cytosol. Whether the cortical microtubule array directs wall ingrowth papillae formation was investigated using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system in which their adaxial epidermal cells were spontaneously induced to trans-differentiate to transfer cells. During deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, the aligned cortical microtubule arrays in precursor epidermal cells were reorganized into a randomized array characterized by circular depletion zones. Concurrence of the temporal appearance, spatial pattern, and size of depletion zones and wall ingrowth papillae was consistent with each papilla occupying a depletion zone. Surprisingly, microtubules appeared not to regulate construction of wall ingrowth papillae, as neither depolymerization nor stabilization of cortical microtubules changed their deposition pattern or morphology. Moreover, the size and spatial pattern of depletion zones was unaltered when the formation of wall ingrowth papillae was blocked by inhibiting cellulose biosynthesis. In contrast, the depletion zones were absent when the cytosolic calcium plumes, responsible for directing wall ingrowth papillae formation, were blocked or dissipated. Thus, we conclude that the depletion zones within the cortical microtubule array result from localized depolymerization of microtubules initiated by elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) levels at loci where wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. The physiological significance of the depletion zones as a mechanism to accommodate the construction of wall ingrowth papillae without compromising maintenance of the plasma membrane-microtubule inter-relationship is discussed.

  5. Transient increase in the levels of gamma-tubulin complex in reorientation of cortical microtubules by gravity in azuki bean epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, Kouichi; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    Azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) seedlings were exposed to centrifugal hypergravity, and the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules and the expression of genes cording γ-tubulin complex (VaTUBG and VaSpc98p) were examined. By 300 g treatment, the percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased in epicotyls. Hypergravity increased the expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p transiently. Also, the expression of both genes was increased transiently by removal of hypergravity stimulus. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified reorientation of microtubules as well as up-regulation of expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p by hypergravity. These results suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane may perceive the gravity signal, which leads to reorientation of cortical microtubules by transiently stimulating the formation of γ-tubulin complex.

  6. Novel coiled-coil proteins regulate exocyst association with cortical microtubules in xylem cells via the conserved oligomeric golgi-complex 2 protein.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoshinobu; Sugiyama, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Xylem vessel cells develop secondary cell walls in distinct patterns. Cortical microtubules are rearranged into distinct patterns and regulate secondary cell wall deposition; however, it is unclear how exocytotic membrane trafficking is linked to cortical microtubules. Here, we show that the novel coiled-coil proteins vesicle tethering 1 (VETH1) and VETH2 recruit EXO70A1, an exocyst subunit essential for correct patterning of secondary cell wall deposition, to cortical microtubules via the conserved oligomeric Golgi complex (COG) 2 protein. VETH1 and VETH2 encode an uncharacterized domain of an unknown function designated DUF869, and were preferentially up-regulated in xylem cells. VETH1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and VETH2-GFP co-localized at novel vesicle-like small compartments, which exhibited microtubule plus-end-directed and end-tracking dynamics. VETH1 and VETH2 interacted with COG2, and this interaction promoted the association between cortical microtubules and EXO70A1 These results suggest that the VETH-COG2 complex ensures the correct secondary cell wall deposition pattern by recruiting exocyst components to cortical microtubules.

  7. The Fragile Fiber1 Kinesin Contributes to Cortical Microtubule-Mediated Trafficking of Cell Wall Components1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chuanmei; Ganguly, Anindya; Baskin, Tobias I.; McClosky, Daniel D.; Anderson, Charles T.; Foster, Cliff; Meunier, Kristoffer A.; Okamoto, Ruth; Berg, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall consists of cellulose microfibrils embedded within a matrix of hemicellulose and pectin. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane, whereas matrix polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and secreted. The trafficking of vesicles containing cell wall components is thought to depend on actin-myosin. Here, we implicate microtubules in this process through studies of the kinesin-4 family member, Fragile Fiber1 (FRA1). In an fra1-5 knockout mutant, the expansion rate of the inflorescence stem is halved compared with the wild type along with the thickness of both primary and secondary cell walls. Nevertheless, cell walls in fra1-5 have an essentially unaltered composition and ultrastructure. A functional triple green fluorescent protein-tagged FRA1 fusion protein moves processively along cortical microtubules, and its abundance and motile density correlate with growth rate. Motility of FRA1 and cellulose synthase complexes is independent, indicating that FRA1 is not directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis; however, the secretion rate of fucose-alkyne-labeled pectin is greatly decreased in fra1-5, and the mutant has Golgi bodies with fewer cisternae and enlarged vesicles. Based on our results, we propose that FRA1 contributes to cell wall production by transporting Golgi-derived vesicles along cortical microtubules for secretion. PMID:25646318

  8. The Arabidopsis TRM1–TON1 Interaction Reveals a Recruitment Network Common to Plant Cortical Microtubule Arrays and Eukaryotic Centrosomes[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Drevensek, Stéphanie; Goussot, Magali; Duroc, Yann; Christodoulidou, Anna; Steyaert, Sylvie; Schaefer, Estelle; Duvernois, Evelyne; Grandjean, Olivier; Vantard, Marylin; Bouchez, David; Pastuglia, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Land plant cells assemble microtubule arrays without a conspicuous microtubule organizing center like a centrosome. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the TONNEAU1 (TON1) proteins, which share similarity with FOP, a human centrosomal protein, are essential for microtubule organization at the cortex. We have identified a novel superfamily of 34 proteins conserved in land plants, the TON1 Recruiting Motif (TRM) proteins, which share six short conserved motifs, including a TON1-interacting motif present in all TRMs. An archetypal member of this family, TRM1, is a microtubule-associated protein that localizes to cortical microtubules and binds microtubules in vitro. Not all TRM proteins can bind microtubules, suggesting a diversity of functions for this family. In addition, we show that TRM1 interacts in vivo with TON1 and is able to target TON1 to cortical microtubules via its C-terminal TON1 interaction motif. Interestingly, three motifs of TRMs are found in CAP350, a human centrosomal protein interacting with FOP, and the C-terminal M2 motif of CAP350 is responsible for FOP recruitment at the centrosome. Moreover, we found that TON1 can interact with the human CAP350 M2 motif in yeast. Taken together, our results suggest conservation of eukaryotic centrosomal components in plant cells. PMID:22286137

  9. Microfilaments and microtubules control the shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of cortical mitochondria in characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, I

    2004-12-01

    The shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of mitochondria in characean internodal cells were studied by visualizing fluorescent dyes with confocal laser scanning microscopy and conducting drug-inhibitor experiments. Shape, size, number, and distribution of mitochondria varied according to the growth status and the metabolic activity within the cell. Vermiform (sausage-shaped), disc-, or amoeba-like mitochondria were present in elongating internodes, whereas very young cells and older cells that had completed growth contained short, rodlike organelles only. Mitochondria were evenly distributed and passively transported in the streaming endoplasm. In the cortex, mitochondria were sandwiched between the plasma membrane and the stationary chloroplast files and distributed in relation to the pattern of pH banding. Highest mitochondrial densities were found at the acid, photosynthetically more active regions, whereas the alkaline sites contained fewer and smaller mitochondria. In the cortex of elongating cells, small mitochondria moved slowly along microtubules or actin filaments. The shape and motility of giant mitochondria depended on the simultaneous interaction with both cytoskeletal systems. There was no microtubule-dependent motility in the cortex of nonelongating mature cells and mitochondria only occasionally travelled along actin filaments. These observations suggest that mitochondria of characean internodes possess motor proteins for microtubules and actin filaments, both of which can be used either as tracks for migration or for immobilization. The cortical cytoskeleton probably controls the spatiotemporal distribution of mitochondria within the cell and promotes their association with chloroplasts, which is necessary for exchange of metabolites during photosynthesis and detoxification.

  10. Is the LIM-domain protein HaWLIM1 associated with cortical microtubules in sunflower protoplasts?

    PubMed

    Brière, Christian; Bordel, Anne-Claire; Barthou, Henri; Jauneau, Alain; Steinmetz, André; Alibert, Gilbert; Petitprez, Michel

    2003-10-01

    Flowering plants express several LIM-domain proteins related to the animal cystein-rich proteins. The expression of sunflower LIM genes was followed by RT-PCR in cultured sunflower protoplasts. A transcript was detected only for HaWLIM1, but not for the other two genes HaPLIM1 and HaPLIM2. Polyclonal antibodies raised against either full length recombinant HaWLIM1 protein or peptides recognized a 27 kDa polypeptide on Western blots. Immunocytolocalization studies showed that HaWLIM1 is located in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. In the cytoplasm, HaWLIM1 is localized in punctate structures, distributed along microtubule bundles. Depolymerizing microtubules with oryzalin resulted in a strong modification of the HaWLIM1 cortical pattern. In contrast, treatment of protoplasts with latrunculin B, which disrupts actin filaments, had no effect on HaWLIM1 localization. HaWLIM1 was also located within the nucleus of interphase protoplasts. During mitosis, nuclear labelling was observed in prophase, which decreased in metaphase, disappeared in anaphase, and recovered in telophase. These results suggest a dual role for HaWLIM1: in the cytoplasm, as a component of molecular complexes which may interact with microtubules, and in the nucleus, as a partner of transcription factors during interphase. PMID:14581630

  11. Simulation of the effects of microtubules in the cortical rotation of amphibian embryos in normal and zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Comron; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wiebe, Mark W; Gordon, Richard

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the results of computer modeling of microtubules that end up in the cortical region of a one-cell amphibian embryo, prior to the first cell division. Microtubules are modeled as initially randomly oriented semi-flexible rods, represented by several lines of point-masses interacting with one another like masses on springs with longitudinal and transverse stiffness. They are also considered to be space-filling rods floating in a viscous fluid (cytoplasm) experiencing drag forces and buoyancy from the fluid under a variable gravity field to test gravitational effects. Their randomly distributed interactions with the surrounding spherical container (the cell membrane) have a statistical nonzero average that creates a torque causing a rotational displacement between the cytoplasm and the rigid cortex. The simulation has been done for zero and normal gravity and it validates the observation that cortical rotation occurs in microgravity as well as on Earth. The speed of rotation depends on gravity, but is still substantial in microgravity.

  12. Speedy small stomata?

    PubMed

    Raven, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recent work has made progress in relating the size of stomata to stomatal functioning and, in particular, the speed of opening and closing and its implications. Calculations of the influence of stomatal size on the potential rate of osmolarity increase, assuming size-independent ion influx rate per unit area of guard cell plasmalemma set at the value found in large (60 μm long) stomata, show that 10 μm long stomata could have at least a 6-fold higher rate of osmolarity increase. There could be a corresponding decrease in the time taken in going from the closed to the fully open state from about 1h to about 10 min; this is approximately the range found for stomata.. However, there are no data on the rate of stomatal movement over a sufficient size range to test this suggestion. Faster opening requires, assuming optimal allocation, a higher activity of the required enzymes per unit volume of guard cells. This is explored for cytosolic carbonic anhydrase which is needed in guard cells, at least in the light, for malic acid synthesis which is involved in stomatal opening in most stomata. Faster opening and closing of smaller than of larger stomata could allow closer tracking of environmental (mainly light) variations, although the available data are not adequate to determine if such a greater tracking occurs. The range of speeds of stomatal movement is similar to that for photoinhibition-related phenomena, despite the very different mechanisms involved.

  13. Salt stress-induced disassembly of Arabidopsis cortical microtubule arrays involves 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of SPIRAL1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songhu; Kurepa, Jasmina; Hashimoto, Takashi; Smalle, Jan A

    2011-09-01

    The dynamic instability of cortical microtubules (MTs) (i.e., their ability to rapidly alternate between phases of growth and shrinkage) plays an essential role in plant growth and development. In addition, recent studies have revealed a pivotal role for dynamic instability in the response to salt stress conditions. The salt stress response includes a rapid depolymerization of MTs followed by the formation of a new MT network that is believed to be better suited for surviving high salinity. Although this initial depolymerization response is essential for the adaptation to salt stress, the underlying molecular mechanism has remained largely unknown. Here, we show that the MT-associated protein SPIRAL1 (SPR1) plays a key role in salt stress-induced MT disassembly. SPR1, a microtubule stabilizing protein, is degraded by the 26S proteasome, and its degradation rate is accelerated in response to high salinity. We show that accelerated SPR1 degradation is required for a fast MT disassembly response to salt stress and for salt stress tolerance.

  14. Wnt5a Evokes Cortical Axon Outgrowth and Repulsive Guidance by Tau Mediated Reorganization of Dynamic Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Fothergill, Thomas; Hutchins, B Ian; Dent, Erik W; Kali, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a guides cortical axons in vivo by repulsion and in vitro evokes cortical axon outgrowth and repulsion by calcium signaling pathways. Here we examined the role of microtubule (MT) reorganization and dynamics in mediating effects of Wnt5a. Inhibiting MT dynamics with nocodazole and taxol abolished Wnt5a evoked axon outgrowth and repulsion of cultured hamster cortical neurons. EGFP-EB3 labeled dynamic MTs visualized in live cell imaging revealed that growth cone MTs align with the nascent axon. Wnt5a increased axon outgrowth by reorganization of dynamic MTs from a splayed to a bundled array oriented in the direction of axon extension, and Wnt5a gradients induced asymmetric redistribution of dynamic MTs toward the far side of the growth cone. Wnt5a gradients also evoked calcium transients that were highest on the far side of the growth cone. Calcium signaling and the reorganization of dynamic MTs could be linked by tau, a MT associated protein that stabilizes MTs. Tau is phosphorylated at the Ser 262 MT binding site by CaMKII, and is required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth and repulsive turning. Phosphorylation of tau at Ser262 is known to detach tau from MTs to increase their dynamics. Using transfection with tau constructs mutated at Ser262, we found that this site is required for the growth and guidance effects of Wnt5a by mediating reorganization of dynamic MTs in cortical growth cones. Moreover, CaMKII inhibition also prevents MT reorganization required for Wnt5a induced axon outgrowth, thus linking Wnt/calcium signaling to tau mediated MT reorganization during growth cone behaviors. © 2013 The Authors. Developmental Neurobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Develop Neurobiol 74: 797–817, 2014 PMID:23818454

  15. Dynein interacts with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM180) to tether dynamic microtubules and maintain synaptic density in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Perlson, Eran; Hendricks, Adam G; Lazarus, Jacob E; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Gradus, Tal; Tokito, Mariko; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2013-09-27

    Cytoplasmic dynein is well characterized as an organelle motor, but dynein also acts to tether and stabilize dynamic microtubule plus-ends in vitro. Here we identify a novel and direct interaction between dynein and the 180-kDa isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Optical trapping experiments indicate that dynein bound to beads via the NCAM180 interaction domain can tether projecting microtubule plus-ends. Live cell assays indicate that the NCAM180-dependent recruitment of dynein to the cortex leads to the selective stabilization of microtubules projecting to NCAM180 patches at the cell periphery. The dynein-NCAM180 interaction also enhances cell-cell adhesion in heterologous cell assays. Dynein and NCAM180 co-precipitate from mouse brain extract and from synaptosomal fractions, consistent with an endogenous interaction in neurons. Thus, we examined microtubule dynamics and synaptic density in primary cortical neurons. We find that depletion of NCAM, inhibition of the dynein-NCAM180 interaction, or dampening of microtubule dynamics with low dose nocodazole all result in significantly decreased in synaptic density. Based on these observations, we propose a working model for the role of dynein at the synapse, in which the anchoring of the motor to the cortex via binding to an adhesion molecule mediates the tethering of dynamic microtubule plus-ends to potentiate synaptic stabilization.

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate 5-Kinase, FAB1/PIKfyve Kinase Mediates Endosome Maturation to Establish Endosome-Cortical Microtubule Interaction in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Tomoko; Munnik, Teun; Sato, Masa H.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] is an important lipid in membrane trafficking in animal and yeast systems; however, its role is still largely obscure in plants. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinase, formation of aploid and binucleate cells1 (FAB1)/FYVE finger-containing phosphoinositide kinase (PIKfyve), and its product, PtdIns(3,5)P2, are essential for the maturation process of endosomes to mediate cortical microtubule association of endosomes, thereby controlling proper PIN-FORMED protein trafficking in young cortical and stele cells of root. We found that FAB1 predominantly localizes on the Sorting Nexin1 (SNX1)-residing late endosomes, and a loss of FAB1 function causes the release of late endosomal proteins, Ara7, and SNX1 from the endosome membrane, indicating that FAB1, or its product PtdIns(3,5)P2, mediates the maturation process of the late endosomes. We also found that loss of FAB1 function causes the release of endosomes from cortical microtubules and disturbs proper cortical microtubule organization. PMID:26353760

  17. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  18. Positioning of microtubule organizing centers by cortical pushing and pulling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavin, Nenad; Laan, Liedewij; Ma, Rui; Dogterom, Marileen; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Positioning of microtubule (MT) organizing centers with respect to the confining geometry of cells depends on pushing and/or pulling forces generated by MTs that interact with the cell cortex (Dogterom et al 2005 Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 17 67-74). How, in living cells, these forces lead to proper positioning is still largely an open question. Recently, it was shown by in vitro experiments using artificial microchambers that in a square geometry, MT asters center more reliably by a combination of pulling and pushing forces than by pushing forces alone (Laan et al 2012a Cell 148 502-14). These findings were explained by a physical description of aster mechanics that includes slipping of pushing MT ends along chamber boundaries. In this paper, we extend that theoretical work by studying the influence of the shape of the confining geometry on the positioning process. We find that pushing and pulling forces can have centering or off-centering behavior in different geometries. Pushing forces center in a one-dimensional and a square geometry, but lead to off-centering in a circle if slipping is sufficiently pronounced. Pulling forces, however, do not center in a one-dimensional geometry, but improve centering in a circle and a square. In an elongated stadium geometry, positioning along the short axis depends mainly on pulling forces, while positioning along the long axis depends mainly on pushing forces. Our theoretical results suggest that different positioning strategies could be used by different cell types.

  19. Turgor pressure regulation and the orientation of cortical microtubules in Spirogyra cells.

    PubMed

    Iwata, K; Tazawa, M; Itoh, T

    2001-06-01

    Microtubules (MTs) of cells of Spirogyra sp. were depolymerized by treatment with amiprophos-methyl (APM) for 1 h and then reorganized in 0.30 M mannitol solution. The reorganized MTs after 1.5 h incubation showed an oblique/longitudinal orientation and then became transversely oriented as the incubation was prolonged. During this incubation, the osmotic pressure of cells was measured by the plasmolysis method. The cell osmotic pressure increased with time. The calculated turgor pressure at 1.5 h was 0.11 M (mannitol equivalent) and, at 13.5 h, 0.25 M. Similar changes in MT orientation and recovery of the turgor pressure were also observed in 0.30 M sorbitol solution. These results suggest that the MT orientation may be correlated with the turgor pressure. Among fresh water algae sensitive to a saline environment, this Spirogyra was the first species shown to have a turgor regulating mechanism, although the recovery of turgor pressure was incomplete. The recovery of turgor pressure in mannitol solutions was also observed without APM treatment.

  20. Stomata and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

  1. Early asymmetries in maternal transcript distribution associated with a cortical microtubule network and a polar body in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Peel, Andrew D; Averof, Michalis

    2010-11-01

    The localization of maternal mRNAs during oogenesis plays a central role in axial specification in some insects. Here we describe a polar body-associated asymmetry in maternal transcript distribution in pre-blastoderm eggs of the beetle Tribolium castaneum. Since the position of the polar body marks the future dorsal side of the embryo, we have investigated whether this asymmetry in mRNA distribution plays a role in dorsal-ventral axis specification. Whilst our results suggest polar body-associated transcripts do not play a significant role in specifying the DV axis, at least during early embryogenesis, we do find that the polar body is closely associated with a cortical microtubule network (CMN), which may play a role in the localization of transcripts during oogenesis. Transcripts of the gene T.c.pangolin co-localize with the CMN at the time of their anterior localization during oogenesis and their anterior localization is disrupted by the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colcemid. PMID:20857499

  2. Early asymmetries in maternal transcript distribution associated with a cortical microtubule network and a polar body in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Peel, Andrew D; Averof, Michalis

    2010-11-01

    The localization of maternal mRNAs during oogenesis plays a central role in axial specification in some insects. Here we describe a polar body-associated asymmetry in maternal transcript distribution in pre-blastoderm eggs of the beetle Tribolium castaneum. Since the position of the polar body marks the future dorsal side of the embryo, we have investigated whether this asymmetry in mRNA distribution plays a role in dorsal-ventral axis specification. Whilst our results suggest polar body-associated transcripts do not play a significant role in specifying the DV axis, at least during early embryogenesis, we do find that the polar body is closely associated with a cortical microtubule network (CMN), which may play a role in the localization of transcripts during oogenesis. Transcripts of the gene T.c.pangolin co-localize with the CMN at the time of their anterior localization during oogenesis and their anterior localization is disrupted by the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colcemid.

  3. Hexavalent chromium-induced differential disruption of cortical microtubules in some Fabaceae species is correlated with acetylation of α-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Michalopoulou, Vasiliki A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the cortical microtubules (MTs) of five species of the Fabaceae family (Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Vigna sinensis, Vigna angularis, and Medicago sativa) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after immunolocalization of total tubulin with conventional immunofluorescence techniques and of acetylated α-tubulin with the specific 6-11B-1 monoclonal antibody. Moreover, total α-tubulin and acetylated α-tubulin were quantified by Western immunoblotting and scanning densitometry. Results showed the universality of Cr(VI) detrimental effects to cortical MTs, which proved to be a sensitive and reliable subcellular marker for monitoring Cr(VI) toxicity in plant cells. However, a species-specific response was recorded, and a correlation of MT disturbance with the acetylation status of α-tubulin was demonstrated. In V. faba, MTs were depolymerized at the gain of cytoplasmic tubulin background and displayed low α-tubulin acetylation, while in P. sativum, V. sinensis, V. angularis, and M. sativa, MTs became bundled and changed orientation from perpendicular to oblique or longitudinal. Bundled MTs were highly acetylated as determined by both immunofluorescence and Western immunoblotting. Tubulin acetylation in P. sativum and M. sativa preceded MT bundling; in V. sinensis it followed MT derangement, while in V. angularis the two phenomena coincided. Total α-tubulin remained constant in all treatments. Should acetylation be an indicator of MT stabilization, it is deduced that bundled MTs became stabilized, lost their dynamic properties, and were rendered inactive. Results of this report allow the conclusion that Cr(VI) toxicity disrupts MTs and deranges the MT-mediated functions either by depolymerizing or stabilizing them.

  4. Cadmium induced inhibition of autophagy is associated with microtubule disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Qiwen; Song, Ruilong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Liu, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that mitochondria serve as direct targets for cadmium- (Cd-) induced neuronal toxicity, which can be attenuated by autophagy. The molecular mechanisms' underlying Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy in neurons are not known. In this study, we studied the upstream signaling pathways induced by Cd-mediated mitochondrial metabolism alterations using primary rat neuron as a model. We found that Cd induced the destruction of microtubules (MTs), and resulted in tau hyper-phosphorylation and decreased acetylated tubulin levels, which were related to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. As a result of taxol disruption, alterations in macroautophagy, like altered cellular distribution of the autophagy-related protein light chain 3 beta (LC3B) and the expression of Atg5 were found compared with Cd group. We found for the first time that MT disruption induced by Cd reduced the levels of autophagy, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations suggest new therapeutic strategies aimed to activate or ameliorate pro-survival macroautophagy.

  5. SPIRAL2 Determines Plant Microtubule Organization by Modulating Microtubule Severing

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Raymond; Chomicki, Guillaume; Kumar, Manoj; Carr, Paul; Turner, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the defining characteristics of plant growth and morphology is the pivotal role of cell expansion. While the mechanical properties of the cell wall determine both the extent and direction of cell expansion, the cortical microtubule array plays a critical role in cell wall organization and, consequently, determining directional (anisotropic) cell expansion [1–6]. The microtubule-severing enzyme katanin is essential for plants to form aligned microtubule arrays [7–10]; however, increasing severing activity alone is not sufficient to drive microtubule alignment [11]. Here, we demonstrate that katanin activity depends upon the behavior of the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) SPIRAL2 (SPR2). Petiole cells in the cotyledon epidermis exhibit well-aligned microtubule arrays, whereas adjacent pavement cells exhibit unaligned arrays, even though SPR2 is found at similar levels in both cell types. In pavement cells, however, SPR2 accumulates at microtubule crossover sites, where it stabilizes these crossovers and prevents severing. In contrast, in the adjacent petiole cells, SPR2 is constantly moving along the microtubules, exposing crossover sites that become substrates for severing. Consequently, our study reveals a novel mechanism whereby microtubule organization is determined by dynamics and localization of a MAP that regulates where and when microtubule severing occurs. PMID:24055158

  6. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  7. Microtubule-microtubule sliding by kinesin-1 is essential for normal cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Wildonger, Jill; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2016-08-23

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes is a microtubule-based bulk cytoplasmic movement. Streaming efficiently circulates and localizes mRNAs and proteins deposited by the nurse cells across the oocyte. This movement is driven by kinesin-1, a major microtubule motor. Recently, we have shown that kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) can transport one microtubule on another microtubule, thus driving microtubule-microtubule sliding in multiple cell types. To study the role of microtubule sliding in oocyte cytoplasmic streaming, we used a Khc mutant that is deficient in microtubule sliding but able to transport a majority of cargoes. We demonstrated that streaming is reduced by genomic replacement of wild-type Khc with this sliding-deficient mutant. Streaming can be fully rescued by wild-type KHC and partially rescued by a chimeric motor that cannot move organelles but is active in microtubule sliding. Consistent with these data, we identified two populations of microtubules in fast-streaming oocytes: a network of stable microtubules anchored to the actin cortex and free cytoplasmic microtubules that moved in the ooplasm. We further demonstrated that the reduced streaming in sliding-deficient oocytes resulted in posterior determination defects. Together, we propose that kinesin-1 slides free cytoplasmic microtubules against cortically immobilized microtubules, generating forces that contribute to cytoplasmic streaming and are essential for the refinement of posterior determinants.

  8. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  9. Dynamics and regulation of plant interphase microtubules: a comparative view.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    Microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are fundamental to a variety of cellular activities within eukaryotic organisms. Extensive information on the dynamics and functions of microtubules, as well as on their regulatory proteins, have been revealed in fungi and animals, and corresponding pictures are now slowly emerging in plants. During interphase, plant cells contain highly dynamic cortical microtubules that organize into ordered arrays, which are apparently regulated by distinct groups of microtubule regulators. Comparison with fungal and animal microtubules highlights both conserved and unique mechanisms for the regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in plants.

  10. Leaf Stomata as Bioindicators: Stimulating Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Steven B.

    2006-01-01

    Stomata are the pores on leaves through which carbon dioxide, oxygen, and water vapor are exchanged with the atmosphere. Researchers have found that leaf stomatal densities change in response to several environmental variables, including humidity, light intensity, and atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas (Van Der Burgh, Dilcher,…

  11. Microtubule nucleating and severing enzymes for modifying microtubule array organization and cell morphogenesis in response to environmental cues.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    In higher plants, reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays has been postulated to be of importance for modifying cell growth to adapt to environmental conditions. However, the process of microtubule reorientation is largely unknown. Recent genetic and live cell imaging studies of microtubule dynamics shed light on the regulatory mechanisms of microtubule molecular nucleation and severing apparatuses, which are required for array reorientation in response to blue light signaling. Branching nucleation from γ-tubulin complexes creates a small population of discordant microtubules that are acted on by KATANIN-mediated severing in two ways. KATANIN releases microtubules from nucleation sites and rapidly amplifies discordant microtubules by severing at microtubule crossovers. In this review, I focus on the molecular details of these two enzymes, which enable microtubule array transition.

  12. Stomata and pathogens: Warfare at the gates.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrian A

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

  13. Stomata and pathogens: Warfare at the gates.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrian A

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense.

  14. Swinging a sword: how microtubules search for their targets.

    PubMed

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2014-09-01

    The cell interior is in constant movement, which is to a large extent determined by microtubules, thin and long filaments that permeate the cytoplasm. To move large objects, microtubules need to connect them to the site of their destination. For example, during cell division, microtubules connect chromosomes with the spindle poles via kinetochores, protein complexes on the chromosomes. A general question is how microtubules, while being bound to one structure, find the target that needs to be connected to this structure. Here we review the mechanisms of how microtubules search for kinetochores, with emphasis on the recently discovered microtubule feature to explore space by pivoting around the spindle pole. In addition to accelerating the search for kinetochores, pivoting helps the microtubules to search for cortical anchors, as well as to self-organize into parallel arrays and asters to target specific regions of the cell. Thus, microtubule pivoting constitutes a mechanism by which they locate targets in different cellular contexts. PMID:25136379

  15. Microfilaments and microtubules: the news from yeast.

    PubMed

    Schott, Daniel; Huffaker, Tim; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    New evidence that cortical actin patches and the endocytic machinery share components supports the idea that actin patches are in fact transient membrane coats at the initial stage of endocytosis. Recent studies of actin cables have identified formins as the core of a novel actin-filament-assembling machine. Meanwhile, microtubule-binding proteins have been found in the kinetochore, and factors affecting microtubule dynamic instability have been identified. PMID:12457699

  16. Microtubules spatial alterations in root cells of Brassica rapa under clinorotation.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Ia

    2008-05-01

    Organization of tubulin cytoskeleton in epidermis and cortex cells in different root growth zones in Brassica rapa L. 6-day-old seedlings under clinorotation has been investigated. It was shown that changes in cortical microtubules orientation occur only in the distal elongation zone. In control, cortical microtubule arrays oriented transversely to the root long axis. Whereas under clinorotation an appearance of shorter randomly organized cortical microtubules was observed. Simultaneously, a significant decrease in a cell length in the central elongation zone under clinorotation was revealed. It is suggested that the decline of anisotropic growth, typical for central elongation zone cells, is connected with cortical microtubules disorientation under clinorotation.

  17. Cortical actin filament organization in developing and functioning stomatal complexes of Zea mays and Triticum turgidum.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Galatis, Basil; Quader, Hartmut; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2007-07-01

    Cortical actin filament (AF) organization was studied in detail in developing stomatal complexes of the grasses Zea mays and Triticum turgidum. AF arrays during the whole stomatal complex development are dynamic, partly following the pattern of cortical microtubule (MT) organization. They also exhibit particular patterns of organization, spatially and temporarily restricted. Among AF arrays, the radial ones that underlie young guard cell (GC) periclinal walls, those that line the bulbous GC ends and the AF ring at the junction between subsidiary cells (SCs) and GCs are described here for the first time. Although many similarities in cortical AF organization exist among the stomatal cells of both plants studied, considerable differences have also been observed between them. Our data reveal that the expanding areas of stomatal cell walls are lined by distinct cortical AF aggregations that probably protect the plasmalemma against mechanical stresses. Experimental AF disruption does not seem to affect detectably stomatal cell morphogenesis. Moreover, the structural and experimental data of this study revealed that, in contrast to the elliptical stomata, in the dumbbell-shaped ones the AFs and MTs seem not to be involved in the mechanism of opening and closing of the stomatal pore.

  18. EXTRACELLULAR MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Bouck, G. Benjamin

    1969-01-01

    Mastigonemes (Flimmer) from the sperm of Ascophyllum and Fucus were found to consist of a tripartite structure—a ca. 2000-A tapered basal region, a closed microtubular shaft, and a group of terminal filaments. Each of these regions appears to be constructed of globular subunits with a center-to-center distance of about 45 A. The mastigoneme microtubule is of smaller diameter (170–190 A) than cytoplasmic microtubules in these or other plant cells. During the initial stages of flagellar ontogeny, structures similar to mastigonemes (presumptive mastigonemes) are found within membrane-limited sacs in the cytoplasm or within the perinuclear space. Mastigonemes at this time are generally not found on the flagellar surface. Later, when the anterior flagellum acquires mastigonemes, the presumptive mastigonemes are absent from the cytoplasm. The regularity of attachment of mastigonemes to the flagellar surface suggests that specific attachment sites are constructed on the plasma membrane during flagellar ontogeny. No evidence for penetration of the mastigoneme through the plasma membrane was obtained. The origin and structure of mastigonemes are discussed in relation to reports of the origin and structure of other microtubular systems. PMID:5812471

  19. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    PubMed

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  20. Quantitative analysis of microtubule orientation in interdigitated leaf pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kae; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Leaf pavement cells are shaped like a jigsaw puzzle in most dicotyledon species. Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes required for pavement cells morphogenesis and proposed that microtubules play crucial roles in the interdigitation of pavement cells. In this study, we performed quantitative analysis of cortical microtubule orientation in leaf pavement cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. We captured confocal images of cortical microtubules in cotyledon leaf epidermis expressing GFP-tubulinβ and quantitatively evaluated the microtubule orientations relative to the pavement cell growth axis using original image processing techniques. Our results showed that microtubules kept parallel orientations to the growth axis during pavement cell growth. In addition, we showed that immersion treatment of seed cotyledons in solutions containing tubulin polymerization and depolymerization inhibitors decreased pavement cell complexity. Treatment with oryzalin and colchicine inhibited the symmetric division of guard mother cells. PMID:26039484

  1. Quantitative analysis of microtubule orientation in interdigitated leaf pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kae; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Leaf pavement cells are shaped like a jigsaw puzzle in most dicotyledon species. Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes required for pavement cells morphogenesis and proposed that microtubules play crucial roles in the interdigitation of pavement cells. In this study, we performed quantitative analysis of cortical microtubule orientation in leaf pavement cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. We captured confocal images of cortical microtubules in cotyledon leaf epidermis expressing GFP-tubulinβ and quantitatively evaluated the microtubule orientations relative to the pavement cell growth axis using original image processing techniques. Our results showed that microtubules kept parallel orientations to the growth axis during pavement cell growth. In addition, we showed that immersion treatment of seed cotyledons in solutions containing tubulin polymerization and depolymerization inhibitors decreased pavement cell complexity. Treatment with oryzalin and colchicine inhibited the symmetric division of guard mother cells.

  2. MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 Regulates Structure and Function of Microtubule Arrays during Mitosis and Cytokinesis in the Arabidopsis Root1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Eiko; Himmelspach, Regina; Rashbrooke, Madeleine C.; Whittington, Angela T.; Gale, Kevin R.; Collings, David A.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2006-01-01

    MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 (MOR1) is a plant member of the highly conserved MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins. Prior studies with the temperature-sensitive mor1 mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which harbor single amino acid substitutions in an N-terminal HEAT repeat, proved that MOR1 regulates cortical microtubule organization and function. Here we demonstrate by use of live cell imaging and immunolabeling that the mor1-1 mutation generates specific defects in the microtubule arrays of dividing vegetative cells. Unlike the universal cortical microtubule disorganization in elongating mor1-1 cells, disruption of mitotic and cytokinetic microtubule arrays was not detected in all dividing cells. Nevertheless, quantitative analysis identified distinct defects in preprophase bands (PPBs), spindles, and phragmoplasts. In nearly one-half of dividing cells at the restrictive temperature of 30°C, PPBs were not detected prior to spindle formation, and those that did form were often disrupted. mor1-1 spindles and phragmoplasts were short and abnormally organized and persisted for longer times than in wild-type cells. The reduced length of these arrays predicts that the component microtubule lengths are also reduced, suggesting that microtubule length is a critical determinant of spindle and phragmoplast structure, orientation, and function. Microtubule organizational defects led to aberrant chromosomal arrangements, misaligned or incomplete cell plates, and multinucleate cells. Antiserum raised against an N-terminal MOR1 sequence labeled the full length of microtubules in interphase arrays, PPBs, spindles, and phragmoplasts. Continued immunolabeling of the disorganized and short microtubules of mor1-1 at the restrictive temperature demonstrated that the mutant mor1-1L174F protein loses function without dissociating from microtubules, providing important insight into the mechanism by which MOR1 may regulate microtubule length. PMID:16377747

  3. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  4. General theory for the mechanics of confined microtubule asters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Laan, Liedewij; Dogterom, Marileen; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In cells, dynamic microtubules organize into asters or spindles to assist positioning of organelles. Two types of forces are suggested to contribute to the positioning process: (i) microtubule-growth based pushing forces; and (ii) motor protein mediated pulling forces. In this paper, we present a general theory to account for aster positioning in a confinement of arbitrary shape. The theory takes account of microtubule nucleation, growth, catastrophe, slipping, as well as interaction with cortical force generators. We calculate microtubule distributions and forces acting on microtubule organizing centers in a sphere and in an ellipsoid. Positioning mechanisms based on both pushing forces and pulling forces can be distinguished in our theory for different parameter regimes or in different geometries. In addition, we investigate positioning of microtubule asters in the case of asymmetric distribution of motors. This analysis enables us to characterize situations relevant for Caenorrhabditis elegans embryos.

  5. Microtubule dynamics and organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogterom, Marileen

    2000-03-01

    Microtubules are rigid biopolymers found in all higher order cells. They are a mayor part of the cytoskeleton, the network of protein polymers that gives the cell its shape and rigidity and allows for various forms of (intra)cellular motility. The intracellular spatial organization of the microtubule network is constantly changing as the microtubules adapt to their different functions. In part, this spatial organization depends on the assembly dynamics (including microtubule nucleation) and forces generated by the microtubules themselves. To understand these mechanisms, we study the physical aspects connected with the assembly, force generation and spatial organization of microtubules in simplified model systems, in the absence of other cellular components. We measure the forces generated by individual microtubules by making them grow against a microfabricated barrier. These experiments show that a single microtubule can generate at least several picoNewton of force, comparable to what is known for motor proteins. Theoretical modeling of force-generation by multi-protofilament polymers is used to predict force-velocity relations that can be compared to experimental data. We study the self-organization of microtubules by confining them to microfabricated chambers that mimic the geometry of living cells. The distribution of microtubule nucleation sites in these chambers is controlled to study its effect on the organization of the microtubule network. We find that so-called microtubule asters position themselves in response to forces generated by dynamic microtubules. Experiments aimed at measuring the forces acting on these asters using optical trapping techniques will be described.

  6. Regulation of developmental and environmental signaling by interaction between microtubules and membranes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Wenhua

    2016-02-01

    Cell division and expansion require the ordered arrangement of microtubules, which are subject to spatial and temporal modifications by developmental and environmental factors. Understanding how signals translate to changes in cortical microtubule organization is of fundamental importance. A defining feature of the cortical microtubule array is its association with the plasma membrane; modules of the plasma membrane are thought to play important roles in the mediation of microtubule organization. In this review, we highlight advances in research on the regulation of cortical microtubule organization by membrane-associated and membrane-tethered proteins and lipids in response to phytohormones and stress. The transmembrane kinase receptor Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase, phospholipase D, phosphatidic acid, and phosphoinositides are discussed with a focus on their roles in microtubule organization. PMID:26687389

  7. Effects of stomata clustering on leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-09-01

    A general theoretical framework for quantifying the stomatal clustering effects on leaf gaseous diffusive conductance was developed and tested. The theory accounts for stomatal spacing and interactions among 'gaseous concentration shells'. The theory was tested using the unique measurements of Dow et al. (2014) that have shown lower leaf diffusive conductance for a genotype of Arabidopsis thaliana with clustered stomata relative to uniformly distributed stomata of similar size and density. The model accounts for gaseous diffusion: through stomatal pores; via concentration shells forming at pore apertures that vary with stomata spacing and are thus altered by clustering; and across the adjacent air boundary layer. Analytical approximations were derived and validated using a numerical model for 3D diffusion equation. Stomata clustering increases the interactions among concentration shells resulting in larger diffusive resistance that may reduce fluxes by 5-15%. A similar reduction in conductance was found for clusters formed by networks of veins. The study resolves ambiguities found in the literature concerning stomata end-corrections and stomatal shape, and provides a new stomata density threshold for diffusive interactions of overlapping vapor shells. The predicted reduction in gaseous exchange due to clustering, suggests that guard cell function is impaired, limiting stomatal aperture opening.

  8. Analysis of microtubule curvature.

    PubMed

    Bicek, Andrew D; Tüzel, Erkan; Kroll, Daniel M; Odde, David J

    2007-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton in living cells generate and resist mechanical forces to mediate fundamental cell processes, including cell division and migration. Recent advances in digital fluorescence microscopy have enabled the direct observation of bending of individual microtubules in living cells, which has enabled quantitative estimation of the mechanical state of the microtubule array. Although a variety of mechanisms have been proposed, the precise origins of microtubule deformation in living cells remain largely obscure. To investigate these mechanisms and their relative importance in cellular processes, a method is needed to accurately quantify microtubule bending within living cells. Here we describe a method for quantification of bending, using digital fluorescence microscope images to estimate the distribution of curvature in the microtubule. Digital images of individual microtubules can be used to obtain a set of discrete x-y coordinates along the microtubule contour, which is then used to estimate the curvature distribution. Due to system noise and digitization error, the estimate will be inaccurate to some degree. To quantify the inaccuracy, a computational model is used to simulate both the bending of thermally driven microtubules and their observation by digital fluorescence microscopy. This allows for direct comparison between experimental and simulated images, a method which we call model convolution microscopy. We assess the accuracy of various methods and present a suitable method for estimating the curvature distribution for thermally driven semiflexible polymers. Finally, we discuss extensions of the method to quantify microtubule curvature in living cells. PMID:17613311

  9. Reelin promotes microtubule dynamics in processes of developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Meseke, Maurice; Cavus, Ersin; Förster, Eckart

    2013-02-01

    The extracellular matrix protein reelin controls radial migration and layer formation of cortical neurons, in part by modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. A stabilizing effect of reelin on the actin cytoskeleton has been described recently. However, it is poorly understood how reelin modulates microtubule dynamics. Here, we provide evidence that reelin increases microtubule assembly. This effect is mediated, at least in part, by promoting microtubule plus end dynamics in processes of developing neurons. Thus, we treated primary neuronal cultures with nocodazole to disrupt microtubules. After nocodazole washout, we found microtubule reassembly to be accelerated in the presence of reelin. Moreover, we show that reelin treatment promoted the formation of microtubule plus end binding protein 3 (EB3) comets in developing dendrites, and that EB3 immunostaining in the developing wild-type neocortex is most intense in the reelin-rich marginal zone where leading processes of radially migrating neurons project to. This characteristic EB3 staining pattern was absent in reeler. Also reassembly of nocodazole-dispersed dendritic Golgi apparati, which are closely associated to microtubules, was accelerated by reelin treatment, though with a substantially slower time course when compared to microtubule reassembly. In support of our in vitro results, we found that the subcellular distribution of α-tubulin and acetylated tubulin in reeler cortical sections differed from wild-type and from mice lacking the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), known to bind reelin. Taken together, our results suggest that reelin promotes microtubule assembly, at least in part, by increasing microtubule plus end dynamics. PMID:22990595

  10. "CLASPing" tungsten's effects on microtubules with "PINs".

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten, supplied as sodium tungstate, inhibits root elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana, which has been attributed to a diminishing of PIN2 and PIN3 auxin efflux carriers. In this work, we sought to analyze the effect of tungsten on cortical microtubules and CLASP (Cytoplasmic Linker Associated Protein), which are also involved in the anisotropic cell expansion of root cells. Seedlings grown in a tungsten-free substrate for 4 d and then transplanted into a tungsten-containing substrate exhibited randomly oriented microtubules in a time-dependent manner. While tungsten had no effect on roots treated for 3 h, microtubule alignment was obviously affected in the transition and elongation zones after a 6, 12, 24, 48 h tungsten treatment, at prolonged tungsten administrations and in seedlings grown directly in the presence of tungsten. This change in microtubule orientation may be associated with the reduction of CLASP protein expression induced by tungsten, as evidenced in experiments with plants expressing the CLASP-GFP protein. A possible mechanism, by which the coordinated functions of CLASP, PIN2 and microtubules are affected, as revealed by inhibited root growth, is discussed. PMID:26313814

  11. Disorders of Microtubule Function in Neurons: Imaging Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, Christopher A.; Poduri, Annapurdi; Sahin, Mustafa; Barry, Brenda; Walsh, Christopher A.; Barkovich, A. James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Significance A number of recent studies have described malformations of cortical development with mutations of components of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins. Despite examinations of large numbers of MRIs, good phenotype-genotype correlations have been elusive. Additionally, most of these studies focused exclusively on cerebral cortical findings. Materials and Methods MRIs from18 patients with confirmed tubulin mutations (8 TUBA1A, 5 TUBB2B, and 5 TUBB3) and 15 patients with known mutations of the genes encoding microtubule-associated proteins (5 LIS1, 4 DCX, and 6 DYNC1H1) were carefully visually analyzed and compared. Specific note was made of cortical gyral pattern, basal ganglia and white matter to assess internal capsular size, cortical thickness, ventricular and cisternal size, and size and contours of the brain stem, cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the corpus callosum of patients with tubulin and microtubule-associated protein gene mutations. Results were determined by unanimous consensus of the authors. Results All patients had abnormal MRI scans. Large proportions of patients with tubulin gene mutations were found to have multiple cortical and subcortical abnormalities including microcephaly, ventriculomegaly, abnormal gyral and sulcal patterns (termed dysgyria), small or absent corpus callosum and small pons. All patients with microtubule-associated proteins mutations also had abnormal cerebral cortices (predominantly pachygyria and agyria), but fewer subcortical abnormalities were noted. Conclusion Comparison of MRIs from patients with known mutations of tubulin genes and microtubule-associated proteins allows for the establishment of some early correlations of phenotype with genotype and may assist in identification and diagnosis of these rare disorders. PMID:26564436

  12. Stomata: key players in the earth system, past and present.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph A; Beerling, David J; Franks, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Stomata have played a key role in the Earth System for at least 400 million years. By enabling plants to control the rate of evaporation from their photosynthetic organs, stomata helped to set in motion non-linear processes that led to an acceleration of the hydrologic cycle over the continents and an expansion of climate zones favorable for plant life. Global scale modeling of land-atmosphere interactions provides a way to explore parallels between the influence of vegetation on climate over time, and the influence of spatial and temporal variation in the activities of vegetation in the current Earth System on climate and weather. We use the logic in models that simulate land-atmosphere interactions to illustrate the central role played by stomatal conductance in the Earth System. In the modeling context, most of the activities of plants and their manifold interactions with their genomes and with the environment are communicated to the atmosphere through a single property: the aperture or conductance of their stomata. We tend to think of the controls on vegetation responses in the real world as being distributed among factors such as seasonal patterns of growth, the changing availability of soil water, or changes in light intensity and leaf water potential over a day. However, the impact of these controls on crucial exchanges of energy and water vapor with the atmosphere are also largely mediated by stomata. The decisions 'made by' stomata emerge as an important and inadequately understood component of these models. At the present time we lack effective ways to link advances in the biology of stomata to this decision making process. While not unusual, this failure to connect between disciplines, introduces uncertainty in modeling studies being used to predict weather and climate change and ultimately to inform policy decisions. This problem is also an opportunity.

  13. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  14. Microtubule organization and microtubule-associated proteins in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Plants have unique microtubule (MT) arrays, cortical MTs, preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and phragmoplast, in the processes of evolution. These MT arrays control the directions of cell division and expansion especially in plants and are essential for plant morphogenesis and developments. Organizations and functions of these MT arrays are accomplished by diverse MT-associated proteins (MAPs). This review introduces 10 of conserved MAPs in eukaryote such as γ-TuC, augmin, katanin, kinesin, EB1, CLASP, MOR1/MAP215, MAP65, TPX2, formin, and several plant-specific MAPs such as CSI1, SPR2, MAP70, WVD2/WDL, RIP/MIDD, SPR1, MAP18/PCaP, EDE1, and MAP190. Most of the studies cited in this review have been analyzed in the particular model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. The significant knowledge of A. thaliana is the important established base to understand MT organizations and functions in plants. PMID:25262237

  15. Microtubules in Mesophyll Cells of Nonacclimated and Cold-Acclimated Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michael E.; Carter, John V.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of cortical microtubules in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Bloomsdale) mesophyll cells to freezing, thawing, supercooling, and dehydration were assessed. Microtubules were visualized using a modified procedure for indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Leaf sections of nonacclimated and cold-acclimated spinach were slowly frozen to various temperatures, fixed while frozen, and microtubules immunolabelled. Both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells exhibited nearly complete microtubule depolymerization after ice formation. After 1 hour thawing at 23°C, microtubules in both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells repolymerized. With time, however, microtubules in nonacclimated cells again depolymerized. Since microtubules in cells of leaf tissue frozen slowly are subjected to dehydration as well as subzero temperatures, these stresses were applied separately and their effects on microtubules noted. Supercooling induced microtubule depolymerization in both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells, but to a smaller extent than did freezing. Exposing leaf sections to solutions of sorbitol (a cell wall-penetrating osmoticum) or polyethylene glycol 10,000 (a nonpenetrating osmoticum) at room temperature caused microtubule depolymerization. The effects of low temperature and dehydration are roughly additive in producing the observed microtubule responses during freezing. Only small differences in microtubule stability were resolved between nonacclimated and cold-acclimated cells. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668366

  16. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  17. Disruption of microtubule integrity initiates mitosis during CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-08-14

    Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates.

