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Sample records for cortical rhythms determine

  1. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  2. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P; Ferrari, Loris L; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M

    2015-11-03

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state.

  3. Cortical development, electroencephalogram rhythms, and the sleep/wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-06-15

    During adulthood, electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are used to distinguish wake, non-rapid eye movement sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep states. The close association between behavioral states and EEG rhythms is reached late during development, after birth in humans and by the end of the second postnatal week in rats and mice. This critical time is also when cortical activity switches from a discontinuous to a continuous pattern. We review the major cellular and network changes that can account for this transition. After this close link is established, new evidence suggests that the slow waves of non-rapid eye movement sleep may function as markers to track cortical development. However, before the EEG can be used to identify behavioral states, two distinct sleep phases--quiet sleep and active sleep--are identified based on behavioral criteria and muscle activity. During this early phase of development, cortical activity is far from being disorganized, despite the presence of long periods of neuronal silence and the poor modulation by behavioral states. Specific EEG patterns, such as spindle bursts and gamma oscillations, have been identified very early on and are believed to play a significant role in the refinement of brain circuits. Because most early EEG patterns do not map to a specific behavioral state, their contribution to the presumptive role of sleep in brain maturation remains to be established and should be a major focus for future research.

  4. Interactions between thalamic and cortical rhythms during semantic memory recall in human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotnick, Scott D.; Moo, Lauren R.; Kraut, Michael A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Hart, John, Jr.

    2002-04-01

    Human scalp electroencephalographic rhythms, indicative of cortical population synchrony, have long been posited to reflect cognitive processing. Although numerous studies employing simultaneous thalamic and cortical electrode recording in nonhuman animals have explored the role of the thalamus in the modulation of cortical rhythms, direct evidence for thalamocortical modulation in human has not, to our knowledge, been obtained. We simultaneously recorded from thalamic and scalp electrodes in one human during performance of a cognitive task and found a spatially widespread, phase-locked, low-frequency rhythm (7-8 Hz) power decrease at thalamus and scalp during semantic memory recall. This low-frequency rhythm power decrease was followed by a spatially specific, phase-locked, fast-rhythm (21-34 Hz) power increase at thalamus and occipital scalp. Such a pattern of thalamocortical activity reflects a plausible neural mechanism underlying semantic memory recall that may underlie other cognitive processes as well.

  5. Slow cortical rhythms: from single-neuron electrophysiology to whole-brain imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Olcese, Umberto; Faraguna, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The slow cortical oscillation is the major brain rhythm occurring during sleep, and has been the object of thorough investigation for over thirty years. Despite all these efforts, the function and the neuronal mechanisms behind slow cortical rhythms remain only partially understood. In this review we will provide an overview of the techniques available for the in vivo study of slow cortical oscillations in animal models. Our goal is to provide an up to date resource for the selection of the best experimental strategies to study specific aspects of slow oscillations. We will cover both traditional, population-level electrophysiological approaches (electroencephalography - EEG, local field potentials) as well as more recent techniques, such as two photon calcium imaging and optogenetics. Overall, we believe that new breakthroughs in our understanding of slow cortical rhythms will require the integration of different techniques, to bridge the gap between different spatio-temporal scales and go from a correlative to a causal level of analysis. PMID:26742663

  6. Neurophysiological and Computational Principles of Cortical Rhythms in Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous rhythms represent a core mechanism for sculpting temporal coordination of neural activity in the brainwide network. This review focuses on oscillations in the cerebral cortex that occur during cognition, in alert behaving conditions. Over the last two decades, experimental and modeling work has made great strides in elucidating the detailed cellular and circuit basis of these rhythms, particularly gamma and theta rhythms. The underlying physiological mechanisms are diverse (ranging from resonance and pacemaker properties of single cells, to multiple scenarios for population synchronization and wave propagation), but also exhibit unifying principles. A major conceptual advance was the realization that synaptic inhibition plays a fundamental role in rhythmogenesis, either in an interneuronal network or in a recipropocal excitatory-inhibitory loop. Computational functions of synchronous oscillations in cognition are still a matter of debate among systems neuroscientists, in part because the notion of regular oscillation seems to contradict the common observation that spiking discharges of individual neurons in the cortex are highly stochastic and far from being clock-like. However, recent findings have led to a framework that goes beyond the conventional theory of coupled oscillators, and reconciles the apparent dichotomy between irregular single neuron activity and field potential oscillations. From this perspective, a plethora of studies will be reviewed on the involvement of long-distance neuronal coherence in cognitive functions such as multisensory integration, working memory and selective attention. Finally, implications of abnormal neural synchronization are discussed as they relate to mental disorders like schizophrenia and autism. PMID:20664082

  7. Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that relate to rhythms, including literary rhythms, natural rhythms, and musical rhythms. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audio materials, magazines, professional resources, and suggested classroom activities. (LRW)

  8. Human motor cortical activity is selectively phase-entrained on underlying rhythms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kai J; Hermes, Dora; Honey, Christopher J; Hebb, Adam O; Ramsey, Nick F; Knight, Robert T; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2012-01-01

    The functional significance of electrical rhythms in the mammalian brain remains uncertain. In the motor cortex, the 12-20 Hz beta rhythm is known to transiently decrease in amplitude during movement, and to be altered in many motor diseases. Here we show that the activity of neuronal populations is phase-coupled with the beta rhythm on rapid timescales, and describe how the strength of this relation changes with movement. To investigate the relationship of the beta rhythm to neuronal dynamics, we measured local cortical activity using arrays of subdural electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes in human patients performing simple movement tasks. In addition to rhythmic brain processes, ECoG potentials also reveal a spectrally broadband motif that reflects the aggregate neural population activity beneath each electrode. During movement, the amplitude of this broadband motif follows the dynamics of individual fingers, with somatotopically specific responses for different fingers at different sites on the pre-central gyrus. The 12-20 Hz beta rhythm, in contrast, is widespread as well as spatially coherent within sulcal boundaries and decreases in amplitude across the pre- and post-central gyri in a diffuse manner that is not finger-specific. We find that the amplitude of this broadband motif is entrained on the phase of the beta rhythm, as well as rhythms at other frequencies, in peri-central cortex during fixation. During finger movement, the beta phase-entrainment is diminished or eliminated. We suggest that the beta rhythm may be more than a resting rhythm, and that this entrainment may reflect a suppressive mechanism for actively gating motor function. PMID:22969416

  9. Auditory cortical activity during cochlear implant-mediated perception of spoken language, melody, and rhythm.

    PubMed

    Limb, Charles J; Molloy, Anne T; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Braun, Allen R

    2010-03-01

    Despite the significant advances in language perception for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, music perception continues to be a major challenge for implant-mediated listening. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie successful implant listening remains limited. To our knowledge, this study represents the first neuroimaging investigation of music perception in CI users, with the hypothesis that CI subjects would demonstrate greater auditory cortical activation than normal hearing controls. H(2) (15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used here to assess auditory cortical activation patterns in ten postlingually deafened CI patients and ten normal hearing control subjects. Subjects were presented with language, melody, and rhythm tasks during scanning. Our results show significant auditory cortical activation in implant subjects in comparison to control subjects for language, melody, and rhythm. The greatest activity in CI users compared to controls was seen for language tasks, which is thought to reflect both implant and neural specializations for language processing. For musical stimuli, PET scanning revealed significantly greater activation during rhythm perception in CI subjects (compared to control subjects), and the least activation during melody perception, which was the most difficult task for CI users. These results may suggest a possible relationship between auditory performance and degree of auditory cortical activation in implant recipients that deserves further study.

  10. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms in subjects with normal and abnormal body weight.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Lizio, Roberta; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Petito, Annamaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Lecce, Brunello; Mundi, Ciro; Soricelli, Andrea; Limatola, Cristina; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Del Percio, Claudio

    2011-09-15

    It is well known that resting state regional cerebral blood flow is abnormal in obese when compared to normal-weight subjects but the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are poorly known. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that amplitude of resting state cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms differ among underweight, normal-weight, and overweight/obese subjects as a reflection of the relationship between cortical neural synchronization and regulation of body weight. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 16 underweight subjects, 25 normal-weight subjects, and 18 overweight/obese subjects. All subjects were psychophysically healthy (no eating disorders or major psychopathologies). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), beta 2 (20-30Hz), and gamma (30-40Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Statistical results showed that parietal and temporal alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern underweight>normal-weight>overweight/obese (p<0.004), whereas occipital alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern normal-weight>underweight>overweight/obese (p<0.00003). Furthermore, amplitude of the parietal, occipital, and temporal alpha 2 sources was stronger in the normal-weight subjects than in the underweight and overweight/obese subjects (p<0.0007). These results suggest that abnormal weight in healthy overweight/obese subjects is related to abnormal cortical neural synchronization at the basis of resting state alpha rhythms and fluctuation of global brain arousal. PMID:21704716

  11. Cortical Activity during Perception of Musical Rhythm; Comparing Musicians and Non-musicians

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Assal; Wirantana, Vinthia; Starr, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of musical training on brain activity to violations of rhythmic expectancies. We recorded behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) responses of musicians and non-musicians to discrepancies of rhythm between pairs of unfamiliar melodies based on Western classical rules. Rhythm deviations in the second melody involved prolongation of a note, thus creating a delay in the subsequent note; the duration of the second note was consequently shorter because the offset time was unchanged. In the first melody, on the other hand, the two notes were of equal duration. Musicians detected rhythm deviations significantly better than non-musicians. A negative auditory cortical potential in response to the omitted stimulus was observed at a latency of 150–250 ms from where the note should have been. There were no significant differences of amplitude or latency between musicians and non-musicians. In contrast, the N100 and P200 to the delayed note after the omission were significantly greater in amplitude in musicians compared to non-musicians especially in frontal and frontal-central areas. These findings indicate that long term musical training enhances brain cortical activities involved in processing temporal irregularities of unfamiliar melodies. PMID:25512680

  12. Cortical plasticity induced by short-term multimodal musical rhythm training.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Claudia; Trainor, Laurel J; Herholz, Sibylle C; Pantev, Christo

    2011-01-01

    Performing music is a multimodal experience involving the visual, auditory, and somatosensory modalities as well as the motor system. Therefore, musical training is an excellent model to study multimodal brain plasticity. Indeed, we have previously shown that short-term piano practice increase the magnetoencephalographic (MEG) response to melodic material in novice players. Here we investigate the impact of piano training using a rhythmic-focused exercise on responses to rhythmic musical material. Musical training with non musicians was conducted over a period of two weeks. One group (sensorimotor-auditory, SA) learned to play a piano sequence with a distinct musical rhythm, another group (auditory, A) listened to, and evaluated the rhythmic accuracy of the performances of the SA-group. Training-induced cortical plasticity was evaluated using MEG, comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN) in response to occasional rhythmic deviants in a repeating rhythm pattern before and after training. The SA-group showed a significantly greater enlargement of MMN and P2 to deviants after training compared to the A- group. The training-induced increase of the rhythm MMN was bilaterally expressed in contrast to our previous finding where the MMN for deviants in the pitch domain showed a larger right than left increase. The results indicate that when auditory experience is strictly controlled during training, involvement of the sensorimotor system and perhaps increased attentional recources that are needed in producing rhythms lead to more robust plastic changes in the auditory cortex compared to when rhythms are simply attended to in the auditory domain in the absence of motor production.

  13. Cortical EEG alpha rhythms reflect task-specific somatosensory and motor interactions in humans.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Soricelli, Andrea; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Capotosto, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Anticipating sensorimotor events allows adaptive reactions to environment with crucial implications for self-protection and survival. Here we review several studies of our group that aimed to test the hypothesis that the cortical processes preparing the elaboration of sensorimotor interaction is reflected by the reduction of anticipatory electroencephalographic alpha power (about 8-12Hz; event-related desynchronization, ERD), as an index that regulate task-specific sensorimotor processes, accounted by high-alpha sub-band (10-12Hz), rather than a general tonic alertness, accounted by low-alpha sub-band (8-10Hz). In this line, we propose a model for human cortical processes anticipating warned sensorimotor interactions. Overall, we reported a stronger high-alpha ERD before painful than non-painful somatosensory stimuli that is also predictive of the subjective evaluation of pain intensity. Furthermore, we showed that anticipatory high-alpha ERD increased before sensorimotor interactions between non-painful or painful stimuli and motor demands involving opposite hands. In contrast, sensorimotor interactions between painful somatosensory and sensorimotor demands involving the same hand decreased anticipatory high-alpha ERD, due to a sort of sensorimotor "gating" effect. In conclusion, we suggest that anticipatory cortical high-alpha rhythms reflect the central interference and/or integration of ascending (sensory) and descending (motor) signals relative to one or two hands before non-painful and painful sensorimotor interactions. PMID:24929901

  14. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I.; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C.; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha 1 (8–10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5–13 Hz), beta 1 (13–20 Hz), beta 2 (20–30 Hz), and gamma (30–40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  15. [Dynamics of driven rhythm in neuron in sensorimotor cerebral cortices in rabbit on electrodermal paw stimulation].

    PubMed

    Galashina, A G; Bogdanov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The dominant centre is a zone of proof higher excitation of neurons in the cortex of the brain, resulting from long stimulation or effector (in our case of a forepaw of an animal) or direct cortical representations of this effector. Besides of higher excitation and the firmness of excitation neurones, the dominant centre has two more very important properties--ability to summation (addition) coming to a cortex and extending on cortical neural networks excitations and inertia. Last property is shown what even in some days after the termination of the stimulations which have formed a dominant, in reply to testing stimulus (earlier indifferent for an animal) the centre is activated and puts in action effector. By means of irritation of a paw of rabbits rhythmic impulses of a current of threshold force us had been formed a rhythmic defensive dominant. Interconnected (coincidence) neuronal activity of the sensorimotor cortex of rabbits, in which the rhythmic defensive dominanta has been created, was investigated. Temporal of sequences intervals between the coincidence impulses in peaks of crosscorrelation histograms (CCH) was analyzed. Frequency of occurrence of the coincidence impulses (intervals between impulses), forming CCH was defined by means of "secondary" autocorrelation histograms (ACH) in during a minute. Peaks on "secondary" ACH showed prevalent intervals between of the coincidence impulses. For the further analysis only those peaks of "secondary" ACH, which prevailed over an average level of the histogram with significance p < 0.05 was used. It has been found that in the formed locus of the defensive dominant the coincidence impulses appear not only in the rhythm of stimulation applied in experiment-- s, but also in multiple beat to it (4, 6 and 8 s). Registration and analysis of neuronal activity were done after creation of a rhythmic dominant. At the beginning of each experiment (i.e. before a presentation of testing stimulus) single 2 --econd peaks were

  16. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface training: the impact on motor cortical responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichiorri, F.; De Vico Fallani, F.; Cincotti, F.; Babiloni, F.; Molinari, M.; Kleih, S. C.; Neuper, C.; Kübler, A.; Mattia, D.

    2011-04-01

    The main purpose of electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is to provide an alternative channel to support communication and control when motor pathways are interrupted. Despite the considerable amount of research focused on the improvement of EEG signal detection and translation into output commands, little is known about how learning to operate a BCI device may affect brain plasticity. This study investigated if and how sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training would induce persistent functional changes in motor cortex, as assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and high-density EEG. Motor imagery (MI)-based BCI training in naïve participants led to a significant increase in motor cortical excitability, as revealed by post-training TMS mapping of the hand muscle's cortical representation; peak amplitude and volume of the motor evoked potentials recorded from the opponens pollicis muscle were significantly higher only in those subjects who develop a MI strategy based on imagination of hand grasping to successfully control a computer cursor. Furthermore, analysis of the functional brain networks constructed using a connectivity matrix between scalp electrodes revealed a significant decrease in the global efficiency index for the higher-beta frequency range (22-29 Hz), indicating that the brain network changes its topology with practice of hand grasping MI. Our findings build the neurophysiological basis for the use of non-invasive BCI technology for monitoring and guidance of motor imagery-dependent brain plasticity and thus may render BCI a viable tool for post-stroke rehabilitation.

  17. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface training: the impact on motor cortical responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pichiorri, F; De Vico Fallani, F; Cincotti, F; Babiloni, F; Molinari, M; Kleih, S C; Neuper, C; Kübler, A; Mattia, D

    2011-04-01

    The main purpose of electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is to provide an alternative channel to support communication and control when motor pathways are interrupted. Despite the considerable amount of research focused on the improvement of EEG signal detection and translation into output commands, little is known about how learning to operate a BCI device may affect brain plasticity. This study investigated if and how sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training would induce persistent functional changes in motor cortex, as assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and high-density EEG. Motor imagery (MI)-based BCI training in naïve participants led to a significant increase in motor cortical excitability, as revealed by post-training TMS mapping of the hand muscle's cortical representation; peak amplitude and volume of the motor evoked potentials recorded from the opponens pollicis muscle were significantly higher only in those subjects who develop a MI strategy based on imagination of hand grasping to successfully control a computer cursor. Furthermore, analysis of the functional brain networks constructed using a connectivity matrix between scalp electrodes revealed a significant decrease in the global efficiency index for the higher-beta frequency range (22-29 Hz), indicating that the brain network changes its topology with practice of hand grasping MI. Our findings build the neurophysiological basis for the use of non-invasive BCI technology for monitoring and guidance of motor imagery-dependent brain plasticity and thus may render BCI a viable tool for post-stroke rehabilitation.

  18. Intraoperative determination and display of cortical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, W. Andrew; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Maciunas, Robert J.

    1997-05-01

    One of the most important issues in neurosurgical lesion resection is margin definition. And while there is still some effort required to exactly determine lesion boundaries from tomographic images, the lesions are at least perceptible on the scans. What is not visible is the location of function. Functional imaging such as PET and fMRI hold some promise for cortical function localization; however, intraoperative cortical mapping can provide exact localization of function without ambiguity. Since tomographic images can provide lesion margin definition and cortical mapping can provide functional information we have developed a system for combining the two in our Interactive, Image-Guided system. For cortical surface mapping we need a surface description. Brain contours are extracted from a MRI volume using a deformable model approach and rendered from multiple angular positions. As the surgeon moves a probe, its position is displayed on the view closes to the angular position of the probe. During functional mapping, positive response to stimulation result in a color overlay 'dot' added to the cortical surface display. Different colored dots are used to distinguish between motor function and language function. And a third color is used to display overlapping functionality. This information is used to guide the resection around functionally eloquent areas of the cortex.

  19. [Changes in Spatial Organization of Cortical Rhythm Vibrations in Children uner the Influence of Music].

    PubMed

    Shepovalnikov, A N; Egorov, M V

    2015-01-01

    Changes is systemic brain activity under influence of classical music (minor and major music) were studied at two groups of healthy children aged 5-6 years (n = 53). In 25 of studied children the Luscher test showed increased level of anxiety which significantly decreased after music therapy sessions. Bioelectrical cortical activity registered from 20 unipolar leads was subjected to correlation, coherence and factor analysis. Also the dynamics of the power spectrum for each of the EEG was studied. According to EEG all children after listening to both minor and major tones showed reorganization of brain rhythm structure accompanied by a decrease in the level of coherence and correlation of EEG; also was found significant and almost universal decrease in the EEG power spectrum. Registered EEG changes under the influence of classical music seems to reflect a decrease in excess of "internal tension" and weakening degree of "stiffness" to ensure the activity of cerebral structures responsible for mechanisms of "basic integration" which maintain constant readiness of brain to rapid and complete inclusion in action. PMID:26859984

  20. [Changes in Spatial Organization of Cortical Rhythm Vibrations in Children uner the Influence of Music].

    PubMed

    Shepovalnikov, A N; Egorov, M V

    2015-01-01

    Changes is systemic brain activity under influence of classical music (minor and major music) were studied at two groups of healthy children aged 5-6 years (n = 53). In 25 of studied children the Luscher test showed increased level of anxiety which significantly decreased after music therapy sessions. Bioelectrical cortical activity registered from 20 unipolar leads was subjected to correlation, coherence and factor analysis. Also the dynamics of the power spectrum for each of the EEG was studied. According to EEG all children after listening to both minor and major tones showed reorganization of brain rhythm structure accompanied by a decrease in the level of coherence and correlation of EEG; also was found significant and almost universal decrease in the EEG power spectrum. Registered EEG changes under the influence of classical music seems to reflect a decrease in excess of "internal tension" and weakening degree of "stiffness" to ensure the activity of cerebral structures responsible for mechanisms of "basic integration" which maintain constant readiness of brain to rapid and complete inclusion in action.

  1. Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity of animals and several determining causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Malyutina, T. S.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.; Vatsek, A.; Rakova, A.

    1974-01-01

    Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity in rats and mice were determined by survival rates after acute total radiation at the same dosage at different times of the day. Radiosensitivity differed in animals of different species and varieties. Inbred mice exhibited one or two increases in radiosensitivity during the dark, active period of the day. These effects were attributed to periodic changes in the state of stem hematopoietic cells.

  2. To the Beat of Your Own Drum: Cortical Regularization of Non-Integer Ratio Rhythms Toward Metrical Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Benjamin A.; Erickson, Molly A.; Hetrick, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Humans perceive a wide range of temporal patterns, including those rhythms that occur in music, speech, and movement; however, there are constraints on the rhythmic patterns that we can represent. Past research has shown that sequences in which sounds occur regularly at non-metrical locations in a repeating beat period (non-integer ratio subdivisions of the beat, e.g. sounds at 430 ms in a 1000 ms beat) are represented less accurately than sequences with metrical relationships, where events occur at even subdivisions of the beat (integer ratios, e.g. sounds at 500 ms in a 1000 ms beat). Why do non-integer ratio rhythms present cognitive challenges? An emerging theory is that non-integer ratio sequences are represented incorrectly, “regularized” in the direction of the nearest metrical pattern, and the present study sought evidence of such perceptual regularization toward integer ratio relationships. Participants listened to metrical and non-metrical rhythmic auditory sequences during electroencephalogram recording, and sounds were pseudorandomly omitted from the stimulus sequence. Cortical responses to these omissions (omission elicited potentials; OEPs) were used to estimate the timing of expectations for omitted sounds in integer ratio and non-integer ratio locations. OEP amplitude and onset latency measures indicated that expectations for non-integer ratio sequences are distorted toward the nearest metrical location in the rhythmic period. These top-down effects demonstrate metrical regularization in a purely perceptual context, and provide support for dynamical accounts of rhythm perception. PMID:23434916

  3. Localization of central rhythm generator involved in cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, S; Iriki, A; Nakamura, Y

    1986-04-01

    The location of the central rhythm generator involved in the cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement was studied in the ketamine-anesthetized guinea pig. These studies show that a population of neurons is activated by a nonrhythmical input from the cortical masticatory area (CMA) and produces a rhythmical output to the trigeminal motoneurons innervating the jaw-opening muscles. Repetitive stimulation (30 Hz) of the pyramidal tract (PT) rostral to the middle level of the medulla oblongata, in the animal with a precollicular transection as well as with an intact neuraxis, induced a rhythmical reciprocal EMG activity in the anterior digastric and masseter muscles. The rhythmical activity could be monitored by a rhythmical burst in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve innervating the anterior digastric muscle. Essentially the same pattern was observed when stimulating the PT as that induced by repetitive stimulation of the CMA. The rhythmical efferent burst in the mylohyoid nerve could still be induced after paralyzing the animal. Repetitive PT stimulation in the isolated brain stem after precollicular and bulbospinal transections induced a rhythmical pattern in the anterior digastric EMG and an efferent activity in the mylohyoid nerve. The rhythmical mylohyoid nerve burst could be induced after paralyzing the animal. After section of the medial part of the brain stem at the pontobulbar junction, including the PT, repetitive PT stimulation at the pontine level did not induce any masticatory activity either in the digastric EMG or in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve, while stimulation at the rostral bulbar level still induced a rhythmicity that was essentially the same pattern as before the section. By testing the effects of total and partial transections of the brain stem in coronal and sagittal planes at various locations, we found that the medial bulbar reticular formation, the lateral pons including the trigeminal motor

  4. Cortical motor systems are involved in second-language comprehension: evidence from rapid mu-rhythm desynchronisation.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Nikola; Shtyrov, Yury

    2014-11-15

    Understanding neurocognitive mechanisms supporting the use of multiple languages is a key question in language science. Recent neuroimaging studies in monolinguals indicated that core language areas in human neocortex together with sensorimotor structures form a highly interactive system underpinning native language comprehension. While the experience of a native speaker promotes the establishment of strong action-perception links in the comprehension network, this may not necessarily be the case for L2 where, as it has been argued, the most a typical L2 speaker may get is a link between an L2 wordform and its L1 translation equivalent. Therefore, we investigated, whether the motor cortex of bilingual subjects shows differential involvement in processing action semantics of native and non-native words. We used high-density EEG to dynamically measure changes in the cortical motor system's activity, indexed by event-related desynchronisation (ERD) of the mu-rhythm, in response to passively reading L1 (German) and L2 (English) action words. Analysis of motor-related EEG oscillations at the sensor level revealed an early (starting ~150 ms) and left-lateralised coupling between action and semantics during both L1 and L2 processing. Crucially, source-level activation in the motor areas showed that mu-rhythm ERD, while present for both languages, is significantly stronger for L1 words. This is the first neurophysiological evidence of rapid motor-cortex involvement during L2 action-semantic processing. Our results both strengthen embodied cognition evidence obtained previously in monolinguals and, at the same time, reveal important quantitative differences between L1 and L2 sensorimotor brain activity in language comprehension.

  5. Dynamic modulation of shared sensory and motor cortical rhythms mediates speech and non-speech discrimination performance

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andrew L.; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Harkrider, Ashley; Wilson, Matt; Toner, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory models of speech processing have proposed that rhythmic cortical oscillations in sensory and motor regions modulate speech sound processing from the bottom-up via phase reset at low frequencies (3–10 Hz) and from the top-down via the disinhibition of alpha/beta rhythms (8–30 Hz). To investigate how the proposed rhythms mediate perceptual performance, electroencephalographic (EEG) was recorded while participants passively listened to or actively identified speech and tone-sweeps in a two-force choice in noise discrimination task presented at high and low signal-to-noise ratios. EEG data were decomposed using independent component analysis and clustered across participants using principle component methods in EEGLAB. Left and right hemisphere sensorimotor and posterior temporal lobe clusters were identified. Alpha and beta suppression was associated with active tasks only in sensorimotor and temporal clusters. In posterior temporal clusters, increases in phase reset at low frequencies were driven by the quality of bottom-up acoustic information for speech and non-speech stimuli, whereas phase reset in sensorimotor clusters was associated with top-down active task demands. A comparison of correct discrimination trials to those identified at chance showed an earlier performance related effect for the left sensorimotor cluster relative to the left-temporal lobe cluster during the syllable discrimination task only. The right sensorimotor cluster was associated with performance related differences for tone–sweep stimuli only. Findings are consistent with internal model accounts suggesting that early efferent sensorimotor models transmitted along alpha and beta channels reflect a release from inhibition related to active attention to auditory discrimination. Results are discussed in the broader context of dynamic, oscillatory models of cognition proposing that top-down internally generated states interact with bottom-up sensory processing to enhance task

  6. Neural net identification of thumb movement using spectral characteristics of magnetic cortical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Portin, K; Kajola, M; Salmelin, R

    1996-04-01

    Neural nets have shown great promise as tools for reducing and examining multi-dimensional data. When carefully tuned with selected data sets of individual subjects neural nets have indisputable potential in identifying distinct stages of voluntary finger movements. However, robust, automatized data description methods would be needed to eventually extend the use of neural networks into visualization of brain activity during more complex, multimodal tasks where the cortical processes are not equally well understood. We explored the suitability of a self-organizing map (SOM) in the widely studied case of voluntary finger movements (left and right thumb), using as input such spectral characteristics that showed systematic task-dependent changes when averaged over repeated movements. SOMs constructed without individual fine-tuning and with generally chosen training parameters from these spectral features identified correctly 85% of the ongoing movements but, somewhat surprisingly, not the side of thumb movement. Even for this inclusive choice of input, the neural nets were sensitive to transient signals, but focused fine tuning, based on a priori known subgroups in the data, is clearly required for more detailed classification. Thus, a neural net visualization is likely not the most attractive first approach for characterization of cortical processing during complex multimodal tasks.

  7. Acetylcholine, theta-rhythm and activity of hippocampal neurons in the rabbit--III. Cortical input.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, O S; Brazhnik, E S; Stafekhina, V S; Kitchigina, V F

    1993-04-01

    Cholinergic modulation of single cell responses and field potentials evoked in the hippocampus by electrical stimulation of the perforant path and mossy fibres was investigated in two groups of chronic unanesthetized rabbits--with intact hippocampus and with basally undercut septum (without ascending medial forebrain bundle afferents). In both groups of animals responses to stimulation were blocked or significantly depressed by i.v. physostigmine injection in many neurons (50% in the intact hippocampus and 69% in the hippocampus without medial forebrain bundle). In minor groups of neurons (10 and 8%, respectively), facilitation of responses was observed. Scopolamine restored initial responsiveness of hippocampal neurons and augmented effects of stimulation in some of them. The effect of physostigmine was reproduced by stimulation of the medial septum. Depressive influence of medial septal area stimulation was increased by physostigmine and blocked by scopolamine. Population spikes evoked by stimulation of the perforant path of the intact group were equally suppressed (by 43%) during sensory stimulation evoking natural theta, after physostigmine and after medial septal area stimulation. In the group of animals without medial forebrain bundle these influences resulted in a complete suppression of field potentials; scopolamine restored them. It is concluded that the main function of the septohippocampal cholinergic input consists of filtering out the signals appearing at the background of theta-rhythm triggered by a previous signal, thus preventing their interference with its processing and registration. PMID:8506031

  8. Cognitive-neural effects of brush writing of chinese characters: cortical excitation of theta rhythm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Kao, Henry S R; Zhang, Manlin; Lam, Stewart P W; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Chinese calligraphy has been scientifically investigated within the contexts and principles of psychology, cognitive science, and the cognitive neuroscience. On the basis of vast amount of research in the last 30 years, we have developed a cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy to account for the intricate interactions of several psychological dimensions involved in the dynamic act of graphic production. Central to this system of writing are the role of sensory, bio-, cognitive, and neurofeedback mechanisms for the initiation, guidance, and regulation of the writing motions vis-a-vis visual-geometric variations of Chinese characters. This experiment provided the first evidence of cortical excitation in EEG theta wave as a neural hub that integrates information coming from changes in the practitioner's body, emotions, and cognition. In addition, it has also confirmed neurofeedback as an essential component of the cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy. PMID:23533532

  9. Cognitive-Neural Effects of Brush Writing of Chinese Characters: Cortical Excitation of Theta Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Kao, Henry S. R.; Zhang, Manlin; Lam, Stewart P. W.; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Chinese calligraphy has been scientifically investigated within the contexts and principles of psychology, cognitive science, and the cognitive neuroscience. On the basis of vast amount of research in the last 30 years, we have developed a cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy to account for the intricate interactions of several psychological dimensions involved in the dynamic act of graphic production. Central to this system of writing are the role of sensory, bio-, cognitive, and neurofeedback mechanisms for the initiation, guidance, and regulation of the writing motions vis-a-vis visual-geometric variations of Chinese characters. This experiment provided the first evidence of cortical excitation in EEG theta wave as a neural hub that integrates information coming from changes in the practitioner's body, emotions, and cognition. In addition, it has also confirmed neurofeedback as an essential component of the cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy. PMID:23533532

  10. High frequency deep brain stimulation attenuates subthalamic and cortical rhythms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Whitmer, Diane; de Solages, Camille; Hill, Bruce; Yu, Hong; Henderson, Jaimie M; Bronte-Stewart, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is marked by excessive synchronous activity in the beta (8-35 Hz) band throughout the cortico-basal ganglia network. The optimal location of high frequency deep brain stimulation (HF DBS) within the subthalamic nucleus (STN) region and the location of maximal beta hypersynchrony are currently matters of debate. Additionally, the effect of STN HF DBS on neural synchrony in functionally connected regions of motor cortex is unknown and is of great interest. Scalp EEG studies demonstrated that stimulation of the STN can activate motor cortex antidromically, but the spatial specificity of this effect has not been examined. The present study examined the effect of STN HF DBS on neural synchrony within the cortico-basal ganglia network in patients with PD. We measured local field potentials dorsal to and within the STN of PD patients, and additionally in the motor cortex in a subset of these patients. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to guide the placement of subdural cortical surface electrodes over the DTI-identified origin of the hyperdirect pathway (HDP) between motor cortex and the STN. The results demonstrated that local beta power was attenuated during HF DBS both dorsal to and within the STN. The degree of attenuation was monotonic with increased DBS voltages in both locations, but this voltage-dependent effect was greater in the central STN than dorsal to the STN (p < 0.05). Cortical signals over the estimated origin of the HDP also demonstrated attenuation of beta hypersynchrony during DBS dorsal to or within STN, whereas signals from non-specific regions of motor cortex were not attenuated. The spatially-specific suppression of beta synchrony in the motor cortex support the hypothesis that DBS may treat Parkinsonism by reducing excessive synchrony in the functionally connected sensorimotor network. PMID:22675296

  11. [Characteristics of cortical activity in persons with high and low verbal creativity: analysis of alpha1,2 rhythms].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Tarasova, I V; Vol'f, N V

    2009-01-01

    Creativity-related changes in alpha power in low-frequency (8-10 Hz) and high-frequency (10-13 Hz) bands were studied in university students having regard to generation of original ideas during performance of two verbal tasks. A high-creative group enrolled 16 subjects asked to generate original words--associates to the triads of verbal stimuli and 14 subjects who were asked to compose a sentence using triads of nouns from remote semantic categories. Low-creative groups included 22 and 13 individuals, respectively. In low-frequency band, highly creative subjects showed a higher level of alpha power than low creative individuals. In the high-frequency band, task-related alpha2 power desynchronization was different in these groups: high-creative individuals had higher power score than low-creative mostly in the anterior and parietal cortical areas. These data and a factor structure of alpha rhythm indices may be evidence of different strategies of information selection in highly and low creative persons.

  12. Detection of the onset of upper-limb movements based on the combined analysis of changes in the sensorimotor rhythms and slow cortical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, J.; Serrano, J. I.; del Castillo, M. D.; Monge-Pereira, E.; Molina-Rueda, F.; Alguacil-Diego, I.; Pons, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Characterizing the intention to move by means of electroencephalographic activity can be used in rehabilitation protocols with patients’ cortical activity taking an active role during the intervention. In such applications, the reliability of the intention estimation is critical both in terms of specificity ‘number of misclassifications’ and temporal accuracy. Here, a detector of the onset of voluntary upper-limb reaching movements based on the cortical rhythms and the slow cortical potentials is proposed. The improvement in detections due to the combination of these two cortical patterns is also studied. Approach. Upper-limb movements and cortical activity were recorded in healthy subjects and stroke patients performing self-paced reaching movements. A logistic regression combined the output of two classifiers: (i) a naïve Bayes classifier trained to detect the event-related desynchronization preceding the movement onset and (ii) a matched filter detecting the bereitschaftspotential. The proposed detector was compared with the detectors by using each one of these cortical patterns separately. In addition, differences between the patients and healthy subjects were analysed. Main results. On average, 74.5 ± 13.8% and 82.2 ± 10.4% of the movements were detected with 1.32 ± 0.87 and 1.50 ± 1.09 false detections generated per minute in the healthy subjects and the patients, respectively. A significantly better performance was achieved by the combined detector (as compared to the detectors of the two cortical patterns separately) in terms of true detections (p = 0.099) and false positives (p = 0.0083). Significance. A rationale is provided for combining information from cortical rhythms and slow cortical potentials to detect the onsets of voluntary upper-limb movements. It is demonstrated that the two cortical processes supply complementary information that can be summed up to boost the performance of the detector. Successful results have been also

  13. Somatostatin modulates generation of inspiratory rhythms and determines asphyxia survival.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Lara-Hernández, Sergio; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Aguileta, Miguel A; Rivera-Angulo, Ana J; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Breathing and the activity of its generator (the pre-Bötzinger complex; pre-BötC) are highly regulated functions. Among neuromodulators of breathing, somatostatin (SST) is unique: it is synthesized by a subset of glutamatergic pre-BötC neurons, but acts as an inhibitory neuromodulator. Moreover, SST regulates breathing both in normoxic and in hypoxic conditions. Although it has been implicated in the neuromodulation of breathing, neither the locus of SST modulation, nor the receptor subtypes involved have been identified. In this study, we aimed to fill in these blanks by characterizing the SST-induced regulation of inspiratory rhythm generation in vitro and in vivo. We found that both endogenous and exogenous SST depress all preBötC-generated rhythms. While SST abolishes sighs, it also decreases the frequency and increases the regularity of eupnea and gasping. Pharmacological experiments showed that SST modulates inspiratory rhythm generation by activating SST receptor type-2, whose mRNA is abundantly expressed in the pre-Bötzinger complex. In vivo, blockade of SST receptor type-2 reduces gasping amplitude and consequently, it precludes auto-resuscitation after asphyxia. Based on our findings, we suggest that SST functions as an inhibitory neuromodulator released by excitatory respiratory neurons when they become overactivated in order to stabilize breathing rhythmicity in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  14. Temporal and Motor Representation of Rhythm in Fronto-Parietal Cortical Areas: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Konoike, Naho; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Miyazaki, Atsuko; Sakaki, Kohei; Shinada, Takamitsu; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-01-01

    When sounds occur with temporally structured patterns, we can feel a rhythm. To memorize a rhythm, perception of its temporal patterns and organization of them into a hierarchically structured sequence are necessary. On the other hand, rhythm perception can often cause unintentional body movements. Thus, we hypothesized that rhythm information can be manifested in two different ways; temporal and motor representations. The motor representation depends on effectors, such as the finger or foot, whereas the temporal representation is effector-independent. We tested our hypothesis with a working memory paradigm to elucidate neuronal correlates of temporal or motor representation of rhythm and to reveal the neural networks associated with these representations. We measured brain activity by fMRI while participants memorized rhythms and reproduced them by tapping with the right finger, left finger, or foot, or by articulation. The right inferior frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal lobule exhibited significant effector-independent activations during encoding and retrieval of rhythm information, whereas the left inferior parietal lobule and supplementary motor area (SMA) showed effector-dependent activations during retrieval. These results suggest that temporal sequences of rhythm are probably represented in the right fronto-parietal network, whereas motor sequences of rhythm can be represented in the SMA-parietal network. PMID:26076024

  15. Behavioral evidence for the role of cortical θ oscillations in determining auditory channel capacity for speech

    PubMed Central

    Ghitza, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the intelligibility of time-compressed speech have shown flawless performance for moderate compression factors, a sharp deterioration for compression factors above three, and an improved performance as a result of “repackaging”—a process of dividing the time-compressed waveform into fragments, called packets, and delivering the packets in a prescribed rate. This intricate pattern of performance reflects the reliability of the auditory system in processing speech streams with different information transfer rates; the knee-point of performance defines the auditory channel capacity. This study is concerned with the cortical computation principle that determines channel capacity. Oscillation-based models of speech perception hypothesize that the speech decoding process is guided by a cascade of oscillations with theta as “master,” capable of tracking the input rhythm, with the theta cycles aligned with the intervocalic speech fragments termed θ-syllables; intelligibility remains high as long as theta is in sync with the input, and it sharply deteriorates once theta is out of sync. In the study described here the hypothesized role of theta was examined by measuring the auditory channel capacity of time-compressed speech undergone repackaging. For all speech speeds tested (with compression factors of up to eight), packaging rate at capacity equals 9 packets/s—aligned with the upper limit of cortical theta, θmax (about 9 Hz)—and the packet duration equals the duration of one uncompressed θ-syllable divided by the compression factor. The alignment of both the packaging rate and the packet duration with properties of cortical theta suggests that the auditory channel capacity is determined by theta. Irrespective of speech speed, the maximum information transfer rate through the auditory channel is the information in one uncompressed θ-syllable long speech fragment per one θmax cycle. Equivalently, the auditory channel capacity is 9

  16. Determination of cerebral cortical blood flow: a thermal technique.

    PubMed

    Hoehner, P J; Krause, G S; White, B C; Gadzinski, D S

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model for tissue thermodilution was developed to study cerebral cortical perfusion before and after controlled perfusion arrest. Cerebral cortical perfusion rates are readily determined by this method. A thermistor was introduced into the subdural space and secured in direct contact with the frontal cortex in 12 dogs on ketamine and gallamine anesthesia. A 22-gauge angiocath was placed in the right superior thyroid artery and directed into the carotid artery on the same side as the thermistor. The dogs were placed on cardiac bypass using a circuit from the right atrium to the pulmonary artery and a second circuit from the left ventricular apex to the left femoral artery. Arterial pressure, central venous pressure (CVP), intracranial pressure (ICP), and left atrial pressure (LAP) were monitored directly. A heat exchanger was used to maintain a constant blood temperature of 37 C in the output of the left side bypass circuit. Thermal flow curves were generated in the cerebral cortex by injecting 2 to 4 cc of cold saline into the common carotid artery through the injection catheter. Preliminary evaluation of this flow method in comparison to radioactive microspheres indicates that this method can be used in a reliable and reproducible fashion to determine cerebral cortical blood flow.

  17. To the Beat of Your Own Drum: Cortical Regularization of Non-Integer Ratio Rhythms toward Metrical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motz, Benjamin A.; Erickson, Molly A.; Hetrick, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Humans perceive a wide range of temporal patterns, including those rhythms that occur in music, speech, and movement; however, there are constraints on the rhythmic patterns that we can represent. Past research has shown that sequences in which sounds occur regularly at non-metrical locations in a repeating beat period (non-integer ratio…

  18. The suprachiasmatic nuclei are involved in determining circadian rhythms during restricted feeding.

    PubMed

    Froy, O; Chapnik, N; Miskin, R

    2008-09-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) responds to light and regulates peripheral circadian rhythms. Feeding regimens also reset the clock, so that time-restricted feeding (RF) dictates rhythms in peripheral tissues, whereas calorie restriction (CR) affects the SCN clock. To better understand the influence of RF vs. CR on circadian rhythms, we took advantage of the transgenic alphaMUPA mice that exhibit spontaneously reduced eating, and can serve as a model for CR under ad libitum feeding, and a model for temporal CR under RF compared with wild type (WT) mice. Our results show that RF advanced and generally increased the amplitude of clock gene expression in the liver under LD in both mouse types. However, under disruptive light conditions, RF resulted in a different clock gene phase in WT mice compared with alphaMUPA mice, suggesting a role for the reduced calories in resetting the SCN that led to the change of phase in alphaMUPA mice. Comparison of the RF regimen in the two lighting conditions in WT mice revealed that mPer1, mClock, and mBmal1 increased, whereas mPer2 decreased in amplitude under ultradian light in WT mice, suggesting a role for the SCN in determining clock gene expression in the periphery during RF. In summary, herein we reinforce a role for calorie restriction in resetting the SCN clock, and unravel a role for the SCN in determining peripheral rhythms under RF.

  19. Investigating the effects of a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training on the cortical activity elicited by mental imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, J.; Risetti, M.; Quitadamo, L. R.; Petti, M.; Bianchi, L.; Salinari, S.; Babiloni, F.; Cincotti, F.; Mattia, D.; Astolfi, L.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. It is well known that to acquire sensorimotor (SMR)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) control requires a training period before users can achieve their best possible performances. Nevertheless, the effect of this training procedure on the cortical activity related to the mental imagery ability still requires investigation to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the effects of SMR-based BCI training on the cortical spectral activity associated with the performance of different mental imagery tasks. Approach. Linear cortical estimation and statistical brain mapping techniques were applied on high-density EEG data acquired from 18 healthy participants performing three different mental imagery tasks. Subjects were divided in two groups, one of BCI trained subjects, according to their previous exposure (at least six months before this study) to motor imagery-based BCI training, and one of subjects who were naive to any BCI paradigms. Main results. Cortical activation maps obtained for trained and naive subjects indicated different spectral and spatial activity patterns in response to the mental imagery tasks. Long-term effects of the previous SMR-based BCI training were observed on the motor cortical spectral activity specific to the BCI trained motor imagery task (simple hand movements) and partially generalized to more complex motor imagery task (playing tennis). Differently, mental imagery with spatial attention and memory content could elicit recognizable cortical spectral activity even in subjects completely naive to (BCI) training. Significance. The present findings contribute to our understanding of BCI technology usage and might be of relevance in those clinical conditions when training to master a BCI application is challenging or even not possible.