  18. Disruption of Microtubule Integrity Initiates Mitosis during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates. PMID:22841498

  19. Mutual Diffusional Interference Between Adjacent Stomata of a Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. D.; Viskanta, R.

    1968-01-01

    The mutual diffusional interference between adjacent stomata in laminar flow over a leaf is shown to play a decisive role in determining overall transpiration. The magnitude of this interference varies with the interaction of the vapor diffusional shells forming above each stoma and the air flow over the leaf. The interference decreases with increasing incident radiation and wind velocity. The effect of interference on the stomatal resistance to diffusion plays a major role in the overall variations in transpiration. PMID:16656876

  20. Microtubules in the Cerebral Cortex: Role in Memory and Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Nancy J.

    This chapter raises the question whether synaptic connections in the cerebral cortex are adequate in accounting for higher cognition, especially cognition involving multimodal processing. A recent and novel approach to brain mechanics is outlined, one that involves microtubules and microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2). In addition to effects on the neuronal membrane, neurotransmitters exert actions on microtubules. These neurotransmitter effects alter the MAP2 phosphorylation state and rates of microtubule polymerization and transport. It is argued that these processes are important to the physical basis of memory and consciousness. In support of this argument, MAP2 is degraded with learning in discrete cortical modules. How this relates to synaptic change related to learning is unknown. The specific proposal is advanced that learning alters microtubules in the subsynaptic zone lying beneath the synapse, and that this forms the physical basis of long-term memory storage because microtubule networks determine the synapse strength by directing contacts with actin filaments and transport of synaptic proteins. It is argued that this is more probable than memory-related physical storage in the synapse itself. Comparisons to consciousness are made and it is concluded that there is a link between microtubules, memory and consciousness.

  1. Microtubule Self- Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jho, Yongseok; Choi, M. C.; Farago, O.; Kim, Mahnwon; Pincus, P. A.

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are important structural elements for neurons. Microtubles are cylindrical pipes that are self-assembled from tubulin dimers, These structures are intimately related to the neuron transport system. Abnormal microtubule disintegration contributes to neuro-disease. For several decades, experimentalists investigated the structure of the microtubules using TEM and Cryo-EM. However, the detailed structure at a molecular level remain incompletely understood. . In this presentation, we report numerically studies of the self-assembly process using a toy model for tubulin dimers. We investigate the nature of the interactions which are essential to stabilize such the cylindrical assembly of protofilaments. We use Monte Carlo simulations to suggest the pathways for assembly and disassembly of the microtubules.

  2. Size scaling of microtubule asters in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, James; Field, Christine; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Fakhri, Nikta; Oakey, John; Gatlin, Jay; Mitchison, Timothy

    Microtubule asters are radial arrays of microtubules (MTs) nucleated around organizing centers (MTOCs). Across a wide range of cell types and sizes, aster positioning influences cellular organization. To investigate aster size and positioning, we reconstituted dynamic asters in Xenopus cytoplasmic extract, confined in fluorous oil microfluidic emulsions. In large droplets, we observed centering of MTOCs. In small droplets, we observed a breakdown in natural positioning, with MTOCs at the droplet edge and buckled or bundled MTs along the interface. In different systems, asters are positioned by different forces, such as pushing due to MT polymerization, or pulling due to bulk or cortical dynein. To estimate different contributions to aster positioning, we biochemically perturbed dynactin function, or MT or actin polymerization. We used carbon nanotubes to measure molecular motions and forces in asters. These experimental results inform quantitative biophysical models of aster size and positioning in confinement. JFP was supported by a Fannie and John Hertz Graduate Fellowship.

  3. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.; Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins.

  4. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    PubMed Central

    Bermudes, D; Hinkle, G; Margulis, L

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins. Images PMID:7968920

  5. The role of stomata in sensing and driving environmental change.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, Alistair M; Woodward, F Ian

    2003-08-21

    Stomata, the small pores on the surfaces of leaves and stalks, regulate the flow of gases in and out of leaves and thus plants as a whole. They adapt to local and global changes on all timescales from minutes to millennia. Recent data from diverse fields are establishing their central importance to plant physiology, evolution and global ecology. Stomatal morphology, distribution and behaviour respond to a spectrum of signals, from intracellular signalling to global climatic change. Such concerted adaptation results from a web of control systems, reminiscent of a 'scale-free' network, whose untangling requires integrated approaches beyond those currently used.

  6. The Arabidopsis CLASP Gene Encodes a Microtubule-Associated Protein Involved in Cell Expansion and Division[W

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, J. Christian; Shoji, Tsubasa; Kotzer, Amanda M.; Pighin, Jamie A.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2007-01-01

    Controlling microtubule dynamics and spatial organization is a fundamental requirement of eukaryotic cell function. Members of the ORBIT/MAST/CLASP family of microtubule-associated proteins associate with the plus ends of microtubules, where they promote the addition of tubulin subunits into attached kinetochore fibers during mitosis and stabilize microtubules in the vicinity of the plasma membrane during interphase. To date, nothing is known about their function in plants. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CLASP protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is involved in both cell division and cell expansion. Green fluorescent protein–CLASP localizes along the full length of microtubules and shows enrichment at growing plus ends. Our analysis suggests that CLASP promotes microtubule stability. clasp-1 T-DNA insertion mutants are hypersensitive to microtubule-destabilizing drugs and exhibit more sparsely populated, yet well ordered, root cortical microtubule arrays. Overexpression of CLASP promotes microtubule bundles that are resistant to depolymerization with oryzalin. Furthermore, clasp-1 mutants have aberrant microtubule preprophase bands, mitotic spindles, and phragmoplasts, indicating a role for At CLASP in stabilizing mitotic arrays. clasp-1 plants are dwarf, have significantly reduced cell numbers in the root division zone, and have defects in directional cell expansion. We discuss possible mechanisms of CLASP function in higher plants. PMID:17873093

  7. Microtubule dynamics in fish melanophores

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of microtubules in black tetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi) melanophores to test the possible correlation of microtubule stability and intracellular particle transport. X- rhodamine-or caged fluorescein-conjugated tubulin were microinjected and visualized by fluorescence digital imaging using a cooled charge coupled device and videomicroscopy. Microtubule dynamics were evaluated by determining the time course of tubulin incorporation after pulse injection, by time lapse observation, and by quantitation of fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching and photoactivation. The time course experiments showed that the kinetics of incorporation of labeled tubulin into microtubules were similar for cells with aggregated or dispersed pigment with most microtubules becoming fully labeled within 15-20 min after injection. Quantitation by fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching and photoactivation confirmed that microtubule turnover was rapid in both states, t1/2 = 3.5 +/- 1.5 and 6.1 +/- 3.0 min for cells with aggregated and dispersed pigment, respectively. In addition, immunostaining with antibodies specific to posttranslationally modified alpha-tubulin, which is usually enriched in stable microtubules, showed that microtubules composed exclusively of detyrosinated tubulin were absent and microtubules containing acetylated tubulin were sparse. We conclude that the microtubules of melanophores are very dynamic, that their dynamic properties do not depend critically on the state of pigment distribution, and that their stabilization is not a prerequisite for intracellular transport. PMID:8089178

  8. Plant microtubule cytoskeleton complexity: microtubule arrays as fractals.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John; Overall, Robyn; Marc, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems are by nature complex and this complexity has been shown to be important in maintaining homeostasis. The plant microtubule cytoskeleton is a highly complex system, with contributing factors through interactions with microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), expression of multiple tubulin isoforms, and post-translational modification of tubulin and MAPs. Some of this complexity is specific to microtubules, such as a redundancy in factors that regulate microtubule depolymerization. Plant microtubules form partial helical fractals that play a key role in development. It is suggested that, under certain cellular conditions, other categories of microtubule fractals may form including isotropic fractals, triangular fractals, and branched fractals. Helical fractal proteins including coiled-coil and armadillo/beta-catenin repeat proteins and the actin cytoskeleton are important here too. Either alone, or in combination, these fractals may drive much of plant development.

  9. Microtubule orientation in globular leaflet cells of Chara inflata.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kazuyoshi; Shimmen, Teruo

    2007-09-01

    Chara inflata has globular leaflet cells and cylindrical internodal cells. The morphology of the leaflet cells is different from that of other Characeae. The orientation of cortical microtubules (MTs) in young leaflet and internodal cells of this species was analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. MTs with random orientation were observed in leaflet cells, while those relatively transverse to the cell axis were observed in cylindrical internodal cells. In cylindrical leaflet cells in Chara corallina, transverse MTs were observed. These results imply that C. inflata is a morphological mutant lacking a mechanism for orienting cortical MTs transverse in leaflet cells.

  10. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  11. Phospholipase d activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Laxalt, Ana M; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Munnik, Teun

    2003-11-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator of PLD, cortical microtubules were released from the plasma membrane and partially depolymerized, as visualized with four-dimensional confocal imaging. The isomers sec- and tert-butanol, which did not activate PLD, did not affect microtubule organization. The effect of treatment on PLD activation was monitored by the in vivo formation of phosphatidylbutanol, a specific reporter of PLD activity. Tobacco cells also were treated with mastoparan, xylanase, NaCl, and hypoosmotic stress as reported activators of PLD. We confirmed the reports and found that all treatments induced microtubule reorganization and PLD activation within the same time frame. PLD still was activated in microtubule-stabilized (taxol) and microtubule-depolymerized (oryzalin) situations, suggesting that PLD activation triggers microtubular reorganization and not vice versa. Exogenously applied water-soluble synthetic phosphatidic acid did not affect the microtubular cytoskeleton. Cell cycle studies revealed that n-butanol influenced not just interphase cortical microtubules but also those in the preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not those in the spindle structure. Cell growth and division were inhibited in the presence of n-butanol, whereas sec- and tert-butanol had no such effects. Using these novel insights, we propose a model for the mechanism by which PLD activation triggers microtubule reorganization in plant cells.

  12. POM-POM2/CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 Is Essential for the Functional Association of Cellulose Synthase and Microtubules in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bringmann, Martin; Li, Eryang; Sampathkumar, Arun; Kocabek, Tomas; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    In plants, regulation of cellulose synthesis is fundamental for morphogenesis and plant growth. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane, and the orientation of synthesis is guided by cortical microtubules; however, the guiding mechanism is currently unknown. We show that the conditional root elongation pom2 mutants are impaired in cell elongation, fertility, and microtubule-related functions. Map-based cloning of the POM-POM2 locus revealed that it is allelic to CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). Fluorescently tagged POM2/CSI1s associated with both plasma membrane–located cellulose synthases (CESAs) and post-Golgi CESA-containing compartments. Interestingly, while CESA insertions coincided with cortical microtubules in the pom2/csi1 mutants, the microtubule-defined movement of the CESAs was significantly reduced in the mutant. We propose that POM2/CSI1 provides a scaffold between the CESAs and cortical microtubules that guide cellulose synthesis. PMID:22294619

  13. POM-POM2/cellulose synthase interacting1 is essential for the functional association of cellulose synthase and microtubules in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Martin; Li, Eryang; Sampathkumar, Arun; Kocabek, Tomas; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    In plants, regulation of cellulose synthesis is fundamental for morphogenesis and plant growth. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane, and the orientation of synthesis is guided by cortical microtubules; however, the guiding mechanism is currently unknown. We show that the conditional root elongation pom2 mutants are impaired in cell elongation, fertility, and microtubule-related functions. Map-based cloning of the POM-POM2 locus revealed that it is allelic to CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). Fluorescently tagged POM2/CSI1s associated with both plasma membrane-located cellulose synthases (CESAs) and post-Golgi CESA-containing compartments. Interestingly, while CESA insertions coincided with cortical microtubules in the pom2/csi1 mutants, the microtubule-defined movement of the CESAs was significantly reduced in the mutant. We propose that POM2/CSI1 provides a scaffold between the CESAs and cortical microtubules that guide cellulose synthesis. PMID:22294619

  14. How to measure microtubule dynamics?

    PubMed

    Straube, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules are one of the most spectacular features in the cell: long, fairly rigid tubules that provide physical strength while at the same time serving as tracks of the intracellular transport network. In addition, they are the main constituents of the cell division machinery, and guide axonal growth and the direction of cell migration. To be able to fulfil such diverse functions, microtubules have to be arranged into suitable patterns and remodelled according to extra- and intracellular cues. Moreover, the delicate regulation of microtubule dynamics and the dynamic interactions with subcellular structures, such as kinetochores or cell adhesion sites, appear to be of crucial importance to microtubule functions. It is, therefore, important to understand microtubule dynamics and its spatiotemporal regulation at the molecular level. In this chapter, I introduce the concept of microtubule dynamics and discuss the techniques that can be employed to study microtubule dynamics in vitro and in cells, for many of which detailed protocols can be found in this volume. Microtubule dynamics is traditionally assessed by the four parameters of dynamic instability: growth and shrinkage rates, rescue and catastrophe frequencies, sometimes supplemented by pause duration. I discuss emerging issues with and alternatives to this parameter description of microtubule dynamics. PMID:21773917

  15. Physical Modeling of Microtubules Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Pierre; Kervrann, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Microtubules (MT) are highly dynamic tubulin polymers that are involved in many cellular processes such as mitosis, intracellular cell organization and vesicular transport. Nevertheless, the modeling of cytoskeleton and MT dynamics based on physical properties is difficult to achieve. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we propose to model the rigidity of microtubules on a physical basis using forces, mass and acceleration. In addition, we link microtubules growth and shrinkage to the presence of molecules (e.g. GTP-tubulin) in the cytosol. The overall model enables linking cytosol to microtubules dynamics in a constant state space thus allowing usage of data assimilation techniques.

  16. Microtubule reorganization in tobacco BY-2 cells stably expressing GFP-MBD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Microtubule organization plays an important role in plant morphogenesis; however, little is known about how microtubule arrays transit from one organized state to another. The use of a genetically incorporated fluorescent marker would allow long-term observation of microtubule behavior in living cells. Here, we have characterized a Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) cell line that had been stably transformed with a gfp-mbd construct previously demonstrated to label microtubules (J. Marc et al., 1998, Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939). Fluorescence levels were low, but interphase and mitotic microtubule arrays, as well as the transitions between these arrays, could be observed in individual gfp-mbd-transformed cells. By comparing several attributes of transformed and untransformed cells it was concluded that the transgenic cells are not adversely affected by low-level expression of the transgene and that these cells will serve as a useful and accurate model system for observing microtubule reorganization in vivo. Indeed, some initial observations were made that are consistent with the involvement of motor proteins in the transition between the spindle and phragmoplast arrays. Our observations also support the role of the perinuclear region in nucleating microtubules at the end of cell division with a progressive shift of these microtubules and/or nucleating activity to the cortex to form the interphase cortical array.

  17. Anomalous Flexural Behaviors of Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Youhe; Gao, Huajian; Wang, Jizeng

    2012-01-01

    Apparent controversies exist on whether the persistence length of microtubules depends on its contour length. This issue is particularly challenging from a theoretical point of view due to the tubular structure and strongly anisotropic material property of microtubules. Here we adopt a higher order continuum orthotropic thin shell model to study the flexural behavior of microtubules. Our model overcomes some key limitations of a recent study based on a simplified anisotropic shell model and results in a closed-form solution for the contour-length-dependent persistence length of microtubules, with predictions in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. By studying the ratio between their contour and persistence lengths, we find that microtubules with length at ∼1.5 μm show the lowest flexural rigidity, whereas those with length at ∼15 μm show the highest flexural rigidity. This finding may provide an important theoretical basis for understanding the mechanical structure of mitotic spindles during cell division. Further analysis on the buckling of microtubules indicates that the critical buckling load becomes insensitive to the tube length for relatively short microtubules, in drastic contrast to the classical Euler buckling. These rich flexural behaviors of microtubules are of profound implication for many biological functions and biomimetic molecular devices. PMID:22768935

  18. Role of Epac1, an Exchange Factor for Rap GTPases, in Endothelial Microtubule Dynamics and Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Seema; Cullere, Xavier; Patel, Sunita; Italiano, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Rap1 GTPase activation by its cAMP responsive nucleotide exchange factor Epac present in endothelial cells increases endothelial cell barrier function with an associated increase in cortical actin. Here, Epac1 was shown to be responsible for these actin changes and to colocalize with microtubules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Importantly, Epac activation with a cAMP analogue, 8-pCPT-2′O-Me-cAMP resulted in a net increase in the length of microtubules. This did not require cell–cell interactions or Rap GTPase activation, and it was attributed to microtubule growth as assessed by time-lapse microscopy of human umbilical vein endothelial cell expressing fluorophore-linked microtubule plus-end marker end-binding protein 3. An intact microtubule network was required for Epac-mediated changes in cortical actin and barrier enhancement, but it was not required for Rap activation. Finally, Epac activation reversed microtubule-dependent increases in vascular permeability induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β. Thus, Epac can directly promote microtubule growth in endothelial cells. This, together with Rap activation leads to an increase in cortical actin, which has functional significance for vascular permeability. PMID:18172027

  19. Arabidopsis MICROTUBULE DESTABILIZING PROTEIN40 Is Involved in Brassinosteroid Regulation of Hypocotyl Elongation[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianling; Zhang, Jin; Yuan, Ming; Ehrhardt, David W.; Wang, Zhiyong; Mao, Tonglin

    2012-01-01

    The brassinosteroid (BR) phytohormones play crucial roles in regulating plant cell growth and morphogenesis, particularly in hypocotyl cell elongation. The microtubule cytoskeleton is also known to participate in the regulation of hypocotyl elongation. However, it is unclear if BR regulation of hypocotyl elongation involves the microtubule cytoskeleton. In this study, we demonstrate that BRs mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by influencing the orientation and stability of cortical microtubules. Further analysis identified the previously undiscovered Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE DESTABILIZING PROTEIN40 (MDP40) as a positive regulator of hypocotyl cell elongation. BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, a key transcription factor in the BR signaling pathway, directly targets and upregulates MDP40. Overexpression of MDP40 partially rescued the shorter hypocotyl phenotype in BR-deficient mutant de-etiolated-2 seedlings. Reorientation of the cortical microtubules in the cells of MDP40 RNA interference transgenic lines was less sensitive to BR. These findings demonstrate that MDP40 is a key regulator in BR regulation of cortical microtubule reorientation and mediates hypocotyl growth. This study reveals a mechanism involving BR regulation of microtubules through MDP40 to mediate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23115248

  20. Astral microtubules control redistribution of dynein at the cell cortex to facilitate spindle positioning.

    PubMed

    Tame, Mihoko A; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; van den Broek, Bram; Lindqvist, Arne; Jalink, Kees; Medema, René H

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is recruited to the cell cortex in early mitosis, where it can generate pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the mitotic spindle. Recent work has shown that dynein displays a dynamic asymmetric cortical localization, and that dynein recruitment is negatively regulated by spindle pole-proximity. This results in oscillating dynein recruitment to opposite sides of the cortex to center the mitotic spindle. However, although the centrosome-derived signal that promotes displacement of dynein has been identified, it is currently unknown how dynein is re-recruited to the cortex once it has been displaced. Here we show that re-recruitment of cortical dynein requires astral microtubules. We find that microtubules are necessary for the sustained localized enrichment of dynein at the cortex. Furthermore, we show that stabilization of astral microtubules causes spindle misorientation, followed by mispositioning of dynein at the cortex. Thus, our results demonstrate the importance of astral microtubules in the dynamic regulation of cortical dynein recruitment in mitosis.

  1. [The roles of microtubule in internodal cell elongation (Nitellopsis obtusa)].

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Yuan, Ming; Zhu, Guo Li; Wang, Xue Chen

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between cell elongation and microtubules (MTs) was investigated in characean internodal cells (Nitellops obtusa). First, we examined the immunofluorescent localization of MTs in different living stages under confocal laser scanning microscope. In young, rapidly elongating cells, MTs were predominantly transverse to the long axis of the cell. As the relative growth rate fell, transverse MTs gradually decreased, and in non-growing cells, longitudinally oriented cortical MTs became most pronounced. Moreover, cells in different living stages responded to the treatment of oryzalin (microtubule-disrupting agent) differently, young active internodal cells seemed to be more sensitive. After 40 min incubation of 10 micromol/L oryzalin, nearly all cortical MTs in the elongating cells depolymerized. However, in the old, non-growing cells, some MT fragments still remained after 3 h treatment of oryzalin. Second, we measured the cell growth rates with and without the treatment of oryzalin. In young growing cells treated with 10 micromol/L oryzalin, the elongation rates were inhibited obviously. When the oryzalin was removed, the elongation rates could be recovered to some extent. Interestingly, a time-gap existed between microtubule disassembly (40 min) and cessation of cell elongation (100 min). Our data confirmed the evidence that MTs are involved in cell elongation.

  2. Transport efficiency through uniformity: organization of veins and stomata in angiosperm leaves.

    PubMed

    Fiorin, Lucia; Brodribb, Timothy J; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Leaves of vascular plants use specific tissues to irrigate the lamina (veins) and to regulate water loss (stomata), to approach homeostasis in leaf hydration during photosynthesis. As both tissues come with attendant costs, it would be expected that the synthesis and spacing of leaf veins and stomata should be coordinated in a way that maximizes benefit to the plant. We propose an innovative geoprocessing method based on image editing and a geographic information system to study the quantitative relationships between vein and stomatal spatial patterns on leaves collected from 31 angiosperm species from different biomes. The number of stomata within each areole was linearly related to the length of the looping vein contour. As a consequence of the presence of free-ending veinlets, the minimum mean distance of stomata from the nearest veins was invariant with areole size in most of the species, and species with smaller distances carried a higher density of stomata. Uniformity of spatial patterning was consistent within leaves and species. Our results demonstrate the existence of an optimal spatial organization of veins and stomata, and suggest their interplay as a key feature for achieving a constant mesophyll hydraulic resistance throughout the leaf.

  3. Engineering oscillating microtubule bundles.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Timothy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-01-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate their activity to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach toward studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up and we present methods for engineering such structures. We demonstrate how simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent assemble into structures that produce spontaneous oscillations, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Synthetic cilia-like structures can be assembled at high density, leading to synchronization and metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in biological ciliary fields.

  4. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  5. Isolation of a 90-kD Microtubule-Associated Protein from Tobacco Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Marc, J.; Sharkey, D. E.; Durso, N. A.; Zhang, M.; Cyr, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The organization and function of microtubules in plant cells are important in key developmental events, including the regulation of directional cellulose deposition. Bridges connecting microtubules to each other and to membranes and other organelles have been documented by electron microscopy; however, the biochemical and molecular nature of these linkages is not known. We have partitioned proteins from a suspension culture of tobacco into cytosolic and membrane fractions, solubilized the membrane fraction with a zwitterionic detergent, and then used affinity chromatography and salt elution to isolate tubulin binding proteins. Dark-field microscopy of in vitro-assembled microtubules showed that the eluted proteins from both fractions induce microtubule bundling and, in the presence of purified tubulin, promote microtubule elongation. Gel electrophoresis of the eluted proteins revealed two distinct sets of polypeptides. Those in the membrane eluate included unique bands with apparent molecular masses of 98, 90, and 75 kD in addition to bands present in both eluates. The cytosolic eluate, in contrast, typically included relatively smaller proteins. The eluted proteins also bound to taxol-stabilized microtubules. Initial immunological characterization using monoclonal antibodies raised against the 90-kD polypeptide showed that it is colocalized in situ with cortical microtubules in tobacco protoplast ghosts. PMID:12239375

  6. Microtubules as key cytoskeletal elements in cellular transport and shape changes: their expected responses to space environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. W.; Conrad, A. H.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Application of reference standard reagents to alternatively depolymerize or stabilize microtubules in a cell that undergoes very regular cytoskeleton-dependent shape changes provides a model system in which some expected components of the environments of spacecraft and space can be tested on Earth for their effects on the cytoskeleton. The fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta undergo polar lobe formation by repeated, dramatic, constriction and relaxation of a microfilamentous band localized in the cortical cytoplasm and activated by microtubules.

  7. Microtubule bundling and shape transitions: Mechanics, interactions, and self-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, Daniel Joseph

    Microtubules associate to form bundles in vivo in a wide variety of contexts including the mitotic spindle, neuronal processes, and the cortical array in plant cells. These supramolecular assemblies differ in size and shape, and in their internal structure, but the principles that determine this variation in morphology are not understood. To help elucidate such principals we constructed microtubule bundles in vitro using a variety of bundling agents. We have characterized the structure of these supramolecular assemblies of microtubules from the nanoscale to the mesoscale using synchrotron x-ray scattering and diffraction, video enhanced DIC and fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy. In the presence of inert polymers, an osmotic pressure imbalance between the inside and the outside of the microtubules may cause them to buckle to a non-circular cross-section. Depletion effects cause these distorted microtubules to bundle into a lattice with rectangular symmetry. The critical buckling pressure provides a measure of the stiffness of the inter-protofilament bond, and we determined that microtubule associated proteins enhance the strength of this bond, while the chemotherapeutic drug taxol has no effect. Multivalent ions cause microtubules to associate into bundles whose morphology depends on the condensing ion. Tightly packed hexagonal bundles with controllable diameters are observed for large tri-, tetra-, and pentavalent counterions. Unexpectedly, in the presence of small divalent cations, we have discovered a living necklace bundle phase, comprised of dynamical assemblies of MT nematic membranes with linear, branched, and loop topologies. Cations may also cause tubulin to assemble into non-microtubule structures. For example, in the presence of spermine, over time the microtubule bundles transform into a columnar phase of inverted tubules, such that the surface which was facing outside of the microtubules switches to the inside. This rearrangement between

  8. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  9. Fluctuation Analysis of Centrosomes Reveals a Cortical Function of Kinesin-1

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Franziska; Gummalla, Maheshwar; Künneke, Lutz; Lv, Zhiyi; Zippelius, Annette; Aspelmeier, Timo; Grosshans, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The actin and microtubule networks form the dynamic cytoskeleton. Network dynamics is driven by molecular motors applying force onto the networks and the interactions between the networks. Here we assay the dynamics of centrosomes in the scale of seconds as a proxy for the movement of microtubule asters. With this assay we want to detect the role of specific motors and of network interaction. During interphase of syncytial embryos of Drosophila, cortical actin and the microtubule network depend on each other. Centrosomes induce cortical actin to form caps, whereas F-actin anchors microtubules to the cortex. In addition, lateral interactions between microtubule asters are assumed to be important for regular spatial organization of the syncytial embryo. The functional interaction between the microtubule asters and cortical actin has been largely analyzed in a static manner, so far. We recorded the movement of centrosomes at 1 Hz and analyzed their fluctuations for two processes—pair separation and individual movement. We found that F-actin is required for directional movements during initial centrosome pair separation, because separation proceeds in a diffusive manner in latrunculin-injected embryos. For assaying individual movement, we established a fluctuation parameter as the deviation from temporally and spatially slowly varying drift movements. By analysis of mutant and drug-injected embryos, we found that the fluctuations were suppressed by both cortical actin and microtubules. Surprisingly, the microtubule motor Kinesin-1 also suppressed fluctuations to a similar degree as F-actin. Kinesin-1 may mediate linkage of the microtubule (+)-ends to the actin cortex. Consistent with this model is our finding that Kinesin-1-GFP accumulates at the cortical actin caps. PMID:26331244

  10. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  11. Microtubules in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are highly conserved polar polymers that are key elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and are essential for various cell functions. αβ-tubulin, a heterodimer containing one structural GTP and one hydrolysable and exchangeable GTP, is the building block of MTs and is formed by the sequential action of several molecular chaperones. GTP hydrolysis in the MT lattice is mechanistically coupled with MT growth, thus giving MTs a metastable and dynamic nature. MTs adopt several distinct higher-order organizations that function in cell division and cell morphogenesis. Small molecular weight compounds that bind tubulin are used as herbicides and as research tools to investigate MT functions in plant cells. The de novo formation of MTs in cells requires conserved γ-tubulin-containing complexes and targeting/activating regulatory proteins that contribute to the geometry of MT arrays. Various MT regulators and tubulin modifications control the dynamics and organization of MTs throughout the cell cycle and in response to developmental and environmental cues. Signaling pathways that converge on the regulation of versatile MT functions are being characterized. PMID:26019693

  12. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    PubMed

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  13. Microtubules in plants.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are highly conserved polar polymers that are key elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and are essential for various cell functions. αβ-tubulin, a heterodimer containing one structural GTP and one hydrolysable and exchangeable GTP, is the building block of MTs and is formed by the sequential action of several molecular chaperones. GTP hydrolysis in the MT lattice is mechanistically coupled with MT growth, thus giving MTs a metastable and dynamic nature. MTs adopt several distinct higher-order organizations that function in cell division and cell morphogenesis. Small molecular weight compounds that bind tubulin are used as herbicides and as research tools to investigate MT functions in plant cells. The de novo formation of MTs in cells requires conserved γ-tubulin-containing complexes and targeting/activating regulatory proteins that contribute to the geometry of MT arrays. Various MT regulators and tubulin modifications control the dynamics and organization of MTs throughout the cell cycle and in response to developmental and environmental cues. Signaling pathways that converge on the regulation of versatile MT functions are being characterized.

  14. Large-scale vortex lattice emerging from collectively moving microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Yutaka; Nagai, Ken H; Shitaka, Yuji; Tanaka, Dan; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Chaté, Hugues; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-21

    Spontaneous collective motion, as in some flocks of bird and schools of fish, is an example of an emergent phenomenon. Such phenomena are at present of great interest and physicists have put forward a number of theoretical results that so far lack experimental verification. In animal behaviour studies, large-scale data collection is now technologically possible, but data are still scarce and arise from observations rather than controlled experiments. Multicellular biological systems, such as bacterial colonies or tissues, allow more control, but may have many hidden variables and interactions, hindering proper tests of theoretical ideas. However, in systems on the subcellular scale such tests may be possible, particularly in in vitro experiments with only few purified components. Motility assays, in which protein filaments are driven by molecular motors grafted to a substrate in the presence of ATP, can show collective motion for high densities of motors and attached filaments. This was demonstrated recently for the actomyosin system, but a complete understanding of the mechanisms at work is still lacking. Here we report experiments in which microtubules are propelled by surface-bound dyneins. In this system it is possible to study the local interaction: we find that colliding microtubules align with each other with high probability. At high densities, this alignment results in self-organization of the microtubules, which are on average 15 µm long, into vortices with diameters of around 400 µm. Inside the vortices, the microtubules circulate both clockwise and anticlockwise. On longer timescales, the vortices form a lattice structure. The emergence of these structures, as verified by a mathematical model, is the result of the smooth, reptation-like motion of single microtubules in combination with local interactions (the nematic alignment due to collisions)--there is no need for long-range interactions. Apart from its potential relevance to cortical arrays in

  15. Analysis of Stomata Distribution Patterns for Quantification of the Foliar Plasticity of Tradescantia Zebrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista Florindo, Joao; Landini, Gabriel; Almeida Filho, Humberto; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2015-09-01

    Here we propose a method for the analysis of the stomata distribution patterns on the surface of plant leaves. We also investigate how light exposure during growth can affect stomata distribution and the plasticity of leaves. Understanding foliar plasticity (the ability of leaves to modify their structural organization to adapt to changing environmental resources) is a fundamental problem in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Most published work on quantification of stomata has concentrated on descriptions of their density per unit of leaf area, however density alone does not provide a complete description of the problem and leaves several unanswered questions (e.g. whether the stomata patterns change across various areas of the leaf, or how the patterns change under varying observational scales). We used two approaches here, to know, multiscale fractal dimension and complex networks, as a means to provide a description of the complexity of these distributions. In the experiments, we used 18 samples from the plant Tradescantia Zebrina grown under three different conditions (4 hours of artificial light each day, 24 hours of artificial light each day, and sunlight) for a total of 69 days. The network descriptors were capable of correctly discriminating the different conditions in 88% of cases, while the fractal descriptors discriminated 83% of the samples. This is a significant improvement over the correct classification rates achieved when using only stomata density (56% of the samples).

  16. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  17. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation.

  18. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H+-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  19. Cuticle Affects Calculations of Internal CO2 in Leaves Closing Their Stomata.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Jun; Kawamitsu, Yoshinobu

    2015-10-01

    Analyzing the assimilation rate (A) relative to the CO(2) concentration inside leaves (C(i)) has been a useful approach for investigating plant responses to various environments. Nevertheless, there are uncertainties in calculating C(i) when stomata close, restricting the application. Here, A-C(i) curves were traced in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves using a method for directly measuring C(i). The method was incorporated into an LI-6400 open gas exchange system, and stomata were closed by feeding 10 µM ABA through petioles. The conductance to CO(2) was derived from the directly measured C(i) and compared with the conductance from the water vapor flux (i.e. the standard calculation). When stomata were open, measured and calculated C(i) gave similar A-C(i) curves. When stomata were closed, the curves differed because measured C(i) departed from the calculated value. This difference caused the calculation to trace an artifactual limitation of photosynthesis. The direct measurement avoided this problem and followed the curve for leaves with open stomata. Largely because of the cuticle, the calculation overestimated CO(2) entry into the leaf because the cuticle transmitted more water vapor than CO(2), and the calculation relied on water vapor. Consequently, the standard calculation gave conductances larger than those from directly measured C(i). Although the cuticle conductance to water vapor remained constant as stomata closed, it increasingly contributed to the overestimation of C(i). The system provided here is not affected by these cuticle properties and thus is expected to open up the opportunity for A-C(i) analysis in plant physiology.

  20. Cuticle Affects Calculations of Internal CO2 in Leaves Closing Their Stomata.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Jun; Kawamitsu, Yoshinobu

    2015-10-01

    Analyzing the assimilation rate (A) relative to the CO(2) concentration inside leaves (C(i)) has been a useful approach for investigating plant responses to various environments. Nevertheless, there are uncertainties in calculating C(i) when stomata close, restricting the application. Here, A-C(i) curves were traced in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves using a method for directly measuring C(i). The method was incorporated into an LI-6400 open gas exchange system, and stomata were closed by feeding 10 µM ABA through petioles. The conductance to CO(2) was derived from the directly measured C(i) and compared with the conductance from the water vapor flux (i.e. the standard calculation). When stomata were open, measured and calculated C(i) gave similar A-C(i) curves. When stomata were closed, the curves differed because measured C(i) departed from the calculated value. This difference caused the calculation to trace an artifactual limitation of photosynthesis. The direct measurement avoided this problem and followed the curve for leaves with open stomata. Largely because of the cuticle, the calculation overestimated CO(2) entry into the leaf because the cuticle transmitted more water vapor than CO(2), and the calculation relied on water vapor. Consequently, the standard calculation gave conductances larger than those from directly measured C(i). Although the cuticle conductance to water vapor remained constant as stomata closed, it increasingly contributed to the overestimation of C(i). The system provided here is not affected by these cuticle properties and thus is expected to open up the opportunity for A-C(i) analysis in plant physiology. PMID:26206845

  1. A mitotic SKAP isoform regulates spindle positioning at astral microtubule plus ends.

    PubMed

    Kern, David M; Nicholls, Peter K; Page, David C; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-05-01

    The Astrin/SKAP complex plays important roles in mitotic chromosome alignment and centrosome integrity, but previous work found conflicting results for SKAP function. Here, we demonstrate that SKAP is expressed as two distinct isoforms in mammals: a longer, testis-specific isoform that was used for the previous studies in mitotic cells and a novel, shorter mitotic isoform. Unlike the long isoform, short SKAP rescues SKAP depletion in mitosis and displays robust microtubule plus-end tracking, including localization to astral microtubules. Eliminating SKAP microtubule binding results in severe chromosome segregation defects. In contrast, SKAP mutants specifically defective for plus-end tracking facilitate proper chromosome segregation but display spindle positioning defects. Cells lacking SKAP plus-end tracking have reduced Clasp1 localization at microtubule plus ends and display increased lateral microtubule contacts with the cell cortex, which we propose results in unbalanced dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces. Our work reveals an unappreciated role for the Astrin/SKAP complex as an astral microtubule mediator of mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:27138257

  2. Microtubule Severing Stymied by Free Tubulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Bailey, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Proper organization of the microtubule cytoskeletal network is required to perform many necessary cellular functions including mitosis, cell development, and cell motility. Network organization is achieved through filament remodeling by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) that control microtubule dynamics. MAPs that stabilize are relatively well understood, while less is known about destabilizing MAPs, such as severing enzymes. Katanin, the first-discovered microtubule-severing enzyme, is a AAA + enzyme that oligomerizes into hexamers and uses ATP hydrolysis to sever microtubules. Using quantitative fluorescence imaging on reconstituted microtubule severing assays in vitro we investigate how katanin can regulate microtubule dynamics. Interestingly, we find microtubule dynamics inhibits katanin severing activity; dynamic microtubules are not severed. Using systematic experiments introducing free tubulin into the assays we find that free tubulin can compete for microtubule filaments for the katanin proteins. Our work indicates that katanin could function best on stabile microtubules or stabile regions of microtubules in cells in regions where free tubulin is sequesters, low, or depleted.

  3. Reconstitution of cortical Dynein function.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sophie; Laan, Liedewij; Dogterom, Marileen

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a major microtubule (MT)-associated motor in nearly all eukaryotic cells. A subpopulation of dyneins associates with the cell cortex and the interaction of this cortical dynein with MTs helps to drive processes such as nuclear migration, mitotic spindle orientation, and cytoskeletal reorientation during wound healing. In this chapter, we describe three types of assays in which interactions between cortical dynein and MTs are reconstituted in vitro at increasing levels of complexity. In the first 1D assay, MTs, nucleated from a centrosome attached to a surface, grow against dynein-coated gold barriers. In this assay configuration, the interactions between MTs and dynein attached to a barrier can be studied in great detail. In the second and third assays, a freely moving dynamic aster is placed in either a 2D microfabricated chamber or a 3D water-in-oil emulsion droplet, with dynein-coated boundaries. These assays can be used to study how cortical dynein positions centrosomes. Finally, we discuss future possibilities for increasing the complexity of these reconstituted systems.

  4. Microtubule catastrophe from protofilament dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemseena, V.; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-09-01

    The disappearance of the guanosine triphosphate- (GTP) tubulin cap is widely believed to be the forerunner event for the growth-shrinkage transition (“catastrophe”) in microtubule filaments in eukaryotic cells. We study a discrete version of a stochastic model of the GTP cap dynamics, originally proposed by Flyvbjerg, Holy, and Leibler [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.73.2372 73, 2372 (1994)]. Our model includes both spontaneous and vectorial hydrolysis, as well as dissociation of a nonhydrolyzed dimer from the filament after incorporation. In the first part of the paper, we apply this model to a single protofilament of a microtubule. A catastrophe transition is defined for each protofilament, similarly to the earlier one-dimensional models, the frequency of occurrence of which is then calculated under various conditions but without explicit assumption of steady-state conditions. Using a perturbative approach, we show that the leading asymptotic behavior of the protofilament catastrophe in the limit of large growth velocities is remarkably similar across different models. In the second part of the paper, we extend our analysis to the entire filament by making a conjecture that a minimum number of such transitions are required to occur for the onset of microtubule catastrophe. The frequency of microtubule catastrophe is then determined using numerical simulations and compared with analytical and semianalytical estimates made under steady-state and quasi-steady-state assumptions, respectively, for the protofilament dynamics. A few relevant experimental results are analyzed in detail and compared with predictions from the model. Our results indicate that loss of GTP cap in two to three protofilaments is necessary to trigger catastrophe in a microtubule.

  5. A Mutation in the Catalytic Subunit of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Transamidase Disrupts Growth, Fertility, and Stomata Formation.

    PubMed

    Bundy, Mark G R; Kosentka, Pawel Z; Willet, Alaina H; Zhang, Liang; Miller, Emily; Shpak, Elena D

    2016-06-01

    GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are essential for plant growth and development; knockout mutations in enzymes responsible for anchor biosynthesis or attachment are gametophyte or embryo lethal. In a genetic screen targeted to identify genes regulating stomata formation, we discovered a missense mutation in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of GPI8/PIG-K, a Cys protease that transfers an assembled GPI anchor to proteins. The Arabidopsis genome has a single copy of AtGPI8, and the atgpi8-1 mutation reduces the efficiency of this enzyme, leading to reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins. While the atgpi8-1 mutation strongly disrupts plant growth, it is not lethal. Phenotypic analysis of atgpi8-1 mutants suggests that GPI-APs are important for root and shoot growth, stomata formation, apical dominance, transition to flowering, and male gametophyte viability. In addition, atgpi8-1 mutants accumulate higher levels of callose and have reduced plasmodesmata permeability. Genetic interactions of atgpi8-1 with mutations in ERECTA family (ERf) genes suggest the existence of a GPI-AP in a branch of the ERf signaling pathway that regulates stomata formation. Activation of the ERf signal transduction cascade by constitutively active YODA rescues stomata clustering in atgpi8-1, indicating that a GPI-AP functions upstream of the MAP kinase cascade. TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) is a receptor-like protein that is able to form heterodimers with ERfs. Our analysis demonstrates that tmm-1 is epistatic to atgpi8-1, indicating that either TMM is a GPI-AP or there is another GPI-AP regulating stomata development whose function is dependent upon TMM.

  6. A Mutation in the Catalytic Subunit of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Transamidase Disrupts Growth, Fertility, and Stomata Formation.

    PubMed

    Bundy, Mark G R; Kosentka, Pawel Z; Willet, Alaina H; Zhang, Liang; Miller, Emily; Shpak, Elena D

    2016-06-01

    GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are essential for plant growth and development; knockout mutations in enzymes responsible for anchor biosynthesis or attachment are gametophyte or embryo lethal. In a genetic screen targeted to identify genes regulating stomata formation, we discovered a missense mutation in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of GPI8/PIG-K, a Cys protease that transfers an assembled GPI anchor to proteins. The Arabidopsis genome has a single copy of AtGPI8, and the atgpi8-1 mutation reduces the efficiency of this enzyme, leading to reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins. While the atgpi8-1 mutation strongly disrupts plant growth, it is not lethal. Phenotypic analysis of atgpi8-1 mutants suggests that GPI-APs are important for root and shoot growth, stomata formation, apical dominance, transition to flowering, and male gametophyte viability. In addition, atgpi8-1 mutants accumulate higher levels of callose and have reduced plasmodesmata permeability. Genetic interactions of atgpi8-1 with mutations in ERECTA family (ERf) genes suggest the existence of a GPI-AP in a branch of the ERf signaling pathway that regulates stomata formation. Activation of the ERf signal transduction cascade by constitutively active YODA rescues stomata clustering in atgpi8-1, indicating that a GPI-AP functions upstream of the MAP kinase cascade. TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) is a receptor-like protein that is able to form heterodimers with ERfs. Our analysis demonstrates that tmm-1 is epistatic to atgpi8-1, indicating that either TMM is a GPI-AP or there is another GPI-AP regulating stomata development whose function is dependent upon TMM. PMID:27208238

  7. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  8. Kinesin follows the microtubule's protofilament axis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that kinesin moves parallel to the microtubule's protofilament axis. We polymerized microtubules with protofilaments that ran either parallel to the microtubule's long axis or that ran along shallow helical paths around the cylindrical surface of the microtubule. When gliding across a kinesin-coated surface, the former microtubules did not rotate. The latter microtubules, those with supertwisted protofilaments, did rotate; the pitch and handedness of the rotation accorded with the supertwist measured by electron cryo- microscopy. The results show that kinesin follows a path parallel to the protofilaments with high fidelity. This implies that the distance between consecutive kinesin-binding sites along the microtubule must be an integral multiple of 4.1 nm, the tubulin monomer spacing along the protofilament, or a multiple of 8.2 nm, the dimer spacing. PMID:8099076

  9. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-12-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic "rule breakers," control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals.

  10. Active Contraction of Microtubule Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Peter; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large scale behaviors of these systems. Here we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction.

  11. Microtubule Bundling and Shape Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cylindrical polymers composed of heterodimers of the protein tubulin that align end-to-end in the MT wall, forming linear protofilaments that interact laterally. Placing MTs under osmotic pressure causes them to reversibly buckle to a noncircular shape and pack into rectangular bundles at a critical osmotic pressure; further increases in pressure continue to distort MTs elastically. At higher osmotic pressures stressing polymers may be forced into the MT lumen causing the MTs to revert to a circle cross-section and pack into hexagonal bundles. This SAXRD-osmotic stress study provides a probe of the inter-protofilament bond strength and gives insight into the mechanisms by which microtubule associated proteins and the cancer chemotherapeutic drug Taxol stabilize MTs. We present further measurements of the mechanical properties of MT walls, MT-MT interactions, and the entry of polymers into the microtubule lumen. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, NIH GM-59288 and NS-13560, and CTS-0103516. SSRL is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  12. Microtubule sliding in reactivated flagella.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Shingyoji, C; Kamimura, S

    1982-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of microtubule sliding in demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella are described. A local iontophoretic application of ATP to a Triton-extracted flagellum elicits a local bending response whose form is in exact conformity with the predictions of the sliding microtubule model. Cinematographic analysis of the microtubule sliding initiated by treating fragments of demembranated flagella with trypsin in the presence of ATP reveals that the speed of sliding is almost constant. This implies that the speed does not depend on the number of dynein arms participating in the generation of sliding force. The distribution of apparent sliding velocities indicates that there is no difference in sliding velocity among the doublets. The sliding velocity depends on MgATP concentration in a manner consistent with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The sliding velocity of doublets in trypsin-treated axonemes is close to the maximum velocity of relative sliding taking place between adjacent doublets in beating flagella reactivated at the same MgATP concentration.

  13. Stomata size and spatial pattern effects on leaf gas exchange - a quantitative assessment of plant evolutionary choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Assouline, Shmuel; Aminzadeh, Milad; Haghighi, Erfan; Schymanski, Stan; Lehmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Land plants developed a dynamically gas-permeable layer at their leaf surfaces to allow CO2 uptake for photosynthesis while controlling water vapor loss through numerous adjustable openings (stomata) in the impervious leaf epidermis. Details of stomata structure, density and function may vary greatly among different plant families and respond to local environmental conditions, yet they share basic traits in dynamically controlling gaseous exchange rates by varying stomata apertures. We implement a pore scale gas diffusion model to quantitatively interpret the functionality of different combinations of stomata size and pattern on leaf gas exchange and thermal management based on data from fossil records and contemporary data sets. Considering all available data we draw several general conclusions concerning stomata design considerations: (1) the sizes and densities of stomata in the available fossil record leaves were designed to evaporate at rates in the range 0.75≤e/e0 ≤0.99 (relative to free water evaporation); (2) examination of evaporation curves show that for a given stomata size, the density (jointly defining the leaf evaporating area when fully open) was chosen to enable a high sensitivity in reducing evaporation rate with incremental stomatal closure, nevertheless, results show the design includes safety margins to account for different wind conditions (boundary layer thickness); (3) scaled for mean vapor flux, the size of stomata plays a minor role in the uniformity of leaf thermal field for a given stomata density. These principles enable rationale assessment of plant response to raising CO2, and provide a physical framework for considering the consequences of different stomata patterns (patchy) on leaf gas exchange (and thermal regime). In contrast with present quantitative description of traits and functionality of these dynamic covers in terms of gaseous diffusion resistance (or conductance), where stomata size, density and spatial pattern are

  14. A mean field Ising model for cortical rotation in amphibian one-cell stage embryos.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Jack A; Gordon, Richard

    2012-09-01

    We propose a new physical mechanism of cortical rotation generation in one-cell embryos of amphibians based on a phase transition in the ensemble of microtubules localized to the cortical region of the cell interior. Microtubules, protein polymers formed from tubulin heterodimers, are highly negatively charged, which results in strong electrostatic interactions over tens of nanometers, even in the presence of counterions that partially screen electrostatic interactions. A simplified model that offers a plausible representation of these effects is based on the Ising Hamiltonian, which has been robustly applied to explain a wide range of order-disorder transitions in physics, chemistry and other sciences. An Ising model phase transition, especially with the supercooperative flow alignment effect of global rotation of the cortex, provides an alternative to models of cortical rotation based on microtubule polymerization or motor molecules. Insofar as there is any reality to the concept that microtubules are involved in consciousness, we propose that cortical rotation in the one-cell embryo is a better place to look for the purported microtubule entanglement or coherence properties than the adult brain. PMID:22626532

  15. Microtubule dynamics of the centrosome-like polar organizers from the basal land plant Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Michael; Borchers, Agnes; O'Donoghue, Martin-Timothy; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The liverwort Marchantia employs both modern and ancestral devices during cell division: it forms preprophase bands and in addition it shows centrosome-like polar organizers. We investigated whether polar organizers and preprophase bands cooperate to set up the division plane. To this end, two novel green fluorescent protein-based microtubule markers for dividing cells of Marchantia were developed. Cells of the apical notch formed polar organizers first and subsequently assembled preprophase bands. Polar organizers were formed de novo from multiple mobile microtubule foci localizing to the nuclear envelope. The foci then became concentrated by bipolar aggregation. We determined the comet production rate of polar organizers and show that microtubule plus ends of astral microtubules polymerize faster than those found on cortical microtubules. Importantly, it was observed that conditions increasing polar organizer numbers interfere with preprophase band formation. The data show that polar organizers have much in common with centrosomes, but that they also have specialized features. The results suggest that polar organizers contribute to preprophase band formation and in this way are involved in controlling the division plane. Our analyses of the basal land plant Marchantia shed new light on the evolution of plant cell division. PMID:26467050

  16. Dachsous1b cadherin regulates actin and microtubule cytoskeleton during early zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li-Villarreal, Nanbing; Forbes, Meredyth M.; Loza, Andrew J.; Chen, Jiakun; Ma, Taylur; Helde, Kathryn; Moens, Cecilia B.; Shin, Jimann; Sawada, Atsushi; Hindes, Anna E.; Dubrulle, Julien; Schier, Alexander F.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Marlow, Florence L.; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2015-01-01

    Dachsous (Dchs), an atypical cadherin, is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of planar cell polarity, tissue size and cell adhesion. In humans, DCHS1 mutations cause pleiotropic Van Maldergem syndrome. Here, we report that mutations in zebrafish dchs1b and dchs2 disrupt several aspects of embryogenesis, including gastrulation. Unexpectedly, maternal zygotic (MZ) dchs1b mutants show defects in the earliest developmental stage, egg activation, including abnormal cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), cytoplasmic segregation, cleavages and maternal mRNA translocation, in transcriptionally quiescent embryos. Later, MZdchs1b mutants exhibit altered dorsal organizer and mesendodermal gene expression, due to impaired dorsal determinant transport and Nodal signaling. Mechanistically, MZdchs1b phenotypes can be explained in part by defective actin or microtubule networks, which appear bundled in mutants. Accordingly, disruption of actin cytoskeleton in wild-type embryos phenocopied MZdchs1b mutant defects in cytoplasmic segregation and CGE, whereas interfering with microtubules in wild-type embryos impaired dorsal organizer and mesodermal gene expression without perceptible earlier phenotypes. Moreover, the bundled microtubule phenotype was partially rescued by expressing either full-length Dchs1b or its intracellular domain, suggesting that Dchs1b affects microtubules and some developmental processes independent of its known ligand Fat. Our results indicate novel roles for vertebrate Dchs in actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulation in the unanticipated context of the single-celled embryo. PMID:26160902

  17. Elevated-CO2 Response of Stomata and Its Dependence on Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Jia, Bingrui; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the flow of gases between plants and the atmosphere. This review is centered on stomatal responses to elevated CO2 concentration and considers other key environmental factors and underlying mechanisms at multiple levels. First, an outline of general responses in stomatal conductance under elevated CO2 is presented. Second, stomatal density response, its development, and the trade-off with leaf growth under elevated CO2 conditions are depicted. Third, the molecular mechanism regulating guard cell movement at elevated CO2 is suggested. Finally, the interactive effects of elevated CO2 with other factors critical to stomatal behavior are reviewed. It may be useful to better understand how stomata respond to elevated CO2 levels while considering other key environmental factors and mechanisms, including molecular mechanism, biochemical processes, and ecophysiological regulation. This understanding may provide profound new insights into how plants cope with climate change. PMID:27242858

  18. Elevated-CO2 Response of Stomata and Its Dependence on Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Jia, Bingrui; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the flow of gases between plants and the atmosphere. This review is centered on stomatal responses to elevated CO2 concentration and considers other key environmental factors and underlying mechanisms at multiple levels. First, an outline of general responses in stomatal conductance under elevated CO2 is presented. Second, stomatal density response, its development, and the trade-off with leaf growth under elevated CO2 conditions are depicted. Third, the molecular mechanism regulating guard cell movement at elevated CO2 is suggested. Finally, the interactive effects of elevated CO2 with other factors critical to stomatal behavior are reviewed. It may be useful to better understand how stomata respond to elevated CO2 levels while considering other key environmental factors and mechanisms, including molecular mechanism, biochemical processes, and ecophysiological regulation. This understanding may provide profound new insights into how plants cope with climate change. PMID:27242858

  19. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination.

  20. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific post-translational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  1. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  2. Acclimation to humidity modifies the link between leaf size and the density of veins and stomata.

    PubMed

    Carins Murphy, Madeline R; Jordan, Gregory J; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The coordination of veins and stomata during leaf acclimation to sun and shade can be facilitated by differential epidermal cell expansion so large leaves with low vein and stomatal densities grow in shade, effectively balancing liquid- and vapour-phase conductances. As the difference in vapour pressure between leaf and atmosphere (VPD) determines transpiration at any given stomatal density, we predict that plants grown under high VPD will modify the balance between veins and stomata to accommodate greater maximum transpiration. Thus, we examined the developmental responses of these traits to contrasting VPD in a woody angiosperm (Toona ciliata M. Roem.) and tested whether the relationship between them was altered. High VPD leaves were one-third the size of low VPD leaves with only marginally greater vein and stomatal density. Transpirational homeostasis was thus maintained by reducing stomatal conductance. VPD acclimation changed leaf size by modifying cell number. Hence, plasticity in vein and stomatal density appears to be generated by plasticity in cell size rather than cell number. Thus, VPD affects cell number and leaf size without changing the relationship between liquid- and vapour-phase conductances. This results in inefficient acclimation to VPD as stomata remain partially closed under high VPD. PMID:23682831

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water.

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water. PMID:26940489

  5. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  6. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  7. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  8. The Role of Dynein in Microtubule Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Tony; Misra, Gaurav; Wu, Jun; Russell, Robert; Lele, Tanmay; Dickinson, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Experiments in Lele's group have shown that microtubules severed by laser ablation do not straighten, as would be expected from the large bending moments along their lengths. Instead, segments near newly created minus ends typically increased in curvature following severing, while segments near new microtubule plus ends depolymerize before any observable change in shape. However, in dynein-inhibited cells, segments near the cut straightened rapidly following severing. These observations suggest that microtubules are subject to significant tangential forces, and that lateral motion of the microtubule is primarily opposed by frictional rather than elastic forces. To interpret the experimental results, we have developed a numerical model for intracellular microtubule mechanics, accounting for dynein-generated forces on the microtubules. We have supplemented the Kirchoff model for an elastic filament with the stochastic growth and collapse of microtubules, and by a model for dynein generated forces. I will present simulations of the dynamics of individual microtubules that show how motor forces result in the localization of short-wavelength buckles near the cell periphery. Our results suggest that microtubule shapes in vivo reflect a dynamic force balance, where bending moments are opposed by dynein-motor forces that include a large effective friction from the stochastic binding and unbinding of the motors. Simulations of the motion of the centrosome are consistent with a mechanism for centrosome centering driven by pulling forces exerted by dynein motors. I will explain how tension on the centrosome can be reconciled with buckled filaments near the cell periphery.

  9. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a "Brush-on", Water-Responsive Polymer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-01-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a "brush-on" sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions. PMID:27578430

  10. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a “Brush-on”, Water-Responsive Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-01-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a “brush-on” sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions. PMID:27578430

  11. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a “Brush-on”, Water-Responsive Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-08-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a “brush-on” sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions.

  12. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a "Brush-on", Water-Responsive Polymer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-08-31

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a "brush-on" sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions.

  13. An agent-based model contrasts opposite effects of dynamic and stable microtubules on cleavage furrow positioning

    PubMed Central

    Odell, Garrett M.; Foe, Victoria E.

    2008-01-01

    From experiments by Foe and von Dassow (Foe, V.E., and G. von Dassow. 2008. J. Cell Biol. 183:457–470) and others, we infer a molecular mechanism for positioning the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Computer simulations reveal how this mechanism depends on quantitative motor-behavior details and explore how robustly this mechanism succeeds across a range of cell sizes. The mechanism involves the MKLP1 (kinesin-6) component of centralspindlin binding to and walking along microtubules to stimulate cortical contractility where the centralspindlin complex concentrates. The majority of astral microtubules are dynamically unstable. They bind most MKLP1 and suppress cortical Rho/myosin II activation because the tips of unstable microtubules usually depolymerize before MKLP1s reach the cortex. A subset of astral microtubules stabilizes during anaphase, becoming effective rails along which MKLP1 can actually reach the cortex. Because stabilized microtubules aim statistically at the equatorial spindle midplane, that is where centralspindlin accumulates to stimulate furrow formation. PMID:18955556

  14. Cross-scale modelling of transpiration from stomata via the leaf boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Verboven, Pieter; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf transpiration is a key parameter for understanding land surface–climate interactions, plant stress and plant structure–function relationships. Transpiration takes place at the microscale level, namely via stomata that are distributed discretely over the leaf surface with a very low surface coverage (approx. 0·2–5 %). The present study aims to shed more light on the dependency of the leaf boundary-layer conductance (BLC) on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Methods An innovative three-dimensional cross-scale modelling approach was applied to investigate convective mass transport from leaves, using computational fluid dynamics. The gap between stomatal and leaf scale was bridged by including all these scales in the same computational model (10−5–10−1 m), which implies explicitly modelling individual stomata. Key Results BLC was strongly dependent on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Leaf BLC at low surface coverage ratios (CR), typical for stomata, was still relatively high, compared with BLC of a fully wet leaf (hypothetical CR of 100 %). Nevertheless, these conventional BLCs (CR of 100 %), as obtained from experiments or simulations on leaf models, were found to overpredict the convective exchange. In addition, small variations in stomatal CR were found to result in large variations in BLCs. Furthermore, stomata of a certain size exhibited a higher mass transfer rate at lower CRs. Conclusions The proposed cross-scale modelling approach allows us to increase our understanding of transpiration at the sub-leaf level as well as the boundary-layer microclimate in a way currently not feasible experimentally. The influence of stomatal size, aperture and surface density, and also flow-field parameters can be studied using the model, and prospects for further improvement of the model are presented. An important conclusion of the study is that existing measures of conductances (e.g. from artificial leaves) can be

  15. Bottle gourd rootstock-grafting promotes photosynthesis by regulating the stomata and non-stomata performances in leaves of watermelon seedlings under NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjuan; Yu, Li; Wang, Liping; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-15

    Previously, we found that the amelioration of photosynthetic capacity by bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Standl.) rootstock in watermelon seedlings (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Mansf.) with salt treatment might be closely related to the enzymes in Calvin cycle such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Yang et al., 2012). We confirmed this and showed more details in this study that improved photosynthesis of watermelon plants by bottle gourd rootstock was associated with the decreased stomata resistance and the increased photochemical activity and photosynthetic metabolism with or without 100mM NaCl stress for 3 days. The analysis of gas exchange parameters showed that self-grafted plants suffered serious non-stomatal limitation to photosynthesis under salt stress while rootstock-grafted plants were mainly affected by stomata limitation in stress conditions. Further, results showed that NaCl stress markedly reduced the chlorophyll content, damaged the structure of photosynthetic apparatus, and inhibited photochemical activity and CO2 assimilation in self-grafted plants. In contrast, rootstock-grafting increased the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b, and minimized the harmful effects on photosystem II (PSII) reaction center and the thylakoids structure induced by NaCl stress. Furthermore, rootstock-grafting enhanced the content and activity of Rubisco and thus elevated carbon fixation in the leaves of watermelon scions under salt stress. The gene expressions of enzymes related to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration were also up-regulated by rootstock and this probably guaranteed the sufficient supply of RuBP for the operation of Calvin cycle in watermelon scions under salt stress. Thus, bottle gourd rootstock promoted photosynthesis by the activation of stomatal and non-stomatal abilities, especially the regulation of a variety of photosynthetic enzymes, including Rubisco in grafted watermelon plants under NaCl stress

  16. Bottle gourd rootstock-grafting promotes photosynthesis by regulating the stomata and non-stomata performances in leaves of watermelon seedlings under NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjuan; Yu, Li; Wang, Liping; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-15

    Previously, we found that the amelioration of photosynthetic capacity by bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Standl.) rootstock in watermelon seedlings (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Mansf.) with salt treatment might be closely related to the enzymes in Calvin cycle such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Yang et al., 2012). We confirmed this and showed more details in this study that improved photosynthesis of watermelon plants by bottle gourd rootstock was associated with the decreased stomata resistance and the increased photochemical activity and photosynthetic metabolism with or without 100mM NaCl stress for 3 days. The analysis of gas exchange parameters showed that self-grafted plants suffered serious non-stomatal limitation to photosynthesis under salt stress while rootstock-grafted plants were mainly affected by stomata limitation in stress conditions. Further, results showed that NaCl stress markedly reduced the chlorophyll content, damaged the structure of photosynthetic apparatus, and inhibited photochemical activity and CO2 assimilation in self-grafted plants. In contrast, rootstock-grafting increased the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b, and minimized the harmful effects on photosystem II (PSII) reaction center and the thylakoids structure induced by NaCl stress. Furthermore, rootstock-grafting enhanced the content and activity of Rubisco and thus elevated carbon fixation in the leaves of watermelon scions under salt stress. The gene expressions of enzymes related to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration were also up-regulated by rootstock and this probably guaranteed the sufficient supply of RuBP for the operation of Calvin cycle in watermelon scions under salt stress. Thus, bottle gourd rootstock promoted photosynthesis by the activation of stomatal and non-stomatal abilities, especially the regulation of a variety of photosynthetic enzymes, including Rubisco in grafted watermelon plants under NaCl stress.

  17. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro-tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element.

  18. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    PubMed

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules. PMID:25576435

  19. MICROTUBULE BIOGENESIS AND CELL SHAPE IN OCHROMONAS

    PubMed Central

    Bouck, G. Benjamin; Brown, David L.

    1973-01-01

    In the first of two companion papers which attempt to correlate microtubules and their nucleating sites with developmental and cell division patterns in the unicellular flagellate, Ochromonas, the distribution of cytoplasmic and mitotic microtubules and various kinetosome-related fibers are detailed. Of the five kinetosome-related fibers, which have been found in Ochromonas, two, the kineto-beak fibers and the rhizoplast fibers are utilized as attachment sites for distinct groups of microtubules. The set of microtubules attached to the kineto-beak fibers apparently shape the anterior beak region of the cell whereas the rhizoplast microtubules appear to extend into and shape the tail in vegetative cells. In mitotic cells a rhizoplast is found at each spindle pole apparently serving as foci for the spindle microtubules. These findings are discussed in relation to the less well defined attachment sites for vegetative and mitotic microtubules in other kinds of cells. It is noted that the effects of depolymerizing microtubules in vivo might be easily quantitated in whole populations since no external wall or pellicle contributes to the maintenance or the biogenesis of the characteristic cell form of Ochromonas. PMID:4682900

  20. Dissecting microtubule structures by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Decker, Franziska; Brugués, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe a detailed protocol, based on laser ablation and fluorescence optical microscopy, to measure the microtubule organization in spindles, including microtubule length distribution, polarity, and plus and minus end densities. The method uses the asymmetry in microtubule depolymerization after a cut, where the newly created microtubule plus ends depolymerize all the way to the minus ends, whereas the newly created minus ends remain stable. The protocol described in this chapter is optimized for spindles, but can be easily applied to any microtubule-based structure. The chapter is divided into two parts. First, we provide the theoretical basis for the method. Second, we describe in detail all steps necessary to reconstruct the microtubule organization of a spindle assembled in Xenopus laevis egg extract. Compared to electron microscopy, which in theory can resolve individual microtubules in spindles and provide similar structural information, our method is fast and simple enough to allow for a full quantitative reconstruction of the microtubule organization of several X. laevis spindles—which have volumes tens of thousands of times larger than spindles whose structures have been previously solved by electron microscopy—in a single experimental session, as well as to explore how the architecture of these structures changes in response to biochemical perturbations.

  1. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    PubMed

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Microtubule Interacting Proteins over the Course of Xylem Tracheary Element Formation in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Buschmann, Henrik; Lloyd, Clive W.

    2015-01-01

    Plant vascular cells, or tracheary elements (TEs), rely on circumferential secondary cell wall thickenings to maintain sap flow. The patterns in which TE thickenings are organized vary according to the underlying microtubule bundles that guide wall deposition. To identify microtubule interacting proteins present at defined stages of TE differentiation, we exploited the synchronous differentiation of TEs in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures. Quantitative proteomic analysis of microtubule pull-downs, using ratiometric 14N/15N labeling, revealed 605 proteins exhibiting differential accumulation during TE differentiation. Microtubule interacting proteins associated with membrane trafficking, protein synthesis, DNA/RNA binding, and signal transduction peaked during secondary cell wall formation, while proteins associated with stress peaked when approaching TE cell death. In particular, CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-INTERACTING PROTEIN1, already associated with primary wall synthesis, was enriched during secondary cell wall formation. RNAi knockdown of genes encoding several of the identified proteins showed that secondary wall formation depends on the coordinated presence of microtubule interacting proteins with nonoverlapping functions: cell wall thickness, cell wall homogeneity, and the pattern and cortical location of the wall are dependent on different proteins. Altogether, proteins linking microtubules to a range of metabolic compartments vary specifically during TE differentiation and regulate different aspects of wall patterning. PMID:26432860

  3. Ethylene Regulates the Arabidopsis Microtubule-Associated Protein WAVE-DAMPENED2-LIKE5 in Etiolated Hypocotyl Elongation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingbo; Ma, Qianqian; Mao, Tonglin

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays crucial roles in the negative regulation of plant etiolated hypocotyl elongation. The microtubule cytoskeleton also participates in hypocotyl cell growth. However, it remains unclear if ethylene signaling-mediated etiolated hypocotyl elongation involves the microtubule cytoskeleton. In this study, we functionally identified the previously uncharacterized microtubule-associated protein WAVE-DAMPENED2-LIKE5 (WDL5) as a microtubule-stabilizing protein that plays a positive role in ethylene-regulated etiolated hypocotyl cell elongation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3, a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, directly targets and up-regulates WDL5. Etiolated hypocotyls from a WDL5 loss-of-function mutant (wdl5-1) were more insensitive to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid treatment than the wild type. Decreasing WDL5 expression partially rescued the shorter etiolated hypocotyl phenotype in the ethylene overproduction mutant eto1-1. Reorganization of cortical microtubules in etiolated hypocotyl cells from the wdl5-1 mutant was less sensitive to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid treatment. These findings indicate that WDL5 is an important participant in ethylene signaling inhibition of etiolated hypocotyl growth. This study reveals a mechanism involved in the ethylene regulation of microtubules through WDL5 to inhibit etiolated hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:26134166

  4. Ethylene Regulates the Arabidopsis Microtubule-Associated Protein WAVE-DAMPENED2-LIKE5 in Etiolated Hypocotyl Elongation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Ma, Qianqian; Mao, Tonglin

    2015-09-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays crucial roles in the negative regulation of plant etiolated hypocotyl elongation. The microtubule cytoskeleton also participates in hypocotyl cell growth. However, it remains unclear if ethylene signaling-mediated etiolated hypocotyl elongation involves the microtubule cytoskeleton. In this study, we functionally identified the previously uncharacterized microtubule-associated protein WAVE-DAMPENED2-LIKE5 (WDL5) as a microtubule-stabilizing protein that plays a positive role in ethylene-regulated etiolated hypocotyl cell elongation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3, a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, directly targets and up-regulates WDL5. Etiolated hypocotyls from a WDL5 loss-of-function mutant (wdl5-1) were more insensitive to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid treatment than the wild type. Decreasing WDL5 expression partially rescued the shorter etiolated hypocotyl phenotype in the ethylene overproduction mutant eto1-1. Reorganization of cortical microtubules in etiolated hypocotyl cells from the wdl5-1 mutant was less sensitive to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid treatment. These findings indicate that WDL5 is an important participant in ethylene signaling inhibition of etiolated hypocotyl growth. This study reveals a mechanism involved in the ethylene regulation of microtubules through WDL5 to inhibit etiolated hypocotyl cell elongation.

  5. Kinesin-12 motors cooperate to suppress microtubule catastrophes and drive the formation of parallel microtubule bundles

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Hauke; McAinsh, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Human Kinesin-12 (hKif15) plays a crucial role in assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. These functions of hKif15 are partially redundant with Kinesin-5 (Eg5), which can cross-link and drive the extensile sliding of antiparallel microtubules. Although both motors are known to be tetramers, the functional properties of hKif15 are less well understood. Here we reveal how single or multiple Kif15 motors can cross-link, transport, and focus the plus-ends of intersecting microtubules. During transport, Kif15 motors step simultaneously along both microtubules with relative microtubule transport driven by a velocity differential between motor domain pairs. Remarkably, this differential is affected by the underlying intersection geometry: the differential is low on parallel and extreme on antiparallel microtubules where one motor domain pair becomes immobile. As a result, when intersecting microtubules are antiparallel, canonical transport of one microtubule along the other is allowed because one motor is firmly attached to one microtubule while it is stepping on the other. When intersecting microtubules are parallel, however, Kif15 motors can drive (biased) parallel sliding because the motor simultaneously steps on both microtubules that it cross-links. These microtubule rearrangements will focus microtubule plus-ends and finally lead to the formation of parallel bundles. At the same time, Kif15 motors cooperate to suppress catastrophe events at polymerizing microtubule plus-ends, raising the possibility that Kif15 motors may synchronize the dynamics of bundles that they have assembled. Thus, Kif15 is adapted to operate on parallel microtubule substrates, a property that clearly distinguishes it from the other tetrameric spindle motor, Eg5. PMID:26969727

  6. Kinesin-12 motors cooperate to suppress microtubule catastrophes and drive the formation of parallel microtubule bundles.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Hauke; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2016-03-22

    Human Kinesin-12 (hKif15) plays a crucial role in assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. These functions of hKif15 are partially redundant with Kinesin-5 (Eg5), which can cross-link and drive the extensile sliding of antiparallel microtubules. Although both motors are known to be tetramers, the functional properties of hKif15 are less well understood. Here we reveal how single or multiple Kif15 motors can cross-link, transport, and focus the plus-ends of intersecting microtubules. During transport, Kif15 motors step simultaneously along both microtubules with relative microtubule transport driven by a velocity differential between motor domain pairs. Remarkably, this differential is affected by the underlying intersection geometry: the differential is low on parallel and extreme on antiparallel microtubules where one motor domain pair becomes immobile. As a result, when intersecting microtubules are antiparallel, canonical transport of one microtubule along the other is allowed because one motor is firmly attached to one microtubule while it is stepping on the other. When intersecting microtubules are parallel, however, Kif15 motors can drive (biased) parallel sliding because the motor simultaneously steps on both microtubules that it cross-links. These microtubule rearrangements will focus microtubule plus-ends and finally lead to the formation of parallel bundles. At the same time, Kif15 motors cooperate to suppress catastrophe events at polymerizing microtubule plus-ends, raising the possibility that Kif15 motors may synchronize the dynamics of bundles that they have assembled. Thus, Kif15 is adapted to operate on parallel microtubule substrates, a property that clearly distinguishes it from the other tetrameric spindle motor, Eg5.

  7. Tubulin Bistability and Polymorphic Dynamics of Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrbach, Hervé; Johner, Albert; Kulić, Igor M.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the hypothesis that the GDP-tubulin dimer is a conformationally bistable molecule—rapidly fluctuating between a discrete curved and a straight state—we develop a model for polymorphic dynamics of the microtubule lattice. We show that GDP-tubulin bistability consistently explains unusual dynamic fluctuations, the apparent length-stiffness relation of grafted taxol-stabilized microtubules, and the curved-helical appearance of microtubules in general. When clamped by one end the microtubules undergo an unusual zero energy motion—in its effect reminiscent of a limited rotational hinge. We conclude that microtubules exist in highly cooperative energy-degenerate helical states and discuss possible implications in vivo.

  8. Targeting Microtubules for Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Charafeddine, Rabab A.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Sharp, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fast and seamless healing is essential for both deep and chronic wounds to restore the skin and protect the body from harmful pathogens. Thus, finding new targets that can both expedite and enhance the repair process without altering the upstream signaling milieu and causing serious side effects can improve the way we treat wounds. Since cell migration is key during the different stages of wound healing, it presents an ideal process and intracellular structural machineries to target. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is rising as an important structural and functional regulator of wound healing. MTs have been reported to play different roles in the migration of the various cell types involved in wound healing. Specific microtubule regulatory proteins (MRPs) can be targeted to alter a section or subtype of the MT cytoskeleton and boost or hinder cell motility. However, inhibiting intracellular components can be challenging in vivo, especially using unstable molecules, such as small interfering RNA. Nanoparticles can be used to protect these unstable molecules and topically deliver them to the wound. Utilizing this approach, we recently showed that fidgetin-like 2, an uncharacterized MRP, can be targeted to enhance cell migration and wound healing. Future Directions: To harness the full potential of the current MRP therapeutic targets, studies should test them with different delivery platforms, dosages, and skin models. Screening for new MT effectors that boost cell migration in vivo would also help find new targets for skin repair. PMID:27785378

  9. Active contraction of microtubule networks

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Peter J; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael J; Needleman, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large-scale behaviors of these systems. Here, we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions, which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10837.001 PMID:26701905

  10. Tomato-Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO₂ concentration: the role of stomata.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations ([CO₂]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO₂-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO₂] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO₂] enhanced tomato defence against P. syringae. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that stomatal aperture of elevated [CO₂] plants was considerably smaller than their ambient counterparts, which affected the behaviour of P. syringae bacteria on the upper surface of epidermal peels. Pharmacological experiments revealed that nitric oxide (NO) played a role in elevated [CO₂]-induced stomatal closure. Silencing key genes involved in NO generation and stomatal closing, nitrate reductase (NR) and guard cell slow-type anion channel 1 (SLAC1), blocked elevated [CO₂]-induced stomatal closure and resulted in significant increases in P. syringae infection. However, the SLAC1-silenced plants, but not the NR-silenced plants, still had significantly higher defence under elevated [CO₂] compared with plants treated with ambient [CO₂]. Similar results were obtained when the stomata-limiting factor for P. syringae entry was excluded by syringe infiltration inoculation. These results indicate that elevated [CO₂] induces defence against P. syringae in tomato plants, not only by reducing the stomata-mediated entry of P. syringae but also by invoking a stomata-independent pathway to counteract P. syringae. This information is valuable for designing proper strategies against bacterial pathogens under changing agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  11. Tomato-Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO₂ concentration: the role of stomata.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations ([CO₂]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO₂-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO₂] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO₂] enhanced tomato defence against P. syringae. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that stomatal aperture of elevated [CO₂] plants was considerably smaller than their ambient counterparts, which affected the behaviour of P. syringae bacteria on the upper surface of epidermal peels. Pharmacological experiments revealed that nitric oxide (NO) played a role in elevated [CO₂]-induced stomatal closure. Silencing key genes involved in NO generation and stomatal closing, nitrate reductase (NR) and guard cell slow-type anion channel 1 (SLAC1), blocked elevated [CO₂]-induced stomatal closure and resulted in significant increases in P. syringae infection. However, the SLAC1-silenced plants, but not the NR-silenced plants, still had significantly higher defence under elevated [CO₂] compared with plants treated with ambient [CO₂]. Similar results were obtained when the stomata-limiting factor for P. syringae entry was excluded by syringe infiltration inoculation. These results indicate that elevated [CO₂] induces defence against P. syringae in tomato plants, not only by reducing the stomata-mediated entry of P. syringae but also by invoking a stomata-independent pathway to counteract P. syringae. This information is valuable for designing proper strategies against bacterial pathogens under changing agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25336683

  12. Open or close the gate - stomata action under the control of phytohormones in drought stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Daszkowska-Golec, Agata; Szarejko, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Two highly specialized cells, the guard cells that surround the stomatal pore, are able to integrate environmental and endogenous signals in order to control the stomatal aperture and thereby the gas exchange. The uptake of CO2 is associated with a loss of water by leaves. Control of the size of the stomatal aperture optimizes the efficiency of water use through dynamic changes in the turgor of the guard cells. The opening and closing of stomata is regulated by the integration of environmental signals and endogenous hormonal stimuli. The various different factors to which the guard cells respond translates into the complexity of the network of signaling pathways that control stomatal movements. The perception of an abiotic stress triggers the activation of signal transduction cascades that interact with or are activated by phytohormones. Among these, abscisic acid (ABA), is the best-known stress hormone that closes the stomata, although other phytohormones, such as jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, cytokinins, or ethylene are also involved in the stomatal response to stresses. As a part of the drought response, ABA may interact with jasmonic acid and nitric oxide in order to stimulate stomatal closure. In addition, the regulation of gene expression in response to ABA involves genes that are related to ethylene, cytokinins, and auxin signaling. In this paper, recent findings on phytohormone crosstalk, changes in signaling pathways including the expression of specific genes and their impact on modulating stress response through the closing or opening of stomata, together with the highlights of gaps that need to be elucidated in the signaling network of stomatal regulation, are reviewed.

  13. Tomato–Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO2 concentration: the role of stomata

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO2-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO2] enhanced tomato defence against P. syringae. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that stomatal aperture of elevated [CO2] plants was considerably smaller than their ambient counterparts, which affected the behaviour of P. syringae bacteria on the upper surface of epidermal peels. Pharmacological experiments revealed that nitric oxide (NO) played a role in elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure. Silencing key genes involved in NO generation and stomatal closing, nitrate reductase (NR) and guard cell slow-type anion channel 1 (SLAC1), blocked elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure and resulted in significant increases in P. syringae infection. However, the SLAC1-silenced plants, but not the NR-silenced plants, still had significantly higher defence under elevated [CO2] compared with plants treated with ambient [CO2]. Similar results were obtained when the stomata-limiting factor for P. syringae entry was excluded by syringe infiltration inoculation. These results indicate that elevated [CO2] induces defence against P. syringae in tomato plants, not only by reducing the stomata-mediated entry of P. syringae but also by invoking a stomata-independent pathway to counteract P. syringae. This information is valuable for designing proper strategies against bacterial pathogens under changing agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25336683

  14. Pollen and stomata morphometrics and polyploidy in Eriotheca (Malvaceae-Bombacoideae).

    PubMed

    Marinho, R C; Mendes-Rodrigues, C; Bonetti, A M; Oliveira, P E

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 70% of the angiosperm species are polyploid, an important phenomenon in the evolution of those plants. But ploidy estimates have often been hindered because of the small size and large number of chromosomes in many tropical groups. Since polyploidy affects cell size, morphometric analyses of pollen grains and stomata have been used to infer ploidy level. Polyploidy is present in many species of the Cerrado, the Neotropical savanna region in Central Brazil, and has been linked to apomixis in some taxa. Eriotheca gracilipes and Eriotheca pubescens are common tree species in this region, and present cytotypes that form reproductive mosaics. Hexaploid individuals (2n = 6x = 276) are polyembryonic and apomictic, while tetraploid and diploid individuals (2n = 2x = 92, 2n = 4x = 184) are sexual and monoembryonic. We tested whether morphometric analysis can be used to estimate ploidy levels in E. gracilipes and E. pubescens individuals. Pollen material from diploid and hexaploid individuals of E. gracilipes, and tetraploid and hexaploid individuals of E. pubescens, were fixed in 50% FAA, and expanded leaves were dried in silica gel. Pollen grains and stomata of at least five individuals from each population were measured. The results demonstrate that all measures were significantly different among cytotypes. Individuals with higher levels of ploidy (hexaploid) all presented measurements that were higher than those with lower levels (diploid and tetraploid). There was no overlap between ploidy levels in each species at 95% confidence interval. Thus, the size of the pollen grains and stomata are effective parameters for analysis of ploidy levels in E. gracilipes and E. pubescens.

  15. Pollen and stomata morphometrics and polyploidy in Eriotheca (Malvaceae-Bombacoideae).

    PubMed

    Marinho, R C; Mendes-Rodrigues, C; Bonetti, A M; Oliveira, P E

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 70% of the angiosperm species are polyploid, an important phenomenon in the evolution of those plants. But ploidy estimates have often been hindered because of the small size and large number of chromosomes in many tropical groups. Since polyploidy affects cell size, morphometric analyses of pollen grains and stomata have been used to infer ploidy level. Polyploidy is present in many species of the Cerrado, the Neotropical savanna region in Central Brazil, and has been linked to apomixis in some taxa. Eriotheca gracilipes and Eriotheca pubescens are common tree species in this region, and present cytotypes that form reproductive mosaics. Hexaploid individuals (2n = 6x = 276) are polyembryonic and apomictic, while tetraploid and diploid individuals (2n = 2x = 92, 2n = 4x = 184) are sexual and monoembryonic. We tested whether morphometric analysis can be used to estimate ploidy levels in E. gracilipes and E. pubescens individuals. Pollen material from diploid and hexaploid individuals of E. gracilipes, and tetraploid and hexaploid individuals of E. pubescens, were fixed in 50% FAA, and expanded leaves were dried in silica gel. Pollen grains and stomata of at least five individuals from each population were measured. The results demonstrate that all measures were significantly different among cytotypes. Individuals with higher levels of ploidy (hexaploid) all presented measurements that were higher than those with lower levels (diploid and tetraploid). There was no overlap between ploidy levels in each species at 95% confidence interval. Thus, the size of the pollen grains and stomata are effective parameters for analysis of ploidy levels in E. gracilipes and E. pubescens. PMID:24341784

  16. The Microtubule Plus End Tracking Protein TIP150 Interacts with Cortactin to Steer Directional Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregory; Zhou, Jiajia; Wang, Wenwen; Wu, Huihui; Quan, Jie; Liu, Yingying; Xia, Peng; Wang, Zhikai; Zhou, Shu; Jiang, Jiying; Mo, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaoxuan; Thomas, Kelwyn; Hill, Donald L; Aikhionbare, Felix O; He, Ping; Liu, Xing; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2016-09-23

    Cell migration is orchestrated by dynamic interactions of microtubules with the plasma membrane cortex. How these interactions facilitate these dynamic processes is still being actively investigated. TIP150 is a newly characterized microtubule plus end tracking protein essential for mitosis and entosis (Ward, T., Wang, M., Liu, X., Wang, Z., Xia, P., Chu, Y., Wang, X., Liu, L., Jiang, K., Yu, H., Yan, M., Wang, J., Hill, D. L., Huang, Y., Zhu, T., and Yao, X. (2013) Regulation of a dynamic interaction between two microtubule-binding proteins, EB1 and TIP150, by the mitotic p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) orchestrates kinetochore microtubule plasticity and chromosome stability during mitosis. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 15771-15785; Xia, P., Zhou, J., Song, X., Wu, B., Liu, X., Li, D., Zhang, S., Wang, Z., Yu, H., Ward, T., Zhang, J., Li, Y., Wang, X., Chen, Y., Guo, Z., and Yao, X. (2014) Aurora A orchestrates entosis by regulating a dynamic MCAK-TIP150 interaction. J. Mol. Cell Biol. 6, 240-254). Here we show that TIP150 links dynamic microtubules to steer cell migration by interacting with cortactin. Mechanistically, TIP150 binds to cortactin via its C-terminal tail. Interestingly, the C-terminal TIP150 proline-rich region (CT150) binds to the Src homology 3 domain of cortactin specifically, and such an interaction is negatively regulated by EGF-elicited tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin. Importantly, suppression of TIP150 or overexpression of phospho-mimicking cortactin inhibits polarized cell migration. In addition, CT150 disrupts the biochemical interaction between TIP150 and cortactin in vitro, and perturbation of the TIP150-cortactin interaction in vivo using a membrane-permeable TAT-CT150 peptide results in an inhibition of directional cell migration. We reason that a dynamic TIP150-cortactin interaction orchestrates directional cell migration via coupling dynamic microtubule plus ends to the cortical cytoskeleton. PMID:27451391

  17. TCTP regulates spindle microtubule dynamics by stabilizing polar microtubules during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; You, Seung Yeop; Park, Yong Seok; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in spindle structure and function are essential for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle. Spindle dynamics are highly dependent on several microtubule-associated proteins that coordinate the dynamic behavior of microtubules, including microtubule assembly, stability and organization. Here, we show that translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a novel microtubule-associated protein that regulates spindle dynamics during meiotic maturation. TCTP was expressed and widely distributed in the cytoplasm with strong enrichment at the spindle microtubules during meiosis. TCTP was found to be phosphorylated during meiotic maturation, and was exclusively localized to the spindle poles. Knockdown of TCTP impaired spindle organization without affecting chromosome alignment. These spindle defects were mostly due to the destabilization of the polar microtubules. However, the stability of kinetochore microtubules attached to chromosomes was not affected by TCTP knockdown. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylable mutant of TCTP disturbed meiotic maturation, stabilizing the spindle microtubules. In addition, Plk1 was decreased by TCTP knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TCTP is a microtubule-associating protein required to regulate spindle microtubule dynamics during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

  18. Live cell imaging reveals structural associations between the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  19. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  20. Profilin connects actin assembly with microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nejedla, Michaela; Sadi, Sara; Sulimenko, Vadym; de Almeida, Francisca Nunes; Blom, Hans; Draber, Pavel; Aspenström, Pontus; Karlsson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Profilin controls actin nucleation and assembly processes in eukaryotic cells. Actin nucleation and elongation promoting factors (NEPFs) such as Ena/VASP, formins, and WASP-family proteins recruit profilin:actin for filament formation. Some of these are found to be microtubule associated, making actin polymerization from microtubule-associated platforms possible. Microtubules are implicated in focal adhesion turnover, cell polarity establishment, and migration, illustrating the coupling between actin and microtubule systems. Here we demonstrate that profilin is functionally linked to microtubules with formins and point to formins as major mediators of this association. To reach this conclusion, we combined different fluorescence microscopy techniques, including superresolution microscopy, with siRNA modulation of profilin expression and drug treatments to interfere with actin dynamics. Our studies show that profilin dynamically associates with microtubules and this fraction of profilin contributes to balance actin assembly during homeostatic cell growth and affects micro­tubule dynamics. Hence profilin functions as a regulator of microtubule (+)-end turnover in addition to being an actin control element. PMID:27307590

  1. Optically Resolving Individual Microtubules in Live Axons

    PubMed Central

    Mudrakola, Harsha V.; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microtubules are essential cytoskeletal tracks for cargo transportation in axons and also serve as the primary structural scaffold of neurons. Structural assembly, stability, and dynamics of axonal microtubules are of great interest for understanding neuronal functions and pathologies. However, microtubules are so densely packed in axons that their separations are well below the diffraction limit of light, which precludes using optical microscopy for live-cell studies. Here, we present a single-molecule imaging method capable of resolving individual microtubules in live axons. In our method, unlabeled microtubules are revealed by following individual axonal cargos that travel along them. We resolved more than six microtubules in a 1 μm diameter axon by real-time tracking of endosomes containing quantum dots. Our live-cell study also provided direct evidence that endosomes switch between microtubules while traveling along axons, which has been proposed to be the primary means for axonal cargos to effectively navigate through the crowded axoplasmic environment. PMID:19913478

  2. MICROTUBULE BIOGENESIS AND CELL SHAPE IN OCHROMONAS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David L.; Bouck, G. Benjamin

    1973-01-01

    The proposal made in the preceding paper that the species-specific shape of Ochromonas is mediated by cytoplasmic microtubules which are related to two nucleating sites has been experimentally verified. Exposure of cells to colchicine or hydrostatic pressure causes microtubule disassembly and a correlative loss of cell shape in a posterior to anterior direction. Upon removal of colchicine or release of pressure, cell shape regenerates and microtubules reappear, first in association with the kineto-beak site concomitant with regeneration of the anterior asymmetry, and later at the rhizoplast site concomitant with formation of the posterior tail. It is concluded that two separate sets of cytoplasmic tubules function in formation and maintenance of specific portions of the total cell shape. On the basis of the following observations, we further suggest that the beak and rhizoplast sites could exert control over the position and timing of the appearance, the orientation, and the pattern of microtubule distribution in Ochromonas. (a) the two sites are accurately positioned in the cell relative to other cell organelles; (b) in regenerating cells microtubules reform first at these sites and appear to elongate to the cell posterior; (c) microtubules initially reappear in the orientation characteristic of the fully differentiated cell; (d) the two sets of tubules are polymerized at different times, in the same sequence, during reassembly or resynthesis of the microtubular system. Experiments using cycloheximide, after a treatment with colchicine, have demonstrated that Ochromonas cannot reassume its normal shape without new protein synthesis. This suggests that microtubule protein once exposed to colchicine cannot be reassembled into microtubules. Pressure-treated cells, on the other hand, reassemble tubules and regenerate the normal shape in the presence or absence of cycloheximide. The use of these two agents in analyzing nucleating site function and the independent

  3. Spindle microtubules and their mechanical associations after micromanipulation in anaphase.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, R B; Kubai, D F; Hays, T S

    1982-10-01

    Micromanipulation of living grasshopper spermatocytes in anaphase has been combined with electron microscopy to reveal otherwise obscure features of spindle organization. A chromosome is pushed laterally outside the spindle and stretched, and the cell is fixed with a novel, agar-treated glutaraldehyde solution. Two- and three-dimensional reconstructions from serial sections of seven cells show that kinetochore microtubules of the manipulated chromosome are shifted outside the confusing thicket of spindle microtubules and mechanical associations among microtubules are revealed by bent or shifted microtubules. These are the chief results: (a) The disposition of microtubules invariably is consistent with a skeletal role for spindle microtubules. (b) The kinetochore microtubule bundle is composed of short and long microtubules, with weak but recognizable mechanical associations among them. Some kinetochore microtubules are more tightly linked to one other microtubule within the bundle. (c) Microtubules of the kinetochore microtubule bundle are firmly connected to other spindle microtubules only near the pole, although some nonkinetochore microtubules of uncertain significance enter the bundle nearer to the kinetochore. (d) The kinetochore microtubules of adjacent chromosomes are mechanically linked, which provides an explanation for interdependent chromosome movement in "hinge anaphases." In the region of the spindle open to analysis after chromosome micromanipulation, microtubules may be linked mechanically by embedment in a gel, rather than by dynein or other specific, cross-bridging molecules.

  4. The microtubule catastrophe promoter Sentin delays stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment in oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, A. Agata; Cullen, C. Fiona; Li, Wenjing; Battaglia, Rachel A.; Radford, Sarah J.; Costa, Mariana F.; McKim, Kim S.; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The critical step in meiosis is to attach homologous chromosomes to the opposite poles. In mouse oocytes, stable microtubule end-on attachments to kinetochores are not established until hours after spindle assembly, and phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins by Aurora B/C is responsible for the delay. Here we demonstrated that microtubule ends are actively prevented from stable attachment to kinetochores until well after spindle formation in Drosophila melanogaster oocytes. We identified the microtubule catastrophe-promoting complex Sentin-EB1 as a major factor responsible for this delay. Without this activity, microtubule ends precociously form robust attachments to kinetochores in oocytes, leading to a high proportion of homologous kinetochores stably attached to the same pole. Therefore, regulation of microtubule ends provides an alternative novel mechanism to delay stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment in oocytes. PMID:26668329

  5. Insights into Antiparallel Microtubule Crosslinking by PRC1, a Conserved Nonmotor Microtubule Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Radhika; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Arthur, Christopher P.; Bick, Matthew J.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Darst, Seth A.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2010-09-03

    Formation of microtubule architectures, required for cell shape maintenance in yeast, directional cell expansion in plants and cytokinesis in eukaryotes, depends on antiparallel microtubule crosslinking by the conserved MAP65 protein family. Here, we combine structural and single molecule fluorescence methods to examine how PRC1, the human MAP65, crosslinks antiparallel microtubules. We find that PRC1's microtubule binding is mediated by a structured domain with a spectrin-fold and an unstructured Lys/Arg-rich domain. These two domains, at each end of a homodimer, are connected by a linkage that is flexible on single microtubules, but forms well-defined crossbridges between antiparallel filaments. Further, we show that PRC1 crosslinks are compliant and do not substantially resist filament sliding by motor proteins in vitro. Together, our data show how MAP65s, by combining structural flexibility and rigidity, tune microtubule associations to establish crosslinks that selectively mark antiparallel overlap in dynamic cytoskeletal networks.

  6. Measuring stress signaling responses of stomata in isolated epidermis of graminaceous species

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Sun, Peng; Bonnell, Verity C.; Edwards, Keith J.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; McAinsh, Martin R.; Roberts, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of guard cell signaling pathways is derived from studies in a small number of model species. The ability to study stomatal responses in isolated epidermis has been an important factor in elucidating the mechanisms by which the stomata of these species respond to environmental stresses. However, such approaches have rarely been applied to study guard cell signaling in the stomata of graminaceous species (including many of the world’s major crops), in which the guard cells have a markedly different morphology to those in other plants. Our understanding of guard cell signaling in these important species is therefore much more limited. Here, we describe a procedure for the isolation of abaxial epidermal peels from barley, wheat and Brachypodium distachyon. We show that isolated epidermis from these species contains viable guard cells that exhibit typical responses to abscisic acid (ABA) and CO2, as determined by measurements of stomatal apertures. We use the epidermal peel assay technique to investigate in more detail interactions between different environmental factors in barley guard cells, and demonstrate that stomatal closure in response to external CO2 is inhibited at higher temperatures, whilst sensitivity to ABA is enhanced at 30°C compared to 20 and 40°C. PMID:26217375

  7. Distinct responses to ozone of abaxial and adaxial stomata in three Euramerican poplar genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Jennifer; Cohen, David; Gérard, Joëlle; Jolivet, Yves; Dizengremel, Pierre; LE Thiec, Didier

    2014-09-01

    Ozone induces stomatal sluggishness, which impacts photosynthesis and transpiration. Stomatal responses to variation of environmental parameters are slowed and reduced by ozone and may be linked to difference of ozone sensitivity. Here we determine the ozone effects on stomatal conductance of each leaf surface. Potential causes of this sluggish movement, such as ultrastructural or ionic fluxes modification, were studied independently on both leaf surfaces of three Euramerican poplar genotypes differing in ozone sensitivity and in stomatal behaviour. The element contents in guard cells were linked to the gene expression of ion channels and transporters involved in stomatal movements, directly in microdissected stomata. In response to ozone, we found a decrease in the stomatal conductance of the leaf adaxial surface correlated with high calcium content in guard cells compared with a slight decrease on the abaxial surface. No ultrastructural modifications of stomata were shown except an increase in the number of mitochondria. The expression of vacuolar H(+) /Ca(2+) -antiports (CAX1 and CAX3 homologs), β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) and proton H(+) -ATPase (AHA11) genes was strongly decreased under ozone treatment. The sensitive genotype characterized by constitutive slow stomatal response was also characterized by constitutive low expression of genes encoding vacuolar H(+) /Ca(2+) -antiports.

  8. Measuring stress signaling responses of stomata in isolated epidermis of graminaceous species.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Sun, Peng; Bonnell, Verity C; Edwards, Keith J; Hetherington, Alistair M; McAinsh, Martin R; Roberts, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of guard cell signaling pathways is derived from studies in a small number of model species. The ability to study stomatal responses in isolated epidermis has been an important factor in elucidating the mechanisms by which the stomata of these species respond to environmental stresses. However, such approaches have rarely been applied to study guard cell signaling in the stomata of graminaceous species (including many of the world's major crops), in which the guard cells have a markedly different morphology to those in other plants. Our understanding of guard cell signaling in these important species is therefore much more limited. Here, we describe a procedure for the isolation of abaxial epidermal peels from barley, wheat and Brachypodium distachyon. We show that isolated epidermis from these species contains viable guard cells that exhibit typical responses to abscisic acid (ABA) and CO2, as determined by measurements of stomatal apertures. We use the epidermal peel assay technique to investigate in more detail interactions between different environmental factors in barley guard cells, and demonstrate that stomatal closure in response to external CO2 is inhibited at higher temperatures, whilst sensitivity to ABA is enhanced at 30°C compared to 20 and 40°C. PMID:26217375

  9. Plant water use efficiency shapes co-evolution of stomata size and density over geologic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Or, D.