  20. Mindfulness starts with the body: somatosensory attention and top-down modulation of cortical alpha rhythms in mindfulness meditation.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Catherine E; Sacchet, Matthew D; Lazar, Sara W; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2013-01-01

    Using a common set of mindfulness exercises, mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) have been shown to reduce distress in chronic pain and decrease risk of depression relapse. These standardized mindfulness (ST-Mindfulness) practices predominantly require attending to breath and body sensations. Here, we offer a novel view of ST-Mindfulness's somatic focus as a form of training for optimizing attentional modulation of 7-14 Hz alpha rhythms that play a key role in filtering inputs to primary sensory neocortex and organizing the flow of sensory information in the brain. In support of the framework, we describe our previous finding that ST-Mindfulness enhanced attentional regulation of alpha in primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The framework allows us to make several predictions. In chronic pain, we predict somatic attention in ST-Mindfulness "de-biases" alpha in SI, freeing up pain-focused attentional resources. In depression relapse, we predict ST-Mindfulness's somatic attention competes with internally focused rumination, as internally focused cognitive processes (including working memory) rely on alpha filtering of sensory input. Our computational model predicts ST-Mindfulness enhances top-down modulation of alpha by facilitating precise alterations in timing and efficacy of SI thalamocortical inputs. We conclude by considering how the framework aligns with Buddhist teachings that mindfulness starts with "mindfulness of the body." Translating this theory into neurophysiology, we hypothesize that with its somatic focus, mindfulness' top-down alpha rhythm modulation in SI enhances gain control which, in turn, sensitizes practitioners to better detect and regulate when the mind wanders from its somatic focus. This enhanced regulation of somatic mind-wandering may be an important early stage of mindfulness training that leads to enhanced cognitive regulation and metacognition.

  1. Nondestructive and intuitive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves using multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xia; Deng, Yong-Ren; Li, Jia-Hang; Chen, Wei; Chiang, John Y; Yang, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-06-10

    The circadian clock, synchronized by daily cyclic environmental cues, regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and increases plant fitness. Even though much is known regarding the molecular mechanism of circadian clock, it remains challenging to quantify the temporal variation of major photosynthesis products as well as their metabolic output in higher plants in a real-time, nondestructive and intuitive manner. In order to reveal the spatial-temporal scenarios of photosynthesis and yield formation regulated by circadian clock, multispectral imaging technique has been employed for nondestructive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves. By utilizing partial least square regression analysis, the determination coefficients R(2), 0.9483 for chlorophyll a and 0.8906 for chlorophyll b, were reached, respectively. The predicted chlorophyll contents extracted from multispectral data showed an approximately 24-h rhythm which could be entrained by external light conditions, consistent with the chlorophyll contents measured by chemical analyses. Visualization of chlorophyll map in each pixel offers an effective way to analyse spatial-temporal distribution of chlorophyll. Our results revealed the potentiality of multispectral imaging as a feasible nondestructive universal assay for examining clock function and robustness, as well as monitoring chlorophyll a and b and other biochemical components in plants.

  2. Nondestructive and intuitive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves using multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xia; Deng, Yong-Ren; Li, Jia-Hang; Chen, Wei; Chiang, John Y.; Yang, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock, synchronized by daily cyclic environmental cues, regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and increases plant fitness. Even though much is known regarding the molecular mechanism of circadian clock, it remains challenging to quantify the temporal variation of major photosynthesis products as well as their metabolic output in higher plants in a real-time, nondestructive and intuitive manner. In order to reveal the spatial-temporal scenarios of photosynthesis and yield formation regulated by circadian clock, multispectral imaging technique has been employed for nondestructive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves. By utilizing partial least square regression analysis, the determination coefficients R2, 0.9483 for chlorophyll a and 0.8906 for chlorophyll b, were reached, respectively. The predicted chlorophyll contents extracted from multispectral data showed an approximately 24-h rhythm which could be entrained by external light conditions, consistent with the chlorophyll contents measured by chemical analyses. Visualization of chlorophyll map in each pixel offers an effective way to analyse spatial-temporal distribution of chlorophyll. Our results revealed the potentiality of multispectral imaging as a feasible nondestructive universal assay for examining clock function and robustness, as well as monitoring chlorophyll a and b and other biochemical components in plants.

  3. Nondestructive and intuitive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves using multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xia; Deng, Yong-Ren; Li, Jia-Hang; Chen, Wei; Chiang, John Y.; Yang, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock, synchronized by daily cyclic environmental cues, regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and increases plant fitness. Even though much is known regarding the molecular mechanism of circadian clock, it remains challenging to quantify the temporal variation of major photosynthesis products as well as their metabolic output in higher plants in a real-time, nondestructive and intuitive manner. In order to reveal the spatial-temporal scenarios of photosynthesis and yield formation regulated by circadian clock, multispectral imaging technique has been employed for nondestructive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves. By utilizing partial least square regression analysis, the determination coefficients R2, 0.9483 for chlorophyll a and 0.8906 for chlorophyll b, were reached, respectively. The predicted chlorophyll contents extracted from multispectral data showed an approximately 24-h rhythm which could be entrained by external light conditions, consistent with the chlorophyll contents measured by chemical analyses. Visualization of chlorophyll map in each pixel offers an effective way to analyse spatial-temporal distribution of chlorophyll. Our results revealed the potentiality of multispectral imaging as a feasible nondestructive universal assay for examining clock function and robustness, as well as monitoring chlorophyll a and b and other biochemical components in plants. PMID:26059057

  4. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  5. Painted Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastian, Duane

    1985-01-01

    In this art activity gifted students, ages 10 to 13, learn about internal and external rhythms and make a painting of an internal rhythm. The lesson can be expanded with a discussion of Kandinsky, Pollock, and other painters who have painted sound or have demonstrated rhythms. (RM)

  6. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-10-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed determination, (b) distraction, (c) placebo, (d) hypnosis, (e) meditation, (f) qi-gong, (g) belief, and (h) emotions, respectively, in the brain function for pain modulation. In each, the operational definition, cortical processing, neuroimaging, and pain modulation were systematically deliberated. However, not all studies had featured the brain modulation processing but rather demonstrated potential effects on human pain. In our own studies on the emotional modulation on human pain, we observed that emotions could be induced from music melodies or pictures perception for reduction of tonic human pain, mainly in potentiation of the posterior alpha EEG fields, likely resulted from underneath activities of precuneous in regulation of consciousness, including pain perception. To sum, higher brain functions become the leading edge research in all sciences. How to solve the information bit of thinking and feeling in the brain can be the greatest challenge of human intelligence. Application of higher cortical modulation of human pain and suffering can lead to the progress of social humanity and civilization.

  7. Subjective pain perception mediated by alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Babiloni, Claudio; Mao, Yanhui; Hu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Suppression of spontaneous alpha oscillatory activities, interpreted as cortical excitability, was observed in response to both transient and tonic painful stimuli. The changes of alpha rhythms induced by pain could be modulated by painful sensory inputs, experimental tasks, and top-down cognitive regulations such as attention. The temporal and spatial characteristics, as well as neural functions of pain induced alpha responses, depend much on how these factors contribute to the observed alpha event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS). How sensory-, task-, and cognitive-related changes of alpha oscillatory activities interact in pain perception process is reviewed in the current study, and the following conclusions are made: (1) the functional inhibition hypothesis that has been proposed in auditory and visual modalities could be applied also in pain modality; (2) the neural functions of pain induced alpha ERD/ERS were highly dependent on the cortical regions where it is observed, e.g., somatosensory cortex alpha ERD/ERS in pain perception for painful stimulus processing; (3) the attention modulation of pain perception, i.e., influences on the sensory and affective dimensions of pain experience, could be mediated by changes of alpha rhythms. Finally, we propose a model regarding the determinants of pain related alpha oscillatory activity, i.e., sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive-modulative aspects of pain experience, would affect and determine pain related alpha oscillatory activities in an integrated way within the distributed alpha system. PMID:26026894

  8. About the cortical origin of the low-delta and high-gamma rhythms observed in EEG signals during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Castermans, Thierry; Duvinage, Matthieu; Cheron, Guy; Dutoit, Thierry

    2014-02-21

    This paper presents a spectral and time-frequency analysis of EEG signals recorded on seven healthy subjects walking on a treadmill at three different speeds. An accelerometer was placed on the head of the subjects in order to record the shocks undergone by the EEG electrodes during walking. Our results indicate that up to 15 harmonics of the fundamental stepping frequency may pollute EEG signals, depending on the walking speed and also on the electrode location. This finding may call into question some conclusions drawn in previous EEG studies where low-delta band (especially around 1 Hz, the fundamental stepping frequency) had been announced as being the seat of angular and linear kinematics control of the lower limbs during walk. Additionally, our analysis reveals that EEG and accelerometer signals exhibit similar time-frequency properties, especially in frequency bands extending up to 150 Hz, suggesting that previous conclusions claiming the activation of high-gamma rhythms during walking may have been drawn on the basis of insufficiently cleaned EEG signals. Our results are put in perspective with recent EEG studies related to locomotion and extensively discussed in particular by focusing on the low-delta and high-gamma bands.

  9. Auditory cortical deactivation during speech production and following speech perception: an EEG investigation of the temporal dynamics of the auditory alpha rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jenson, David; Harkrider, Ashley W; Thornton, David; Bowers, Andrew L; Saltuklaroglu, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration (SMI) across the dorsal stream enables online monitoring of speech. Jenson et al. (2014) used independent component analysis (ICA) and event related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to describe anterior sensorimotor (e.g., premotor cortex, PMC) activity during speech perception and production. The purpose of the current study was to identify and temporally map neural activity from posterior (i.e., auditory) regions of the dorsal stream in the same tasks. Perception tasks required "active" discrimination of syllable pairs (/ba/ and /da/) in quiet and noisy conditions. Production conditions required overt production of syllable pairs and nouns. ICA performed on concatenated raw 68 channel EEG data from all tasks identified bilateral "auditory" alpha (α) components in 15 of 29 participants localized to pSTG (left) and pMTG (right). ERSP analyses were performed to reveal fluctuations in the spectral power of the α rhythm clusters across time. Production conditions were characterized by significant α event related synchronization (ERS; pFDR < 0.05) concurrent with EMG activity from speech production, consistent with speech-induced auditory inhibition. Discrimination conditions were also characterized by α ERS following stimulus offset. Auditory α ERS in all conditions temporally aligned with PMC activity reported in Jenson et al. (2014). These findings are indicative of speech-induced suppression of auditory regions, possibly via efference copy. The presence of the same pattern following stimulus offset in discrimination conditions suggests that sensorimotor contributions following speech perception reflect covert replay, and that covert replay provides one source of the motor activity previously observed in some speech perception tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inhibition of auditory regions by speech has been observed in real-time with the ICA/ERSP technique. PMID:26500519

  10. Auditory cortical deactivation during speech production and following speech perception: an EEG investigation of the temporal dynamics of the auditory alpha rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Jenson, David; Harkrider, Ashley W.; Thornton, David; Bowers, Andrew L.; Saltuklaroglu, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration (SMI) across the dorsal stream enables online monitoring of speech. Jenson et al. (2014) used independent component analysis (ICA) and event related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to describe anterior sensorimotor (e.g., premotor cortex, PMC) activity during speech perception and production. The purpose of the current study was to identify and temporally map neural activity from posterior (i.e., auditory) regions of the dorsal stream in the same tasks. Perception tasks required “active” discrimination of syllable pairs (/ba/ and /da/) in quiet and noisy conditions. Production conditions required overt production of syllable pairs and nouns. ICA performed on concatenated raw 68 channel EEG data from all tasks identified bilateral “auditory” alpha (α) components in 15 of 29 participants localized to pSTG (left) and pMTG (right). ERSP analyses were performed to reveal fluctuations in the spectral power of the α rhythm clusters across time. Production conditions were characterized by significant α event related synchronization (ERS; pFDR < 0.05) concurrent with EMG activity from speech production, consistent with speech-induced auditory inhibition. Discrimination conditions were also characterized by α ERS following stimulus offset. Auditory α ERS in all conditions temporally aligned with PMC activity reported in Jenson et al. (2014). These findings are indicative of speech-induced suppression of auditory regions, possibly via efference copy. The presence of the same pattern following stimulus offset in discrimination conditions suggests that sensorimotor contributions following speech perception reflect covert replay, and that covert replay provides one source of the motor activity previously observed in some speech perception tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inhibition of auditory regions by speech has been observed in real-time with the ICA/ERSP technique. PMID

  11. Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Bodosi, B; Gardi, J; Hajdu, I; Szentirmai, E; Obal, F; Krueger, J M

    2004-11-01

    To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat. PMID:15475503

  12. Biological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  13. Cortical activation associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception: A normalized integrative fMRI-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    When visual patterns drifting in different directions and/or at different speeds are superimposed on the same plane, observers perceive transparent surfaces on planes of different depths. This phenomenon is known as transparent motion perception. In this study, cortical activities were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to reveal the cortical dynamics associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception. In addition, offline eye movement measurements were performed to determine the latencies of the start of both pursuit eye movements and depth attention that are important in determination of the depth order. MEG and fMRI data were analyzed by a normalized integrative fMRI-MEG method that enables reconstruction of time-varying dipole moments of activated regions from MEG signals. Statistical analysis of fMRI data was performed to identify activated regions. The activated regions were used as spatial constraints for the reconstruction using the integrative fMRI-MEG method. We focused on the period between latencies (216-405 ms) determined by eye movement experiment, which are related to determination of the depth order. The results of integrative analysis revealed that significant neural activities were observed in the visual association area, the human middle temporal area, the intraparietal sulcus, the lateral occipital cortex, and the anterior cingulate cortex between 216 and 405 ms. These results suggest that initial eye movement and accompanying cortical activations during focused duration play an important role in determining the depth order during transparent motion perception.

  14. Using the gradient of human cortical bone properties to determine age-related bone changes via ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Baron, Cécile

    2012-06-01

    Bone fragility depends not only on bone mass but also on bone quality (structure and material). To accurately evaluate fracture risk or propose therapeutic treatment, clinicians need a criterion, which reflects the determinants of bone strength: geometry, structure and material. In human long bone, the changes due to aging, accentuated by osteoporosis are often revealed through the trabecularization of cortical bone, i.e., increased porosity of endosteal bone inducing a thinning of the cortex. Consequently, the intracortical porosity gradient corresponding to the spatial variation in porosity across the cortical thickness is representative of loss of mass, changes in geometry (thinning) and variations in structure (porosity). This article examines the gradient of material properties and its age-related evolution as a relevant parameter to assess bone geometry, structure and material. By applying a homogenization process, cortical bone can be considered as an anisotropic functionally graded material with variations in material properties. A semi-analytical method based on the sextic Stroh formalism is proposed to solve the wave equation in an anisotropic functionally graded waveguide for two geometries, a plate and a tube, without using a multilayered model to represent the structure. This method provides an analytical solution called the matricant and explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Our findings indicate that ultrasonic guided waves are sensitive to the age-related evolution of realistic gradients in human bone properties across the cortical thickness and have their place in a multimodal clinical protocol.

  15. Linking physics with physiology in TMS: a sphere field model to determine the cortical stimulation site in TMS.

    PubMed

    Thielscher, Axel; Kammer, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    A fundamental problem of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is determining the site and size of the stimulated cortical area. In the motor system, the most common procedure for this is motor mapping. The obtained two-dimensional distribution of coil positions with associated muscle responses is used to calculate a center of gravity on the skull. However, even in motor mapping the exact stimulation site on the cortex is not known and only rough estimates of its size are possible. We report a new method which combines physiological measurements with a physical model used to predict the electric field induced by the TMS coil. In four subjects motor responses in a small hand muscle were mapped with 9-13 stimulation sites at the head perpendicular to the central sulcus in order to keep the induced current direction constant in a given cortical region of interest. Input-output functions from these head locations were used to determine stimulator intensities that elicit half-maximal muscle responses. Based on these stimulator intensities the field distribution on the individual cortical surface was calculated as rendered from anatomical MR data. The region on the cortical surface in which the different stimulation sites produced the same electric field strength (minimal variance, 4.2 +/- 0.8%.) was determined as the most likely stimulation site on the cortex. In all subjects, it was located at the lateral part of the hand knob in the motor cortex. Comparisons of model calculations with the solutions obtained in this manner reveal that the stimulated cortex area innervating the target muscle is substantially smaller than the size of the electric field induced by the coil. Our results help to resolve fundamental questions raised by motor mapping studies as well as motor threshold measurements.

  16. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone.

  17. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone. PMID:22109098

  18. Pharmacokinetics of cefuroxime in porcine cortical and cancellous bone determined by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Bendtsen, Michael; Bue, Mats; Brock, Birgitte; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    Traditionally, the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in bone have been investigated using bone biopsy specimens, but this approach suffers from considerable methodological limitations. Consequently, new methods are needed. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of microdialysis (MD) for measuring cefuroxime in bone and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. The measurements were conducted in bone wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone and in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue. As a reference, the free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1,500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences were found between the key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone. The mean ± standard error of the mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values from 0 to 5 h were 6,013 ± 1,339, 3,222 ± 1086, 2,232 ± 635, and 952 ± 290 min · μg/ml for free plasma, subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively (P < 0.01, analysis of variance). The AUC for cortical bone was also significantly different from that for cancellous bone (P = 0.04). This heterogeneous tissue distribution was also reflected in other key pharmacokinetic parameters. This study validates MD as a suitable method for measuring cefuroxime in bone. Cefuroxime penetration was impaired for all tissues, and bone may not be considered one distinct compartment.

  19. The primate seahorse rhythm.

    PubMed

    Campos, L M G; Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; Pinato, L

    2015-07-10

    The main Zeitgeber, the day-night cycle, synchronizes the central oscillator which determines behaviors rhythms as sleep-wake behavior, body temperature, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the acquisition and processing of memory. Thus, actions such as acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval performed in the hippocampus are modulated by the circadian system and show a varied dependence on light and dark. To investigate changes in the hippocampus' cellular mechanism invoked by the day and night in a diurnal primate, this study analyzed the expression of PER2 and the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the hippocampus of Sapajus apella, a diurnal primate, at two different time points, one during the day and one during the dark phase. The PER2 protein expression peaked at night in the antiphase described for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the same primate, indicating that hippocampal cells can present independent rhythmicity. This hippocampal rhythm was similar to that presented by diurnal but not nocturnal rodents. The CaBPs immunoreactivity also showed day/night variations in the cell number and in the cell morphology. Our findings provide evidence for the claim that the circadian regulation in the hippocampus may involve rhythms of PER2 and CaBPs expression that may contribute to the adaptation of this species in events and activities relevant to the respective periods.

  20. Circadian rhythm in handwriting.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Häussler, Andreas; Marquardt, Christian; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the motor process of handwriting is influenced by a circadian rhythm. Nine healthy young male subjects underwent a 40-h sleep deprivation protocol under constant routine conditions. Starting at 09:00 hours, subjects performed every 3 h two handwriting tasks of different complexity. Handwriting performance was evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency and script size. The frequency of handwriting, as a measure of movement speed, revealed a circadian rhythm, validated by harmonic regression, with a slowing at the time of the onset of melatonin secretion (22:17 hours) and a trough in the very early morning at around 03:30 hours. In the temporal variability of handwriting an effect of task complexity was suggested in the direction of circadian variations in parallel with speed only for the sentence. Despite deficits of speed and temporal variability, writing fluency did not change significantly across sessions indicating that the basic automation of handwriting was preserved at any time. On the second day, daytime levels of the kinematics of handwriting did not reflect impaired performance after sleep deprivation. Our results show for the first time a clear circadian rhythm for the production of handwriting.

  1. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace IBHRE Heart Rhythm Journal Heart Rhythm Case Reports EP Buyer's Guide Connect With Us ... Heart Rhythm Society 2016 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You ...

  2. The Natural History of Kidney Graft Cortical Microcirculation Determined by Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Sonography (RT-CES)

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Carlos; López, María Ovidia; Ros, Amaia; Aguilar, Ana; Menendez, David; Rivas, Begoña; Santana, María José; Vaca, Marco Antonio; Escuin, Fernando; Madero, Rosario; Selgas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice for end-stage kidney disease. Graft’s life span is shorter than expected due in part to the delayed diagnosis of various complications, specifically those related to silent progression. It is recognized that serum creatinine levels and proteinuria are poor markers of mild kidney lesions, which results in delayed clinical information. There are many investigation looking for early markers of graft damage. Decreasing kidney graft cortical microcirculation has been related to poor prognosis in kidney transplantation. Cortical capillary blood flow (CCBF) can be measured by real-time contrast-enhanced sonography (RT-CES). Our aim was to describe the natural history of CCBF over time under diverse conditions of kidney transplantation, to explore the influence of donor conditions and recipient events, and to determine the capacity of CCBF for predicting renal function in medium term. Patients and Methods RT-CES was performed in 79 consecutive kidney transplant recipients during the first year under regular clinical practice. Cortical capillary blood flow was measured. Clinical variables were analyzed. The influence of CCBF has been determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using mixed regression models based on sequential measurements for each patient over time. We used a first-order autoregression model as the structure of the covariation between measures. The post-hoc comparisons were considered using the Bonferroni correction. Results The CCBF values varied significantly over the study periods and were significantly lower at 48 h and day 7. Brain-death donor age and CCBF levels showed an inverse relationship (r: -0.62, p<0.001). Living donors showed higher mean CCBF levels than brain-death donors at each point in the study. These significant differences persisted at month 12 (54.5 ± 28.2 vs 33.7 ± 30 dB/sec, living vs brain-death donor, respectively, p = 0.004) despite similar serum creatinine

  3. Determinations of renal cortical and medullary oxygenation using BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging and selective diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Lizette; Glockner, James F.; Woollard, John; Textor, Stephen C.; Romero, Juan C.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood O2 level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) can detect changes in cortical proximal tubule (PT) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL) oxygenation consequent to successive administration of furosemide and acetazolamide (Az). Assessment of PT and TAL function could be useful to monitor renal disease states in vivo. Therefore, the adjunct use of diuretics that inhibit Na+ reabsorption selectively in PT and TAL, Az and furosemide, respectively, may help discern tubular function by using BOLD MRI to detect changes in tissue oxygenation. Material and Methods BOLD MRI signal R2* (inversely related to oxygenation) and tissue oxygenation with intrarenal O2 probes were measured in pigs that received either furosemide (0.5mg/kg) or Az (15mg/kg) alone, Az sequentially after furosemide (n=6 each, 15-minute intervals), or only saline vehicle (n=3). Results R2* decreased in the cortex of Az-treated and medulla of furosemide-treated kidneys, corresponding to an increase in their tissue O2 assessed with probes. However, BOLD MRI also showed decreased cortical R2* following furosemide that was additive to the Az-induced decrease. Az administration, both alone and after furosemide, also decreased renal blood flow (−26±3.5 and −29.2±3%, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion These results suggest that an increase in medullary and cortical tissue O2 elicited by selective diuretics is detectable by BOLD MRI, but may be complicated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Therefore, the BOLD MRI signal may reflect functional changes additional to oxygenation, and needs to be interpreted cautiously. PMID:20856128

  4. Rhythm, Timing and the Timing of Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for rhythmic categorization that has emerged on the basis of rhythm metrics, and argues that the metrics are unreliable predictors of rhythm which provide no more than a crude measure of timing. It is further argued that timing is distinct from rhythm and that equating them has led to circularity and a psychologically questionable conceptualization of rhythm in speech. It is thus proposed that research on rhythm be based on the same principles for all languages, something that does not apply to the widely accepted division of languages into stress- and syllable-timed. The hypothesis is advanced that these universal principles are grouping and prominence and evidence to support it is provided. PMID:19390230

  5. Dwelling quietly in the rich club: brain network determinants of slow cortical fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Zalesky, Andrew; Hutchison, R. Matthew; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For more than a century, cerebral cartography has been driven by investigations of structural and morphological properties of the brain across spatial scales and the temporal/functional phenomena that emerge from these underlying features. The next era of brain mapping will be driven by studies that consider both of these components of brain organization simultaneously—elucidating their interactions and dependencies. Using this guiding principle, we explored the origin of slowly fluctuating patterns of synchronization within the topological core of brain regions known as the rich club, implicated in the regulation of mood and introspection. We find that a constellation of densely interconnected regions that constitute the rich club (including the anterior insula, amygdala and precuneus) play a central role in promoting a stable, dynamical core of spontaneous activity in the primate cortex. The slow timescales are well matched to the regulation of internal visceral states, corresponding to the somatic correlates of mood and anxiety. In contrast, the topology of the surrounding ‘feeder’ cortical regions shows unstable, rapidly fluctuating dynamics likely to be crucial for fast perceptual processes. We discuss these findings in relation to psychiatric disorders and the future of connectomics. PMID:25823864

  6. Motor cortical plasticity in extrinsic hand muscles is determined by the resting thresholds of overlapping representations.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the properties that govern the effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions is critical to clinical application. Extrapolation to clinical populations has been limited by high inter-subject variability and a focus on intrinsic muscles of the hand in healthy populations. Therefore, the current study assessed variability of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), a patterned TMS protocol, across an agonist-antagonist pair of extrinsic muscles of the hand. Secondarily, we assessed whether concurrent agonist contraction could enhance the efficacy of cTBS. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were simultaneously recorded from the agonist flexor (FCR) and antagonist extensor (ECR) carpi radialis before and after cTBS over the FCR hotspot. cTBS was delivered with the FCR relaxed (cTBS-Relax) or during isometric wrist flexion (cTBS-Contract). cTBS-Relax suppressed FCR MEPs evoked from the FCR hotspot. However, the extent of FCR MEP suppression was strongly correlated with the relative difference between FCR and ECR resting motor thresholds. cTBS-Contract decreased FCR suppression but increased suppression of ECR MEPs elicited from the FCR hotspot. The magnitude of ECR MEP suppression following cTBS-Contract was independent of the threshold-amplitude relationships observed with cTBS-Relax. Contraction alone had no effect confirming the effect of cTBS-Contract was driven by the interaction between neuromuscular activity and cTBS. Interactions across muscle representations should be taken into account when predicting cTBS outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. Contraction during cTBS may be a useful means of focusing aftereffects when differences in baseline excitability across overlapping agonist-antagonist cortical representations may mitigate the inhibitory effect of cTBS.

  7. Motor cortical plasticity in extrinsic hand muscles is determined by the resting thresholds of overlapping representations.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the properties that govern the effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions is critical to clinical application. Extrapolation to clinical populations has been limited by high inter-subject variability and a focus on intrinsic muscles of the hand in healthy populations. Therefore, the current study assessed variability of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), a patterned TMS protocol, across an agonist-antagonist pair of extrinsic muscles of the hand. Secondarily, we assessed whether concurrent agonist contraction could enhance the efficacy of cTBS. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were simultaneously recorded from the agonist flexor (FCR) and antagonist extensor (ECR) carpi radialis before and after cTBS over the FCR hotspot. cTBS was delivered with the FCR relaxed (cTBS-Relax) or during isometric wrist flexion (cTBS-Contract). cTBS-Relax suppressed FCR MEPs evoked from the FCR hotspot. However, the extent of FCR MEP suppression was strongly correlated with the relative difference between FCR and ECR resting motor thresholds. cTBS-Contract decreased FCR suppression but increased suppression of ECR MEPs elicited from the FCR hotspot. The magnitude of ECR MEP suppression following cTBS-Contract was independent of the threshold-amplitude relationships observed with cTBS-Relax. Contraction alone had no effect confirming the effect of cTBS-Contract was driven by the interaction between neuromuscular activity and cTBS. Interactions across muscle representations should be taken into account when predicting cTBS outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. Contraction during cTBS may be a useful means of focusing aftereffects when differences in baseline excitability across overlapping agonist-antagonist cortical representations may mitigate the inhibitory effect of cTBS. PMID:27425211

  8. Dissociable systems of working memory for rhythm and melody.

    PubMed

    Jerde, Trenton A; Childs, Stephanie K; Handy, Sarah T; Nagode, Jennifer C; Pardo, José V

    2011-08-15

    Specialized neural systems are engaged by the rhythmic and melodic components of music. Here, we used PET to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a working memory task for sequences of rhythms and melodies, which were presented in separate blocks. Healthy subjects, without musical training, judged whether a target rhythm or melody was identical to a series of subsequently presented rhythms or melodies. When contrasted with passive listening to rhythms, working memory for rhythm activated the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, right anterior insular cortex, and left anterior cingulate gyrus. These areas were not activated in a contrast between passive listening to rhythms and a non-auditory control, indicating their role in the temporal processing that was specific to working memory for rhythm. The contrast between working memory for melody and passive listening to melodies activated mainly a right-hemisphere network of frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices: areas involved in pitch processing and auditory working memory. Overall, these results demonstrate that rhythm and melody have unique neural signatures not only in the early stages of auditory processing, but also at the higher cognitive level of working memory. PMID:21645625

  9. Rhythm in Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This research is an attempt at the elucidation of the significance of rhythmic in translations. According to Eugene A. Nada's functional equivalence, the comprehensive effect which the receptors of the versions get should be the same as the one the readers of the original get, and since rhythm is an integral part of the style, rhythm should be…

  10. Circahoralian (ultradian) metabolic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y

    2014-06-01

    This review presents data concerning metabolic rhythms with periods close to one hour (20 to 120 min): their occurrence, biochemical organization, nature, and significance for adaptations and age-related changes of cells and organs. Circahoralian (ultradian) rhythms have been detected for cell mass and size, protein synthesis, enzyme activities, concentration of ATP and hormones, cell respiration, and cytoplasm pH. Rhythms have been observed in bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa, as well as in many cells of metazoans, including mammals, in vivo and in cell cultures. In cell populations, the rhythms are organized by direct cell-cell communication. The biochemical mechanism involves membrane signal factors and cytoplasmic processes resulting in synchronization of individual oscillations to a common rhythm. Phosphorylation of proteins is the key process of coordination of protein synthesis and enzyme activity kinetics. The fractal nature of circahoralian rhythms is discussed as well as the involvement of these rhythms in adaptations of the cells and organs. Senescent decrease in rhythm amplitudes and correspondingly in cell-cell communication has been observed. The possibility of remodeling these changes through the intercellular medium has been predicted and experimentally shown. Perspectives for studies of the organizers and disorganizers of cell-cell communication in the intercellular medium along with appropriate receptors are discussed with special emphasis on aging and pathology. One perspective can be more precise definition of the range of normal biochemical and physiological state with the goal of correction of cellular functions.

  11. Centrosome movement in the early divisions of Caenorhabditis elegans: A cortical site determining centrosome position

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, A.A. )

    1989-09-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, early blastomeres of the P cell lineage divide successively on the same axis. This axis is a consequence of the specific rotational movement of the pair of centrosomes and nucleus. A laser has been used to perturb the centrosome movements that determine the pattern of early embryonic divisions. The results support a previously proposed model in which a centrosome rotates towards its correct position by shortening of connections, possibly microtubules, between a centrosome and a defined site on the cortex of the embryo.

  12. Centrosome movement in the early divisions of Caenorhabditis elegans: a cortical site determining centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, early blastomeres of the P cell lineage divide successively on the same axis. This axis is a consequence of the specific rotational movement of the pair of centrosomes and nucleus (Hyman, A. A., and J. G. White. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2123-2135). A laser has been used to perturb the centrosome movements that determine the pattern of early embryonic divisions. The results support a previously proposed model in which a centrosome rotates towards its correct position by shortening of connections, possibly microtubules, between a centrosome and a defined site on the cortex of the embryo. PMID:2768338

  13. Circadian Rhythm Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). Recent Findings: Recent evidence strongly points to the ubiquitous influence of circadian timing in nearly all physiologic functions. Thus, in addition to the prominent sleep and wake disturbances, circadian rhythm disorders are associated with cognitive impairment, mood disturbances, and increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. The recent availability of biomarkers of circadian timing in clinical practice has improved our ability to identify and treat these CRSDs. Summary: Circadian rhythms are endogenous rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. These rhythms are synchronized to the physical environment by social and work schedules by various photic and nonphotic stimuli. CRSDs result from a misalignment between the timing of the circadian rhythm and the external environment (eg, jet lag and shift work) or a dysfunction of the circadian clock or its afferent and efferent pathways (eg, delayed sleep-phase, advanced sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorders). The most common symptoms of these disorders are difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance and excessive sleepiness that are associated with impaired social and occupational functioning. Effective treatment for most of the CRSDs requires a multimodal approach to accelerate circadian realignment with timed exposure to light, avoidance of bright light at inappropriate times, and adherence to scheduled sleep and wake times. In addition, pharmacologic agents are recommended for some of the CRSDs. For delayed sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and shift work disorders, timed low-dose melatonin can help advance or entrain circadian rhythms; and for shift work disorder, wake-enhancing agents such as caffeine, modafinil, and armodafinil are options

  14. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C

    2012-11-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiologic mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, and of the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance, and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian timekeeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. This article reviews circadian biology and discusses the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  16. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Large, Edward W.; Herrera, Jorge A.; Velasco, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  17. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Herrera, Jorge A; Velasco, Marc J

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  18. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  19. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanathur, Naveen; Harrington, John; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2010-06-01

    Because there is insufficient cellular energy for organisms to perform their functions at the same constant rate and at the same time, all biologic processes show rhythmicity, each with its own unique frequency, amplitude, and phase. Optimal sleep and wakefulness requires proper timing and alignment of desired sleep-wake schedules and circadian rhythm-related periods of alertness. Persistent or recurrent mismatch between endogenous circadian rhythms and the conventional sleep-wake schedules of the environmental day can give rise to several circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Evaluation of suspected circadian rhythm sleep disorders requires proper monitoring of sleep diaries, often over several days to weeks. This article discusses the disorders of the circadian sleep-wake cycle and the therapeutic measures to correct the same.

  20. Activity in the ferret: oestradiol effects and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, E. R.; Albers, H. E.; Baum, M. J.; Wurtman, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether oestradiol increases activity in the European ferret (Mustela furo), whether this effect is sexually dimorphic, and whether a 24-h rhythm is present in the ferret's daily activity. The activity of male and female adult, postpubertally gonadectomized ferrets was monitored while they were maintained singly on a 13:11 light-dark cycle, before and after implantation with oestradiol-17 beta. Gonadectomized male and female ferrets exhibited equal levels of activity, and neither sex exhibited a significant change in activity following oestradiol implantation. None of the ferrets exhibited a strong circadian rhythm, although weak 24-h rhythms and shorter harmonic rhythms were present. Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), monitored in an identical manner, exhibited strong circadian rhythms. It was concluded that oestradiol administration may not cause an increase in activity in the ferret, and that this species lacks a strong circadian activity rhythm.

  1. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  2. How does the brain create rhythms?

    PubMed

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-01-30

    Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz micro-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central micro-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the "clock-mechanism" are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The "timer" function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/1(2), 1/2(2), 1/2(3), 1/2(4), 1/2(5)). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of conscious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octave-based. Musical

  3. Convergent Rhythm Generation from Divergent Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason C.; Blitz, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    Different modulatory inputs commonly elicit distinct rhythmic motor patterns from a central pattern generator (CPG), but they can instead elicit the same pattern. We are determining the rhythm-generating mechanisms in this latter situation, using the gastric mill (chewing) CPG in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric ganglion, where stimulating the projection neuron MCN1 (modulatory commissural neuron 1) or bath applying CabPK (C. borealis pyrokinin) peptide elicits the same gastric mill motor pattern, despite configuring different gastric mill circuits. In both cases, the core rhythm generator includes the same reciprocally inhibitory neurons LG (lateral gastric) and Int1 (interneuron 1), but the pyloric (food-filtering) circuit pacemaker neuron AB (anterior burster) is additionally necessary only for CabPK rhythm generation. MCN1 drives this rhythm generator by activating in the LG neuron the modulator-activated inward current (IMI), which waxes and wanes periodically due to phasic feedback inhibition of MCN1 transmitter release. Each buildup of IMI enables the LG neuron to generate a self-terminating burst and thereby alternate with Int1 activity. Here we establish that CabPK drives gastric mill rhythm generation by activating in the LG neuron IMI plus a slowly activating transient, low-threshold inward current (ITrans-LTS) that is voltage, time, and Ca2+ dependent. Unlike MCN1, CabPK maintains a steady IMI activation, causing a subthreshold depolarization in LG that facilitates a periodic postinhibitory rebound burst caused by the regular buildup and decay of the availability of ITrans-LTS. Thus, different modulatory inputs can use different rhythm-generating mechanisms to drive the same neuronal rhythm. Additionally, the same ionic current (IMI) can play different roles under these different conditions, while different currents (IMI, ITrans-LTS) can play the same role. PMID:24227716

  4. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  5. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep ‘prominence gradient’, i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a ‘stress-timed’ language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow ‘syntagmatic contrast’ between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  6. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms.

  7. Measuring Child Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elinor; Post, Brechtje; Astruc, Lluisa; Prieto, Pilar; Vanrell, Maria del Mar

    2012-01-01

    Interval-based rhythm metrics were applied to the speech of English, Catalan and Spanish 2, 4 and 6 year-olds, and compared with the (adult-directed) speech of their mothers. Results reveal that child speech does not fall into a well-defined rhythmic class: for all three languages, it is more "vocalic" (higher %V) than adult speech and has a…

  8. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  9. Perceiving Speech Rhythm in Music: Listeners Classify Instrumental Songs According to Language of Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the musical rhythm of a particular culture may parallel the speech rhythm of that culture's language (Patel, A. D., & Daniele, J. R. (2003). "An empirical comparison of rhythm in language and music." "Cognition, 87," B35-B45). The present experiments aimed to determine whether listeners actually perceive such rhythmic…

  10. The Effect of Pitch and Rhythm Difficulty on Vocal Sight-Reading Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Michele L.

    2011-01-01

    Singing music at sight is a complex skill, requiring the singer to perform pitch and rhythm simultaneously. Previous research has identified difficulty levels for pitch and rhythm skills individually but not in combination. In this study, the author sought to determine the relationship between pitch and rhythm tasks occurring concurrently. High…

  11. Combination of starvation interval and food volume determines the phase of liver circadian rhythm in Per2::Luc knock-in mice under two meals per day feeding.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Akiko; Nagahama, Hiroki; Tsuboi, Takuma; Hirao, Mizuho; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2010-11-01

    Although the circadian liver clock is entrained by the feeding cycle, factors such as food volume and starvation interval are poorly understood. Per2::Luc knock-in mice were given two meals per day with different food volume sizes and/or with different intervals of starvation between two mealtimes with the total food volume per day fixed at 3.6 g (80 food pellets, ∼75% of free feeding) per mouse. The bioluminescence rhythm in the liver produced a unimodal peak but not bimodal peak under the regimen of two meals per day over 14-15 days. Peak Per2 expression occurred concurrently with the mealtime of the larger food volume, when the first and second meal were given as different food volume ratios under a 12 h feeding interval. When an equal volume of food was given under different starvation interval (8 h:16 h), the peak of the Per2 rhythm was close to peak by mealtime after long starvation (16 h). When food volumes for each mealtime were changed under 8 h:16 h, the peak rhythm was influenced by combined factors of food volume and starvation interval. Food intake after the 16-h starvation caused a significant increase in liver Per2, Dec1, and Bmal1 gene expression compared with food intake after the 8-h starvation with 8 h:16 h feeding intervals. In conclusion, the present results clearly demonstrate that food-induced entrainment of the liver clock is dependent on both food volume and the starvation interval between two meals. Therefore, normal feeding habits may help to maintain normal clock function in the liver organ.

  12. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  13. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  14. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  15. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  16. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  17. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sulzman, F M; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C

    1977-11-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation was examined on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys. In the absence of other time cues, 24-h cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 h with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined. PMID:412829

  18. Rhythms of locomotion expressed by Limulus polyphemus, the American horseshoe crab: II. Relationship to circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Watson, Winsor H; Bedford, Lisa; Chabot, Christopher C

    2008-08-01

    In the laboratory, horseshoe crabs express a circadian rhythm of visual sensitivity as well as daily and circatidal rhythms of locomotion. The major goal of this investigation was to determine whether the circadian clock underlying changes in visual sensitivity also modulates locomotion. To address this question, we developed a method for simultaneously recording changes in visual sensitivity and locomotion. Although every animal (24) expressed consistent circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity, rhythms of locomotion were more variable: 44% expressed a tidal rhythm, 28% were most active at night, and the rest lacked statistically significant rhythms. When exposed to artificial tides, 8 of 16 animals expressed circatidal rhythms of locomotion that continued after tidal cycles were stopped. However, rhythms of visual sensitivity remained stable and showed no tendency to be influenced by the imposed tides or locomotor activity. These results indicate that horseshoe crabs possess at least two biological clocks: one circadian clock primarily used for modulating visual sensitivity, and one or more clocks that control patterns of locomotion. This arrangement allows horseshoe crabs to see quite well while mating during both daytime and nighttime high tides.

  19. The thymic cortical epithelium determines the TCR repertoire of IL-17-producing γδT cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Takeshi; Muro, Ryunosuke; Shimizu, Yukiko; Nitta, Sachiko; Oda, Hiroyo; Ohte, Yuki; Goto, Motohito; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Narita, Tomoya; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Hisataka; Okamura, Tadashi; Murata, Shigeo; Suzuki, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    The thymus provides a specialized microenvironment in which distinct subsets of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) support T-cell development. Here, we describe the significance of cortical TECs (cTECs) in T-cell development, using a newly established mouse model of cTEC deficiency. The deficiency of mature cTECs caused a massive loss of thymic cellularity and impaired the development of αβT cells and invariant natural killer T cells. Unexpectedly, the differentiation of certain γδT-cell subpopulations—interleukin-17-producing Vγ4 and Vγ6 cells—was strongly dysregulated, resulting in the perturbation of γδT-mediated inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues. These findings show that cTECs contribute to the shaping of the TCR repertoire, not only of “conventional” αβT cells but also of inflammatory “innate” γδT cells. PMID:25770130

  20. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  1. Characterization of neurospora circadian rhythms in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, James S.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether the circadian rhythm of conidiation in neurospora crassa is endogenously derived or is driven by some geophysical time cue, an experiment was conducted on space shuttle flight STS-9, where inoculated race tubes were exposed to the microgravity environment of space. The results demonstated that the rhythm can persist in space. However, there were several minor alterations noted; an increase in the period of the oscillation and the variability of the growth rate and a diminished rhythm amplitude, which eventually damped out in 25% of the flight tubes. On day seven of the flight, the tubes were exposed to light while their growth fronts were marked. It appears that some aspects of this marking process reinstated a robust rhythm in all the tubes which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. It was hypothesized that the damping found prior to the marking procedure on STS-9 may have been a result of the hypergravity pulse of launch and not due to the microgravity of the orbital lab; furthermore, that the marking procedure, by exposing the samples to light, had reinstated rhythmicity. To test this, an investigation was conducted into the effects of acute and chronic exposure to hypergravity.

  2. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums. PMID:25437475

  3. Sleep, Memory & Brain Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occupies roughly one-third of our lives, yet the scientific community is still not entirely clear on its purpose or function. Existing data point most strongly to its role in memory and homeostasis: that sleep helps maintain basic brain functioning via a homeostatic mechanism that loosens connections between overworked synapses, and that sleep helps consolidate and re-form important memories. In this review, we will summarize these theories, but also focus on substantial new information regarding the relation of electrical brain rhythms to sleep. In particular, while REM sleep may contribute to the homeostatic weakening of overactive synapses, a prominent and transient oscillatory rhythm called “sharp-wave ripple” seems to allow for consolidation of behaviorally relevant memories across many structures of the brain. We propose that a theory of sleep involving the division of labor between two states of sleep–REM and non-REM, the latter of which has an abundance of ripple electrical activity–might allow for a fusion of the two main sleep theories. This theory then postulates that sleep performs a combination of consolidation and homeostasis that promotes optimal knowledge retention as well as optimal waking brain function. PMID:26097242

  4. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums.

  5. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... in others. These rhythm problems are rarely serious. Substance Abuse: Drugs and Inhalants Abusing legal or illegal drugs ... people, alcohol can cause heart rhythm disturbances. Alcohol abuse is a major risk factor for High ... herbs and other substances used in over-the-counter remedies are believed ...

  6. Lunasensor, infradian rhythms, telomeres, and the chronomere program of aging.

    PubMed

    Olovnikov, Alexey

    2005-12-01

    According to the redusome hypothesis, the aging of an organism is determined by the shortening of chronomeres (small perichromosomal linear DNA molecules). In this paper, a presumptive role for infradian hormonal rhythms is considered. Endogenous infradian rhythms are supposed to actively interact with those hormonal shifts which are governed by an exogenous infradian gravitational lunar rhythm. As a result of this interaction, the so-called T-rhythm is formed. Peaks of T-rhythms are used as the pacemaker signals to keep the life-long "clockwork" of the brain running. The "ticking" of this clock is realized by the periodically repeated shortening of chronomeres in postmitotic neuroendocrine cells, which occurs just at the maxima of T-rhythms. Shortening of telomeres in mitotic cells in vivo is a witness of the aging of the organism, but not the cause of aging. The primary cause of aging is shortening of chronomeres, the material carriers of a temporal program of development and aging. To recognize exogenous gravitational infradian rhythms, a special physiological system--the "lunasensor" system--evolved. It is assumed that it is a necessity to have a lunasensor as a particular variant of sensors of gravitation. PMID:16399890

  7. Endogenous thermoregulatory rhythms of squirrel monkeys in thermoneutrality and cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine if the free-running circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb) results from coordinated changes in HP and HL rhythms in thermoneutrality (27 degrees C) as well as mild cold (17 degrees C). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of Tb and activity. Feeding was also measured. Rhythms of HP, HL, and conductance were tightly coupled with the circadian Tb rhythm at both ambient temperatures (TA). At 17 degrees C, increased HP compensated for higher HL at all phases of the Tb rhythm, resulting in only minor changes to Tb. Parallel compensatory changes of HP and HL were seen at all rhythm phases at both TA. Similar time courses of Tb, HP, and HL in their respective rhythms and the relative stability of Tb during both active and rest periods suggest action of the circadian timing system on Tb set point.

  8. Delta rhythm in wakefulness: evidence from intracranial recordings in human beings.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Robert N S; Gaspard, Nicolas; Gerrard, Jason L; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Dennis D; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2015-08-01

    A widely accepted view is that wakefulness is a state in which the entire cortical mantle is persistently activated, and therefore desynchronized. Consequently, the EEG is dominated by low-amplitude, high-frequency fluctuations. This view is currently under revision because the 1-4 Hz delta rhythm is often evident during "quiet" wakefulness in rodents and nonhuman primates. Here we used intracranial EEG recordings to assess the occurrence of delta rhythm in 18 awake human beings. Our recordings reveal rhythmic delta during wakefulness at 10% of all recording sites. Delta rhythm could be observed in a single cortical lobe or in multiple lobes. Sites with high delta could flip between high and low delta power or could be in a persistently high delta state. Finally, these sites were rarely identified as the sites of seizure onset. Thus rhythmic delta can dominate the background operation and activity of some neocortical circuits in awake human beings.

  9. [Genetic Control of Circadian Rhythms and Aging].

    PubMed

    Solovyeva, I A; Dobrovolskayaa, E V; Moskalev, A A

    2016-04-01

    The review establishes a link between a group of genes which are conserved in evolution and form a molecular oscillator responsible for generation of circadian rhythms and genetic determinants of aging including associated pathways of intracellular signaling. An analysis of mechanisms of development of age-dependent pathologies is conducted from the viewpoint of circadian genetics. Systematic data of circadian gene expression studies in animals demonstrating different rates of aging from accelerated to negligible are presented. PMID:27529973

  10. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  11. Biophysical Modeling of Alpha Rhythms During Halothane-Induced Unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sujith; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Kopell, Nancy J

    2013-01-01

    During the induction of general anesthesia there is a shift in power from the posterior regions of the brain to the frontal cortices; this shift in power is called anteriorization. For many anesthetics, a prominent feature of anteriorization is a shift specifically in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) from posterior to frontal cortices. Here we present a biophysical computational model that describes thalamocortical circuit-level dynamics underlying anteriorization of the alpha rhythm in the case of halothane. Halothane potentiates GABAA and increases potassium leak conductances. According to our model, an increase in potassium leak conductances hyperpolarizes and silences the high-threshold thalamocortical (HTC) cells, a specialized subset of thalamocortical cells that fire at the alpha frequency at relatively depolarized membrane potentials (>-60 mV) and are thought to be the generators of quiet awake occipital alpha. At the same time the potentiation of GABAA imposes an alpha time scale on both the cortical and the thalamic component of the frontal portion of our model. The alpha activity in the frontal component is further strengthened by reciprocal thalamocortical feedback. Thus, we argue that the dual molecular targets of halothane induce the anteriorization of the alpha rhythm by increasing potassium leak conductances, which abolishes occipital alpha, and by potentiating GABAA, which induces frontal alpha. These results provide a computational modeling formulation for studying highly detailed biophysical mechanisms of anesthetic action in silico.

  12. A novel underuse model shows that inactivity but not ovariectomy determines the deteriorated material properties and geometry of cortical bone in the tibia of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Kozai, Yusuke; Ito, Yumi; Furuhama, Takami; Naruse, Kouji; Nonaka, Kiichi; Nagai, Yumiko; Yamato, Hideyuki; Kashima, Isamu; Ohya, Keiichi; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2011-07-01

    Our goal in this study was to determine to what extent the physiologic consequences of ovariectomy (OVX) in bones are exacerbated by a lack of daily activity such as walking. We forced 14-week-old female rats to be inactive for 15 weeks with a unique experimental system that prevents standing and walking while allowing other movements. Tibiae, femora, and 4th lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), microfocused X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), histology, histomorphometry, Raman spectroscopy, and the three-point bending test. Contrary to our expectation, the exacerbation was very much limited to the cancellous bone parameters. Parameters of femur and tibia cortical bone were affected by the forced inactivity but not by OVX: (1) cross-sectional moment of inertia was significantly smaller in Sham-Inactive rat bones than that of their walking counterparts; (2) the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes per unit cross-sectional area was larger in Sham-Inactive rat bones than in Sham-Walking rat bones; and (3) material properties such as ultimate stress of inactive rat tibia was lower than that of their walking counterparts. Of note, the additive effect of inactivity and OVX was seen only in a few parameters, such as the cancellous bone mineral density of the lumbar vertebrae and the structural parameters of cancellous bone in the lumbar vertebrae/tibiae. It is concluded that the lack of daily activity is detrimental to the strength and quality of cortical bone in the femur and tibia of rats, while lack of estrogen is not. Our inactive rat model, with the older rats, will aid the study of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the etiology of which may be both hormonal and mechanical. PMID:21127921

  13. [The nature of the circahoralian (ultradian) intracellular rhythms. Similarity to fractals].

    PubMed

    Brodskiĭ, V Ia

    1998-01-01

    The properties and possible origin of circahoralian intracellular rhythms are discussed. Irregularity of these oscillations, as expressed in different time scales, determination, and resistance to external influences, including changes in the environmental temperature, are noted. No pacemaker of circahoralian rhythms was found. These specific features and analysis of the structure of circahoralian rhythms (Herst equation) suggest their similarity to fractals, chaotic but determined forms with a certain internal structure. Determination of circahoralian rhythms in a cell-free system and their possible fractal nature characterizes the rhythms as an imminent property of the cytoplasm, that does not require special regulation. Modulations of the frequency and amplitude of oscillation under the influence of external influences are described. It is proposed that the circahoralian rhythms are a protective factor for the cell and organ functions and a mechanism of adaptations under varying life conditions.

  14. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  15. Heart Rhythm Genomic Fabric in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which chronic hypoxia, whether constant (CCH) or intermittent (CIH), alters the heart rhythm are still under debate. Expression level, control, maturational profile and intercoordination of 54 genes encoding heart rhythm determinants (HRDs) were analyzed in 36 mice subjected for one, two or four weeks of their early life to normal atmospheric conditions or to CCH or CIH. Our analysis revealed a complex network of genes encoding various heart rate, inotropy and development controllers, receptors, ion channels and transporters, ankyrins, epigenetic modulators and intercalated disc components (adherens, cadherins, catenins, desmosomal, gap and tight junction proteins). The network is remodeled during maturation and substantially and differently altered by CIH and CCH. Gene Prominence Analysis that ranks the genes according to their expression stability and networking within functional gene webs, confirmed the HRD status of certain epigenetic modulators and components of the intercalated discs not yet associated with arrhythmia. PMID:20044980

  16. Relationships between behavioral rhythms, plasma corticosterone and hypothalamic circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kafka, M S; Benedito, M A; Steele, L K; Gibson, M J; Zerbe, R L; Jacobowitz, D M; Roth, R H; Zander, K

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological processes and behaviors were compared with hypothalamic circadian rhythms in norepinephrine (NE) metabolites, adrenergic transmitter receptors, cAMP, cGMP and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) arginine vasopressin (AVP) in a single population of rats under D:D conditions. Eating, drinking and locomotor activity were high during the subjective night (the time when lights were out in L:D) and low during the subjective day (the time when lights were on in L:D). Plasma corticosterone concentration rose at subjective dusk and remained high until subjective dawn. Binding to hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic receptors also peaked during the subjective night. Cyclic cGMP concentration was elevated throughout the 24-hr period except for a trough at dusk, whereas DHPG concentration peaked at dawn. Arginine vasopressin levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus peaked in the middle of the day. No rhythm was found either in binding to the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor, or in MHPG or cAMP concentration. Behavioral and corticosterone rhythms, therefore, are parallel to rhythms in hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-receptor binding and NE-release. Cyclic GMP falls only at dusk, suggesting the possibility that cGMP inhibits activity much of the day and that at dusk the inhibition of nocturnal activity is removed. SCN AVP, on the other hand, peaking at 1400 hr, may play a role in the pacemaking function of the SCN that drives these other rhythms.

  17. Biological rhythms and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2012-12-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis.

  18. Dynamic Modulation of Local Population Activity by Rhythm Phase in Human Occipital Cortex During a Visual Search Task

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Hermes, Dora; Honey, Christopher J.; Sharma, Mohit; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; den Nijs, Marcel; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Hebb, Adam O.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Makeig, Scott; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Brain rhythms are more than just passive phenomena in visual cortex. For the first time, we show that the physiology underlying brain rhythms actively suppresses and releases cortical areas on a second-to-second basis during visual processing. Furthermore, their influence is specific at the scale of individual gyri. We quantified the interaction between broadband spectral change and brain rhythms on a second-to-second basis in electrocorticographic (ECoG) measurement of brain surface potentials in five human subjects during a visual search task. Comparison of visual search epochs with a blank screen baseline revealed changes in the raw potential, the amplitude of rhythmic activity, and in the decoupled broadband spectral amplitude. We present new methods to characterize the intensity and preferred phase of coupling between broadband power and band-limited rhythms, and to estimate the magnitude of rhythm-to-broadband modulation on a trial-by-trial basis. These tools revealed numerous coupling motifs between the phase of low-frequency (δ, θ, α, β, and γ band) rhythms and the amplitude of broadband spectral change. In the θ and β ranges, the coupling of phase to broadband change is dynamic during visual processing, decreasing in some occipital areas and increasing in others, in a gyrally specific pattern. Finally, we demonstrate that the rhythms interact with one another across frequency ranges, and across cortical sites. PMID:21119778

  19. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  20. Circadian rhythm of intraocular pressure in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Diana C; Hartwick, Andrew T E; Twa, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    Ocular hypertension is a risk factor for developing glaucoma, which consists of a group of optic neuropathies characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and subsequent irreversible vision loss. Our understanding of how intraocular pressure damages the optic nerve is based on clinical measures of intraocular pressure that only gives a partial view of the dynamic pressure load inside the eye. Intraocular pressure varies over the course of the day and the oscillator regulating these daily changes has not yet been conclusively identified. The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast the circadian rhythms of intraocular pressure and body temperature in Brown Norway rats when these animals are housed in standard light-dark and continuous dim light (40-90 lux) conditions. The results from this study show that the temperature rhythm measured in continuous dim light drifted forward relative to external time, indicating that the rhythm was free running and being regulated by an internal biological clock. Also, the results show that there is a persistent, but dampened, circadian rhythm of intraocular pressure in continuous dim light and that the circadian rhythms of temperature and intraocular pressure are not synchronized by the same central oscillator. We conclude that once- or twice-daily clinical measures of intraocular pressure are insufficient to describe intraocular pressure dynamics. Similarly, our results indicate that, in experimental animal models of glaucoma, the common practice of housing animals in constant light does not necessarily eliminate the potential influence of intraocular pressure rhythms on the progression of nerve damage. Future studies should aim to determine whether an oscillator within the eye regulates the rhythm of intraocular pressure and to better characterize the impact of glaucoma on this rhythm.

  1. Do rhythm measures reflect perceived rhythm?

    PubMed

    Barry, William; Andreeva, Bistra; Koreman, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    In a production study, Bulgarian, English and German verses with regular poetic metrical metres of different types and elicited prose utterances with varied accentual patterns are produced in textual and iterative (dada) form and measured at syllable level according to the pairwise variability index (PVI) principle. Systematic differences in PVI values show that the measure is sensitive to metrical differences. But variations for utterances with the same metrical structure and comparable measures for accentually different utterances show the measure to be insensitive to the temporal distribution of accents. A perceptual experiment with Bulgarian, English and German subjects confirms the hypothesis that the perceived strength of rhythmicity in a line of verse is determined not only by its temporal structure, but also by other acoustic properties, most clearly by F(0) change within the metrical foot. PMID:19390232

  2. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  3. Decibel attenuation of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in blood and cortical bone determined experimentally and from the theory of ohmic losses.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Kligman, Boris; Midura, Ronald J; Wolfman, Alan; Patterson, Thomas E; Ibiwoye, Michael; Grabiner, Mark

    2006-06-01

    We studied the PEMF power attenuation in tissues representative of clinical applications (blood and cortical bone) to determine the amount of power available for PEMF purported biological effects. The experimental system consisted of a pair of nearly circular, parallel and coaxial coils separated by a distance of one coil diameter. The power attenuation was measured using a small search coil connected to a digital oscilloscope. The coils were powered by a voltage switch operating at two different frequencies (3.8 and 63 kHz) producing bursts of pulses (numbering 21 and 1619) and triggered at two different frequencies (1.5 and 15 Hz, respectively). The tissue samples were placed inside the coils so as to expose them to either transverse electric field (at the center of coils) or the transverse magnetic field (at the coil wire). The cylindrical coil geometry yielded closed-form expressions for power attenuation based on magnetic diffusion equation and ohmic losses due to bulk tissue magnetic permeability and electrical conductivity. The measured power attenuation at these PEMF frequencies of not more than one decibel (1 dB) was well explained by the theory for the 3.8 kHz but less so for the 63 kHz frequency PEMF. The results provide important insights regarding physical mechanism of weak PEMF power dissipation in tissues.

  4. [Rhythmic photostimulation and a number of alpha-rhythm dipoles in the human brain].

    PubMed

    Bark, E D; Tokareva, Iu A; Shevelev, I A

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic study of the equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) of alpha rhythm in the human brain was performed in a one-dipole model. The number of ECDs was shown to be dependent on the time course of visual stimulation, on the phase shift of triggering of flickers with alpha-rhythm frequency from alpha-wave, as well as on the type of visual illusions produced in subjects by this stimulation. The data are discussed in accordance with the "scanning hypothesis" that predict a certain functional meaning of the spreading alpha-wave for cortical processing of sensory information in the human brain.

  5. Neurospora circadian rhythms in space - A reexamination of the endogenous-exogenous question

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Ellman, D.; Wassmer, G.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M.

    1984-01-01

    To test the functioning of circadian rhythms removed from periodicities of the earth's 24-hour rotation, the conidiation rhythm of the fungus Neurospora crassa was monitored in constant darkness during spaceflight. The free-running period of the rhythm was the same in space as on the earth, but there was a marked reduction in the clarity of the rhythm, and apparent arrhythmicity in some tubes. At the current stage of analysis of the results there is insufficient evidence to determine whether the effect seen in space was related to removal from 24-hour periodicities and whether the circadian timekeeping mechanism, or merely its expression, was affected.

  6. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. PMID:26820249

  7. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  8. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  9. Modulation of cortical oscillatory activity during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brignani, Debora; Manganotti, Paolo; Rossini, Paolo M; Miniussi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (< or =1 Hz inhibition vs. > or =5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics. PMID:17557296

  10. Spatiotemporal characteristics of sensorimotor neuromagnetic rhythms related to thumb movement.

    PubMed

    Salmelin, R; Hari, R

    1994-05-01

    To assess the spatial extent and temporal behavior of rolandic rhythms we recorded neuromagnetic signals from four healthy subjects with a 24-channel magnetometer. The subjects performed self-paced thumb movements or the motions were triggered by electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. The main frequency components of the magnetic mu rhythm signals centered at 10 and 20 Hz. Both components were completely suppressed during the movement and increased substantially 0.5-2.5 s after it; the 20-Hz component reacted about 300 ms faster. The rebound was stronger after self-paced than after stimulated motion, and after contra- than after ipsilateral movement. The reactive source areas were identified for both frequency ranges, and they clustered on partly overlapping cortical areas of 6-8 cm2 wide along the course of the central sulcus. The 10-Hz rhythmic oscillations occurred predominantly at the primary somatosensory hand cortex; the sources of the 20-Hz signals were slightly more anterior. We hypothesize that the 10-Hz signal is a true somatosensory rhythm whereas the 20-Hz activity is essentially somatomotor in origin. PMID:8072694

  11. Control mechanisms in physiological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, S.

    1973-01-01

    A search was made for the factors involved in regulating rhythmic body functions. The basic premise was that at a particular point in time, any cell can normally act in one of two ways. It can either be engaged in dividing or carrying out its particular function. Experimental results indicate rhythmic functions are controlled by a lighting regime and that an inverse correlation exists between rhythms of cell division and cell function. Data also show rhythms are a function of animal sex and environment.

  12. Biological rhythms and mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2012-01-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis. PMID:23393414

  13. The Contribution of Sensitivity to Speech Rhythm and Non-Speech Rhythm to Early Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew J.; Wood, Clare; Sheehy, Kieron

    2010-01-01

    Both sensitivity to speech rhythm and non-speech rhythm have been associated with successful phonological awareness and reading development in separate studies. However, the extent to which speech rhythm, non-speech rhythm and literacy skills are interrelated has not been examined. As a result, five- to seven-year-old English-speaking children…

  14. Melatonin modifies the rhythm of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y; Dubovaya, N D; Zvezdina, T K; Fateeva, V I; Mal'chenko, L A

    2010-07-01

    Melatonin (5 nM) added to medium with primary hepatocyte cultures shifted the phase of circahoralian rhythm of protein synthesis and hence, can be a factor synchronizing fluctuations in protein synthesis and rhythm organizer in the hepatocyte population. Blockade of melatonin receptors with luzindole (20 nM) arrested rhythm organization of protein synthesis by melatonin. Prospects of studying biochemical mechanisms of protein synthesis rhythm organization with other drugs (calcium agonists, similarly to melatonin) are discussed.

  15. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  16. Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Wagstyl, Konrad; Ronan, Lisa; Goodyer, Ian M.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    MRI, enabling in vivo analysis of cortical morphology, offers a powerful tool in the assessment of brain development and pathology. One of the most ubiquitous measures used—the thickness of the cortex—shows abnormalities in a number of diseases and conditions, but the functional and biological correlates of such alterations are unclear. If the functional connotations of structural MRI measures are to be understood, we must strive to clarify the relationship between measures such as cortical thickness and their cytoarchitectural determinants. We therefore sought to determine whether patterns of cortical thickness mirror a key motif of the cortex, specifically its structural hierarchical organisation. We delineated three sensory hierarchies (visual, somatosensory and auditory) in two species—macaque and human—and explored whether cortical thickness was correlated with specific cytoarchitectural characteristics. Importantly, we controlled for cortical folding which impacts upon thickness and may obscure regional differences. Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex. We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure–function relationships. The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:25725468

  17. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

    PubMed

    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement. PMID:26608123

  18. Ultradian rhythms in walking gastric activity.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, J F; Kripke, D F

    1975-01-01

    Ninety to 120 min ultradian rhythms have been described in physiologic and behavioral functions relating to biologic drives. Gastric contractility rhythms were examined in isolated fasting volunteers to supplement behavioral observations of "oral" drives. A clear ultradian rhythms was observed, indicating inherent physiologic oscillation in stomach contractions.

  19. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction, and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  20. Circadian rhythm of onset of stroke - in 50 cases of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Hoque, M I; Uddin, M K; Kamol, S A; Chowdhury, R H

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. While the immediate consequence of stroke include permanent cognitive deficits, paralysis, visual impairment and sensory disturbances; stroke also results in long term dysregulation of sleep and mood, which may be equally disabling. The influence of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythm regulation, which is strongly linked to sleep and mood, may thus potentially influence long term recovery in stroke patients. Stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating that cortical and basal ganglia infarction impacts the timing of melatonin rhythms. This study was done to find out the time of onset of most of the ischemic stroke attack and to determine the outcome of ischemic stroke during hospital stay. All ischemic stroke patients admitted in Medicine wards in Comilla Medical College Hospital during the period of 1st November 2010 to 30th April 2011 included in this study. After admission, a careful history and a thorough clinical examination was carried out. Data collection was done on a preset questionnaire which involved to identify the risk factors, the time of onset of ischemic stroke, and outcome during hospital stay. All the cases were investigated. Among the 50 ischemic stroke patients, 68% were male and 32% female. Maximum age groups were 61-70 years (50%). By occupational category, maximum were retired persons (46%); 68% were hypertensive, 38% smoker and 16% had diabetes. Dyslipidemia was present in 44% patients. Most of the ischemic stroke (44%) occurred in the morning to late morning (6:01AM-12:00PM) and majority (80%) of the patients was discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. This study supports the presence of a circadian pattern in the onset of ischemic stroke, with higher risk in the morning to late morning. Most of the patients were discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. PMID:25725678

  1. Modeling and Validating Chronic Pharmacological Manipulation of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J K; Forger, D B; Marconi, M; Wood, D; Doran, A; Wager, T; Chang, C; Walton, K M

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms can be entrained by a light-dark (LD) cycle and can also be reset pharmacologically, for example, by the CK1δ/ε inhibitor PF-670462. Here, we determine how these two independent signals affect circadian timekeeping from the molecular to the behavioral level. By developing a systems pharmacology model, we predict and experimentally validate that chronic CK1δ/ε inhibition during the earlier hours of a LD cycle can produce a constant stable delay of rhythm. However, chronic dosing later during the day, or in the presence of longer light intervals, is not predicted to yield an entrained rhythm. We also propose a simple method based on phase response curves (PRCs) that predicts the effects of a LD cycle and chronic dosing of a circadian drug. This work indicates that dosing timing and environmental signals must be carefully considered for accurate pharmacological manipulation of circadian phase. PMID:23863866

  2. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  3. Mesoscopic Patterns of Neural Activity Support Songbird Cortical Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From “time cells” in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia–projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song. PMID:26039895

  4. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  5. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  6. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  7. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise.

    PubMed

    Doelling, Keith B; Poeppel, David

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (<8 Hz; delta-theta) oscillations, similarly entrain to music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15-30 Hz)-often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition.

  8. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise.

    PubMed

    Doelling, Keith B; Poeppel, David

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (<8 Hz; delta-theta) oscillations, similarly entrain to music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15-30 Hz)-often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition. PMID:26504238

  9. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, Keith B.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (<8 Hz; delta–theta) oscillations, similarly entrain to music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15–30 Hz)—often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition. PMID:26504238

  10. A mathematical model for the mating-induced prolactin rhythm of female rats

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Richard; Egli, Marcel; Toporikova, Natalia; Freeman, Marc E.

    2006-01-01

    For the first 10 days of pregnancy and the first 12 days of pseudopregnancy, the secretion of prolactin (PRL) from pituitary lactotrophs is rhythmic, with two surges/day. This rhythm can also be triggered by bolus injection of oxytocin (OT). We describe a mathematical model for the initiation, maintenance, and termination of the OT-induced PRL rhythm. In our model, the mechanism for this circadian rhythm is mutual interaction between lactotrophs and neuroendocrine dopamine (DA) neurons. This rhythm is, under normal lighting conditions, entrained by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) but persists in the absence of input from the SCN. We postulate that OT injection triggers the rhythm by activating a population of bistable hypothalamic neurons that innervate and inhibit DA neurons. The bistable nature of these neurons allows them to act as a memory device, maintaining the rhythm long after OT has been cleared from the blood. The mechanism for this memory device and the arguments supporting it are detailed with computer simulations. Finally, we consider potential targets for a rhythm-terminating factor and make predictions that may be used to determine which mechanism is operational in terminating the OT- or mating-induced PRL rhythm. PMID:16467488

  11. Scapulothoracic muscle fatigue associated with alterations in scapulohumeral rhythm kinematics during maximum resistive shoulder elevation.

    PubMed

    McQuade, K J; Dawson, J; Smidt, G L

    1998-08-01

    Clinical examinations and biomechanical analysis of the shoulder often include an assessment of the scapulohumeral rhythm. It is important to understand factors which may affect the scapulohumeral rhythm so that optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies can be devised. The purpose of this study was to determine if the scapulohumeral rhythm, when assessed under dynamic conditions, is altered as a result of a fatigue-inducing exercise. Twenty-five subjects were required to elevate their arm against maximum resistance until they were no longer able to completely elevate their arm. Three-dimensional kinematics were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and the middle deltoid muscles. Power frequency spectrum using the Fast Fourier Transform and the root mean square signal amplitudes were determined for each muscle. The scapulohumeral rhythm was determined using least squares regressions of humeral elevation to scapular upward rotation for 20% intervals (phases) of elevation for each subject. The results showed that during the midrange of elevation to maximum elevation [phases 3-5 (60-150 degrees)], the scapulohumeral rhythm decreased with fatigue, and that the decrease in the scapulohumeral rhythm was associated with myoelectric indicators of fatigue (median power frequency). The study suggests that shoulder fatigue affects the way in which the scapula moves concomitantly with the humerus. Fatigue tends to result in increased motion of the scapula, which alters the scapulohumeral rhythm.

  12. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  13. Acquisition of speech rhythm in first language.

    PubMed

    Polyanskaya, Leona; Ordin, Mikhail

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of English rhythm in speech produced by children and adults revealed that speech rhythm becomes increasingly more stress-timed as language acquisition progresses. Children reach the adult-like target by 11 to 12 years. The employed speech elicitation paradigm ensured that the sentences produced by adults and children at different ages were comparable in terms of lexical content, segmental composition, and phonotactic complexity. Detected differences between child and adult rhythm and between rhythm in child speech at various ages cannot be attributed to acquisition of phonotactic language features or vocabulary, and indicate the development of language-specific phonetic timing in the course of acquisition.

  14. Wheel-running activity modulates circadian organization and the daily rhythm of eating behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Branecky, Katrina L.; Huang, Roya; Niswender, Kevin D.; Yamazaki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet acutely alters the daily rhythm of eating behavior and circadian organization (the phase relationship between oscillators in central and peripheral tissues) in mice. Voluntary wheel-running activity counteracts the obesogenic effects of high-fat diet and also modulates circadian rhythms in mice. In this study, we sought to determine whether voluntary wheel-running activity could prevent the proximate effects of high-fat diet consumption on circadian organization and behavioral rhythms in mice. Mice were housed with locked or freely rotating running wheels and fed chow or high-fat diet for 1 week and rhythms of locomotor activity, eating behavior, and molecular timekeeping (PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE luminescence rhythms) in ex vivo tissues were measured. Wheel-running activity delayed the phase of the liver rhythm by 4 h in both chow- and high-fat diet-fed mice. The delayed liver phase was specific to wheel-running activity since an enriched environment without the running wheel did not alter the phase of the liver rhythm. In addition, wheel-running activity modulated the effect of high-fat diet consumption on the daily rhythm of eating behavior. While high-fat diet consumption caused eating events to be more evenly dispersed across the 24 h-day in both locked-wheel and wheel-running mice, the effect of high-fat diet was much less pronounced in wheel-running mice. Together these data demonstrate that wheel-running activity is a salient factor that modulates liver phase and eating behavior rhythms in both chow- and high-fat-diet fed mice. Wheel-running activity in mice is both a source of exercise and a self-motivating, rewarding behavior. Understanding the putative reward-related mechanisms whereby wheel-running activity alters circadian rhythms could have implications for human obesity since palatable food and exercise may modulate similar reward circuits. PMID:24624109

  15. Wheel-running activity modulates circadian organization and the daily rhythm of eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Julie S; Branecky, Katrina L; Huang, Roya; Niswender, Kevin D; Yamazaki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet acutely alters the daily rhythm of eating behavior and circadian organization (the phase relationship between oscillators in central and peripheral tissues) in mice. Voluntary wheel-running activity counteracts the obesogenic effects of high-fat diet and also modulates circadian rhythms in mice. In this study, we sought to determine whether voluntary wheel-running activity could prevent the proximate effects of high-fat diet consumption on circadian organization and behavioral rhythms in mice. Mice were housed with locked or freely rotating running wheels and fed chow or high-fat diet for 1 week and rhythms of locomotor activity, eating behavior, and molecular timekeeping (PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE luminescence rhythms) in ex vivo tissues were measured. Wheel-running activity delayed the phase of the liver rhythm by 4 h in both chow- and high-fat diet-fed mice. The delayed liver phase was specific to wheel-running activity since an enriched environment without the running wheel did not alter the phase of the liver rhythm. In addition, wheel-running activity modulated the effect of high-fat diet consumption on the daily rhythm of eating behavior. While high-fat diet consumption caused eating events to be more evenly dispersed across the 24 h-day in both locked-wheel and wheel-running mice, the effect of high-fat diet was much less pronounced in wheel-running mice. Together these data demonstrate that wheel-running activity is a salient factor that modulates liver phase and eating behavior rhythms in both chow- and high-fat-diet fed mice. Wheel-running activity in mice is both a source of exercise and a self-motivating, rewarding behavior. Understanding the putative reward-related mechanisms whereby wheel-running activity alters circadian rhythms could have implications for human obesity since palatable food and exercise may modulate similar reward circuits.

  16. Stimulating deep cortical structures with the Batwing Coil: how to determine the intensity for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation using coil-cortex distance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weidong; George, Jobi S.; Chambers, Christopher D.; Stokes, Mark G.; Verbruggen, Frederick; Aron, Adam R.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is increasingly used in cognitive neuroscience to probe non-motor cortical regions. A key question for such studies is the choice of stimulation intensity. Early studies used a simple metric such as 115% of motor threshold (MT) for non-motor regions; where MT is the stimulation intensity required to elicit a particular amplitude of motor evoked potential or visible muscle twitch when the coil is placed over primary motor cortex. Recently, however, it was demonstrated that this simple metric for stimulation of non-motor regions is inadequate – it could lead to over or under-stimulation depending on the distance between the coil and the cortex. Instead, a method was developed to scale the motor threshold based on coil-cortex distance, at least for standard figure-of-eight stimulating coils. Here we validate the same method for a ‘batwing coil’, which is designed to stimulate deeper cortical structures such as the medial frontal cortex. We modulated coil-cortex distance within-participant by inserting spacers of different thickness between coil and scalp. We then measured MT at each spacer. We show that for every millimeter between coil and scalp an additional 1.4% of TMS output is required to induce an equivalent level of brain stimulation at the motor cortex. Using this parameter we describe a linear function to adjust MT for future studies of non-motor regions-of-interest using the batwing coil. This is the first study to demonstrate the effects of coil-cortical distance on stimulation efficiency via a monophasic system using a batwing coil. PMID:22138632

  17. Circadian rhythms of crawling and swimming in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E; Naimie, Amanda A; Bixby, Kimberly A; Lee, Colin; Malanga, Stephanie; Raubach, Maureen; Watson, Winsor H

    2014-12-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms.

  18. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. PMID:22844804

  19. Gravitational considerations with animal rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    As established in the laboratory and largely confirmed by others, simulated high-g environments influence growth and development of animals as small as or smaller than baby turtles, sometimes accelerating and sometimes decelerating these processes. High-g environments result in many functional changes or adjustments in feeding, metabolism, circulation, fluid balances, and structures for support, and influence life expectancy. An assembly of equipment suitable for measuring oxygen consumption of small mammals as influenced by chronic centrifugation and/or by day-night rhythms is discussed.

  20. A thalamo-cortico-thalamic neural mass model to study alpha rhythms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta Sen; Coyle, Damien; Maguire, Liam P

    2011-08-01

    We present a lumped computational model of the thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuitry. The model essentially consists of two modules: a thalamic module and a cortical module. The thalamic module circuitry is a modified version of a classic neural mass computational model of the thalamic circuitry to simulate cortical alpha rhythms and which we have used in previous research to study EEG abnormality associated with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Here, we introduce a modified synaptic structure representing a neuronal population in the thalamic model. Furthermore, the synaptic organisation and connectivity parameter values in the model are based on experimental data reported from the dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of different species. The cortical module circuitry is based on a recent work studying cortical brain rhythms. We vary the synaptic connectivity parameters in the thalamic module of the model to simulate the effects of AD on brain synaptic circuitry and study power within the alpha frequency bands. The power and dominant frequencies of the model output are studied in three sub-bands within the alpha band: lower alpha (7-9 Hz), middle alpha (9-11 Hz) and upper alpha (11-13 Hz). Such an analytical method conforms to recent comparative EEG studies on young adults, healthy aged adults and MCI or early stage AD patients. The results show a remarkable role of the synaptic connectivities in the inhibitory thalamic cell populations on the alpha band power and frequency. Furthermore, the total number of active synapses in the thalamic cell populations produces the slowing of alpha rhythms and a simultaneous decrease of alpha band power in the brain as a result of AD.

  1. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  2. [Manifestations of polymorphism of β1-adrenoreceptors in patients with newly diagnosed cardiac rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, S A; Rebrova, T Iu; Batalov, R E; Muslimova, É F; Borisova, E V; Popov, S V

    2013-01-01

    Individual peculiarities of the receptor apparatus of cardiomyocytes may determine pathological features of heart activity and susceptibility to pharmaceuticals. The possible role of beta-adrenoreceptor polymorphism in the development of cardiac rhythm disturbances is assessed by PCR. Special attention is given to A145G polymorphism of the ADRB1 gene in 127 patients with primary cardiac rhythm disorders. It was shown that AJ45G polymorphism (Ser49Gly) at DNA sites encoding for the amino acid sequence of beta-1 adrenoreceptors can influence the development of sex-specific cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:24437165

  3. Rhythms essential to logical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.; Madjid, F. Hadi

    2011-05-01

    In the context of quantum theory, recently we distinguished mathematics for expressing evidence from mathematics for explaining evidence. Here this distinction is made in spacetime physics. We offer a system of mathematical thought-or as termed in geodesy a reference system-for evidence, separated out from additional assumptions of a geometry in terms of which to explain that evidence. The offered reference system for evidence, free of any assumption of a particular explanatory geometry, whether Euclidean or general relativistic, amounts to a (theoretical) "assemblage of histories accumulated in the memories of parties to a synchronous communications network." The assemblage of histories gives voice to the known experimental finding, sometimes forgotten by theorists, that any memory device for recording logical symbols must be insensitive to variations in signals in which those symbols are carried. Out of acknowledging this insensitivity comes an appreciation of rhythms essential to the communication of digital symbols and of the need for analog measurements to maintain these rhythms. The separate reference system for evidence reconciles what otherwise is a conflict between the demand in quantum mechanics for repeatable experiments and the lack in spacetime metrics appropriate to the Global Positioning System of any exact symmetry, a lack that rules out an isometry between two spacetime regions for two occurrences of an experiment.

  4. Detecting and Correcting Speech Rhythm Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Every language has its own rhythm. Unlike many other languages in the world, English depends on the correct pronunciation of stressed and unstressed or weakened syllables recurring in the same phrase or sentence. Mastering the rhythm of English makes speaking more effective. Experiments have shown that we tend to hear speech as more rhythmical…

  5. The Essential Connection between Rhythm and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    It is the most fundamental aspect of music, yet so many students struggle with rhythm. How does one effectively teach budding young musicians to properly feel and read the rhythms all around them? Eileen Benedict, vocal music specialist at the Edith L. Slocum School in Ronkonkoma, New York, finds it best to start teaching her young students not…

  6. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  7. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  8. The Incarnate Rhythm of Geometrical Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a fundamental dimension of human nature at both biological and social levels. However, existing research literature has not sufficiently investigated its role in mathematical cognition and behavior. The purpose of this article is to bring the concept of "incarnate rhythm" into current discourses in the field of mathematical learning and…

  9. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  10. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harfmann, Brianna D.; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  11. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle.

  12. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  13. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  14. Biological rhythms, higher brain function, and behavior: Gaps, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Benca, Ruth; Duncan, Marilyn J; Frank, Ellen; McClung, Colleen; Nelson, Randy J; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2009-12-11

    Increasing evidence suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, and affect; further, disruption of circadian clock genes impairs sleep-wake cycle and social rhythms which may be implicated in mental disorders. Despite this strong evidence, a gap in understanding the neural mechanisms of this interaction obscures whether biological rhythms disturbances are the underlying causes or merely symptoms of mental disorder. Here, we review current understanding, emerging concepts, gaps, and opportunities pertinent to (1) the neurobiology of the interactions between circadian oscillators and the neural circuits subserving higher brain function and behaviors of relevance to mental health, (2) the most promising approaches to determine how biological rhythms regulate brain function and behavior under normal and pathological conditions, (3) the gaps and challenges to advancing knowledge on the link between disrupted circadian rhythms/sleep and psychiatric disorders, and (4) the novel strategies for translation of basic science discoveries in circadian biology to clinical settings to define risk, prevent or delay onset of mental illnesses, design diagnostic tools, and propose new therapeutic strategies. The review is organized around five themes pertinent to (1) the impact of molecular clocks on physiology and behavior, (2) the interactions between circadian signals and cognitive functions, (3) the interface of circadian rhythms with sleep, (4) a clinical perspective on the relationship between circadian rhythm abnormalities and affective disorders, and (5) the pre-clinical models of circadian rhythm abnormalities and mood disorders.

  15. Circadian rhythms in the concentration of plasma thyroxine in vitamin A-deprived calves.

    PubMed

    Bridge, P S; Abrams, J T; Curtis, R J; Spratling, F R

    1977-01-01

    Over a period of approximately 11 months, a total of 57 24 hour experiments was performed on 5 calves. The animals were fed a vitamin A-free diet and showed the common signs of vitamin A deficiency. During each experiment blood samples were taken hourly and the plasma iodoprotein content of each sample was determined. Each set of 24 values was subjected to Fourier analysis in an attempt to elucidate 24 hour, sinusoidal rhythms in iodoprotein concentration. A rhythm was deemed to be present where the chance of random sampling producing the observed pattern of concentration was less than or equal to 0.05. 25 such rhythms were detected. As the probability of random sampling giving rise to 25 rhythms in 57 tests is extremely small, circadian rhythms are assumed to exist in vitamin A-deficient, as in normal, calves. Rhythms, the characteristics of which are described here, were observed under natural conditions of day and night, and with controlled light and darkness. It is suggested that the occurrence of the rhythms, in relation to the environmental patterns of light and darkness, is better related to other aspects of brain activity than to those concerned with vision. PMID:563385

  16. “Biological rhythms, higher brain function, and behavior: gaps, opportunities and challenges”

    PubMed Central

    Benca, Ruth; Duncan, Marilyn J.; Frank, Ellen; McClung, Colleen; Nelson, Randy J.; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, and affect; further, disruption of circadian clock genes impairs sleep/wake cycle and social rhythms which may be implicated in mental disorders. Despite this strong evidence, a gap in understanding the neural mechanisms of this interaction obscures whether biological rhythms disturbances are the underlying causes or merely symptoms of these diseases. Here, we review current understanding, emerging concepts, gaps and opportunities pertinent to: (1) the neurobiology of the interactions between circadian oscillators and the neural circuits subserving higher brain function and behaviors of relevance to mental health, (2) the most promising approaches to determine how biological rhythms regulate brain function and behavior under normal and pathological conditions, (3) gaps and challenges to advancing knowledge on the link between disrupted circadian rhythms/sleep and psychiatric disorders, and (4) novel strategies for translation of basic science discoveries in circadian biology to clinical settings to define risk, prevent or delay onset of mental illnesses, design diagnostic tools and propose new therapeutic strategies. The review is organized around five themes pertinent to: (1) the impact of molecular clocks on physiology and behavior, (2) interactions between circadian signals and cognitive functions, (3) the interface of circadian rhythms with sleep (4) a clinical perspective on the relationship between circadian rhythm abnormalities and affective disorders, and (5) pre-clinical models of circadian rhythm abnormalities and mood disorders. PMID:19766673

  17. Forced desynchrony reveals independent contributions of suprachiasmatic oscillators to the daily plasma corticosterone rhythm in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wotus, Cheryl; Lilley, Travis R; Neal, Adam S; Suleiman, Nicole L; Schmuck, Stefanie C; Smarr, Benjamin L; Fischer, Brian J; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrolateral (vl-) and dorsomedial (dm-) SCN, respectively. We show that when the vlSCN and dmSCN are in maximum phase misalignment, the peak of the plasma corticosterone rhythm is shifted and the amplitude reduced; whereas, the peak of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) rhythm is also reduced, the phase is dissociated from that of the corticosterone rhythm. These data support previous studies suggesting an ACTH-independent pathway contributes to the corticosterone rhythm. To determine if either SCN subregion independently regulates corticosterone through the sympathetic nervous system, we compared unilateral adrenalectomized, desynchronized rats that had undergone either transection of the thoracic splanchnic nerve or sham transection to the remaining adrenal. Splanchnicectomy reduced and phase advanced the peak of both the corticosterone and ACTH rhythms. These data suggest that both the vlSCN and dmSCN contribute to the corticosterone rhythm by both reducing plasma ACTH and differentially regulating plasma corticosterone through an ACTH- and sympathetic nervous system-independent pathway.

  18. Electroconvulsive shock alters the rat overt rhythms of motor activity and temperature without altering the circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Anglès-Pujolràs, Montserrat; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Soria, Virginia; Urretavizcaya, Mikel; Menchón, José Manuel; Cambras, Trinitat

    2009-01-01

    The hypothetical relationship between circadian rhythms alterations and depression has prompted studies that examine the resultant effects of various antidepressants. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) exerts significant antidepressant effects that have been modelled in the laboratory via the use of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) in rats. However, data on the effects of ECT or ECS vis-à-vis the circadian rhythms remain scarce. Thus, we report here the effects of acute and chronic ECS administration on the temperature and motor activity circadian rhythms of rats. The motor activity and core body temperature of rats were continuously recorded to determine the circadian rhythms. We carried out three experiments. In the first, we analyzed the effects of acute ECS on both the phase and period when applied at different times of the subjective day. In the second and third experiments ECS was nearly daily applied to rats for 3 weeks: respectively, under dim red light, which allows a robust free-running circadian rhythm; and under light-dark cycles of 22 h (T22), a setting that implies dissociation in the circadian system. Acute ECS does not modify the phase or the period of circadian rhythms. Chronic administration of ECS produces an increase in motor activity and temperature, a decrease in the amplitude of circadian rhythms, although the period of the free-running rhythm remains unaffected. In conclusion, while chronic ECS does alter the overt rhythms of motor activity and temperature, it does not modify the functioning of the circadian pacemaker.

  19. Forced Desynchrony Reveals Independent Contributions of Suprachiasmatic Oscillators to the Daily Plasma Corticosterone Rhythm in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wotus, Cheryl; Lilley, Travis R.; Neal, Adam S.; Suleiman, Nicole L.; Schmuck, Stefanie C.; Smarr, Benjamin L.; Fischer, Brian J.; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrolateral (vl-) and dorsomedial (dm-) SCN, respectively. We show that when the vlSCN and dmSCN are in maximum phase misalignment, the peak of the plasma corticosterone rhythm is shifted and the amplitude reduced; whereas, the peak of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) rhythm is also reduced, the phase is dissociated from that of the corticosterone rhythm. These data support previous studies suggesting an ACTH-independent pathway contributes to the corticosterone rhythm. To determine if either SCN subregion independently regulates corticosterone through the sympathetic nervous system, we compared unilateral adrenalectomized, desynchronized rats that had undergone either transection of the thoracic splanchnic nerve or sham transection to the remaining adrenal. Splanchnicectomy reduced and phase advanced the peak of both the corticosterone and ACTH rhythms. These data suggest that both the vlSCN and dmSCN contribute to the corticosterone rhythm by both reducing plasma ACTH and differentially regulating plasma corticosterone through an ACTH- and sympathetic nervous system-independent pathway. PMID:23894346

  20. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo.

    PubMed

    Poskanzer, Kira E; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-05-10

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation-dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  1. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poskanzer, Kira E.; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation–dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  2. Ultra-slow oscillations in cortical networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mok, S Y; Nadasdy, Z; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2012-03-29

    An ultra-slow oscillation (<0.01 Hz) in the network-wide activity of dissociated cortical networks is described in this article. This slow rhythm is characterized by the recurrence of clusters of large synchronized bursts of activity lasting approximately 1-3 min, separated by an almost equivalent interval of relatively smaller bursts. Such rhythmic activity was detected in cultures starting from the fourth week in vitro. Our analysis revealed that the propagation motifs of constituent bursts were strongly conserved across multiple oscillation cycles, and these motifs were more consistent at the electrode level compared with the neuronal level.