    2010-12-01

    The appearance of stomata and formation of impervious leaf cuticle are key elements in terrestrial plant evolution allowing plants to control gaseous diffusion and regulate water loss during simultaneous carbon dioxide uptake. An important plant gaseous diffusion adaptation was achieved by co-evolution of stomata density (D) and maximum aperture size (S), whose product α=S.D defines the evaporating fraction of the leaf surface and determines gaseous conductance. The plant leaf fossil record reveals significant variations in D and S over the 400 Myrs of the Phanerozoic eon, whose impact on gas-exchange capacity and on plant evolution are not fully understood. Characteristics of evaporation suppression from perforated diffusion barriers deduced from plant fossil record delineate the evolution of α as atmospheric CO2 declined from 4000 ppm to present day values. Surprisingly, despite non monotonous variations in α during plant evolution, plant water use efficiency (WUE) has improved systematically during the decrease in atmospheric CO2 over the Phanerozoic, at variance with conventional predictions. The new WUE trend is based on physical relations between α and evaporation suppression by perforated diffusion barriers, providing new insights on the dominance of water related regulatory function and on consequences of future CO2 enriched atmosphere on plant function and hydrologic cycle such as continental runoff scenarios.

  10. A Rapid and Simple Method for Microscopy-Based Stomata Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Jochen F.; Fäßler, Florian; Bürgel, Patrick F.; Chaban, Christina

    2016-01-01

    There are two major methodical approaches with which changes of status in stomatal pores are addressed: indirectly by measurement of leaf transpiration, and directly by measurement of stomatal apertures. Application of the former method requires special equipment, whereas microscopic images are utilized for the direct measurements. Due to obscure visualization of cell boundaries in intact leaves, a certain degree of invasive leaf manipulation is often required. Our aim was to develop a protocol based on the minimization of leaf manipulation and the reduction of analysis completion time, while still producing consistent results. We applied rhodamine 6G staining of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves for stomata visualization, which greatly simplifies the measurement of stomatal apertures. By using this staining protocol, we successfully conducted analyses of stomatal responses in Arabidopsis leaves to both closure and opening stimuli. We performed long-term monitoring of living stomata and were able to document the same leaf before and after treatment. Moreover, we developed a protocol for rapid-fixation of epidermal peels, which enables high throughput data analysis. The described method allows analysis of stomatal apertures with minimal leaf manipulation and usage of the same leaf for sequential measurements, and will facilitate the analysis of several lines in parallel. PMID:27732636

  11. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control.

  12. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  13. Dissecting the cellular functions of plant microtubules using mutant tubulins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    α- and β-tubulins, the building blocks of the microtubule (MT) polymer, are encoded by multiple genes that are largely functionally redundant in plants. Null tubulin mutants are thus phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type, but miss-sense or deletion mutations of critical amino acid residues that are important for the assembly, stability, or dynamics of the polymer disrupt the proper organization and function of the resultant MT arrays. Mutant tubulins co-assemble with wild-type tubulins into mutant MTs with compromised functions, and thus mechanistically act as dominant-negative MT poisons. Cortical MT arrays in interphase plant cells are most sensitive to tubulin mutations, and are transformed into helical structures or random orientation, which produce twisted or radially swollen cells. Mutant plants resistant to MT-targeted herbicides may possess tubulin mutations at the binding sites of the herbicides. Tubulin mutants are valuable tools for investigating how individual MTs are organized into particular patterns in cortical arrays, and for defining the functional contribution of MTs to various MT-dependent or -assisted cellular processes in plant cells.

  14. Pressure-induced depolymerization of brain microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salmon, E D

    1975-09-12

    Microtubules, assembled in vitro from tubulin extracted from rabbit brain, were subjected to changes in hydrostatic pressure (200 to 10,000 pounds per square inch) and temperature (37 degrees to 0 degrees C). Increased pressure, like cooling, reversibly depolymerizes microtubules, as measured by changes in either turbidity, birefringence, or the number of microtubules seen in electron micrographs. The characteristic response of brain microtubules in vitro to pressure is similar to that of mitotic spindle microtubules in vivo.

  15. Damage to stomata and inhibition of photosynthesis by toxic pollutants in Pinus sylvestris needles as affected by the exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Kaipiainen, L.K.; Sofronova, G.I.; Hari, P.

    1995-11-01

    The impact of persistent exposure of Pinus sylvestris L. trees of various ages to industrial emissions on stomata and photosynthesis of needles was studied in relation to the exposure time. The electron microscopic examination of the needles revealed an erosion of the epicuticular wax and damage to stomata, which increased with needle age until stomata were completely occluded by polymetallic dust. Pollutant particles wee found to contain S, Cl, Ca, K, Mg, Mn, Al, Ni, Fe, Cu, Co, Ti, and Zn. Photosynthetic rates were inhibited by 20-60%, depending on the needle age and tree condition. It is concluded that a nonuniformity in the toxicant distribution over the forest canopy and the age-dependent changes in the state of the cuticular wax layer are the most likely causes of variability in the extent to which individual trees were damaged by the toxicants.

  16. Measuring kinetochore-microtubule interaction in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Jonathan W.; Powers, Andrew F.; Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Biggins, Sue; Asbury, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins and protein complexes perform sophisticated, regulated functions in vivo. Many of these functions can be recapitulated using in vitro reconstitution, which serves as a means to establish unambiguous cause-effect relationships, for example between a protein and its phosphorylating kinase. Here, we describe a protocol to purify kinetochores, the protein complexes that attach chromosomes to microtubules during mitosis, and quantitatively assay their microtubule binding characteristics. Our assays, based on DIC imaging and laser trapping microscopy, are used to measure the attachment of microtubules to kinetochores and the load-bearing capabilities of those attachments. These assays provide a platform for studying kinase disruption of kinetochore-microtubule attachments, which is believed to be critical for correcting erroneous kinetochore-spindle attachments and thereby avoiding chromosome mis-segregation. The principles of our approach should be extensible to studies of a wide range of force-bearing interactions in biology. PMID:24630115

  17. A protein factor essential for microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, M D; Lockwood, A H; Hwo, S Y; Kirschner, M W

    1975-01-01

    A heat stable protein essentail for microtubule assembly has been isolated. This protein, which we designate tau (tau), is present in association with tubulin purified from porcine brain by repeated cycles of polymerization. Tau is separated from tubulin by ion exchange chromatography on phosphocellulose. In the absence of tau, tubulin exists entirely as a 6S dimer of two polypeptide chains (alpha and beta tubulin) with a molecular weight of 120,000, which will not assemble into microtubules in vitro. Addition of tau completely restores tubule-forming capacity. Under nonpolymerizing conditions, tau converts 6S dimers to 36S rings-structures which have been implicated as intermediates in tubule formation. Hence, tau appears to act on the 6S tubulin dimer, activating it for polymerization. The unique ability of tau to restore the normal features of in vitro microtubule assembly makes it likely that tau is a major regulator of microtubule formation in cells. Images PMID:1057175

  18. Rigidity of microtubules is increased by stabilizing agents

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules are rigid polymers that contribute to the static mechanical properties of cells. Because microtubules are dynamic structures whose polymerization is regulated during changes in cell shape, we have asked whether the mechanical properties of microtubules might also be modulated. We measured the flexural rigidity, or bending stiffness, of individual microtubules under a number of different conditions that affect the stability of microtubules against depolymerization. The flexural rigidity of microtubules polymerized with the slowly hydrolyzable nucleotide analogue guanylyl-(alpha, beta)- methylene-diphosphonate was 62 +/- 9 x 10(-24) Nm2 (weighted mean +/- SEM); that of microtubules stabilized with tau protein was 34 +/- 3 x 10(-24) Nm2; and that of microtubules stabilized with the antimitotic drug taxol was 32 +/- 2 x 10(-24) Nm2. For comparison, microtubules that were capped to prevent depolymerization, but were not otherwise stabilized, had a flexural rigidity of 26 +/- 2 x 10(-24) Nm2. Decreasing the temperature from 37 degrees C to approximately 25 degrees C, a condition that makes microtubules less stable, decreased the stiffness of taxol-stabilized microtubules by one-third. We thus find that the more stable a microtubule, the higher its flexural rigidity. This raises the possibility that microtubule rigidity may be regulated in vivo. In addition, the high rigidity of an unstabilized, GDP-containing microtubule suggests that a large amount of energy could be stored as mechanical strain energy in the protein lattice for subsequent force generation during microtubule depolymerization. PMID:7642706

  19. Cold exposure reveals two populations of microtubules in pulmonary endothelia

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Stevens, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules are composed of α-tubulin and β-tubulin dimers. Microtubules yield tubulin dimers when exposed to cold, which reassemble spontaneously to form microtubule fibers at 37°C. However, mammalian neurons, glial cells, and fibroblasts have cold-stable microtubules. While studying the microtubule toxicity mechanisms of the exotoxin Y from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, we observed that some endothelial microtubules were very difficult to disassemble in the cold. As a consequence, we designed studies to test the hypothesis that microvascular endothelium has a population of cold-stable microtubules. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells (control) were grown under regular cell culture conditions, followed by exposure to an ice-cold water bath and a microtubule extraction protocol. Polymerized microtubules were detected by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analyses. After cold exposure, immunofluorescence revealed that the majority of HeLa cell microtubules disassembled, whereas a smaller population of endothelial cell microtubules disassembled. Immunoblot analyses showed that microvascular endothelial cells express the microtubule cold-stabilizing protein N-STOP (neuronal stable tubule-only polypeptides), and that N-STOP binds to endothelial microtubules after cold exposure, but not if microtubules are disassembled with nocodazole before cold exposure. Hence, pulmonary endothelia have a population of cold-stable microtubules. PMID:20971804

  20. Transcriptional profiles of Arabidopsis stomataless mutants reveal developmental and physiological features of life in the absence of stomata.

    PubMed

    de Marcos, Alberto; Triviño, Magdalena; Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Ballesteros, Isabel; Barón, Matilde; Mena, Montaña; Fenoll, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the positive stomata development regulators SPCH or MUTE in Arabidopsis thaliana renders stomataless plants; spch-3 and mute-3 mutants are extreme dwarfs, but produce cotyledons and tiny leaves, providing a system to interrogate plant life in the absence of stomata. To this end, we compared their cotyledon transcriptomes with that of wild-type plants. K-means clustering of differentially expressed genes generated four clusters: clusters 1 and 2 grouped genes commonly regulated in the mutants, while clusters 3 and 4 contained genes distinctively regulated in mute-3. Classification in functional categories and metabolic pathways of genes in clusters 1 and 2 suggested that both mutants had depressed secondary, nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms, while only a few photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. In situ quenching analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence revealed limited inhibition of photosynthesis. This and other fluorescence measurements matched the mutant transcriptomic features. Differential transcriptomes of both mutants were enriched in growth-related genes, including known stomata development regulators, which paralleled their epidermal phenotypes. Analysis of cluster 3 was not informative for developmental aspects of mute-3. Cluster 4 comprised genes differentially up-regulated in mute-3, 35% of which were direct targets for SPCH and may relate to the unique cell types of mute-3. A screen of T-DNA insertion lines in genes differentially expressed in the mutants identified a gene putatively involved in stomata development. A collection of lines for conditional overexpression of transcription factors differentially expressed in the mutants rendered distinct epidermal phenotypes, suggesting that these proteins may be novel stomatal development regulators. Thus, our transcriptome analysis represents a useful source of new genes for the study of stomata development and for characterizing physiology and growth in the absence of stomata.

  1. Transcriptional profiles of Arabidopsis stomataless mutants reveal developmental and physiological features of life in the absence of stomata

    PubMed Central

    de Marcos, Alberto; Triviño, Magdalena; Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Ballesteros, Isabel; Barón, Matilde; Mena, Montaña; Fenoll, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the positive stomata development regulators SPCH or MUTE in Arabidopsis thaliana renders stomataless plants; spch-3 and mute-3 mutants are extreme dwarfs, but produce cotyledons and tiny leaves, providing a system to interrogate plant life in the absence of stomata. To this end, we compared their cotyledon transcriptomes with that of wild-type plants. K-means clustering of differentially expressed genes generated four clusters: clusters 1 and 2 grouped genes commonly regulated in the mutants, while clusters 3 and 4 contained genes distinctively regulated in mute-3. Classification in functional categories and metabolic pathways of genes in clusters 1 and 2 suggested that both mutants had depressed secondary, nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms, while only a few photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. In situ quenching analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence revealed limited inhibition of photosynthesis. This and other fluorescence measurements matched the mutant transcriptomic features. Differential transcriptomes of both mutants were enriched in growth-related genes, including known stomata development regulators, which paralleled their epidermal phenotypes. Analysis of cluster 3 was not informative for developmental aspects of mute-3. Cluster 4 comprised genes differentially up−regulated in mute−3, 35% of which were direct targets for SPCH and may relate to the unique cell types of mute−3. A screen of T-DNA insertion lines in genes differentially expressed in the mutants identified a gene putatively involved in stomata development. A collection of lines for conditional overexpression of transcription factors differentially expressed in the mutants rendered distinct epidermal phenotypes, suggesting that these proteins may be novel stomatal development regulators. Thus, our transcriptome analysis represents a useful source of new genes for the study of stomata development and for characterizing physiology and growth in the absence of

  2. MAPK Phosphatase AP2C3 Induces Ectopic Proliferation of Epidermal Cells Leading to Stomata Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kazanaviciute, Vaiva; Magyar, Zoltan; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Unterwurzacher, Verena; Choopayak, Chonnanit; Boniecka, Justyna; Murray, James A. H.; Bogre, Laszlo; Meskiene, Irute

    2010-01-01

    In plant post-embryonic epidermis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes differentiation of pavement cells and inhibits initiation of stomata. Stomata are cells specialized to modulate gas exchange and water loss. Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3 and MPK6 are at the core of the signaling cascade; however, it is not well understood how the activity of these pleiotropic MAPKs is constrained spatially so that pavement cell differentiation is promoted only outside the stomata lineage. Here we identified a PP2C-type phosphatase termed AP2C3 (Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C) that is expressed distinctively during stomata development as well as interacts and inactivates MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. AP2C3 co-localizes with MAPKs within the nucleus and this localization depends on its N-terminal extension. We show that other closely related phosphatases AP2C2 and AP2C4 are also MAPK phosphatases acting on MPK6, but have a distinct expression pattern from AP2C3. In accordance with this, only AP2C3 ectopic expression is able to stimulate cell proliferation leading to excess stomata development. This function of AP2C3 relies on the domains required for MAPK docking and intracellular localization. Concomitantly, the constitutive and inducible AP2C3 expression deregulates E2F-RB pathway, promotes the abundance and activity of CDKA, as well as changes of CDKB1;1 forms. We suggest that AP2C3 downregulates the MAPK signaling activity to help maintain the balance between differentiation of stomata and pavement cells. PMID:21203456

  3. Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Andreas; van Haren, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Susana A; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-06-20

    Many microtubule (MT) functions are mediated by a diverse class of proteins (+TIPs) at growing MT plus ends that control intracellular MT interactions and dynamics and depend on end-binding proteins (EBs) [1]. Cryoelectron microscopy has recently identified the EB binding site as the interface of four tubulin dimers that undergoes a conformational change in response to β-tubulin GTP hydrolysis [2, 3]. Doublecortin (DCX), a MT-associated protein (MAP) required for neuronal migration during cortical development [4, 5], binds to the same site as EBs [6], and recent in vitro studies proposed DCX localization to growing MT ends independent of EBs [7]. Because this conflicts with observations in neurons [8, 9] and the molecular function of DCX is not well understood, we revisited intracellular DCX dynamics at low expression levels. Here, we report that DCX is not a +TIP in cells but, on the contrary, is excluded from the EB1 domain. In addition, we find that DCX-MT interactions are highly sensitive to MT geometry. In cells, DCX binding was greatly reduced at MT segments with high local curvature. Remarkably, this geometry-dependent binding to MTs was completely reversed in the presence of taxanes, which reconciles incompatible observations in cells [9] and in vitro [10]. We propose a model explaining DCX specificity for different MT geometries based on structural changes induced by GTP hydrolysis that decreases the spacing between adjacent tubulin dimers [11]. Our data are consistent with a unique mode of MT interaction in which DCX specifically recognizes this compacted GDP-like MT lattice.

  4. Mobility of Taxol in Microtubule Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J.

    2003-06-01

    Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With > 63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k_{off}. It was found that 10*k_{off} (GMPCPP) ~ k_{off} (GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With < 63% sites occupied, recovery times decreased as ~ [Tax]^{-1/5} for both types of microtubules. We conclude that the diffusion of taxol along the microtubule interior is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within ~7 nm of each other.

  5. Colchicine activates actin polymerization by microtubule depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Jung, H I; Shin, I; Park, Y M; Kang, K W; Ha, K S

    1997-06-30

    Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts were treated with the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine to study any interaction between microtubule dynamics and actin polymerization. Colchicine increased the amount of filamentous actin (F-actin), in a dose- and time-dependent manner with a significant increase at 1 h by about 130% over control level. Confocal microscopic observation showed that colchicine increased F-actin contents by stress fiber formation without inducing membrane ruffling. Colchicine did not activate phospholipase C and phospholipase D, whereas lysophosphatidic acid did, indicating that colchicine may have a different mechanism of actin polymerization regulation from LPA. A variety of microtubule-disrupting agents stimulated actin polymerization in Swiss 3T3 and Rat-2 fibroblasts as did colchicine, but the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol inhibited actin polymerization induced by the above microtubule-disrupting agents. In addition, colchicine-induced actin polymerization was blocked by two protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid and calyculin A. These results suggest that microtubule depolymerization activates stress fiber formation by serine/threonine dephosphorylation in fibroblasts. PMID:9264034

  6. Separation and Measurement of Direct and Indirect Effects of Light on Stomata 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Raschke, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO2, and intercellular CO2 concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO2 concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO2 concentration. The slopes of these curves allowed us to estimate infinitesimal changes in conductance (and assimilation) that occurred when irradiance changed and intercellular CO2 concentration was constant, and when CO2 concentration changed and irradiance was constant. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was determined to be mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO2 concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances < 150 watts per square meter, when stomata responded primarily to the depletion of the intercellular spaces of CO2 which in turn was caused by changes in the assimilation of CO2. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO2 was reduced to zero through application of the inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, cyanazine (2-chloro-4[1-cyano-1-methylethylamino]-6-ethylamino-S-triazine). When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis (presumably in the guard cells). In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO2 and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO2 free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO2 containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO2 was strongest in darkness and it decreased

  7. Activation of Aurora-A is essential for neuronal migration via modulation of microtubule organization.

    PubMed

    Takitoh, Takako; Kumamoto, Kanako; Wang, Chen-Chi; Sato, Makoto; Toba, Shiori; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hirotsune, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Neuronal migration is a critical feature to ensure proper location and wiring of neurons during cortical development. Postmitotic neurons migrate from the ventricular zone into the cortical plate to establish neuronal lamina in an "inside-out" gradient of maturation. Here, we report that the mitotic kinase Aurora-A is critical for the regulation of microtubule organization during neuronal migration via an Aurora-A-NDEL1 pathway in the mouse. Suppression of Aurora-A activity by inhibitors or siRNA resulted in severe impairment of neuronal migration of granular neurons. In addition, in utero injection of the Aurora-A kinase-dead mutant provoked defective migration of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrated that suppression of Aurora-A impaired microtubule modulation in migrating neurons. Interestingly, suppression of CDK5 by an inhibitor or siRNA reduced Aurora-A activity and NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A, which led to defective neuronal migration. We found that CDK5RAP2 is a key molecule that mediates functional interaction and is essential for centrosomal targeting of Aurora-A. Our observations demonstrated novel and surprising cross talk between Aurora-A and CDK5 during neuronal migration. PMID:22875938

  8. Loss of Microtubules in the Interphase Cells of Onion (Allium cepa L.) Root Tips from the Cell Cortex and Their Appearance in the Cytoplasm after Treatment with Cycloheximide.

    PubMed Central

    Mineyuki, Y.; Iida, H.; Anraku, Y.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a project to investigate the mechanism of cortical microtubule (MT) alignment, we examined the effects of cycloheximide (CHM) on cortical MTs in the root tip cells of Allium cepa L. Results show that although a preprophase band of MTs remained in the cell cortex, interphase MTs disappeared from the cortical cytoplasm and then appeared concomitantly in the inner cytoplasm when the rate of de novo protein synthesis was reduced with CHM (11-360 [mu]M for 2 h) PMID:12232080

  9. PKA antagonizes CLASP-dependent microtubule stabilization to re-localize Pom1 and buffer cell size upon glucose limitation

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Manasi; Martin, Sophie G.

    2015-01-01

    Cells couple growth with division and regulate size in response to nutrient availability. In rod-shaped fission yeast, cell-size control occurs at mitotic commitment. An important regulator is the DYRK-family kinase Pom1, which forms gradients from cell poles and inhibits the mitotic activator Cdr2, itself localized at the medial cortex. Where and when Pom1 modulates Cdr2 activity is unclear as Pom1 medial cortical levels remain constant during cell elongation. Here we show that Pom1 re-localizes to cell sides upon environmental glucose limitation, where it strongly delays mitosis. This re-localization is caused by severe microtubule destabilization upon glucose starvation, with microtubules undergoing catastrophe and depositing the Pom1 gradient nucleator Tea4 at cell sides. Microtubule destabilization requires PKA/Pka1 activity, which negatively regulates the microtubule rescue factor CLASP/Cls1/Peg1, reducing CLASP's ability to stabilize microtubules. Thus, PKA signalling tunes CLASP's activity to promote Pom1 cell side localization and buffer cell size upon glucose starvation. PMID:26443240

  10. The effects of the phospholipase D-antagonist 1-butanol on seedling development and microtubule organisation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John; Collings, David A; Harper, John D I; Marc, Jan

    2003-07-01

    The organisation of plant microtubules into distinct arrays during the cell cycle requires interactions with partner proteins. Having recently identified a 90-kDa phospholipase D (PLD) that associates with microtubules and the plasma membrane [Gardiner et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13: 2143], we exposed seeds and young seedlings of Arabidopsis to 1-butanol, a specific inhibitor of PLD-dependent production of the signalling molecule phosphatidic acid (PA). When added to agar growth media, 0.2% 1-butanol strongly inhibited the emergence of the radicle and cotyledons, while 0.4% 1-butanol effectively blocked germination. When normal seedlings were transferred onto media containing 0.2% and 0.4% 1-butanol, the inhibitor retarded root growth by about 40% and 90%, respectively, by reducing cell elongation. Inhibited plants showed significant swelling in the root elongation zone, bulbous or branched root hairs, and modified cotyledon morphology. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of root tips revealed that 1-butanol disrupted the organisation of interphase cortical microtubules. Butanol isomers that do not inhibit PLD-dependent PA production, 2- and 3-butanol, had no effect on seed germination, seedling growth, or microtubule organisation. We propose that production of PA by PLD may be required for normal microtubule organisation and hence normal growth in Arabidopsis.

  11. Single file diffusion in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Farrell, Spencer; Brown, Aidan

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the single file diffusion (SFD) of large particles entering a confined tubular geometry, such as luminal diffusion of proteins inside microtubules or flagella. While single-file effects have no effect on particle density, we report significant single-file effects for individually-tracked tracer particle motion. Both exact and approximate ordering statistics of particles entering semi-infinite tubes agree well with our stochastic simulations. Considering initially empty semi-infinite tubes, with particles entering at one end starting from an initial time t = 0 , tracked particles display super-diffusive effective exponents just after they enter the system and trends towards diffusive exponents at later times. Equivalently, if diffusive exponents are assumed the effective diffusivity is reduced at early times and enhanced at later times through a logarithmic factor logN , where N is the number of particles in the tube. When we number each particle from the first (n = 1) to the most recent (n = N), we find good scaling collapse of the effective diffusivity for all n. Techniques that track individual particles, or local groups of particles, such as photo-activation or photobleaching, will exhibit single-file effects.

  12. Microtubules self-repair in response to mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, Laura; John, Karin; Gaillard, Jérémie; Nachury, Maxence V.; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules--which define the shape of axons, cilia and flagella, and provide tracks for intracellular transport--can be highly bent by intracellular forces, and microtubule structure and stiffness are thought to be affected by physical constraints. Yet how microtubules tolerate the vast forces exerted on them remains unknown. Here, by using a microfluidic device, we show that microtubule stiffness decreases incrementally with each cycle of bending and release. Similar to other cases of material fatigue, the concentration of mechanical stresses on pre-existing defects in the microtubule lattice is responsible for the generation of more extensive damage, which further decreases microtubule stiffness. Strikingly, damaged microtubules were able to incorporate new tubulin dimers into their lattice and recover their initial stiffness. Our findings demonstrate that microtubules are ductile materials with self-healing properties, that their dynamics does not exclusively occur at their ends, and that their lattice plasticity enables the microtubules' adaptation to mechanical stresses.

  13. The role of dynamic instability in microtubule organization

    PubMed Central

    Horio, Tetsuya; Murata, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are one of the three major cytoskeletal components in eukaryotic cells. Heterodimers composed of GTP-bound α- and β-tubulin molecules polymerize to form microtubule protofilaments, which associate laterally to form a hollow microtubule. Tubulin has GTPase activity and the GTP molecules associated with β-tubulin molecules are hydrolyzed shortly after being incorporated into the polymerizing microtubules. GTP hydrolysis alters the conformation of the tubulin molecules and drives the dynamic behavior of microtubules. Periods of rapid microtubule polymerization alternate with periods of shrinkage in a process known as dynamic instability. In plants, dynamic instability plays a key role in determining the organization of microtubules into arrays, and these arrays vary throughout the cell cycle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms that regulate microtubule dynamics and underlie dynamic instability, and discuss how dynamic instability may shape microtubule organization in plant cells. PMID:25339962

  14. Microtubules self-repair in response to mechanical stress

    PubMed Central

    Schaedel, Laura; John, Karin; Gaillard, Jérémie; Nachury, Maxence V.; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules - which define the shape of axons, cilia and flagella, and provide tracks for intracellular transport - can be highly bent by intracellular forces, and microtubule structure and stiffness are thought to be affected by physical constraints. Yet how microtubules tolerate the vast forces exerted on them remains unknown. Here, by using a microfluidic device, we show that microtubule stiffness decreases incrementally with each cycle of bending and release. Similar to other cases of material fatigue, the concentration of mechanical stresses on pre-existing defects in the microtubule lattice is responsible for the generation of larger damages, which further decrease microtubule stiffness. Strikingly, damaged microtubules were able to incorporate new tubulin dimers into their lattice and recover their initial stiffness. Our findings demonstrate that microtubules are ductile materials with self-healing properties, that their dynamics does not exclusively occur at their ends, and that their lattice plasticity enables the microtubules' adaptation to mechanical stresses. PMID:26343914

  15. Microtubules self-repair in response to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Schaedel, Laura; John, Karin; Gaillard, Jérémie; Nachury, Maxence V; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules--which define the shape of axons, cilia and flagella, and provide tracks for intracellular transport--can be highly bent by intracellular forces, and microtubule structure and stiffness are thought to be affected by physical constraints. Yet how microtubules tolerate the vast forces exerted on them remains unknown. Here, by using a microfluidic device, we show that microtubule stiffness decreases incrementally with each cycle of bending and release. Similar to other cases of material fatigue, the concentration of mechanical stresses on pre-existing defects in the microtubule lattice is responsible for the generation of more extensive damage, which further decreases microtubule stiffness. Strikingly, damaged microtubules were able to incorporate new tubulin dimers into their lattice and recover their initial stiffness. Our findings demonstrate that microtubules are ductile materials with self-healing properties, that their dynamics does not exclusively occur at their ends, and that their lattice plasticity enables the microtubules' adaptation to mechanical stresses. PMID:26343914

  16. Cortical dynamics during cell motility are regulated by CRL3(KLHL21) E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Courtheoux, Thibault; Enchev, Radoslav I; Lampert, Fabienne; Gerez, Juan; Beck, Jochen; Picotti, Paola; Sumara, Izabela; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Directed cell movement involves spatial and temporal regulation of the cortical microtubule (Mt) and actin networks to allow focal adhesions (FAs) to assemble at the cell front and disassemble at the rear. Mts are known to associate with FAs, but the mechanisms coordinating their dynamic interactions remain unknown. Here we show that the CRL3(KLHL21) E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes cell migration by controlling Mt and FA dynamics at the cell cortex. Indeed, KLHL21 localizes to FA structures preferentially at the leading edge, and in complex with Cul3, ubiquitylates EB1 within its microtubule-interacting CH-domain. Cells lacking CRL3(KLHL21) activity or expressing a non-ubiquitylatable EB1 mutant protein are unable to migrate and exhibit strong defects in FA dynamics, lamellipodia formation and cortical plasticity. Our study thus reveals an important mechanism to regulate cortical dynamics during cell migration that involves ubiquitylation of EB1 at focal adhesions. PMID:27641145

  17. Cortical dynamics during cell motility are regulated by CRL3KLHL21 E3 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Courtheoux, Thibault; Enchev, Radoslav I.; Lampert, Fabienne; Gerez, Juan; Beck, Jochen; Picotti, Paola; Sumara, Izabela; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Directed cell movement involves spatial and temporal regulation of the cortical microtubule (Mt) and actin networks to allow focal adhesions (FAs) to assemble at the cell front and disassemble at the rear. Mts are known to associate with FAs, but the mechanisms coordinating their dynamic interactions remain unknown. Here we show that the CRL3KLHL21 E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes cell migration by controlling Mt and FA dynamics at the cell cortex. Indeed, KLHL21 localizes to FA structures preferentially at the leading edge, and in complex with Cul3, ubiquitylates EB1 within its microtubule-interacting CH-domain. Cells lacking CRL3KLHL21 activity or expressing a non-ubiquitylatable EB1 mutant protein are unable to migrate and exhibit strong defects in FA dynamics, lamellipodia formation and cortical plasticity. Our study thus reveals an important mechanism to regulate cortical dynamics during cell migration that involves ubiquitylation of EB1 at focal adhesions. PMID:27641145

  18. Cortical dynamics during cell motility are regulated by CRL3(KLHL21) E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Courtheoux, Thibault; Enchev, Radoslav I; Lampert, Fabienne; Gerez, Juan; Beck, Jochen; Picotti, Paola; Sumara, Izabela; Peter, Matthias

    2016-09-19

    Directed cell movement involves spatial and temporal regulation of the cortical microtubule (Mt) and actin networks to allow focal adhesions (FAs) to assemble at the cell front and disassemble at the rear. Mts are known to associate with FAs, but the mechanisms coordinating their dynamic interactions remain unknown. Here we show that the CRL3(KLHL21) E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes cell migration by controlling Mt and FA dynamics at the cell cortex. Indeed, KLHL21 localizes to FA structures preferentially at the leading edge, and in complex with Cul3, ubiquitylates EB1 within its microtubule-interacting CH-domain. Cells lacking CRL3(KLHL21) activity or expressing a non-ubiquitylatable EB1 mutant protein are unable to migrate and exhibit strong defects in FA dynamics, lamellipodia formation and cortical plasticity. Our study thus reveals an important mechanism to regulate cortical dynamics during cell migration that involves ubiquitylation of EB1 at focal adhesions.

  19. Effects of phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid on stomata and the photosynthetic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Raschke, K.

    1980-02-01

    Plant extracts containing phaseic acid (PA), as well as solutions of purified PA and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) were applied to leaves, isolated mesophyll cells, and isolated epidermal strips. In Commelina communis, stomatal closure began 4 minutes after the addition of either 20 micromolar (+-)-abscisic acid or 10 micromolar PA. Stomata closed less rapidly after treatment with 10 micromolar PA than after treatment with 10 micromolar (+-)-abscisic acid in Amaranthus powelli, Hordeum vulgare, Xanthium strumarium, and Zea mays and did not respond at all to PA in Vicia faba. DPA (10 micromolar) did not cause stomatal closure in any species. Plant extracts containing PA reduced photosynthesis. Subsequent experiments with PA purified by crystallization and with residues of solvents employed in the extraction of PA proved that it was not PA that impaired photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution or CO/sub 2/ uptake but unidentified contaminants of the allegedly pure solvents.

  20. Fabrication of Triple-parted Stomata-inspired Membrane with Stimulus-responsive Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogels with controllable morphologies and functional movements present a wide range of practical applications. In this work, a triple-parted stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) was fabricated using a UV light cured hydrogel by polymerization-induced diffusion of reactants. A single UV light illumination yielded the SIM that has completely-penetrating pores and semi-penetrated parts. Membranes of various shapes can be easily fabricated within a few minutes by changing the photomask design and composition of the pre-gel solution. Similar to stomatal movement, pores in the fabricated SIM open and close their aperture in response to thermal stimuli. The deformability and transparency of the SIM can be easily controlled for a given application. This SIM exhibits stimulus-response, and therefore has numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, and functional smart membranes.

  1. Fabrication of Triple-parted Stomata-inspired Membrane with Stimulus-responsive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels with controllable morphologies and functional movements present a wide range of practical applications. In this work, a triple-parted stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) was fabricated using a UV light cured hydrogel by polymerization-induced diffusion of reactants. A single UV light illumination yielded the SIM that has completely-penetrating pores and semi-penetrated parts. Membranes of various shapes can be easily fabricated within a few minutes by changing the photomask design and composition of the pre-gel solution. Similar to stomatal movement, pores in the fabricated SIM open and close their aperture in response to thermal stimuli. The deformability and transparency of the SIM can be easily controlled for a given application. This SIM exhibits stimulus-response, and therefore has numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, and functional smart membranes. PMID:26887794

  2. Homolog Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhang; Hu, Lei; Punta, Marco; Bruni, Renato; Hillerich, Brandan; Kloss, Brian; Rost, Burkhard; Love, James; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating exchange of water vapor and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial homolog of SLAC1 at 1.20Å resolution, and we have used structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyze the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetric trimer composed from quasi-symmetric subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features suggest a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics suggest that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration. PMID:20981093

  3. Homologue Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Y Chen; L Hu; M Punta; R Bruni; B Hillerich; B Kloss; B Rost; J Love; S Siegelbaum; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. Here we determine the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue (Haemophilus influenzae) of SLAC1 at 1.20 {angstrom} resolution, and use structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyse the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetrical trimer composed from quasi-symmetrical subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features indicate a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics indicate that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration.

  4. Fabrication of Triple-parted Stomata-inspired Membrane with Stimulus-responsive Functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejeong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels with controllable morphologies and functional movements present a wide range of practical applications. In this work, a triple-parted stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) was fabricated using a UV light cured hydrogel by polymerization-induced diffusion of reactants. A single UV light illumination yielded the SIM that has completely-penetrating pores and semi-penetrated parts. Membranes of various shapes can be easily fabricated within a few minutes by changing the photomask design and composition of the pre-gel solution. Similar to stomatal movement, pores in the fabricated SIM open and close their aperture in response to thermal stimuli. The deformability and transparency of the SIM can be easily controlled for a given application. This SIM exhibits stimulus-response, and therefore has numerous practical applications, such as filter membranes with self-adjustable pores, membrane-based sensors, and functional smart membranes. PMID:26887794

  5. Smaller stomata require less severe leaf drying to close: a case study in Rosa hydrida.

    PubMed

    Giday, Habtamu; Kjaer, Katrine H; Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2013-10-15

    Stomata formed at high relative air humidity (RH) close less as leaf dries; an effect that varies depending on the genotype. We here quantified the contribution of each stomatal response characteristic to the higher water loss of high RH-grown plants, and assessed the relationship between response characteristics and intraspecific variation in stomatal size. Stomatal size (length multiplied by width), density and responsiveness to desiccation, as well as pore dimensions were analyzed in ten rose cultivars grown at moderate (60%) or high (85%) RH. Leaf morphological components and transpiration at growth conditions were also assessed. High growth RH resulted in thinner (11%) leaves with larger area. A strong positive genetic correlation of daytime and nighttime transpiration at either RH was observed. Stomatal size determined pore area (r=0.7) and varied by a factor of two, as a result of proportional changes in length and width. Size and density of stomata were not related. Following desiccation, high RH resulted in a significantly lower (6-19%) decline of transpiration in three cultivars, whereas the relative water content (RWC) of high RH-expanded leaflets was lower (29-297%) in seven cultivars. The lower RWC of these leaflets was caused by (a) higher (33-72%) stable transpiration and/or (b) lower (12-143%) RWC at which this stable transpiration occurred, depending on the cultivar. Stomatal size was significantly correlated with both characteristics (r=0.5 and -0.7, respectively). These results indicate that stomatal size explains much of the intraspecific variation in the regulation of transpiration upon water deprivation on rose. PMID:23726470

  6. Separation and measurement of direct and indirect effects of light on stomata

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Raschke, K.

    1981-07-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO/sub 2/, and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO/sub 2/ concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances <150 watts per square meter. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO/sub 2/ was reduced to zero. When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis. In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO/sub 2/-free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO/sub 2/-containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO/sub 2/ was strongest in darkness and it decreased as irradiance increased. In X. strumarium, P. vulgaris, and P. frutescens, an irradiance of 300 watts per square meter was sufficient to eliminate the stomatal response to CO/sub 2/ altogether. Application of abscisic acid, or an increase in vapor pressure deficit, or a decrease in leaf temperature reduced the stomatal conductance at light saturation.

  7. Microtubule flux in mitosis is independent of chromosomes, centrosomes, and antiparallel microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Sawin, K E; Mitchison, T J

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of poleward microtubule flux in the mitotic spindle by generating spindle subassemblies in Xenopus egg extracts in vitro and assaying their ability to flux by photoactivation of fluorescence and low-light multichannel fluorescence video-microscopy. We find that monopolar intermediates of in vitro spindle assembly (half-spindles) exhibit normal poleward flux, as do astral microtubule arrays induced by the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to egg extracts in the absence of both chromosomes and conventional centrosomes. Immunodepletion of the kinesin-related microtubule motor protein Eg5, a candidate flux motor, suggests that Eg5 is not required for flux. These results suggest that poleward flux is a basic element of microtubule behavior exhibited by even simple self-organized microtubule arrays and presumably underlies the most elementary levels of spindle morphogenesis. Images PMID:8019007

  8. Non-centrosomal nucleation mediated by augmin organizes microtubules in post-mitotic neurons and controls axonal microtubule polarity

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Freixo, Francisco; Viais, Ricardo; Lacasa, Cristina; Soriano, Eduardo; Lüders, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Neurons display a highly polarized microtubule network that mediates trafficking throughout the extensive cytoplasm and is crucial for neuronal differentiation and function. In newborn migrating neurons, the microtubule network is organized by the centrosome. During neuron maturation, however, the centrosome gradually loses this activity, and how microtubules are organized in more mature neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that microtubule organization in post-mitotic neurons strongly depends on non-centrosomal nucleation mediated by augmin and by the nucleator γTuRC. Disruption of either complex not only reduces microtubule density but also microtubule bundling. These microtubule defects impair neurite formation, interfere with axon specification and growth, and disrupt axonal trafficking. In axons augmin does not merely mediate nucleation of microtubules but ensures their uniform plus end-out orientation. Thus, the augmin-γTuRC module, initially identified in mitotic cells, may be commonly used to generate and maintain microtubule configurations with specific polarity. PMID:27405868

  9. Generation of differentially modified microtubules using in vitro enzymatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Vemu, Annapurna; Garnham, Christopher P; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin, the building block of microtubules, is subject to chemically diverse and evolutionarily conserved post-translational modifications that mark microtubules for specific functions in the cell. Here we describe in vitro methods for generating homogenous acetylated, glutamylated, or tyrosinated tubulin and microtubules using recombinantly expressed and purified modification enzymes. The generation of differentially modified microtubules now enables a mechanistic dissection of the effects of tubulin post-translational modifications on the dynamics and mechanical properties of microtubules as well as the behavior of motors and microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:24630106

  10. Expression of a gene encoding a rice RING zinc-finger protein, OsRZFP34, enhances stomata opening.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Liu, Chia-Chin; Wu, Shaw-Jye; Kuo, Ying-Yu; Lu, Chung-An; Wu, Ching-Rong; Lian, Pei-Jyun; Hong, Chwan-Yang; Ke, Yi-Ting; Huang, Juin-Hua; Yeh, Ching-Hui

    2014-09-01

    By oligo microarray expression profiling, we identified a rice RING zinc-finger protein (RZFP), OsRZFP34, whose gene expression increased with high temperature or abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. As compared with the wild type, rice and Arabidopsis with OsRZFP34 overexpression showed increased relative stomata opening even with ABA treatment. Furthermore, loss-of-function mutation of OsRZFP34 and AtRZFP34 (At5g22920), an OsRZFP34 homolog in Arabidopsis, decreased relative stomata aperture under nonstress control conditions. Expressing OsRZFP34 in atrzfp34 reverted the mutant phenotype to normal, which indicates a conserved molecular function between OsRZFP34 and AtRZFP34. Analysis of water loss and leaf temperature under stress conditions revealed a higher evaporation rate and cooling effect in OsRZFP34-overexpressing Arabidopsis and rice than the wild type, atrzfp34 and osrzfp34. Thus, stomata opening, enhanced leaf cooling, and ABA insensitivity was conserved with OsRZFP34 expression. Transcription profiling of transgenic rice overexpressing OsRZFP34 revealed many genes involved in OsRZFP34-mediated stomatal movement. Several genes upregulated or downregulated in OsRZFP34-overexpressing plants were previously implicated in Ca(2+) sensing, K(+) regulator, and ABA response. We suggest that OsRZFP34 may modulate these genes to control stomata opening.

  11. A Barley ROP GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEIN Associates with Microtubules and Regulates Entry of the Barley Powdery Mildew Fungus into Leaf Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hoefle, Caroline; Huesmann, Christina; Schultheiss, Holger; Börnke, Frederik; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the function of host factors involved in disease susceptibility. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) ROP (RHO of plants) G-protein RACB is required for full susceptibility of the leaf epidermis to invasion by the biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei. Stable transgenic knockdown of RACB reduced the ability of barley to accommodate haustoria of B. graminis in intact epidermal leaf cells and to form hairs on the root epidermis, suggesting that RACB is a common element of root hair outgrowth and ingrowth of haustoria in leaf epidermal cells. We further identified a barley MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED ROP-GTPASE ACTIVATING PROTEIN (MAGAP1) interacting with RACB in yeast and in planta. Fluorescent MAGAP1 decorated cortical microtubules and was recruited by activated RACB to the cell periphery. Under fungal attack, MAGAP1-labeled microtubules built a polarized network at sites of successful defense. By contrast, microtubules loosened where the fungus succeeded in penetration. Genetic evidence suggests a function of MAGAP1 in limiting susceptibility to penetration by B. graminis. Additionally, MAGAP1 influenced the polar organization of cortical microtubules. These results add to our understanding of how intact plant cells accommodate fungal infection structures and suggest that RACB and MAGAP1 might be antagonistic players in cytoskeleton organization for fungal entry. PMID:21685259

  12. Light-Regulated Hypocotyl Elongation Involves Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of the Microtubule Regulatory Protein WDL3 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Qin, Tao; Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Ziqiang; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2013-01-01

    Light significantly inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation, and dark-grown seedlings exhibit elongated, etiolated hypocotyls. Microtubule regulatory proteins function as positive or negative regulators that mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by altering microtubule organization. However, it remains unclear how plants coordinate these regulators to promote hypocotyl growth in darkness and inhibit growth in the light. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE-DAMPENED 2–LIKE3 (WDL3), a microtubule regulatory protein of the WVD2/WDL family from Arabidopsis thaliana, functions in hypocotyl cell elongation and is regulated by a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent pathway in response to light. WDL3 RNA interference Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light had much longer hypocotyls than controls. Moreover, WDL3 overexpression resulted in overall shortening of hypocotyl cells and stabilization of cortical microtubules in the light. Cortical microtubule reorganization occurred slowly in cells from WDL3 RNA interference transgenic lines but was accelerated in cells from WDL3-overexpressing seedlings subjected to light treatment. More importantly, WDL3 protein was abundant in the light but was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway in the dark. Overexpression of WDL3 inhibited etiolated hypocotyl growth in regulatory particle non-ATPase subunit-1a mutant (rpn1a-4) plants but not in wild-type seedlings. Therefore, a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent mechanism regulates the levels of WDL3 in response to light to modulate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23653471

  13. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich . E-mail: friedrich.propst@univie.ac.at

    2007-05-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir.

  14. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  15. Polyribosome targeting to microtubules: enrichment of specific mRNAs in a reconstituted microtubule preparation from sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A subset of mRNAs, polyribosomes, and poly(A)-binding proteins copurify with microtubules from sea urchin embryos. Several lines of evidence indicate that the interaction of microtubules with ribosomes is specific: a distinct stalk-like structure appears to mediate their association; ribosomes bind to microtubules with a constant stoichiometry through several purification cycles; and the presence of ribosomes in these preparations depends on the presence of intact microtubules. Five specific mRNAs are enriched with the microtubule- bound ribosomes, indicating that translation of specific proteins may occur on the microtubule scaffolding in vivo. PMID:7962079

  16. A Mutation in the Catalytic Subunit of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Transamidase Disrupts Growth, Fertility, and Stomata Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are essential for plant growth and development; knockout mutations in enzymes responsible for anchor biosynthesis or attachment are gametophyte or embryo lethal. In a genetic screen targeted to identify genes regulating stomata formation, we discovered a missense mutation in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of GPI8/PIG-K, a Cys protease that transfers an assembled GPI anchor to proteins. The Arabidopsis genome has a single copy of AtGPI8, and the atgpi8-1 mutation reduces the efficiency of this enzyme, leading to reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins. While the atgpi8-1 mutation strongly disrupts plant growth, it is not lethal. Phenotypic analysis of atgpi8-1 mutants suggests that GPI-APs are important for root and shoot growth, stomata formation, apical dominance, transition to flowering, and male gametophyte viability. In addition, atgpi8-1 mutants accumulate higher levels of callose and have reduced plasmodesmata permeability. Genetic interactions of atgpi8-1 with mutations in ERECTA family (ERf) genes suggest the existence of a GPI-AP in a branch of the ERf signaling pathway that regulates stomata formation. Activation of the ERf signal transduction cascade by constitutively active YODA rescues stomata clustering in atgpi8-1, indicating that a GPI-AP functions upstream of the MAP kinase cascade. TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) is a receptor-like protein that is able to form heterodimers with ERfs. Our analysis demonstrates that tmm-1 is epistatic to atgpi8-1, indicating that either TMM is a GPI-AP or there is another GPI-AP regulating stomata development whose function is dependent upon TMM. PMID:27208238

  17. Microtubule-associated protein-like binding of the kinesin-1 tail to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Mark A; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-03-12

    The kinesin-1 molecular motor contains an ATP-dependent microtubule-binding site in its N-terminal head domain and an ATP-independent microtubule-binding site in its C-terminal tail domain. Here we demonstrate that a kinesin-1 tail fragment associates with microtubules with submicromolar affinity. Binding is largely electrostatic in nature, and is facilitated by a region of basic amino acids in the tail and the acidic E-hook at the C terminus of tubulin. The tail binds to a site on tubulin that is independent of the head domain-binding site but overlaps with the binding site of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. Surprisingly, the kinesin tail domain stimulates microtubule assembly and stability in a manner similar to Tau. The biological function of this strong kinesin tail-microtubule interaction remains to be seen, but it is likely to play an important role in kinesin regulation due to the close proximity of the microtubule-binding region to the conserved regulatory and cargo-binding domains of the tail. PMID:20071331

  18. Microtubules move the nucleus to quiescence.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Damien; Sagot, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is a cellular compartment that hosts several macro-molecular machines displaying a highly complex spatial organization. This tight architectural orchestration determines not only DNA replication and repair but also regulates gene expression. In budding yeast microtubules play a key role in structuring the nucleus since they condition the Rabl arrangement in G1 and chromosome partitioning during mitosis through their attachment to centromeres via the kinetochore proteins. Recently, we have shown that upon quiescence entry, intranuclear microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body elongate to form a highly stable bundle that spans the entire nucleus. Here, we examine some molecular mechanisms that may underlie the formation of this structure. As the intranuclear microtubule bundle causes a profound re-organization of the yeast nucleus and is required for cell survival during quiescence, we discuss the possibility that the assembly of such a structure participates in quiescence establishment.