  3. Finding synchrony in the desynchronized EEG: the history and interpretation of gamma rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2013-01-01

    Neocortical gamma (30–80 Hz) rhythms correlate with attention, movement and perception and are often disrupted in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gamma primarily occurs during alert brain states characterized by the so-called “desynchronized” EEG. Is this because gamma rhythms are devoid of synchrony? In this review we take a historical approach to answering this question. Richard Caton and Adolf Beck were the first to report the rhythmic voltage fluctuations in the animal brain. They were limited by the poor amplification of their early galvanometers. Thus when they presented light or other stimuli, they observed a disappearance of the large resting oscillations. Several groups have since shown that visual stimuli lead to low amplitude gamma rhythms and that groups of neurons in the visual cortices fire together during individual gamma cycles. This synchronous firing can more strongly drive downstream neurons. We discuss how gamma-band synchrony can support ongoing communication between brain regions, and highlight an important fact: there is at least local neuronal synchrony during gamma rhythms. Thus, it is best to refer to the low amplitude, high frequency EEG as an “activated”, not “desynchronized”, EEG. PMID:23964210

  4. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  5. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, Aİ; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, HO; Nas, O; Yılmaz, YK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). Results: There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Further, a significant correlation was found between biological rhythms and BDI scores (p < 0.001) and there were positive correlations between the VAS score and BRIAN total, sleep, and eating and BDI in patients with FMS (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: There are marked biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS. PMID:26426177

  6. Cortical State and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kenneth D.; Thiele, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Preface The brain continuously adapts its processing machinery to behavioural demands. To achieve this it rapidly modulates the operating mode of cortical circuits, controlling the way information is transformed and routed. This article will focus on two experimental approaches by which the control of cortical information processing has been investigated: the study of state-dependent cortical processing in rodents, and attention in the primate visual system. Both processes involve a modulation of low-frequency activity fluctuations and spiking correlation, and are mediated by common receptor systems. We suggest that selective attention involves processes similar to state change, operating at a local columnar level to enhance the representation of otherwise nonsalient features while suppressing internally generated activity patterns. PMID:21829219

  7. Brain rhythms and neural syntax: implications for efficient coding of cognitive content and neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Buzsáki, György; Watson, Brendon O

    2012-12-01

    The perpetual activity of the cerebral cortex is largely supported by the variety of oscillations the brain generates, spanning a number of frequencies and anatomical locations, as well as behavioral correlates. First, we review findings from animal studies showing that most forms of brain rhythms are inhibition-based, producing rhythmic volleys of inhibitory inputs to principal cell populations, thereby providing alternating temporal windows of relatively reduced and enhanced excitability in neuronal networks. These inhibition-based mechanisms offer natural temporal frames to group or "chunk" neuronal activity into cell assemblies and sequences of assemblies, with more complex multi-oscillation interactions creating syntactical rules for the effective exchange of information among cortical networks. We then review recent studies in human psychiatric patients demonstrating a variety alterations in neural oscillations across all major psychiatric diseases, and suggest possible future research directions and treatment approaches based on the fundamental properties of brain rhythms.

  8. Speech encoding by coupled cortical theta and gamma oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hyafil, Alexandre; Fontolan, Lorenzo; Kabdebon, Claire; Gutkin, Boris; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2015-05-29

    Many environmental stimuli present a quasi-rhythmic structure at different timescales that the brain needs to decompose and integrate. Cortical oscillations have been proposed as instruments of sensory de-multiplexing, i.e., the parallel processing of different frequency streams in sensory signals. Yet their causal role in such a process has never been demonstrated. Here, we used a neural microcircuit model to address whether coupled theta-gamma oscillations, as observed in human auditory cortex, could underpin the multiscale sensory analysis of speech. We show that, in continuous speech, theta oscillations can flexibly track the syllabic rhythm and temporally organize the phoneme-level response of gamma neurons into a code that enables syllable identification. The tracking of slow speech fluctuations by theta oscillations, and its coupling to gamma-spiking activity both appeared as critical features for accurate speech encoding. These results demonstrate that cortical oscillations can be a key instrument of speech de-multiplexing, parsing, and encoding.

  9. Postmortem validation of MRI cortical volume measurements in MS.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Veronica; Klaver, Roel; Versteeg, Adriaan; Voorn, Pieter; Twisk, Jos W R; Barkhof, Frederik; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Grey matter (GM) atrophy is a prominent aspect of multiple sclerosis pathology and an important outcome in studies. GM atrophy measurement requires accurate GM segmentation. Several methods are used in vivo for measuring GM volumes in MS, but assessing their validity in vivo remains challenging. In this postmortem study, we evaluated the correlation between postmortem MRI cortical volume or thickness and the cortical thickness measured on histological sections. Sixteen MS brains were scanned in situ using 3DT1-weighted MRI and these images were used to measure regional cortical volume using FSL-SIENAX, FreeSurfer, and SPM, and regional cortical thickness using FreeSurfer. Subsequently, cortical thickness was measured histologically in 5 systematically sampled cortical areas. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relation between MRI regional cortical volume or thickness and histological cortical thickness to determine which postprocessing technique was most valid. After correction for multiple comparisons, we observed a significant correlation with the histological cortical thickness for FSL-SIENAX cortical volume with manual editing (std. β = 0.345, adjusted R(2)  = 0.105, P = 0.005), and FreeSurfer cortical volume with manual editing (std. β = 0.379, adjusted R(2)  = 0.129, P = 0.003). In addition, there was a significant correlation between FreeSurfer cortical thickness with manual editing and histological cortical thickness (std. β = 0.381, adjusted R(2)  = 0.130, P = 0.003). The results support the use of FSL-SIENAX and FreeSurfer in cases of severe MS pathology. Interestingly none of the methods were significant in automated mode, which supports the use of manual editing to improve the automated segmentation. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2223-2233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945922

  10. Perceiving speech rhythm in music: listeners classify instrumental songs according to language of origin.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Erin E

    2009-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the musical rhythm of a particular culture may parallel the speech rhythm of that culture's language (Patel, A. D., & Daniele, J. R. (2003). An empirical comparison of rhythm in language and music. Cognition, 87, B35-B45). The present experiments aimed to determine whether listeners actually perceive such rhythmic differences in a purely musical context (i.e., in instrumental music without words). In Experiment 1a, listeners successfully classified instrumental renditions of French and English songs having highly contrastive rhythmic differences. Experiment 1b replicated this result with the same songs containing rhythmic information only. In Experiments 2a and 2b, listeners successfully classified original and rhythm-only stimuli when language-specific rhythmic differences were less contrastive but more representative of differences found in actual music and speech. These findings indicate that listeners can use rhythmic similarities and differences to classify songs originally composed in two languages having contrasting rhythmic prosody.

  11. Cortical dynamics revisited.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries on the organisation of the cortical connectome together with novel data on the dynamics of neuronal interactions require an extension of classical concepts on information processing in the cerebral cortex. These new insights justify considering the brain as a complex, self-organised system with nonlinear dynamics in which principles of distributed, parallel processing coexist with serial operations within highly interconnected networks. The observed dynamics suggest that cortical networks are capable of providing an extremely high-dimensional state space in which a large amount of evolutionary and ontogenetically acquired information can coexist and be accessible to rapid parallel search.

  12. Decision by division: making cortical maps.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Pasko; Ayoub, Albert E; Breunig, Joshua J; Dominguez, Martin H

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades, mounting evidence has revealed that specification of the basic cortical neuronal classes starts at the time of their final mitotic divisions in the embryonic proliferative zones. This early cell determination continues during the migration of the newborn neurons across the widening cerebral wall, and it is in the cortical plate that they attain their final positions and establish species-specific cytoarchitectonic areas. Here, the development and evolutionary expansion of the neocortex is viewed in the context of the radial unit and protomap hypotheses. A broad spectrum of findings gave insight into the pathogenesis of cortical malformations and the biological bases for the evolution of the modern human neocortex. We examine the history and evidence behind the concept of early specification of neurons and provide the latest compendium of genes and signaling molecules involved in neuronal fate determination and specification.

  13. Musical alexia for rhythm notation: a discrepancy between pitch and rhythm.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Kezuka, Machiko

    2003-06-01

    In the process of reading music, the reading of rhythm and pitch might be differentiated, although there is no evidence of this to date. There have been cases of disorders restricted to the reading of pitch, but none in which the disorder has been restricted to the reading of rhythm. We present a case of musical alexia and agraphia with Wernicke's aphasia. An in-depth assessment of the subject's musical reading ability showed that her musical alexia was restricted to unfamiliar melodies. When a melody was divided into rhythm elements and pitch elements, pitch reading was preserved, but rhythm reading was severely disturbed. This is the first case reported of a disorder restricted to rhythm reading, and suggests the independence of rhythm reading and pitch reading. PMID:12925929

  14. Effect of hypergravity on the circadian rhythms of white rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafferty, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of artificial gravity on the circadian rhythm of white rats was observed by comparing feeding activity at 1.0 and 1.75 g. The feeding cycle data were obtained by observing the number of feeding switch responses, as well as the amount of food obtained, as a function of time. One of the three subjects clearly established a free-running cycle with a period of 24.742 hr. During a 40-day exposure to the 1.75 g environment, the subjects maintained the same feeding cycle period which was established at 1.0 g. While the results of this study indicate that the activity rhythms of rats are insensitive to gravity levels between 1.0 and 1.75 g, the effects of gravity levels below 1.0 g are yet to be determined.

  15. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    PubMed

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  16. Circadian activity rhythms and mortality: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tranah, Gregory J.; Blackwell, Terri; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Paudel, Misti L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Cauley, Jane A.; Redline, Susan; Hillier, Teresa A.; Cummings, Steven R; Stone, Katie L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether circadian activity rhythms are associated with mortality in community-dwelling older women. DESIGN Prospective study of mortality. SETTING A cohort study of health and aging. PARTICIPANTS 3,027 community-dwelling women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures cohort (mean age 84 years). MEASUREMENTS Activity data were collected with wrist actigraphy for a minimum of three 24-hour periods and circadian activity rhythms were computed. Parameters of interest included height of activity peak (amplitude), mean activity level (mesor), strength of activity rhythm (robustness), and time of peak activity (acrophase). Vital status, with cause of death adjudicated through death certificates, was prospectively ascertained. RESULTS Over an average of 4.1 years of follow-up there were 444 (15%) deaths. There was an inverse association between peak activity height and all-cause mortality rates with higher mortality rates observed in the lowest activity quartile (Hazard ratio [HR]=2.18, 95% CI, 1.63–2.92) compared with the highest quartile after adjusting for age, clinic site, race, BMI, cognitive function, exercise, IADL impairments, depression, medications, alcohol, smoking, self-reported health status, married status, and co-morbidities. Increased risk of all-cause mortality was observed between lower mean activity level (HR=1.71, 95% CI, 1.29–2.27) and rhythm robustness (HR=1.97, 95% CI, 1.50–2.60). Increased mortality from cancer (HR=2.09, 95% CI, 1.04–4.22) and stroke (HR=2.64, 95% CI, 1.11–6.30) was observed for a delayed timing of peak activity (after 4:33PM; >1.5 SD from mean) when compared to the mean peak range (2:50PM–4:33PM). CONCLUSION Older women with weak circadian activity rhythms have higher mortality risk. If confirmed in other cohorts, studies will be needed to test whether interventions (e.g. physical activity, bright light exposure) that regulate circadian activity rhythms will improve health outcomes in the elderly

  17. Nutrients and Circadian Rhythms in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Huang, Liangfeng; Mao, Youxiang; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is generally existed in mammalian behavior and metabolic processes, which results from the self-sustained circadian clocks. The mammalian circadian clocks are composed of a master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and of many peripheral clocks in tissues and extra-SCN brain regions. It is indicated that feeding could take over part of the SCN signaling, and affect internal synchrony between the master clock and the peripheral clocks. Thus, recent studies focus more on the relationship between the nutrients and circadian rhythms. Various nutrient components (glucose, amino acid, alcohol) are found to be able to directly affect the circadian rhythm of clock genes. Moreover, the feeding schedule of nutrients is as important as the nutrient components in maintaining a healthy circadian rhythm. Therefore, the circadian homeostasis needs not only balanced nutrient components but also regular timed nutrients.

  18. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  19. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  20. Visualization of Cortical Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinvald, Amiram

    2003-03-01

    Recent progress in studies of cortical dynamics will be reviewed including the combination of real time optical imaging based on voltage sensitive dyes, single and multi- unit recordings, LFP, intracellular recordings and microstimulation. To image the flow of neuronal activity from one cortical site to the next, in real time, we have used optical imaging based on newly designed voltage sensitive dyes and a Fuji 128x 128 fast camera which we modified. A factor of 20-40 fold improvement in the signal to noise ratio was obtained with the new dye during in vivo imaging experiments. This improvements has facilitates the exploration of cortical dynamics without signal averaging in the millisecond time domain. We confirmed that the voltage sensitive dye signal indeed reflects membrane potential changes in populations of neurons by showing that the time course of the intracellular activity recorded intracellularly from a single neuron was highly correlated in many cases with the optical signal from a small patch of cortex recorded nearby. We showed that the firing of single cortical neurons is not a random process but occurs when the on-going pattern of million of neurons is similar to the functional architecture map which correspond to the tuning properties of that neuron. Chronic optical imaging, combined with electrical recordings and microstimulation, over a long period of times of more than a year, was successfully applied also to the study of higher brain functions in the behaving macaque monkey.

  1. Cortical thinning in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Martina; Motzkin, Julian C.; Philippi, Carissa L.; Kirk, Gregory R.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopathy is a personality disorder associated with severely antisocial behavior and a host of cognitive and affective deficits. The neuropathological basis of the disorder has not been clearly established. Cortical thickness is a sensitive measure of brain structure that has been used to identify neurobiological abnormalities in a number of psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate cortical thickness and corresponding functional connectivity in criminal psychopaths. Method Using T1 MRI data, we computed cortical thickness maps in a sample of adult male prison inmates selected based on psychopathy diagnosis (n=21 psychopathic inmates, n=31 non-psychopathic inmates). Using rest-fMRI data from a subset of these inmates (n=20 psychopathic inmates, n=20 non-psychopathic inmates), we then computed functional connectivity within networks exhibiting significant thinning among psychopaths. Results Relative to non-psychopaths, psychopaths exhibited significantly thinner cortex in a number of regions, including left insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral anterior temporal cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These neurostructural differences were not due to differences in age, IQ, or substance abuse. Psychopaths also exhibited a corresponding reduction in functional connectivity between left insula and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Psychopathy is associated with a distinct pattern of cortical thinning and reduced functional connectivity. PMID:22581200

  2. Sleep protects excitatory cortical circuits against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Activity in excitatory cortical pathways increases the oxidative metabolism of the brain and the risk of oxidative damage. Oxyradicals formed during periods of activity are mopped up by neural pools of nuclear factor kappa-B resulting in their activation and translocation to cell nuclei. During waking hours, glucocorticoids inhibit transactivation by nuclear factor kappa-B, increase central norepinephrine release, and elevate expression of prostaglandin D2. The build-up of nuclear factor kappa-B and prostaglandin D2 produces sleep pressures leading to sleep onset, normally gated by circadian melatonin release. During slow wave sleep nuclear factor kappa-B induces transcription of synaptogenic and antioxidant products and synaptic remodeling follows. Synaptically remodeled neural circuits have modified conductivity patterns and timescales and need to be resynchronized with existing unmodified neural circuits. The resynchronization process, mediated by theta rhythm, occurs during rapid eye movement sleep and is orchestrated from pontine centers. Resynchronization of remodeled neural circuits produces dreams. The waking state results upon successful resynchronization. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation results in a lack of resynchronization and leads to cognitive inefficiencies. The model presented here proposes that the primary purpose of sleep is to protect cortical circuits against oxidative damage by reducing cortical activity and by remodeling and resynchronizing cortical circuits during this period of reduced activity to sustain new patterns of activation more effectively.

  3. Therapeutics for Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Ehren R.; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by the interaction of endogenous circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian system provides timing information for most physiological rhythms, including the sleep and wake cycle. In addition, the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus has been shown to promote alertness during the day. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders arise when there is a misalignment between the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythms and the external environment or when there is dysfunction of the circadian clock or its entrainment pathways. The primary synchronizing agents of the circadian system are light and melatonin. Light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms and timed exposure to bright light is often used in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has been shown to be useful in the treatment of the following circadian rhythm sleep disorders: delayed sleep phase, advanced sleep phase, free-running, irregular sleep wake, jet lag and shift work. PMID:21243069

  4. Malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Leventer, Richard J; Guerrini, Renzo; Dobyns, William B

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are macroscopic or microscopic abnormalities of the cerebral cortex that arise as a consequence of an interruption to the normal steps of formation of the cortical plate. The human cortex develops its basic structure during the first two trimesters of pregnancy as a series of overlapping steps, beginning with proliferation and differentiation of neurons, which then migrate before finally organizing themselves in the developing cortex. Abnormalities at any of these stages, be they environmental or genetic in origin, may cause disruption of neuronal circuitry and predispose to a variety of clinical consequences, the most common of which is epileptic seizures. A large number of MCDs have now been described, each with characteristic pathological, clinical, and imaging features. The causes of many of these MCDs have been determined through the study of affected individuals, with many MCDs now established as being secondary to mutations in cortical development genes. This review will highlight the best-known of the human cortical malformations associated with epilepsy. The pathological, clinical, imaging, and etiologic features of each MCD will be summarized, with representative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images shown for each MCD. The malformations tuberous sclerosis, focal cortical dysplasia, hemimegalencephaly, classical lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia, periventricular nodular heterotopia, polymicrogyria, and schizencephaly will be presented. PMID:18472484

  5. Neural Oscillations Carry Speech Rhythm through to Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Peelle, Jonathan E.; Davis, Matthew H.

    2012-01-01

    A key feature of speech is the quasi-regular rhythmic information contained in its slow amplitude modulations. In this article we review the information conveyed by speech rhythm, and the role of ongoing brain oscillations in listeners’ processing of this content. Our starting point is the fact that speech is inherently temporal, and that rhythmic information conveyed by the amplitude envelope contains important markers for place and manner of articulation, segmental information, and speech rate. Behavioral studies demonstrate that amplitude envelope information is relied upon by listeners and plays a key role in speech intelligibility. Extending behavioral findings, data from neuroimaging – particularly electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) – point to phase locking by ongoing cortical oscillations to low-frequency information (~4–8 Hz) in the speech envelope. This phase modulation effectively encodes a prediction of when important events (such as stressed syllables) are likely to occur, and acts to increase sensitivity to these relevant acoustic cues. We suggest a framework through which such neural entrainment to speech rhythm can explain effects of speech rate on word and segment perception (i.e., that the perception of phonemes and words in connected speech is influenced by preceding speech rate). Neuroanatomically, acoustic amplitude modulations are processed largely bilaterally in auditory cortex, with intelligible speech resulting in differential recruitment of left-hemisphere regions. Notable among these is lateral anterior temporal cortex, which we propose functions in a domain-general fashion to support ongoing memory and integration of meaningful input. Together, the reviewed evidence suggests that low-frequency oscillations in the acoustic speech signal form the foundation of a rhythmic hierarchy supporting spoken language, mirrored by phase-locked oscillations in the human brain. PMID:22973251

  6. Dynamic markers of altered gait rhythm in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Lertratanakul, A.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Peterson, A. L.; Kaliton, D.; Goldberger, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder marked by loss of motoneurons. We hypothesized that subjects with ALS would have an altered gait rhythm, with an increase in both the magnitude of the stride-to-stride fluctuations and perturbations in the fluctuation dynamics. To test for this locomotor instability, we quantitatively compared the gait rhythm of subjects with ALS with that of normal controls and with that of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), pathologies of the basal ganglia. Subjects walked for 5 min at their usual pace wearing an ankle-worn recorder that enabled determination of the duration of each stride and of stride-to-stride fluctuations. We found that the gait of patients with ALS is less steady and more temporally disorganized compared with that of healthy controls. In addition, advanced ALS, HD, and PD were associated with certain common, as well as apparently distinct, features of altered stride dynamics. Thus stride-to-stride control of gait rhythm is apparently compromised with ALS. Moreover, a matrix of markers based on gait dynamics may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  7. Regulation of circadian rhythms in mammals by behavioral arousal.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian C; Antle, Michael C; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in most mammals are synchronized to local time by phase and period resetting actions of daily light-dark cycles on a retino-recipient, light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN receives input from other brain regions, some of which mediate the phase and period resetting actions of behavioral arousal on circadian rhythms. We review historical milestones in the discovery of so-called "nonphotic" circadian clock resetting induced by environmentally stimulated arousal, or by feedback from clock-controlled rest-activity cycles. Topics include species generality, interactions between concurrent or successive photic and nonphotic inputs to the circadian clock, neural pathways, neurotransmitters, and clock cell responses that mediate resetting by behavioral arousal. The role of behavioral inputs to the circadian clock in determining the phase of entrainment to local time in natural environments is not well understood. Nonetheless, nonphotic effects are of sufficient magnitude to raise issues for the design of experiments in behavioral neuroscience (any procedure that is sufficiently arousing may alter the timing of circadian clocks that regulate dependent variables of primary interest). Nonphotic inputs to the clock may be exploited in strategies to reset or strengthen circadian rhythms in humans. PMID:24773430

  8. Regulation of circadian rhythms in mammals by behavioral arousal.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian C; Antle, Michael C; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in most mammals are synchronized to local time by phase and period resetting actions of daily light-dark cycles on a retino-recipient, light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN receives input from other brain regions, some of which mediate the phase and period resetting actions of behavioral arousal on circadian rhythms. We review historical milestones in the discovery of so-called "nonphotic" circadian clock resetting induced by environmentally stimulated arousal, or by feedback from clock-controlled rest-activity cycles. Topics include species generality, interactions between concurrent or successive photic and nonphotic inputs to the circadian clock, neural pathways, neurotransmitters, and clock cell responses that mediate resetting by behavioral arousal. The role of behavioral inputs to the circadian clock in determining the phase of entrainment to local time in natural environments is not well understood. Nonetheless, nonphotic effects are of sufficient magnitude to raise issues for the design of experiments in behavioral neuroscience (any procedure that is sufficiently arousing may alter the timing of circadian clocks that regulate dependent variables of primary interest). Nonphotic inputs to the clock may be exploited in strategies to reset or strengthen circadian rhythms in humans.

  9. Circadian activity rhythms and risk of incident dementia and MCI in older women

    PubMed Central

    Tranah, Gregory J.; Blackwell, Terri; Stone, Katie L.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Paudel, Misti L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Cauley, Jane A.; Redline, Susan; Hillier, Teresa A.; Cummings, Steven R; Yaffe, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Objective Previous cross-sectional studies have observed alterations in activity rhythms in dementia patients but the direction of causation is unclear. We determined whether circadian activity rhythms measured in community-dwelling older women are prospectively associated with incident dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Method Activity rhythm data were collected from 1,282 healthy community-dwelling women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures cohort (mean age 83 years) with wrist actigraphy for a minimum of three 24-hour periods. Each participant completed a neuropsychological test battery and had clinical cognitive status (dementia, MCI, normal) adjudicated by an expert panel approximately 5 years later. All analyses were adjusted for demographics, BMI, functional status, depression, medications, alcohol, caffeine, smoking, health status, and co-morbidities. Results After 4.9 years of follow-up, 195 (15%) women had developed dementia and 302 (24%) had developed MCI. Older women with decreased activity rhythms had a higher likelihood of developing dementia or MCI when comparing those in the lowest quartiles of amplitude (Odds ratio[OR]=1.57,95% CI,1.09–2.25) or rhythm robustness (OR=1.57,95%CI,1.10–2.26) to women in the highest quartiles. An increased risk of dementia or MCI (OR=1.83,95% CI,1.29–2.61) was found for women whose timing of peak activity occurred later in the day (after 3:51PM) when compared to those with average timing (1:34PM–3:51PM). Interpretation Older, healthy women with decreased circadian activity rhythm amplitude and robustness, and delayed rhythms have increased odds of developing dementia and MCI. If confirmed, future studies should examine whether interventions (physical activity, bright light exposure) that influence activity rhythms will reduce the risk of cognitive deterioration in the elderly. PMID:22162057

  10. The influence of rhythm and personality in the endurance response to motivational asynchronous music.

    PubMed

    Crust, Lee; Clough, Peter J

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we examined participants' responses to motivational asynchronous music by isolating rhythmical properties and exploring personality correlates. Fifty-eight physically active participants (41 men and 17 women) aged 22.3 +/- 6.4 years performed an isometric weight-holding task on three occasions while being randomly exposed to no music, rhythm and motivational music. The rhythm and music conditions were edited portions of the same musical selection and had identical fast tempi, although the rhythm condition contained no melody, harmonies or lyrics. Participants each completed a copy of Cattell's 16PF following the third and final trial. A repeated-measures analysis of variance found the participants held the weight suspended for significantly longer when listening to motivational music in comparison to rhythm or no music. When listening to rhythm, participants endured the task for significantly longer than when listening to no music. The response to music was found to be significantly related to liveliness, while sensitivity correlated with responses to music factors (harmony, melody, lyrics, etc.) not present in the rhythm condition. These results suggest that responses to motivational music are subtle in nature and are determined by both musical factors and individual characteristics, and potentially an interaction between the two.

  11. Noisy unmaskers of multistability of periodic rhythms in a model of the ventricular cardiac action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Egorchenkov, Roman; Ivanov, Guennady

    2007-06-01

    The coexistence of different dynamical regimes of cardiac cell-model at a fixed set of stimulation parameters, i.e. multistability, revealed by noise is presented in this paper. Numerical simulations are performed using Luo-Rudy (LR1) action potential model. Numerical experiments with LR1 model conducted via noisy periodical stimulation showed the coexistence of several periodic rhythms. Weak noise in period of stimulation causes a hopping process between all the (meta-) stable rhythms of cell-model. This process is reflected in several parallel branches of the bifurcation diagram: noise unveils new, invisible before, stable rhythms which could appear in this model at different initial conditions. The phenomenon of multistability is directly evidenced by other numerical experiments: we have established the multistability property of a cell consisting in the fact that different initial conditions of stimulation (different extrasystole application times) lead to different stable periodic rhythms. We have obtained the shaping of attraction basins on the action potential curves. Such basins of attraction contain a set of initial conditions which determinate a stable periodic rhythm. We have found a close association between the attraction basins of the complex rhythms on the curves of action potential and the cardiac vulnerable windows on ECG record, during which extra stimuli can induce life threatening arrhythmias. Obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that multistability is very important for the electrical conduction system of the heart from the cell level to the integrated function of the heart.

  12. Development of the cortisol circadian rhythm in the light of stress early in life.

    PubMed

    Simons, Sterre S H; Beijers, Roseriet; Cillessen, Antonius H N; de Weerth, Carolina

    2015-12-01

    The secretion of the stress hormone cortisol follows a diurnal circadian rhythm. There are indications that this rhythm is affected by stress early in life. This paper addresses the development of the cortisol circadian rhythm between 1 and 6 years of age, and the role of maternal stress and anxiety early in the child's life on this (developing) rhythm. Participants were 193 healthy mother-child dyads from a community sample. Self-reported maternal stress and anxiety and physiological stress (saliva cortisol), were assessed prenatally (gestational week 37). Postnatally, self-reported maternal stress and anxiety were measured at 3, 6, 12, 30, and 72 months. Saliva cortisol samples from the children were collected on two days (four times each day) at 12, 30, and 72 months of age. The total amount of cortisol during the day and the cortisol decline over the day were determined to indicate children's cortisol circadian rhythm. Multilevel analyses showed that the total amount of cortisol decreased between 1 and 6 years. Furthermore, more maternal pregnancy-specific stress was related to higher total amounts of cortisol in the child. Higher levels of early postnatal maternal anxiety were associated with flatter cortisol declines in children. Higher levels of early postnatal maternal daily hassles were associated with steeper child cortisol declines over the day. These results indicated developmental change in children's cortisol secretion from 1 to 6 years and associations between maternal stress and anxiety early in children's lives and children's cortisol circadian rhythm in early childhood.

  13. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-07-25

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  14. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals. PMID:17653263

  15. Practical Designs of Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on the Modulation of EEG Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun; Gao, Xiaorong; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication channel which does not depend on the brain's normal output pathways of peripheral nerves and muscles [1-3]. It supplies paralyzed patients with a new approach to communicate with the environment. Among various brain monitoring methods employed in current BCI research, electroencephalogram (EEG) is the main interest due to its advantages of low cost, convenient operation and non-invasiveness. In present-day EEG-based BCIs, the following signals have been paid much attention: visual evoked potential (VEP), sensorimotor mu/beta rhythms, P300 evoked potential, slow cortical potential (SCP), and movement-related cortical potential (MRCP). Details about these signals can be found in chapter "Brain Signals for Brain-Computer Interfaces". These systems offer some practical solutions (e.g., cursor movement and word processing) for patients with motor disabilities.

  16. Stochastic Amplification of Fluctuations in Cortical Up-States

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Seoane, Luís F.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical neurons are bistable; as a consequence their local field potentials can fluctuate between quiescent and active states, generating slow Hz oscillations which are widely known as transitions between Up and Down States. Despite a large number of studies on Up-Down transitions, deciphering its nature, mechanisms and function are still today challenging tasks. In this paper we focus on recent experimental evidence, showing that a class of spontaneous oscillations can emerge within the Up states. In particular, a non-trivial peak around Hz appears in their associated power-spectra, what produces an enhancement of the activity power for higher frequencies (in the Hz band). Moreover, this rhythm within Ups seems to be an emergent or collective phenomenon given that individual neurons do not lock to it as they remain mostly unsynchronized. Remarkably, similar oscillations (and the concomitant peak in the spectrum) do not appear in the Down states. Here we shed light on these findings by using different computational models for the dynamics of cortical networks in presence of different levels of physiological complexity. Our conclusion, supported by both theory and simulations, is that the collective phenomenon of “stochastic amplification of fluctuations” – previously described in other contexts such as Ecology and Epidemiology – explains in an elegant and parsimonious manner, beyond model-dependent details, this extra-rhythm emerging only in the Up states but not in the Downs. PMID:22879879

  17. Stochastic amplification of fluctuations in cortical up-states.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Seoane, Luís F; Cortés, Jesús M; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Cortical neurons are bistable; as a consequence their local field potentials can fluctuate between quiescent and active states, generating slow 0.5 2 Hz oscillations which are widely known as transitions between Up and Down States. Despite a large number of studies on Up-Down transitions, deciphering its nature, mechanisms and function are still today challenging tasks. In this paper we focus on recent experimental evidence, showing that a class of spontaneous oscillations can emerge within the Up states. In particular, a non-trivial peak around 20 Hz appears in their associated power-spectra, what produces an enhancement of the activity power for higher frequencies (in the 30-90 Hz band). Moreover, this rhythm within Ups seems to be an emergent or collective phenomenon given that individual neurons do not lock to it as they remain mostly unsynchronized. Remarkably, similar oscillations (and the concomitant peak in the spectrum) do not appear in the Down states. Here we shed light on these findings by using different computational models for the dynamics of cortical networks in presence of different levels of physiological complexity. Our conclusion, supported by both theory and simulations, is that the collective phenomenon of "stochastic amplification of fluctuations"--previously described in other contexts such as Ecology and Epidemiology--explains in an elegant and parsimonious manner, beyond model-dependent details, this extra-rhythm emerging only in the Up states but not in the Downs.

  18. Abstract art and cortical motor activation: an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Umilta', M. Alessandra; Berchio, Cristina; Sestito, Mariateresa; Freedberg, David; Gallese, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    The role of the motor system in the perception of visual art remains to be better understood. Earlier studies on the visual perception of abstract art (from Gestalt theory, as in Arnheim, 1954 and 1988, to balance preference studies as in Locher and Stappers, 2002, and more recent work by Locher et al., 2007; Redies, 2007, and Taylor et al., 2011), neglected the question, while the field of neuroesthetics (Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1999; Zeki, 1999) mostly concentrated on figurative works. Much recent work has demonstrated the multimodality of vision, encompassing the activation of motor, somatosensory, and viscero-motor brain regions. The present study investigated whether the observation of high-resolution digitized static images of abstract paintings by Lucio Fontana is associated with specific cortical motor activation in the beholder's brain. Mu rhythm suppression was evoked by the observation of original art works but not by control stimuli (as in the case of graphically modified versions of these works). Most interestingly, previous visual exposure to the stimuli did not affect the mu rhythm suppression induced by their observation. The present results clearly show the involvement of the cortical motor system in the viewing of static abstract art works. PMID:23162456

  19. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  20. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  1. Life Events and Social Rhythms in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: An Examination of Social Rhythm Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Elaine M.; Bender, Rachel E.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Conner, Bradley T.; LaBelle, Denise R.; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the presence of an underlying social rhythm sensitivity in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders. METHODS The present study examined the impact of life events on sleep loss and social rhythm disruption in 184 individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) compared to 197 demographically similar normal controls (NC) drawn from the Longitudinal Investigation of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders (LIBS) project. Life events data were obtained at three time points, each spaced four months apart, and included information on the intensity of the event (high or low), valence (negative or positive), and levels of sleep loss and social rhythm disruption brought about the event. We hypothesized that BSD participants would exhibit higher levels of social rhythm disruption and sleep loss than normal controls as a consequence of the same life events. RESULTS BSD participants experienced significantly more social rhythm disruption and sleep loss following all classes of life events. LIMITATIONS The cross-sectional design of this study limits the strength of the conclusions that can be drawn, primarily cause and effect relationships between social rhythms and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Findings support the presence of an underlying social rhythm sensitivity in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders. An additive effect of sleep loss and social rhythm disruption may contribute to subsequent mood symptomatology. Results from this study may inform early psychosocial interventions for at-risk individuals. PMID:22381951

  2. Cortical Specializations Underlying Fast Computations

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    The time course of behaviorally relevant environmental events sets temporal constraints on neuronal processing. How does the mammalian brain make use of the increasingly complex networks of the neocortex, while making decisions and executing behavioral reactions within a reasonable time? The key parameter determining the speed of computations in neuronal networks is a time interval that neuronal ensembles need to process changes at their input and communicate results of this processing to downstream neurons. Theoretical analysis identified basic requirements for fast processing: use of neuronal populations for encoding, background activity, and fast onset dynamics of action potentials in neurons. Experimental evidence shows that populations of neocortical neurons fulfil these requirements. Indeed, they can change firing rate in response to input perturbations very quickly, within 1 to 3 ms, and encode high-frequency components of the input by phase-locking their spiking to frequencies up to 300 to 1000 Hz. This implies that time unit of computations by cortical ensembles is only few, 1 to 3 ms, which is considerably faster than the membrane time constant of individual neurons. The ability of cortical neuronal ensembles to communicate on a millisecond time scale allows for complex, multiple-step processing and precise coordination of neuronal activity in parallel processing streams, while keeping the speed of behavioral reactions within environmentally set temporal constraints. PMID:25689988

  3. Circadian rhythms in the green sunfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of circadian rhythms in retinomotor movements and retinal sensitivity in the green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus. When green sunfish were kept in constant darkness, cone photoreceptors exhibited circadian retinomotor movements; rod photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pigment granules did not. Cones elongated during subjective night and contracted during subjective day. These results corroborate those of Burnside and Ackland (1984. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 25:539-545). Electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded in constant darkness in response to dim flashes (lambda = 640 nm) exhibited a greater amplitude during subjective night than during subjective day. The nighttime increase in the ERG amplitude corresponded to a 3-10-fold increase in retinal sensitivity. The rhythmic changes in the ERG amplitude continued in constant darkness with a period of approximately 24 h, which indicates that the rhythm is generated by a circadian oscillator. The spectral sensitivity of the ERG recorded in constant darkness suggests that cones contribute to retinal responses during both day and night. Thus, the elongation of cone myoids during the night does not abolish the response of the cones. To examine the role of retinal efferents in generating retinal circadian rhythms, we cut the optic nerve. This procedure did not abolish the rhythms of retinomotor movement or of the ERG amplitude, but it did reduce the magnitude of the nighttime phases of both rhythms. Our results suggest that more than one endogenous oscillator regulates the retinal circadian rhythms in green sunfish. Circadian signals controlling the rhythms may be either generated within the eye or transferred to the eye via a humoral pathway. PMID:3598559

  4. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  5. Purely cortical anaplastic ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  6. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  7. The dark side of the alpha rhythm: fMRI evidence for induced alpha modulation during complete darkness.

    PubMed

    Ben-Simon, Eti; Podlipsky, Ilana; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Gruberger, Michal; Cvetkovic, Dean; Intrator, Nathan; Hendler, Talma

    2013-03-01

    The unique role of the EEG alpha rhythm in different states of cortical activity is still debated. The main theories regarding alpha function posit either sensory processing or attention allocation as the main processes governing its modulation. Closing and opening eyes, a well-known manipulation of the alpha rhythm, could be regarded as attention allocation from inward to outward focus though during light is also accompanied by visual change. To disentangle the effects of attention allocation and sensory visual input on alpha modulation, 14 healthy subjects were asked to open and close their eyes during conditions of light and of complete darkness while simultaneous recordings of EEG and fMRI were acquired. Thus, during complete darkness the eyes-open condition is not related to visual input but only to attention allocation, allowing direct examination of its role in alpha modulation. A data-driven ridge regression classifier was applied to the EEG data in order to ascertain the contribution of the alpha rhythm to eyes-open/eyes-closed inference in both lighting conditions. Classifier results revealed significant alpha contribution during both light and dark conditions, suggesting that alpha rhythm modulation is closely linked to the change in the direction of attention regardless of the presence of visual sensory input. Furthermore, fMRI activation maps derived from an alpha modulation time-course during the complete darkness condition exhibited a right frontal cortical network associated with attention allocation. These findings support the importance of top-down processes such as attention allocation to alpha rhythm modulation, possibly as a prerequisite to its known bottom-up processing of sensory input.

  8. Daily rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amount and timing of sleep and sleep architecture (sleep stages) are determined by several factors, important among which are the environment, circadian rhythms and time awake. Separating the roles played by these factors requires specific protocols, including the constant routine and altered sleep-wake schedules. Results from such protocols have led to the discovery of the factors that determine the amounts and distribution of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep as well as to the development of models to determine the amount and timing of sleep. One successful model postulates two processes. The first is process S, which is due to sleep pressure (and increases with time awake) and is attributed to a 'sleep homeostat'. Process S reverses during slow wave sleep (when it is called process S'). The second is process C, which shows a daily rhythm that is parallel to the rhythm of core temperature. Processes S and C combine approximately additively to determine the times of sleep onset and waking. The model has proved useful in describing normal sleep in adults. Current work aims to identify the detailed nature of processes S and C. The model can also be applied to circumstances when the sleep-wake cycle is different from the norm in some way. These circumstances include: those who are poor sleepers or short sleepers; the role an individual's chronotype (a measure of how the timing of the individual's preferred sleep-wake cycle compares with the average for a population); and changes in the sleep-wake cycle with age, particularly in adolescence and aging, since individuals tend to prefer to go to sleep later during adolescence and earlier in old age. In all circumstances, the evidence that sleep times and architecture are altered and the possible causes of these changes (including altered S, S' and C processes) are examined. PMID:22738268

  9. Microglia modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Morales, Teresa; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Alcantara-Gonzalez, David; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has been linked to the induction of apneas and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, whereas proinflammatory mediators inhibit breathing when applied peripherally or directly into the CNS. Considering that peripheral inflammation can activate microglia in the CNS and that this cell type can directly release all proinflammatory mediators that modulate breathing, it is likely that microglia can modulate breathing generation. It might do so also in hypoxia, since microglia are sensitive to hypoxia, and peripheral proinflammatory conditions affect gasping generation and autoresuscitation. Here, we tested whether microglial activation or inhibition affected respiratory rhythm generation. By measuring breathing as well as the activity of the respiratory rhythm generator (the preBötzinger complex), we found that several microglial activators or inhibitors, applied intracisternally in vivo or in the recording bath in vitro, affect the generation of the respiratory rhythms both in normoxia and hypoxia. Furthermore, microglial activation with lipopolysaccharide affected the ability of the animals to autoresuscitate after hypoxic conditions, an effect that is blocked when lipopolysaccharide is co-applied with the microglial inhibitor minocycline. Moreover, we found that the modulation of respiratory rhythm generation induced in vitro by microglial inhibitors was reproduced by microglial depletion. In conclusion, our data show that microglia can modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

  10. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  11. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G. B.; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals’ social networks. Further, women’s calls were longer than men’s calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  12. Turning a Negative into a Positive: Ascending GABAergic Control of Cortical Activation and Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; McKenna, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Recent technological advances have illuminated the role of GABAergic neurons in control of cortical arousal and sleep. Sleep-promoting GABAergic neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus are well-known. Less well-appreciated are GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem, midbrain, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain, which paradoxically promote arousal and fast electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. Thus, GABA is not purely a sleep-promoting neurotransmitter. GABAergic projection neurons in the brainstem nucleus incertus and ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden promote theta (4–8 Hz) rhythms. Ventral tegmental area GABAergic neurons, neighboring midbrain dopamine neurons, project to the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. They discharge faster during cortical arousal and regulate reward. Thalamic reticular nucleus GABAergic neurons initiate sleep spindles in non-REM sleep. In addition, however, during wakefulness, they tonically regulate the activity of thalamocortical neurons. Other GABAergic inputs to the thalamus arising in the globus pallidus pars interna, substantia nigra pars reticulata, zona incerta, and basal forebrain regulate motor activity, arousal, attention, and sensory transmission. Several subpopulations of cortically projecting GABAergic neurons in the basal forebrain project to the thalamus and neocortex and preferentially promote cortical gamma-band (30–80 Hz) activity and wakefulness. Unlike sleep-active GABAergic neurons, these ascending GABAergic neurons are fast-firing neurons which disinhibit and synchronize the activity of their forebrain targets, promoting the fast EEG rhythms typical of conscious states. They are prominent targets of GABAergic hypnotic agents. Understanding the properties of ascending GABAergic neurons may lead to novel treatments for diseases involving disorders of cortical activation and wakefulness. PMID:26124745

  13. Visuo-attentional and sensorimotor alpha rhythms are related to visuo-motor performance in athletes.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Babiloni, Claudio; Bertollo, Maurizio; Marzano, Nicola; Iacoboni, Marco; Infarinato, Francesco; Lizio, Roberta; Stocchi, Massimiliano; Robazza, Claudio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Comani, Silvia; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-11-01

    This study tested the two following hypotheses: (i) compared with non-athletes, elite athletes are characterized by a reduced cortical activation during the preparation of precise visuo-motor performance; (ii) in elite athletes, an optimal visuo-motor performance is related to a low cortical activation. To this aim, electroencephalographic (EEG; 56 channels; Be Plus EB-Neuro) data were recorded in 18 right-handed elite air pistol shooters and 10 right-handed non-athletes. All subjects performed 120 shots. The EEG data were spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian estimation. With reference to a baseline period, power decrease/increase of alpha rhythms during the preshot period indexed the cortical activation/deactivation (event-related desynchronization/synchronization, ERD/ERS). Regarding the hypothesis (i), low- (about 8-10 Hz) and high-frequency (about 10-12 Hz) alpha ERD was lower in amplitude in the elite athletes than in the non-athletes over the whole scalp. Regarding the hypothesis (ii), the elite athletes showed high-frequency alpha ERS (about 10-12 Hz) larger in amplitude for high score shots (50%) than for low score shots; this was true in right parietal and left central areas. A control analysis confirmed these results with another indicator of cortical activation (beta ERD, about 20 Hz). The control analysis also showed that the amplitude reduction of alpha ERD for the high compared with low score shots was not observed in the non-athletes. The present findings globally suggest that in elite athletes (experts), visuo-motor performance is related to a global decrease of cortical activity, as a possible index of spatially selective cortical processes ("neural efficiency"). PMID:19350556

  14. Circadian Rhythms of Crawling and Swimming in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    PubMed Central

    NEWCOMB, JAMES M.; KIROUAC, LAUREN E.; NAIMIE, AMANDA A.; BIXBY, KIMBERLY A.; LEE, COLIN; MALANGA, STEPHANIE; RAUBACH, MAUREEN; WATSON, WINSOR H.

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms. PMID:25572214

  15. Circadian rhythms of crawling and swimming in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E; Naimie, Amanda A; Bixby, Kimberly A; Lee, Colin; Malanga, Stephanie; Raubach, Maureen; Watson, Winsor H

    2014-12-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms. PMID:25572214

  16. Plastic oscillators and fixed rhythms: Changes in the phase of clock-gene rhythms in the PVN are not reflected in the phase of the melatonin rhythm of grass rats

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fairey, Carmel A.; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Stowie, Adam; Walaszczyk, Erin; Smale, Laura; Nunez, Antonio A.

    2015-01-01

    The same clock-genes, including Period (PER) 1 and 2, that show rhythmic expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are also rhythmically expressed in other brain regions that serve as extra-SCN oscillators. Outside the hypothalamus, the phase of these extra-SCN oscillators appears to be reversed when diurnal and nocturnal mammals are compared. Based on mRNA data, PER1 protein is expected to peak in the late night in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of nocturnal laboratory rats, but comparable data are not available for a diurnal species. Here we use the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus) to describe rhythms of PER1 and 2 protein in the PVN of animals that either show the species-typical day-active profile, or that adopt a night-active profile when given access to running wheels. For day-active animals housed with or without wheels, significant rhythms of PER1 or PER2 protein expression featured peaks in the late morning; night-active animals showed patterns similar to those expected from nocturnal laboratory rats. Since the PVN is part of the circuit that controls pineal rhythms, we also measured circulating levels of melatonin during the day and night in day-active animals with and without wheels and in night-active wheel runners. All three groups showed elevated levels of melatonin at night, with higher levels during both the day and night being associated with the levels of activity displayed by each group. The differential phase of rhythms in clock-gene protein in the PVN of diurnal and nocturnal animals presents a possible mechanism for explaining species differences in the phase of autonomic rhythms controlled, in part, by the PVN. The present study suggests that the phase of the oscillator of the PVN does not determine that of the melatonin rhythm in diurnal and nocturnal species or in diurnal and nocturnal chronotypes within a species. PMID:25575946

  17. Distinct recurrent versus afferent dynamics in cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Kimberly; Lien, Anthony D; Scanziani, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    How intracortical recurrent circuits in mammalian sensory cortex influence dynamics of sensory representation is not understood. Previous methods could not distinguish the relative contributions of recurrent circuits and thalamic afferents to cortical dynamics. We accomplish this by optogenetically manipulating thalamus and cortex. Over the initial 40 ms of visual stimulation, excitation from recurrent circuits in visual cortex progressively increased to exceed direct thalamocortical excitation. Even when recurrent excitation exceeded thalamic excitation, upon silencing thalamus, sensory-evoked activity in cortex decayed rapidly, with a time constant of 10 ms, which is similar to a neuron's integration time window. In awake mice, this cortical decay function predicted the time-locking of cortical activity to thalamic input at frequencies <15 Hz and attenuation of the cortical response to higher frequencies. Under anesthesia, depression at thalamocortical synapses disrupted the fidelity of sensory transmission. Thus, we determine dynamics intrinsic to cortical recurrent circuits that transform afferent input in time.

  18. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  19. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  20. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Asthik; Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    Cortical 'clefts' (schizencephaly) and cortical 'bumps' (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep 'incomplete' cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  1. [Circadian rhythm of lutropin and follitropin in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Riemel, A; Grzeszczak, W; Koziak, H; Moczulski, D

    1996-04-01

    Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in patients with chronic renal failure is well documented. This study was aimed to answer the following questions: 1. Is there the circadian rhythm in serum concentration of lutropin and follitropin preserved in male patients with chronic renal failure. 2. Does hemodialysis, used in treatment of uremia, influence LH and FSH circadian variations. 3. Is there statistically significant difference between hormonal circadian rhythm determined on the day of hemodialysis and on the interdialytic day. Circadian patterns of LH and FSH and their characteristics were studied in 32 uremic men and 16 healthy men. 16 uremic males were non-dialyzed and 16 were hemodialyzed. In all investigated cases the basal serum concentrations of LH and FSH were measured 8-times a day at 3-hour intervals. LH and FSH serum concentrations were determined using an immunoradiometric assay. To estimate the circadian rhythms of the investigated hormones COSINOR computer analysis was used. The following results were obtained: 1. Significantly higher basal LH concentration in hemodialyzed patients, compared with the control group. 2. Absence of significant differences in LH serum concentration between hemodialyzed patients (on the day of dialysis and on the following day) and non-dialyzed patients. 3. Absence of LH circadian rhythm in both non-dialyzed and hemodialyzed uremic patients. 4. Existence of LH circadian rhythm in healthy subjects. 5. Significantly higher serum FSH concentration in hemodialyzed patients compared with healthy subjects.

  2. Congenital anophthalmia: a circadian rhythm study.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Julio; Andres, Jesus; Aragon, Maria P; Agapito, Teresa

    2004-03-01

    A circadian rhythm of heart rate and respiratory rate was seen at 1, 8, and 12 months of age in an infant born without ocular tissue, which supports the possibility that the time cues were nonphotic. No melatonin circadian rhythm was detected at any age up to 9 years of age, and this is most likely associated with the anophthalmia and lack of photic input to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Usually circadian organization is present after the neonatal period and approaches adult levels with development.

  3. Improvement of pedestrian flow by slow rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Daichi; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple model for pedestrians by dividing walking velocity into two parts, which are step size and pace of walking (number of steps per unit time). Theoretical analysis on pace indicates that rhythm that is slower than normal-walking pace in a low-density regime increases flow if the flow-density diagram is convex downward in a high-density regime. In order to verify this result, we have performed an experiment with real pedestrians and observed the improvement of flow in a congested situation using slow rhythm.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  5. [Biological rhythm, sleep and jet lag].

    PubMed

    Zulley, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Sleep is an active recovery process, which is governed by biological rhythms. This rhythmic variation influences almost all bodily functions and dictates the optimal time for sleep. Sleep itself is an inconsistent state mainly characterized by the alteration between REM and NREM sleep. Vital regenerative processes occur during sleep. Sleep is a basic prerequisite for wellbeing, health and performance. If the synchronization between sleep and the biological rhythms is disturbed, malfunctions of the organism have to be expected. Such a state can be found by a sudden shift of local time by travelling across time zones (jet lag). Therapeutic strategies can reduce the symptoms associated with the state of jet lag.

  6. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  7. Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Chin, Steven S.; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  8. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Myles P.; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success. PMID:27148293

  9. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission.

    PubMed

    Fenske, Myles P; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success. PMID:27148293

  10. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae. PMID:26147202

  11. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae.

  12. A riot of rhythms: neuronal and glial circadian oscillators in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Guilding, Clare; Hughes, Alun TL; Brown, Timothy M; Namvar, Sara; Piggins, Hugh D

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, the synchronized activity of cell autonomous clocks in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) enables this structure to function as the master circadian clock, coordinating daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, the dominance of this clock has been challenged by the observations that metabolic duress can over-ride SCN controlled rhythms, and that clock genes are expressed in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of appetite and feeding. The recent development of mice in which clock gene/protein activity is reported by bioluminescent constructs (luciferase or luc) now enables us to track molecular oscillations in numerous tissues ex vivo. Consequently we determined both clock activities and responsiveness to metabolic perturbations of cells and tissues within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a site pivotal for optimal internal homeostatic regulation. Results Here we demonstrate endogenous circadian rhythms of PER2::LUC expression in discrete subdivisions of the arcuate (Arc) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH). Rhythms resolved to single cells did not maintain long-term synchrony with one-another, leading to a damping of oscillations at both cell and tissue levels. Complementary electrophysiology recordings revealed rhythms in neuronal activity in the Arc and DMH. Further, PER2::LUC rhythms were detected in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle and in the median eminence/pars tuberalis (ME/PT). A high-fat diet had no effect on the molecular oscillations in the MBH, whereas food deprivation resulted in an altered phase in the ME/PT. Conclusion Our results provide the first single cell resolution of endogenous circadian rhythms in clock gene expression in any intact tissue outside the SCN, reveal the cellular basis for tissue level damping in extra-SCN oscillators and demonstrate that an oscillator in the ME/PT is responsive to changes in metabolism. PMID:19712475

  13. Neural dynamics in a model of the thalamocortical system. I. Layers, loops and the emergence of fast synchronous rhythms.

    PubMed

    Lumer, E D; Edelman, G M; Tononi, G

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale computer model was constructed to gain insight into the structural basis for the generation of fast synchronous rhythms (20-60 Hz) in the thalamocortical system. The model consisted of 65,000 spiking neurons organized topographically to represent sectors of a primary and secondary area of mammalian visual cortex, and two associated regions of the dorsal thalamus and the thalamic reticular nucleus. Cortical neurons, both excitatory and inhibitory, were organized in supragranular layers, infraganular layers and layer IV. Reciprocal intra- and interlaminar, interareal, thalamocortical, corticothalamic and thalamoreticular connections were set up based on known anatomical constraints. Simulations of neuronal responses to visual input revealed sporadic epochs of synchronous oscillations involving all levels of the model, similar to the fast rhythms recorded in vivo. By systematically modifying physiological and structural parameters in the model, specific network properties were found to play a major role in the generation of this rhythmic activity. For example, fast synchronous rhythms could be sustained autonomously by lateral and interlaminar interactions within and among local cortical circuits. In addition, these oscillations were propagated to the thalamus and amplified by corticothalamocortical loops, including the thalamic reticular complex. Finally, synchronous oscillations were differentially affected by lesioning forward and backward interareal connections.

  14. The Utility of the Swine Model to Assess Biological Rhythms and Their Characteristics during Different Stages of Residence in a Simulated Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Leyden, Katrina N.; Hanneman, Sandra K.; Padhye, Nikhil S.; Smolensky, Michael H.; Kang, Duck-Hee; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the utility of the mammalian swine model under simulated intensive care unit (sICU) conditions and mechanical ventilation for assessment of the trajectory of circadian rhythms of sedation requirement, core body temperature (CBT), pulmonary mechanics (PM), and gas exchange (GE). Data were collected prospectively with an observational time-series design to describe and compare circadian rhythms of selected study variables in four swine mechanically ventilated for up to 7 consecutive days. We derived the circadian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 20–28 h)/ultradian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 1 to <20 h) bandpower ratio to assess the robustness of circadian rhythms, and compare findings between the early (first 3 days) and late (subsequent days) sICU stay. All pigs exhibited statistically significant circadian rhythms (τ between 20–28 h) in CBT, respiratory rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation, but circadian rhythms were detected less frequently for sedation requirement, spontaneous minute volume, arterial oxygen tension, arterial carbon dioxide tension, and arterial pH. Sedation did not appear to mask the circadian rhythms of CBT, PM, and GE. Individual subject observations were more informative than group data, and provided preliminary evidence that (a) circadian rhythms of multiple variables are lost or desynchronized in mechanically ventilated subjects, (b) robustness of circadian rhythm varies with subject morbidity, and (c) healthier pigs develop more robust circadian rhythm profiles over time in the sICU. Comparison of biological rhythm profiles among sICU subjects with similar severity of illness is needed to determine if the results of this pilot study are reproducible. Identification of consistent patterns may provide insight into subject morbidity and timing of such therapeutic interventions as weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26204131

  15. The Utility of the Swine Model to Assess Biological Rhythms and Their Characteristics during Different Stages of Residence in a Simulated Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Leyden, Katrina N; Hanneman, Sandra K; Padhye, Nikhil S; Smolensky, Michael H; Kang, Duck-Hee; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the utility of the mammalian swine model under simulated intensive care unit (sICU) conditions and mechanical ventilation (MV) for assessment of the trajectory of circadian rhythms of sedation requirement, core body temperature (CBT), pulmonary mechanics (PM) and gas exchange (GE). Data were collected prospectively with an observational time-series design to describe and compare circadian rhythms of selected study variables in four swine mechanically ventilated for up to seven consecutive days. We derived the circadian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 20 and 28 h)/ultradian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 1 and <20 h) bandpower ratio to assess the robustness of circadian rhythms, and compare findings between the early (first 3 days) and late (subsequent days) sICU stay. All pigs exhibited statistically significant circadian rhythms (τ between 20 and 28 h) in CBT, respiratory rate and peripheral oxygen saturation, but circadian rhythms were detected less frequently for sedation requirement, spontaneous minute volume, arterial oxygen tension, arterial carbon dioxide tension and arterial pH. Sedation did not appear to mask the circadian rhythms of CBT, PM and GE. Individual subject observations were more informative than group data, and provided preliminary evidence that (a) circadian rhythms of multiple variables are lost or desynchronized in mechanically ventilated subjects, (b) robustness of circadian rhythm varies with subject morbidity and (c) healthier pigs develop more robust circadian rhythm profiles over time in the sICU. Comparison of biological rhythm profiles among sICU subjects with similar severity of illness is needed to determine if the results of this pilot study are reproducible. Identification of consistent patterns may provide insight into subject morbidity and timing of such therapeutic interventions as weaning from MV. PMID:26204131

  16. Stressful life events, social rhythms, and depressive symptoms among the elderly: an examination of hypothesized causal linkages.

    PubMed

    Prigerson, H G; Reynolds, C F; Frank, E; Kupfer, D J; George, C J; Houck, P R

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to determine possible causal linkages among stressful life events, social rhythms, and levels of depressive symptomatology for 81 elderly subjects (51 recently widowed, 30 healthy controls). We examined the associations among stressful life events (i.e., bereavement status at baseline or a severely threatening event occurring between baseline and followup), social rhythm stability, and the level of depressive symptoms. Results indicated that while stressful life events were not associated with significant changes in social rhythm stability, social rhythm stability was a significant negative correlate of both baseline and followup levels of depressive symptomatology; that is, lower levels of social rhythm stability at baseline were associated with high levels of depressive symptoms at baseline (rho = -0.33, n = 81, p < 0.001) and at followup (rho = -0.23, n = 81, p < 0.05). Bereavement was also a significant positive correlate of depressive symptomatology both at baseline (rho = 0.79, n = 81), p < 0.0001) and at followup (rho = 0.55, n = 81, p < 0.0001). It is likely that future research will benefit from social rhythm assessment obtained temporally closer to major life events and from the use of structured interviews to ascertain the presence of syndromal major depression at followup as well as the inclusion of subjects with a wider range of functional impairments. Nevertheless, these results represent a first step in disentangling possible causal connections among stressful life events, social rhythms, and depressive symptomatology.

  17. Frequency and phase synchronization in neuromagnetic cortical responses to flickering-color stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timashev, S. F.; Polyakov, Yu. S.; Yulmetyev, R. M.; Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu.; Shimojo, S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2010-03-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms—MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-frequency processes that correspond to normal physiological rhythms. But for the patient, the frequency and phase synchronization breaks down, which is associated with the suppression of cortical regulatory functions when the flickering-color stimulus is applied, and higher frequencies start playing the dominating role. This suggests that the disruption of correlations in the MEG responses is the indicator of pathological changes leading to photosensitive epilepsy, which can be used for developing a method of diagnosing the disease based on the analysis with the FNS cross-correlation function.

  18. Broadband cortical desynchronization underlies the human psychedelic state.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Moran, Rosalyn J; Brookes, Matthew J; Williams, Tim M; Errtizoe, David; Sessa, Ben; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Bolstridge, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Feilding, Amanda; Friston, Karl J; Nutt, David J

    2013-09-18

    Psychedelic drugs produce profound changes in consciousness, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms for this remain unclear. Spontaneous and induced oscillatory activity was recorded in healthy human participants with magnetoencephalography after intravenous infusion of psilocybin--prodrug of the nonselective serotonin 2A receptor agonist and classic psychedelic psilocin. Psilocybin reduced spontaneous cortical oscillatory power from 1 to 50 Hz in posterior association cortices, and from 8 to 100 Hz in frontal association cortices. Large decreases in oscillatory power were seen in areas of the default-mode network. Independent component analysis was used to identify a number of resting-state networks, and activity in these was similarly decreased after psilocybin. Psilocybin had no effect on low-level visually induced and motor-induced gamma-band oscillations, suggesting that some basic elements of oscillatory brain activity are relatively preserved during the psychedelic experience. Dynamic causal modeling revealed that posterior cingulate cortex desynchronization can be explained by increased excitability of deep-layer pyramidal neurons, which are known to be rich in 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that the subjective effects of psychedelics result from a desynchronization of ongoing oscillatory rhythms in the cortex, likely triggered by 5-HT2A receptor-mediated excitation of deep pyramidal cells. PMID:24048847

  19. Circadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Gaggioni, Giulia; Ly, Julien Q M; Papachilleos, Soterios; Borsu, Chloé; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Massimini, Marcello; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe; Moran, Rosalyn J; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders have recently been characterized as dysfunctions arising from a 'final common pathway' of imbalanced excitation to inhibition within cortical networks. How the regulation of a cortical E/I ratio is affected by sleep and the circadian rhythm however, remains to be established. Here we addressed this issue through the analyses of TMS-evoked responses recorded over a 29 h sleep deprivation protocol conducted in young and healthy volunteers. Spectral analyses of TMS-evoked responses in frontal cortex revealed non-linear changes in gamma band evoked oscillations, compatible with an influence of circadian timing on inhibitory interneuron activity. In silico inferences of cell-to-cell excitatory and inhibitory connectivity and GABA/Glutamate receptor time constant based on neural mass modeling within the Dynamic causal modeling framework, further suggested excitation/inhibition balance was under a strong circadian influence. These results indicate that circadian changes in EEG spectral properties, in measure of excitatory/inhibitory connectivity and in GABA/glutamate receptor function could support the maintenance of cognitive performance during a normal waking day, but also during overnight wakefulness. More generally, these findings demonstrate a slow daily regulation of cortical excitation/inhibition balance, which depends on circadian-timing and prior sleep-wake history. PMID:27651114

  20. Circadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah L.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Ly, Julien Q. M.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Borsu, Chloé; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Massimini, Marcello; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe; Moran, Rosalyn J.; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders have recently been characterized as dysfunctions arising from a ‘final common pathway’ of imbalanced excitation to inhibition within cortical networks. How the regulation of a cortical E/I ratio is affected by sleep and the circadian rhythm however, remains to be established. Here we addressed this issue through the analyses of TMS-evoked responses recorded over a 29 h sleep deprivation protocol conducted in young and healthy volunteers. Spectral analyses of TMS-evoked responses in frontal cortex revealed non-linear changes in gamma band evoked oscillations, compatible with an influence of circadian timing on inhibitory interneuron activity. In silico inferences of cell-to-cell excitatory and inhibitory connectivity and GABA/Glutamate receptor time constant based on neural mass modeling within the Dynamic causal modeling framework, further suggested excitation/inhibition balance was under a strong circadian influence. These results indicate that circadian changes in EEG spectral properties, in measure of excitatory/inhibitory connectivity and in GABA/glutamate receptor function could support the maintenance of cognitive performance during a normal waking day, but also during overnight wakefulness. More generally, these findings demonstrate a slow daily regulation of cortical excitation/inhibition balance, which depends on circadian-timing and prior sleep-wake history. PMID:27651114

  1. Broadband cortical desynchronization underlies the human psychedelic state.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Moran, Rosalyn J; Brookes, Matthew J; Williams, Tim M; Errtizoe, David; Sessa, Ben; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Bolstridge, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Feilding, Amanda; Friston, Karl J; Nutt, David J

    2013-09-18

    Psychedelic drugs produce profound changes in consciousness, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms for this remain unclear. Spontaneous and induced oscillatory activity was recorded in healthy human participants with magnetoencephalography after intravenous infusion of psilocybin--prodrug of the nonselective serotonin 2A receptor agonist and classic psychedelic psilocin. Psilocybin reduced spontaneous cortical oscillatory power from 1 to 50 Hz in posterior association cortices, and from 8 to 100 Hz in frontal association cortices. Large decreases in oscillatory power were seen in areas of the default-mode network. Independent component analysis was used to identify a number of resting-state networks, and activity in these was similarly decreased after psilocybin. Psilocybin had no effect on low-level visually induced and motor-induced gamma-band oscillations, suggesting that some basic elements of oscillatory brain activity are relatively preserved during the psychedelic experience. Dynamic causal modeling revealed that posterior cingulate cortex desynchronization can be explained by increased excitability of deep-layer pyramidal neurons, which are known to be rich in 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that the subjective effects of psychedelics result from a desynchronization of ongoing oscillatory rhythms in the cortex, likely triggered by 5-HT2A receptor-mediated excitation of deep pyramidal cells.

  2. Temporal accuracy of human cortico-cortical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The precision in space and time of interactions among multiple cortical sites was evaluated by examining repeating precise spatiotemporal patterns of instances in which cortical currents showed brief amplitude undulations. The amplitudes of the cortical current dipoles were estimated by applying a variant of synthetic aperture magnetometry to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of subjects tapping to metric auditory rhythms of drum beats. Brief amplitude undulations were detected in the currents by template matching at a rate of 2–3 per second. Their timing was treated as point processes, and precise spatiotemporal patterns were searched for. By randomly teetering these point processes within a time window W, we estimated the accuracy of the timing of these brief amplitude undulations and compared the results with those obtained by applying the same analysis to traces composed of random numbers. The results demonstrated that the timing accuracy of patterns was better than 3 ms. Successful classification of two different cognitive processes based on these patterns suggests that at least some of the repeating patterns are specific to a cognitive process. PMID:26843604

  3. Time in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shadlen, Michael N.; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Nobre, Anna C.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2015-01-01

    Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. PMID:26468192

  4. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: I. Mora Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Lalita; Otake, Takashi; Cutler, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Listeners rely on native-language rhythm in segmenting speech; in different languages, stress-, syllable- or mora-based rhythm is exploited. The rhythmic similarity hypothesis holds that where two languages have similar rhythm, listeners of each language should segment their own and the other language similarly. Such similarity in listening was…

  5. Interaction among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms during cardiolocomotor synchronization.

    PubMed

    Niizeki, K; Kawahara, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1993-10-01

    The nature of entrainment between cardiac and locomotor rhythms was investigated while normal human subjects walked or ran on a treadmill. To detect the incidence of entrainment occurrence, the phase relationships among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms were analyzed. The phase relationship between heartbeats and gait signals showed that entrainment of cardiac rhythm to locomotor rhythm occurred in all subjects at one or more treadmill speeds. To elucidate interactions among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms during the cardiolocomotor synchronization, spectral and coherence analyses were done for these three rhythms. Spectral and coherence analyses on fluctuations in the heart period and respiratory rhythms revealed that the strength of coupling between cardiac and respiratory rhythms decreased in the presence of cardiolocomotor synchronization. In addition, the coupling of cardiac and locomotor rhythms appeared to induce dissociation of coupling between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. These results were similar to those observed when stepping was voluntarily synchronized with cardiac rhythm. Possible mechanisms to explain coordination and interaction among the neural oscillators innervating these three rhythms are discussed.

  6. A rhythm landscape approach to the developmental dynamics of birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Tchernichovski, Ofer; Takahasi, Miki; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Unlike simple biological rhythms, the rhythm of the oscine bird song is a learned time series of diverse sounds that change dynamically during vocal ontogeny. How to quantify rhythm development is one of the most important challenges in behavioural biology. Here, we propose a simple method, called ‘rhythm landscape’, to visualize and quantify how rhythm structure, which is measured as durational patterns of sounds and silences, emerges and changes over development. Applying this method to the development of Bengalese finch songs, we show that the rhythm structure begins with a broadband rhythm that develops into diverse rhythms largely through branching from precursors. Furthermore, an information-theoretic measure, the Jensen–Shannon divergence, was used to characterize the crystallization process of birdsong rhythm, which started with a high rate of rhythm change and progressed to a stage of slow refinement. This simple method provides a useful description of rhythm development, thereby helping to reveal key temporal constraints on complex biological rhythms. PMID:26538559

  7. The Features and Training of English Stress and Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Cui-yun

    2008-01-01

    In second language learning, to possess a perfect pronunciation, the importance of stress and rhythm should not be ignored. This articles explores the nature of sentence and word stress as well as rhythm, thus putting forward some feasible ways of training and acquiring a good English stress and rhythm in EFLT (English as Foreign Language…

  8. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  9. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  10. Does Melody Assist in the Reproduction of Novel Rhythm Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Daryl W.; Forsythe, Jere L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined music education majors' ability to reproduce rhythmic stimuli presented in melody and rhythm only conditions. Participants reproduced rhythms of two-measure music examples by immediately echo-performing through a method of their choosing (e.g., clapping, tapping, vocalizing). Forty examples were presented in melody and rhythm only…

  11. Theta-burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters the Functional Topography of the Cortical Motor Network

    PubMed Central

    NOH, Nor Azila; FUGGETTA, Giorgio; MANGANOTTI, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive tool that is able to modulate the electrical activity of the brain depending upon its protocol of stimulation. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a high-frequency TMS protocol that is able to induce prolonged plasticity changes in the brain. The induction of plasticity-like effects by TBS is useful in both experimental and therapeutic settings; however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this modulation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous TBS (cTBS) on the intrahemispheric and interhemispheric functional connectivity of the resting and active brain. Methods: A total of 26 healthy humans were randomly divided into two groups that received either real cTBS or sham (control) over the left primary motor cortex. Surface electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to quantify the changes of neural oscillations after cTBS at rest and after a choice reaction time test. The cTBS-induced EEG oscillations were computed using spectral analysis of event-related coherence (ERCoh) of theta (4–7.5 Hz), low alpha (8–9.5 Hz), high alpha (10–12.5 Hz), low beta (13–19.5 Hz), and high beta (20–30 Hz) brain rhythms. Results: We observed a global decrease in functional connectivity of the brain in the cTBS group when compared to sham in the low beta brain rhythm at rest and high beta brain rhythm during the active state. In particular, EEG spectral analysis revealed that high-frequency beta, a cortically generated brain rhythm, was the most sensitive band that was modulated by cTBS. Conclusion: Overall, our findings suggest that cTBS, a TMS protocol that mimics the mechanism of long-term depression of synaptic plasticity, modulates motor network oscillations primarily at the cortical level and might interfere with cortical information coding. PMID:27006636

  12. Development of sucking rhythm in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, M; Estabrook, M M; Robertson, S S

    1985-07-01

    We studied the ontogeny and temporal organization of non-nutritive sucking during active sleep in 6 healthy preterm infants (mean birthweight 1.1 kg (range 0.8-1.3 kg) gestational age 28.6 weeks (range 26-30 w] from 30 to 35 weeks of post-menstrual (PM) age. Recognizable rhythmical sucking bursts were recorded at 28 weeks in one infant and by 31-33 weeks in the others. Results were analyzed for the periods 30-31, 32-33 and 34-35 PM weeks. The number of bursts/min increased with age, while the duration of each burst was stable (mean 4.1 s). The pause between bursts decreased. Sucking pace within bursts increased with age which resulted in an increase in the overall rate of sucking. The coefficient of variation (CV) for intersuck time within bursts and for interburst time was computed to examine the stability of the sucking rhythm. For intersuck time the CV was relatively low and constant across ages. However, for interburst time CV was relatively large across ages. Thus, there appears to be a stability of the intraburst sucking rhythm from 30 weeks of gestation, whereas the interburst rhythm is less regular. This documentation of temporal organization in sucking from 30 weeks is one of the earliest indications of an intrinsic rhythm in human behavior.

  13. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  14. Molecular Regulation of Circadian Rhythms by Polyamines.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-01

    In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Zwighaft and colleagues (Zwighaft et al., 2015) describe a novel mechanism through which intracellular polyamines regulate circadian rhythms. These findings are significant, as they add yet another layer of complexity to the interplay between environmental, dietary, and organismal factors in the molecular control of daily behavioral oscillations.

  15. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  16. Neuroscience: A Sleep Rhythm with Multiple Facets.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ping Chai; Marshall, Lisa

    2016-09-12

    Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior.

  17. Circadian temperature rhythms of older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of studies had the aim of exploring whether older (77+ years) men and women have circadian body temperature rhythms different from those of younger adults. A total of 20 older men and 28 older women were compared with either 22 young men or 14 middle-aged men in four protocols; all but the first protocol using a subset of the sample. The four protocols were: 1) 24 h, and 2) 72 h data collections on a normal laboratory routine (sleeping at night); 3) between 36 h and 153 h of field data collection at home; and 4) 36 h of a constant conditions routine (wakeful bedrest under temporal isolation) in the laboratory. There was some evidence for an age-related phase advance in temperature rhythm, especially for the older men on a normal routine, though this was not present in the constant conditions protocol, where 5 of the older subjects showed major delays in the timing of the body temperature trough (10:00 or later). There was no statistically significant evidence from any of the protocols that older subjects generally had lower temperature rhythm amplitudes than younger adults. Only when older men were compared with younger men in 24-h rhythm amplitude by simple t-test did any comparison involving amplitude achieve statistical significance (p < 0.05).

  18. Neuroscience: A Sleep Rhythm with Multiple Facets.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ping Chai; Marshall, Lisa

    2016-09-12

    Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior. PMID:27623266

  19. Emotion and Rhythm in Critical Learning Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Hannu; Flynn, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the descriptions of learning provided by 234 College of Education students from Finland and Canada and compared them with Whitehead's (1932/1962) epistemological theory of the rhythm of mental growth. The students were asked to "Give a concrete example of a situation in which you really learned something." The…

  20. From Biological Rhythms to Social Rhythms: Physiological Precursors of Mother-Infant Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Links between neonatal biological rhythms and the emergence of interaction rhythms were examined in 3 groups (N=71): high-risk preterms (HR; birth weight less than 1,000 g), low-risk preterms (LR; birth weight=1,700-1,850 g), and full-term (FT) infants. Once a week for premature infants and on the 2nd day for FT infants, sleep-wake cyclicity was…

  1. Foraging activity rhythms of Dinoponera quadriceps (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jeniffer; Azevedo, Dina L O; Santana, Melquisedec A D; Lopes, Talita R P; Araújo, Arrilton

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the foraging activity of the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempf) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment by testing the hypotheses that foraging activity presents both daily and seasonal rhythmic variations, and that these rhythms are related to environmental variables. Four colonies of D. quadriceps were observed in an area of secondary Atlantic forest in northeastern Brazil. Data collection was performed over 72 h every three months during an annual cycle. Both daily and seasonal foraging activity rhythms of D. quadriceps colonies were related to environmental factors, but colony differences also explained part of foraging variations. Foraging activity of D. quadriceps colonies was predominantly diurnal independently of season. In the early dry season, the colonies had two activity peaks, one in the morning and another in the afternoon, with a decrease in foraging at midday; however, during the rest of the year, foraging activity was distributed more evenly throughout the daylight hours. The daily rhythm of foraging activity was likely determined by an endogenous circadian rhythm year-round, but in the dry season, temperature and relative humidity also influenced daily foraging activity, with a negative effect of temperature and a positive effect of relative humidity. On a seasonal scale, foraging activity peaked in the early dry season and suddenly declined at the end of this season, increasing again at the late rainy season. The seasonal rhythm of foraging was negatively related to relative humidity and positively related to prey availability. PMID:25525097

  2. Analyzing cardiac rhythm in the presence of chest compression artifact for automated shock advisory.

    PubMed

    Babaeizadeh, Saeed; Firoozabadi, Reza; Han, Chengzong; Helfenbein, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    Defibrillation is often required to terminate a ventricular fibrillation or fast ventricular tachycardia rhythm and resume a perfusing rhythm in sudden cardiac arrest patients. Automated external defibrillators rely on automatic ECG analysis algorithms to detect the presence of shockable rhythms before advising the rescuer to deliver a shock. For a reliable rhythm analysis, chest compression must be interrupted to prevent corruption of the ECG waveform due to the artifact induced by the mechanical activity of compressions. However, these hands-off intervals adversely affect the success of treatment. To minimize the hands-off intervals and increase the chance of successful resuscitation, we developed a method which asks for interrupting the compressions only if the underlying ECG rhythm cannot be accurately determined during chest compressions. Using this method only a small percentage of cases need compressions interruption, hence a significant reduction in hands-off time is achieved. Our algorithm comprises a novel filtering technique for the ECG and thoracic impedance waveforms, and an innovative method to combine analysis from both filtered and unfiltered data. Requiring compression interruption for only 14% of cases, our algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 99%.

  3. Effect of spaceflight on the circadian rhythm, lifespan and gene expression of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lingling; Ma, Jun; Xu, Kanyan

    2015-01-01

    Space travelers are reported to experience circadian rhythm disruption during spaceflight. However, how the space environment affects circadian rhythm is yet to be determined. The major focus of this study was to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the Drosophila circadian clock at both the behavioral and molecular level. We used China's Shenzhou-9 spaceship to carry Drosophila. After 13 days of spaceflight, behavior tests showed that the flies maintained normal locomotor activity rhythm and sleep pattern. The expression level and rhythm of major clock genes were also unaffected. However, expression profiling showed differentially regulated output genes of the circadian clock system between space flown and control flies, suggesting that spaceflight affected the circadian output pathway. We also investigated other physiological effects of spaceflight such as lipid metabolism and lifespan, and searched genes significantly affected by spaceflight using microarray analysis. These results provide new information on the effects of spaceflight on circadian rhythm, lipid metabolism and lifespan. Furthermore, we showed that studying the effect of spaceflight on gene expression using samples collected at different Zeitgeber time could obtain different results, suggesting the importance of appropriate sampling procedures in studies on the effects of spaceflight.

  4. Rhythms in cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, free fatty acids, and triglycerides in blood of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bitman, J; Wood, D L; Lefcourt, A M

    1990-04-01

    Blood samples from six lactating dairy cows were analyzed to determine whether circulating neutral lipids exhibit rhythmic variations. Plasma neutral lipids were measured by quantitative TLC on every fourth integrated 15-min blood sample taken over 48-h periods. Cows were housed in an environmental chamber at 20 degrees C with 16 h light:8 h dark (lights on at 0700 h), fed daily at 0900 h, and milked at 0830 and 2000 h. Other variables monitored included: body temperature, ammonia nitrogen, urea nitrogen, glucose, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, somatotropin, insulin, cortisol, and prolactin. Mean concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, free fatty acids, and triglycerides were 21.4, 175.4, 3.1, and 6.3 mg/dl, respectively. Visual and power spectral analysis of the pulsatile fluctuations in lipids indicated rhythms with periods of 2 to 3 h. Amplitudes of rhythms for free fatty acids and triglycerides were 60% of mean concentrations and for cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were 20% of mean concentrations. The presence of these rhythms was conserved when data were averaged across time by cow. However, because of nonstationary conditions, rhythms identified by spectral analysis were not statistically significant. There was no evidence of circadian patterns in circulating neutral lipid components. All other metabolic and hormonal variables except cortisol exhibited distinct circadian rhythms. PMID:2345205

  5. Effect of Spaceflight on the Circadian Rhythm, Lifespan and Gene Expression of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kanyan

    2015-01-01

    Space travelers are reported to experience circadian rhythm disruption during spaceflight. However, how the space environment affects circadian rhythm is yet to be determined. The major focus of this study was to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the Drosophila circadian clock at both the behavioral and molecular level. We used China’s Shenzhou-9 spaceship to carry Drosophila. After 13 days of spaceflight, behavior tests showed that the flies maintained normal locomotor activity rhythm and sleep pattern. The expression level and rhythm of major clock genes were also unaffected. However, expression profiling showed differentially regulated output genes of the circadian clock system between space flown and control flies, suggesting that spaceflight affected the circadian output pathway. We also investigated other physiological effects of spaceflight such as lipid metabolism and lifespan, and searched genes significantly affected by spaceflight using microarray analysis. These results provide new information on the effects of spaceflight on circadian rhythm, lipid metabolism and lifespan. Furthermore, we showed that studying the effect of spaceflight on gene expression using samples collected at different Zeitgeber time could obtain different results, suggesting the importance of appropriate sampling procedures in studies on the effects of spaceflight. PMID:25798821

  6. Novel Pharmacological Targets for the Rhythm Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Burashnikov, Alexander; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing clinical problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Development of safe and effective pharmacological treatments for AF is one of the greatest unmet medical needs facing our society. In spite of significant progress in non-pharmacological AF treatments (largely due to the use of catheter ablation techniques), anti-arrhythmic agents (AADs) remain first line therapy for rhythm control management of AF for most AF patients. When considering efficacy, safety and tolerability, currently available AADs for rhythm control of AF are less than optimal. Ion channel inhibition remains the principal strategy for termination of AF and prevention of its recurrence. Practical clinical experience indicates that multi-ion channel blockers are generally more optimal for rhythm control of AF compared to ion channel-selective blockers. Recent studies suggest that atrial-selective sodium channel block can lead to safe and effective suppression of AF and that concurrent inhibition of potassium ion channels may potentiate this effect. An important limitation of the ion channel block approach for AF treatment is that non-electrical factors (largely structural remodeling) may importantly determine the generation of AF, so that “upstream therapy”, aimed at preventing or reversing structural remodeling, may be required for effective rhythm control management. This review focuses on novel pharmacological targets for the rhythm control management of AF. PMID:21867730

  7. Circadian rhythm of autophagy proteins in hippocampus is blunted by sleep fragmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J; Harrison, Laura M; Pan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for normal cellular survival and activity. Circadian rhythms of autophagy have been studied in several peripheral organs but not yet reported in the brain. Here, we measured the circadian rhythm of autophagy-related proteins in mouse hippocampus and tested the effect of sleep fragmentation (SF). Expressions of the autophagy-related proteins microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and beclin were determined by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Both the hippocampal LC3 signal and the ratio of its lipid-conjugated form LC3-II to its cytosolic form LC3-I showed a 24 h rhythm. The peak was seen at ZT6 (1 pm) and the nadir at ZT16 (1 am). The LC3 immunoreactivity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons also distributed differently, with more diffuse cytoplasmic appearance at ZT16. Chronic SF had a mild effect to disrupt the 24 h rhythm of LC3 and beclin expression. Interestingly, a greater effect of SF was seen after 24 h of recovery sleep when LC3-II expression was attenuated at both the peak and trough of circadian activities. Overall, the results show for the first time that the hippocampus has a distinct rhythm of autophagy that can be altered by SF.

  8. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  9. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  10. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    SciTech Connect

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  11. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  12. Daily rhythms in plasma levels of homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Lena; Lavie, Peretz

    2004-01-01

    Background There is accumulated evidence that plasma concentration of the sulfur-containing amino-acid homocysteine (Hcy) is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Both fasting levels of Hcy and post methionine loading levels are used as prognostic markers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of a daily rhythm in plasma Hcy under strictly controlled nutritional and sleep-wake conditions. We also investigated if the time during which methionine loading is performed, i.e., morning or evening, had a different effect on the resultant plasma Hcy concentration. Methods Six healthy men aged 23–26 years participated in 4 experiments. In the first and second experiments, the daily rhythm in Hcy as well as in other amino acids was investigated under a normal or an inverse sleep-wake cycle. In the third and fourth, Hcy concentrations were investigated after a morning and evening methionine loading. To standardize food consumption in the first two experiments, subjects received every 3 hours 150 ml of specially designed low-protein liquid food (Ensure® formula). Results In both the first and second experiments there was a significant daily rhythm in Hcy concentrations with a mid-day nadir and a nocturnal peak. Strikingly different 24-h patterns were observed in methionine, leucine, isoleucine and tyrosine. In all, the 24-h curves revealed a strong influence of both the sleep-wake cycle and the feeding schedule. Methionine loading resulted in increased plasma Hcy levels during both morning and evening experiments, which were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions There is a daily rhythm in plasma concentration of the amino acid Hcy, and this rhythm is independent of sleep-wake and food consumption. In view of the fact that increased Hcy concentrations may be associated with increased cardiovascular risks, these findings may have clinical implications for the health of rotating shift workers. PMID:15347422

  13. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths' Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  14. The Validity and Reliability of Rhythm Measurements in Automatically Scoring the English Rhythm Proficiency of Chinese EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Lin, Jianghao; Li, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to find out the validity of rhythm measurements to capture the rhythmic features of Chinese English. Besides, the reliability of the valid rhythm measurements applied in automatically scoring the English rhythm proficiency of Chinese EFL learners is also explored. Thus, two experiments were carried out. First, thirty students of…

  15. Free-running circadian rhythms of muscle strength, reaction time, and body temperature in totally blind people.

    PubMed

    Squarcini, Camila Fabiana Rossi; Pires, Maria Laura Nogueira; Lopes, Cleide; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Esteves, Andrea Maculano; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine; Matarazzo, Carolina; Garcia, Danilo; da Silva, Maria Stella Peccin; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2013-01-01

    Light is the major synchronizer of circadian rhythms. In the absence of light, as for totally blind people, some variables, such as body temperature, have an endogenous period that is longer than 24 h and tend to be free running. However, the circadian rhythm of muscle strength and reaction time in totally blind people has not been defined in the literature. The objective of this study was to determine the period of the endogenous circadian rhythm of the isometric and isokinetic contraction strength and simple reaction time of totally blind people. The study included six totally blind people with free-running circadian rhythms and four sighted people (control group). Although the control group required only a single session to determine the circadian rhythm, the blind people required three sessions to determine the endogenous period. In each session, isometric strength, isokinetic strength, reaction time, and body temperature were collected six different times a day with an interval of at least 8 h. The control group had better performance for strength and reaction time in the afternoon. For the blind, this performance became delayed throughout the day. Therefore, we conclude that the circadian rhythms of strength and simple reaction time of totally blind people are within their free-running periods. For some professionals, like the blind paralympic athletes, activities that require large physiological capacities in which the maximum stimulus should match the ideal time of competition may result in the blind athletes falling short of their expected performance under this free-running condition.

  16. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG), and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review. PMID:24847217

  17. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Causton, Helen C.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Ziegler, Christine A.; O’Neill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment [1, 2]. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms [1, 3, 4]. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla [3, 5]. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate [6]. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins [7–9]. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast [10]. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock. PMID:25866393

  18. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  19. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  20. Seizure-like thalamocortical rhythms initiate in the deep layers of the cortex in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brendan E L; Kyi, Mervyn; Reid, Christopher A; Myers, Damian E; Xu, Shenghong; Williams, David A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2011-01-01

    The oscillatory rhythms underlying many physiological and pathological states, including absence seizures, require both the thalamus and cortices for full expression. A co-culture preparation combining cortical and thalamic explants provides a unique model for investigating how such oscillations initiate and spread. Here we investigated the dynamics of synchronized thalamocortical activity by simultaneous measurement of field-potential recordings and rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients by fluorescence methods. Spontaneous sustained hypersynchronized "seizure-like" oscillations required reciprocal cortico-thalamocortical connections. Isolated cortical explants can independently develop brief discharges, while thalamic explants alone were unable to do so. Rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients demonstrated deep-layer cortical initiation of oscillatory network activity in both connected and isolated explants. Further, cortical explants derived from a rat model of genetic absence epilepsy showed increased bursting duration consistent with an excitable cortex. We propose that thalamocortical oscillatory network activity initiates in deep layers of the cortex with reciprocal thalamic interconnections enabling sustained hyper-synchronization.

  1. Melatonin Entrains PER2::LUC Bioluminescence Circadian Rhythm in the Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Davidson, Alec J.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported the presence of a circadian rhythm in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) bioluminescence in mouse photoreceptors, retina, RPE, and cornea. Melatonin (MLT) modulates many physiological functions in the eye and it is believed to be one of the key circadian signals within the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm in mouse cornea and to determine the role played by MLT. Methods Corneas were obtained from PER2::LUC mice and cultured to measure bioluminescence rhythmicity in isolated tissue using a Lumicycle or CCD camera. To determine the time-dependent resetting of the corneal circadian clocks in response to MLT or IIK7 (a melatonin type 2 receptor, MT2, agonist) was added to the cultured corneas at different times of the day. We also defined the location of the MT2 receptor within different corneal layers using immunohistochemistry. Results A long-lasting bioluminescence rhythm was recorded from cultured PER2::LUC cornea and PER2::LUC signal was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. MLT administration in the early night delayed the cornea rhythm, whereas administration of MLT at late night to early morning advanced the cornea rhythm. Treatment with IIK7 mimicked the MLT phase-shifting effect. Consistent with these results, MT2 immunoreactivity was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. Conclusions Our work demonstrates that MLT entrains the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythm in the cornea. Our data indicate that the cornea may represent a model to study the molecular mechanisms by which MLT affects the circadian clock. PMID:26207312

  2. Maternal obesity and post-natal high fat diet disrupt hepatic circadian rhythm in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of obese (Ob) rat dams gain greater body wt and fat mass when fed high-fat diet (HFD) as compared to controls. Alterations of diurnal circadian rhythm are known to detrimentally impact metabolically active tissues such as liver. We sought to determine if maternal obesity (MOb) leads to p...

  3. The Effect of Peer-Based Instruction on Rhythm Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of peer-based instruction on rhythm reading achievement of instrumental and choral music students attending a large urbanfringe high school in a major metropolitan area. Participants (N = 131) included band (n = 71) and choir (n = 60) students whose backgrounds reflected extensive economic (78%…

  4. Cortical organization in shrews: evidence from five species.

    PubMed

    Catania, K C; Lyon, D C; Mock, O B; Kaas, J H

    1999-07-19

    Cortical organization was examined in five shrew species. In three species, Blarina brevicauda, Cryptotis parva, and Sorex palustris, microelectrode recordings were made in cortex to determine the organization of sensory areas. Cortical recordings were then related to flattened sections of cortex processed for cytochrome oxidase or myelin to reveal architectural borders. An additional two species (Sorex cinereus and Sorex longirostris) with visible cortical subdivisions based on histology alone were analyzed without electrophysiological mapping. A single basic plan of cortical organization was found in shrews, consisting of a few clearly defined sensory areas located caudally in cortex. Two somatosensory areas contained complete representations of the contralateral body, corresponding to primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). A small primary visual cortex (V1) was located closely adjacent to S1, whereas auditory cortex (A1) was located in extreme caudolateral cortex, partially encircled by S2. Areas did not overlap and had sharp, histochemically apparent and electrophysiologically defined borders. The adjacency of these areas suggests a complete absence of intervening higher level or association areas. Based on a previous study of corticospinal connections, a presumptive primary motor cortex (M1) was identified directly rostral to S1. Apparently, in shrews, the solution to having extremely little neocortex is to have only a few small cortical subdivisions. However, the small areas remain discrete, well organized, and functional. This cortical organization in shrews is likely a derived condition, because a wide range of extant mammals have a greater number of cortical subdivisions. PMID:10397395

  5. Phase sensitivity analysis of circadian rhythm entrainment.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Doyle, Francis J

    2007-04-01

    As a biological clock, circadian rhythms evolve to accomplish a stable (robust) entrainment to environmental cycles, of which light is the most obvious. The mechanism of photic entrainment is not known, but two models of entrainment have been proposed based on whether light has a continuous (parametric) or discrete (nonparametric) effect on the circadian pacemaker. A novel sensitivity analysis is developed to study the circadian entrainment in silico based on a limit cycle approach and applied to a model of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The comparative analyses of complete and skeleton photoperiods suggest a trade-off between the contribution of period modulation (parametric effect) and phase shift (nonparametric effect) in Drosophila circadian entrainment. The results also give suggestions for an experimental study to (in)validate the two models of entrainment.