  19. Mechanical model of kinesin moving on microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Kiwing; Chou, Ya-Chang; Hsiao, Yi-Feng; Chen, Kuan-Hua

    Kinesins are biomolecules that serve as intercellular motors for carrying cellular cargos along microtubules. Although the mechanism of converting the chemical energy of ATP to mechanical work is not fully understood, the motion of a kinesin on a microtubule has been measured and two different mechanisms, namely the ``hand-over-hand'' and ``inchworm'', has been proposed. The particular shape of kinesin and microtubules suggest a possible mechanism for force generation similar to Brownian ratchet. Using a bead chain connected to two heads that are attracted to a vibrated ratchet plate as a scaled up analog of the kinesinmicrotubule system, we manage to simulate both ``handoverhand'' and ``inchworm'' motion [Chou, et. al., Physica A443, 66 (2015)]. In addition, we find that chain, which play the role of the stalk in a kinesin molecule, can also generate force by interacting with the ratchet plate [Chen, et. al. Phys. Rev. E87, 012711 (2013)].

  20. Microtubules viewed as molecular ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Tabony, James

    2006-10-01

    Populations of ants and other social insects self-organize and develop 'emergent' properties through stigmergy in which individual ants communicate with one another via chemical trails of pheromones that attract or repulse other ants. In this way, sophisticated properties and functions develop. Under appropriate conditions, in vitro microtubule preparations, initially comprised of only tubulin and GTP, behave in a similar manner. They self-organize and develop other higher-level emergent phenomena by a process where individual microtubules are coupled together by the chemical trails they produce by their own reactive growing and shrinking. This behaviour is described and compared with the behaviour of ant colonies. Viewing microtubules as populations of molecular ants may provide new insights as to how the cytoskeleton may spontaneously develop high-level functions. It is plausible that such processes occur during the early stages of embryogenesis and in cells. PMID:16968217

  1. Biomimetic Phases of Microtubule-Motor Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    We try to determine the universal principles of organization from the molecular scale that gives rise to architecture on the cellular scale. We are specifically interested in the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, a rigid, yet versatile network in most cell types. Microtubules in the cell are organized by motor proteins and crosslinkers. This work applies the ideas of statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics to the non-equilibrium pattern formation behind intracellular organization using the microtubule cytoskeleton as the building blocks. We examine these processes in a bottom-up manner by adding increasingly complex protein actors into the system. Our systematic experiments expose nature's laws for organization and has large impacts on biology as well as illuminating new frontiers of non-equilibrium physics.

  2. Graded Control of Microtubule Severing by Tubulin Glutamylation.

    PubMed

    Valenstein, Max L; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2016-02-25

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are critical for the biogenesis and maintenance of complex microtubule arrays in axons, spindles, and cilia where tubulin detyrosination, acetylation, and glutamylation are abundant. These modifications exhibit stereotyped patterns suggesting spatial and temporal control of microtubule functions. Using human-engineered and differentially modified microtubules we find that glutamylation is the main regulator of the hereditary spastic paraplegia microtubule severing enzyme spastin. Glutamylation acts as a rheostat and tunes microtubule severing as a function of glutamate number added per tubulin. Unexpectedly, glutamylation is a non-linear biphasic tuner and becomes inhibitory beyond a threshold. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of localized glutamylation propagates across neighboring microtubules, modulating severing in trans. Our work provides the first quantitative evidence for a graded response to a tubulin posttranslational modification and a biochemical link between tubulin glutamylation and complex architectures of microtubule arrays such as those in neurons where spastin deficiency causes disease.

  3. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  4. Micropattern-Guided Assembly of Overlapping Pairs of Dynamic Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Fourniol, Franck J.; Li, Tai-De; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between antiparallel microtubules are essential for the organization of spindles in dividing cells. The ability to form immobilized antiparallel microtubule pairs in vitro, combined with the ability to image them via TIRF microscopy, permits detailed biochemical characterization of microtubule cross-linking proteins and their effects on microtubule dynamics. Here, we describe methods for chemical micropatterning of microtubule seeds on glass surfaces in configurations that specifically promote the formation of antiparallel microtubule overlaps in vitro. We demonstrate that this assay is especially well suited for reconstitution of minimal midzone overlaps stabilized by the antiparallel microtubule cross-linking protein PRC1 and its binding partners. The micropatterning method is suitable for use with a broad range of proteins, and the assay is generally applicable to any microtubule cross-linking protein. PMID:24630116

  5. Observation of microtubule-based motor protein activity.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Roger D

    2015-02-01

    It is possible to detect the presence of motor proteins that have the ability to translocate particles along microtubules. The two procedures described here were developed to detect microtubule-dependent motor protein activity in cell lysates or of purified proteins. In the first procedure, latex beads bound to the putative motor protein are assayed for their ability to translocate along microtubules in an ATP-dependent fashion. If motor protein activity is present, it will bind to the beads and translocate them unidirectionally along the microtubules. In the second procedure, motor proteins induce microtubule gliding over a glass coverslip surface that is coated with active motor protein. Because the mass of a microtubule is negligible compared to that of a coverslip or slide, the microtubule glides over the glass surface when the surface is coated with active motor protein. Also included here are descriptions of assays designed to determine the directionality of movement of microtubule-based motor proteins. PMID:25646501

  6. The microtubules dance and the spindle poles swing.

    PubMed

    Munro, Edwin

    2007-05-01

    Using live imaging and computer simulation, Kozlowski et al. (2007) show that an interplay between spindle pole movements, microtubule dynamics, and microtubule bending contribute to asymmetric spindle placement in the C. elegans embryo. PMID:17482539

  7. TUBA1A mutation can cause a hydranencephaly-like severe form of cortical dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Setsuri; Ishihara, Naoko; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Yanagihara, Itaru; Fujita, Naoko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kojima, Seiji; Saitoh, Shinji; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Natsume, Jun

    2015-01-01

    TUBA1A mutations cause a wide spectrum of lissencephaly and brain malformations. Here, we report two patients with severe cortical dysgeneses, one with an extremely thin cerebral parenchyma apparently looking like hydranencephaly and the other with lissencephaly accompanied by marked hydrocephalus, both harbouring novel de novo missense mutations of TUBA1A. To elucidate how the various TUBA1A mutations affect the severity of the phenotype, we examined the capacity of the mutant protein to incorporate into the endogenous microtubule network in transfected COS7 cells by measuring line density using line extraction in an immunofluorescence study. The mutants responsible for severe phenotypes were found to incorporate extensively into the network. To determine how each mutant alters the microtubule stability, we examined cold-induced microtubule depolymerisation in fibroblasts. The depolymerisation of patients’ fibroblasts occurred earlier than that of control fibroblasts, suggesting that microtubules bearing mutated tubulins are unstable. Both mutations are predicted to participate in lateral interactions of microtubules. Our data suggest that the TUBA1A mutations disrupting lateral interactions have pronounced dominant-negative effects on microtubule dynamics that are associated with the severe end of the lissencephaly spectrum. PMID:26493046

  8. TUBA1A mutation can cause a hydranencephaly-like severe form of cortical dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Setsuri; Ishihara, Naoko; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Yanagihara, Itaru; Fujita, Naoko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kojima, Seiji; Saitoh, Shinji; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Natsume, Jun

    2015-10-23

    TUBA1A mutations cause a wide spectrum of lissencephaly and brain malformations. Here, we report two patients with severe cortical dysgeneses, one with an extremely thin cerebral parenchyma apparently looking like hydranencephaly and the other with lissencephaly accompanied by marked hydrocephalus, both harbouring novel de novo missense mutations of TUBA1A. To elucidate how the various TUBA1A mutations affect the severity of the phenotype, we examined the capacity of the mutant protein to incorporate into the endogenous microtubule network in transfected COS7 cells by measuring line density using line extraction in an immunofluorescence study. The mutants responsible for severe phenotypes were found to incorporate extensively into the network. To determine how each mutant alters the microtubule stability, we examined cold-induced microtubule depolymerisation in fibroblasts. The depolymerisation of patients' fibroblasts occurred earlier than that of control fibroblasts, suggesting that microtubules bearing mutated tubulins are unstable. Both mutations are predicted to participate in lateral interactions of microtubules. Our data suggest that the TUBA1A mutations disrupting lateral interactions have pronounced dominant-negative effects on microtubule dynamics that are associated with the severe end of the lissencephaly spectrum.

  9. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2015-01-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic “rule breakers,” control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals. PMID:26628750

  10. Effect of Aluminum, Iron, and Zinc Ions on the Assembly of Microtubules from Brain Microtubule Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, P N; Shevtsova, E F; Burbaeva, G Sh

    2016-08-01

    Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+) ions can disturb microtubule assembly from tubulin and microtubuleassociated proteins in rat brain. The main structural forms of these microtubules are rings and tangled bundles. These structures are formed only in the presence of Al(3+) and Fe(3+) ions. Therefore, Zn(2+) ions can be excluded from possible causes of structural abnormalities in microtubules during Alzheimer's disease. Al(3+) ions are the most probable etiological cause of Alzheimer's disease. The concentration of Al(3+) ions affecting the structure of microtubules is one order of magnitude lower than that of Fe(3+) ions (10 and 100 μM, respectively), which corresponds to their brain concentration reported in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27591874

  11. The role of microtubules and microtubule-organising centres during the migration of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Knabe, W; Kuhn, H J

    1996-10-01

    The translocation of mitochondria towards the primitive inner segment of the cones in the tree shrew Tupaia belangeri was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Throughout ontogeny the migrating mitochondria were codistributed with cytoplasmic microtubules which were preserved after the application of conventional preparation techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Both the basal body of the connecting cilium and the second centriole located in the vicinity of the basal body were demonstrated to act as microtubule-organising centres (MTOCs) from which axonemal and cytoplasmic microtubules originated. The megamitochondria in the inner segment of the retinal cones of Tupaia are unique among mammals with respect to their extraordinary size and to their ordered distribution characterised by longitudinal and radial size-gradients within developing and mature cone inner segments. Thus the consistent finding of microtubules and MTOCs in the structurally polarised cones represents an extreme example of the capacity of cells to regulate the transport and distribution of organelles.

  12. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda S.; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-02-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results suggest that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oligocene transition and that when a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed, the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  13. Open Stomata 1 Kinase is Essential for Yeast Elicitor-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Adachi, Yuji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    We recently demonstrated that yeast elicitor (YEL)-induced stomatal closure requires a Ca(2+)-dependent kinase, CPK6. A Ca(2+)-independent kinase, Open Stomata 1 (OST1), is involved in stomatal closure induced by various stimuli including ABA. In the present study, we investigated the role of OST1 in YEL-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis using a knock-out mutant, ost1-3, and a kinase-deficient mutant, ost1-2. YEL did not induce stomatal closure or activation of guard cell S-type anion channels in the ost1 mutants unlike in wild-type plants. However, YEL did not increase OST1 kinase activity in wild-type guard cells. The YEL-induced stomatal closure and activation of S-type anion channels were also impaired in a gain-of-function mutant of a clade A type 2C protein phosphatase (ABA INSENSITIVE 1), abi1-1C. In the ost1 mutants like in the wild type, YEL induced H2O2 accumulation, activation of non-selective Ca(2+)-permeable cation (ICa) channels and transient elevations in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in guard cells. These results suggest that OST1 kinase is essential for stomatal closure and activation of S-type anion channels induced by YEL and that OST1 is not involved in H2O2 accumulation, ICa channel activation or [Ca(2+)]cyt elevations in guard cells induced by YEL.

  14. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, M.; Porter, A. S.; Holohan, A.; Kunzmann, L.; Collinson, M.; McElwain, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results show that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene transition. This may be related to the "hysteresis effect" previously proposed - where a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed before the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  15. Smaller, faster stomata: scaling of stomatal size, rate of response, and stomatal conductance

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum and minimum stomatal conductance, as well as stomatal size and rate of response, are known to vary widely across plant species, but the functional relationship between these static and dynamic stomatal properties is unknown. The objective of this study was to test three hypotheses: (i) operating stomatal conductance under standard conditions (g op) correlates with minimum stomatal conductance prior to morning light [g min(dawn)]; (ii) stomatal size (S) is negatively correlated with g op and the maximum rate of stomatal opening in response to light, (dg/dt)max; and (iii) g op correlates negatively with instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE) despite positive correlations with maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc max) and light-saturated rate of electron transport (J max). Using five closely related species of the genus Banksia, the above variables were measured, and it was found that all three hypotheses were supported by the results. Overall, this indicates that leaves built for higher rates of gas exchange have smaller stomata and faster dynamic characteristics. With the aid of a stomatal control model, it is demonstrated that higher g op can potentially expose plants to larger tissue water potential gradients, and that faster stomatal response times can help offset this risk. PMID:23264516

  16. Open Stomata 1 (OST1) is limiting in abscisic acid responses of Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Biswa R; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Open Stomata 1 (OST1) (SnRK2.6 or SRK2E), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a positive regulator in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal response, but OST1-regulation of K(+) and Ca(2+) currents has not been studied directly in guard cells and it is unknown whether OST1 activity is limiting in ABA-mediated stomatal responses. We employed loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches to study native ABA responses of Arabidopsis guard cells. We performed stomatal aperture bioassays, patch clamp analyses and reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements. ABA inhibition of inward K(+) channels and light-induced stomatal opening are reduced in ost1 mutants while transgenic plants overexpressing OST1 show ABA hypersensitivity in these responses. ost1 mutants are insensitive to ABA-induced stomatal closure, regulation of slow anion currents, Ca(2+) -permeable channel activation and ROS production while OST1 overexpressing lines are hypersensitive for these responses, resulting in accelerated stomatal closure in response to ABA. Overexpression of OST1 in planta in the absence of ABA application does not affect basal apertures or ion currents. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical interaction of OST1 with the inward K(+) channel KAT1, the anion channel SLAC1, and the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Our findings support OST1 as a critical limiting component in ABA regulation of stomatal apertures, ion channels and NADPH oxidases in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  17. Interaction of peroxisomes with microtubules. In vitro studies using a novel peroxisome-microtubule binding assay.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, M; Schrader, M; Völkl, A; Baumgart, E; Fahimi, H D

    2000-10-01

    The association of membrane-bounded cell organelles to microtubules is crucial for determination of their shape, intracellular localization and translocation. We have shown previously the high affinity binding of peroxisomes to microtubules which appears to be of static nature as in vivo studies indicate that only a few peroxisomes move along the microtubular tracks. In order to characterize the interactions of peroxisomes with microtubules, we have developed a semiquantitative in vitro binding assay, which is based on the association of highly purified rat liver peroxisomes to microtubules coated onto microtiterplates. The binding was visualized by differential interference contrast and immunofluorescence using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The binding was concentration dependent and saturable, being affected by time, temperature, and pH. Addition of ATP or the motor proteins kinesin and dynein increased the binding capacity, while ATP-depletion or microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) decreased it. KCl treatment of peroxisomes reduced the binding, which was restored by dialyzed KCl-stripping eluate as well as by rat liver cytosol. The reconstituting effect of cytosol was abolished by its pretreatment with proteases or N-ethylmaleimide. Moreover, the treatment of peroxisomes with proteases or N-ethylmaleimide reduced their binding, which was not reversed by cytosol. These results suggest the involvement of a peroxisomal membrane protein and cytosolic factor(s) in the binding of peroxisomes to microtubules. This notion is supported by the observation that distinct subfractions of dialyzed KCl-stripping eluate obtained by gel chromatography augmented the binding. Those subfractions, as well as purified peroxisome fractions, exhibited strong immunoreactivity with an antibody to cytoplasmic linker protein (CLIP)-115, revealing a 70-kDa polypeptide. Moreover, immunodepletion of KCl-stripping eluate and its subfractions with an antibody to the conserved

  18. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Grant, Barry J; Gheorghe, Dana M; Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J Andrew; Cross, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  19. How dynein and microtubules rotate the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Lee, Kristen C; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2011-10-01

    In living cells, a fluctuating torque is exerted on the nuclear surface but the origin of the torque is unclear. In this study, we found that the nuclear rotation angle is directionally persistent on a time scale of tens of minutes, but rotationally diffusive on longer time scales. Rotation required the activity of the microtubule motor dynein. We formulated a model based on microtubules undergoing dynamic instability, with tensional forces between a stationary centrosome and the nuclear surface mediated by dynein. Model simulations suggest that the persistence in rotation angle is due to the transient asymmetric configuration of microtubules exerting a net torque in one direction until the configuration is again randomized by dynamic instability. The model predicts that the rotational magnitude must depend on the distance between the nucleus and the centrosome. To test this prediction, rotation was quantified in patterned cells in which the cell's centrosome was close to the projected nuclear centroid. Consistent with the prediction, the angular displacement was found to decrease in these cells relative to unpatterned cells. This work provides the first mechanistic explanation for how nuclear dynein interactions with discrete microtubules emanating from a stationary centrosome cause rotational torque on the nucleus.

  20. Forces due to curving protofilaments in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Shirish; Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2013-12-01

    Microtubules consist of 13 protofilaments arranged in the form of a cylinder. The protofilaments are composed of longitudinally attached tubulin dimers that can exist in either a less curved state [GTP-bound tubulin (T)] or a more curved state [GDP-bound tubulin (D)]. Hydrolysis of T into D leaves the straight and laterally attached protofilaments of the microtubule in a mechanically stressed state, thus leading to their unzipping. The elastic energy in the unzipping protofilaments can be harnessed by a force transducer such as the Dam1-kinetochore ring complex in order to exert pulling force on chromosomes during cell division. In the present paper we develop a simple continuum model to obtain this pulling force as a function of the mechanical properties of protofilaments and the size of the Dam1-kinetochore ring. We also extend this model to investigate the role played by the T subunits found at the plus end of the microtubule (the T cap) on the mechanical stability of microtubules.

  1. Electrostatically Biased Binding of Kinesin to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J. Andrew; Cross, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  2. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  3. Involvement of microtubules in rhizoid differentiation of Spirogyra species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Inoue, N; Sonobe, S; Shimmen, T

    2003-06-01

    Some species of Spirogyra form rosette-shaped or rod-shaped rhizoids in the terminal cell of the filaments. In the present study, we analyzed an involvement of microtubules (MTs) in rhizoid differentiation. Before rhizoid differentiation, cortical MTs were arranged transversely to the long axis of cylindrical cells, reflecting the diffuse growth. At the beginning of rhizoid differentiation, MTs were absent from the extreme tip of the terminal cell. In the other area of the cell, however, MTs were arranged transversely to the long axis of the cell. In the fully differentiated rosette-shaped rhizoid, MTs were randomly organized. However, at a younger stage of rosette-shaped rhizoids, MTs were sometimes arranged almost transversely in the lobes of the rosette. In the rod-shaped rhizoid, MTs were arranged almost transversely. MT-destabilizing drugs (oryzalin and propyzamide) induced swelling of rhizoids, and neither rosette-shaped nor rod-shaped rhizoids were formed. The role of MTs in rhizoid differentiation was discussed.

  4. Analysis of microtubule-mediated intracellular viral transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyong; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Host microtubules and motor proteins are crucial to the intracellular transport of a number of viruses. Disruption of microtubules or suppression of motor functions can remarkably inhibit the movement of viruses in host cells. It is now known that incoming viruses use motor proteins to travel along microtubules from the plasma membrane to the nuclear or perinuclear replication site, whereas progeny viruses depend on microtubules and motors to move from the assembly site to the cell periphery. Here, we describe several major methods for analyzing microtubule-mediated intracellular viral transport, using adenovirus as an example.

  5. What generates flux of tubulin in kinetochore microtubules?

    PubMed

    Forer, Arthur; Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy D; Spurck, Tim

    2008-01-01

    We discuss models for production of tubulin flux in kinetochore microtubules. Current models concentrate solely on microtubules and their associated motors and enzymes. For example, in some models the driving force for flux is enzymes at the poles and the kinetochores; in others the driving force is motor molecules that are associated with a stationary spindle matrix. We present a different viewpoint, that microtubules are propelled poleward by forces arising from the spindle matrix, that the forces on the microtubules "activate" polymerising and depolymerising enzymes at kinetochores and poles, that matrix forces utilise actin, myosin, and microtubule motors, and that the matrix itself may not necessarily be static. PMID:18421550

  6. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  7. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Justin W; Genheden, Maja; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Wang, Xuemin; Foster, Leonard J; Proud, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of the elongation phase of protein synthesis is important for numerous physiological processes in both neurons and other cell types. Elongation is primarily regulated via eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K). However, the consequence of altering eEF2K activity on the synthesis of specific proteins is largely unknown. Using both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of eEF2K combined with two protein-labeling techniques, stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture and bio-orthogonal non-canonical amino acid tagging, we identified a subset of proteins whose synthesis is sensitive to inhibition of eEF2K in murine primary cortical neurons. Gene ontology (GO) analyses indicated that processes related to microtubules are particularly sensitive to eEF2K inhibition. Our findings suggest that eEF2K likely contributes to neuronal function by regulating the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins. Modulation of the elongation phase of protein synthesis is important for numerous physiological processes in neurons. Here, using labeling of new proteins coupled with proteomic techniques in primary cortical neurons, we find that the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins is up-regulated by inhibition of elongation. This suggests that translation elongation is a key regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics in neurons.

  8. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  9. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lynn; Tüzel, Erkan; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2011-09-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  10. Surface Structures Involved in Plant Stomata and Leaf Colonization by Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia Coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Zeus; Sánchez, Ethel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Puente, Jose Luis; Girón, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water, or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection. PMID:21887151

  11. Mechanism of microtubule array expansion in the cytokinetic phragmoplast

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takashi; Sano, Toshio; Sasabe, Michiko; Nonaka, Shigenori; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Machida, Yasunori; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2013-01-01

    In land plants, the cell plate partitions the daughter cells at cytokinesis. The cell plate initially forms between daughter nuclei and expands centrifugally until reaching the plasma membrane. The centrifugal development of the cell plate is driven by the centrifugal expansion of the phragmoplast microtubule array, but the molecular mechanism underlying this expansion is unknown. Here, we show that the phragmoplast array comprises stable microtubule bundles and dynamic microtubules. We find that the dynamic microtubules are nucleated by γ-tubulin on stable bundles. The dynamic microtubules elongate at the plus ends and form new bundles preferentially at the leading edge of the phragmoplast. At the same time, they are moved away from the cell plate, maintaining a restricted distribution of minus ends. We propose that cycles of attachment of γ-tubulin complexes onto the microtubule bundles, microtubule nucleation and bundling, accompanied by minus-end-directed motility, drive the centrifugal development of the phragmoplast. PMID:23770826

  12. Measuring the Dynamic Parameters of MCF7 Cell Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, Carly; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2013-03-01

    Microtubules are the key component of the cytoskeleton. They are intrinsically dynamic displaying dynamic instability in which they randomly switch between a phase of growing and shrinking, both in vitro and in vivo. This dynamic is specified by the following parameters: growing rate, shrinking rate, frequency of catastrophe, and frequency of rescue. In this work, we will present our primary results in which we measured the dynamic parameters of a single microtubule polymerized from MCF7 tubulin in vitro. The results are significant since the MCF7 microtubules are non-neural mammalian consisting of different beta tubulin isotypes in their structures as compared to neural mammalian microtubules, such as bovine brain. The unique dynamic parameters of individual MCF7 microtubules in vitro, which are reported for the first time, indicate that non-neural microtubules can be fundamentally different from neural microtubules.

  13. Effects of Tau on Flow-Aligned Microtubule Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer L.; Kuchnir Fygenson, D.

    2003-03-01

    Microtubules are cylindrical crystals of the protein tubulin with 17nm inner diameter and 25nm outer diameter. Recent structural studies suggest that the microtubule wall may be porous to small molecules. We have investigated the mobility of molecules in bundles of flow aligned microtubules. We find the spacing between the microtubules in the bundle is increased by the addition of tau, a microtubule associated protein. In the absence of tau, flow can be used to make tightly packed bundles of microtubules. Adding tau causes the tight bundles to swell and separate. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to quantify the mobility of a taxol, a small drug that binds to the microtubule interior.

  14. The role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport.

    PubMed

    Kulic, Igor M; Brown, André E X; Kim, Hwajin; Kural, Comert; Blehm, Benjamin; Selvin, Paul R; Nelson, Philip C; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2008-07-22

    We study the role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport in Drosophila S2 cells and show that EGFP-tagged peroxisomes in cells serve as sensitive probes of motor induced, noisy cytoskeletal motions. Multiple peroxisomes move in unison over large time windows and show correlations with microtubule tip positions, indicating rapid microtubule fluctuations in the longitudinal direction. We report the first high-resolution measurement of longitudinal microtubule fluctuations performed by tracing such pairs of co-moving peroxisomes. The resulting picture shows that motor-dependent longitudinal microtubule oscillations contribute significantly to cargo movement along microtubules. Thus, contrary to the conventional view, organelle transport cannot be described solely in terms of cargo movement along stationary microtubule tracks, but instead includes a strong contribution from the movement of the tracks.

  15. Centrosome repositioning in T cells is biphasic and driven by microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jason; Wu, Xufeng; Chung, Andrew H.; Chen, James K.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2013-01-01

    T cells rapidly reposition their centrosome to the center of the immunological synapse (IS) to drive polarized secretion in the direction of the bound target cell. Using an optical trap for spatial and temporal control over target presentation, we show that centrosome repositioning in Jurkat T cells exhibited kinetically distinct polarization and docking phases and required calcium flux and signaling through both the T cell receptor and integrin to be robust. In “frustrated” conjugates where the centrosome is stuck behind the nucleus, the center of the IS invaginated dramatically to approach the centrosome. Consistently, imaging of microtubules during normal repositioning revealed a microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage mechanism operating at the center of the IS. In agreement with this mechanism, centrosome repositioning was impaired by inhibiting microtubule depolymerization or dynein. We conclude that dynein drives centrosome repositioning in T cells via microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage operating at the center of the IS and not cortical sliding at the IS periphery, as previously thought. PMID:23979719

  16. Partial Depletion of Gamma-Actin Suppresses Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Po'uha, Sela T; Honore, Stephane; Braguer, Diane; Kavallaris, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Actin and microtubule interactions are important for many cellular events, however these interactions are poorly described. Alterations in γ-actin are associated with diseases such as hearing loss and cancer. Functional investigations demonstrated that partial depletion of γ-actin affects cell polarity and induces resistance to microtubule-targeted agents. To determine whether γ-actin alterations directly affect microtubule dynamics, microtubule dynamic instability was analyzed in living cells following partial siRNA depletion of γ-actin. Partial depletion of γ-actin suppresses interphase microtubule dynamics by 17.5% due to a decrease in microtubule shortening rates and an increase in microtubule attenuation. γ-Actin partial depletion also increased distance-based microtubule catastrophe and rescue frequencies. In addition, knockdown of γ-actin delayed mitotic progression, partially blocking metaphase–anaphase transition and inhibiting cell proliferation. Interestingly, in the presence of paclitaxel, interphase microtubule dynamics were further suppressed by 24.4% in the γ-actin knockdown cells, which is comparable to 28.8% suppression observed in the control siRNA treated cells. Paclitaxel blocked metaphase–anaphase transition in both the γ-actin knockdown cells and the control siRNA cells. However, the extent of mitotic arrest was much higher in the control cells (28.4%), compared to the γ-actin depleted cells (8.5%). Therefore, suppression of microtubule dynamics by partial depletion of γ-actin is associated with marked delays in metaphase-anaphase transition and not mitotic arrest. This is the first demonstration that γ-actin can modulate microtubule dynamics by reducing the microtubule shortening rate, promoting paused/attenuated microtubules, and increasing transition frequencies suggesting a mechanistic link between γ-actin and microtubules. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc PMID:23335583

  17. Role of tau in the spatial organization of axonal microtubules: keeping parallel microtubules evenly distributed despite macromolecular crowding.

    PubMed

    Méphon-Gaspard, Alix; Boca, Mirela; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Desforges, Bénédicte; Burgo, Andrea; Hamon, Loic; Piétrement, Olivier; Pastré, David

    2016-10-01

    Opposing views have been proposed regarding the role of tau, the principal microtubule-associated protein in axons. On the one hand, tau forms cross-bridges at the interface between microtubules and induces microtubule bundling in neurons. On the other hand, tau is also considered a polymer brush which efficiently separates microtubules. In mature axons, microtubules are indeed arranged in parallel arrays and are well separated from each other. To reconcile these views, we developed a mechanistic model based on in vitro and cellular approaches combined to analytical and numerical analyses. The results indicate that tau forms long-range cross-bridges between microtubules under macromolecular crowding conditions. Tau cross-bridges prevent the redistribution of tau away from the interface between microtubules, which would have occurred in the polymer brush model. Consequently, the short-range attractive force between microtubules induced by macromolecular crowding is avoided and thus microtubules remain well separated from each other. Interestingly, in this unified model, tau diffusion on microtubules enables to keep microtubules evenly distributed in axonal sections at low tau levels.

  18. Elevated CO2-Induced Responses in Stomata Require ABA and ABA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar; Peng, Kai; Movahedi, Mahsa; Dunn, Jessica A; Walker, Heather J; Liang, Yun-Kuan; McLachlan, Deirdre H; Casson, Stuart; Isner, Jean Charles; Wilson, Ian; Neill, Steven J; Hedrich, Rainer; Gray, Julie E; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2015-10-19

    An integral part of global environment change is an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) [1]. Increased [CO2] reduces leaf stomatal apertures and density of stomata that plays out as reductions in evapotranspiration [2-4]. Surprisingly, given the importance of transpiration to the control of terrestrial water fluxes [5] and plant nutrient acquisition [6], we know comparatively little about the molecular components involved in the intracellular signaling pathways by which [CO2] controls stomatal development and function [7]. Here, we report that elevated [CO2]-induced closure and reductions in stomatal density require the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby adding a new common element to these signaling pathways. We also show that the PYR/RCAR family of ABA receptors [8, 9] and ABA itself are required in both responses. Using genetic approaches, we show that ABA in guard cells or their precursors is sufficient to mediate the [CO2]-induced stomatal density response. Taken together, our results suggest that stomatal responses to increased [CO2] operate through the intermediacy of ABA. In the case of [CO2]-induced reductions in stomatal aperture, this occurs by accessing the guard cell ABA signaling pathway. In both [CO2]-mediated responses, our data are consistent with a mechanism in which ABA increases the sensitivity of the system to [CO2] but could also be explained by requirement for a CO2-induced increase in ABA biosynthesis specifically in the guard cell lineage. Furthermore, the dependency of stomatal [CO2] signaling on ABA suggests that the ABA pathway is, in evolutionary terms, likely to be ancestral.

  19. Elevated CO2-Induced Responses in Stomata Require ABA and ABA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar; Peng, Kai; Movahedi, Mahsa; Dunn, Jessica A; Walker, Heather J; Liang, Yun-Kuan; McLachlan, Deirdre H; Casson, Stuart; Isner, Jean Charles; Wilson, Ian; Neill, Steven J; Hedrich, Rainer; Gray, Julie E; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2015-10-19

    An integral part of global environment change is an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) [1]. Increased [CO2] reduces leaf stomatal apertures and density of stomata that plays out as reductions in evapotranspiration [2-4]. Surprisingly, given the importance of transpiration to the control of terrestrial water fluxes [5] and plant nutrient acquisition [6], we know comparatively little about the molecular components involved in the intracellular signaling pathways by which [CO2] controls stomatal development and function [7]. Here, we report that elevated [CO2]-induced closure and reductions in stomatal density require the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby adding a new common element to these signaling pathways. We also show that the PYR/RCAR family of ABA receptors [8, 9] and ABA itself are required in both responses. Using genetic approaches, we show that ABA in guard cells or their precursors is sufficient to mediate the [CO2]-induced stomatal density response. Taken together, our results suggest that stomatal responses to increased [CO2] operate through the intermediacy of ABA. In the case of [CO2]-induced reductions in stomatal aperture, this occurs by accessing the guard cell ABA signaling pathway. In both [CO2]-mediated responses, our data are consistent with a mechanism in which ABA increases the sensitivity of the system to [CO2] but could also be explained by requirement for a CO2-induced increase in ABA biosynthesis specifically in the guard cell lineage. Furthermore, the dependency of stomatal [CO2] signaling on ABA suggests that the ABA pathway is, in evolutionary terms, likely to be ancestral. PMID:26455301

  20. The Arabidopsis SKU6/SPIRAL1 Gene Encodes a Plus End–Localized Microtubule-Interacting Protein Involved in Directional Cell ExpansionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sedbrook, John C.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Fisher, Sarah E.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Somerville, Chris R.

    2004-01-01

    The sku6-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits altered patterns of root and organ growth. sku6 roots, etiolated hypocotyls, and leaf petioles exhibit right-handed axial twisting, and root growth on inclined agar media is strongly right skewed. The touch-dependent sku6 root skewing phenotype is suppressed by the antimicrotubule drugs propyzamide and oryzalin, and right skewing is exacerbated by cold treatment. Cloning revealed that sku6-1 is allelic to spiral1-1 (spr1-1). However, modifiers in the Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype backgrounds mask noncomplementation in sku6-1 (Col)/spr1-1 (Ler) F1 plants. The SPR1 gene encodes a plant-specific 12-kD protein that is ubiquitously expressed and belongs to a six-member gene family in Arabidopsis. An SPR1:green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed in transgenic seedlings localized to microtubules within the cortical array, preprophase band, phragmoplast, and mitotic spindle. SPR1:GFP was concentrated at the growing ends of cortical microtubules and was dependent on polymer growth state; the microtubule-related fluorescence dissipated upon polymer shortening. The protein has a repeated motif at both ends, separated by a predicted rod-like domain, suggesting that it may act as an intermolecular linker. These observations suggest that SPR1 is involved in microtubule polymerization dynamics and/or guidance, which in turn influences touch-induced directional cell expansion and axial twisting. PMID:15155883

  1. Targeting, Capture, and Stabilization of Microtubules at Early Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaverina, Irina; Rottner, Klemens; Small, J. Victor

    1998-01-01

    By co-injecting fluorescent tubulin and vinculin into fish fibroblasts we have revealed a “cross talk” between microtubules and early sites of substrate contact. This mutuality was first indicated by the targeting of vinculin-rich foci by microtubules during their growth towards the cell periphery. In addition to passing directly over contact sites, the ends of single microtubules could be observed to target several contacts in succession or the same contact repetitively, with intermittent withdrawals. Targeting sometimes involved side-stepping, or the major re-routing of a microtubule, indicative of a guided, rather than a random process. The paths that microtubules followed into contacts were unrelated to the orientation of stress fiber assemblies and targeting occurred also in mouse fibroblasts that lacked a system of intermediate filaments. Further experiments with microtubule inhibitors showed that adhesion foci can: (a) capture microtubules and stabilize them against disassembly by nocodazole; and (b), act as preferred sites of microtubule polymerization, during either early recovery from nocodazole, or brief treatment with taxol. From these and other findings we speculate that microtubules are guided into substrate contact sites and through the motor-dependent delivery of signaling molecules serve to modulate their development. It is further proposed this modulation provides the route whereby microtubules exert their influence on cell shape and polarity. PMID:9660872

  2. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-08-11

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techniques can detect specific structures at an increased resolution, but the narrow spacing between neuronal microtubules poses challenges because most existing labelling strategies increase the effective microtubule diameter by 20-40 nm and will thereby blend neighbouring microtubules into one structure. Here we develop single-chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) against tubulin to achieve super-resolution imaging of microtubules with a decreased apparent diameter. To test the resolving power of these novel probes, we generate microtubule bundles with a known spacing of 50-70 nm and successfully resolve individual microtubules. Individual bundled microtubules can also be resolved in different mammalian cells, including hippocampal neurons, allowing novel insights into fundamental mechanisms of microtubule organization in cell- and neurobiology.

  3. Neurodegeneration and microtubule dynamics: death by a thousand cuts

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Jyoti; Ratnakaran, Neena; Koushika, Sandhya P.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules form important cytoskeletal structures that play a role in establishing and maintaining neuronal polarity, regulating neuronal morphology, transporting cargo, and scaffolding signaling molecules to form signaling hubs. Within a neuronal cell, microtubules are found to have variable lengths and can be both stable and dynamic. Microtubule associated proteins, post-translational modifications of tubulin subunits, microtubule severing enzymes, and signaling molecules are all known to influence both stable and dynamic pools of microtubules. Microtubule dynamics, the process of interconversion between stable and dynamic pools, and the proportions of these two pools have the potential to influence a wide variety of cellular processes. Reduced microtubule stability has been observed in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and tauopathies like Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Hyperstable microtubules, as seen in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), also lead to neurodegeneration. Therefore, the ratio of stable and dynamic microtubules is likely to be important for neuronal function and perturbation in microtubule dynamics might contribute to disease progression. PMID:26441521

  4. MEC-17 deficiency leads to reduced α-tubulin acetylation and impaired migration of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wei, Dan; Wang, Qiong; Pan, Jing; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2012-09-12

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental process during the development of the cerebral cortex and is regulated by cytoskeletal components. Microtubule dynamics can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to tubulin subunits. Acetylation of α-tubulin at lysine 40 is important in regulating microtubule properties, and this process is controlled by acetyltransferase and deacetylase. MEC-17 is a newly discovered α-tubulin acetyltransferase that has been found to play a major role in the acetylation of α-tubulin in different species in vivo. However, the physiological function of MEC-17 during neural development is largely unknown. Here, we report that MEC-17 is critical for the migration of cortical neurons in the rat. MEC-17 was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex during development. MEC-17 deficiency caused migratory defects in the cortical projection neurons and interneurons, and perturbed the transition of projection neurons from the multipolar stage to the unipolar/bipolar stage in the intermediate zone of the cortex. Furthermore, knockdown of α-tubulin deacetylase HDAC6 or overexpression of tubulin(K40Q) to mimic acetylated α-tubulin could reduce the migratory and morphological defects caused by MEC-17 deficiency in cortical projection neurons. Thus, MEC-17, which regulates the acetylation of α-tubulin, appears to control the migration and morphological transition of cortical neurons. This finding reveals the importance of MEC-17 and α-tubulin acetylation in cortical development.

  5. Dynamic Concentration of Motors in Microtubule Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédélec, François; Surrey, Thomas; Maggs, A. C.

    2001-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the dynamics of molecular motors in microtubule arrays and asters. By solving a convection-diffusion equation we find that the density profile of motors in a two-dimensional aster is characterized by continuously varying exponents. Simulations are used to verify the assumptions of the continuum model. We observe the concentration profiles of kinesin moving in quasi-two-dimensional artificial asters by fluorescent microscopy and compare with our theoretical results.

  6. Cortical and cytoplasmic flow polarity in early embryonic cells of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the cortex of Caenorhabditis elegans eggs during pseudocleavage (PC), a period of the first cell cycle which is important for the generation of asymmetry at first cleavage (Strome, S. 1989. Int. Rev. Cytol. 114: 81-123). We have found that directed, actin dependent, cytoplasmic, and cortical flow occurs during this period coincident with a rearrangement of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (Strome, S. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103: 2241-2252). The flow velocity (4-7 microns/min) is similar to previously determined particle movements driven by cortical actin flows in motile cells. We show that directed flows occur in one of the daughters of the first division that itself divides asymmetrically, but not in its sister that divides symmetrically. The cortical and cytoplasmic events of PC can be mimicked in other cells during cytokinesis by displacing the mitotic apparatus with the microtubule polymerization inhibitor nocodazole. In all cases, the polarity of the resulting cortical and cytoplasmic flows correlates with the position of the attenuated mitotic spindle formed. These cortical flows are also accompanied by a change in the distribution of the cortical actin network. The polarity of this redistribution is similarly correlated with the location of the attenuated spindle. These observations suggest a mechanism for generating polarized flows of cytoplasmic and cortical material during embryonic cleavages. We present a model for the events of PC and suggest how the poles of the mitotic spindle mediate the formation of the contractile ring during cytokinesis in C. elegans. PMID:8509454

  7. Molecular Communication: Simulation of Microtubule Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael J.; Enomoto, Akihiro; Nakano, Tadashi; Kayasuga, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroaki; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Suda, Tatsuya

    Molecular communication is one method for communication among biological nanomachines. Nanomachines are artificial or biological nano-scale devices that perform simple computation, sensing, or actuation. Future applications using nanomachines may require various communication mechanisms. For example, broadcast is one primitive communication for transmission from one sender to many receivers. In this paper, we discuss preliminary work on designing a molecular communication system that is adapted from the molecular motor transport mechanism existing in biological cells. In the proposed molecular motor mechanism, a sender releases information molecules, and molecular motors transport the information molecules along microtubule filaments to receiver nanomachines up to hundreds of micrometers away. This paper describes some possible arrangements for microtubule filaments and simulations to evaluate sending of one information molecule to many receivers. The simulation results indicate that the proposed molecular motor system transports simulated information molecules (100nm radius spheres) more quickly than a diffusion-only communication and that placement of receivers at the plus-end of microtubules results in lower propagation delay.

  8. Self-organization of microtubules and motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndlec, F. J.; Surrey, T.; Maggs, A. C.; Leibler, S.

    1997-09-01

    Cellular structures are established and maintained through a dynamic interplay between assembly and regulatory processes. Self-organization of molecular components provides a variety of possible spatial structures: the regulatory machinery chooses the most appropriate to express a given cellular function. Here we study the extent and the characteristics of self-organization using microtubules and molecular motors as a model system. These components are known to participate in the formation of many cellular structures, such as the dynamic asters found in mitotic and meiotic spindles. Purified motors and microtubules have previously been observed to form asters in vitro. We have reproduced this result with a simple system consisting solely of multi-headed constructs of the motor protein kinesin and stabilized microtubules. We show that dynamic asters can also be obtained from a homogeneous solution of tubulin and motors. By varying the relative concentrations of the components, we obtain a variety of self-organized structures. Further, by studying this process in a constrained geometry of micro-fabricated glass chambers, we demonstrate that the same final structure can be reached through different assembly `pathways'.

  9. EB1 regulates attachment of Ska1 with microtubules by forming extended structures on the microtubule lattice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geethu E.; Bandopadhyay, K.; Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Renjith, M. R.; Singh, Puja; Gireesh, K. K.; Simon, Steny; Badarudeen, Binshad; Gupta, Hindol; Banerjee, Manidipa; Paul, Raja; Mitra, J.; Manna, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochore couples chromosome movement to dynamic microtubules, a process that is fundamental to mitosis in all eukaryotes but poorly understood. In vertebrates, spindle-kinetochore-associated (Ska1–3) protein complex plays an important role in this process. However, the proteins that stabilize Ska-mediated kinetochore-microtubule attachment remain unknown. Here we show that microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 facilitates Ska localization on microtubules in vertebrate cells. EB1 depletion results in a significant reduction of Ska1 recruitment onto microtubules and defects in mitotic chromosome alignment, which is also reflected in computational modelling. Biochemical experiments reveal that EB1 interacts with Ska1, facilitates Ska1-microtubule attachment and together stabilizes microtubules. Structural studies reveal that EB1 either with Ska1 or Ska complex forms extended structures on microtubule lattice. Results indicate that EB1 promotes Ska association with K-fibres and facilitates kinetochore-microtubule attachment. They also implicate that in vertebrates, chromosome coupling to dynamic microtubules could be mediated through EB1-Ska extended structures. PMID:27225956

  10. Ahead of the Curve: New Insights into Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Ryoma; Zanic, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics are fundamental for many aspects of cell physiology, but their mechanistic underpinnings remain unclear despite 40 years of intense research. In recent years, the continued union of reconstitution biochemistry, structural biology, and modeling has yielded important discoveries that deepen our understanding of microtubule dynamics. These studies, which we review here, underscore the importance of GTP hydrolysis-induced changes in tubulin structure as microtubules assemble, and highlight the fact that each aspect of microtubule behavior is the output of complex, multi-step processes. Although this body of work moves us closer to appreciating the key features of microtubule biochemistry that drive dynamic instability, the divide between our understanding of microtubules in isolation versus within the cellular milieu remains vast. Bridging this gap will serve as fertile grounds of cytoskeleton-focused research for many years to come. PMID:26998244

  11. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  12. Asymmetric behavior of severed microtubule ends after ultraviolet-microbeam irradiation of individual microtubules in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.A.; Inoue, S.; Salmon, E.D.

    1989-03-01

    The molecular basis of microtubule dynamic instability is controversial, but is thought to be related to a GTP cap. A key prediction of the GTP cap model is that the proposed labile GDP-tubulin core will rapidly dissociate if the GTP-tubulin cap is lost. We have tested this prediction by using a UV microbeam to cut the ends from elongating microtubules. Phosphocellulose-purified tubulin was assembled onto the plus and minus ends of sea urchin flagellar axoneme fragments at 21-22 degrees C. The assembly dynamics of individual microtubules were recorded in real time using video microscopy. When the tip of an elongating plus end microtubule was cut off, the severed plus end microtubule always rapidly shortened back to the axoneme at the normal plus end rate. However, when the distal tip of an elongating minus end microtubule was cut off, no rapid shortening occurred. Instead, the severed minus end resumed elongation at the normal minus end rate. Our results show that some form of stabilizing cap, possibly a GTP cap, governs the transition (catastrophe) from elongation to rapid shortening at the plus end. At the minus end, a simple GTP cap is not sufficient to explain the observed behavior unless UV induces immediate recapping of minus, but not plus, ends. Another possibility is that a second step, perhaps a structural transformation, is required in addition to GTP cap loss for rapid shortening to occur. This transformation would be favored at plus, but not minus ends, to account for the asymmetric behavior of the ends.

  13. Microtubules and cellulose biosynthesis: the emergence of new players.

    PubMed

    Li, Shundai; Lei, Lei; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Gu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules determine the orientation of newly formed cellulose microfibrils in expanding cells. There are many hypotheses regarding how the information is transduced across the plasma membrane from microtubules to cellulose microfibrils. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the co-alignment between microtubules and cellulose microfibrils were not revealed until the recent discovery of cellulose synthase interacting (CSI) proteins. Characterization of CSIs and additional cellulose synthase-associated proteins will greatly advance the knowledge of how cellulose microfibrils are organized.

  14. Molecular motors are stymied by microtubule lattice defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramlich, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The microtubule surface provides the tracks that molecular motors use to transport cargo throughout the cell. Much like any surface lattice, the microtubule surface may have surface defects such as dislocations or step edges caused by missing tubulin dimers or shifts in the number of protofilaments, respectively. It is an open question as to how microtubule lattice defects affect molecular motors walking along microtubule surfaces. We used the kinesin-1 motor that walks along a single protofilament and has a short step size of only 8 nm to test how lattice defects affect transport. We created microtubule lattice defects by end-to-end annealing microtubules with different protofilament numbers and differential fluorescence labeling, creating a transition in microtubule radius at the annealed site that is directly visualizable. Surprisingly, we observed that kinesin-1 motors are significantly inhibited by protofilament shift defects. GFP-tagged kinesin-1 motors detach at the defect site during at least 70% of encounters with the defect. We find end-to-end annealed microtubules without the additional change in protofilament number at the defect site inhibit at least 50% of kinesin-1 motors at the defect, suggesting that the process of end-to-end annealing creates defects within the lattice. Our results imply that defects within the microtubule lattice can inhibit motility, and must be corrected. Our work sheds light on the biological importance of removing and correcting lattice defects, an activity known to occur by multiple methods in cells.

  15. Theoretical Description of Microtubule Dynamics in Fission Yeast During Interphase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oei, Yung-Chin; Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Fission yeast (S. pombe) is a unicellular organism with a characteristic cylindrical shape. Cell growth during interphase is strongly influenced by microtubule self-organization - a process that has been experimentally well characterised. The microtubules are organized in 3 to 4 bundles, called ``interphase microtubule assemblies'' (IMAs). Each IMA is composed of several microtubules, arranged with their dynamic ``plus'' ends facing the cell tips and their ``minus'' ends overlapping at the cell middle. Although the main protein factors involved in interphase microtubule organization have been identified, an understanding of how their collective interaction with microtubules leads to the organization and structures observed in vivo is lacking. We present a physical model of microtubule dynamics that aims to provide a quantitative description of the self-organization process. First, we solve equations for the microtubule length distribution in steady-state, taking into account the way that a limited tubulin pool affects the nucleation, growth and shrinkage of microtubules. Then we incorporate passive and active crosslinkers (the bundling factor Ase1 and molecular motor Klp2) and investigate the formation of IMA structures. Analytical results are complemented by a 3D stochastic simulation.