  6. Circadian rhythms, athletic performance, and jet lag

    PubMed Central

    Manfredini, R.; Manfredini, F.; Fersini, C.; Conconi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid air travel across several time zones exposes the traveller to a shift in his/her internal biological clock. The result is a transient desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, called jet lag, lasting until the rhythm is rephased to the new environmental conditions. The most commonly experienced symptoms are sleep disorders, difficulties with concentrating, irritability, depression, fatigue, disorientation, loss of appetite, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Apart from the decrements in mental and physical performance directly consequent on such symptoms, competitive athletes are also exposed to the additional negative consequences of a shift from the optimal circadian window of performance. A brief summary of the possible negative effects of jet lag on athletic performance and potentially alleviating strategies is given. 




 PMID:9631214

  7. Caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ishida, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Although caffeine alters sleep in many animals, whether or not it affects mammalian circadian clocks remains unknown. Here, we found that incubating cultured mammalian cell lines, human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, with caffeine lengthened the period of circadian rhythms. Adding caffeine to ex vivo cultures also lengthened the circadian period in mouse liver explants from Per2::Luciferase reporter gene knockin mice, and caused a phase delay in brain slices containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the central circadian clock in mammals is located. Furthermore, chronic caffeine consumption ad libitum for a week delayed the phase of the mouse liver clock in vivo under 12 h light-dark conditions and lengthened the period of circadian locomotor rhythms in mice under constant darkness. Our results showed that caffeine alters circadian clocks in mammalian cells in vitro and in the mouse ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21684260

  8. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues.

  9. Sex-dependent gene regulatory networks of the heart rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, S.; Thomas, N.; Spray, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression level, control, and intercoordination of 66 selected heart rhythm determinant (HRD) genes were compared in atria and ventricles of four male and four female adult mice. We found that genes encoding various adrenergic receptors, ankyrins, ion channels and transporters, connexins, cadherins, plakophilins, and other components of the intercalated discs form a complex network that is chamber dependent and differs between the two sexes. In addition, most HRD genes in atria had higher expression in males than in females, while in ventricles, expression levels were mostly higher in females than in males. Moreover, significant chamber differences were observed between the sexes, with higher expression in atria than ventricles for males and higher expression in ventricles than atria for females. We have ranked the selected genes according to their prominence (new concept) within the HRD gene web defined as extent of expression coordination with the other web genes and stability of expression. Interestingly, the prominence hierarchy was substantially different between the two sexes. Taken together, these findings indicate that the organizational principles of the heart rhythm transcriptome are sex dependent, with the newly introduced prominence analysis allowing identification of genes that are pivotal for the sexual dichotomy. PMID:19756788

  10. Reported Drosophila courtship song rhythms are artifacts of data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a series of landmark papers, Kyriacou, Hall, and colleagues reported that the average inter-pulse interval of Drosophila melanogaster male courtship song varies rhythmically (KH cycles), that the period gene controls this rhythm, and that evolution of the period gene determines species differences in the rhythm’s frequency. Several groups failed to recover KH cycles, but this may have resulted from differences in recording chamber size. Results Here, using recording chambers of the same dimensions as used by Kyriacou and Hall, I found no compelling evidence for KH cycles at any frequency. By replicating the data analysis procedures employed by Kyriacou and Hall, I found that two factors - data binned into 10-second intervals and short recordings - imposed non-significant periodicity in the frequency range reported for KH cycles. Randomized data showed similar patterns. Conclusions All of the results related to KH cycles are likely to be artifacts of binning data from short songs. Reported genotypic differences in KH cycles cannot be explained by this artifact and may have resulted from the use of small sample sizes and/or from the exclusion of samples that did not exhibit song rhythms. PMID:24965095

  11. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  12. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  13. Speech timing and linguistic rhythm: on the acoustic bases of rhythm typologies.

    PubMed

    Rathcke, Tamara V; Smith, Rachel H

    2015-05-01

    Research into linguistic rhythm has been dominated by the idea that languages can be classified according to rhythmic templates, amenable to assessment by acoustic measures of vowel and consonant durations. This study tested predictions of two proposals explaining the bases of rhythmic typologies: the Rhythm Class Hypothesis which assumes that the templates arise from an extensive vs a limited use of durational contrasts, and the Control and Compensation Hypothesis which proposes that the templates are rooted in more vs less flexible speech production strategies. Temporal properties of segments, syllables and rhythmic feet were examined in two accents of British English, a "stress-timed" variety from Leeds, and a "syllable-timed" variety spoken by Panjabi-English bilinguals from Bradford. Rhythm metrics were calculated. A perception study confirmed that the speakers of the two varieties differed in their perceived rhythm. The results revealed that both typologies were informative in that to a certain degree, they predicted temporal patterns of the two varieties. None of the metrics tested was capable of adequately reflecting the temporal complexity found in the durational data. These findings contribute to the critical evaluation of the explanatory adequacy of rhythm metrics. Acoustic bases and limitations of the traditional rhythmic typologies are discussed.

  14. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) levels. Adjustment for circadian BP rhythm status ascribed this finding exclusively to non-dippers (p<0.01). Two months after delivery, in 11 of the 21 non-dippers both circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  15. Uncovering Different Masking Factors on Wrist Skin Temperature Rhythm in Free-Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Nicolas, Antonio; Ortiz-Tudela, Elisabet; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Most circadian rhythms are controlled by a major pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Some of these rhythms, called marker rhythms, serve to characterize the timing of the internal temporal order. However, these variables are susceptible to masking effects as the result of activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep. Recently, wrist skin temperature (WT) has been proposed as a new index for evaluating circadian system status. In light of previous evidence suggesting the important relationship between WT and core body temperature regulation, the aim of this work was to purify the WT pattern in order to obtain its endogenous rhythm with the application of multiple demasking procedures. To this end, 103 subjects (18–24 years old) were recruited and their WT, activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep were recorded under free-living conditions for 1 week. WT demasking by categories or intercepts was applied to simulate a “constant routine” protocol (awakening, dim light, recumbent position, low activity and warm environmental temperature). Although the overall circadian pattern of WT was similar regardless of the masking effects, its amplitude was the rhythmic parameter most affected by environmental conditions. The acrophase and mesor were determined to be the most robust parameters for characterizing this rhythm. In addition, a circadian modulation of the masking effect was found for each masking variable. WT rhythm exhibits a strong endogenous component, despite the existence of multiple external influences. This was evidenced by simultaneously eliminating the influence of activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep. We therefore propose that it could be considered a valuable and minimally-invasive means of recording circadian physiology in ambulatory conditions. PMID:23577201

  16. Uncovering different masking factors on wrist skin temperature rhythm in free-living subjects.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Nicolas, Antonio; Ortiz-Tudela, Elisabet; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Most circadian rhythms are controlled by a major pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Some of these rhythms, called marker rhythms, serve to characterize the timing of the internal temporal order. However, these variables are susceptible to masking effects as the result of activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep. Recently, wrist skin temperature (WT) has been proposed as a new index for evaluating circadian system status. In light of previous evidence suggesting the important relationship between WT and core body temperature regulation, the aim of this work was to purify the WT pattern in order to obtain its endogenous rhythm with the application of multiple demasking procedures. To this end, 103 subjects (18-24 years old) were recruited and their WT, activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep were recorded under free-living conditions for 1 week. WT demasking by categories or intercepts was applied to simulate a "constant routine" protocol (awakening, dim light, recumbent position, low activity and warm environmental temperature). Although the overall circadian pattern of WT was similar regardless of the masking effects, its amplitude was the rhythmic parameter most affected by environmental conditions. The acrophase and mesor were determined to be the most robust parameters for characterizing this rhythm. In addition, a circadian modulation of the masking effect was found for each masking variable. WT rhythm exhibits a strong endogenous component, despite the existence of multiple external influences. This was evidenced by simultaneously eliminating the influence of activity, body position, light exposure, environmental temperature and sleep. We therefore propose that it could be considered a valuable and minimally-invasive means of recording circadian physiology in ambulatory conditions.

  17. On the Role of Histamine Receptors in the Regulation of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Stanislav V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a regulatory role of histamine in circadian rhythms, but little is known about signaling pathways that would be involved in such a putative role. The aim of this study was to examine whether histamine mediates its effects on the circadian system through Hrh1 or Hrh3 receptors. We assessed both diurnal and free-running locomotor activity rhythms of Hrh1-/- and Hrh3-/- mice. We also determined the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, several areas of the cerebral cortex and striatum under symmetric 24 h light-dark cycle at zeitgeber times 14 and 6 by using radioactive in situ hybridization. We found no differences between Hrh1-/- and wild type mice in the length, amplitude and mesor of diurnal and free-running activity rhythms as well as in expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in any of the examined brain structures. The amplitude of free-running activity rhythm of the Hrh3-/- mice was significantly flattened, whereas the expression of the clock genes in Hrh3-/- mice was similar to the wild type animals in all of the assessed brain structures. Therefore, the knockout of Hrh1 receptor had no effects on the circadian rhythm of spontaneous locomotion, and a knockout of Hrh3 receptor caused a substantial reduction of free-running activity rhythm amplitude, but none of these knockout models affected the expression patterns of the core clock genes in any of the studied brain structures. PMID:26660098

  18. Time-restricted feeding entrains daily rhythms of energy metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoko; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2006-05-01

    Energy metabolism, oxygen consumption rate (VO2), and respiratory quotient (RQ) in mice were monitored continuously throughout 12:12-h light-dark cycles before, during, and after time-restricted feeding (RF). Mice fed ad libitum showed robust daily rhythms in both parameters: high during the dark phase and low during the light phase. The daily profile of energy metabolism in mice under daytime-only feeding was reversed at the beginning of the first fasting night. A few days after daytime-only feeding began, RF also reversed the circadian core body temperature rhythm. Moreover, RF for 6 consecutive days shifted the phases of circadian expression patterns of clock genes in liver significantly by 8-10 h. When mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet ad libitum, the daily rhythm of RQ dampened day by day and disappeared on the sixth day of RF, whereas VO2 showed a robust daily rhythm. Mice fed HF only in the daytime had reversed VO2 and RQ rhythms. Similarly, mice fed HF only in the daytime significantly phase shifted the clock gene expression in liver, whereas ad libitum feeding with HF had no significant effect on the expression phases of liver clock genes. These results suggested that VO2 is a sensitive indicator of entrainment in the mouse liver. Moreover, physiologically, it can be determined without any surgery or constraint. On the basis of these results, we hypothesize that a change in the daily VO2 rhythm, independent of the energy source, might drive phase shifts of circadian oscillators in peripheral tissues, at least in the liver.

  19. Circadian Rhythm Disruption in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Savvidis, Christos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes. PMID:22811066

  20. Tonic Neuromodulation of the Inspiratory Rhythm Generator

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (“tonic”) neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea) as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity. PMID:22934010

  1. Subjective alertness rhythms in elderly people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in the circadian rhythm of subjective alertness and to explore the circadian mechanisms underlying such changes. Using a visual analogue scale (VAS) instrument, 25 older men and women (71 y and older; 15 female, 10 male) rated their subjective alertness about 7 times per day during 5 baseline days of temporal isolation during which habitual bedtimes and waketimes were enforced. Comparisons were made with 13 middle-aged men (37-52 y) experiencing the same protocol. Advancing age (particularly in the men) resulted in less rhythmic alertness patterns, as indicated by lower amplitudes and less reliability of fitted 24-h sinusoids. This appeared in spite of the absence of any reliable age-related diminution in circadian temperature rhythm amplitude, thus suggesting the effect was not due to SCN weakness per se, but to weakened transduction of SCN output. In a further experiment, involving 36 h of constant wakeful bedrest, differences in the amplitude of the alertness rhythm were observed between 9 older men (79 y+), 7 older women (79 y+), and 17 young controls (9 males, 8 females, 19-28 y) suggesting that with advancing age (particularly in men) there is less rhythmic input into subjective alertness from the endogenous circadian pacemaker. These results may explain some of the nocturnal insomnia and daytime hypersomnia that afflict many elderly people.

  2. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol.

  3. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badra, L. J.; Cooke, W. H.; Hoag, J. B.; Crossman, A. A.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of three types of breathing [spontaneous, frequency controlled (0.25 Hz), and hyperventilation with 100% oxygen] and apnea on R-R interval, photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic rhythms in nine healthy young adults. We integrated fast Fourier transform power spectra over low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory (0.15-0.3 Hz) frequencies; estimated vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex gain at low frequencies with cross-spectral techniques; and used partial coherence analysis to remove the influence of breathing from the R-R interval, systolic pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve spectra. Coherence among signals varied as functions of both frequency and time. Partialization abolished the coherence among these signals at respiratory but not at low frequencies. The mode of breathing did not influence low-frequency oscillations, and they persisted during apnea. Our study documents the independence of low-frequency rhythms from respiratory activity and suggests that the close correlations that may exist among arterial pressures, R-R intervals, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity at respiratory frequencies result from the influence of respiration on these measures rather than from arterial baroreflex physiology. Most importantly, our results indicate that correlations among autonomic and hemodynamic rhythms vary over time and frequency, and, thus, are facultative rather than fixed.

  4. Investigating repetition and change in musical rhythm by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, A; Otnæss, M K; Jensen, J; Williams, S C R; Ostberg, B C

    2014-09-01

    Groove-based rhythm is a basic and much appreciated feature of Western popular music. It is commonly associated with dance, movement and pleasure and is characterized by the repetition of a basic rhythmic pattern. At various points in the musical course, drum breaks occur, representing a change compared to the repeated pattern of the groove. In the present experiment, we investigated the brain response to such drum breaks in a repetitive groove. Participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a previously unheard naturalistic groove with drum breaks at uneven intervals. The rhythmic pattern and the timing of its different parts as performed were the only aspects that changed from the repetitive sections to the breaks. Differences in blood oxygen level-dependent activation were analyzed. In contrast to the repetitive parts, the drum breaks activated the left cerebellum, the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and the superior temporal gyri (STG) bilaterally. A tapping test using the same stimulus showed an increase in the standard deviation of inter-tap-intervals in the breaks versus the repetitive parts, indicating extra challenges for auditory-motor integration in the drum breaks. Both the RIFG and STG have been associated with structural irregularity and increase in musical-syntactical complexity in several earlier studies, whereas the left cerebellum is known to play a part in timing. Together these areas may be recruited in the breaks due to a prediction error process whereby the internal model is being updated. This concurs with previous research suggesting a network for predictive feed-forward control that comprises the cerebellum and the cortical areas that were activated in the breaks. PMID:24972303

  5. Effect of tidal cycle and food intake on the baseline plasma corticosterone rhythm in intertidally foraging marine iguanas.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Sarah K; Painter, Danika L; Moore, Michael C; Wikelski, Martin; Romero, L Michael

    2003-06-15

    In most species, plasma levels of baseline glucocorticoids such as corticosterone (B) have a circadian rhythm. This rhythm can be entrained by both photoperiod and food intake and is related to aspects of energy intake and metabolism. Marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) offer a unique opportunity to better understand the relative importance of the light:dark cycle versus food intake in influencing the rhythm in baseline B in a natural system. Compared to other species, food intake is not as strictly determined by the phase of the light:dark cycle. Animals feed in the intertidal zone so feeding activity is heavily influenced by the tidal cycle. We measured baseline plasma B levels in free-living iguanas over several 24-h periods that varied in the timing of low tide/foraging activity. We found that baseline B levels were higher during the day relative to night. However, when low tide occurred during the day, baseline B levels dropped coincident with the timing of low tide. Whether the baseline B rhythm (including the drop during foraging) is an endogenous rhythm with a circatidal component, or is simply a result of feeding and associated physiological changes needs to be tested. Together, these data suggest that the baseline B rhythm in marine iguanas is influenced by the tidal cycle/food intake as well as the light:dark cycle.

  6. The effect of paired pitch, rhythm, and speech on working memory as measured by sequential digit recall.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Educational and therapeutic objectives are often paired with music to facilitate the recall of information. The purpose of this study was to isolate and determine the effect of paired pitch, rhythm, and speech on undergraduate's memory as measured by sequential digit recall performance. Participants (N = 120) listened to 4 completely counterbalanced treatment conditions each consisting of 9 randomized monosyllabic digits paired with speech, pitch, rhythm, and the combination of pitch and rhythm. No statistically significant learning or order effects were found across the 4 trials. A 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a statistically significant difference in digit recall performance across treatment conditions, positions, groups, and treatment by position. No other comparisons resulted in statistically significant differences. Participants were able to recall digits from the rhythm condition most accurately while recalling digits from the speech and pitch only conditions the least accurately. Consistent with previous research, the music major participants scored significantly higher than non-music major participants and the main effect associated with serial position indicated that recall performance was best during primacy and recency positions. Analyses indicated an interaction between serial position and treatment condition, also a result consistent with previous research. The results of this study suggest that pairing information with rhythm can facilitate recall but pairing information with pitch or the combination of pitch and rhythm may not enhance recall more than speech when participants listen to an unfamiliar musical selection only once. Implications for practice in therapy and education are made as well as suggestions for future research.

  7. Spatial integration and cortical dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C D; Das, A; Ito, M; Kapadia, M; Westheimer, G

    1996-01-01

    Cells in adult primary visual cortex are capable of integrating information over much larger portions of the visual field than was originally thought. Moreover, their receptive field properties can be altered by the context within which local features are presented and by changes in visual experience. The substrate for both spatial integration and cortical plasticity is likely to be found in a plexus of long-range horizontal connections, formed by cortical pyramidal cells, which link cells within each cortical area over distances of 6-8 mm. The relationship between horizontal connections and cortical functional architecture suggests a role in visual segmentation and spatial integration. The distribution of lateral interactions within striate cortex was visualized with optical recording, and their functional consequences were explored by using comparable stimuli in human psychophysical experiments and in recordings from alert monkeys. They may represent the substrate for perceptual phenomena such as illusory contours, surface fill-in, and contour saliency. The dynamic nature of receptive field properties and cortical architecture has been seen over time scales ranging from seconds to months. One can induce a remapping of the topography of visual cortex by making focal binocular retinal lesions. Shorter-term plasticity of cortical receptive fields was observed following brief periods of visual stimulation. The mechanisms involved entailed, for the short-term changes, altering the effectiveness of existing cortical connections, and for the long-term changes, sprouting of axon collaterals and synaptogenesis. The mutability of cortical function implies a continual process of calibration and normalization of the perception of visual attributes that is dependent on sensory experience throughout adulthood and might further represent the mechanism of perceptual learning. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8570604

  8. Studies of cortical interactions over short periods of time during the search for verbal associations.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A R; Ivanitskii, G A; Ivanitskii, A M

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between cortical areas were studied during the search for verbal associations and reading of words. The functional anatomy and the sequence of involvement of cortical areas during the solution of these tasks have been described previously, in studies using positron emission tomography and multichannel recordings of evoked potentials combined with identification of the locations of dipole sources [8, 9, 19, 25]. Cortical interactions reflected in terms of the synchronization of EEG rhythms were studied by developing a method based on correlating curve wavelets, which allows the moments at which this synchronization occurs to be identified over short periods of time comparable with the speeds of individual thought operations (up to 100 msec). Three main stages were identified in the search for associations. During the first 200 msec after stimulus presentation, cortical connections were seen between the right and left frontal areas; at 200-500 msec, there were connections between the frontal and the temporal-parietal areas; finally, at 450-700 sec, there were connections between the left temporal and the right frontal-central-temporal areas. These results are in good agreement with data obtained previously using other methods and supplement them with mapping data on cortical connections. A number of differences in the mechanisms of information processing during the search for associations and reading were also identified.

  9. Individual Differences in Rhythmic Cortical Entrainment Correlate with Predictive Behavior in Sensorimotor Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle; Keller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims at characterizing the mechanisms that allow humans to entrain the mind and body to incoming rhythmic sensory inputs in real time. We addressed this unresolved issue by examining the relationship between covert neural processes and overt behavior in the context of musical rhythm. We measured temporal prediction abilities, sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and neural entrainment to auditory rhythms as captured using an EEG frequency-tagging approach. Importantly, movement synchronization accuracy with a rhythmic beat could be explained by the amplitude of neural activity selectively locked with the beat period when listening to the rhythmic inputs. Furthermore, stronger endogenous neural entrainment at the beat frequency was associated with superior temporal prediction abilities. Together, these results reveal a direct link between cortical and behavioral measures of rhythmic entrainment, thus providing evidence that frequency-tagged brain activity has functional relevance for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:26847160

  10. Mechanisms of cortical neural synchronization related to healthy and impaired consciousness: evidence by quantitative electroencephalographic studies.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Buffo, Paola; Iacoboni, Marco; Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Sara, Marco; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we review the contribution of our research group to the study of human consciousness by quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques. We posit that EEG techniques can be extremely useful for a direct measurement of brain electrophysiological activity related to human consciousness for their unsurpassable high temporal resolution (milliseconds). This activity can be expressed in terms of event-related potentials as well as changes of EEG rhythms of interest, for example the dominant alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz). The results of our studies, and those of several independent groups, lead support to the hypothesis that these techniques provide important insights about the neurophysiologic mechanisms underlying cortical neural synchronization/desynchronization and the regulation of neuromodulatory systems (e.g. dopaminergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic, etc.) at the basis of brain arousal and consciousness in healthy subjects and in patients with impairment of the consciousness. A possible interaction of these mechanisms and the drugs administered to patients with consciousness disorders is discussed.

  11. Individual Differences in Rhythmic Cortical Entrainment Correlate with Predictive Behavior in Sensorimotor Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle; Keller, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims at characterizing the mechanisms that allow humans to entrain the mind and body to incoming rhythmic sensory inputs in real time. We addressed this unresolved issue by examining the relationship between covert neural processes and overt behavior in the context of musical rhythm. We measured temporal prediction abilities, sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and neural entrainment to auditory rhythms as captured using an EEG frequency-tagging approach. Importantly, movement synchronization accuracy with a rhythmic beat could be explained by the amplitude of neural activity selectively locked with the beat period when listening to the rhythmic inputs. Furthermore, stronger endogenous neural entrainment at the beat frequency was associated with superior temporal prediction abilities. Together, these results reveal a direct link between cortical and behavioral measures of rhythmic entrainment, thus providing evidence that frequency-tagged brain activity has functional relevance for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:26847160

  12. The influence of biological rhythms on host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Bakker, Micaela; Helm, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Biological rhythms, from circadian control of cellular processes to annual cycles in life history, are a main structural element of biology. Biological rhythms are considered adaptive because they enable organisms to partition activities to cope with, and take advantage of, predictable fluctuations in environmental conditions. A flourishing area of immunology is uncovering rhythms in the immune system of animals, including humans. Given the temporal structure of immunity, and rhythms in parasite activity and disease incidence, we propose that the intersection of chronobiology, disease ecology, and evolutionary biology holds the key to understanding host-parasite interactions. Here, we review host-parasite interactions while explicitly considering biological rhythms, and propose that rhythms: influence within-host infection dynamics and transmission between hosts, might account for diel and annual periodicity in host-parasite systems, and can lead to a host-parasite arms race in the temporal domain.

  13. Entrainment of neocortical neurons and gamma oscillations by the hippocampal theta rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Anton; Montgomery, Sean; Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Zugaro, Michael; Buzsáki, György

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although it has been tacitly assumed that the hippocampus exerts an influence on neocortical networks, the mechanisms of this process are not well understood. We examined whether and how hippocampal theta oscillations affect neocortical assembly patterns by recording populations of single cells and transient gamma oscillations in multiple cortical regions, including the somatosensory area and prefrontal cortex in behaving rats and mice. Laminar analysis of neocortical gamma bursts revealed multiple gamma oscillators of varying frequency and location, which were spatially confined and synchronized local groups of neurons. A significant fraction of putative pyramidal cells and interneurons as well as localized gamma oscillations in all recorded neocortical areas were phase-biased by the hippocampal theta rhythm. We hypothesize that temporal coordination of neocortical gamma oscillators by hippocampal theta is a mechanism by which information contained in spatially widespread neocortical assemblies can be synchronously transferred to the associative networks of the hippocampus. PMID:19038224

  14. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, Elise; Cursi, Marco; Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits.

  15. Cortical structure predicts success in performing musical transformation judgments.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nicholas E V; Zatorre, Robert J

    2010-10-15

    Recognizing melodies by their interval structure, or "relative pitch," is a fundamental aspect of musical perception. By using relative pitch, we are able to recognize tunes regardless of the key in which they are played. We sought to determine the cortical areas important for relative pitch processing using two morphometric techniques. Cortical differences have been reported in musicians within right auditory cortex (AC), a region considered important for pitch-based processing, and we have previously reported a functional correlation between relative pitch processing in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS). We addressed the hypothesis that regional variation of cortical structure within AC and IPS is related to relative pitch ability using two anatomical techniques, cortical thickness (CT) analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of magnetic resonance imaging data. Persons with variable amounts of formal musical training were tested on a melody transposition task, as well as two musical control tasks and a speech control task. We found that gray matter concentration and cortical thickness in right Heschl's sulcus and bilateral IPS both predicted relative pitch task performance and correlated to a lesser extent with performance on the two musical control tasks. After factoring out variance explained by musical training, only relative pitch performance was predicted by cortical structure in these regions. These results directly demonstrate the functional relevance of previously reported anatomical differences in the auditory cortex of musicians. The findings in the IPS provide further support for the existence of a multimodal network for systematic transformation of stimulus information in this region. PMID:20600982

  16. Bone density and cortical structure after pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, Anniek M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Foster, Bethany J; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Leonard, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure.

  17. Implications of circadian rhythm and stress in addiction vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Krail, Darius; McClung, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    In the face of chronic stress, some individuals can maintain normal function while others go on to develop mental illness. Addiction, affecting one in every twelve people in America, is a substance use disorder long associated with stressful life events and disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle. The circadian and stress response systems have evolved to afford adaptability to environmental changes and allow for maintenance of functional stability, or homeostasis. This mini-review will discuss how circadian rhythms and stress individually affect drug response, affect each other, and how their interactions may regulate reward-related behavior. In particular, we will focus on the interactions between the circadian clock and the regulation of glucocorticoids by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Determining how these two systems act on dopaminergic reward circuitry may not only reveal the basis for vulnerability to addiction, but may also illuminate potential therapeutic targets for future investigation. PMID:26913197

  18. Transcranial Electrical Currents to Probe EEG Brain Rhythms and Memory Consolidation during Sleep in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Lisa; Kirov, Roumen; Brade, Julian; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Previously the application of a weak electric anodal current oscillating with a frequency of the sleep slow oscillation (∼0.75 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NonREM) sleep boosted endogenous slow oscillation activity and enhanced sleep-associated memory consolidation. The slow oscillations occurring during NonREM sleep and theta oscillations present during REM sleep have been considered of critical relevance for memory formation. Here transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) oscillating at 5 Hz, i.e., within the theta frequency range (theta-tDCS) is applied during NonREM and REM sleep. Theta-tDCS during NonREM sleep produced a global decrease in slow oscillatory activity conjoint with a local reduction of frontal slow EEG spindle power (8–12 Hz) and a decrement in consolidation of declarative memory, underlining the relevance of these cortical oscillations for sleep-dependent memory consolidation. In contrast, during REM sleep theta-tDCS appears to increase global gamma (25–45 Hz) activity, indicating a clear brain state-dependency of theta-tDCS. More generally, results demonstrate the suitability of oscillating-tDCS as a tool to analyze functions of endogenous EEG rhythms and underlying endogenous electric fields as well as the interactions between EEG rhythms of different frequencies. PMID:21340034

  19. Thalamocortical mechanisms for the anteriorization of α rhythms during propofol-induced unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sujith; Ching, Shinung; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Kopell, Nancy J

    2013-07-01

    As humans are induced into a state of general anesthesia via propofol, the normal alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) in the occipital cortex disappears and a frontal alpha rhythm emerges. This spatial shift in alpha activity is called anteriorization. We present a thalamocortical model that suggests mechanisms underlying anteriorization. Our model captures the neural dynamics of anteriorization when we adjust it to reflect two key actions of propofol: its potentiation of GABA and its reduction of the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih. The reduction in Ih abolishes the occipital alpha by silencing a specialized subset of thalamocortical cells, thought to generate occipital alpha at depolarized membrane potentials (>-60 mV). The increase in GABA inhibition imposes an alpha timescale on both the cortical and thalamic portions of the frontal component that are reinforced by reciprocal thalamocortical feedback. Anteriorization can thus be understood as a differential effect of anesthetic drugs on thalamic nuclei with disparate spatial projections, i.e.: (1) they disrupt the normal, depolarized alpha in posterior-projecting thalamic nuclei while (2) they engage a new, hyperpolarized alpha in frontothalamic nuclei. Our model generalizes to other anesthetics that include GABA as a target, since the molecular targets of many such anesthetics alter the model dynamics in a manner similar to that of propofol.

  20. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  1. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    PubMed

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research.

  2. Scapulothoracic rhythm in normal male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Talkhani, I S; Kelly, C P

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic pattern of Scapulothoracic rhythm during arm abduction in scapular plane is studied using computer-imaging technique. Aim of the study is to produce a reproducible and reliable way of calculating the scapular movement and glenohumeral movement using least possible roentgenographic exposure. Moving X-ray screening picture of the shoulder joint is analysed using video capture computer programme and the images at different degrees of abduction are then analysed for scapular movement using computer aided designer and drafting software. Results were comparable to the authoritative shoulder analysis carried out in the past, the difference of radiation exposure, approximately 10 times less. PMID:9603061

  3. [The concept of biological rhythm in psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Darcourt, G

    1987-12-01

    The chronobiological hypotheses of depression are based on epidemiological, biological as well as therapeutical pieces of evidence. The seasonal pattern of depression and suicide rates tend to link affective disorders and the daylight duration. Disturbances of circadian rhythms have been reported in endogenous depression. Treatments of depression, such as manipulations of the sleep/wake cycle, phototherapy or tricyclics, may involve chronobiological mechanisms on endogenous pacemakers. Beside the phase advance hypothesis of depression, present data seem to involve a disturbance of the mechanisms of entrainment of the internal clocks by external synchronizers. Other psychiatric illnesses may thus be linked to chronobiological abnormalities. PMID:3326073

  4. Robust circadian rhythms of gene expression in Brassica rapa tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodong; Xie, Qiguang; McClung, C Robertson

    2010-06-01

    Circadian clocks provide temporal coordination by synchronizing internal biological processes with daily environmental cycles. To date, study of the plant circadian clock has emphasized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model, but it is important to determine the extent to which this model applies in other species. Accordingly, we have investigated circadian clock function in Brassica rapa. In Arabidopsis, analysis of gene expression in transgenic plants in which luciferase activity is expressed from clock-regulated promoters has proven a useful tool, although technical challenges associated with the regeneration of transgenic plants has hindered the implementation of this powerful tool in B. rapa. The circadian clock is cell autonomous, and rhythmicity has been shown to persist in tissue culture from a number of species. We have established a transgenic B. rapa tissue culture system to allow the facile measurement and manipulation of clock function. We demonstrate circadian rhythms in the expression of several promoter:LUC reporters in explant-induced tissue culture of B. rapa. These rhythms are temperature compensated and are reset by light and temperature pulses. We observe a strong positive correlation in period length between the tissue culture rhythm in gene expression and the seedling rhythm in cotyledon movement, indicating that the circadian clock in B. rapa tissue culture provides a good model for the clock in planta.

  5. Robust Circadian Rhythms of Gene Expression in Brassica rapa Tissue Culture1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaodong; Xie, Qiguang; McClung, C. Robertson

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks provide temporal coordination by synchronizing internal biological processes with daily environmental cycles. To date, study of the plant circadian clock has emphasized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model, but it is important to determine the extent to which this model applies in other species. Accordingly, we have investigated circadian clock function in Brassica rapa. In Arabidopsis, analysis of gene expression in transgenic plants in which luciferase activity is expressed from clock-regulated promoters has proven a useful tool, although technical challenges associated with the regeneration of transgenic plants has hindered the implementation of this powerful tool in B. rapa. The circadian clock is cell autonomous, and rhythmicity has been shown to persist in tissue culture from a number of species. We have established a transgenic B. rapa tissue culture system to allow the facile measurement and manipulation of clock function. We demonstrate circadian rhythms in the expression of several promoter:LUC reporters in explant-induced tissue culture of B. rapa. These rhythms are temperature compensated and are reset by light and temperature pulses. We observe a strong positive correlation in period length between the tissue culture rhythm in gene expression and the seedling rhythm in cotyledon movement, indicating that the circadian clock in B. rapa tissue culture provides a good model for the clock in planta. PMID:20406912

  6. Effects of moonlight exposure on plasma melatonin rhythms in the seagrass rabbitfish, Siganus canaliculatus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Saydur; Kim, Byung-Ho; Takemura, Akihiro; Park, Chang-Bum; Lee, Young-Don

    2004-08-01

    Influences of light-dark (LD) cycle and moonlight exposure on plasma melatonin rhythms in the seagrass rabbitfish, Siganus canaliculatus, a lunar synchronized spawner, were determined by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA). When the fish were exposed to a natural LD (12:12) cycle, plasma melatonin levels exhibited a clear daily rhythm, with higher levels at midnight and lower levels during the day. These rhythms were not evident under either constant light (LL) or constant dark (DD) conditions. Plasma melatonin levels under LL condition were low and high under DD condition. These results indicate that plasma melatonin rhythms are driven by LD cycle in this species. When the fish were exposed to the 4 lunar phases, plasma melatonin levels around the new moon were significantly higher than during the first quarter moon and the full moon. Exposure to experimental new moon and full moon conditions caused significant increases and decreases of plasma melatonin levels, respectively. The synchronous rhythmicity of melatonin levels in the plasma support the hypothesis that the seagrass rabbitfish perceives moonlight intensity and responds with secretion of melatonin into the bloodstream.

  7. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  8. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-08-23

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in the circadian and circatidal rhythms of A. asahinai using RNAi. After injection of double-stranded RNA of per, most crickets did not show the circadian modulation of activity but the circatidal rhythm persisted without a significant difference in the period from controls. Thus, per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm but plays no role, or a less important role, in the circatidal rhythm. We conclude that the circatidal rhythm in A. asahinai is controlled by a circatidal clock whose molecular mechanism is different from that of the circadian clock.

  9. The Effects of Rhythm Training on Tennis Performance

    PubMed Central

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Group, General Rhythm Training Group and Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group. The experimental procedure lasted 8 weeks. During this period, all groups had the same tennis training twice a week. The Tennis Group had regular tennis training sessions. In addition to regular tennis training sessions, the General Rhythm Training Group followed the general rhythm training sessions and the Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group had tennis-specific rhythm training. The measurement instruments were ITN, Rhythmic Competence Analysis Test and Untimed Consecutive Rally Test. The results indicated that participation in tennis-specific or general rhythm training resulted in progress in tennis playing levels, forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence of the participants. On the other hand, attendance to the regular 8-week tennis training was enough to solely increase the tennis playing level but not sufficient to develop forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence. Although the participants in the TRTG had better improvement scores than the ones in the GRTG, no significant difference was found between the rhythm training groups. The results also revealed that participants exhibited higher rhythmic competence scores on fast tempo compared to slow tempo. PMID:23486093

  10. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  11. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-06-17

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure.

  12. Human Brain Basis of Musical Rhythm Perception: Common and Distinct Neural Substrates for Meter, Tempo, and Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Thaut, Michael H.; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  13. Rhythms for Cognition: Communication through Coherence.

    PubMed

    Fries, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    I propose that synchronization affects communication between neuronal groups. Gamma-band (30-90 Hz) synchronization modulates excitation rapidly enough that it escapes the following inhibition and activates postsynaptic neurons effectively. Synchronization also ensures that a presynaptic activation pattern arrives at postsynaptic neurons in a temporally coordinated manner. At a postsynaptic neuron, multiple presynaptic groups converge, e.g., representing different stimuli. If a stimulus is selected by attention, its neuronal representation shows stronger and higher-frequency gamma-band synchronization. Thereby, the attended stimulus representation selectively entrains postsynaptic neurons. The entrainment creates sequences of short excitation and longer inhibition that are coordinated between pre- and postsynaptic groups to transmit the attended representation and shut out competing inputs. The predominantly bottom-up-directed gamma-band influences are controlled by predominantly top-down-directed alpha-beta-band (8-20 Hz) influences. Attention itself samples stimuli at a 7-8 Hz theta rhythm. Thus, several rhythms and their interplay render neuronal communication effective, precise, and selective. PMID:26447583

  14. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  15. Circadian rhythms in rheumatology - a glucocorticoid perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis plays an important role in regulating and controlling immune responses. Dysfunction of the HPA axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic diseases. The impact of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on HPA axis function also remains a matter of concern, particularly for longer treatment duration. Knowledge of circadian rhythms and the influence of GC in rheumatology is important: on the one hand we aim for optimal treatment of the daily undulating inflammatory symptoms, for example morning stiffness and swelling; on the other, we wish to disturb the HPA axis as little as possible. This review describes circadian rhythms in RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases, dysfunction of the HPA axis in RA and other rheumatic diseases and the recent concept of the hepato-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-renal axis, the problem of adrenal suppression by GC therapy and how it can be avoided, and evidence that chronotherapy with modified release prednisone effective at 02:00 a.m. can inhibit proinflammatory sequelae of nocturnal inflammation better compared with GC administration in the morning but does not increase the risk of HPA axis insufficiency in RA. PMID:25608777

  16. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity correlates with cortical perfusion parameters determined by bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Shane; Rouine, Jennifer; McIntosh, Allison; Kerskens, Christian; Harkin, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in astrocyte number and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the animal laboratory has enabled an investigation of the relationship between pathological and neuroimaging markers in animal models. However the physiological processes which underlie these markers and their role in mediating behavioural deficits is still poorly understood. Rodent models have provided us with important insights into physiological and cellular mechanisms which may mediate anxiety and depression-related behaviours. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a strain which endogenously expresses highly anxious and depressive-like behaviours and has previously been reported to exhibit alterations in immunoreactivity for the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in brain sub-regions relative to more stress resilient out-bred strains. Here we report that the depressive and anxiety-like behaviours exhibited by the WKY rat strain are associated with alterations in brain morphology including a decrease in hippocampal volume, coupled with reduced resting state frontal cortical perfusion as assessed by MR bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) relative to the out-bred Wistar strain. Pre-limbic cortical GFAP immunoreactivity and astrocyte cell number were positively correlated with cortical blood perfusion in the WKY strain. These experiments provide a link between pathological and neuroimaging markers of aberrant astrocytic function and add validity to the WKY rat as a model for co-morbid anxiety and depression.

  17. Perfusion Imaging of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Using Arterial Spin Labeling: Correlation With Histopathological Vascular Density

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Pia; Lechpammer, Mirna; Warfield, Simon K.; Kosaras, Bela; Takeoka, Masanori; Poduri, Annapurna; Madsen, Joseph R.; Bergin, Ann M.; Whalen, Stephen; Jensen, Frances E.

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common malformation of cortical development, causing intractable epilepsy. This study investigated the relationship between brain perfusion and microvessel density in 7 children with focal cortical dysplasia. The authors analyzed brain perfusion measurements obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of 2 of the children and the microvessel density of brain tissue specimens obtained by epilepsy surgery on all of the children. Brain perfusion was approximately 2 times higher in the area of focal cortical dysplasia compared to the contralateral side. The microvessel density was nearly double in the area of focal cortical dysplasia compared to the surrounding cortex that did not have morphological abnormalities. These findings suggest that hyperperfusion can be related to increased microvessel density in focal cortical dysplasia rather than only to seizures. Further investigations are needed to determine the relationship between brain perfusion, microvessel density, and seizure activity. PMID:23696629

  18. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; López-Cruz, Pedro; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-08-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven different cortical regions of the frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex of the mouse. We found that, despite the differences in the structure of the pyramidal cells in these distinct functional and cytoarchitectonic cortical areas, there are common design principles that govern the geometry of dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells in all cortical areas.

  19. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; López-Cruz, Pedro; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven different cortical regions of the frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex of the mouse. We found that, despite the differences in the structure of the pyramidal cells in these distinct functional and cytoarchitectonic cortical areas, there are common design principles that govern the geometry of dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells in all cortical areas. PMID:25081193

  20. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; López-Cruz, Pedro; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven different cortical regions of the frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex of the mouse. We found that, despite the differences in the structure of the pyramidal cells in these distinct functional and cytoarchitectonic cortical areas, there are common design principles that govern the geometry of dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells in all cortical areas. PMID:25081193

  1. Lipoic acid reduces inflammation in a mouse focal cortical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Priya; Marracci, Gail; Galipeau, Danielle; Pocius, Edvinas; Morris, Brooke; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-12-15

    Cortical lesions are a crucial part of MS pathology and it is critical to determine that new MS therapies have the ability to alter cortical inflammatory lesions given the differences between white and gray matter lesions. We tested lipoic acid (LA) in a mouse focal cortical EAE model. Brain sections were stained with antibodies against CD4, CD11b and galectin-3. Compared with vehicle, treatment with LA significantly decreased CD4+ and galectin-3+ immune cells in the brain. LA treated mice had fewer galectin-3+ cells with no projections indicating decrease in the number of infiltrating monocytes. LA significantly reduces inflammation in a focal cortical model of MS. PMID:26616873

  2. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  3. Grid cells and cortical representation.

    PubMed

    Moser, Edvard I; Roudi, Yasser; Witter, Menno P; Kentros, Clifford; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Moser, May-Britt

    2014-07-01

    One of the grand challenges in neuroscience is to comprehend neural computation in the association cortices, the parts of the cortex that have shown the largest expansion and differentiation during mammalian evolution and that are thought to contribute profoundly to the emergence of advanced cognition in humans. In this Review, we use grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex as a gateway to understand network computation at a stage of cortical processing in which firing patterns are shaped not primarily by incoming sensory signals but to a large extent by the intrinsic properties of the local circuit.

  4. Horizontal integration and cortical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C D

    1992-07-01

    We have discussed several results that lead to a view that cells in the visual system are endowed with dynamic properties, influenced by context, expectation, and long-term modifications of the cortical network. These observations will be important for understanding how neuronal ensembles produce a system that perceives, remembers, and adapts to injury. The advantage to being able to observe changes at early stages in a sensory pathway is that one may be able to understand the way in which neuronal ensembles encode and represent images at the level of their receptive field properties, of cortical topographies, and of the patterns of connections between cells participating in a network.

  5. Rhythm's Gonna Get You: Regular Meter Facilitates Semantic Sentence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothermich, Kathrin; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a phenomenon that fundamentally affects the perception of events unfolding in time. In language, we define "rhythm" as the temporal structure that underlies the perception and production of utterances, whereas "meter" is defined as the regular occurrence of beats (i.e. stressed syllables). In stress-timed languages such as German, this…

  6. Development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S

    2005-11-15

    Compared with birds and mammals, very little is known about the development and regulation of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates. The development and regulation of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) should provide insight into the evolution of these mechanisms. One useful model for examining the development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates has emerged from studies with the North American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). A major advantage of bullfrogs as a comparative model for respiratory rhythm generation is that respiratory output may be measured at all stages of development, both in vivo and in vitro. An emerging view of recent studies in developing bullfrogs is that many of the mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation are very similar to those seen in birds and mammals. The overall conclusion from these studies is that respiratory rhythm generation during development may be highly conserved during evolution. The development of respiratory rhythm generation in mammals may, therefore, reflect the antecedent mechanisms seen in ectothermic vertebrates. The main focus of this brief review is to discuss recent data on the development of respiratory rhythm generation in ectothermic vertebrates, with particular emphasis on the North American bullfrog (R. catesbeiana) as a model. PMID:15914099

  7. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  8. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi.

  9. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  10. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi. PMID:20943572

  11. A Rhythm Recognition Computer Program to Advocate Interactivist Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Jean-Christophe

    2004-01-01

    This paper advocates the main ideas of the interactive model of representation of Mark Bickhard and the assimilation/accommodation framework of Jean Piaget, through a rhythm recognition demonstration program. Although completely unsupervised, the program progressively learns to recognize more and more complex rhythms struck on the user's keyboard.…

  12. Neglect of Biological Rhythms in High School Biology Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Nelson, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    This article developed from a survey of the five most popular biology texts which promote the theory of invariant homeostasis rather than biological rhythms. The popular fad of "birthdate biorhythms" is discussed in relation to providing education on biological rhythms and its legitimacy to the public. (SA)

  13. Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J.; Peng, Jie; Turek, Fred W.; Marconi, Angelica; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Simuni, Tanya; Zadikoff, Cindy; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Diurnal fluctuations of motor and non-motor symptoms and high prevalence of sleep/wake disturbances in Parkinson’s disease (PD) suggest a role of the circadian system in the modulation of these symptoms. Yet, surprisingly little is known regarding circadian function in PD, and whether circadian dysfunction is involved in the development of sleep/wake disturbances in PD. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the timing and amplitude of the 24-hour melatonin rhythm, a marker of endogenous circadian rhythmicity, with self-reported sleep quality, the severity of daytime sleepiness and disease metrics. Design A cross-sectional study, (2009–2012). Setting PD and Movement Disorders Center, Northwestern University, Chicago. Participants Twenty PD patients on stable dopaminergic therapy and 15 age-matched controls underwent blood sampling for the measurement of serum melatonin levels at 30-minute intervals for 24 hours under modified constant routine conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Clinical and demographic data, self-reported measures of sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)), circadian markers of the melatonin rhythm, including the amplitude, area-under-the-curve (AUC), and phase of the 24-hour rhythm. Results Participants with PD had a blunted circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion compared to controls; both the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour AUC for circulating melatonin levels were significantly lower in PD participants compared with controls (p<0.001). Markers of circadian phase were not significantly different between the two groups. Among PD participants, those with excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS score ≥10) had a significantly lower amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour melatonin AUC compared with PD participants without excessive sleepiness (p=0.001). Disease duration, UPDRS scores, levodopa

  14. Anatomical Abnormalities in Gray and White Matter of the Cortical Surface in Persons with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Colibazzi, Tiziano; Wexler, Bruce E.; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Liu, Jun; Sanchez-Peña, Juan; Corcoran, Cheryl; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although schizophrenia has been associated with abnormalities in brain anatomy, imaging studies have not fully determined the nature and relative contributions of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) disturbances underlying these findings. We sought to determine the pattern and distribution of these GM and WM abnormalities. Furthermore, we aimed to clarify the contribution of abnormalities in cortical thickness and cortical surface area to the reduced GM volumes reported in schizophrenia. Methods We recruited 76 persons with schizophrenia and 57 healthy controls from the community and obtained measures of cortical and WM surface areas, of local volumes along the brain and WM surfaces, and of cortical thickness. Results We detected reduced local volumes in patients along corresponding locations of the brain and WM surfaces in addition to bilateral greater thickness of perisylvian cortices and thinner cortex in the superior frontal and cingulate gyri. Total cortical and WM surface areas were reduced. Patients with worse performance on the serial-position task, a measure of working memory, had a higher burden of WM abnormalities. Conclusions Reduced local volumes along the surface of the brain mirrored the locations of abnormalities along the surface of the underlying WM, rather than of abnormalities of cortical thickness. Moreover, anatomical features of white matter, but not cortical thickness, correlated with measures of working memory. We propose that reductions in WM and smaller total cortical surface area could be central anatomical abnormalities in schizophrenia, driving, at least partially, the reduced regional GM volumes often observed in this illness. PMID:23418459

  15. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  16. The pineal and circadian rhythms of temperature selection and locomotion in lizards.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, A; Minutini, L; Foà, A

    1993-05-01

    The existence of a circadian rhythm of behavioral temperature selection has been demonstrated in lizards (Podarcis sicula) held on a thermal gradient in constant darkness. This rhythm becomes temporarily abolished during 1 week following parietalectomy and 2-3 weeks following pinealectomy. Parietalectomy does not affect the locomotor rhythm, while pinealectomy invariably lengthens the freerunning period of this rhythm. These results support the contention of separate control systems for the temperature selection rhythm and the locomotor rhythm. As neither rhythm is definitively abolished by parietalectomy and pinealectomy, other pacemaking components exist elsewhere in the circadian system of Podarcis sicula which can control both rhythms.

  17. Persistence of a behavioral food-anticipatory circadian rhythm following dorsomedial hypothalamic ablation in rats.

    PubMed

    Landry, G J; Simon, M M; Webb, I C; Mistlberger, R E

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms of behavior in rodents are regulated by a system of circadian oscillators, including a master light-entrainable pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus that mediates synchrony to the day-night cycle, and food-entrainable oscillators located elsewhere that generate rhythms of food-anticipatory activity (FAA) synchronized to daily feeding schedules. Despite progress in elucidating neural and molecular mechanisms of circadian oscillators, localization of food-entrainable oscillators driving FAA remains an enduring problem. Recent evidence suggests that the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) may function as a final common output for behavioral rhythms and may be critical for the expression of FAA (Gooley JJ, Schomer A, and Saper CB. Nat Neurosci 9: 398-407, 2006). To determine whether the reported loss of FAA by DMH lesions is specific to one behavioral measure or generalizes to other measures, rats received large radiofrequency lesions aimed at the DMH and were recorded in cages with movement sensors. Total and partial DMH ablation was associated with a significant attenuation of light-dark-entrained activity rhythms during ad libitum food access, because of a selective reduction in nocturnal activity. When food was restricted to a single 3-h daily meal in the middle of the lights-on period, all DMH and intact rats exhibited significant FAA. The rhythm of FAA persisted during a 48-h food deprivation test and reappeared during a 72-h deprivation test after ad libitum food access. The DMH is not the site of oscillators or entrainment pathways necessary for all manifestations of FAA, but may participate on the output side of this circadian function.

  18. Scheduled daily mating induces circadian anticipatory activity rhythms in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Landry, Glenn J; Opiol, Hanna; Marchant, Elliott G; Pavlovski, Ilya; Mear, Rhiannon J; Hamson, Dwayne K; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2012-01-01

    Daily schedules of limited access to food, palatable high calorie snacks, water and salt can induce circadian rhythms of anticipatory locomotor activity in rats and mice. All of these stimuli are rewarding, but whether anticipation can be induced by neural correlates of reward independent of metabolic perturbations associated with manipulations of food and hydration is unclear. Three experiments were conducted to determine whether mating, a non-ingestive behavior that is potently rewarding, can induce circadian anticipatory activity rhythms in male rats provided scheduled daily access to steroid-primed estrous female rats. In Experiment 1, rats anticipated access to estrous females in the mid-light period, but also exhibited post-coital eating and running. In Experiment 2, post-coital eating and running were prevented and only a minority of rats exhibited anticipation. Rats allowed to see and smell estrous females showed no anticipation. In both experiments, all rats exhibited sustained behavioral arousal and multiple mounts and intromissions during every session, but ejaculated only every 2-3 days. In Experiment 3, the rats were given more time with individual females, late at night for 28 days, and then in the midday for 28 days. Ejaculation rates increased and anticipation was robust to night sessions and significant although weaker to day sessions. The anticipation rhythm persisted during 3 days of constant dark without mating. During anticipation of nocturnal mating, the rats exhibited a significant preference for a tube to the mating cage over a tube to a locked cage with mating cage litter. This apparent place preference was absent during anticipation of midday mating, which may reflect a daily rhythm of sexual reward. The results establish mating as a reward stimulus capable of inducing circadian rhythms of anticipatory behavior in the male rat, and reveal a critical role for ejaculation, a modulatory role for time of day, and a potential confound role for

  19. Scheduled daily mating induces circadian anticipatory activity rhythms in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Landry, Glenn J; Opiol, Hanna; Marchant, Elliott G; Pavlovski, Ilya; Mear, Rhiannon J; Hamson, Dwayne K; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2012-01-01

    Daily schedules of limited access to food, palatable high calorie snacks, water and salt can induce circadian rhythms of anticipatory locomotor activity in rats and mice. All of these stimuli are rewarding, but whether anticipation can be induced by neural correlates of reward independent of metabolic perturbations associated with manipulations of food and hydration is unclear. Three experiments were conducted to determine whether mating, a non-ingestive behavior that is potently rewarding, can induce circadian anticipatory activity rhythms in male rats provided scheduled daily access to steroid-primed estrous female rats. In Experiment 1, rats anticipated access to estrous females in the mid-light period, but also exhibited post-coital eating and running. In Experiment 2, post-coital eating and running were prevented and only a minority of rats exhibited anticipation. Rats allowed to see and smell estrous females showed no anticipation. In both experiments, all rats exhibited sustained behavioral arousal and multiple mounts and intromissions during every session, but ejaculated only every 2-3 days. In Experiment 3, the rats were given more time with individual females, late at night for 28 days, and then in the midday for 28 days. Ejaculation rates increased and anticipation was robust to night sessions and significant although weaker to day sessions. The anticipation rhythm persisted during 3 days of constant dark without mating. During anticipation of nocturnal mating, the rats exhibited a significant preference for a tube to the mating cage over a tube to a locked cage with mating cage litter. This apparent place preference was absent during anticipation of midday mating, which may reflect a daily rhythm of sexual reward. The results establish mating as a reward stimulus capable of inducing circadian rhythms of anticipatory behavior in the male rat, and reveal a critical role for ejaculation, a modulatory role for time of day, and a potential confound role for

  20. A Newly Identified Extrinsic Input Triggers a Distinct Gastric Mill Rhythm via Activation of Modulatory Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Dawn M.; White, Rachel S.; Saideman, Shari R.; Cook, Aaron; Christie, Andrew E.; Nadim, Farzan; Nusbaum, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal network flexibility enables animals to respond appropriately to changes in their internal and external states. We are using the isolated crab stomatogastric nervous system to determine how extrinsic inputs contribute to network flexibility. The stomatogastric system includes the well-characterized gastric mill (chewing) and pyloric (filtering of chewed food) motor circuits in the stomatogastric ganglion. Projection neurons with somata in the commissural ganglia (CoGs) regulate these rhythms. Previous work characterized a unique gastric mill rhythm that occurred spontaneously in some preparations, but whose origin remained undetermined. This rhythm includes a distinct protractor phase activity pattern, during which all active gastric mill circuit and projection neurons fire in a pyloric rhythm-timed activity pattern instead of the tonic firing pattern exhibited by these neurons during previously studied gastric mill rhythms. Here we identify a new extrinsic input, the post-oesophageal commissure (POC) neurons, relatively brief stimulation (30 sec) of which triggers a long-lasting (tens of minutes) activation of this novel gastric mill rhythm at least in part via its lasting activation of CoG projection neurons, including the previously identified MCN1 and CPN2. Immunocytochemical and electrophysiological data suggest that the POC neurons excite MCN1 and CPN2 by release of the neuropeptide Cancer borealis tachykinin-related peptide Ia (CabTRP Ia). These data further suggest that the CoG arborization of the POC neurons comprises the previously identified anterior commissural organ (ACO), a CabTRP Ia-containing neurohemal organ. This endocrine pathway thus appears to also have paracrine actions that include activation of a novel and lasting gastric mill rhythm. PMID:18310125

  1. Seasonal feeding rhythm associated with fasting period of Pangasianodon gigas: long-term monitoring in an aquarium.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Koki; Kume, Manabu

    2011-08-01

    The Mekong giant catfish Pangasianodon gigas is endemic to the Mekong River basin, and is recognized as endangered species, largely due to overfishing and development of the river basin. We monitored food intake of P. gigas in a stable environment in an aquarium over a 6-year period and analyzed their feeding rhythm and fasting periods. The daily food intake for each fish was recorded from 18 June 2004 to 17 June 2010. The feeding rhythm or pattern was determined by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The FFT analysis revealed that different cycles of feeding rhythm (168.8, 313.1, and 365.3 days) in three catfishes and no observable cycles in two catfishes. However, three catfishes showed subordinate peaks with approximately 365 days (365.3 days for all). These suggest that, at least, four of five catfish had have approximately 365-days feeding cycle. We also showed that all catfish undergo long-term fasting periods (> 20 days). Of note, the feeding/fasting pattern coincides with the wet/dry seasons in Thailand, which also corresponds to the abundance of the catfish food resource (Cladophora spp.). We found that P. gigas exhibit a seasonal feeding rhythm that is synchronized by food availability. Furthermore, we found that the seasonal feeding rhythm was gradually dampened over time, suggesting that the observed seasonal feeding rhythm with long-term fasting of the catfish is likely controlled by an endogenous clock system. To our knowledge, this is the first case of quantification of the seasonal feeding rhythm with fasting periods in teleost fish.

  2. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang; Wu, Huijian

    2013-08-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer.

  3. [Diagnosis and treatment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junichi; Imai, Makoto; Yamada, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) are characterized by misalignment between major sleep episode and desired sleep phase, or symptoms associated with internal desynchronization between endogenous circadian rhythm and overt sleep-wake rhythm. Endogenous circadian rhythm is mainly regulated by master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Light entrains the circadian clock according to a phase-response curve. Furthermore, social time cue affects human sleep-wake rhythm. Instructions concerning sleep hygiene including light environment play fundamental role for the treatment in CRSD. In addition, light therapy and oral melatonin administration have application to delayed sleep phase type. Diagnostic classification and treatment in each types of CRSD are reviewed in this article.

  4. Circadian rhythms in the short-tailed shrew, Blarina brevicauda.

    PubMed

    Antipas, A J; Madison, D M; Ferraro, J S

    1990-08-01

    Circadian rhythms of wheel running and feeding were measured in the short-tailed shrew. Shrews were strongly nocturnal, and their activity rhythms entrained to both long-day (LD 16:8) and short-day (LD 6:18) photocycles. Under conditions of continuous light (LL) or darkness (DD), the activity rhythms free-ran with average periodicities of 25.1 hours and 24.1 hours, respectively. In LL the level of activity was depressed, and in some cases wheel running was completely inhibited. No significant sex differences were observed in the period or amplitude of the monitored circadian rhythms. All shrews fed throughout the day and night; however, unlike in previous reports, ultradian periods of feeding behavior were not found. The results are related to Aschoff's four observations for the effect of light on activity rhythms in nocturnal rodents. PMID:2255728

  5. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Rund, Samuel S. C.; O’Donnell, Aidan J.; Gentile, James E.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control. PMID:27089370

  6. Beta rhythm modulation by speech sounds: somatotopic mapping in somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Campus, Claudio; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    During speech listening motor regions are somatotopically activated, resembling the activity that subtends actual speech production, suggesting that motor commands can be retrieved from sensory inputs. Crucially, the efficient motor control of the articulators relies on the accurate anticipation of the somatosensory reafference. Nevertheless, evidence about somatosensory activities elicited by auditory speech processing is sparse. The present work looked for specific interactions between auditory speech presentation and somatosensory cortical information processing. We used an auditory speech identification task with sounds having different place of articulation (bilabials and dentals). We tested whether coupling the auditory task with a peripheral electrical stimulation of the lips would affect the pattern of sensorimotor electroencephalographic rhythms. Peripheral electrical stimulation elicits a series of spectral perturbations of which the beta rebound reflects the return-to-baseline stage of somatosensory processing. We show a left-lateralized and selective reduction in the beta rebound following lip somatosensory stimulation when listening to speech sounds produced with the lips (i.e. bilabials). Thus, the somatosensory processing could not return to baseline due to the recruitment of the same neural resources by speech stimuli. Our results are a clear demonstration that heard speech sounds are somatotopically mapped onto somatosensory cortices, according to place of articulation. PMID:27499204

  7. Beta rhythm modulation by speech sounds: somatotopic mapping in somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Campus, Claudio; D’Ausilio, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    During speech listening motor regions are somatotopically activated, resembling the activity that subtends actual speech production, suggesting that motor commands can be retrieved from sensory inputs. Crucially, the efficient motor control of the articulators relies on the accurate anticipation of the somatosensory reafference. Nevertheless, evidence about somatosensory activities elicited by auditory speech processing is sparse. The present work looked for specific interactions between auditory speech presentation and somatosensory cortical information processing. We used an auditory speech identification task with sounds having different place of articulation (bilabials and dentals). We tested whether coupling the auditory task with a peripheral electrical stimulation of the lips would affect the pattern of sensorimotor electroencephalographic rhythms. Peripheral electrical stimulation elicits a series of spectral perturbations of which the beta rebound reflects the return-to-baseline stage of somatosensory processing. We show a left-lateralized and selective reduction in the beta rebound following lip somatosensory stimulation when listening to speech sounds produced with the lips (i.e. bilabials). Thus, the somatosensory processing could not return to baseline due to the recruitment of the same neural resources by speech stimuli. Our results are a clear demonstration that heard speech sounds are somatotopically mapped onto somatosensory cortices, according to place of articulation. PMID:27499204

  8. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant's ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion

  9. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  10. Biological rhythm disturbances in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Wirz-Justice, Anna

    2006-02-01

    From earliest times, psychiatrists have described biological rhythm disturbances as characteristic of mood disorders. The present flourishing of circadian biology has revealed the molecular basis of 24-h rhythmicity driven by 'clock' genes, as well as the importance of zeitgebers (synchronisers). Winter depression was first modelled on regulation of animal behaviour by seasonal changes in daylength, and led to application of light as the first successful chronobiological treatment in psychiatry. Light therapy has great promise for many other disorders (e.g. sleep-wake cycle disturbances in Alzheimer's dementia, bulimia, premenstrual disorder, depression during pregnancy) and, importantly, as an adjuvant to antidepressant medication in major non-seasonal depression. The pineal hormone melatonin is also a zeitgeber for the human circadian system, in addition to possessing direct sleep-promoting effects. Chronobiology has provided efficacious non-pharmaceutical treatments for mood disorders (such as sleep deprivation or light therapy) as well as novel approaches to new drugs (e.g. agomelatine).

  11. Virtual tools for teaching electrocardiographic rhythm analysis.

    PubMed

    Criley, John Michael; Nelson, William P

    2006-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) rhythm analysis is inadequately taught in training programs, resulting in undertrained physicians reading a large percentage of the 40 million ECGs recorded annually. The effective use of simple tools (calipers, ruler, and magnifier) required for crucial measurements and comparisons of intervals requires considerable time for interactive instruction and is difficult to teach in the classroom. The ECGViewer (Blaufuss Medical Multimedia Laboratories, Palo Alto, Calif) program was developed using virtual tools easily manipulated by computer mouse that can be used to analyze archived scanned ECGs on computer screens and classroom projection. Trainees manipulate the on-screen tools from their seats by wireless mouse while the instructor makes corrections with a second mouse, in clear view of the trainees. An on-screen ladder diagram may be constructed by the trainee and critiqued by the instructor. The ECGViewer program has been successfully used and well received by trainees at medical school, residence, and subspecialty fellow level.

  12. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Yang; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chang, Yu-Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance. PMID:26866770

  13. Unstable periodic orbits in human cardiac rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, K.; Govindan, R. B.; Gopinathan, M. S.

    1998-04-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) extracted from experimental electrocardiograph signals are reported for normal and pathological human cardiac rhythms. The periodicity and distribution of the orbits on the chaotic attractor are found to be indicative of the state of health of the cardiac system. The normal cardiac system is characterized by three to four UPOs with typical periodicities and intensities. However, pathological conditions such as premature ventricular contraction, atrio ventricular block, ventricular tachy arrhythmia, and ventricular fibrillation have UPOs whose periodicity and intensity distribution are quite distinct from those of the healthy cases and are characteristic of the pathological conditions. Eigenvalues and the largest positive Lyapunov exponent value for the UPOs are also reported. The UPOs are shown to be insensitive to the embedding dimension and the present UPO analysis is demonstrated to be reliable by the method of surrogate analysis.

  14. Copula-based analysis of rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.; Viola, M. L. Lanfredi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we establish stochastic profiles of the rhythm for three languages: English, Japanese and Spanish. We model the increase or decrease of the acoustical energy, collected into three bands coming from the acoustic signal. The number of parameters needed to specify a discrete multivariate Markov chain grows exponentially with the order and dimension of the chain. In this case the size of the database is not large enough for a consistent estimation of the model. We apply a strategy to estimate a multivariate process with an order greater than the order achieved using standard procedures. The new strategy consist on obtaining a partition of the state space which is constructed from a combination of the partitions corresponding to the three marginal processes, one for each band of energy, and the partition coming from to the multivariate Markov chain. Then, all the partitions are linked using a copula, in order to estimate the transition probabilities.

  15. Vitamin B12 enhances the phase-response of circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Kohsaka, M; Morita, N; Fukuda, N; Honma, S; Honma, K

    1996-12-13

    Eight young males were subjected to a single blind cross-over test to see the effects of vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin; VB12) on the phase-response of the circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure. VB12 (0.5 mg/day) or vehicle was injected intravenously at 1230 h for 11 days, which was followed by oral administration (2 mg x 3/day) for 7 days. A serial blood sampling was performed under dim light condition (less than 200 lx) and plasma melatonin rhythm was determined before and after a single bright light exposure (2500 lx for 3 h) at 0700 h. The melatonin rhythm before the light exposure showed a smaller amplitude in the VB12 trial than in the placebo. The light exposure phase-advanced the melatonin rhythm significantly in the VB12 trail, but not in the placebo. These findings indicate that VB12 enhances the light-induced phase-shift in the human circadian rhythm. PMID:8981490

  16. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  17. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation.

    PubMed

    Millet, C; Custaud, M A; Allevard, A M; Zaouali-Ajina, M; Monk, T H; Arnaud, S B; Claustrat, B; Gharib, C; Gauquelin-Koch, G

    2001-07-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  18. Biological and psychological rhythms: an integrative approach to rhythm disturbances in autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Botbol, Michel; Cabon, Philippe; Kermarrec, Solenn; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Biological rhythms are crucial phenomena that are perfect examples of the adaptation of organisms to their environment. A considerable amount of work has described different types of biological rhythms (from circadian to ultradian), individual differences in their patterns and the complexity of their regulation. In particular, the regulation and maturation of the sleep-wake cycle have been thoroughly studied. Its desynchronization, both endogenous and exogenous, is now well understood, as are its consequences for cognitive impairments and health problems. From a completely different perspective, psychoanalysts have shown a growing interest in the rhythms of psychic life. This interest extends beyond the original focus of psychoanalysis on dreams and the sleep-wake cycle, incorporating central theoretical and practical psychoanalytic issues related to the core functioning of the psychic life: the rhythmic structures of drive dynamics, intersubjective developmental processes and psychic containment functions. Psychopathological and biological approaches to the study of infantile autism reveal the importance of specific biological and psychological rhythmic disturbances in this disorder. Considering data and hypotheses from both perspectives, this paper proposes an integrative approach to the study of these rhythmic disturbances and offers an etiopathogenic hypothesis based on this integrative approach.

  19. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  20. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  1. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  2. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  3. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  4. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  5. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  6. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  7. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  8. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia.

  9. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-09-06

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia.

  10. Biological rhythms and melatonin in mood disorders and their treatments.

    PubMed

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Mongeau, Raymond; Hamon, Michel

    2013-05-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorders and seasonal affective disorders have been described as alterations of various neuronal systems. In addition to the classical monoaminergic hypotheses that have been long proposed to explain the pathophysiology of these disorders, a strong association between circadian rhythms and mood regulation has been suggested in the light of several clinical and preclinical findings. In this review, we summarize the different hypotheses on pathophysiology mechanisms underlying depressive disorders and put a special emphasis on the alterations of melatonin secretion and associated changes in biological rhythms that characterize mood disorders. Causal relationships between alterations in circadian rhythms and mood disorders are strongly supported by the antidepressant efficacy of innovative pharmacological treatments aimed at resynchronizing endogenous rhythms in depressed patients. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors generating desynchronization between endogenous biological rhythms and exogenous rhythms driven by environmental and societal constraints are very probably involved in the vulnerability to mood disorders. Further investigations of the molecular/cellular bases of the relationships between stress axis dysfunctions, endogenous biological rhythm dysregulations and associated functional and anatomical brain alterations should allow important progress in the knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms of affective disorders and the downstream development of innovative, more effective and better tolerated, therapies.

  11. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H. T.

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  12. Food-anticipatory circadian rhythms: concepts and methods.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2009-11-01

    Rats, mice and other species can behaviorally anticipate a predictable daily mealtime by entrainment of circadian oscillators (food-entrainable oscillators) distinct from those (light-entrainable oscillators) that regulate light-dark entrained rhythms of behavior and physiology. Neurobiological analysis of food-anticipatory rhythms has progressed slowly but is gaining pace. Food-anticipatory rhythms have proven to be surprisingly robust to many neural and circadian clock gene perturbations. A few neural ablation sites or gene mutations have been associated with loss or marked attenuation of anticipatory rhythms, but in each case there are apparently conflicting reports. Attenuation of food-anticipatory rhythms following neural or genetic perturbations could result from actions upstream or downstream from the clock mechanism, and could be limited to certain behavioral endpoints or recording conditions. Failure to observe attenuation could reflect compensation by alternate timing mechanisms that do not involve food-entrainable oscillators. To facilitate progress in neurobiological analysis of food-anticipatory rhythms, criteria for distinguishing among formally distinct mechanisms by which animals might anticipate a daily meal are reviewed, and procedural variables that can affect the expression of food-anticipatory rhythms in neurobiologically intact or compromised animals are identified.

  13. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H T

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  14. Prefrontal cortical blood flow and cognitive function in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, D R; Berman, K F; Iadarola, M; Driesen, N; Zec, R F

    1988-01-01

    To examine the relationship between cortical physiology and dementia in Huntington's disease, rCBF during three different behavioural conditions, one of which emphasised prefrontal cognition, was determined by xenon-133 inhalation in 14 patients with Huntington's disease and in matched controls. Cortical rCBF was not reduced in Huntington's disease patients even while they manifested overt prefrontal-type cognitive deficits. Caudate atrophy on CT and rCBF were significantly correlated, but only during the prefrontal behaviour where the correlation was positive. These results suggest a qualification of the subcortical dementia concept as applied to Huntington's disease and implicate an interaction between pathology that is subcortical and cognitive function that is cortical. Images PMID:2965218

  15. SMI-32 parcellates the visual cortical areas of the marmoset.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Zsolt B

    The distribution pattern of SMI-32-immunoreactivity (SMI-32-ir) of neuronal elements was examined in the visual cortical areas of marmoset monkey. Layer IV of the primary visual cortex (V1) and layers III and V of the extrastriate areas showed the most abundant SMI-32-ir. The different areal and laminar distribution of SMI-32-ir allowed the distinction between various extrastriate areas and determined their exact anatomical boundaries in the New World monkey, Callithrix penicillata. It is shown here that the parcellating nature of SMI-32 described earlier in the visual cortical areas of other mammals - including Old World monkeys - is also present in the marmoset. Furthermore, a comparison became possible between the chemoanatomical organization of New World and Old World primates' visual cortical areas.

  16. Cortical bone screw fixation in ionically modified apatite cements.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Duncan, C O; Dover, M S; Bassett, D C; Nishikawa, H; Monaghan, A; Gbureck, U

    2005-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite cements are used in reconstruction of the face; usually in well-defined cavities where the cement can be stabilized without the need for internal fixation. A hydroxyapatite cement that could enable screw fixation and some loading therefore has considerable potential in maxillofacial reconstruction. It has been demonstrated recently that water demand of calcium phosphate cements can be reduced by ionically modifying the liquid component. This study investigated the capacity of an ionically modified precompacted apatite cement to retain self-tapping cortical bone screws. Screw pullout forces were determined in the direction of the screw long axis and perpendicular to it, using cortical bone and polymethylmethacrylate cement as a control. In bending pullout tests, measured forces to remove screws from ionically modified precompacted cement were insignificantly different from cortical bone. However, pullout forces of bone screws from hydroxyapatite cement decreased with aging time in vitro.

  17. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  18. Attraction and social coordination: mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    McGarva, Andrew R; Warner, Rebecca M

    2003-05-01

    To investigate factors that affect the mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms, female general psychology students paired according to attitude similarity questionnaires engaged in 40-minute introductory conversations. Fourier analyses performed on speakers' on-off vocal activity demonstrated periodic oscillations in talkativeness. Although some dyads coordinated their vocal activity rhythms, speech accommodation was not predicted by attitude similarity or attraction and did not affect ratings of conversation quality. These rhythms of dialogue appear resistant to change, their behavioral momentum rooted perhaps in an underlying chronobiology. PMID:12845943

  19. Fast rhythms in the discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christakos, C N; Cohen, M I; See, W R; Barnhardt, R

    1988-11-01

    The discharges of 44 medullary inspiratory (I) neurons in decerebrate paralyzed cats were studied using interval and spectral analysis. Most neurons had a rhythm in their discharge. In 31 the rhythm was at the frequency of, and coherent to, the high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) of I nerves, and in 7 the rhythm was in the range of medium-frequency oscillations (MFOs), with no coherence to nerve MFOs. Thus, correlated HFOs are characteristic of the I system at all levels, whereas MFOs are uncommon in medullary neurons and seem to be unrelated to general mechanisms. PMID:3196923

  20. Attraction and social coordination: mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    McGarva, Andrew R; Warner, Rebecca M

    2003-05-01

    To investigate factors that affect the mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms, female general psychology students paired according to attitude similarity questionnaires engaged in 40-minute introductory conversations. Fourier analyses performed on speakers' on-off vocal activity demonstrated periodic oscillations in talkativeness. Although some dyads coordinated their vocal activity rhythms, speech accommodation was not predicted by attitude similarity or attraction and did not affect ratings of conversation quality. These rhythms of dialogue appear resistant to change, their behavioral momentum rooted perhaps in an underlying chronobiology.

  1. Circadian rhythms of visual accommodation responses and physiological correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Use of a recently developed servocontrolled infrared optometer to continuously record the state of monocular focus while subjects viewed a visual target for which the stimulus to focus was systematically varied. Calculated parameters form recorded data - e.g., speeds of accommodation to approaching and receding targets, magnitude of accommodation to step changes in target distance, and amplitude and phase lag of response to sinusoidally varying stimuli were submitted to periodicity analyses. Ear canal temperature (ECT) and heart rate (HR) rhythms were also recorded for physiological correlation with accommodation rhythms. HR demonstrated a 24-hr rhythm, but ECT data did not.

  2. Circadian rhythms from multiple oscillators: lessons from diverse organisms.

    PubMed

    Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Cassone, Vincent M; Earnest, David J; Golden, Susan S; Hardin, Paul E; Thomas, Terry L; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-07-01

    The organization of biological activities into daily cycles is universal in organisms as diverse as cyanobacteria, fungi, algae, plants, flies, birds and man. Comparisons of circadian clocks in unicellular and multicellular organisms using molecular genetics and genomics have provided new insights into the mechanisms and complexity of clock systems. Whereas unicellular organisms require stand-alone clocks that can generate 24-hour rhythms for diverse processes, organisms with differentiated tissues can partition clock function to generate and coordinate different rhythms. In both cases, the temporal coordination of a multi-oscillator system is essential for producing robust circadian rhythms of gene expression and biological activity. PMID:15951747

  3. Circadian rhythm in Alzheimer disease after trazodone use.

    PubMed

    Grippe, Talyta C; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Louzada, Luciana L; Quintas, Juliana L; Naves, Janeth O S; Camargos, Einstein F; Nóbrega, Otávio T

    2015-01-01

    A circadian rhythm is a cycle of approximately 24 h, responsible for many physiological adjustments, and ageing of the circadian clock contributes to cognitive decline. Rhythmicity is severely impaired in Alzheimer disease (AD) and few therapeutic attempts succeeded in improving sleep disorders in such context. This study evaluated sleep parameters by actigraphy in 30 AD patients before and after trazodone use for 2 weeks, and we show a significant improvement in relative rhythm amplitude (RRA), compatible with a more stable daytime behavioral pattern. So, trazodone appears to produce a stabilization of the circadian rhythms in individuals with AD.

  4. Frequency spectra and cosinor for evaluating circadian rhythms in rodent data and in man during Gemini and Vostok flights.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F

    1970-01-01

    With the advent of a capability for extraterrestrial existence of lifeforms, chronobiology--the study of biological rhythms--has reached a position analogous to that of classical endocrinology. Just as an endocrine gland can be removed from an experimental animal, the effects of removal examined and the gland (or an extract) then replaced to determine whether the removal effects are reversible, lifeforms should be rigorously evaluated by rhythmometry before and during their (attempted) removal from Earth effects, as well as following their return to Earth. Methods lending themselves to such studies before, during and after travel in extraterrestrial space are illustrated herein, and their applications may be of value to preventive medicine as well as to basic science. Analyses of terrestrial control data and of restricted time series from extraterrestrial missions indicate that substantial scientific returns on Earth can be anticipated if in the routine of all mammalian space travelers provisions are made for: (1) monitoring body core temperature so as to evaluate its stable circadian rhythm--a phenomenon of interest in itself and also a reference rhythm for other variables; (2) saving aliquots from all urine samples, whereby a spectrum of diverse rhythms can be examined; (3) repeating simple performance tests, e.g., of grip strength or eye-hand coordination. Plans also should be implemented in unmanned space vehicles for explicit chronobiologic studies so designed that daily cosinor analysis can determine, e.g., whether circadian phase control or the desynchronized period length be altered as we move away from the Earth. Thus, some of the mechanisms underlying rhythms are now amenable to study on experimental mammals in unmanned space vehicles. In view of the high degree of generality of mammalian rhythms--many related to human well-being and optimal performance--and of dramatic consequences from some rhythmic variations in man, such studies deserve time and

  5. Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Effects of Repeated Practice and Rate/Rhythm Control Treatments on Sound Production Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambaugh, Julie L.; Nessler, Christina; Cameron, Rosalea; Mauszycki, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation was designed to elucidate the effects of repeated practice treatment on sound production accuracy in individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. A secondary purpose was to determine if the addition of rate/rhythm control to treatment provided further benefits beyond those achieved with repeated practice.…

  6. Alpha Rhythm During Three Conditions of Visual Imagery and Emergent Uncovering Psychotherapy: The Critical Role of Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morishige, Howard; Reyher, Joseph

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to verify an earlier finding that visual imagery does not desynchronize alpha rhythms, to determine if the revisualization of a nocturnal dream is desynchronizing beyond the expectation to request revisualization of a dream, and to demonstrate that hot images are produced by the repressed aims of drives. (Author/RK)

  7. The primate connectome in context: Principles of connections of the cortical visual system.

    PubMed

    Hilgetag, Claus C; Medalla, Maria; Beul, Sarah F; Barbas, Helen

    2016-07-01

    Which principles determine the organization of the intricate network formed by nerve fibers that link the primate cerebral cortex? We addressed this issue for the connections of primate visual cortices by systematically analyzing how the existence or absence of connections, their density as well as laminar patterns of projection origins and terminations are correlated with distance, similarity in cortical type as well as neuronal density or the thickness of cortical areas. Analyses were based on four extensive compilations of qualitative as well as quantitative data for connections of the primate visual cortical system in macaque monkeys (Felleman and Van Essen 1991; Barbas 1986; Barbas and Rempel-Clower 1997; Barone et al. 2000; Markov et al. 2014). Distance and thickness similarity were not consistently correlated with connection features, but similarity of cortical type, determined by qualitative features of laminar differentiation, or measured quantitatively as the areas' overall neuronal density, was a reliable predictor for the existence of connections between areas. Cortical type similarity was also consistently and closely correlated with characteristic laminar connection profiles: structurally dissimilar areas had origin and termination patterns that were biased to the upper or deep cortical layers, while similar areas showed more bilaminar origins and terminations. These results suggest that patterns of corticocortical connections of primate visual cortices are closely linked to the stratified architecture of the cerebral cortex. In particular, the regularity of laminar projection origins and terminations arises from the structural differences between cortical areas. The observed integration of projections with the intrinsic cortical architecture provides a structural basis for advanced theories of cortical organization and function. PMID:27083526

  8. Effects of biological and environmental factors on activity rhythms of wild animals.

    PubMed

    Tester, J R; Figala, J

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews information on the effects of biological and environmental factors on activity rhythms of wild animals monitored by radio telemetry. Variations in radio signals received from free-ranging animals are used to determine the pattern of activity and rest. Telemetry is especially effective for obtaining activity data from wild animals at night and from those living in dense vegetation or underground. Biological factors such as breeding behavior, care of young, time of last eating, and food storage cause changes in daily activity patterns. Similarly, environmental factors such as temperature, snow cover, food supply and disturbance caused by humans in an urban setting also cause changes in daily activity patterns. The observed modifications of activity rhythms show that controlling mechanisms allow wild animals to quickly respond to changing biological and environmental factors.

  9. Circadian rhythms and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: The what, the when and the why.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Andrew N; Baird, Alison L; Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Thome, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterised by impulsivity, inattention and hyperactivity. Aside from these core psychopathologies, sleep disturbances are found to be highly comorbid with ADHD, and indeed dysregulated sleep may contribute to some of the symptoms of the disorder. It is not clear how sleep disturbances come to be so common in ADHD, but one putative mechanism is through the circadian timekeeping system. This system underpins the generation of near 24-hour rhythms in a host of physiological, behavioural and psychological parameters, and is a key determinant of the sleep/wake cycle. In this paper we review the evidence for sleep and circadian rhythm disturbance in ADHD, examine the possible mechanistic links between these factors and the disorder and discuss future directions through which the circadian clock can be targetted for ADHD symptom relief. PMID:26776072

  10. Many Specialists for Suppressing Cortical Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Burkhalter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Cortical computations are critically dependent on GABA-releasing neurons for dynamically balancing excitation with inhibition that is proportional to the overall level of activity. Although it is widely accepted that there are multiple types of interneurons, defining their identities based on qualitative descriptions of morphological, molecular and physiological features has failed to produce a universally accepted ‘parts list’, which is needed to understand the roles that interneurons play in cortical processing. A list of features has been published by the Petilla Interneurons Nomenclature Group, which represents an important step toward an unbiased classification of interneurons. To this end some essential features have recently been studied quantitatively and their association was examined using multidimensional cluster analyses. These studies revealed at least 3 distinct electrophysiological, 6 morphological and 15 molecular phenotypes. This is a conservative estimate of the number of interneuron types, which almost certainly will be revised as more quantitative studies will be performed and similarities will be defined objectively. It is clear that interneurons are organized with physiological attributes representing the most general, molecular characteristics the most detailed and morphological features occupying the middle ground. By themselves, none of these features are sufficient to define classes of interneurons. The challenge will be to determine which features belong together and how cell type-specific feature combinations are genetically specified. PMID:19225588

  11. Object recognition by artificial cortical maps.

    PubMed

    Plebe, Alessio; Domenella, Rosaria Grazia

    2007-09-01

    Object recognition is one of the most important functions of the human visual system, yet one of the least understood, this despite the fact that vision is certainly the most studied function of the brain. We understand relatively well how several processes in the cortical visual areas that support recognition capabilities take place, such as orientation discrimination and color constancy. This paper proposes a model of the development of object recognition capability, based on two main theoretical principles. The first is that recognition does not imply any sort of geometrical reconstruction, it is instead fully driven by the two dimensional view captured by the retina. The second assumption is that all the processing functions involved in recognition are not genetically determined or hardwired in neural circuits, but are the result of interactions between epigenetic influences and basic neural plasticity mechanisms. The model is organized in modules roughly related to the main visual biological areas, and is implemented mainly using the LISSOM architecture, a recent neural self-organizing map model that simulates the effects of intercortical lateral connections. This paper shows how recognition capabilities, similar to those found in brain ventral visual areas, can develop spontaneously by exposure to natural images in an artificial cortical model.

  12. Correlation of cerebral cortical morphology with behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.

    1989-03-01

    Association between functional damage and damage to the central nervous system from toxic agents can be used to determine the value of behavioral tests as predictors of damage to the nervous system. Variability in data from behavioral tests may be caused, in part, by varying levels of structural differences in the nervous system. Stepwise multiple regression is one method for analyzing the relationship between variability in data resulting from linkage between functional and morphological or other parameters of the structure of the nervous system. As an example, the predictive value of four behavioral tests is assessed in detecting thinning of the cerebral cortex following gestational exposure of rats to ionizing radiation. In this analysis, there were seven independent variables for predicting cortical thickness. The sequence of number of times each variable was used in prediction, from most frequent to least frequent, was: angle of stride greater than negative geotaxis greater than continuous corridor greater than body weight greater than width of stride greater than length of stride greater than reflex suspension. The data support the concept that there are varying degrees of predictive associations between these functional and cortical parameters.

  13. Automatic segmentation editing for cortical surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Xu, Chenyang; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation and representation of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images is an important goal in neuroscience and medicine. Accurate cortical segmentation requires preprocessing of the image data to separate certain subcortical structures from the cortex in order to generate a good initial white-matter/gray-matter interface. This step is typically manual or semi-automatic. In this paper, we propose an automatic procedure that is based on a careful analysis of the brain anatomy. Following a fuzzy segmentation of the brain image, the method first extracts the ventricles using a geometric deformable surface model. A region force, derived from the cerebrospinal membership function, is used to deform the surface towards the boundary of the ventricles, while a curvature force controls the smoothness of the surface and prevents it from growing into the outer pial surface. Next, region-growing identifies and fills the subcortical regions in each cortical slice using the detected ventricles as seeds and the white matter and several automatically determined sealing lines as boundaries. To make the method robust to segmentation artifacts, a putamen mask drawn in the Talairach coordinate system is also used to help the region growing process. Visual inspection and initial results on 15 subjects show the success of the proposed method.

  14. Many specialists for suppressing cortical excitation.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Cortical computations are critically dependent on GABA-releasing neurons for dynamically balancing excitation with inhibition that is proportional to the overall level of activity. Although it is widely accepted that there are multiple types of interneurons, defining their identities based on qualitative descriptions of morphological, molecular and physiological features has failed to produce a universally accepted 'parts list', which is needed to understand the roles that interneurons play in cortical processing. A list of features has been published by the Petilla Interneurons Nomenclature Group, which represents an important step toward an unbiased classification of interneurons. To this end some essential features have recently been studied quantitatively and their association was examined using multidimensional cluster analyses. These studies revealed at least 3 distinct electrophysiological, 6 morphological and 15 molecular phenotypes. This is a conservative estimate of the number of interneuron types, which almost certainly will be revised as more quantitative studies will be performed and similarities will be defined objectively. It is clear that interneurons are organized with physiological attributes representing the most general, molecular characteristics the most detailed and morphological features occupying the middle ground. By themselves, none of these features are sufficient to define classes of interneurons. The challenge will be to determine which features belong together and how cell type-specific feature combinations are genetically specified. PMID:19225588

  15. Actin kinetics shapes cortical network structure and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Kruse, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The actin cortex of animal cells is the main determinant of cellular mechanics. The continuous turnover of cortical actin filaments enables cells to quickly respond to stimuli. Recent work has shown that most of the cortical actin is generated by only two actin nucleators, the Arp2/3 complex and the formin Diaph1. However, our understanding of their interplay, their kinetics, and the length distribution of the filaments that they nucleate within living cells is poor. Such knowledge is necessary for a thorough comprehension of cellular processes and cell mechanics from basic polymer physics principles. We determined cortical assembly rates in living cells by using single-molecule fluorescence imaging in combination with stochastic simulations. We find that formin-nucleated filaments are, on average, 10 times longer than Arp2/3-nucleated filaments. Although formin-generated filaments represent less than 10% of all actin filaments, mechanical measurements indicate that they are important determinants of cortical elasticity. Tuning the activity of actin nucleators to alter filament length distribution may thus be a mechanism allowing cells to adjust their macroscopic mechanical properties to their physiological needs. PMID:27152338

  16. Time-restricted feeding and the realignment of biological rhythms: translational opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sunderram, Jag; Sofou, Stavroula; Kamisoglu, Kubra; Karantza, Vassiliki; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-03-28

    It has been argued that circadian dysregulation is not only a critical inducer and promoter of adverse health effects, exacerbating symptom burden, but also hampers recovery. Therefore understanding the health-promoting roles of regulating (i.e., restoring) circadian rhythms, thus suppressing harmful effects of circadian dysregulation, would likely improve treatment. At a critical care setting it has been argued that studies are warranted to determine whether there is any use in restoring circadian rhythms in critically ill patients, what therapeutic goals should be targeted, and how these could be achieved. Particularly interesting are interventional approaches aiming at optimizing the time of feeding in relation to individualized day-night cycles for patients receiving enteral nutrition, in an attempt to re-establish circadian patterns of molecular expression. In this short review we wish to explore the idea of transiently imposing (appropriate, but yet to be determined) circadian rhythmicity via regulation of food intake as a means of exploring rhythm-setting properties of metabolic cues in the context of improving immune response. We highlight some of the key elements associated with his complex question particularly as they relate to: a) stress and rhythmic variability; and b) metabolic entrainment of peripheral tissues as a possible intervention strategy through time-restricted feeding. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for translating these ideas to the bedside.

  17. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function.