  16. Microtubule-binding agents: a dynamic field of cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dumontet, Charles; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Preface Microtubules are dynamic filamentous cytoskeletal proteins that are an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Microtubule binding agents have been part of the pharmacopoeia of cancer for decades, and until the advent of targeted therapy microtubules were the only alternative to DNA as a therapeutic target in cancer. The screening of a variety of botanical species and marine organisms has yielded promising new antitubulin agents with novel properties. Enhanced tumor specificity, reduced neurotoxicity, and insensitivity to chemoresistance mechanisms are the three main objectives in the current search for novel microtubule binding agents. PMID:20885410

  17. Microtubule Elasticity: Connecting All-Atom Simulations with Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sept, David; Mackintosh, Fred C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of microtubules have been extensively studied using a wide range of biophysical techniques, seeking to understand the mechanics of these cylindrical polymers. Here we develop a method for connecting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with continuum mechanics and show how this can be applied to understand microtubule mechanics. Our coarse-graining technique applied to the microscopic simulation system yields consistent predictions for the Young’s modulus and persistence length of microtubules, while clearly demonstrating how binding of the drug Taxol decreases the stiffness of microtubules. The techniques we develop should be widely applicable to other macromolecular systems.

  18. CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore–microtubule attachments

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Galjart, Niels; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Medema, René H

    2006-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule ‘plus end tracking' protein involved in several microtubule-dependent processes in interphase. At the onset of mitosis, CLIP-170 localizes to kinetochores, but at metaphase, it is no longer detectable at kinetochores. Although RNA interference (RNAi) experiments have suggested an essential role for CLIP-170 during mitosis, the molecular function of CLIP-170 in mitosis has not yet been revealed. Here, we used a combination of high-resolution microscopy and RNAi-mediated depletion to study the function of CLIP-170 in mitosis. We found that CLIP-170 dynamically localizes to the outer most part of unattached kinetochores and to the ends of growing microtubules. In addition, we provide evidence that a pool of CLIP-170 is transported along kinetochore–microtubules by the dynein/dynactin complex. Interference with CLIP-170 expression results in defective chromosome congression and diminished kinetochore–microtubule attachments, but does not detectibly affect microtubule dynamics or kinetochore–microtubule stability. Taken together, our results indicate that CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore–microtubule attachments, possibly through direct capture of microtubules at the kinetochore. PMID:16362039

  19. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  20. Vinblastine suppresses dynamics of individual microtubules in living interphase cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dhamodharan, R; Jordan, M A; Thrower, D; Wilson, L; Wadsworth, P

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the effects of vinblastine on the dynamic instability behavior of individual microtubules in living BS-C-1 cells microinjected with rhodamine-labeled tubulin and have found that at low concentrations (3-64 nM), vinblastine potently suppresses dynamic instability without causing net microtubule depolymerization. Vinblastine suppressed the rates of microtubule growth and shortening, and decreased the frequency of transitions from growth or pause to shortening, also called catastrophe. In vinblastine-treated cells, both the average duration of a pause (a state of attenuated dynamics where neither growth nor shortening could be detected) and the percentage of total time spent in pause were significantly increased. Vinblastine potently decreased dynamicity, a measure of the overall dynamic activity of microtubules, reducing this parameter by 75% at 32 nM. The present work, consistent with earlier in vitro studies, demonstrates that vinblastine kinetically caps the ends of microtubules in living cells and supports the hypothesis that the potent chemotherapeutic action of vinblastine as an antitumor drug is suppression of mitotic spindle microtubule dynamics. Further, the results indicate that molecules that bind to microtubule ends can regulate microtubule dynamic behavior in living cells and suggest that endogenous regulators of microtubule dynamics that work by similar mechanisms may exist in living cells. Images PMID:8534917

  1. Open or Close the Gate – Stomata Action Under the Control of Phytohormones in Drought Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Daszkowska-Golec, Agata; Szarejko, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Two highly specialized cells, the guard cells that surround the stomatal pore, are able to integrate environmental and endogenous signals in order to control the stomatal aperture and thereby the gas exchange. The uptake of CO2 is associated with a loss of water by leaves. Control of the size of the stomatal aperture optimizes the efficiency of water use through dynamic changes in the turgor of the guard cells. The opening and closing of stomata is regulated by the integration of environmental signals and endogenous hormonal stimuli. The various different factors to which the guard cells respond translates into the complexity of the network of signaling pathways that control stomatal movements. The perception of an abiotic stress triggers the activation of signal transduction cascades that interact with or are activated by phytohormones. Among these, abscisic acid (ABA), is the best-known stress hormone that closes the stomata, although other phytohormones, such as jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, cytokinins, or ethylene are also involved in the stomatal response to stresses. As a part of the drought response, ABA may interact with jasmonic acid and nitric oxide in order to stimulate stomatal closure. In addition, the regulation of gene expression in response to ABA involves genes that are related to ethylene, cytokinins, and auxin signaling. In this paper, recent findings on phytohormone crosstalk, changes in signaling pathways including the expression of specific genes and their impact on modulating stress response through the closing or opening of stomata, together with the highlights of gaps that need to be elucidated in the signaling network of stomatal regulation, are reviewed. PMID:23717320

  2. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on growth, stomata, flavonoid, and ABA content in cucumber leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lizhe; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Yanhong; Chen, Tuo; Xu, Shijian; Feng, Huyuan; Wang, Xunling

    2003-06-01

    Cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No 3) grown in a greenhouse were treated with three different biologically effective ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels: 1.28 kJ. m-2 (CK), 8.82kJ.m-2 (T1) and 12.6 kJ. m-2 (T2). Irradiances corresponded to 8% and 21% reduction in stratospheric ozone in Lanzhou. Plants at three-leaf stage were irradiated 7 h daily for 25 days. The growth, stomata, flavonoid and ABA content in cucumber leaves exposed to 3 levels of UV-B radiation were determined in this paper. The results indicated that, compared with the control after 25 days UV-B radiation, RI of cucumber under T1 treatment is -18.0% and RI under T2 treatment is -48% mostly because of the reduce of leave area and dry weight accompanying with the increase of SLW; the rate of stomata closure under the treatments of T1 and T2 on the 6th day was up to respectively 70% and 89%, and amounted to 90% and 100% on the 18th day, and the guard cells in some stomata apparatus became permanent pores and lost their function at the same time; with the duration of UV-B radiation, the rise of the absorbance to ultraviolet light (305nm) showed the content increase of flavonoid; Abscisic acid (ABA) was determined by means of ELISA which showed that under the T1 treatment, the content of ABA was up to maximum to 510% higher than that of the control on the 21st day, meanwhile, under the treatment of T2, it was the highest on the 18th day to 680% of the control, and then had a decrease tendency on 21st day. The result still indicated that ABA accumulation could be induced by enhanced UV-B the radiation. The bigger was the dose of radiation, the higher was the accumulation of ABA. When intensity of UV-B radiation went beyond the degree of endurance of cucumber plants, ABA content descended then. Cucumber plants resist enhanced UV-B radiation by means of improving the contents of ABA and flavonoid. The increase of ABA content in cucumber leaves could lead to the stomata closure. Therefore

  3. ABA induces H2O2 production in guard cells, but does not close the stomata on Vicia faba leaves developed at high air humidity.

    PubMed

    Arve, Louise E; Carvalho, Dália R A; Olsen, Jorunn E; Torre, Sissel

    2014-01-01

    Plants developed under constant high (> 85%) relative air humidity (RH) have larger stomata that are unable to close completely. One of the hypotheses for the less responsive stomata is that the plants have reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). Both ABA and darkness are signals for stomatal closure and induce the production of the secondary messenger hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In this study, the ability of Vicia faba plants developed in moderate or high RH to close the stomata in response to darkness, ABA and H2O2 was investigated. Moreover, the ability of the plants to produce H2O2 when treated with ABA or transferred to darkness was also assessed. Our results show that the ABA concentration in moderate RH is not increased during darkness even though the stomata are closing. This indicates that stomatal closure in V. faba during darkness is independent of ABA production. ABA induced both H2O2 production and stomatal closure in stomata formed at moderate RH. H2O2 production, as a result of treatment with ABA, was also observed in stomata formed at high RH, though the closing response was considerably smaller as compared with moderate RH. In either RH, leaf ABA concentration was not affected by darkness. Similarly to ABA treatment, darkness elicited both H2O2 production and stomatal closure following plant cultivation at moderate RH. Contrary to this, neither H2O2 production nor stomatal closure took place when stomata were formed at high RH. These results suggest that the reduced stomatal response in plants developed in continuous high RH is caused by one or more factors downstream of H2O2 in the signaling pathway toward stomatal closure. PMID:25763494

  4. ABA induces H2O2 production in guard cells, but does not close the stomata on Vicia faba leaves developed at high air humidity.

    PubMed

    Arve, Louise E; Carvalho, Dália R A; Olsen, Jorunn E; Torre, Sissel

    2014-01-01

    Plants developed under constant high (> 85%) relative air humidity (RH) have larger stomata that are unable to close completely. One of the hypotheses for the less responsive stomata is that the plants have reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). Both ABA and darkness are signals for stomatal closure and induce the production of the secondary messenger hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In this study, the ability of Vicia faba plants developed in moderate or high RH to close the stomata in response to darkness, ABA and H2O2 was investigated. Moreover, the ability of the plants to produce H2O2 when treated with ABA or transferred to darkness was also assessed. Our results show that the ABA concentration in moderate RH is not increased during darkness even though the stomata are closing. This indicates that stomatal closure in V. faba during darkness is independent of ABA production. ABA induced both H2O2 production and stomatal closure in stomata formed at moderate RH. H2O2 production, as a result of treatment with ABA, was also observed in stomata formed at high RH, though the closing response was considerably smaller as compared with moderate RH. In either RH, leaf ABA concentration was not affected by darkness. Similarly to ABA treatment, darkness elicited both H2O2 production and stomatal closure following plant cultivation at moderate RH. Contrary to this, neither H2O2 production nor stomatal closure took place when stomata were formed at high RH. These results suggest that the reduced stomatal response in plants developed in continuous high RH is caused by one or more factors downstream of H2O2 in the signaling pathway toward stomatal closure.

  5. ABA induces H2O2 production in guard cells, but does not close the stomata on Vicia faba leaves developed at high air humidity

    PubMed Central

    Arve, Louise E; Carvalho, Dália RA; Olsen, Jorunn E; Torre, Sissel

    2014-01-01

    Plants developed under constant high (> 85%) relative air humidity (RH) have larger stomata that are unable to close completely. One of the hypotheses for the less responsive stomata is that the plants have reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). Both ABA and darkness are signals for stomatal closure and induce the production of the secondary messenger hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In this study, the ability of Vicia faba plants developed in moderate or high RH to close the stomata in response to darkness, ABA and H2O2 was investigated. Moreover, the ability of the plants to produce H2O2 when treated with ABA or transferred to darkness was also assessed. Our results show that the ABA concentration in moderate RH is not increased during darkness even though the stomata are closing. This indicates that stomatal closure in V. faba during darkness is independent of ABA production. ABA induced both H2O2 production and stomatal closure in stomata formed at moderate RH. H2O2 production, as a result of treatment with ABA, was also observed in stomata formed at high RH, though the closing response was considerably smaller as compared with moderate RH. In either RH, leaf ABA concentration was not affected by darkness. Similarly to ABA treatment, darkness elicited both H2O2 production and stomatal closure following plant cultivation at moderate RH. Contrary to this, neither H2O2 production nor stomatal closure took place when stomata were formed at high RH. These results suggest that the reduced stomatal response in plants developed in continuous high RH is caused by one or more factors downstream of H2O2 in the signaling pathway toward stomatal closure. PMID:25763494

  6. Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hindol; Badarudeen, Binshad; George, Athira; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, K K; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-10-20

    Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.

  7. Ska3 Ensures Timely Mitotic Progression by Interacting Directly With Microtubules and Ska1 Microtubule Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Maria Alba; Zou, Juan; Medina-Pritchard, Bethan; Nigg, Erich A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Santamaria, Anna; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of physical attachment between the kinetochore and dynamic spindle microtubules, which undergo cycles of polymerization and depolymerization generating straight and curved microtubule structures, is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. The Ndc80 and Ska complexes are the major microtubule-binding factors of the kinetochore responsible for maintaining chromosome-microtubule coupling during chromosome segregation. We previously showed that the Ska1 subunit of the Ska complex binds dynamic microtubules using multiple contact sites in a mode that allows conformation-independent binding. Here, we show that the Ska3 subunit is required to modulate the microtubule binding capability of the Ska complex (i) by directly interacting with tubulin monomers and (ii) indirectly by interacting with tubulin contacting regions of Ska1 suggesting an allosteric regulation. Perturbing either the Ska3-microtubule interaction or the Ska3-Ska1 interactions negatively influences microtubule binding by the Ska complex in vitro and affects the timely onset of anaphase in cells. Thus, Ska3 employs additional modulatory elements within the Ska complex to ensure robust kinetochore-microtubule attachments and timely progression of mitosis. PMID:27667719

  8. Interaction of CDK5RAP2 with EB1 to track growing microtubule tips and to regulate microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ka-Wing; Hau, Shiu-Yeung; Kho, Yik-Shing; Jia, Yue; He, Lisheng; Qi, Robert Z

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in cdk5rap2 are linked to autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, and attention has been paid to its function at centrosomes. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK5RAP2 localizes to microtubules and concentrates at the distal tips in addition to centrosomal localization. CDK5RAP2 interacts directly with EB1, a prototypic member of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, and contains the basic and Ser-rich motif responsible for EB1 binding. The EB1-binding motif is conserved in the CDK5RAP2 sequences of chimpanzee, bovine, and dog but not in those of rat and mouse, suggesting a function gained during the evolution of mammals. The mutation of the Ile/Leu-Pro dipeptide within the motif abolishes EB1 interaction and plus-end attachment. In agreement with the mutational analysis, suppression of EB1 expression inhibits microtubule tip-tracking of CDK5RAP2. We have also found that the CDK5RAP2-EB1 complex regulates microtubule dynamics and stability. CDK5RAP2 depletion by RNA interference impacts the dynamic behaviors of microtubules. The CDK5RAP2-EB1 complex induces microtubule bundling and acetylation when expressed in cell cultures and stimulates microtubule assembly and bundle formation in vitro. Collectively, these results show that CDK5RAP2 targets growing microtubule tips in association with EB1 to regulate microtubule dynamics. PMID:19553473

  9. Phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein SB401 from Solanum berthaultii regulates its effect on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-Quan; Jin, Lifeng; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiejie; Huang, Shuli; Yuan, Ming

    2009-03-01

    We reported previously that the protein SB401 from Solanum berthaultii binds to and bundles both microtubules and F-actin. In the current study, we investigated the regulation of SB401 activity by its phosphorylation. Our experimental results showed that the phosphorylation of SB401 by casein kinase II (CKII) downregulates the activities of SB401, namely the bundling of microtubules and enhancement of the polymerization of tubulin. However, phosphorylation of SB401 had no observable effect on its bundling of F-actin. Further investigation using extract of potato pollen indicated that a CKII-like kinase may exist in potato pollen. Antibodies against CKII alpha recognized specifically a major band from the pollen extract and the pollen extract was able to phosphorylate the SB401 protein in vitro. The CKII-like kinase showed a similar ability to downregulate the bundling of microtubules. Our experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of SB401 activity. We propose that this phosphorylation may regulate the effects of SB401 on microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton.

  10. Estimation of the diffusion-limited rate of microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Odde, D J

    1997-01-01

    Microtubule assembly is a complex process with individual microtubules alternating stochastically between extended periods of assembly and disassembly, a phenomenon known as dynamic instability. Since the discovery of dynamic instability, molecular models of assembly have generally assumed that tubulin incorporation into the microtubule lattice is primarily reaction-limited. Recently this assumption has been challenged and the importance of diffusion in microtubule assembly dynamics asserted on the basis of scaling arguments, with tubulin gradients predicted to extend over length scales exceeding a cell diameter, approximately 50 microns. To assess whether individual microtubules in vivo assemble at diffusion-limited rates and to predict the theoretical upper limit on the assembly rate, a steady-state mean-field model for the concentration of tubulin about a growing microtubule tip was developed. Using published parameter values for microtubule assembly in vivo (growth rate = 7 microns/min, diffusivity = 6 x 10(-12) m2/s, tubulin concentration = 10 microM), the model predicted that the tubulin concentration at the microtubule tip was approximately 89% of the concentration far from the tip, indicating that microtubule self-assembly is not diffusion-limited. Furthermore, the gradients extended less than approximately 50 nm (the equivalent of about two microtubule diameters) from the microtubule tip, a distance much less than a cell diameter. In addition, a general relation was developed to predict the diffusion-limited assembly rate from the diffusivity and bulk tubulin concentration. Using this relation, it was estimated that the maximum theoretical assembly rate is approximately 65 microns/min, above which tubulin can no longer diffuse rapidly enough to support faster growth. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199774

  11. Cortical State and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kenneth D.; Thiele, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Preface The brain continuously adapts its processing machinery to behavioural demands. To achieve this it rapidly modulates the operating mode of cortical circuits, controlling the way information is transformed and routed. This article will focus on two experimental approaches by which the control of cortical information processing has been investigated: the study of state-dependent cortical processing in rodents, and attention in the primate visual system. Both processes involve a modulation of low-frequency activity fluctuations and spiking correlation, and are mediated by common receptor systems. We suggest that selective attention involves processes similar to state change, operating at a local columnar level to enhance the representation of otherwise nonsalient features while suppressing internally generated activity patterns. PMID:21829219

  12. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  13. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  14. Building the Microtubule Cytoskeleton Piece by Piece*

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Aco, Ray; Petry, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton gives cells their shape, organizes the cellular interior, and segregates chromosomes. These functions rely on the precise arrangement of MTs, which is achieved by the coordinated action of MT-associated proteins (MAPs). We highlight the first and most important examples of how different MAP activities are combined in vitro to create an ensemble function that exceeds the simple addition of their individual activities, and how the Xenopus laevis egg extract system has been utilized as a powerful intermediate between cellular and purified systems to uncover the design principles of self-organized MT networks in the cell. PMID:25957410

  15. Self-assembly of microtubules and motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor; Tsimring, Lev

    2005-03-01

    We derive a model describing spatio-temporal assembly of an array of microtubules interacting via molecular motors. Starting from a stochastic model of inelastic polar rods with a generic anisotropic interaction kernel we obtain a set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. At large enough mean density of rods and concentration of motors, the model describes orientational instability. We demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and (for large density and/or kernel anisotropy) asters seen in recent experiments.

  16. Self-organization of microtubules and motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at San Diego

    2006-01-01

    Here we introduce a model for spatio-temporal self-organization of an ensemble of microtubules interacting via molecular motors. Starting from a generic stochastic model of inelastic polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel we derive a set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. At large enough mean density of rods and concentration of motors, the model describes orientational instability. We demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and (for large density and/or kernel anisotropy) asters seen in recent experiments. The corresponding phase diagram of vortexasters transitions is in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  17. Cortical dynamics revisited.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries on the organisation of the cortical connectome together with novel data on the dynamics of neuronal interactions require an extension of classical concepts on information processing in the cerebral cortex. These new insights justify considering the brain as a complex, self-organised system with nonlinear dynamics in which principles of distributed, parallel processing coexist with serial operations within highly interconnected networks. The observed dynamics suggest that cortical networks are capable of providing an extremely high-dimensional state space in which a large amount of evolutionary and ontogenetically acquired information can coexist and be accessible to rapid parallel search.

  18. A 14,000 year vegetation history of a hypermaritime island on the outer Pacific coast of Canada based on fossil pollen, spores and conifer stomata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, Terri; Delepine, J. Michelle; Hoffman, Elizabeth H.; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2012-11-01

    Pollen and conifer stomata analyses of lake sediments from Hippa Island on the north coast of British Columbia were used to reconstruct the vegetation history of this small hypermaritime island. Between 14,000 and 13,230 cal yr BP, the island supported diverse herb-shrub communities dominated by Cyperaceae, Artemisia and Salix. Pinus contorta and Picea sitchensis stomata indicate that these conifers were present among the herb-shrub communities, likely as scattered individuals. Transition to open P. contorta woodland by 13,000 cal yr BP was followed by increases in Alnus viridis, Alnus rubra and P. sitchensis. After 12,000 cal yr BP, Pinus-dominated communities were replaced by dense P. sitchensis and Tsuga heterophylla forest with Lysichiton americanus and fern understory. Thuja plicata stomata indicate that this species was present by 8700 cal yr BP, but the pollen record suggests that its populations did not expand to dominate regional rainforests, along with Tsuga and Picea, until after 6600 cal yr BP. Conifer stomata indicate that species may be locally present for hundreds to thousands of years before pollen exceed thresholds routinely used to infer local species arrival. When combined, pollen and conifer stomata can provide a more accurate record of paleovegetation than either when used alone.

  19. High relative air humidity and continuous light reduce stomata functionality by affecting the ABA regulation in rose leaves.

    PubMed

    Arve, Louise E; Terfa, Meseret T; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar; Olsen, Jorunn E; Torre, Sissel

    2013-02-01

    Plants developed under high (90%) relative air humidity (RH) have previously been shown to have large, malfunctioning stomata, which results in high water loss during desiccation and reduced dark induced closure. Stomatal movement is to a large extent regulated by abscisic acid (ABA). It has therefore been proposed that low ABA levels contribute to the development of malfunctioning stomata. In this study, we investigated the regulation of ABA content in rose leaves, through hormone analysis and β-glucosidase quantification. Compared with high RH, rose plants developed in moderate RH (60%) and 20 h photoperiod contained higher levels of ABA and β-glucosidase activity. Also, the amount of ABA increased during darkness simultaneously as the ABA-glucose ester (GE) levels decreased. In contrast, plants developed under high RH with 20 h photoperiod showed no increase in ABA levels during darkness, and had low β-glucosidase activity converting ABA-GE to ABA. Continuous lighting (24 h) resulted in low levels of β-glucosidase activity irrespective of RH, indicating that a dark period is essential to activate β-glucosidase. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of ABA under different humidities and photoperiods, and clearly show that β-glucosidase is a key enzyme regulating the ABA pool in rose plants. PMID:22812416

  20. Stomata open at night in pole-sized and mature ponderosa pine: implications for O3 exposure metrics.

    PubMed

    Grulke, N E; Alonso, R; Nguyen, T; Cascio, C; Dobrowolski, W

    2004-09-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) is widely distributed in the western USA. We report the lack of stomatal closure at night in early summer for ponderosa pine at two of three sites investigated. Trees at a third site with lower nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid exposure, but greater drought stress, had slightly open stomata at night in early summer but closed stomata at night for the rest of the summer. The three sites had similar background ozone exposure during the summer of measurement (2001). Nighttime stomatal conductance (gs) ranged from one tenth to one fifth that of maximum daytime values. In general, pole-sized trees (< 40 years old) had greater nighttime gs than mature trees (> 250 years old). In late summer, nighttime gs was low (< 3.0 mmol H2O m(-2) s(-1)) for both tree size classes at all sites. Measurable nighttime gs has also been reported in other conifers, but the values we observed were higher. In June, nighttime ozone (O3) uptake accounted for 9, 5 and 3% of the total daily O3 uptake of pole-sized trees from west to east across the San Bernardino Mountains. In late summer, O3 uptake at night was < 2% of diel uptake at all sites. Nocturnal O3 uptake may contribute to greater oxidant injury development, especially in pole-sized trees in early summer. PMID:15234897

  1. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1/MOZART 1 is an integral component of the γ-tubulin-containing microtubule nucleating complex.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masayoshi; Yagi, Noriyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Fujita, Satoshi; Kawashima, Noriyuki; Ehrhardt, David W; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Microtubules in eukaryotic cells are nucleated from ring-shaped complexes that contain γ-tubulin and a family of homologous γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs), but the subunit composition of the complexes can vary among fungi, animals and plants. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1 (GIP1), a small protein with no homology to the GCP family, interacts with GCP3 in vitro, and is a plant homolog of vertebrate mitotic-spindle organizing protein associated with a ring of γ-tubulin 1 (MOZART1), a recently identified component of the γ-tubulin complex in human cell lines. In this study, we characterized two closely related Arabidopsis GIP1s: GIP1a and GIP1b. Single mutants of gip1a and gip1b were indistinguishable from wild-type plants, but their double mutant was embryonic lethal, and showed impaired development of male gametophytes. Functional fusions of GIP1a with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to purify GIP1a-containing complexes from Arabidopsis plants, which contained all the subunits (except NEDD1) previously identified in the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes. GIP1a and GIP1b interacted specifically with Arabidopsis GCP3 in yeast. GFP-GIP1a labeled mitotic microtubule arrays in a pattern largely consistent with, but partly distinct from, the localization of the γ-tubulin complex containing GCP2 or GCP3 in planta. In interphase cortical arrays, the labeled complexes were preferentially recruited to existing microtubules, from which new microtubules were efficiently nucleated. However, in contrast to complexes labeled with tagged GCP2 or GCP3, their recruitment to cortical areas with no microtubules was rarely observed. These results indicate that GIP1/MOZART1 is an integral component of a subset of the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes.

  2. The leading role of microtubules in endothelial barrier dysfunction: disassembly of peripheral microtubules leaves behind the cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Irina B; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Smurova, Ksenija M; Kaverina, Irina N; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-10-01

    Disturbance of the endothelial barrier is characterized by dramatic cytoskeleton reorganization, activation of actomyosin contraction and, finally, leads to intercellular gap formation. Here we demonstrate that the edemagenic agent, thrombin, causes a rapid increase in the human pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) barrier permeability accompanied by fast decreasing in the peripheral microtubules quantity and reorganization of the microtubule system in the internal cytoplasm of the EC within 5 min of the treatment. The actin stress-fibers formation occurs gradually and the maximal effect is observed relatively later, 30 min of the thrombin treatment. Thus, microtubules reaction develops faster than the reorganization of the actin filaments system responsible for the subsequent changes of the cell shape during barrier dysfunction development. Direct microtubules depolymerization by nocodazole initiates the cascade of barrier dysfunction reactions. Nocodazole-induced barrier disruption is connected directly with the degree of peripheral microtubules depolymerization. Short-term loss of endothelial barrier function occurs at the minimal destruction of peripheral microtubules, when actin filament system is still intact. Specifically, we demonstrate that the EC microtubule dynamics examined by time-lapse imaging of EB3-GFP comets movement has changed under these conditions: microtubule plus ends growth rate significantly decreased near the cell periphery. The microtubules, apparently, are the first target in the circuit of reactions leading to the pulmonary EC barrier compromise. Our results show that dynamic microtubules play an essential role in the barrier function in vitro; peripheral microtubules depolymerization is necessary and sufficient condition for initiation of endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23606375

  3. Molecular and Mechanical Causes of Microtubule Catastrophe and Aging.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Pavel; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Voevodin, Vladimir; Tikhonravov, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2015-12-15

    Tubulin polymers, microtubules, can switch abruptly from the assembly to shortening. These infrequent transitions, termed "catastrophes", affect numerous cellular processes but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We approached this complex stochastic system using advanced coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of tubulin-tubulin interactions. Unlike in previous simplified models of dynamic microtubules, the catastrophes in this model arise owing to fluctuations in the composition and conformation of a growing microtubule tip, most notably in the number of protofilament curls. In our model, dynamic evolution of the stochastic microtubule tip configurations over a long timescale, known as the system's "aging", gives rise to the nonexponential distribution of microtubule lifetimes, consistent with experiment. We show that aging takes place in the absence of visible changes in the microtubule wall or tip, as this complex molecular-mechanical system evolves slowly and asymptotically toward the steady-state level of the catastrophe-promoting configurations. This new, to our knowledge, theoretical basis will assist detailed mechanistic investigations of the mechanisms of action of different microtubule-binding proteins and drugs, thereby enabling accurate control over the microtubule dynamics to treat various pathologies. PMID:26682815

  4. Ice recovery assay for detection of Golgi-derived microtubules.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Ashley D; Fomicheva, Maria; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Proper organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton is essential for many cellular processes including maintenance of Golgi organization and cell polarity. Traditionally, the centrosome is considered to be the major microtubule organizing center (MTOC) of the cell; however, microtubule nucleation can also occur through centrosome-independent mechanisms. Recently, the Golgi has been described as an additional, centrosome-independent, MTOC with distinct cellular functions. Golgi-derived microtubules contribute to the formation of an asymmetric microtubule network, control Golgi organization, and support polarized trafficking and directed migration in motile cells. In this chapter, we present an assay using recovery from ice treatment to evaluate the potential of the Golgi, or other MTOCs, to nucleate microtubules. This technique allows for clear separation of distinct MTOCs and observation of newly nucleated microtubules at these locations, which are normally obscured by the dense microtubule network present at steady-state conditions. This type of analysis is important for discovery and characterization of noncentrosomal MTOCs and, ultimately, understanding of their unique cellular functions. PMID:24295320

  5. Leading at the Front: How EB Proteins Regulate Microtubule Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are the most rigid of the cytoskeletal filaments, they provide the cell's scaffolding, form the byways on which motor proteins transport intracellular cargo and reorganize to form the mitotic spindle when the cell needs to divide. These biopolymers are composed of alpha and beta tubulin monomers that create hollow cylindrical nanotubes with an outer diameter of 25 nm and an inner diameter of 17 nm. At steady state concentrations, microtubules undergo a process known as dynamic instability. During dynamic instability the length of individual microtubules is changing as the filament alternates between periods of growth to shrinkage (catastrophe) and shrinkage to growth (rescue). This process can be enhanced or diminished with the addition of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). MAPs are microtubule binding proteins that stabilize, destabilize, or nucleate microtubules. We will discuss the effects of the stabilizing end-binding proteins (EB1, EB2 and EB3), on microtubule dynamics observed in vitro. The EBs are a unique family of MAPs known to tip track and enhance microtubule growth by stabilizing the ends. This is a different mechanism than those employed by structural MAPs such as tau or MAP4.

  6. Microtubule-severing enzymes at the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David J.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent severing of microtubules was first reported in Xenopus laevis egg extracts in 1991. Two years later this observation led to the purification of the first known microtubule-severing enzyme, katanin. Katanin homologs have now been identified throughout the animal kingdom and in plants. Moreover, members of two closely related enzyme subfamilies, spastin and fidgetin, have been found to sever microtubules and might act alongside katanins in some contexts (Roll-Mecak and McNally, 2010; Yu et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2007). Over the past few years, it has become clear that microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to a wide range of cellular activities including mitosis and meiosis, morphogenesis, cilia biogenesis and disassembly, and migration. Thus, this group of enzymes is revealing itself to be among the most important of the microtubule regulators. This Commentary focuses on our growing understanding of how microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to the organization and dynamics of diverse microtubule arrays, as well as the structural and biophysical characteristics that afford them the unique capacity to catalyze the removal of tubulin from the interior microtubule lattice. Our goal is to provide a broader perspective, focusing on a limited number of particularly informative, representative and/or timely findings. PMID:22595526

  7. Microtubule distribution in gravitropic protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.; Hartmann, E.

    1990-01-01

    Tip cells of dark-grown protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are negatively gravitropic (grow upward). They possess a unique longitudinal zonation: (1) a tip group of amylochloroplasts in the apical dome, (2) a plastid-free zone, (3) a zone of significant plastid sedimentation, and (4) a zone of mostly non-sedimenting plastids. Immunofluorescence of vertical cells showed microtubules distributed throughout the cytoplasm in a mostly axial orientation extending through all zones. Optical sectioning revealed a close spatial association between microtubules and plastids. A majority (two thirds) of protonemata gravistimulated for > 20 min had a higher density of microtubules near the lower flank compared to the upper flank in the plastid-free zone. This apparent enrichment of microtubules occurred just proximal to sedimented plastids and near the part of the tip that presumably elongates more to produce curvature. Fewer than 5% of gravistimulated protonemata had an enrichment in microtubules near the upper flank, whereas 14% of vertical protonemata were enriched near one of the side walls. Oryzalin and amiprophos-methyl (APM) disrupted microtubules, gravitropism, and normal tip growth and zonation, but did not prevent plastid sedimentation. We hypothesize that a microtubule redistribution plays a role in gravitropism in this protonema. This appears to be the first report of an effect of gravity on microtubule distribution in plants.

  8. Preparatory tests for immunodetection of microtubules in protoplasts during IML-2.

    PubMed

    Skagen, E B; Rasmussen, O S; Iversen, T H

    1994-04-01

    Preparatory tests to improve methods for detection of cortical microtubules (cMTs) in rapeseed protoplasts for the IML-2 experiment "TRANSFORM" were undertaken. This study is based on the results obtained in the "PROTO" experiment onboard the shuttle Discovery during an 8-day IML-1 flight in 1992. The use of free-floating protoplasts on IML-1 made it technically impossible for the astronauts to remove the glutaraldehyde fixative during the orbital period resulting in high background fluorescence which made it very difficult to detect MTs. In order to avoid this on the IML-2 mission, protoplasts will be immobilized in alginate beads. The effect of variable concentrations and fixation periods for two different fixatives on the preservation of cMTs was tested. Best results were obtained using 3.5% paraformaldehyde (PFA) for 1 hour, but 1% glutaraldehyde (GA) also gave acceptable results. The effect of low temperatures on microtubule depolymerization was also examined as freshly isolated protoplasts have to be kept at 5 degrees C for up to 20 hours pre-launch and before activation of Biorack. Only slight changes in cMT-appearance were observed at 4 degrees C indicating a minor depolymerization compared to the cMTs in non-chilled protoplasts.

  9. Tensile stress stimulates microtubule outgrowth in living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaverina, Irina; Krylyshkina, Olga; Beningo, Karen; Anderson, Kurt; Wang, Yu-Li; Small, J. Victor

    2002-01-01

    Cell motility is driven by the sum of asymmetric traction forces exerted on the substrate through adhesion foci that interface with the actin cytoskeleton. Establishment of this asymmetry involves microtubules, which exert a destabilising effect on adhesion foci via targeting events. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a mechano-sensing mechanism that signals microtubule polymerisation and guidance of the microtubules towards adhesion sites under increased stress. Stress was applied either by manipulating the body of cells moving on glass with a microneedle or by stretching a flexible substrate that cells were migrating on. We propose a model for this mechano-sensing phenomenon whereby microtubule polymerisation is stimulated and guided through the interaction of a microtubule tip complex with actin filaments under tension.

  10. Assembly and Positioning of Microtubule Asters in Microfabricated Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holy, Timothy E.; Dogterom, Marileen; Yurke, Bernard; Leibler, Stanislas

    1997-06-01

    Intracellular organization depends on a variety of molecular assembly processes; while some of these have been studied in simplified cell-free systems, others depend on the confined geometry of cells and cannot be reconstructed using bulk techniques. To study the latter processes in vitro, we fabricated microscopic chambers that simulate the closed environment of cells. We used these chambers to study the positioning of microtubule asters. Microtubule assembly alone, without the action of molecular motors, is sufficient to position asters. Asters with short microtubules move toward the position expected from symmetry; however, once the microtubules become long enough to buckle, symmetry is broken. Calculations and experiments show that the bending-energy landscape has multiple minima. Microtubule dynamic instability modifies the landscape over time and allows asters to explore otherwise inaccessible configurations.

  11. Kinetic model for colchicine inhibition of microtubule assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sternlicht, H.; Ringel, I.; Szasz, J.

    1980-10-01

    Colchicine is a potent drug used to probe microtubule dependent processes. We have recently shown that substoichiometric concentrations of colchicine-tubulin complex (CD), a 1:1 tight binding complex of drug with tubulin, copolymerizes with tubulin to form microtubule copolymers. The affinity of the microtubule ends for tublin decreased as the CD mole fraction in the microtubule increased. Mole fraction ratios as small as 1 CD to approx. 50 to 100 tubulins in the copolymers were accompanied by a significant change in binding affinities and polymerization rates. We have further extended our investigation of the CD-tubulin copolymerization reaction. A kinetic model was derived which relates the composition of the microtubule copolymer to the composition of the reaction mixture. This model allowed a predictive correlation to be made between copolymer composition and the extent of assembly inhibition.

  12. Anisotropic elastic network modeling of entire microtubules.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Marco A; Soncini, Monica; Orsi, Mario; Patel, Mishal; Essex, Jonathan W; Montevecchi, Franco M; Redaelli, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Microtubules are supramolecular structures that make up the cytoskeleton and strongly affect the mechanical properties of the cell. Within the cytoskeleton filaments, the microtubule (MT) exhibits by far the highest bending stiffness. Bending stiffness depends on the mechanical properties and intermolecular interactions of the tubulin dimers (the MT building blocks). Computational molecular modeling has the potential for obtaining quantitative insights into this area. However, to our knowledge, standard molecular modeling techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) and normal mode analysis (NMA), are not yet able to simulate large molecular structures like the MTs; in fact, their possibilities are normally limited to much smaller protein complexes. In this work, we developed a multiscale approach by merging the modeling contribution from MD and NMA. In particular, MD simulations were used to refine the molecular conformation and arrangement of the tubulin dimers inside the MT lattice. Subsequently, NMA was used to investigate the vibrational properties of MTs modeled as an elastic network. The coarse-grain model here developed can describe systems of hundreds of interacting tubulin monomers (corresponding to up to 1,000,000 atoms). In particular, we were able to simulate coarse-grain models of entire MTs, with lengths up to 350 nm. A quantitative mechanical investigation was performed; from the bending and stretching modes, we estimated MT macroscopic properties such as bending stiffness, Young modulus, and persistence length, thus allowing a direct comparison with experimental data.

  13. Tau interaction with microtubules in vivo.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, Andrey; Yu, Jiang-Zhou; Rasenick, Mark; Popov, Sergey V

    2004-12-01

    Tau is a major microtubule-associated protein which induces bundling and stabilization of axonal microtubules (MTs). To investigate the interaction of tau with MTs in living cells, we expressed GFP-tau fusion protein in cultured Xenopus embryo neurons and performed time-lapse imaging of tau-labeled MTs. Tau uniformly labeled individual MTs regardless of their assembly/disassembly status and location along the axon. Photobleaching experiments indicated that interaction of tau with MTs is very dynamic, with a half-time of fluorescence recovery of the order of 3 seconds. Treatment of cells with taxol, a drug that suppresses MT dynamics, rapidly induced detachment of tau from MTs. Although binding of tau to straight MTs was uniform, there was a heightened concentration of tau at the sites of high MT curvature. Our results suggest that dynamic interaction of tau with MTs may modify local mechanical properties of individual MTs and play a crucial role in the remodeling of the MT cytoskeleton during neuronal plasticity.

  14. Multifunctional Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Benáková, Martina; Schwarzerová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in key processes in plant cells, including cell division, growth and development. MT-interacting proteins modulate MT dynamics and organization, mediating functional and structural interaction of MTs with other cell structures. In addition to conventional microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in plants, there are many other MT-binding proteins whose primary function is not related to the regulation of MTs. This review focuses on enzymes, chaperones, or proteins primarily involved in other processes that also bind to MTs. The MT-binding activity of these multifunctional MAPs is often performed only under specific environmental or physiological conditions, or they bind to MTs only as components of a larger MT-binding protein complex. The involvement of multifunctional MAPs in these interactions may underlie physiological and morphogenetic events, e.g., under specific environmental or developmental conditions. Uncovering MT-binding activity of these proteins, although challenging, may contribute to understanding of the novel functions of the MT cytoskeleton in plant biological processes. PMID:27148302

  15. Visualization of Cortical Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinvald, Amiram

    2003-03-01

    Recent progress in studies of cortical dynamics will be reviewed including the combination of real time optical imaging based on voltage sensitive dyes, single and multi- unit recordings, LFP, intracellular recordings and microstimulation. To image the flow of neuronal activity from one cortical site to the next, in real time, we have used optical imaging based on newly designed voltage sensitive dyes and a Fuji 128x 128 fast camera which we modified. A factor of 20-40 fold improvement in the signal to noise ratio was obtained with the new dye during in vivo imaging experiments. This improvements has facilitates the exploration of cortical dynamics without signal averaging in the millisecond time domain. We confirmed that the voltage sensitive dye signal indeed reflects membrane potential changes in populations of neurons by showing that the time course of the intracellular activity recorded intracellularly from a single neuron was highly correlated in many cases with the optical signal from a small patch of cortex recorded nearby. We showed that the firing of single cortical neurons is not a random process but occurs when the on-going pattern of million of neurons is similar to the functional architecture map which correspond to the tuning properties of that neuron. Chronic optical imaging, combined with electrical recordings and microstimulation, over a long period of times of more than a year, was successfully applied also to the study of higher brain functions in the behaving macaque monkey.

  16. Cortical thinning in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Martina; Motzkin, Julian C.; Philippi, Carissa L.; Kirk, Gregory R.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopathy is a personality disorder associated with severely antisocial behavior and a host of cognitive and affective deficits. The neuropathological basis of the disorder has not been clearly established. Cortical thickness is a sensitive measure of brain structure that has been used to identify neurobiological abnormalities in a number of psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate cortical thickness and corresponding functional connectivity in criminal psychopaths. Method Using T1 MRI data, we computed cortical thickness maps in a sample of adult male prison inmates selected based on psychopathy diagnosis (n=21 psychopathic inmates, n=31 non-psychopathic inmates). Using rest-fMRI data from a subset of these inmates (n=20 psychopathic inmates, n=20 non-psychopathic inmates), we then computed functional connectivity within networks exhibiting significant thinning among psychopaths. Results Relative to non-psychopaths, psychopaths exhibited significantly thinner cortex in a number of regions, including left insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral anterior temporal cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These neurostructural differences were not due to differences in age, IQ, or substance abuse. Psychopaths also exhibited a corresponding reduction in functional connectivity between left insula and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Psychopathy is associated with a distinct pattern of cortical thinning and reduced functional connectivity. PMID:22581200

  17. Interactions among p22, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Josefa; Pearce, Sandy Timm; Zhao, Hu; Barroso, Margarida

    2004-12-01

    Previously, we have shown that p22, an EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein, interacts indirectly with microtubules in an N-myristoylation-dependent and Ca2+-independent manner. In the present study, we report that N-myristoylated p22 interacts with several microtubule-associated proteins within the 30-100 kDa range using overlay blots of microtubule pellets containing cytosolic proteins. One of those p22-binding partners, a 35-40 kDa microtubule-binding protein, has been identified by MS as GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Several lines of evidence suggest a functional relationship between GAPDH and p22. First, endogenous p22 interacts with GAPDH by immunoprecipitation. Secondly, p22 and GAPDH align along microtubule tracks in analogous punctate structures in BHK cells. Thirdly, GAPDH facilitates the p22-dependent interactions between microtubules and microsomal membranes, by increasing the ability of p22 to bind microtubules but not membranes. We have also shown a direct interaction between N-myristoylated p22 and GAPDH in vitro with a K(D) of approximately 0.5 microM. The removal of either the N-myristoyl group or the last six C-terminal amino acids abolishes the binding of p22 to GAPDH and reduces the ability of p22 to associate with microtubules. In summary, we report that GAPDH is involved in the ability of p22 to facilitate microtubule-membrane interactions by affecting the p22-microtubule, but not the p22-membrane, association. PMID:15312048

  18. Transient Pinning and Pulling: A Mechanism for Bending Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Ian A.; Rane, Parag S.; Dickinson, Richard B.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules have a persistence length of the order of millimeters in vitro, but inside cells they bend over length scales of microns. It has been proposed that polymerization forces bend microtubules in the vicinity of the cell boundary or other obstacles, yet bends develop even when microtubules are polymerizing freely, unaffected by obstacles and cell boundaries. How these bends are formed remains unclear. By tracking the motions of microtubules marked by photobleaching, we found that in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells local bends develop primarily by plus-end directed transport of portions of the microtubule contour towards stationary locations (termed pinning points) along the length of the microtubule. The pinning points were transient in nature, and their eventual release allowed the bends to relax. The directionality of the transport as well as the overall incidence of local bends decreased when dynein was inhibited, while myosin inhibition had no observable effect. This suggests that dynein generates a tangential force that bends microtubules against stationary pinning points. Simulations of microtubule motion and polymerization accounting for filament mechanics and dynein forces predict the development of bends of size and shape similar to those observed in cells. Furthermore, simulations show that dynein-generated bends at a pinning point near the plus end can cause a persistent rotation of the tip consistent with the observation that bend formation near the tip can change the direction of microtubule growth. Collectively, these results suggest a simple physical mechanism for the bending of growing microtubules by dynein forces accumulating at pinning points. PMID:26974838

  19. [Coordination effect between vapor water loss through plant stomata and liquid water supply in soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC): a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Min; Qi, Hua; Luo, Xin-Lan; Zhang, Xuan

    2008-09-01

    Some important phenomena and behaviors concerned with the coordination effect between vapor water loss through plant stomata and liquid water supply in SPAC were discussed in this paper. A large amount of research results showed that plants show isohydric behavior when the plant hydraulic and chemical signals cooperate to promote the stomatal regulation of leaf water potential. The feedback response of stomata to the change of environmental humidity could be used to explain the midday depression of stomatal conductance and photosynthesis under drought condition, and also, to interpret the correlation between stomatal conductance and hydraulic conductance. The feed-forward response of stomata to the change of environmental humidity could be used to explain the hysteresis response of stomatal conductance to leaf-atmosphere vapor pressure deficit. The strategy for getting the most of xylem transport requires the rapid stomatal responses to avoid excess cavitation and the corresponding mechanisms for reversal of cavitation in short time. PMID:19102325

  20. Centlein, a novel microtubule-associated protein stabilizing microtubules and involved in neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhenli; Yin, Huilong; Wang, Pan; Gao, Juntao; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that the centriolar protein centlein functions as a molecular link between C-Nap1 and Cep68 to maintain centrosome cohesion [1]. In this study, we identified centlein as a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP), directly binding to purified microtubules (MTs) via its longest coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of centlein caused profound nocodazole- and cold-resistant MT bundles, which also relied on its MT-binding domain. siRNA-mediated centlein depletion resulted in a significant reduction in tubulin acetylation level and overall fluorescence intensity of cytoplasmic MT acetylation. Centlein was further characterized in neurons. We found that centlein overexpression inhibited neurite formation in retinoic acid (RA)-induced SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Taken together, we propose that centlein is involved in MT stability and neuritogenesis in vivo. PMID:26915804

  1. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects.Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being

  2. Kinetics of microtubule catastrophe assessed by probabilistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Odde, D J; Cassimeris, L; Buettner, H M

    1995-09-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments whose self-assembly occurs by abrupt switching between states of roughly constant growth and shrinkage, a process known as dynamic instability. Understanding the mechanism of dynamic instability offers potential for controlling microtubule-dependent cellular processes such as nerve growth and mitosis. The growth to shrinkage transitions (catastrophes) and the reverse transitions (rescues) that characterize microtubule dynamic instability have been assumed to be random events with first-order kinetics. By direct observation of individual microtubules in vitro and probabilistic analysis of their distribution of growth times, we found that while the slower growing and biologically inactive (minus) ends obeyed first-order catastrophe kinetics, the faster growing and biologically active (plus) ends did not. The non-first-order kinetics at plus ends imply that growing microtubule plus ends have an effective frequency of catastrophe that depends on how long the microtubules have been growing. This frequency is low initially but then rises asymptotically to a limiting value. Our results also suggest that an additional parameter, beyond the four parameters typically used to describe dynamic instability, is needed to account for the observed behavior and that changing this parameter can significantly affect the distribution of microtubule lengths at steady state. PMID:8519980

  3. Jupiter, a new Drosophila protein associated with microtubules.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Nina; Bobinnec, Yves; Fouix, Sylvaine; Huitorel, Philippe; Debec, Alain

    2006-05-01

    In this study we describe a novel Drosophila protein Jupiter, which shares properties with several structural microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) including TAU, MAP2, MAP4. Jupiter is a soluble unfolded molecule with the high net positive charge, rich in Glycine. It possesses two degenerated repeats around the sequence PPGG, separated by a Serine-rich region. Jupiter associates with microtubules in vitro and, fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP), is an excellent marker to follow microtubule dynamics in vivo. In a jupiter transgenic Drosophila strain generated by the "protein-trap" technique, Jupiter:GFP fusion protein localizes to the microtubule network through the cell cycle at the different stages of development. We found particularly high Jupiter:GFP concentrations in the young embryo, larval nervous system, precursors of eye photoreceptors and adult ovary. Moreover, from jupiter:gfp embryos we have established two permanent cell lines presenting strongly fluorescent microtubules during the whole cell cycle. In these cells, the distribution of the Jupiter:GFP fusion protein reproduces microtubule behavior upon treatment by the drugs colchicine and taxol. The jupiter cell lines and fly strain should be of wide interest for biologists interested in in vivo analysis of microtubule dynamics.

  4. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase.

    PubMed

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M; Casagrande, Francesca V M; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson's disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson's disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  5. Microtubule polarity confers direction to pigment transport in chromatophores.