    PubMed

    Castejon, Carlos; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm) is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas.

  18. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm) is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas. PMID:26820514

  19. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function.

    PubMed

    Castejon, Carlos; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm) is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas. PMID:26820514

  20. Reconstitution of cortical Dynein function.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sophie; Laan, Liedewij; Dogterom, Marileen

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a major microtubule (MT)-associated motor in nearly all eukaryotic cells. A subpopulation of dyneins associates with the cell cortex and the interaction of this cortical dynein with MTs helps to drive processes such as nuclear migration, mitotic spindle orientation, and cytoskeletal reorientation during wound healing. In this chapter, we describe three types of assays in which interactions between cortical dynein and MTs are reconstituted in vitro at increasing levels of complexity. In the first 1D assay, MTs, nucleated from a centrosome attached to a surface, grow against dynein-coated gold barriers. In this assay configuration, the interactions between MTs and dynein attached to a barrier can be studied in great detail. In the second and third assays, a freely moving dynamic aster is placed in either a 2D microfabricated chamber or a 3D water-in-oil emulsion droplet, with dynein-coated boundaries. These assays can be used to study how cortical dynein positions centrosomes. Finally, we discuss future possibilities for increasing the complexity of these reconstituted systems.

  1. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Black, Sherilynn J.; Hultman, Rainbo; Szabo, Steven T.; DeMaio, Kristine D.; Du, Jeanette; Katz, Brittany M.; Feng, Guoping; Covington, Herbert E.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic effect of these approaches. Here we show that direct optogenetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) descending projection neurons in mice engineered to express Chr2 in layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1–Chr2 mice) models an antidepressant-like effect in mice subjected to a forced-swim test. Furthermore, we show that this PFC stimulation induces a long-lasting suppression of anxiety-like behavior (but not conditioned social avoidance) in socially stressed Thy1–Chr2 mice: an effect that is observed >10 d after the last stimulation. Finally, we use optogenetic stimulation and multicircuit recording techniques concurrently in Thy1–Chr2 mice to demonstrate that activation of cortical projection neurons entrains neural oscillatory activity and drives synchrony across limbic brain areas that regulate affect. Importantly, these neural oscillatory changes directly correlate with the temporally precise activation and suppression of limbic unit activity. Together, our findings show that the direct activation of cortical projection systems is sufficient to modulate activity across networks underlying affective regulation. They also suggest that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projection systems may serve as a viable therapeutic strategy for treating affective disorders. PMID:23325249

  2. Automatic Evaluation of Speech Rhythm Instability and Acceleration in Dysarthrias Associated with Basal Ganglia Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Jan; Hlavnička, Jan; Čmejla, Roman; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programing, and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability (RI) and rhythm acceleration (RA). A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD), 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing RI and RA were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and non-speech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP, and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias. PMID:26258122

  3. Hysteresis and bistability in the direct transition from 1:1 to 2:1 rhythm in periodically driven single ventricular cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Ali R.; Jeandupeux, Dominique; Alonso, Francisco; Guevara, Michael R.

    1999-12-01

    found in the experiments. The steady-state action potential duration restitution curve, which is a plot of the duration of the action potential during 1:1 rhythm as a function of the recovery time or diastolic interval immediately preceding that action potential, was determined. Iteration of a finite-difference equation derived using the restitution curve predicted the direct {1:1↔2:1} transition, as well as bistability, in both the experimental and modeling work. However, prediction of the action potential duration during 2:1 rhythm was not as accurate in the experiments as in the model. Finally, we point out a few implications of our findings for cardiac arrhythmias (e.g., Mobitz type II block, ischemic alternans).

  4. Social Rhythm Therapies for Mood Disorders: an Update.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Patricia L; Gengler, Devan; Kelly, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Social rhythms are patterns of habitual daily behaviors that may impact the timing of the circadian system directly or indirectly through light exposure. According to the social rhythm hypothesis of depression, depressed individuals possess a vulnerability in the circadian timing system that inhibits natural recovery after disrupting life events. Social rhythm therapies (SRTs) support the implementation of regular, daily patterns of activity in order to facilitate recovery of circadian biological processes and also to improve mood. The majority of SRT research has examined interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) for bipolar disorder. Recent studies have examined IPSRT in inpatient settings, using alternative modes of delivery (group, combined individual and group, internet-based applications) and with brief timeframes. New forms of SRTs are developing that target mood in individuals who have experienced specific types of stressful life events. This manuscript reviews the theoretical and biological bases of SRTs and current literature on SRT outcomes.

  5. An empirical comparison of rhythm in language and music.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aniruddh D; Daniele, Joseph R

    2003-02-01

    Musicologists and linguists have often suggested that the prosody of a culture's spoken language can influence the structure of its instrumental music. However, empirical data supporting this idea have been lacking. This has been partly due to the difficulty of developing and applying comparable quantitative measures to melody and rhythm in speech and music. This study uses a recently-developed measure for the study of speech rhythm to compare rhythmic patterns in English and French language and classical music. We find that English and French musical themes are significantly different in this measure of rhythm, which also differentiates the rhythm of spoken English and French. Thus, there is an empirical basis for the claim that spoken prosody leaves an imprint on the music of a culture.

  6. Age, circadian rhythms, and sleep loss in flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Nguyen, DE; Rosekind, Mark R.; Connell, Linda J.

    1993-01-01

    Age-related changes in trip-induced sleep loss, personality, and the preduty temperature rhythm were analyzed in crews from various flight operations. Eveningness decreased with age. The minimum of the baseline temperature rhythm occurred earlier with age. The amplitude of the baseline temperature rhythm declined with age. Average daily percentage sleep loss during trips increased with age. Among crewmembers flying longhaul flight operations, subjects aged 50-60 averaged 3.5 times more sleep loss per day than subjects aged 20-30. These studies support previous findings that evening types and subjects with later peaking temperature rhythms adapt better to shift work and time zone changes. Age and circadian type may be important considerations for duty schedules and fatigue countermeasures.

  7. Introduction: circadian rhythm and its disruption: impact on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F; Gladanac, Bojana

    2014-08-01

    Almost all forms of life have predictable daily or circadian rhythms in molecular, endocrine, and behavioral functions. In mammals, a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei coordinates the timing of these rhythms. Daily light exposure that affects the retina of the eye directly influences this area, which is required to align endogenous processes to the appropriate time of day. The present "Views and Reviews" articles discuss the influence of circadian rhythms, especially nightly secretion of melatonin, on reproductive function and parturition. In addition, an examination is made of problems that arise from recurrent circadian rhythm disruption associated with changes in light exposure patterns common to modern day society. Finally, a possible solution to prevent disruptions in circadian phase markers by filtering out short wavelengths from nocturnal light is reviewed.

  8. Temporal coding in rhythm tasks revealed by modality effects.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, A M; Jona, M

    1991-09-01

    Temporal coding has been studied by examining the perception and reproduction of rhythms and by examining memory for the order of events in a list. We attempt to link these research programs both empirically and theoretically. Glenberg and Swanson (1986) proposed that the superior recall of auditory material, compared with visual material, reflects more accurate temporal coding for the auditory material. In this paper, we demonstrate that a similar modality effect can be produced in a rhythm task. Auditory rhythms composed of stimuli of two durations are reproduced more accurately than are visual rhythms. Furthermore, it appears that the auditory superiority reflects enhanced chunking of the auditory material rather than better identification of durations. PMID:1956312

  9. Language familiarity, expectation, and novice musical rhythm production.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, John G; Lidji, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    The music of expert musicians reflects the speech rhythm of their native language. Here, we examine this effect in amateur and novice musicians. English- and French-speaking participants were both instructed to produce simple "English" and "French" tunes using only two keys on a keyboard. All participants later rated the rhythmic variability of English and French speech samples. The rhythmic variability of the "English" and "French" tunes that were produced reflected the perceived rhythmic variability in English and French speech samples. Yet, the pattern was different for English and French participants and did not correspond to the actual measured speech rhythm variability of the speech samples. Surprise recognition tests two weeks later confirmed that the music-speech relationship remained over time. The results show that the relationship between music and speech rhythm is more widespread than previously thought and that musical rhythm production by amateurs and novices is concordant with their rhythmic expectations in the perception of speech.

  10. Preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultzman, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the function of the circadian timing system in space, the circadian rhythm of conidiation of the fungus Neurospora crassa was monitored in constant darkness on the STS 9 flight of the Space Shuttle Columbia. During the first 7 days of spaceflight many tubes showed a marked reduction in the apparent amplitude of the conidiation rhythm, and some cultures appeared arrhythmic. There was more variability in the growth rate and circadian rhythms of individual cultures in space than is usually seen on earth. The results of this experiment indicate that while the circadian rhythm of Neurospora conidiation can persist outside of the earth's environment, either the timekeeping process or its expression is altered in space.

  11. Speech rhythm sensitivity and musical aptitude: ERPs and individual differences.

    PubMed

    Magne, Cyrille; Jordan, Deanna K; Gordon, Reyna L

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the electrophysiological markers of rhythmic expectancy during speech perception. In addition, given the large literature showing overlaps between cognitive and neural resources recruited for language and music, we considered a relation between musical aptitude and individual differences in speech rhythm sensitivity. Twenty adults were administered a standardized assessment of musical aptitude, and EEG was recorded as participants listened to sequences of four bisyllabic words for which the stress pattern of the final word either matched or mismatched the stress pattern of the preceding words. Words with unexpected stress patterns elicited an increased fronto-central mid-latency negativity. In addition, rhythm aptitude significantly correlated with the size of the negative effect elicited by unexpected iambic words, the least common type of stress pattern in English. The present results suggest shared neurocognitive resources for speech rhythm and musical rhythm.

  12. Level of participation in robotic-assisted treadmill walking modulates midline sensorimotor EEG rhythms in able-bodied subjects.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johanna; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Grieshofer, Peter; Neuper, Christa; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Scherer, Reinhold

    2012-11-15

    In robot assisted gait training, a pattern of human locomotion is executed repetitively with the intention to restore the motor programs associated with walking. Several studies showed that active contribution to the movement is critical for the encoding of motor memory. We propose to use brain monitoring techniques during gait training to encourage active participation in the movement. We investigated the spectral patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) that are related to active and passive robot assisted gait. Fourteen healthy participants were considered. Infomax independent component analysis separated the EEG into independent components representing brain, muscle, and eye movement activity, as well as other artifacts. An equivalent current dipole was calculated for each independent component. Independent components were clustered across participants based on their anatomical position and frequency spectra. Four clusters were identified in the sensorimotor cortices that accounted for differences between active and passive walking or showed activity related to the gait cycle. We show that in central midline areas the mu (8-12 Hz) and beta (18-21 Hz) rhythms are suppressed during active compared to passive walking. These changes are statistically significant: mu (F(1, 13)=11.2 p ≤ 0.01) and beta (F(1, 13)=7.7, p ≤ 0.05). We also show that these differences depend on the gait cycle phases. We provide first evidence of modulations of the gamma rhythm in the band 25 to 40 Hz, localized in central midline areas related to the phases of the gait cycle. We observed a trend (F(1, 8)=11.03, p ≤ 0.06) for suppressed low gamma rhythm when comparing active and passive walking. Additionally we found significant suppressions of the mu (F(1, 11)=20.1 p ≤ 0.01), beta (F(1, 11)=11.3 p ≤ 0.05) and gamma (F(1, 11)=4.9 p ≤ 0.05) rhythms near C3 (in the right hand area of the primary motor cortex) during phases of active vs. passive robot assisted walking. To our

  13. The ontogeny of circadian rhythms in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Jilge, B

    1993-01-01

    The nursing rhythms of 14 rabbit does and the activity of 18 litters from birth to days 14-16 were monitored continuously, as were the circadian rhythms of different behavioral functions of 10 young rabbits from weaning until day 380 of life. The does gave birth 2 hr, 26 min +/- 2 hr, 8 min after lights-on in a light-dark cycle (LD 12:12). The first nursing occurred 20 hr, 30 min +/- 2 hr, 21 min after parturition. Does that had continuous access to the next boxes exhibited a regular once-a-day nursing rhythm; the nursing visits to the litters occurred during the dark phase (D). The nursing visits lasted 3 min, 42 sec +/- 25 sec. Nursing advanced during the first 10 days of lactation by an average of 42 +/- 16 min/day, and thus shifted to the first half of D. The pups anticipated nursing by a significant increase of activity, which was established between days 1 and 5 of life. In two does, the nursing rhythm split into two nursing visits per day, one during D and one during the light phase (L). When scheduled to nurse at an "artificial" phase in L with T = 24 hr, the pups' anticipatory activity was entrained by the 24-hr nursing rhythm. During a 48-hr fast, the elevated activity persisted around the phase of prior nursing time, demonstrating that it was controlled by an endogenous oscillator entrained by the zeitgeber of maternal nursing. Of 10 weanlings, 6 first exhibited a trimodal rhythm, which turned bimodal within 3-6 days. Stable entrainment by the external LD zeitgeber was attained by about days 45-80, and full nocturnality was attained by about days 200-250 after weaning. Having attained steady-state conditions, 7 of 10 rabbits exhibited a stable unimodal, nocturnal rhythm in each of the five functions, while the other 3 retained a bimodal rhythm.

  14. Methods to Record Circadian Rhythm Wheel Running Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siepka, Sandra M.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches (phenotype to gene) are powerful methods to identify mouse circadian clock components. The success of these approaches, however, is highly dependent on the quality of the phenotype— specifically, the ability to measure circadian rhythms in individual mice. This article outlines the factors necessary to measure mouse circadian rhythms, including choice of mouse strain, facilities and equipment design and construction, experimental design, high-throughput methods, and finally methods for data analysis. PMID:15817291

  15. Circadian Rhythms in Stomatal Responsiveness to Red and Blue Light.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Williams, W. E.; Assmann, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Stomata of many plants have circadian rhythms in responsiveness to environmental cues as well as circadian rhythms in aperture. Stomatal responses to red light and blue light are mediated by photosynthetic photoreceptors; responses to blue light are additionally controlled by a specific blue-light photoreceptor. This paper describes circadian rhythmic aspects of stomatal responsiveness to red and blue light in Vicia faba. Plants were exposed to a repeated light:dark regime of 1.5:2.5 h for a total of 48 h, and because the plants could not entrain to this short light:dark cycle, circadian rhythms were able to "free run" as if in continuous light. The rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the 1.5-h light periods was caused both by a rhythm in sensitivity to light and by a rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the preceding 2.5-h dark periods. Both rhythms peaked during the middle of the subjective day. Although the stomatal response to blue light is greater than the response to red light at all times of day, there was no discernible difference in period, phase, or amplitude of the rhythm in sensitivity to the two light qualities. We observed no circadian rhythmicity in net carbon assimilation with the 1.5:2.5 h light regime for either red or blue light. In continuous white light, small rhythmic changes in photosynthetic assimilation were observed, but at relatively high light levels, and these appeared to be attributable largely to changes in internal CO2 availability governed by stomatal conductance. PMID:12231947

  16. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits. PMID:27309353

  17. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, Elise; Cursi, Marco; Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits. PMID:27309353

  18. Cortical and cancellous bone in the human femoral neck: evaluation of an interactive image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Bell, K L; Garrahan, N; Kneissel, M; Loveridge, N; Grau, E; Stanton, M; Reeve, J

    1996-11-01

    An interactive image analysis package was developed to examine whole cross-sections from the femoral neck. The package quantifies cortical width (Ct.Wi), cortical porosity (Ct.Po), and proportions of cortical, cancellous bone as a percentage of bone plus marrow area. Segmental analysis was used to quantify circumferential variations in bone distribution within the femoral cross-section. To evaluate reproducibility of data four independent operators analyzed previously prepared femoral neck sections from a 2000 BC population. Differences in total and circumferential distributions of cortical and cancellous bone with respect to gender and age of samples were demonstrated. Reproducibility was assessed using coefficients of variation (CV). Analysis of sections using a variable magnification, giving largest possible image size, rather than a set magnification reduced variation between operators for all measurements. Use of a calculated threshold significantly decreased variation between operators for the proportions of cortical and cancellous bone (p < or = 0.026). Dividing the image into 8 rather than 16 segments also improved reproducibility. There was little agreement between operators in the determination of cortical porosity. The mean CV for the other quantitative indices such as cortical width and proportions of cortical and cancellous bone ranged from 4.87% to 13.52%. The genders showed similar patterns in circumferential distribution of bone. Cortical width was significantly greater in the inferior region compared to the other areas, whereas percent cortical bone was lowest at the superior region. The center of mass (COM) for the younger age group was located anteriorly, whereas in the older samples the COM was located posteriorly of the center of area (p = 0.041). Basic data relating to cortical and cancellous bone of acceptable reproducibility in comparison with current standards in iliac histomorphometry can now be provided at modest cost in operator time and

  19. Development of fetal and neonatal sleep and circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Majid; Maas, Yolanda G H; Ariagno, Ronald L

    2003-08-01

    The origin of sleep and circadian rhythms development is found during the fetal period. Both quiet (NREM) and active (REM) sleep are distinguishable during the last 10 weeks of gestation. Comparable to fetuses, low risk preterm infants recorded at 30-40 weeks postconceptional age, had a similar development of sleep i.e. an increase in quiet sleep and a decrease in indeterminate sleep. A further development in sleep organization characterized by increased slow wave and spindle activity during quiet sleep and coupling with circadian rhythm takes place during the first 6 months of life in both term and preterm infants.Circadian rhythm of fetal heart rate synchronized with maternal rest-activity, heart rate, cortisol, melatonin, and body temperature rhythms is present during the last 10 weeks of gestation. Although maternally influenced, circadian rhythm antenatally becomes ultradian at birth. Both preterm and term infants show a significant increase in circadian body temperature rhythm amplitude during the first 3 months of life.

  20. Monkey lipsmacking develops like the human speech rhythm.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Ryan J; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2012-07-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved de novo in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial expressions. We tested this idea by investigating the structure and development of macaque monkey lipsmacks and found that their developmental trajectory is strikingly similar to the one that leads from human infant babbling to adult speech. Specifically, we show that: (1) younger monkeys produce slower, more variable mouth movements and as they get older, these movements become faster and less variable; and (2) this developmental pattern does not occur for another cyclical mouth movement--chewing. These patterns parallel human developmental patterns for speech and chewing. They suggest that, in both species, the two types of rhythmic mouth movements use different underlying neural circuits that develop in different ways. Ultimately, both lipsmacking and speech converge on a ~5 Hz rhythm that represents the frequency that characterizes the speech rhythm of human adults. We conclude that monkey lipsmacking and human speech share a homologous developmental mechanism, lending strong empirical support to the idea that the human speech rhythm evolved from the rhythmic facial expressions of our primate ancestors.

  1. The phonetic rhythm/syntax headedness connection: Evidence from Tagalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Sonya; Fais, Laurel; Werker, Janet

    2005-04-01

    Ramus, Nespor, and Mehler [Cognition (1999)] show that the rhythm of a language (broadly: stress- versus syllable- versus mora-timing) results from the proportion of vocalic material in an utterance (%V) and the standard deviation of consonantal intervals (delta-C). Based on 14 languages, Shukla, Nespor, and Mehler [submitted] further argue that rhythm is correlated with syntactic headedness: low %V is correlated with head-first languages (e.g., English); high %V is correlated with head-final languages (e.g., Japanese). Together, these proposals have important implications for language acquisition: infants can discriminate across rhythm classes [Nazzi, Bertoncini, and Mehler, J. Exp. Psych: Human Perception and Performance (1998)]. If rhythm, as defined by %V and delta-C, can predict headedness, then infants can potentially use rhythm information to bootstrap into their languages syntactic structure. This paper reports on a study analyzing rhythm in a language not yet considered: Tagalog. Results support the Shukla et al. proposal in an interesting way: based on its %V and delta-C, Tagalog falls between head-first and head-last languages, slighty closer to the head-first group. This placement correlates well with the fact that, although Tagalog is said to be primarily head-first syntactically, head-last phrases are permitted and common in the language.

  2. Rhythm perception, production, and synchronization during the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Provasi, Joëlle; Anderson, David I.; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Sensori-motor synchronization (SMS) is the coordination of rhythmic movement with an external rhythm. It plays a central role in motor, cognitive, and social behavior. SMS is commonly studied in adults and in children from four years of age onward. Prior to this age, the ability has rarely been investigated due to a lack of available methods. The present paper reviews what is known about SMS in young children, infants, newborns, and fetuses. The review highlights fetal and infant perception of rhythm and cross modal perception of rhythm, fetal, and infant production of rhythm and cross modal production of rhythm, and the contexts in which production of rhythm can be observed in infants. A primary question is whether infants, even newborns, can modify their spontaneous rhythmical motor behavior in response to external rhythmical stimulation. Spontaneous sucking, crying, and leg movements have been studied in the presence or absence of rhythmical auditory stimulation. Findings suggest that the interaction between movement and sound is present at birth and that SMS can be observed in special conditions and within a narrow range of tempi, particularly near the infant’s own spontaneous motor tempo. The discussion centers on the fundamental role of SMS in interaction and communication at the beginning of life. PMID:25278929

  3. MicroRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Wang, Ruiqi

    2012-07-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms have been extensively studied for many years and many computational models have been presented. Most of the circadian rhythms are based on interlocked positive and negative feedback loops involving coding regions of some 'clock' genes. Recent works have implicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play crucial roles in modulating the circadian clock. Here we develop a computational model involving four genes, Per, Cry, Bmal1, and Clock, and two miRNAs, miRNA-219 and miRNA-132, to show their post-transcriptional roles in the modulation of the circadian rhythm. The model is based on experimental observations, by which the miRNAs are incorporated into a classic model including only coding genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model predicts that miRNA-mediated regulation plays critical roles in modulating the circadian clock. In addition, parameter sensitivity analysis indicates that the period of circadian rhythm with miRNA-mediated regulation is more insensitive to perturbations, showing that the miRNA-mediated regulation can enhance the robustness of the circadian rhythms. This study may help us understand the microRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm more clearly.

  4. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  5. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities. PMID:26467405

  6. [Diurnal activity rhythm of Clethrionomys rufocanus].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianli; Zhang, Chunmei; Yang, Chunwen

    2003-06-01

    The diurnal activity rhythm of Clethrionomys rufocanus was studied under three different food conditions in a laboratory. The activity occurred both in the daytime and at night, but mainly at night (19:00-4:00). The mice fed with Mouse food exhibited six small peaks in their daily activity, and those fed with grass or hay exhibited seven, but the peak of the out-nest night activity was 2-3 hours earlier. The activity amount of out-nest was 30,518.0 +/- 3,694.9 s for those fed with grass, the next was 21,811.7 +/- 2,288.0 s for those fed with hay, and the least was 15,038.0 +/- 666.0 s for those fed with mouse food. The activity amount of feeding was 10,867.3 +/- 1,612.1 s for those fed with grass, much more than those fed with mouse food and hay. The activity amount for drinking was 988.5 +/- 79.1 s (fed with hay), 568.9 +/- 60.9 s (fed with mouse food) and 139.3 +/- 47.2 s (fed with grass).

  7. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress).

  8. Human daily rhythms measured for one year.

    PubMed

    Binkley, S; Tome, M B; Crawford, D; Mosher, K

    1990-08-01

    Four human subjects recorded their wake-up and to-sleep times for one year each. The data were plotted to display individual circadian rhythms and the data were analyzed statistically. First, individuals had characteristic patterns in which visible changes in the patterns were observed mainly when time zones were changed because of travel. Second, the months with the latest wake-up and latest to-sleep times concentrated around the winter solstice; the months with the earliest wake-up and earliest to-sleep times concentrated around the fall equinox. Third, new moon versus full moon days were not different. Fourth, one-hour changes between standard and daylight savings time in the USA were reflected by near one-hour changes in two subjects, but not in a third. Fifth, weekend delays in wake-up time (0.8-1.6 hours), weekend delays in to-sleep time (0.1-0.5 hours), and shorter weekend awake time (0.8-1.3 hours) were observed. Sixth, throughout the year, wake-up times were close to the time of sunrise, but to-sleep times were several hours past sunset.

  9. Biological rhythms as organization and information.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, D; Rossi, E L

    1993-11-01

    While it is generally acknowledged that modern science began with the quantification of time in the measurement of linear physical processes in space by Galileo and Newton, the biological sciences have only recently developed appropriate experimental and mathematical methods for the description of living systems in terms of processes of non-linear, recursive dynamics. We now recognize that living organisms have patterns of exquisitely timed processes that are as intricate as their spatial structure and organization. Self-similarities of life processes in time and space have evolved to generate an ensemble of oscillators within which analogous functions may be discerned on many different time scales. The increasing complexity of periodic relationships on and between the many levels of biological organization are uncovered by current research. Recent efforts to reformulate the foundation of physics from the quantum to the cosmological level by using the concept of information as the common denominator integrating time, structure and energy remind us of an apparently analogous suggestion in the chronobiological literature which also describes the periodic dynamics of living systems as information processing. In this paper we review the periodic processes of living systems on all levels from the molecular, genetic and cellular to the neuroendocrinological, behavioural and social domains. Biological rhythms may be conceptualized as the evolution of ever more complex dynamics of information transduction that optimize the temporal integrity, development, and survival of the organism. PMID:8130327

  10. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R.; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  11. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities.

  12. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  13. Frontal Cortical Atrophy as a Predictor of Poststroke Apathy.

    PubMed

    Mihalov, Ján; Mikula, Peter; Budiš, Jaroslav; Valkovič, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the symptoms of poststroke apathy and sociodemographic, stroke-related (severity of stroke, degree of disability, and performance in activities of daily living), and radiological correlates. We determined the degree of cortical and subcortical brain atrophy, the severity of white matter and basal ganglia lesions on baseline computed tomography (CT) scans, and the localization of acute ischemia on control CT or magnetic resonance imaging scans in subacute stages of stroke. During follow-up examinations, in addition to the assessment of apathy symptoms using the Apathy Scale, we also evaluated symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study included 47 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. Correlates significantly associated with apathy, determined at baseline and during follow-up, were entered into the "predictive" and "associative" multiple regression models, respectively. Frontal cortical atrophy and symptoms of depression were most strongly associated with poststroke apathy symptoms. In order to model an interrelation between both cortical atrophy and white matter lesions and aging, we supplemented 2 additional "predictive" models using interaction variables, whereby we confirmed the role of frontal cortical atrophy as a predictor of poststroke apathy also as a function of the increasing age of patients. PMID:27056065

  14. Cortical surface alignment in multi-subject spatiotemporal independent EEG source imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Arthur C; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Chien, Vincent S C; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Makeig, Scott

    2014-02-15

    Brain responses to stimulus presentations may vary widely across subjects in both time course and spatial origins. Multi-subject EEG source imaging studies that apply Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to data concatenated across subjects have overlooked the fact that projections to the scalp sensors from functionally equivalent cortical sources vary from subject to subject. This study demonstrates an approach to spatiotemporal independent component decomposition and alignment that spatially co-registers the MR-derived cortical topographies of individual subjects to a well-defined, shared spherical topology (Fischl et al., 1999). Its efficacy for identifying functionally equivalent EEG sources in multi-subject analysis is demonstrated by analyzing EEG and behavioral data from a stop-signal paradigm using two source-imaging approaches, both based on individual subject independent source decompositions. The first, two-stage approach uses temporal infomax ICA to separate each subject's data into temporally independent components (ICs), then estimates the source density distribution of each IC process from its scalp map and clusters similar sources across subjects (Makeig et al., 2002). The second approach, Electromagnetic Spatiotemporal Independent Component Analysis (EMSICA), combines ICA decomposition and source current density estimation of the artifact-rejected data into a single spatiotemporal ICA decomposition for each subject (Tsai et al., 2006), concurrently identifying both the spatial source distribution of each cortical source and its event-related dynamics. Applied to the stop-signal task data, both approaches gave IC clusters that separately accounted for EEG processes expected in stop-signal tasks, including pre/postcentral mu rhythms, anterior-cingulate theta rhythm, and right-inferior frontal responses, the EMSICA clusters exhibiting more tightly correlated source areas and time-frequency features.

  15. Relating Alpha Power and Phase to Population Firing and Hemodynamic Activity Using a Thalamo-cortical Neural Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Robert; Knock, Stuart; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Oscillations are ubiquitous phenomena in the animal and human brain. Among them, the alpha rhythm in human EEG is one of the most prominent examples. However, its precise mechanisms of generation are still poorly understood. It was mainly this lack of knowledge that motivated a number of simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) – functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. This approach revealed how oscillatory neuronal signatures such as the alpha rhythm are paralleled by changes of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal. Several such studies revealed a negative correlation between the alpha rhythm and the hemodynamic BOLD signal in visual cortex and a positive correlation in the thalamus. In this study we explore the potential generative mechanisms that lead to those observations. We use a bursting capable Stefanescu-Jirsa 3D (SJ3D) neural-mass model that reproduces a wide repertoire of prominent features of local neuronal-population dynamics. We construct a thalamo-cortical network of coupled SJ3D nodes considering excitatory and inhibitory directed connections. The model suggests that an inverse correlation between cortical multi-unit activity, i.e. the firing of neuronal populations, and narrow band local field potential oscillations in the alpha band underlies the empirically observed negative correlation between alpha-rhythm power and fMRI signal in visual cortex. Furthermore the model suggests that the interplay between tonic and bursting mode in thalamus and cortex is critical for this relation. This demonstrates how biophysically meaningful modelling can generate precise and testable hypotheses about the underpinnings of large-scale neuroimaging signals. PMID:26335064

  16. Analysis of blood pressure rhythms for drug efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Germanò, G; Federico, L; Angotti, S; Codispoti, P; Muscolo, M; Bravo, S; Damiani, S

    1996-08-15

    This study analyzes some methods of evaluating the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure circadian rhythm. We reviewed four different approaches: hourly averages, trough-to-peak ratio, cosinor method, and Fourier series applied to the same data to prove the time course of the effects of isradipine administered once daily. A total of 141 patients of both sexes (mean age 53 years, range 30-76) with mild to moderate essential hypertension were enrolled in this multicenter trial after a 2-week placebo run-in. Treatment with isradipine SRO 5 mg/day administered between 8 and 9 AM was started. Each patient underwent ambulatory BP monitoring at the time of entry and after 6 weeks of treatment. Calculation of hourly averages showed decreases after 4 AM, and from about 8-9 AM, when the drug was administered, and the decreases practically did not vary until about 10 PM. Subsequently, the decreases became smaller and indicated reduced drug activity. However, this hypothesis no longer held after 4 AM. The trough-to-peak ratio was calculated including hourly averages after the dose divided by the lowest hourly average. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure showed constant reduction from 3 PM (time of peak) to 11 PM. However, after 11 PM, higher trough-to-peak ratios paradoxically occurred due to a major reduction obtained with placebo, and the negative percentages just before the next dose cannot be attributed to treatment. Applying the cosinor method, maximal values were greatly underestimated, nocturnal values were overestimated, and the absolute maximum occurred in proximity to the minimum relating to postprandial dip. The generalized cosinor model, known as Fourier partial series, was always curtailed to the third harmonic. Fourier analysis was able to describe the daily trend of BP both before and after isradipine administration. We used statistical tests to determine if the differences described by the models were significant. The tests indicated

  17. Maintenance of biological rhythms during hibernation in Eastern woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed

    Zervanos, Stam M; Salsbury, Carmen M; Brown, June K

    2009-05-01

    We undertook a study to determine presence of circadian rhythms during woodchuck hibernation using continuously monitored body temperatures. Males had shorter torpor and longer euthermic periods than females. Circular statistics revealed a significant mean vector for males entering into torpor (10:21 h), but not for females. No significant mean vector was found for male or female arousal from torpor. A contingency test was applied to the torpor bout durations. All 7 males tested had significant tau's between 24 and 26 h, while 6 of the 13 females tested had significant tau's with a range of 22-27 h. These results implicate a free-running circadian clock during torpor bouts. Overall, the data support the existence of biological rhythms during hibernation in woodchucks, especially for males during arousals. Since entries into torpor appear to be synchronized for males, arousal periods may be used to resynchronize their circadian system. The persistence of biological rhythms during hibernation may help to insure successful mating in the spring after emergence.

  18. Dopamine receptor 1 neurons in the dorsal striatum regulate food anticipatory circadian activity rhythms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Christian M; Darvas, Martin; Oviatt, Mia; Chang, Chris H; Michalik, Mateusz; Huddy, Timothy F; Meyer, Emily E; Shuster, Scott A; Aguayo, Antonio; Hill, Elizabeth M; Kiani, Karun; Ikpeazu, Jonathan; Martinez, Johan S; Purpura, Mari; Smit, Andrea N; Patton, Danica F; Mistlberger, Ralph E; Palmiter, Richard D; Steele, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Daily rhythms of food anticipatory activity (FAA) are regulated independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which mediates entrainment of rhythms to light, but the neural circuits that establish FAA remain elusive. In this study, we show that mice lacking the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R KO mice) manifest greatly reduced FAA, whereas mice lacking the dopamine D2 receptor have normal FAA. To determine where dopamine exerts its effect, we limited expression of dopamine signaling to the dorsal striatum of dopamine-deficient mice; these mice developed FAA. Within the dorsal striatum, the daily rhythm of clock gene period2 expression was markedly suppressed in D1R KO mice. Pharmacological activation of D1R at the same time daily was sufficient to establish anticipatory activity in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that dopamine signaling to D1R-expressing neurons in the dorsal striatum plays an important role in manifestation of FAA, possibly by synchronizing circadian oscillators that modulate motivational processes and behavioral output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03781.001 PMID:25217530

  19. Light pollution modifies the expression of daily rhythms and behavior patterns in a nocturnal primate.

    PubMed

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14(th) night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.

  20. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals.

  1. Comparative Review of Approved Melatonin Agonists for the Treatment of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilbur P Trey; McLin, Dewey E; Dressman, Marlene A; Neubauer, David N

    2016-09-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) are characterized by persistent or recurrent patterns of sleep disturbance related primarily to alterations of the circadian rhythm system or the misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm and exogenous factors that affect the timing or duration of sleep. These disorders collectively represent a significant unmet medical need, with a total prevalence in the millions, a substantial negative impact on quality of life, and a lack of studied treatments for most of these disorders. Activation of the endogenous melatonin receptors appears to play an important role in setting the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Therefore, melatonin agonists, which may be able to shift and/or stabilize the circadian phase, have been identified as potential therapeutic candidates for the treatment of CRSWDs. Currently, only one melatonin receptor agonist, tasimelteon, is approved for the treatment of a CRSWD: non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (or non-24). However, three additional commercially available melatonin receptor agonists-agomelatine, prolonged-release melatonin, and ramelteon-have been investigated for potential use for treatment of CRSWDs. Data indicate that these melatonin receptor agonists have distinct pharmacologic profiles that may help clarify their clinical use in CRSWDs. We review the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these melatonin agonists and summarize their efficacy profiles when used for the treatment of CRSWDs. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic potential of these melatonin agonists for most CRSWDs.

  2. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7-742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals.

  3. Corkscrews and singularities in fruitflies - Resetting behavior of the circadian eclosion rhythm.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, A. T.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments undertaken to define the phase-resetting behavior of the circadian rhythm of pupal eclosion in populations of fruitflies. An attempt is made to determine how and why the resetting response depends on the duration of a standard perturbation as well as on the time at which it is given. Plotting a three-dimensional graph of the measured emergence centroids vs the stimulus variables, the data are found to spiral up around a vertical rotation axis. Using a computer, a smooth surface, called the resetting surface, which approximately fits the helicoidal cloud of data points, is obtained and is shown to be best described as a vertical corkscrew linking together tilted planes. This corkscrew feature of the resetting surface is taken to indicate that there is an isolated perturbation following which there is either no circadian rhythm of emergence in the steady state, or one of unpredictable phase. A hypothesis concerning the clock dynamics underlying the eclosion rhythm is briefly sketched which encompasses the main features of known resetting data using single discrete pulses of any perturbing agent.

  4. Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate

    PubMed Central

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes. PMID:24236115

  5. The Circadian Rhythm in Photosynthesis in Acetabularia in the Presence of Actinomycin D, Puromycin, and Chloramphenicol

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Beatrice M.; Tuffli, Charles F.; Rubin, Richard H.

    1967-01-01

    Anucleate Acetabularia crenulata shows a circadian rhythm in photosynthesis. In this study, an oxygen electrode was employed to measure this photosynthetic rhythm in the presence and absence of the inhibitors, actinomycin D, chloramphenicol, and puromycin. High concentrations of the inhibitors were used: actinomycin D, 20–40 µg ml-1 puromycin, 30 and 100 µg ml-1; and chloramphenicol, 250 µg ml-1. The effectiveness of these inhibitors on protein synthesis was also measured under the same conditions used for the determination of rhythmicity. In spite of large effects of all three inhibitors on the incorporation of 14C leucine, no effect on the period or the phase of the photosynthetic rhythm was observed. The higher concentration of puromycin and chloramphenicol produced toxic effects which were expressed as a reduction in the amount of photosynthesis, but rhythmicity was still apparent. After 3 or 4 days' exposure to actinomycin, Acetabularia became resistant to its effect. Recovery was also observed in the ability to incorporate leucine. The implications of these results for theories of the basic oscillator responsible for circadian rhythmicity are discussed. PMID:11526851

  6. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface (BCI): model order selection for autoregressive spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Dennis J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2008-06-01

    People can learn to control EEG features consisting of sensorimotor rhythm amplitudes and can use this control to move a cursor in one or two dimensions to a target on a screen. Cursor movement depends on the estimate of the amplitudes of sensorimotor rhythms. Autoregressive models are often used to provide these estimates. The order of the autoregressive model has varied widely among studies. Through analyses of both simulated and actual EEG data, the present study examines the effects of model order on sensorimotor rhythm measurements and BCI performance. The results show that resolution of lower frequency signals requires higher model orders and that this requirement reflects the temporal span of the model coefficients. This is true for both simulated EEG data and actual EEG data during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation. Increasing model order, and decimating the signal were similarly effective in increasing spectral resolution. Furthermore, for BCI control of two-dimensional cursor movement, higher model orders produced better performance in each dimension and greater independence between horizontal and vertical movements. In sum, these results show that autoregressive model order selection is an important determinant of BCI performance and should be based on criteria that reflect system performance.

  7. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN.

  8. Molecular mechanism of suppression of circadian rhythms by a critical stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guocun; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Circadian singularity behavior (also called suppression of circadian rhythms) is a phenomenon characterized by the abolishment of circadian rhythmicities by a critical stimulus. Here we demonstrate that both temperature step up and light pulse, stimuli that activate the expression of the Neurospora circadian clock gene frequency (frq), can trigger singularity behavior in this organism. The arrhythmicity is transient and is followed by the resumption of rhythm in randomly distributed phases. In addition, we show that induction of FRQ expression alone can trigger singularity behavior, indicating that FRQ is a state variable of the Neurospora circadian oscillator. Furthermore, mutations of frq lead to changes in the amplitude of FRQ oscillation, which determines the sensitivity of the clock to phase-resetting cues. Our results further suggest that the singularity behavior is due to the loss of rhythm in all cells. Together, these data suggest that the singularity behavior is due to a circadian negative feedback loop driven to a steady state after the critical treatment. After the initial arrhythmicity, cell populations are then desynchronized. PMID:17066078

  9. Effects of dietary protein alterations on circadian rhythms of gastrointestinal peptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rayford, P L

    1990-10-01

    Altered protein diets and circadian rhythms of gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) were investigated in 126 male and 126 female Sprague-Dawley rats acclimated for two weeks to a 12:12 hr light-dark cycle. Rats were divided equally and fed low-protein (8%), high-protein (64%) or normal protein (27%) diets for four weeks. All animals were fasted for 24 hr prior to blood collections. Blood samples were collected at 4-hr intervals for 24 hr for determination of plasma gastrin and CCK using specific radioimmunoassays. A significant rhythm for gastrin was detected in males on normal and low-protein diets (P less than 0.03) and in females on low-protein diets (P less than .02). A significant rhythm for CCK was detected (P less than 0.05) in rats of both sexes fed normal and high-protein diets. Mean plasma levels of both peptides were lower in females than males. In a separate study, food intake and body weight were monitored in male rats receiving the three diets over 21 days. Animals on the low-protein diet exhibited reduced food intake and body weight compared to rats fed the normal or high-protein diets.

  10. The circadian rhythm in photosynthesis in Acetabularia in the presence of actinomycin D, puromycin, and chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, B M; Tuffli, C F; Rubin, R H

    1967-01-01

    Anucleate Acetabularia crenulata shows a circadian rhythm in photosynthesis. In this study, an oxygen electrode was employed to measure this photosynthetic rhythm in the presence and absence of the inhibitors, actinomycin D, chloramphenicol, and puromycin. High concentrations of the inhibitors were used: actinomycin D, 20-40 micrograms ml-1; puromycin, 30 and 100 micrograms ml-1; and chloramphenicol, 250 micrograms ml-1. The effectiveness of these inhibitors on protein synthesis was also measured under the same conditions used for the determination of rhythmicity. In spite of large effects of all three inhibitors on the incorporation of 14C leucine, no effect on the period or the phase of the photosynthetic rhythm was observed. The higher concentration of puromycin and chloramphenicol produced toxic effects which were expressed as a reduction in the amount of photosynthesis, but rhythmicity was still apparent. After 3 or 4 days' exposure to actinomycin, Acetabularia became resistant to its effect. Recovery was also observed in the ability to incorporate leucine. The implications of these results for theories of the basic oscillator responsible for circadian rhythmicity are discussed.

  11. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals. PMID:26899944

  12. Human cortical prostheses: lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, KRIShna V.

    2012-01-01

    Direct brain control of a prosthetic system is the subject of much popular and scientific news. Neural technology and science have advanced to the point that proof-of-concept systems exist for cortically-controlled prostheses in rats, monkeys, and even humans. However, realizing the dream of making such technology available to everyone is still far off. Fortunately today there is great public and scientific interest in making this happen, but it will only occur when the functional benefits of such systems outweigh the risks. In this article, the authors briefly summarize the state of the art and then highlight many issues that will directly limit clinical translation, including system durability, system performance, and patient risk. Despite the challenges, scientists and clinicians are in the desirable position of having both public and fiscal support to begin addressing these issues directly. The ultimate challenge now is to determine definitively whether these prosthetic systems will become clinical reality or forever unrealized. PMID:19569893

  13. Scheduled feeding versus the light-dark cycle on the rhythms of circulating tryptophan, serotonin and N-acetylserotonin in rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, A K; Chik, C L; Brown, G M

    1985-10-28

    Both the environmental light-dark cycle and scheduled feeding can act as entrainers of biological rhythms. The present study investigated the relative potency of these two environmental cues in entraining the rhythms of circulating tryptophan (TRP), serotonin (5HT) and N-acetylserotonin (NAS). Four groups of rats were subjected for one month to an identical light-dark cycle of 14 h light and 10 h dark with food availability restricted to the 3 h period beginning 2 h after onset of light or onset of darkness. Two groups of animals were food deprived on the day of experiment. The 24 h rhythms of serum TRP, 5HT and NAS were determined. Serum TRP showed a sharp increase after food presentation and declined gradually to a trough just before feeding. Withholding food on the day of experiment abolished this increase. The trough of serum 5HT occurred just before feeding, increased gradually after feeding and peaked 10-13 h afterwards. Serum NAS levels, however, demonstrated an anticipatory rise before feeding, which peaked during feeding and declined to a trough 8 h afterwards. Unlike TRP, withholding food had no effect on either the 5HT or the NAS rhythm. These results indicated that feeding schedule was the common and stronger entrainer for the rhythms of serum TRP, 5HT and NAS. However, each indole had a different rhythm pattern in relation to the feeding schedule which could not be explained by a simple precursor-product relationship.

  14. Chronobiological studies of chicken IgY: monitoring of infradian, circadian and ultradian rhythms of IgY in blood and yolk of chickens.

    PubMed

    He, Jin-Xin; Thirumalai, Diraviyam; Schade, Rüdiger; Zhang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-08-15

    IgY is the functional equivalent of mammalian IgG found in birds, reptiles and amphibians. Many of its biological aspects have been explored with different approaches. In order to evaluate the rhythmicity of serum and yolk IgY, four chickens were examined and reared under the same conditions. To monitor biological oscillations of IgY in yolk and serum, the eggs and blood samples were collected over a 60 day period and the rhythm of yolk and serum IgY was determined by direct-ELISA. Results indicated that, there is a significant circaseptan rhythm in yolk IgY and circaquattran rhythm in serum IgY. The serum IgY concentration reached a peak in the morning, decreased to a minimum during the daytime and increased again at night revealing a significant circadian rhythm was superimposed by an ultradian rhythm. These data are suited to address the controversies concerning the IgY concentration in egg yolk and blood of laying hens. In addition, this study raised new questions, if the different rhythms in yolk and serum are concerned.

  15. Sensorimotor cortical influences on cuneate nucleus rhythmic activity in the anesthetized cat.