    PubMed

    McNiven, M A; Porter, K R

    1986-10-01

    The cellular mechanisms used to direct translocating organelles are poorly understood. It is believed that the intrinsic structural polarity of microtubules may play a role in this process. We have examined the effects that differently oriented microtubules have upon the direction of pigment transport in surgically severed melanophore arms. In a previous paper (McNiven, M. A., M. Wang, and K. R. Porter, 1984, Cell, 37:753-765) we reported that after isolation, arms repolarized and reoriented their microtubules outward from their centers as if to form new "microcells." Pigment aggregation in these arms was toward a new focal point located at the arm centers. In this study we monitored pigment movement in isolated arms containing taxol-stabilized microtubules to test if the reversal in direction of pigment transport is dependent upon the repolarization of microtubules. We report that taxol delays both the microtubule reorientation and reversal in transport direction in a concentration-dependent manner. These and other presented data suggest that the polarity of the microtubule population within a melanophore confers direction on pigment transport.

  6. Gravitropic microtubule reorientation can be uncoupled from growth.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, R; Nick, P

    2001-01-01

    The causal relationship between gravitropic growth responses and microtubule reorientation has been studied. Growth and microtubule reorientation have been uncoupled during the gravitropic response of maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles. Microtubule orientation and growth were measured under three different conditions: (i) a gravitropic stimulation where the growth response was allowed to be expressed (intact seedlings were displaced from the vertical position by 90 degrees), (ii) a gravitropic stimulation where the growth response was suppressed (coleoptiles were attached to microscope slides and kept in a horizontal position), (iii) suppression of growth in the absence of gravitropic stimulation (coleoptiles were attached to microscope slides and kept in a vertical position). It was found that (i) gravitropic stimulation can induce a microtubular reorientation from transverse to longitudinal in the upper (slower growing) flank of the coleoptile, and an inhibition of growth; (ii) the reorientation of microtubules precedes the inhibition of growth; (iii) the gravitropic response of microtubules is weaker, not elevated, when the inhibition of growth is artificially enhanced by attaching the coleoptiles to a slide; and (iv) artificial inhibition of growth in the absence of gravitropic stimulation cannot induce a microtubular response. Thus, the extent of microtubule reorientation is not correlated with the extent of growth inhibition. Moreover, these findings demonstrate that microtubules do not reorient passively after growth changes, but actively in response to gravitropic stimulation. PMID:11216838

  7. Modulation of Microtubule Interprotofilament Interactions by Modified Taxanes

    PubMed Central

    Matesanz, Ruth; Rodríguez-Salarichs, Javier; Pera, Benet; Canales, Ángeles; Andreu, José Manuel; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Bras, Wim; Nogales, Aurora; Fang, Wei-Shuo; Díaz, José Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules assembled with paclitaxel and docetaxel differ in their numbers of protofilaments, reflecting modification of the lateral association between αβ-tubulin molecules in the microtubule wall. These modifications of microtubule structure, through a not-yet-characterized mechanism, are most likely related to the changes in tubulin-tubulin interactions responsible for microtubule stabilization by these antitumor compounds. We have used a set of modified taxanes to study the structural mechanism of microtubule stabilization by these ligands. Using small-angle x-ray scattering, we have determined how modifications in the shape and size of the taxane substituents result in changes in the interprotofilament angles and in their number. The observed effects have been explained using NMR-aided docking and molecular dynamic simulations of taxane binding at the microtubule pore and luminal sites. Modeling results indicate that modification of the size of substituents at positions C7 and C10 of the taxane core influence the conformation of three key elements in microtubule lateral interactions (the M-loop, the S3 β-strand, and the H3 helix) that modulate the contacts between adjacent protofilaments. In addition, modifications of the substituents at position C2 slightly rearrange the ligand in the binding site, modifying the interaction of the C7 substituent with the M-loop. PMID:22208196

  8. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase

    PubMed Central

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M.; Casagrande, Francesca V.M.; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson’s disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson’s disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  10. Kinetics of microtubule catastrophe assessed by probabilistic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Odde, D J; Cassimeris, L; Buettner, H M

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments whose self-assembly occurs by abrupt switching between states of roughly constant growth and shrinkage, a process known as dynamic instability. Understanding the mechanism of dynamic instability offers potential for controlling microtubule-dependent cellular processes such as nerve growth and mitosis. The growth to shrinkage transitions (catastrophes) and the reverse transitions (rescues) that characterize microtubule dynamic instability have been assumed to be random events with first-order kinetics. By direct observation of individual microtubules in vitro and probabilistic analysis of their distribution of growth times, we found that while the slower growing and biologically inactive (minus) ends obeyed first-order catastrophe kinetics, the faster growing and biologically active (plus) ends did not. The non-first-order kinetics at plus ends imply that growing microtubule plus ends have an effective frequency of catastrophe that depends on how long the microtubules have been growing. This frequency is low initially but then rises asymptotically to a limiting value. Our results also suggest that an additional parameter, beyond the four parameters typically used to describe dynamic instability, is needed to account for the observed behavior and that changing this parameter can significantly affect the distribution of microtubule lengths at steady state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8519980

  11. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  12. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  13. Tau mediates microtubule bundle architectures mimicking fascicles of microtubules found in the axon initial segment

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter J.; Song, Chaeyeon; Deek, Joanna; Miller, Herbert P.; Li, Youli; Choi, Myung Chul; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-01-01

    Tau, an intrinsically disordered protein confined to neuronal axons, binds to and regulates microtubule dynamics. Although there have been observations of string-like microtubule fascicles in the axon initial segment (AIS) and hexagonal bundles in neurite-like processes in non-neuronal cells overexpressing Tau, cell-free reconstitutions have not replicated either geometry. Here we map out the energy landscape of Tau-mediated, GTP-dependent ‘active' microtubule bundles at 37 °C, as revealed by synchrotron SAXS and TEM. Widely spaced bundles (wall-to-wall distance Dw–w≈25–41 nm) with hexagonal and string-like symmetry are observed, the latter mimicking bundles found in the AIS. A second energy minimum (Dw–w≈16–23 nm) is revealed under osmotic pressure. The wide spacing results from a balance between repulsive forces, due to Tau's projection domain (PD), and a stabilizing sum of transient sub-kBT cationic/anionic charge–charge attractions mediated by weakly penetrating opposing PDs. This landscape would be significantly affected by charge-altering modifications of Tau associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:27452526

  14. Tau mediates microtubule bundle architectures mimicking fascicles of microtubules found in the axon initial segment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Peter J.; Song, Chaeyeon; Deek, Joanna; Miller, Herbert P.; Li, Youli; Choi, Myung Chul; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-07-25

    Tau, an intrinsically disordered protein confined to neuronal axons, binds to and regulates microtubule dynamics. Although there have been observations of string-like microtubule fascicles in the axon initial segment (AIS) and hexagonal bundles in neurite-like processes in non-neuronal cells overexpressing Tau, cell-free reconstitutions have not replicated either geometry. Here we map out the energy landscape of Tau-mediated, GTP-dependent ‘active’ microtubule bundles at 37°C, as revealed by synchrotron SAXS and TEM. Widely spaced bundles (wall-to-wall distance Dw–w≈25–41nm) with hexagonal and string-like symmetry are observed, the latter mimicking bundles found in the AIS. A second energy minimum (Dw–w≈16–23nm) is revealed under osmoticmore » pressure. The wide spacing results from a balance between repulsive forces, due to Tau’s projection domain (PD), and a stabilizing sum of transient sub-kBT cationic/anionic charge–charge attractions mediated by weakly penetrating opposing PDs. In the end, we find that this landscape would be significantly affected by charge-altering modifications of Tau associated with neurodegeneration.« less

  15. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  16. Diffusion of dextran inside microtubule sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Camelia

    2005-03-01

    Microtubules (Mts) are the bones of the cell. Their exterior has been extensively studied but little is known about their interior. We have studied the diffusion of fluorescein labeled dextran in the presence of GDP Mts and taxol stabilized GDP Mts. The diffusion coefficient, D, of different size dextran (10 kD, 40 kD, 70 kD, 500 kD) was measured using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). If dextran was present during the assembling of Mts, D was smaller then free diffusion coefficient. When dextran was added after the assembling, D was the same as the free diffusion coefficient. For taxol stabilized Mts (0.90 fill ratio), D was also found the same as the free diffusion coefficient .

  17. Hypothesis: microtubules, a key to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, S S; Jarvik, L F

    1989-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a clinicopathologic syndrome of unknown etiology with numerous abnormalities in neuronal and nonneuronal cells. A review of the literature suggests that a common basic intracellular defect may underlie many of the reported abnormalities. We hypothesize impairment of the microtubule (MT) system as one explanation for the pathogenesis of AD. Evidence in support of the hypothesis includes the following: MTs are ubiquitous and vital cell components, unequally distributed, with the highest concentration in the brain; various abnormalities, including the key neuropathologic lesions, can be explained by impairments of the MT system; and experiments utilizing pharmacologic agents known to disrupt MTs have reproduced certain abnormalities observed in AD. The hypothesis provides a framework for systematic investigations of MTs at the cellular and molecular levels as well as the basis for in vivo diagnostic tests for AD. PMID:2813384

  18. Centrosome and microtubule instability in aging Drosophila cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.; Hedrick, J.

    1999-01-01

    Several cytoskeletal changes are associated with aging which includes alterations in muscle structure leading to muscular atrophy, and weakening of the microtubule network which affects cellular secretion and maintenance of cell shape. Weakening of the microtubule network during meiosis in aging oocytes can result in aneuploidy or trisomic zygotes with increasing maternal age. Imbalances of cytoskeletal organization can lead to disease such as Alzheimer's, muscular disorders, and cancer. Because many cytoskeletal diseases are related to age we investigated the effects of aging on microtubule organization in cell cultures of the Drosophila cell model system (Schneider S-1 and Kc23 cell lines). This cell model is increasingly being used as an alternative system to mammalian cell cultures. Drosophila cells are amenable to genetic manipulations and can be used to identify and manipulate genes which are involved in the aging processes. Immunofluorescence, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy were employed for the analysis of microtubule organizing centers (centrosomes) and microtubules at various times after subculturing cells in fresh medium. Our results reveal that centrosomes and the microtubule network becomes significantly affected in aging cells after 5 days of subculture. At 5-14 days of subculture, 1% abnormal out of 3% mitoses were noted which were clearly distinguishable from freshly subcultured control cells in which 3% of cells undergo normal mitosis with bipolar configurations. Microtubules are also affected in the midbody during cell division. The midbody in aging cells becomes up to 10 times longer when compared with midbodies in freshly subcultured cells. During interphase, microtubules are often disrupted and disorganized, which may indicate improper function related to transport of cell organelles along microtubules. These results are likely to help explain some cytoskeletal disorders and diseases related to aging.

  19. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-21

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. PMID:26260025

  20. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  1. Birefringence of single and bundled microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Oldenbourg, R; Salmon, E D; Tran, P T

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the birefringence of microtubules (MTs) and of MT-based macromolecular assemblies in vitro and in living cells by using the new Pol-Scope. A single microtubule in aqueous suspension and imaged with a numerical aperture of 1.4 had a peak retardance of 0.07 nm. The peak retardance of a small bundle increased linearly with the number of MTs in the bundle. Axonemes (prepared from sea urchin sperm) had a peak retardance 20 times higher than that of single MTs, in accordance with the nine doublets and two singlets arrangement of parallel MTs in the axoneme. Measured filament retardance decreased when the filament was defocused or the numerical aperture of the imaging system was decreased. However, the retardance "area," which we defined as the image retardance integrated along a line perpendicular to the filament axis, proved to be independent of focus and of numerical aperture. These results are in good agreement with a theory that we developed for measuring retardances with imaging optics. Our theoretical concept is based on Wiener's theory of mixed dielectrics, which is well established for nonimaging applications. We extend its use to imaging systems by considering the coherence region defined by the optical set-up. Light scattered from within that region interferes coherently in the image point. The presence of a filament in the coherence region leads to a polarization dependent scattering cross section and to a finite retardance measured in the image point. Similar to resolution measurements, the linear dimension of the coherence region for retardance measurements is on the order lambda/(2 NA), where lambda is the wavelength of light and NA is the numerical aperture of the illumination and imaging lenses. PMID:9449366

  2. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  3. Purely cortical anaplastic ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  4. Stomata-controlled nighttime COS fluxes in a boreal forest: implications for the use of COS as a GPP tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulli; Vesala, Timo; Mammarella, Ivan; Baker, Ian T.; Franchin, Alessandro; Kolari, Pasi; Sun, Wu; Keskinen, Helmi; Levula, Janne; Chen, Huilin

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) is a promising new tracer that can be used to partition the Net Ecosystem Exchange into gross primary production (GPP) and respiration. COS and CO2 vegetation fluxes are closely related as these gases share the same diffusion pathway into stomata. This close coupling is the fundamental principle for the use of COS as tracer for GPP. Nonetheless, in contrast to CO2 , the uptake of COS by vegetation is not light-dependent, and therefore the vegetative uptake of COS can continue during the night as long as stomata are open. Nighttime stomatal conductance is observed in a variety of studies, and also nighttime depletion of COS concentrations is reported several times but it is not confirmed with field measurements that the depletion of COS in the night is indeed driven by stomatal opening. In the summer of 2015 a campaign took place at the SMEAR II site in Hyytiälä, Finland to provide better constrained COS flux data for boreal forests using a combination of COS measurements, i.e. atmospheric profile concentrations up to 125 m, eddy-covariance fluxes and soil chamber fluxes, and collocated measurements of stomatal conductance and 222Radon. A high correlation between concentrations of 222Radon and COS implies that the radon-tracer method is a valuable tool to derive nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes. We find that soils contribute to 17% of the total ecosystem COS flux during nighttime in the peak growing season. Nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes show a correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 = 0.3), indicating that nighttime COS fluxes are primarily driven by vegetation. The COS vegetation fluxes will be compared with calculated fluxes from the Simple Biosphere model. Furthermore, the nighttime vegetative COS uptake covers a substantial fraction (25%) of the daily maximum COS uptake by vegetation. Accurate quantification of nighttime COS uptake is required to be able to use COS as a useful tracer for GPP.

  5. Ecological distribution of leaf stomata and trichomes among tree species in a Malaysian lowland tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Ichie, Tomoaki; Inoue, Yuta; Takahashi, Narumi; Kamiya, Koichi; Kenzo, Tanaka

    2016-07-01

    The vertical structure of a tropical rain forest is complex and multilayered, with strong variation of micro-environment with height up to the canopy. We investigated the relation between morphological traits of leaf surfaces and tree ecological characteristics in a Malaysian tropical rain forest. The shapes and densities of stomata and trichomes on the abaxial leaf surfaces and their relation with leaf characteristics such as leaf area and leaf mass per area (LMA) were studied in 136 tree species in 35 families with different growth forms in the tropical moist forest. Leaf physiological properties were also measured in 50 canopy and emergent species. Most tree species had flat type (40.4 %) or mound type (39.7 %) stomata. In addition, 84 species (61.76 %) in 22 families had trichomes, including those with glandular (17.65 %) and non-glandular trichomes (44.11 %). Most leaf characteristics significantly varied among the growth form types: species in canopy and emergent layers and canopy gap conditions had higher stomatal density, stomatal pore index (SPI), trichome density and LMA than species in understory and subcanopy layers, though the relation of phylogenetically independent contrasts to each characteristic was not statistically significant, except for leaf stomatal density, SPI and LMA. Intrinsic water use efficiency in canopy and emergent tree species with higher trichome densities was greater than in species with lower trichome densities. These results suggest that tree species in tropical rain forests adapt to a spatial difference in their growth forms, which are considerably affected by phylogenetic context, by having different stomatal and trichome shapes and/or densities.

  6. Ecological distribution of leaf stomata and trichomes among tree species in a Malaysian lowland tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Ichie, Tomoaki; Inoue, Yuta; Takahashi, Narumi; Kamiya, Koichi; Kenzo, Tanaka

    2016-07-01

    The vertical structure of a tropical rain forest is complex and multilayered, with strong variation of micro-environment with height up to the canopy. We investigated the relation between morphological traits of leaf surfaces and tree ecological characteristics in a Malaysian tropical rain forest. The shapes and densities of stomata and trichomes on the abaxial leaf surfaces and their relation with leaf characteristics such as leaf area and leaf mass per area (LMA) were studied in 136 tree species in 35 families with different growth forms in the tropical moist forest. Leaf physiological properties were also measured in 50 canopy and emergent species. Most tree species had flat type (40.4 %) or mound type (39.7 %) stomata. In addition, 84 species (61.76 %) in 22 families had trichomes, including those with glandular (17.65 %) and non-glandular trichomes (44.11 %). Most leaf characteristics significantly varied among the growth form types: species in canopy and emergent layers and canopy gap conditions had higher stomatal density, stomatal pore index (SPI), trichome density and LMA than species in understory and subcanopy layers, though the relation of phylogenetically independent contrasts to each characteristic was not statistically significant, except for leaf stomatal density, SPI and LMA. Intrinsic water use efficiency in canopy and emergent tree species with higher trichome densities was greater than in species with lower trichome densities. These results suggest that tree species in tropical rain forests adapt to a spatial difference in their growth forms, which are considerably affected by phylogenetic context, by having different stomatal and trichome shapes and/or densities. PMID:26879931

  7. Microtubule attachment and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling at the kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Emily A.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosome segregation during cell division is facilitated by the kinetochore, an assembly of proteins built on centromeric DNA. The kinetochore attaches chromosomes to spindle microtubules, modulates the stability of these attachments, and relays microtubule-binding status to the spindle assembly checkpoint, a cell cycle surveillance pathway that delays chromosome segregation in response to unattached kinetochores. Here, we discuss recent results that guide current thinking on how each of these kinetochore-centered processes is achieved, and how their integration ensures faithful chromosome segregation, focusing on the essential roles of kinase-phosphatase signaling and the microtubule-binding KMN protein network. PMID:23258294

  8. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  9. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved. PMID:27193844

  10. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved.

  11. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Lindsay G.

    2015-01-01

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from “off” at the plus ends to “on” at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein–dynactin–Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end–directed dynein–dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched “on” by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal. PMID:26483554

  12. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Lindsay G; Markus, Steven M

    2015-10-26

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from "off" at the plus ends to "on" at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein-dynactin-Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end-directed dynein-dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched "on" by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal. PMID:26483554

  13. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Lindsay G; Markus, Steven M

    2015-10-26

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from "off" at the plus ends to "on" at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein-dynactin-Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end-directed dynein-dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched "on" by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal.

  14. Analysis of microtubules in isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuyu; Brady, Scott T

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical specialization of cellular microtubules has emerged as a primary mechanism in specifying microtubule dynamics and function. However, study of specific subcellular populations of cytoplasmic microtubules has been limited, particularly in the nervous system. The complexity of nervous tissue makes it difficult to distinguish neuronal microtubules from glial microtubules, and axonal microtubules from dendritic and cell body microtubules. The problem is further compounded by the finding that a large fraction of neuronal tubulin is lost during standard preparations of brain tubulin, and this population of stable microtubules is enriched in axons. Here, we consider a unique biological model that provides a unique opportunity to study axonal microtubules both in situ and in vitro: isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon. The axoplasm model represents a powerful system for addressing fundamental questions of microtubule structure and function in the axon.

  15. Flexural Rigidity of MCF-7 Microtubules Measured from Thermal Fluctuations in Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Mutafopulos, Kiryako; Behr, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules play a key role in the mechanical and elastic properties of eukaryotic cells. For this reason, measuring the flexural rigidity of bovine brain microtubules have been extensively investigated through different methods of measurement. Beta tubulin isotypes, a noticeable trait to consider as we transfer from mammalian neural microtubules to mammalian non-neural microtubules, are assembled differently in distributions among various types of microtubules. Different studies have shown that microtubules made from different beta-tubulin isotypes express unique polymerization and dynamic behavior. This study focuses on measuring mechanical properties of one of non-neural microtubules, MCF-7. We will discuss the structure differences between brain bovine microtubules and MCF-7, along with the rigidity of single microtubules polymerized from MCF-7 tubulin through monitoring the curvature of microtubule due to thermal fluctuations.

  16. GTPγS microtubules mimic the growing microtubule end structure recognized by end-binding proteins (EBs)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Sebastian P.; Bieling, Peter; Cope, Julia; Hoenger, Andreas; Surrey, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) localize to growing microtubule plus ends to regulate a multitude of essential microtubule functions. End-binding proteins (EBs) form the core of this network by recognizing a distinct structural feature transiently existing in an extended region at growing microtubule ends and by recruiting other +TIPs to this region. The nature of the conformational difference allowing EBs to discriminate between tubulins in this region and other potential tubulin binding sites farther away from the microtubule end is unknown. By combining in vitro reconstitution, multicolor total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate here that a closed microtubule B lattice with incorporated GTPγS, a slowly hydrolyzable GTP analog, can mimic the natural EB protein binding site. Our findings indicate that the guanine nucleotide γ-phosphate binding site is crucial for determining the affinity of EBs for lattice-incorporated tubulin. This defines the molecular mechanism by which EBs recognize growing microtubule ends. PMID:21368119

  17. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  18. Genetic evidence for a microtubule-capture mechanism during polarised growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Manck, Raphael; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Herrero, Saturnino; Takeshita, Norio; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Fischer, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    The cellular switch from symmetry to polarity in eukaryotes depends on the microtubule (MT) and actin cytoskeletons. In fungi such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe or Aspergillus nidulans, the MT cytoskeleton determines the sites of actin polymerization through cortical cell-end marker proteins. Here we describe A. nidulans MT guidance protein A (MigA) as the first ortholog of the karyogamy protein Kar9 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in filamentous fungi. A. nidulans MigA interacts with the cortical ApsA protein and is involved in spindle positioning during mitosis. MigA is also associated with septal and nuclear MT organizing centers (MTOCs). Super-resolution photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) analyses revealed that MigA is recruited to assembling and retracting MT plus ends in an EbA-dependent manner. MigA is required for MT convergence in hyphal tips and plays a role in correct localization of the cell-end markers TeaA and TeaR. In addition, MigA interacts with a class-V myosin, suggesting that an active mechanism exists to capture MTs and to pull the ends along actin filaments. Hence, the organization of MTs and actin depend on each other, and positive feedback loops ensure robust polar growth. PMID:26272919

  19. Carbon dioxide diffusion across stomata and mesophyll and photo-biochemical processes as affected by growth CO2 and phosphorus nutrition in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrients such as phosphorus availability may exert a major control over plant response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2), which is projected to double by the end of 21st century. Elevated CO2 may overcome the diffusional limitation to photosynthesis posed by stomata and mesop...

  20. Gaseous NO2 effects on epidermis and stomata related physiochemical characteristics of hybrid poplar leaves: chemical elements composition, stomatal functions, photosynthesis and respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms controlling effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide on epidermis and stomata dynamics, and photosynthesis and respirations processes are still not fully understood. In this study, we used poplar as a model plant and investigated the effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide (4 microliters per lite...

  1. Application of Bacillus subtilis to the roots of leafy greens, in the presence of Listeria innocua and Salmonella Newport, induces closure of stomata.

    PubMed

    Markland, Sarah M; Ferelli, Angela M; Craighead, Shani A; Bais, Harsh; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2015-10-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis UD1022 has been shown to trigger an induced systemic response in Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction causes plant stomata to close, protecting the plant from infection by plant pathogens and thereby increasing crop yield. The purpose of this study was to determine whether UD1022 applied to the roots of plants is able to induce stomata closure in leafy greens as well as influence the persistence of human pathogens (Listeria and Salmonella) on plants. UD1022 induced stomata closure in the presence of human pathogens on both lettuce and spinach 3 h post-inoculation (p<0.0001). Results were confirmed by root inoculation with heat-killed UD1022, which did not induce stomata closure. Presence of UD1022 on lettuce roots significantly reduced the persistence of Listeria on plants after 3 days post-inoculation (p=0.02) but had less of an effect on the persistence of Salmonella. The results of this study indicate that plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium B. subtilis UD1022 may be able to prevent contamination by some human pathogens. This is the first study to investigate the use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to control the persistence of human pathogens on plants.

  2. Dynamics of an Idealized Model of Microtubule Growth and Catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Antal, T.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.; Mailman, M.; Chakraborty, B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a simple dynamical model of a microtubule that evolves by attachment of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) tubulin to its end, irreversible conversion of GTP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) tubulin by hydrolysis, and detachment of GDP at the end of a microtubule. As a function of rates of these processes, the microtubule can grow steadily or its length can fluctuate wildly. In the regime where detachment can be neglected, we find exact expressions for the tubule and GTP cap length distributions, as well as power-law length distributions of GTP and GDP islands. In the opposite limit of instantaneous detachment, we find the time between catastrophes, where the microtubule shrinks to zero length, and determine the size distribution of avalanches (sequence of consecutive GDP detachment events). We obtain the phase diagram for general rates and verify our predictions by numerical simulations. PMID:17995026

  3. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  4. γ-Tubulin complexes in microtubule nucleation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Berl R; Paolillo, Vitoria; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the functions of γ-tubulin and, in particular, its role in microtubule nucleation since the publication of its discovery in 1989. The structure of γ-tubulin has been determined, and the components of γ-tubulin complexes have been identified. Significant progress in understanding the structure of the γ-tubulin ring complex and its components has led to a persuasive model for how these complexes nucleate microtubule assembly. At the same time, data have accumulated that γ-tubulin has important but less well understood functions that are not simply a consequence of its function in microtubule nucleation. These include roles in the regulation of plus-end microtubule dynamics, gene regulation, and mitotic and cell cycle regulation. Finally, evidence is emerging that γ-tubulin mutations or alterations of γ-tubulin expression play an important role in certain types of cancer and in other diseases.

  5. Mechanism and Dynamics of Breakage of Fluorescent Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglian; Xu, Chunhua; Liu, Chunxiang; Qu, E.; Yuan, Ming; Li, Zhaolin; Cheng, Bingying; Zhang, Daozhong

    2006-01-01

    The breakage of fluorescence-labeled microtubules under irradiation of excitation light is found in our experiments. Its mechanism is studied. The results indicate that free radicals are the main reason for the photosensitive breakage. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the microtubules are probed with a dual-optical tweezers system. It is found that the fluorescence-labeled microtubules are much easier to extend compared with those without fluorescence. Such microtubules can be extended by 30%, and the force for breaking them up is only several piconewtons. In addition, we find that the breakup of the protofilaments is not simultaneous but step-by-step, which further confirms that the interaction between protofilaments is fairly weak. PMID:16387782

  6. Assaying microtubule nucleation by the γ-tubulin ring complex.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuk-Kwan; Qi, Robert Z

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule organization by microtubule-organizing centers such as the centrosome requires γ-tubulin, which exists in the γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) that nucleates microtubules. The γTuRC is a ring-shaped, macromolecular complex whose core components are γ-tubulin and the γ-tubulin complex proteins. Despite the recent identification of additional γTuRC components, the molecular composition and regulatory properties of the complex remain poorly understood. The ability to purify the γTuRC at a large scale for characterization may hold a key to understanding the mechanism by which the γTuRC nucleates microtubules. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate the γTuRC from human cell cultures and to perform assays on the purified γTuRC. PMID:24630104

  7. γ-Tubulin complexes in microtubule nucleation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Berl R.; Paolillo, Vitoria; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the functions of γ-tubulin and, in particular, its role in microtubule nucleation since the publication of its discovery in 1989. The structure of γ-tubulin has been determined, and the components of γ-tubulin complexes have been identified. Significant progress in understanding the structure of the γ-tubulin ring complex and its components has led to a persuasive model for how these complexes nucleate microtubule assembly. At the same time, data have accumulated that γ-tubulin has important but less well understood functions that are not simply a consequence of its function in microtubule nucleation. These include roles in the regulation of plus-end microtubule dynamics, gene regulation, and mitotic and cell cycle regulation. Finally, evidence is emerging that γ-tubulin mutations or alterations of γ-tubulin expression play an important role in certain types of cancer and in other diseases. PMID:26316498

  8. Multiscale Polar Theory of Microtubule and Motor-Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins are building blocks of self-organized subcellular biological structures such as the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. These same ingredients can form new “bioactive” liquid-crystalline fluids that are intrinsically out of equilibrium and which display complex flows and defect dynamics. It is not yet well understood how microscopic activity, which involves polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, yields such larger-scale dynamical structures. In our multiscale theory, Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubule ensembles driven by cross-linking motors allow us to study microscopic organization and stresses. Polarity sorting and cross-link relaxation emerge as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. On larger length scales, our continuum Doi-Onsager theory captures the hydrodynamic flows generated by polarity-dependent active stresses. The results connect local polar structure to flow structures and defect dynamics. PMID:25679909

  9. KIF1A Alternately Uses Two Loops to Bind Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Ryo; Kikkawa, Masahide; Okada, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2004-07-01

    The motor protein kinesin moves along microtubules, driven by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. However, it remains unclear how kinesin converts the chemical energy into mechanical movement. We report crystal structures of monomeric kinesin KIF1A with three transition-state analogs: adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-vanadate, and ADP-AlFx (aluminofluoride complexes). These structures, together with known structures of the ADP-bound state and the adenylyl-(β,γ-methylene) diphosphate (AMP-PCP)-bound state, show that kinesin uses two microtubule-binding loops in an alternating manner to change its interaction with microtubules during the ATP hydrolysis cycle; loop L11 is extended in the AMP-PNP structure, whereas loop L12 is extended in the ADP structure. ADP-vanadate displays an intermediate structure in which a conformational change in two switch regions causes both loops to be raised from the microtubule, thus actively detaching kinesin.

  10. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  11. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Asthik; Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    Cortical 'clefts' (schizencephaly) and cortical 'bumps' (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep 'incomplete' cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  12. Kinesin-microtubule interactions during gliding assays under magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallesen, Todd L.

    Conventional kinesin is a motor protein capable of converting the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. In the cell, this is used to actively transport vesicles through the intracellular matrix. The relationship between the velocity of a single kinesin, as it works against an increasing opposing load, has been well studied. The relationship between the velocity of a cargo being moved by multiple kinesin motors against an opposing load has not been established. A major difficulty in determining the force-velocity relationship for multiple motors is determining the number of motors that are moving a cargo against an opposing load. Here I report on a novel method for detaching microtubules bound to a superparamagnetic bead from kinesin anchor points in an upside down gliding assay using a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of microtubule travel. The anchor points are presumably kinesin motors bound to the surface which microtubules are gliding over. Determining the distance between anchor points, d, allows the calculation of the average number of kinesins, n, that are moving a microtubule. It is possible to calculate the fraction of motors able to move microtubules as well, which is determined to be ˜ 5%. Using a uniform magnetic field parallel to the direction of microtubule travel, it is possible to impart a uniform magnetic field on a microtubule bound to a superparamagnetic bead. We are able to decrease the average velocity of microtubules driven by multiple kinesin motors moving against an opposing force. Using the average number of kinesins on a microtubule, we estimate that there are an average 2-7 kinesins acting against the opposing force. By fitting Gaussians to the smoothed distributions of microtubule velocities acting against an opposing force, multiple velocities are seen, presumably for n, n-1, n-2, etc motors acting together. When these velocities are scaled for the average number of motors on a microtubule, the force

  13. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  14. Translocation and clustering of endosomes and lysosomes depends on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Matteoni, R; Kreis, T E

    1987-09-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence labeling of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells with antibodies recognizing a lysosomal glycoprotein (LGP 120; Lewis, V., S.A. Green, M. Marsh, P. Vihko, A. Helenius, and I. Mellman, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:1839-1847) reveals that lysosomes accumulate in the region around the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). This clustering of lysosomes depends on microtubules. When the interphase microtubules are depolymerized by treatment of the cells with nocodazole or during mitosis, the lysosomes disperse throughout the cytoplasm. Lysosomes recluster rapidly (within 30-60 min) in the region of the centrosomes either upon removal of the drug, or, in telophase, when repolymerization of interphase microtubules has occurred. During this translocation process the lysosomes can be found aligned along centrosomal microtubules. Endosomes and lysosomes can be visualized by incubating living cells with acridine orange. We have analyzed the movement of these labeled endocytic organelles in vivo by video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy. Translocation of endosomes and lysosomes occurs along linear tracks (up to 10 microns long) by discontinuous saltations (with velocities of up to 2.5 microns/s). Organelles move bidirectionally with respect to the MTOC. This movement ceases when microtubules are depolymerized by treatment of the cells with nocodazole. After nocodazole washout and microtubule repolymerization, the translocation and reclustering of fluorescent organelles predominantly occurs in a unidirectional manner towards the area of the MTOC. Organelle movement remains unaffected when cells are treated with cytochalasin D, or when the collapse of intermediate filaments is induced by microinjected monoclonal antivimentin antibodies. It can be concluded that translocation of endosomes and lysosomes occurs along microtubules and is independent of the intermediate filament and microfilament networks. PMID:3308906

  15. Differential microtubule requirements for transcytosis in MDCK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, W; Mâle, P; Mellman, I

    1990-01-01

    Given the role of microtubules in directing the transport of many intracellular organelles, we investigated whether intact microtubules were also required for transcytosis across epithelia. Using polarized MDCK cells expressing receptors for the Fc domain of IgG (FcRII-B2) or polymeric immunoglobulin (pIg-R), we examined the involvement of microtubules in apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical transcytosis, respectively. While depolymerization of microtubules with nocodozole had no effect on apical to basolateral transcytosis via FcR, basolateral to apical transcytosis of dimeric IgA via pIg-R was almost completely blocked. Inhibition due to nocodozole was selective for basolateral to apical transcytosis, since neither endocytosis nor receptor recycling was significantly affected at either plasma membrane domain. As shown by confocal microscopy, the block in transcytosis was due to the inability of MDCK cells to translocate IgA-containing vesicles from the basolateral to the apical cytoplasm in the absence of an intact microtubule network. The nocodazole sensitive step could be partially by-passed, however, by allowing cells to internalize IgA at 17 degrees C prior to nocodazole treatment. Although incubation at 17 degrees C blocked release of IgA into the apical medium, it did not prevent translocation of IgA-containing vesicles to the apical cytoplasm. Thus, receptor-mediated transcytosis in opposite directions exhibits distinct requirements for microtubules, a feature which reflects the spatial organization of MDCK cells. Images Fig.3 Fig.7 PMID:2170116

  16. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF.

  17. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  18. A dynamical model of kinesin-microtubule motility assays.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, F; Chauwin, J F; Despósito, M; José, J V

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional stochastic model for the dynamics of microtubules in gliding-assay experiments is presented here, which includes the viscous drag acting on the moving fiber and the interaction with the kinesins. For this purpose, we model kinesin as a spring, and explicitly use parameter values to characterize the model from experimental data. We numerically compute the mean attachment lifetimes of all motors, the total force exerted on the microtubules at all times, the effects of a distribution in the motor speeds, and also the mean velocity of a microtubule in a gliding assay. We find quantitative agreement with the results of J. Howard, A. J. Hudspeth, and R. D. Vale, Nature. 342:154-158. We perform additional numerical analysis of the individual motors, and show how cancellation of the forces exerted by the many motors creates a resultant longitudinal force much smaller than the maximum force that could be exerted by a single motor. We also examine the effects of inhomogeneities in the motor-speeds. Finally, we present a simple theoretical model for microtubules dynamics in gliding assays. We show that the model can be analytically solved in the limit of few motors attached to the microtubule and in the opposite limit of high motor density. We find that the speed of the microtubule goes like the mean speed of the motors in good quantitative agreement with the experimental and numerical results. PMID:11371430

  19. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  20. Modulation of host microtubule dynamics by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Girish K.; Splitter, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is a vulnerable target of many microbial pathogens during the course of infection. Rearrangements of host cytoskeleton benefit microbes in various stages of their infection cycle such as invasion, motility, and persistence. Bacterial pathogens deliver a number of effector proteins into host cells for modulating the dynamics of actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Alteration of the actin cytoskeleton is generally achieved by bacterial effectors that target the small GTPases of the host. Modulation of microtubule dynamics involves direct interaction of effector proteins with the subunits of microtubules or recruiting cellular proteins that affect microtubule dynamics. This review will discuss effector proteins from animal and human bacterial pathogens that either destabilize or stabilize host micro-tubules to advance the infectious process. A compilation of these research findings will provide an overview of known and unknown strategies used by various bacterial effectors to modulate the host microtubule dynamics. The present review will undoubtedly help direct future research to determine the mechanisms of action of many bacterial effector proteins and contribute to understanding the survival strategies of diverse adherent and invasive bacterial pathogens. PMID:23585820

  1. Fluorescent markers of the microtubule cytoskeleton in Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, M.; Kilaru, S.; Latz, M.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton supports vital processes in fungal cells, including hyphal growth and mitosis. Consequently, it is a target for fungicides, such as benomyl. The use of fluorescent fusion proteins to illuminate microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins has led to a break-through in our understanding of their dynamics and function in fungal cells. Here, we introduce fluorescent markers to visualize microtubules and accessory proteins in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We fused enhanced green-fluorescent protein to α-tubulin (ZtTub2), to ZtPeb1, a homologue of the mammalian plus-end binding protein EB1, and to ZtGrc1, a component of the minus-end located γ-tubulin ring complex, involved in the nucleation of microtubules. In vivo observation confirms the localization and dynamic behaviour of all three markers. These marker proteins are useful tools for understanding the organization and importance of the microtubule cytoskeleton in Z. tritici. PMID:25857261

  2. Elastic Response, Buckling, and Instability of Microtubules under Radial Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Carrasco, Carolina; de Pablo, Pedro J.; MacKintosh, Frederick C.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the mechanical properties of single microtubules by lateral indentation with the tip of an atomic force microscope. Indentations up to ∼3.6 nm, i.e., 15% of the microtubule diameter, resulted in an approximately linear elastic response, and indentations were reversible without hysteresis. At an indentation force of around 0.3 nN we observed an instability corresponding to an ∼1-nm indentation step in the taxol-stabilized microtubules, which could be due to partial or complete rupture of a relatively small number of lateral or axial tubulin-tubulin bonds. These indentations were reversible with hysteresis when the tip was retracted and no trace of damage was observed in subsequent high-resolution images. Higher forces caused substantial damage to the microtubules, which either led to depolymerization or, occasionally, to slowly reannealing holes in the microtubule wall. We modeled the experimental results using finite-element methods and find that the simple assumption of a homogeneous isotropic material, albeit structured with the characteristic protofilament corrugations, is sufficient to explain the linear elastic response of microtubules. PMID:16731557

  3. Dynein prevents erroneous kinetochore-microtubule attachments in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Equal distribution of the genetic material during cell division relies on efficient congression of chromosomes to the metaphase plate. Prior to their alignment, the Dynein motor recruited to kinetochores transports a fraction of laterally-attached chromosomes along microtubules toward the spindle poles. By doing that, Dynein not only contributes to chromosome movements, but also prevents premature stabilization of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This is achieved by 2 parallel mechanisms: 1) Dynein-mediated poleward movement of chromosomes counteracts opposite polar-ejection forces (PEFs) on chromosome arms by the microtubule plus-end-directed motors chromokinesins. Otherwise, they could stabilize erroneous syntelic kinetochore-microtubule attachments and lead to the random ejection of chromosomes away from the spindle poles; and 2) By transporting chromosomes to the spindle poles, Dynein brings the former to the zone of highest Aurora A kinase activity, further destabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Thus, Dynein plays an important role in keeping chromosome segregation error-free by preventing premature stabilization of kinetochore-microtubule attachments near the spindle poles.

  4. Structural microtubule cap: stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state.

    PubMed Central

    Jánosi, Imre M; Chrétien, Denis; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dimers, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We point out that near the end of a microtubule, the proximity of the end shifts the balance in this tug-of-war, with some protofilament bending as result. This somewhat relaxes the microtubule lattice near its end, resulting in a structural cap. This structural cap thus is a simple mechanical consequence of two well-established facts: protofilaments made of GDP-liganded tubulin have intrinsic curvature, and microtubules are elastic, made from material that can yield to forces, in casu its own intrinsic forces. We explore possible properties of this structural cap, and demonstrate 1) how it allows both polymerization from GTP-liganded tubulin and rapid depolymerization in its absence; 2) how rescue can occur; 3) how a third, meta-stable intermediate state is possible and can explain some experimental results; and 4) how the tapered tips observed at polymerizing microtubule ends are stabilized during growth, though unable to accommodate a lateral cap. This scenario thus supports the widely accepted GTP-cap model by suggesting a stabilizing mechanism that explains the many aspects of dynamic instability. PMID:12202357

  5. Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Chin, Steven S.; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  6. Arrangement of microtubules in Beta vulgaris statocytes and their possible role in graviperception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G.

    It is widely assumed that only actin cytoskeleton is directly implicated in plant cell graviperception and little is known about the role of microtubules (MTs) in the above process. Generally, it is suggested that MTs do not participate in the graviperceptive reactions. Our investigation was aimed to visualize tubulin cytoskeleton in B. vulgaris statocytes and study MT patterns in above cells under gravistimulation. To fulfill the above we have applied immunohistochemical reaction with the use of monoclonal antibodies against tubulin and have revealed the arrangement of MTs in root cap statocytes in the control and gravistimulated (2h in darkness) roots of beat seedlings. Both in control and gravistimulated samples endoplasmic MTs were absent in columella cells. Cortical MTs were observed at the cell periphery. In contradiction to observations on Zea mays and Lepidium sativum especially prominent bundles of cortical MTs were in the distal part of statocyte, in the region of statolith localization. To our mind enrichment of the distal part of statocyte with MTs evidence implication of tubulin cytoskeleton in statolith sedimentation. In particular, cortical MTs form the scaffold for filamentous actin which is attached to statolith surface and promote their movement. Therefore arrangement of MTs is not changed during graviperception allowing the actin cytoskeleton fulfil its function of statolith movement. Such our suggestion is in agreement with the hypothesis of some authors (Baluska and Hasenstein, 1997) who proposed that so-called restrained gravisensing is spatially restricted to the bottom of the statocyte. This promotes the amplification of gravity-induced impacts on the cellular architecture. Another explanation for tubulin cytoskeleton direct and indirect role in graviperception is discussed.

  7. The Phragmoplast-Orienting Kinesin-12 Class Proteins Translate the Positional Information of the Preprophase Band to Establish the Cortical Division Zone in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Elisabeth; Gadeyne, Astrid; Stöckle, Dorothee; Zimmermann, Steffi; De Jaeger, Geert; Ehrhardt, David W; Kirik, Viktor; Van Damme, Daniel; Müller, Sabine

    2014-06-27

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a faithful but transient predictor of the division plane in somatic cell divisions. Throughout mitosis the PPBs positional information is preserved by factors that continuously mark the division plane at the cell cortex, the cortical division zone, by their distinct spatio-temporal localization patterns. However, the mechanism maintaining these identity factors at the plasma membrane after PPB disassembly remains obscure. The pair of kinesin-12 class proteins PHRAGMOPLAST ORIENTING KINESIN1 (POK1) and POK2 are key players in division plane maintenance. Here, we show that POK1 is continuously present at the cell cortex, providing a spatial reference for the site formerly occupied by the PPB. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis combined with microtubule destabilization revealed dynamic microtubule-dependent recruitment of POK1 to the PPB during prophase, while POK1 retention at the cortical division zone in the absence of cortical microtubules appeared static. POK function is strictly required to maintain the division plane identity factor TANGLED (TAN) after PPB disassembly, although POK1 and TAN recruitment to the PPB occur independently during prophase. Together, our data suggest that POKs represent fundamental early anchoring components of the cortical division zone, translating and preserving the positional information of the PPB by maintaining downstream identity markers. PMID:24972597

  8. The Phragmoplast-Orienting Kinesin-12 Class Proteins Translate the Positional Information of the Preprophase Band to Establish the Cortical Division Zone in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lipka, Elisabeth; Gadeyne, Astrid; Stöckle, Dorothee; Zimmermann, Steffi; De Jaeger, Geert; Ehrhardt, David W.; Kirik, Viktor; Van Damme, Daniel; Müller, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a faithful but transient predictor of the division plane in somatic cell divisions. Throughout mitosis the PPBs positional information is preserved by factors that continuously mark the division plane at the cell cortex, the cortical division zone, by their distinct spatio-temporal localization patterns. However, the mechanism maintaining these identity factors at the plasma membrane after PPB disassembly remains obscure. The pair of kinesin-12 class proteins PHRAGMOPLAST ORIENTING KINESIN1 (POK1) and POK2 are key players in division plane maintenance. Here, we show that POK1 is continuously present at the cell cortex, providing a spatial reference for the site formerly occupied by the PPB. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis combined with microtubule destabilization revealed dynamic microtubule-dependent recruitment of POK1 to the PPB during prophase, while POK1 retention at the cortical division zone in the absence of cortical microtubules appeared static. POK function is strictly required to maintain the division plane identity factor TANGLED (TAN) after PPB disassembly, although POK1 and TAN recruitment to the PPB occur independently during prophase. Together, our data suggest that POKs represent fundamental early anchoring components of the cortical division zone, translating and preserving the positional information of the PPB by maintaining downstream identity markers. PMID:24972597

  9. Time in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shadlen, Michael N.; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Nobre, Anna C.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2015-01-01

    Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. PMID:26468192

  10. Xenopus TACC1 is a microtubule plus‐end tracking protein that can regulate microtubule dynamics during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Lucaj, Christopher M.; Evans, Matthew F.; Nwagbara, Belinda U.; Ebbert, Patrick T.; Baker, Charlie C.; Volk, Joseph G.; Francl, Andrew F.; Ruvolo, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule plus‐end dynamics are regulated by a family of proteins called plus‐end tracking proteins (+TIPs). We recently demonstrated that the transforming acidic coiled‐coil (TACC) domain family member, TACC3, can function as a +TIP to regulate microtubule dynamics in Xenopus laevis embryonic cells. Although it has been previously reported that TACC3 is the only TACC family member that exists in Xenopus, our examination of its genome determined that Xenopus, like all other vertebrates, contains three TACC family members. Here, we investigate the localization and function of Xenopus TACC1, the founding member of the TACC family. We demonstrate that it can act as a +TIP to regulate microtubule dynamics, and that the conserved C‐terminal TACC domain is required for its localization to plus‐ends. We also show that, in Xenopus embryonic mesenchymal cells, TACC1 and TACC3 are each required for maintaining normal microtubule growth speed but exhibit some functional redundancy in the regulation of microtubule growth lifetime. Given the conservation of TACC1 in Xenopus and other vertebrates, we propose that Xenopus laevis is a useful system to investigate unexplored cell biological functions of TACC1 and other TACC family members in the regulation of microtubule dynamics. © 2015 The Authors. Cytoskeleton, Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26012630

  11. Dynamical Length-Regulation of Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbinger, Anna; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are vital constituents of the cytoskeleton. These stiff filaments are not only needed for mechanical support. They also fulfill highly dynamic tasks. For instance MTs build the mitotic spindle, which pulls the doubled set of chromosomes apart during mitosis. Hence, a well-regulated and adjustable MT length is essential for cell division. Extending a recently introduced model [1], we here study length-regulation of MTs. Thereby we account for both spontaneous polymerization and depolymerization triggered by motor proteins. In contrast to the polymerization rate, the effective depolymerization rate depends on the presence of molecular motors at the tip and thereby on crowding effects which in turn depend on the MT length. We show that these antagonistic effects result in a well-defined MT length. Stochastic simulations and analytic calculations reveal the exact regimes where regulation is feasible. Furthermore, the adjusted MT length and the ensuing strength of fluctuations are analyzed. Taken together, we make quantitative predictions which can be tested experimentally. These results should help to obtain deeper insights in the microscopic mechanisms underlying length-regulation. [4pt] [1] L.Reese, A.Melbinger, E.Frey, Biophys. J., 101, 9, 2190 (2011)

  12. Microtubules, polarity and vertebrate neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cearns, Michael D; Escuin, Sarah; Alexandre, Paula; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are key cellular components, long known to participate in morphogenetic events that shape the developing embryo. However, the links between the cellular functions of MTs, their effects on cell shape and polarity, and their role in large-scale morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, these relationships were examined with respect to two strategies for generating the vertebrate neural tube: bending and closure of the mammalian neural plate; and cavitation of the teleost neural rod. The latter process has been compared with 'secondary' neurulation that generates the caudal spinal cord in mammals. MTs align along the apico-basal axis of the mammalian neuroepithelium early in neural tube closure, participating functionally in interkinetic nuclear migration, which indirectly impacts on cell shape. Whether MTs play other functional roles in mammalian neurulation remains unclear. In the zebrafish, MTs are important for defining the neural rod midline prior to its cavitation, both by localizing apical proteins at the tissue midline and by orienting cell division through a mirror-symmetric MT apparatus that helps to further define the medial localization of apical polarity proteins. Par proteins have been implicated in centrosome positioning in neuroepithelia as well as in the control of polarized morphogenetic movements in the neural rod. Understanding of MT functions during early nervous system development has so far been limited, partly by techniques that fail to distinguish 'cause' from 'effect'. Future developments will likely rely on novel ways to selectively impair MT function in order to investigate the roles they play.

  13. Tau stabilizes microtubules by binding at the interface between tubulin heterodimers

    PubMed Central

    Kadavath, Harindranath; Hofele, Romina V.; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Tepper, Katharina; Urlaub, Henning; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior, and spatial organization of microtubules are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins. An important microtubule-associated protein is the protein Tau, because its microtubule interaction is impaired in the course of Alzheimer’s disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Tau binds to microtubules by using small groups of evolutionary conserved residues. The binding sites are formed by residues that are essential for the pathological aggregation of Tau, suggesting competition between physiological interaction and pathogenic misfolding. Tau residues in between the microtubule-binding sites remain flexible when Tau is bound to microtubules in agreement with a highly dynamic nature of the Tau–microtubule interaction. By binding at the interface between tubulin heterodimers, Tau uses a conserved mechanism of microtubule polymerization and, thus, regulation of axonal stability and cell morphology. PMID:26034266

  14. EBs Recognize a Nucleotide-Dependent Structural Cap at Growing Microtubule Ends

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Sebastian P.; Fourniol, Franck J.; Bohner, Gergő; Moores, Carolyn A.; Surrey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Growing microtubule ends serve as transient binding platforms for essential proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics and their interactions with cellular substructures. End-binding proteins (EBs) autonomously recognize an extended region at growing microtubule ends with unknown structural characteristics and then recruit other factors to the dynamic end structure. Using cryo-electron microscopy, subnanometer single-particle reconstruction, and fluorescence imaging, we present a pseudoatomic model of how the calponin homology (CH) domain of the fission yeast EB Mal3 binds to the end regions of growing microtubules. The Mal3 CH domain bridges protofilaments except at the microtubule seam. By binding close to the exchangeable GTP-binding site, the CH domain is ideally positioned to sense the microtubule's nucleotide state. The same microtubule-end region is also a stabilizing structural cap protecting the microtubule from depolymerization. This insight supports a common structural link between two important biological phenomena, microtubule dynamic instability and end tracking. PMID:22500803

  15. Regulation of kinesin-transport by microtubule age and polymerization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Liang, Winnie; King, Stephen; Faysal, K.

    2015-03-01

    Microtubules are fundamental biopolymers in cells, formed via self-assembly (``polymerization'') of tubulin dimers. Microtubule polymerization conditions have been shown to alter the presence of defects in microtubule lattices, including point defects (missing tubulin dimers) and line defects (protofilament disruption). Potential impact of these lattice defects on molecular motor-based transport is not yet understood. Here we investigate the impact of microtubule polymerization conditions on multiple-kinesin transport, using single-molecule-type optical trapping experiments. We find that kinesin-based cargoes pause preferentially at specific locations along individual microtubules, and that the pause frequency and duration is strongly dependent on microtubule age and polymerization condition. Within each polymerization condition and for fresh microtubules, we also observe significant variations in multiple-kinesin travel distances, depending on which microtubules the motors travel along. Taken together, our study suggests an important role of microtubule lattice defect in regulating intracellular transport.

  16. The dual specificity phosphatase Cdc14B bundles and stabilizes microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Plumley, Hyekyung; Liu, Yie; Gomez, Marla V; Wang, Yisong

    2005-01-01

    The Cdc14 dual-specificity phosphatases regulate key events in the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, little is known about the function of mammalian CDC14B family members. Here, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDC14B protein is cell cycle regulated. CDC14B can bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules in vitro independently of its catalytic activity. Basic amino acid residues within the nucleolar targeting domain are important for both retaining CDC14B in the nucleolus and preventing microtubule bundling. Overexpression of CDC14B resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic CDC14B and microtubule bundles in interphase cells. These microtubule bundles were resistant to microtubule depolymerization reagents and enriched in acetylated -tubulin. Expression of cytoplasmic forms of CDC14B impaired microtubule nucleation from the microtubule organization center. CDC14B is thus a novel microtubule-bundling and -stabilizing protein, whose regulated subcellular localization may help modulate spindle and microtubule dynamics in mitosis.

  17. Quantum computation in brain microtubules: Decoherence and biological feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, S.; Hameroff, S. R.; Tuszyński, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    The Penrose-Hameroff orchestrated objective reduction (orch. OR) model assigns a cognitive role to quantum computations in microtubules within the neurons of the brain. Despite an apparently ``warm, wet, and noisy'' intracellular milieu, the proposal suggests that microtubules avoid environmental decoherence long enough to reach threshold for ``self-collapse'' (objective reduction) by a quantum gravity mechanism put forth by Penrose. The model has been criticized as regards the issue of environmental decoherence, and a recent report by Tegmark finds that microtubules can maintain quantum coherence for only 10-13 s, far too short to be neurophysiologically relevant. Here, we critically examine the decoherence mechanisms likely to dominate in a biological setting and find that (1) Tegmark's commentary is not aimed at an existing model in the literature but rather at a hybrid that replaces the superposed protein conformations of the orch. OR theory with a soliton in superposition along the microtubule; (2) recalculation after correcting for differences between the model on which Tegmark bases his calculations and the orch. OR model (superposition separation, charge vs dipole, dielectric constant) lengthens the decoherence time to 10-5-10-4 s (3) decoherence times on this order invalidate the assumptions of the derivation and determine the approximation regime considered by Tegmark to be inappropriate to the orch. OR superposition; (4) Tegmark's formulation yields decoherence times that increase with temperature contrary to well-established physical intuitions and the observed behavior of quantum coherent states; (5) incoherent metabolic energy supplied to the collective dynamics ordering water in the vicinity of microtubules at a rate exceeding that of decoherence can counter decoherence effects (in the same way that lasers avoid decoherence at room temperature); (6) microtubules are surrounded by a Debye layer of counterions, which can screen thermal fluctuations

  18. On the Significance of Microtubule Flexural Behavior in Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics. In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics. One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that “every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior,” i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial

  19. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial energy

  20. Water and carbon fluxes in rain fed agricultural sites under a changing climate: The role of stomata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, A.; Gayler, S.; Streck, T.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation models are needed to assess how crop productivity may be altered due to variations in climatic conditions. Stomatal conductance controls both diffusion of CO2 from the atmosphere into the leaf and water losses from the soil-plant system to the atmosphere through transpiration (E). Despite its significance, stomatal conductance and its links to climatic variables remains empirically specified in current crop models thereby challenging their application to future climatic conditions. It has long been conjectured that stomata has evolved so as to allow terrestrial plants to assimilate CO2 in a desiccating atmosphere while minimizing water losses. Hence, the hypothesis that stomata adapt optimally to their environment so as to maximize assimilation (A) for a given amount of water loss has received significant attention over the past 4 decades. Here, a new approach to implement optimization theory of stomatal conductance into a dynamic canopy gas exchange model is introduced. A key variable in this theory is the so-called marginal water use efficiency (MWUE), which is assumed to be constant on time scales commensurate with fluctuations in stomatal aperture. However, on time scales relevant to crop productivity (daily to seasonal), the boundary conditions on the optimization problem evolve in time prompting the question of how to assign MWUE on such time scales. To address this question, MWUE was formulated as a function of time-integrated leaf-water potential and atmospheric CO2. Next, leaf water potential was linked to root and soil pressure using a soil water balance model based on a modified Richards' equation that considers vertical distribution of root water uptake. The adequacy of the new approach was tested by comparing predicted diurnal cycles of A and E as well as variability of soil moisture with long-term observations at a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv.Cubus) field in southwest Germany (see Figure), where transpiration and assimilation rates

  1. LKB1 Destabilizes Microtubules in Myoblasts and Contributes to Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Neha; Gilberti, Renée M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleate myotubes is associated with dramatic cytoskeletal changes. We find that microtubules in differentiated myotubes are highly stabilized, but premature microtubule stabilization blocks differentiation. Factors responsible for microtubule destabilization in myoblasts have not been identified. Findings We find that a transient decrease in microtubule stabilization early during myoblast differentiation precedes the ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in differentiated myotubes. We report a role for the serine-threonine kinase LKB1 in both microtubule destabilization and myoblast differentiation. LKB1 overexpression reduced microtubule elongation in a Nocodazole washout assay, and LKB1 RNAi increased it, showing LKB1 destabilizes microtubule assembly in myoblasts. LKB1 levels and activity increased during myoblast differentiation, along with activation of the known LKB1 substrates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and microtubule affinity regulating kinases (MARKs). LKB1 overexpression accelerated differentiation, whereas RNAi impaired it. Conclusions Reduced microtubule stability precedes myoblast differentiation and the associated ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in myotubes. LKB1 plays a positive role in microtubule destabilization in myoblasts and in myoblast differentiation. This work suggests a model by which LKB1-induced microtubule destabilization facilitates the cytoskeletal changes required for differentiation. Transient destabilization of microtubules might be a useful strategy for enhancing and/or synchronizing myoblast differentiation. PMID:22348111

  2. Association between microtubules and Golgi vesicles isolated from rat parotid glands.

    PubMed

    Coffe, G; Raymond, M N

    1990-01-01

    We report an isolation procedure of trans-Golgi vesicles (GVs) from rat parotid glands. Various organelle markers were used, particularly galactosyl transferase as a trans-Golgi marker, to test the purity of the GV fraction. A quantitative in vitro binding assay between microtubules and GVs is described. The vesicles were incubated with taxol-induced microtubules, layered between 50% and 43% sucrose cushions and subjected to centrifugation. Unlike free microtubules which were sedimented, the GV-bound microtubules co-migrated upward with GVs. Quantification of these bound microtubules was carried out by densitometric scanning of Coomassie blue-stained gels. The association between microtubules and GVs followed a saturation curve, with a plateau value of 20 micrograms of microtubule protein bound to 500 micrograms of GV fraction. The half-saturation of the GV sites was obtained with a microtubule concentration of 20 micrograms/ml. Electron microscopy of negatively stained re-floated material showed numerous microtubule-vesicle complexes. Coating of microtubules with an excess of brain microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) abolished binding. In the absence of exogenous microtubules, we showed that the GV fraction was already interacting with a class of endogenous rat parotid microtubules. This class of colcemid and cold-stable microtubules represents 10-20% of the total tubulin content of the parotid cell. PMID:1983303

  3. Glutamylation on alpha-tubulin is not essential but affects the assembly and functions of a subset of microtubules in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Wloga, Dorota; Rogowski, Krzysztof; Sharma, Neeraj; Van Dijk, Juliette; Janke, Carsten; Eddé, Bernard; Bré, Marie-Hélène; Levilliers, Nicolette; Redeker, Virginie; Duan, Jianming; Gorovsky, Martin A; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Gaertig, Jacek

    2008-08-01

    Tubulin undergoes glutamylation, a conserved posttranslational modification of poorly understood function. We show here that in the ciliate Tetrahymena, most of the microtubule arrays contain glutamylated tubulin. However, the length of the polyglutamyl side chain is spatially regulated, with the longest side chains present on ciliary and basal body microtubules. We focused our efforts on the function of glutamylation on the alpha-tubulin subunit. By site-directed mutagenesis, we show that all six glutamates of the C-terminal tail domain of alpha-tubulin that provide potential sites for glutamylation are not essential but are needed for normal rates of cell multiplication and cilium-based functions (phagocytosis and cell motility). By comparative phylogeny and biochemical assays, we identify two conserved tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) domain proteins, Ttll1p and Ttll9p, as alpha-tubulin-preferring glutamyl ligase enzymes. In an in vitro microtubule glutamylation assay, Ttll1p showed a chain-initiating activity while Ttll9p had primarily a chain-elongating activity. GFP-Ttll1p localized mainly to basal bodies, while GFP-Ttll9p localized to cilia. Disruption of the TTLL1 and TTLL9 genes decreased the rates of cell multiplication and phagocytosis. Cells lacking both genes had fewer cortical microtubules and showed defects in the maturation of basal bodies. We conclude that glutamylation on alpha-tubulin is not essential but is required for efficiency of assembly and function of a subset of microtubule-based organelles. Furthermore, the spatial restriction of modifying enzymes appears to be a major mechanism that drives differential glutamylation at the subcellular level.

  4. Microtubule converging centers-implications for microtubule dynamics in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bajer, A.S.; Mole-Bajer, J.

    1993-12-31

    The reorganization of the microtubular cytoskeleton was studied during telophase-interphase transition and interphase in Haemanthus endosperm cells, and in cell fragments (cytoplasts). This report concerns the role of microtubule (MT) converging centers (MTCCs) in the reorganization of the higher plant cytoskeleton. Microtubules (MTs) were visualized with the immunogold and immunogold-silver enhanced methods. Cells were fixed at room temperature (21{degrees}-24{degrees}C) and after high (35{degrees}-37{degrees}C) and low (4{degrees}-7{degrees}C) temperature shocks. The temperature shocks modify behavior of MTCCs. During early prophase and telophase-interphase transition, the formation of MTCCs is greatly enhanced at elevated temperature. These are stages when a pronounced reorganization of the cytoskeleton takes place. MTCCs are polar structures with remarkably different dynamics and properties at the diverging and converging ends. The indirect evidence shows that the converging tip of MTCC is (-) and the diverging end is (+). Our data imply that the reorganization of the higher plant cytoskeleton is basically a competitive sorting of MTs intrinsic polarity, with MTCCs as principal structural components.

  5. Automated Stitching of Microtubule Centerlines across Serial Electron Tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Britta; Tranfield, Erin M.; Höög, Johanna L.; Baum, Daniel; Antony, Claude; Hyman, Tony; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Prohaska, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Tracing microtubule centerlines in serial section electron tomography requires microtubules to be stitched across sections, that is lines from different sections need to be aligned, endpoints need to be matched at section boundaries to establish a correspondence between neighboring sections, and corresponding lines need to be connected across multiple sections. We present computational methods for these tasks: 1) An initial alignment is computed using a distance compatibility graph. 2) A fine alignment is then computed with a probabilistic variant of the iterative closest points algorithm, which we extended to handle the orientation of lines by introducing a periodic random variable to the probabilistic formulation. 3) Endpoint correspondence is established by formulating a matching problem in terms of a Markov random field and computing the best matching with belief propagation. Belief propagation is not generally guaranteed to converge to a minimum. We show how convergence can be achieved, nonetheless, with minimal manual input. In addition to stitching microtubule centerlines, the correspondence is also applied to transform and merge the electron tomograms. We applied the proposed methods to samples from the mitotic spindle in C. elegans, the meiotic spindle in X. laevis, and sub-pellicular microtubule arrays in T. brucei. The methods were able to stitch microtubules across section boundaries in good agreement with experts' opinions for the spindle samples. Results, however, were not satisfactory for the microtubule arrays. For certain experiments, such as an analysis of the spindle, the proposed methods can replace manual expert tracing and thus enable the analysis of microtubules over long distances with reasonable manual effort. PMID:25438148

  6. Automated stitching of microtubule centerlines across serial electron tomograms.

    PubMed

    Weber, Britta; Tranfield, Erin M; Höög, Johanna L; Baum, Daniel; Antony, Claude; Hyman, Tony; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Prohaska, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Tracing microtubule centerlines in serial section electron tomography requires microtubules to be stitched across sections, that is lines from different sections need to be aligned, endpoints need to be matched at section boundaries to establish a correspondence between neighboring sections, and corresponding lines need to be connected across multiple sections. We present computational methods for these tasks: 1) An initial alignment is computed using a distance compatibility graph. 2) A fine alignment is then computed with a probabilistic variant of the iterative closest points algorithm, which we extended to handle the orientation of lines by introducing a periodic random variable to the probabilistic formulation. 3) Endpoint correspondence is established by formulating a matching problem in terms of a Markov random field and computing the best matching with belief propagation. Belief propagation is not generally guaranteed to converge to a minimum. We show how convergence can be achieved, nonetheless, with minimal manual input. In addition to stitching microtubule centerlines, the correspondence is also applied to transform and merge the electron tomograms. We applied the proposed methods to samples from the mitotic spindle in C. elegans, the meiotic spindle in X. laevis, and sub-pellicular microtubule arrays in T. brucei. The methods were able to stitch microtubules across section boundaries in good agreement with experts' opinions for the spindle samples. Results, however, were not satisfactory for the microtubule arrays. For certain experiments, such as an analysis of the spindle, the proposed methods can replace manual expert tracing and thus enable the analysis of microtubules over long distances with reasonable manual effort.

  7. Hsc70 rapidly engages tau after microtubule destabilization.

    PubMed

    Jinwal, Umesh K; O'Leary, John C; Borysov, Sergiy I; Jones, Jeffrey R; Li, Qingyou; Koren, John; Abisambra, Jose F; Vestal, Grant D; Lawson, Lisa Y; Johnson, Amelia G; Blair, Laura J; Jin, Ying; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2010-05-28

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau plays a crucial role in regulating the dynamic stability of microtubules during neuronal development and synaptic transmission. In a group of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, conformational changes in Tau are associated with the initial stages of disease pathology. Folding of Tau into the MC1 conformation, where the amino acids at residues 7-9 interact with residues 312-342, is one of the earliest pathological alterations of Tau in Alzheimer disease. The mechanism of this conformational change in Tau and the subsequent effect on function and association to microtubules is largely unknown. Recent work by our group and others suggests that members of the Hsp70 family play a significant role in Tau regulation. Our new findings suggest that heat shock cognate (Hsc) 70 facilitates Tau-mediated microtubule polymerization. The association of Hsc70 with Tau was rapidly enhanced following treatment with microtubule-destabilizing agents. The fate of Tau released from the microtubule was found to be dependent on ATPase activity of Hsc70. Microtubule destabilization also rapidly increased the MC1 folded conformation of Tau. An in vitro assay suggests that Hsc70 facilitates formation of MC1 Tau. However, in a hyperphosphorylating environment, the formation of MC1 was abrogated, but Hsc70 binding to Tau was enhanced. Thus, under normal circumstances, MC1 formation may be a protective conformation facilitated by Hsc70. However, in a diseased environment, Hsc70 may preserve Tau in a more unstructured state, perhaps facilitating its pathogenicity.

  8. Role of microtubules in the contractile dysfunction of hypertrophied myocardium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Ishiguro, Y.; Conrad, C. H.; Buckley, J. M.; Morgan, J. P.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the ameliorative effects of microtubule depolymerization on cellular contractile dysfunction in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy apply at the tissue level. BACKGROUND: A selective and persistent increase in microtubule density causes decreased contractile function of cardiocytes from cats with hypertrophy produced by chronic right ventricular (RV) pressure overloading. Microtubule depolymerization by colchicine normalizes contractility in these isolated cardiocytes. However, whether these changes in cellular function might contribute to changes in function at the more highly integrated and complex cardiac tissue level was unknown. METHODS: Accordingly, RV papillary muscles were isolated from 25 cats with RV pressure overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) for 4 weeks and 25 control cats. Contractile state was measured using physiologically sequenced contractions before and 90 min after treatment with 10(-5) mol/liter colchicine. RESULTS: The PAB significantly increased RV systolic pressure and the RV weight/body weight ratio in PAB; it significantly decreased developed tension from 59+/-3 mN/mm2 in control to 25+/-4 mN/mm2 in PAB, shortening extent from 0.21+/-0.01 muscle lengths (ML) in control to 0.12+/-0.01 ML in PAB, and shortening rate from 1.12+/-0.07 ML/s in control to 0.55+/-0.03 ML/s in PAB. Indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that PAB muscles had a selective increase in microtubule density and that colchicine caused complete microtubule depolymerization in both control and PAB papillary muscles. Microtubule depolymerization normalized myocardial contractility in papillary muscles of PAB cats but did not alter contractility in control muscles. CONCLUSIONS: Excess microtubule density, therefore, is equally important to both cellular and to myocardial contractile dysfunction caused by chronic, severe pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy.

  9. Astral signals spatially bias cortical myosin recruitment to break symmetry and promote cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Michael; Munro, Ed; Glotzer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Following anaphase, the segregated chromosomes are sequestered by cytokinesis into two separate daughter cells by a cleavage furrow formed by the actomyosin-based contractile ring. Failure to properly position the contractile ring between the segregated chromosomes can result in aneuploidy. In both C. elegans embryos and human cells, the central spindle regulates division plane positioning in parallel with a second pathway that involves astral microtubules. Here we combine genetic and pharmacological manipulations with live cell imaging to spatially separate the two division cues in a single cell. We demonstrate that the two pathways are mechanistically and genetically distinct. By following the distribution of gfp-tagged non-muscle myosin, we have found that the astral pathway for furrow formation involves negative regulation of cortical myosin recruitment. An asymmetrically positioned spindle induces the asymmetric cortical accumulation of myosin. This cortical myosin behaves as a coherent contractile network. If the cortical network is non-uniform over the cell, the cortical contractile elements coalesce into a single furrow. This coalescence requires interconnections among contractile elements. These results provide direct evidence that spindle cues negatively regulate myosin distribution. PMID:17669650

  10. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG), and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review. PMID:24847217

  11. Loss of Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 Immunoreactivity Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Micah A.; Newman, Jason T.; Gu, Hong; Sampson, Allan R.; Fish, Kenneth N.; MacDonald, Matthew L; Moyer, Caitlin E.; DiBitetto, James V; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Penzes, Peter; Lewis, David A.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is a neuronal protein that plays a role in maintaining dendritic structure through its interaction with microtubules. In schizophrenia (Sz), a number of studies have revealed that MAP2’s typically robust immunoreactivity (IR) is significantly reduced across several cortical regions. Previous studies have not explored the relationship between MAP2-IR reduction and lower dendritic spine density, which is frequently reported in schizophrenia nor has MAP2-IR loss been investigated in the primary auditory cortex (Brodmann Area 41), a site of conserved pathology in Sz. Methods Using quantitative spinning disk confocal microscopy in two cohorts of Sz subjects and matched control subjects (Sz, n=20; C, n=20), we measured MAP2-IR as well as dendritic spine density and spine number in deep layer 3 of BA41. Results Sz subjects exhibited a significant reduction in MAP2-IR. The reductions in MAP2-IR were not associated with neuron loss, loss of MAP2 protein, clinical confounders, or technical factors. Dendritic spine density and number were also reduced in Sz and correlated with MAP2-IR. Twelve (60%) Sz subjects exhibited MAP2-IR values lower than the lowest values in controls; only in this group were spine density and number significantly reduced. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that MAP2-IR loss is closely linked to dendritic spine pathology in Sz. Because MAP2 shares substantial sequence, regulatory, and functional homology with MAP tau, the wealth of knowledge regarding tau biology and the rapidly expanding field of tau therapeutics provide resources for identifying how MAP2 is altered in Sz and possible leads to novel therapeutics. PMID:25818630

  12. Difference in Abscisic Acid Perception Mechanisms between Closure Induction and Opening Inhibition of Stomata1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ye; Adachi, Yuji; Ye, Wenxiu; Hayashi, Maki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Mori, Izumi C.; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure and inhibits light-induced stomatal opening. The mechanisms in these two processes are not necessarily the same. It has been postulated that the ABA receptors involved in opening inhibition are different from those involved in closure induction. Here, we provide evidence that four recently identified ABA receptors (PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE1 [PYR1], PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE-LIKE1 [PYL1], PYL2, and PYL4) are not sufficient for opening inhibition in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ABA-induced stomatal closure was impaired in the pyr1/pyl1/pyl2/pyl4 quadruple ABA receptor mutant. ABA inhibition of the opening of the mutant’s stomata remained intact. ABA did not induce either the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide or the alkalization of the cytosol in the quadruple mutant, in accordance with the closure phenotype. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis of inward-rectifying K+ current in guard cells showed a partial inhibition by ABA, indicating that the ABA sensitivity of the mutant was not fully impaired. ABA substantially inhibited blue light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase in guard cells in both the mutant and the wild type. On the other hand, in a knockout mutant of the SNF1-related protein kinase, srk2e, stomatal opening and closure, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, cytosolic alkalization, inward-rectifying K+ current inactivation, and H+-ATPase phosphorylation were not sensitive to ABA. PMID:23946352

  13. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  14. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  15. Cell prestress. II. Contribution of microtubules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The tensegrity model hypothesizes that cytoskeleton-based microtubules (MTs) carry compression as they balance a portion of cell contractile stress. To test this hypothesis, we used traction force microscopy to measure traction at the interface of adhering human airway smooth muscle cells and a flexible polyacrylamide gel substrate. The prediction is that if MTs balance a portion of contractile stress, then, upon their disruption, the portion of stress balanced by MTs would shift to the substrate, thereby causing an increase in traction. Measurements were done first in maximally activated cells (10 microM histamine) and then again after MTs had been disrupted (1 microM colchicine). We found that after disruption of MTs, traction increased on average by approximately 13%. Because in activated cells colchicine induced neither an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) nor an increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation as shown previously, we concluded that the observed increase in traction was a result of load shift from MTs to the substrate. In addition, energy stored in the flexible substrate was calculated as work done by traction on the deformation of the substrate. This result was then utilized in an energetic analysis. We assumed that cytoskeleton-based MTs are slender elastic rods supported laterally by intermediate filaments and that MTs buckle as the cell contracts. Using the post-buckling equilibrium theory of Euler struts, we found that energy stored during buckling of MTs was quantitatively consistent with the measured increase in substrate energy after disruption of MTs. This is further evidence supporting the idea that MTs are intracellular compression-bearing elements.

  16. Microtubule guidance tested through controlled cell geometry

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Sabil; Soh, Siowling; Pilans, Didzis; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Kim, Jiwon; Wilk, Gary; Borisy, Gary G.; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In moving cells dynamic microtubules (MTs) target and disassemble substrate adhesion sites (focal adhesions; FAs) in a process that enables the cell to detach from the substrate and propel itself forward. The short-range interactions between FAs and MT plus ends have been observed in several experimental systems, but the spatial overlap of these structures within the cell has precluded analysis of the putative long-range mechanisms by which MTs growing through the cell body reach FAs in the periphery of the cell. In the work described here cell geometry was controlled to remove the spatial overlap of cellular structures thus allowing for unambiguous observation of MT guidance. Specifically, micropatterning of living cells was combined with high-resolution in-cell imaging and gene product depletion by means of RNA interference to study the long-range MT guidance in quantitative detail. Cells were confined on adhesive triangular microislands that determined cell shape and ensured that FAs localized exclusively at the vertices of the triangular cells. It is shown that initial MT nucleation at the centrosome is random in direction, while the alignment of MT trajectories with the targets (i.e. FAs at vertices) increases with an increasing distance from the centrosome, indicating that MT growth is a non-random, guided process. The guided MT growth is dependent on the presence of FAs at the vertices. The depletion of either myosin IIA or myosin IIB results in depletion of F-actin bundles and spatially unguided MT growth. Taken together our findings provide quantitative evidence of a role for long-range MT guidance in MT targeting of FAs. PMID:22992457

  17. Buckling Behavior of Individual and Bundled Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  18. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  19. Microtubule guiding in a multi-walled carbon nanotube circuit.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Aurélien; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Sen, Mustafa; Kim, Kyongwan; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Kumagai, Izumi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu; Teizer, Winfried

    2015-08-01

    In nanotechnological devices, mass transport can be initiated by pressure driven flow, diffusion or by employing molecular motors. As the scale decreases, molecular motors can be helpful as they are not limited by increased viscous resistance. Moreover, molecular motors can move against diffusion gradients and are naturally fitted for nanoscale transportation. Among motor proteins, kinesin has particular potential for lab-on-a-chip applications. It can be used for sorting, concentrating or as a mechanical sensor. When bound to a surface, kinesin motors propel microtubules in random directions, depending on their landing orientation. In order to circumvent this complication, the microtubule motion should be confined or guided. To this end, dielectrophoretically aligned multi-walled-carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be employed as nanotracks. In order to control more precisely the spatial repartition of the MWCNTs, a screening method has been implemented and tested. Polygonal patterns have been fabricated with the aim of studying the guiding and the microtubule displacement between MWCNT segments. Microtubules are observed to transfer between MWCNT segments, a prerequisite for the guiding of microtubules in MWCNT circuit-based biodevices. The effect of the MWCNT organization (crenellated or hexagonal) on the MT travel distance has been investigated as well.

  20. Direct incorporation of GDP into microtubules without GTP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.M.; Hamel, E.

    1987-05-01

    Tubulin bearing (8-/sup 14/C)GDP in the exchangeable nucleotide binding site was prepared, and its polymerization was examined with microtubule-associated proteins containing minimal nucleoside diphosphate kinase and nonspecific phosphatase contamination. Although microtubule assembly required GTP, significant incorporation of tubulin-bound GDP into microtubules without exchange of the radiolabeled GDP for GTP was observed under reaction conditions which favored an increased proportion of tubulin x GDP relative to tubulin x GTP. These were low GTP concentrations, low Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations, high tubulin concentrations, and exogenous GDP in the reaction mixture. The minimum tubulin x GTP:tubulin x GDP ratio required for microtubule assembly was determined to establish the relative importance of the two tubulin species in the initiation of assembly and was found to be about 2:1. In addition, the relative efficiency with which tubulin x GTP and tubulin x GDP were incorporated into microtubules was determined. They found that tubulin x GDP was incorporated into polymer about half as efficiently as tubulin x GTP.

  1. Changes in Neurofilament and Microtubule Distribution following Focal Axon Compression

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Adam J.; Hogan, James D.; Rajbhandari, Labchan; Shrestha, Shiva; Venkatesan, Arun; Ramesh, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Although a number of cytoskeletal derangements have been described in the setting of traumatic axonal injury (TAI), little is known of early structural changes that may serve to initiate a cascade of further axonal degeneration. Recent work by the authors has examined conformational changes in cytoskeletal constituents of neuronal axons undergoing traumatic axonal injury (TAI) following focal compression through confocal imaging data taken in vitro and in situ. The present study uses electron microscopy to understand and quantify in vitro alterations in the ultrastructural composition of microtubules and neurofilaments within neuronal axons of rats following focal compression. Standard transmission electron microscopy processing methods are used to identify microtubules, while neurofilament identification is performed using antibody labeling through gold nanoparticles. The number, density, and spacing of microtubules and neurofilaments are quantified for specimens in sham Control and Crushed groups with fixation at <1min following load. Our results indicate that the axon caliber dependency known to exist for microtubule and neurofilament metrics extends to axons undergoing TAI, with the exception of neurofilament spacing, which appears to remain constant across all Crushed axon diameters. Confidence interval comparisons between Control and Crushed cytoskeletal measures suggests early changes in the neurofilament spatial distributions within axons undergoing TAI may precede microtubule changes in response to applied loads. This may serve as a trigger for further secondary damage to the axon, representing a key insight into the temporal aspects of cytoskeletal degeneration at the component level, and suggests the rapid removal of neurofilament sidearms as one possible mechanism. PMID:26111004

  2. Single molecule studies reveal new mechanisms for microtubule severing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Diaz-Valencia, Juan Daniel; Morelli, Margaret; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David

    2011-03-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are hexameric complexes made from monomeric enzyme subunits that remove tubulin dimers from the microtubule lattice. Severing proteins are known to remodel the cytoskeleton during interphase and mitosis, and are required in proper axon morphology and mammalian bone and cartilage development. We have performed the first single molecule imaging to determine where and how severing enzymes act to cut microtubules. We have focused on the original member of the group, katanin, and the newest member, fidgetin to compare their biophysical activities in vitro. We find that, as expected, severing proteins localize to areas of activity. Interestingly, the association is very brief: they do not stay bound nor do they bind cooperatively at active sites. The association duration changes with the nucleotide content, implying that the state in the catalytic cycle dictates binding affinity with the microtubule. We also discovered that, at lower concentrations, both katanin and fidgetin can depolymerize taxol-stabilized microtubules by removing terminal dimers. These studies reveal the physical regulation schemes to control severing activity in cells, and ultimately regulate cytoskeletal architecture. This work is supported by the March of Dimes Grant #5-FY09-46.

  3. Microtubule ionic conduction and its implications for higher cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Travis J A; Tuszynski, Jack A; Priel, Avner; Freedman, Holly

    2010-06-01

    The neuronal cytoskeleton has been hypothesized to play a role in higher cognitive functions including learning, memory and consciousness. Experimental evidence suggests that both microtubules and actin filaments act as biological electrical wires that can transmit and amplify electric signals via the flow of condensed ion clouds. The potential transmission of electrical signals via the cytoskeleton is of extreme importance to the electrical activity of neurons in general. In this regard, the unique structure, geometry and electrostatics of microtubules are discussed with the expected impact on their specific functions within the neuron. Electric circuit models of ionic flow along microtubules are discussed in the context of experimental data, and the specific importance of both the tubulin C-terminal tail regions, and the nano-pore openings lining the microtubule wall is elucidated. Overall, these recent results suggest that ions, condensed around the surface of the major filaments of the cytoskeleton, flow along and through microtubules in the presence of potential differences, thus acting as transmission lines propagating intracellular signals in a given cell. The significance of this conductance to the functioning of the electrically active neuron, and to higher cognitive function is also discussed.

  4. MAP3: characterization of a novel microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies we have characterized a brain protein that copurifies with microtubules. We identify it as a microtubule- associated protein (MAP) by the following criteria: it copolymerizes with tubulin through repeated cycles of microtubule assembly in vitro; it is not associated with any brain subcellular fraction other than microtubules; in double-label immunofluorescence experiments antibodies against this protein stain the same fibrous elements in cultured cells as are stained by antitubulin; and this fibrous staining pattern is dispersed when cytoplasmic microtubules are disrupted by colchicine. Because it is distinct from previously described MAPs we designate this novel species MAP3. The MAP3 protein consists of a closely spaced pair of polypeptides on SDS gels, Mr 180,000, which are present in both glial (glioma C6) and neuronal (neuroblastoma B104) cell lines. In brain the MAP3 antigen is present in both neurons and glia. In nerve cells its distribution is strikingly restricted: anti-MAP3 staining is detectable only in neurofilament-rich axons. It is not, however, a component of isolated brain intermediate filaments. PMID:3968174

  5. Self-organized pattern formation in motor-microtubule mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2004-09-01

    We model the stable self-organized patterns obtained in the nonequilibrium steady states of mixtures of molecular motors and microtubules. In experiments [Nédélec , Nature (London) 389, 305 (1997); Surrey , Science 292, 1167 (2001)] performed in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, microtubules are oriented by complexes of motor proteins. This interaction yields a variety of patterns, including arrangements of asters, vortices, and disordered configurations. We model this system via a two-dimensional vector field describing the local coarse-grained microtubule orientation and two scalar density fields associated to molecular motors. These scalar fields describe motors which either attach to and move along microtubules or diffuse freely within the solvent. Transitions between single aster, spiral, and vortex states are obtained as a consequence of confinement, as parameters in our model are varied. For systems in which the effects of confinement can be neglected, we present a map of nonequilibrium steady states, which includes arrangements of asters and vortices separately as well as aster-vortex mixtures and fully disordered states. We calculate the steady state distribution of bound and free motors in aster and vortex configurations of microtubules and compare these to our simulation results, providing qualitative arguments for the stability of different patterns in various regimes of parameter space. We study the role of crowding or “saturation” effects on the density profiles of motors in asters, discussing the role of such effects in stabilizing single asters. We also comment on the implications of our results for experiments.

  6. Tubulin tyrosine nitration regulates microtubule organization in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Yaroslav B.; Krasylenko, Yuliya A.; Demchuk, Oleh M.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2013-01-01

    During last years, selective tyrosine nitration of plant proteins gains importance as well-recognized pathway of direct nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction. Plant microtubules are one of the intracellular signaling targets for NO, however, the molecular mechanisms of NO signal transduction with the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins remain to be elucidated. Since biochemical evidence of plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration has been obtained recently, potential role of this posttranslational modification in regulation of microtubules organization in plant cell is estimated in current paper. It was shown that 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NO2-Tyr) induced partially reversible Arabidopsis primary root growth inhibition, alterations of root hairs morphology and organization of microtubules in root cells. It was also revealed that 3-NO2-Tyr intensively decorates such highly dynamic microtubular arrays as preprophase bands, mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells under physiological conditions. Moreover, 3D models of the mitotic kinesin-8 complexes with the tail of detyrosinated, tyrosinated and tyrosine nitrated α-tubulin (on C-terminal Tyr 450 residue) from Arabidopsis were reconstructed in silico to investigate the potential influence of tubulin nitrotyrosination on the molecular dynamics of α-tubulin and kinesin-8 interaction. Generally, presented data suggest that plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration can be considered as its common posttranslational modification, the direct mechanism of NO signal transduction with the participation of microtubules under physiological conditions and one of the hallmarks of the increased microtubule dynamics. PMID:24421781

  7. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  8. Diffusible crosslinkers generate directed forces in microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Zdenek; Braun, Marcus; Lüdecke, Annemarie; Schlierf, Michael; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Janson, Marcel E; Diez, Stefan

    2015-03-12

    Cytoskeletal remodeling is essential to eukaryotic cell division and morphogenesis. The mechanical forces driving the restructuring are attributed to the action of molecular motors and the dynamics of cytoskeletal filaments, which both consume chemical energy. By contrast, non-enzymatic filament crosslinkers are regarded as mere friction-generating entities. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that diffusible microtubule crosslinkers of the Ase1/PRC1/Map65 family generate directed microtubule sliding when confined between partially overlapping microtubules. The Ase1-generated forces, directly measured by optical tweezers to be in the piconewton-range, were sufficient to antagonize motor-protein driven microtubule sliding. Force generation is quantitatively explained by the entropic expansion of confined Ase1 molecules diffusing within the microtubule overlaps. The thermal motion of crosslinkers is thus harnessed to generate mechanical work analogous to compressed gas propelling a piston in a cylinder. As confinement of diffusible proteins is ubiquitous in cells, the associated entropic forces are likely of importance for cellular mechanics beyond cytoskeletal networks. PMID:25748652

  9. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  10. Interaction between microtubules and the Drosophila formin Cappuccino and its effect on actin assembly.

    PubMed

    Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth A; Vizcarra, Christina L; Bois, Justin S; Quinlan, Margot E

    2014-02-14

    Formin family actin nucleators are potential coordinators of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, as they can both nucleate actin filaments and bind microtubules in vitro. To gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of formin-microtubule interactions and formin-mediated actin-microtubule cross-talk, we studied microtubule binding by Cappuccino (Capu), a formin involved in regulating actin and microtubule organization during Drosophila oogenesis. We found that two distinct domains within Capu, FH2 and tail, work together to promote high-affinity microtubule binding. The tail domain appears to bind microtubules through nonspecific charge-based interactions. In contrast, distinct residues within the FH2 domain are important for microtubule binding. We also report the first visualization of a formin polymerizing actin filaments in the presence of microtubules. Interestingly, microtubules are potent inhibitors of the actin nucleation activity of Capu but appear to have little effect on Capu once it is bound to the barbed end of an elongating filament. Because Capu does not simultaneously bind microtubules and assemble actin filaments in vitro, its actin assembly and microtubule binding activities likely require spatial and/or temporal regulation within the Drosophila oocyte.

  11. Microtubule organization during the cell cycle of the primitive eukaryote dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii.

    PubMed

    Perret, E; Davoust, J; Albert, M; Besseau, L; Soyer-Gobillard, M O

    1993-03-01

    The complete microtubular system of the dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler is described, as seen by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and labelling with anti-beta-tubulin antibody. This technique allowed us to observe the organization of the subcortical and internal cytoskeletons and the mitotic microtubular system, and their changes during the cell cycle. These observations are compared with those made in cryosections by light microscopy and in fast-freeze-fixed, cryosubstituted cells by electron microscopy. We show the organization of the cortical microtubules, and in particular of the thick microtubular bundles arranged as a three-pronged fork from which they seem to emanate. This fork emerges from a peculiar cytoplasmic zone at the pole of the cell and is in contact with the region of the kinetosomes, at the cingulum. During the G1 phase, only a single, radial microtubular bundle (a "desmose") is observable in the inner part of the cytoplasm. One of its ends is near the flagellar bases and the other end is close to the nucleus in the centrosome region. During the S phase, the flagella drop off, the cell encysts and the kinetosomes duplicate. In mitosis, the cortical microtubules and the intracytoplasmic microtubular bundles do not depolymerize. The microtubular fork, desmose and centrosome double and migrate, while the divided kinetosomes stay in the same place. Later, the centrosomes organize the extranuclear spindle, which is connected to the kinetosome region by the microtubular desmose. The convergent end of the three-pronged fork seems to be in contact with the centrosome region. In early and mid-prophase, thick microtubular bundles pass through the nucleus in cytoplasmic channels and converge towards the two poles. Asters were never seen at the spindle poles. The channels and microtubular bundles in the spindle double in number during late prophase and lengthen in early anaphase. The spindle bundles diverge in late anaphase

  12. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity. PMID:26096890

  13. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity.

  14. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  15. LGN Directs Interphase Endothelial Cell Behavior via the Microtubule Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Catherine E.; Kushner, Erich J.; Du, Quansheng; Bautch, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenic sprouts require coordination of endothelial cell (EC) behaviors as they extend and branch. Microtubules influence behaviors such as cell migration and cell-cell interactions via regulated growth and shrinkage. Here we investigated the role of the mitotic polarity protein LGN in EC behaviors and sprouting angiogenesis. Surprisingly, reduced levels of LGN did not affect oriented division of EC within a sprout, but knockdown perturbed overall sprouting. At the cell level, LGN knockdown compromised cell-cell adhesion and migration. EC with reduced LGN levels also showed enhanced growth and stabilization of microtubules that correlated with perturbed migration. These results fit a model whereby LGN influences interphase microtubule dynamics in endothelial cells to regulate migration, cell adhesion, and sprout extension, and reveal a novel non-mitotic role for LGN in sprouting angiogenesis. PMID:26398908

  16. Tubulin carbamoylation. Functional amino groups in microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, W; Slebe, J C; Maccioni, R B

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of the carbamoylation of pig brain tubulin were examined by using the modification conditions with cyanate described previously [Mellado, Slebe + Maccioni (1980) Biochem. Int. I, 584--590]. The carbamoylation reaction resulted in an inhibition of microtubule assembly, which was dependent on the concentration of the modifying agent. This tubulin modification appears to inhibit the growth of microtubules. The presence of GTP did not protect tubulin against this inhibition. Electron microscopy showed a marked decrease in the number of tubules after carbamoylation, but no alterations were observed in the microtubule morphology. The incorporation of KN14CO into alpha- and beta-subunits with similar kinetics was also shown, and the carbamoylated residues were identified as epsilon-N-carbamoyl-lysine residues. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 4. PMID:7115308

  17. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-01

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components. PMID:27151870

  18. Effects of anti-Alzheimer drugs on phosphorylation and assembly of microtubules from brain microtubular proteins.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, P N; Shevtsova, E F; Burbaeva, G Sh; Bachurin, S O

    2014-04-01

    We studied the effects of anti-Alzheimer drugs (tacrine, amiridine, and memantine) on phosphorylation of tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins isolated from rat brain, evaluated the capacity of these proteins to polymerize into microtubules after addition of study pharmacological agents, and analyzed the structure of generated microtubules. It was shown that test substances impair assembly of microtubules to a different extent. Dose-dependent effects of these agents on phosphorylation of tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins were observed. Triazolam (not approved for clinical use as anti-Alzheimer drug) in the same concentrations was used as the reference substance in the same tests. It was observed that this substance even in minimal concentration induced the most pronounced changes in microtubule structure. A direct correlation between the capacity of the test substances to modulate tubulin phosphorylation and to impair microtubule structure was found: the more the substance inhibited tubulin phosphorylation, the more it disordered microtubule structure.

  19. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  20. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-01

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components.

  1. Disruption of microtubules in plants suppresses macroautophagy and triggers starch excess-associated chloroplast autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiyin; Yu, Bingjie; Han, Shaojie; Guo, Jiangbo; Tang, Haiping; Yu, Alice Yunzi L; Deng, Haiteng; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the major components of cytoskeleton, are involved in various fundamental biological processes in plants. Recent studies in mammalian cells have revealed the importance of microtubule cytoskeleton in autophagy. However, little is known about the roles of microtubules in plant autophagy. Here, we found that ATG6 interacts with TUB8/β-tubulin 8 and colocalizes with microtubules in Nicotiana benthamiana. Disruption of microtubules by either silencing of tubulin genes or treatment with microtubule-depolymerizing agents in N. benthamiana reduces autophagosome formation during upregulation of nocturnal or oxidation-induced macroautophagy. Furthermore, a blockage of leaf starch degradation occurred in microtubule-disrupted cells and triggered a distinct ATG6-, ATG5- and ATG7-independent autophagic pathway termed starch excess-associated chloroplast autophagy (SEX chlorophagy) for clearance of dysfunctional chloroplasts. Our findings reveal that an intact microtubule network is important for efficient macroautophagy and leaf starch degradation. PMID:26566764

  2. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  3. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  4. Kinesin-3 in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis transports organelles along the entire microtubule array.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gero

    2015-01-01

    The molecular motor kinesin-3 transports early endosomes along microtubules in filamentous fungi. It was reported that kinesin-3 from the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa use a subset of post-translationally modified and more stable microtubules. Here, I show that kinesin-3 from the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis moves along all hyphal microtubules. This difference is likely due to variation in cell cycle control and associated organization of the microtubule array.

  5. TACC3 is a microtubule plus end-tracking protein that promotes axon elongation and also regulates microtubule plus end dynamics in multiple embryonic cell types.

    PubMed

    Nwagbara, Belinda U; Faris, Anna E; Bearce, Elizabeth A; Erdogan, Burcu; Ebbert, Patrick T; Evans, Matthew F; Rutherford, Erin L; Enzenbacher, Tiffany B; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule plus end dynamics are regulated by a conserved family of proteins called plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs). It is unclear how various +TIPs interact with each other and with plus ends to control microtubule behavior. The centrosome-associated protein TACC3, a member of the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) domain family, has been implicated in regulating several aspects of microtubule dynamics. However, TACC3 has not been shown to function as a +TIP in vertebrates. Here we show that TACC3 promotes axon outgrowth and regulates microtubule dynamics by increasing microtubule plus end velocities in vivo. We also demonstrate that TACC3 acts as a +TIP in multiple embryonic cell types and that this requires the conserved C-terminal TACC domain. Using high-resolution live-imaging data on tagged +TIPs, we show that TACC3 localizes to the extreme microtubule plus end, where it lies distal to the microtubule polymerization marker EB1 and directly overlaps with the microtubule polymerase XMAP215. TACC3 also plays a role in regulating XMAP215 stability and localizing XMAP215 to microtubule plus ends. Taken together, our results implicate TACC3 as a +TIP that functions with XMAP215 to regulate microtubule plus end dynamics.

  6. Open stomata 1 (OST1) kinase controls R-type anion channel QUAC1 in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Imes, Dennis; Mumm, Patrick; Böhm, Jennifer; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Marten, Irene; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Under drought stress, the stress hormone ABA addresses the SnR kinase OST1 via its cytosolic receptor and the protein phosphatase ABI1. Upon activation, OST1 phosphorylates the guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1. Arabidopsis ABI1 and OST1 loss-of-function mutants are characterized by an extreme wilting 'open stomata' phenotype. Given the fact that guard cells express both SLAC- and R-/QUAC-type anion channels, we questioned whether OST1, besides SLAC1, also controls the QUAC1 channel. In other words, are ABI1/OST1 defects preventing both of the guard cell anion channel types from operating properly in terms of stomatal closure? The activation of the R-/QUAC-type anion channel by ABA signaling kinase OST1 and phosphatase ABI1 was analyzed in two experimental systems: Arabidopsis guard cells and the plant cell-free background of Xenopus oocytes. Patch-clamp studies on guard cells show that ABA activates R-/QUAC-type currents of wild-type plants, but to a much lesser extent in those of abi1-1 and ost1-2 mutants. In the oocyte system the co-expression of QUAC1 and OST1 resulted in a pronounced activation of the R-type anion channel. These studies indicate that OST1 is addressing both S-/SLAC- and R-/QUAC-type guard cell anion channels, and explain why the ost1-2 mutant is much more sensitive to drought than single slac1 or quac1 mutants.

  7. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor