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Sample records for coset electroweak gauge

  1. Gauging nonrelativistic field theories using the coset construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karananas, Georgios K.; Monin, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We discuss how nonrelativistic spacetime symmetries can be gauged in the context of the coset construction. We consider theories invariant under the centrally extended Galilei algebra as well as the Lifshitz one, and we investigate under what conditions they can be supplemented by scale transformations. We also clarify the role of torsion in these theories.

  2. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  3. Coset construction of a D-brane gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, I. N.

    2016-04-01

    D-branes have a world-volume U (1) gauge field A whose field strength F = dA gives rise to a Born-Infeld term in the D-brane action. Supersymmetry and kappa symmetry transformations of A are traditionally inferred by the requirement that the Born-Infeld term is consistent with both supersymmetry and kappa symmetry of the D-brane action. In this paper, we show that integrability of the assigned supersymmetry transformations leads to an extension of the standard supersymmetry algebra that includes a fermionic central charge. We construct a superspace one-form on an enlarged superspace related by a coset construction to this centrally extended algebra whose supersymmetry and kappa symmetry transformations are derived, rather than inferred. It is shown that under pullback, these transformations are of the form expected for the D-brane U (1) gauge field. We relate these results to manifestly supersymmetric approaches to construction of D-brane actions.

  4. Electroweak Gauge-Higgs Unification Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    2008-11-23

    In the gauge-Higgs unification scenario 4D Higgs fields are unified with gauge fields in higher dimensions. The electroweak model is constructed in the Randall-Sundrum warped space. The electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken by the Hosotani mechanism due to the top quark contribution. The Higgs mass is predicted to be around 50 GeV with the vanishing ZZH and WWH couplings so that the LEP2 bound for the Higgs mass is evaded.

  5. Electroweak Gauge Models and Lepton Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuji, N.; Ito, I.; Tsai, S. Y.; Kimura, T.; Furuya, K.

    1982-04-01

    We discuss, in the framework of the spontaneously broken electroweak gauge theory, the connection between the two non-standard lepton conservation laws, i.e., the Konopinski-Mahmoud (KM) scheme and the multiplicative scheme. For this purpose, we take SU(3) as a gauge group and start with KM triplets ({μ}^+,{ν},e^-)_L and (e^+,{ν}^c,{μ}^-)_L. We then point out that the idea of mass generation through the Higgs mechanism naturally gives rise to {μ}-e mixing which, supplemented by the requirement of a {μ}-e symmetry, results in a model of leptons which obeys the multiplicative scheme. This model also provides a mechanism for giving an asymmetrical masses to the electron and muon which otherwise behave symmetrically. An extension of the model to include the heavy lepton and quark sectors is suggested.

  6. Gauge-free electroweak theory: Radiative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2011-04-15

    A recent reformulation of the scalar-vector sector of standard electroweak theory (without a Higgs potential), in terms of manifestly SU(2){sub W} gauge-invariant variables, is extended so that all field variables in the action are manifestly free of the residual U(1){sub em} gauge transformations as well. Functional evaluation of the one-loop gauge-free effective Higgs potential is shown to precisely cancel effects due to the local functional measure of the Higgs field found earlier. The implications for the classical interpretation of the Higgs scalar as the dilaton field in a background conformal gravity theory are discussed. The Higgs scalar is shown to radiatively acquire a one-loop vacuum expectation value which gives masses to the W and Z bosons but not to photons, without any notion of ''spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking'' appearing anywhere. Further, the renormalization scale is fixed in this theory by requiring that W and Z boson masses coincide with their experimentally measured values, thereby precluding any ''naturalness'' problem usually associated with uncontrolled running of such a scale.

  7. LHC Higgs signatures from extended electroweak gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Chen, Ning; He, Hong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We study LHC Higgs signatures from the extended electroweak gauge symmetry SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) ⊗ U(1). Under this gauge structure, we present an effective UV completion of the 3-site moose model with ideal fermion delocalization, which contains two neutral Higgs states ( h, H) plus three new gauge bosons ( W ' , Z '). We study the unitarity, and reveal that the exact E 2 cancellation in the longitudinal V L V L scattering amplitudes is achieved by the joint role of exchanging both spin-1 new gauge bosons W ' /Z ' and spin-0 Higgs bosons h/H. We identify the lighter Higgs state h with mass 125 GeV, and derive the unitarity bound on the mass of heavier Higgs boson H. The parameter space of this model is highly predictive. We study the production and decay signals of this 125 GeV Higgs boson h at the LHC. We demonstrate that the h Higgs boson can naturally have enhanced signals in the diphoton channel gg → h → γγ, while the event rates in the reactions gg → h → W W ∗ and gg → h → ZZ ∗ are generally suppressed relative to the SM expectation. Searching the h Higgs boson via the associated production and the vector boson fusions are also discussed for our model. We further analyze the LHC signals of the heavier Higgs boson H as a new physics discriminator from the SM. For wide mass-ranges of H, we derive constraints from the existing LHC searches, and study the discovery potential of H at the LHC (8 TeV) and LHC (14 TeV).

  8. N=2 gauge theories: Congruence subgroups, coset graphs, and modular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; McKay, John

    2013-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between generalized quiver gauge theories in four dimensions and congruence subgroups of the modular group, hinging upon the trivalent graphs, which arise in both. The gauge theories and the graphs are enumerated and their numbers are compared. The correspondence is particularly striking for genus zero torsion-free congruence subgroups as exemplified by those which arise in Moonshine. We analyze in detail the case of index 24, where modular elliptic K3 surfaces emerge: here, the elliptic j-invariants can be recast as dessins d'enfant, which dictate the Seiberg-Witten curves.

  9. Stability of the Electroweak Vacuum: Gauge Independence and Advanced Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. V.; Kniehl, B. A.; Pikelner, A. F.; Veretin, O. L.

    2015-11-01

    We perform a manifestly gauge-independent analysis of the vacuum stability in the standard model including two-loop matching, three-loop renormalization group evolution, and pure QCD corrections through four loops. All these ingredients are exact, except that light-fermion masses are neglected. We in turn apply the criterion of nullifying the Higgs self-coupling and its beta function in the modified minimal-subtraction scheme and a recently proposed consistent method for determining the true minimum of the effective Higgs potential that also avoids gauge dependence. Exploiting our knowledge of the Higgs-boson mass, we derive an upper bound on the pole mass of the top quark by requiring that the standard model be stable all the way up to the Planck mass scale and conservatively estimate the theoretical uncertainty. This bound is compatible with the Monte Carlo mass quoted by the Particle Data Group at the 1.3 σ level.

  10. Polarisation of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, James; Vryonidou, Eleni

    2013-05-01

    We present results for the polarisation of gauge bosons produced at the LHC. Polarisation effects for W bosons manifest themselves in the angular distributions of the lepton and in the distributions of lepton transverse momentum and missing transverse energy. The polarisation is discussed for a range of different processes producing W bosons such as W+jets and W from top production. The relative contributions of the different polarisation states vary from process to process, reflecting the dynamics of the underlying hardscattering process. We also calculate the polarisation of the Z boson produced in association with QCD jets at the LHC.

  11. Toward electroweak scale cold dark matter with local dark gauge symmetry and beyond the DM EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, I describe a class of electroweak (EW) scale dark matter (DM) models where its stability or longevity are the results of underlying dark gauge symmetries: stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry or topology, or long-lived due to the accidental global symmetry of dark gauge theories. Compared with the usual phenomenological dark matter models (including DM EFT or simplified DM models), DM models with local dark gauge symmetries include dark gauge bosons, dark Higgs bosons and sometimes excited dark matter. And dynamics among these fields are completely fixed by local gauge principle. The idea of singlet portals including the Higgs portal can thermalize these hidden sector dark matter very efficiently, so that these DM could be easily thermal DM. I also discuss the limitation of the usual DM effective field theory or simplified DM models without the full SM gauge symmetry, and emphasize the importance of the full SM gauge symmetry and renormalizability especially for collider searches for DM.

  12. A note on gauge-fixing in the electroweak sector of non-minimal UED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2016-09-01

    Electroweak observables are highly sensitive to the loop corrections. Therefore, a proper gauge-fixing mechanism is always needed to define the propagators which are involved in Feynman loop amplitude. With this spirit, we compute gauge-fixing mechanism in five-dimensional (5D) universal extra-dimensional (UED) model with boundary localized terms (BLTs). These BLTs are not 5D operators in four-dimensional (4D) effective theory but some sort of boundary conditions on the respective fields at the fixed points of S1/Z 2 orbifold. Furthermore, these BLTs nontrivially modify the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra and some of the interactions among the KK-excitations compared to the minimal UED (mUED), in which, these BLTs are absent. In this note, we calculate the gauge-fixing mechanism in the electroweak sector of such nontrivial UED scenario. Moreover, we discuss the composition and masses of Goldstone and any physical scalar that emerge after the symmetry breaking in this set up with different choices of gauge.

  13. Interpretation of neutrino-matter interactions at low energies as contraction of gauge group of Electroweak Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2013-09-15

    The very weak neutrino-matter interactions are explained with the help of the gauge group contraction of the standard Electroweak Model. The mathematical contraction procedure is connected with the energy dependence of the interaction cross section for neutrinos and corresponds to the limiting case of the Electroweak Model at low energies. Contraction parameter is connected with the universal Fermi constant of weak interactions and neutrino energy as j{sup 2}(s) = {radical}(G{sub F} s)

  14. Gamma-ray constraints on dark-matter annihilation to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Kolb, Edward W.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian-Tao E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu E-mail: liantaow@uchicago.edu

    2014-01-01

    Dark-matter annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons results in γ-ray emission. We use observational upper limits on the fluxes of both line and continuum γ-rays from the Milky Way Galactic Center and from Milky Way dwarf companion galaxies to set exclusion limits on allowed dark-matter masses. (Generally, Galactic Center γ-ray line search limits from the Fermi-LAT and the H.E.S.S. experiments are most restrictive.) Our limits apply under the following assumptions: a) the dark matter species is a cold thermal relic with present mass density equal to the measured dark-matter density of the universe; b) dark-matter annihilation to standard-model particles is described in the non-relativistic limit by a single effective operator O∝J{sub DM}⋅J{sub SM}, where J{sub DM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of dark-matter fields (Dirac fermions or complex scalars), and J{sub SM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons; and c) the dark-matter mass is in the range 5 GeV to 20 TeV. We consider, in turn, the 34 possible operators with mass dimension 8 or lower with non-zero s-wave annihilation channels satisfying the above assumptions. Our limits are presented in a large number of figures, one for each of the 34 possible operators; these limits can be grouped into 13 classes determined by the field content and structure of the operators. We also identify three classes of operators (coupling to the Higgs and SU(2){sub L} gauge bosons) that can supply a 130 GeV line with the desired strength to fit the putative line signal in the Fermi-LAT data, while saturating the relic density and satisfying all other indirect constraints we consider.

  15. Charm production in association with an electroweak gauge boson at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Stirling, W J; Vryonidou, E

    2012-08-24

    The production of charm quark jets in association with electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC can be used as a tool to constrain quark parton distribution functions (PDFs). Motivated by recent measurements at the Tevatron and LHC, we calculate cross sections for W/Z+c, comparing these to W/Z+jet, for various PDF sets. The cross-section differences can be understood in terms of the different underlying PDFs, with the strange quark distribution being particularly important for W+c production. We suggest measurements of appropriately defined ratios and comment on how these measurements at the LHC can be used to extract information on the strange and charm content of the proton at high Q(2) scales.

  16. Electroweak Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    The test of the electroweak corrections has played a major role in providing evidence for the gauge and the Higgs sectors of the Standard Model. At the same time the consideration of the electroweak corrections has given significant indirect information on the masses of the top and the Higgs boson before their discoveries and important orientation/constraints on the searches for new physics, still highly valuable in the present situation. The progression of these contributions is reviewed.

  17. QCD and electroweak interference in Higgs production by gauge boson fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jeppe R.; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2007-02-01

    We explicitly calculate the contribution to Higgs production at the LHC from the interference between gluon fusion and weak vector boson fusion, and compare it to the pure QCD and pure electroweak result. While the effect is small at tree level, we speculate it will be significantly enhanced by loop effects.

  18. Probing the W-Z-Higgs sector of electroweak gauge theories at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.

    1986-10-01

    We review and summarize the procedures for exploring at the SSC the W-Z-Higgs sector of SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) and extended gauge theory versions thereof, including supersymmetric and left-right symmetric models.

  19. Gravitational coset models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Paul P.; Fleming, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The algebra A {/D - 3 + + +} dimensionally reduces to the E D-1 symmetry algebra of (12 - D)-dimensional supergravity. An infinite set of five-dimensional gravitational objects embedded in D-dimensions is constructed by identifying the null geodesic motion on cosets embedded in the generalised Kac-Moody algebra A {/D - 3 + + +}. By analogy with super-gravity these are bound states of dual gravitons. The metric interpolates continuously between exotic gravitational solutions generated by the action of an affine sub-group. We investigate mixed-symmetry fields in the brane sigma model, identify actions for the full interpolating bound state and investigate the dualisation of the bound state to a solution of the Einstein-Hilbert action via the Hodge dual on multiforms. We conclude that the Hodge dual is insufficient to reconstruct solutions to the Einstein-Hilbert action from mixed-symmetry tensors.

  20. Electroweak theory based on S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, H. N.; Hue, L. T.; Loi, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper includes two main parts. In the first part, we present generalized gauge models based on the S U (3 )C⊗S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X (3-4-1) gauge group with arbitrary electric charges of exotic leptons. The mixing matrix of neutral gauge bosons is analyzed, and the eigenmasses and eigenstates are obtained. The anomaly-free as well as matching conditions are discussed precisely. In the second part, we present a new development of the original 3-4-1 model [R. Foot, H. N. Long, and T. A. Tran, Phys. Rev. D 50, R34 (1994), F. Pisano and V. Pleitez, Phys. Rev. D 51, 3865 (1995).]. Different from previous works, in this paper the neutrinos, with the help of the scalar decuplet H , get the Dirac masses at the tree level. The vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the Higgs boson field in the decuplet H acquiring the VEV responsible for neutrino Dirac mass leads to mixing in separated pairs of singly charged gauge bosons, namely the Standard Model (SM) W boson and K , the new gauge boson acting in the right-handed lepton sector, as well as the singly charged bileptons X and Y . Due to the mixing, there occurs a right-handed current carried by the W boson. From the expression of the electromagnetic coupling constant, ones get the limit of the sine-squared of the Weinberg angle, sin2θW<0.25 , and a constraint on electric charges of extra leptons. In the limit of lepton number conservation, the Higgs sector contains all massless Goldstone bosons for massive gauge bosons and the SM-like Higgs boson. Some phenomenology is discussed.

  1. Neutral triple electroweak gauge boson production in the large extra-dimension model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit

    2012-05-01

    We study the prospects of probing large extra-dimension models at the LHC through neutral triple gauge boson production processes. In theories with extra dimensions these processes result from the exchange of a tower of massive graviton modes between the SM particles. We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and present our results for various kinematic distributions at the LHC for S=14TeV.

  2. Field Identification in Nonunitary Diagonal Cosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre; Sénéchal, David; Walton, Mark

    We study the nonunitary diagonal cosets constructed from admissible representations of Kač-Moody algebras at fractional level, with an emphasis on the question of field identification. Generic classes of field identifications are obtained from the analysis of the modular S matrix. These include the usual class related to outer automorphisms, as well as some intrinsically nonunitary field identifications. They allow for a simple choice of coset field representatives where all field components of the coset are associated with integrable weights.

  3. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  4. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haidt, D.; Pietschmann, H

    1988-01-01

    This volume aims at a consistent presentation of the relevant experimental data in the theoretical context of Quantum Flavor Dynamics (QFD). QFD stems from research in the last 15 years and describes successfully all phenomena of so-called electroweak interactions. This allows for a natural and efficient ordering of the vast body of data resulting from many different types of experiments. After an outline of the theoretical foundations, several chapters deal with the three sectors of QFD, i.e. fermions, gauge bosons and Higgs bosons as far as their properties (quantum numbers, lifetime etc.) are concerned. The largest chapter examines the structure of the electromagnetic, the weak neutral and the weak charged currents. Best values for the basic parameters of QFD are suggested, and open questions and new directions are discussed.

  5. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  6. Unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chala, Mikael; Nardini, Germano; Sobolev, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset S O (7 )/S O (6 ). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of S O (7 ), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new C P -violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  7. Non-Abelian coset string backgrounds from asymptotic and initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, P. Marios; Sfetsos, Konstadinos

    2007-04-01

    We describe hierarchies of exact string backgrounds obtained as non-Abelian cosets of orthogonal groups and having a space-time realization in terms of gauged WZW models. For each member in these hierarchies, the target-space backgrounds are identified with the ``boundary'' backgrounds of the next member. We explicitly demonstrate that this property holds to all orders in α' for the three- and four-dimensional cosets, while the general structure of the backgrounds at hand suggests that the property holds in any dimension. The affiliation of the ``boundary'' theory to the ``bulk'' theory exhibits marginal operators, generically build on non-Abelian parafermion bilinears, dressed with a dilaton vertex operator. The dilaton is supported by the extra radial dimension, whose asymptotic value defines the boundary. Depending on the hierarchy, this boundary can be time-like or space-like with, in the latter case, potential cosmological applications.

  8. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-11-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  9. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Renton, P.

    1990-01-01

    The central part of the book consists of a comprehensive discussion of many scattering and decay processes involving electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. A list of topics includes electron-proton scattering, Compton scattering, muon decay, electron-positron annihilation, photon and hadron structure functions, neutrino-nucleus scattering, Cabibbo theory, tau-lepton decays, W and Z boson decays, mixing phenomena and many others. For most processes, the author presents the appropriate Feynman diagrams, first-order matrix elements and the resulting cross sections or decay rates. The last section of Electroweak Interactions discusses some of the open or unanswered questions in the standard model, including the undiscovered top quark, the Higgs mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and detailed tests involving radiative effects. The book concludes with a brief account of ideas that extend beyond the standard model, such as left-right symmetric models, grand unified theories, compositeness, supersymmetry and string theory.

  10. Electroweak Baryogenesis with Anomalous Higgs Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wu, Lei; Yue, Jason

    2016-07-01

    In non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry, the LHC Higgs boson can be assumed to be a singlet under SU(2)L ⊗ U(1)Y. In such scenario, the Standard Model particle content can be kept but new sets of couplings are allowed. We identify a range of anomalous Higgs cubic and the 𝒞𝒫-violating Higgs-top quark couplings that leads to first order phase transition and successful baryogenesis at the electroweak scale.

  11. Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Jose E.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-06-01

    Recent Electroweak measurements by the CDF and D0 collaborations in p{bar p} collisions {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented here. Measurements of W, Z and diboson production cross sections as well as W asymmetry using integrated luminosities up to 800 pb{sup -1} are reviewed. Limits on triple gauge anomalous couplings on diboson production are discussed elsewhere.

  12. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  13. Electroweak Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschos, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    The electroweak theory unifies two basic forces of nature: the weak force and electromagnetism. This book is a concise introduction to the structure of the electroweak theory and its applications. It describes the structure and properties of field theories with global and local symmetries, leading to the construction of the standard model. It describes the new particles and processes predicted by the theory, and compares them with experimental results. It also covers neutral currents, the properties of W and Z bosons, the properties of quarks and mesons containing heavy quarks, neutrino oscillations, CP-asymmetries in K, D, and B meson decays, and the search for Higgs particles. Each chapter contains problems, stemming from the long teaching experience of the author, to supplement the text. This will be of great interest to graduate students and researchers in elementary particle physics. Password protected solutions are available to lecturers at www.cambridge.org/9780521860987. Each chapter has an introduction highlighting its contents and giving a historical perspective. Chapters are cross-referenced, interrelating concepts and sections of the book. Contains 49 exercises

  14. Models of little Higgs and electroweak precision tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The little Higgs idea is an alternative to supersymmetry as a solution to the gauge hierarchy problem. In this note, the author reviews various little Higgs models and their phenomenology with emphasis on the precision electroweak constraints in these models.

  15. Electroweak physics results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    An overview of recent electroweak physics results from the Tevatron is given. Properties of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. In particular, measurements of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions are measured by studying gauge boson pair production and Emits on anomalous gauge boson couplings are discussed.

  16. Theory and phenomenology of electroweak phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Hiren H.

    An open problem in cosmology is to explain the origin of baryon abundance implied by observational cosmology. Among the many proposed explanations, electroweak baryogenesis is particularly attractive in that its ingredients is discoverable by modern experiments. The analysis of the electroweak phase transition in the early universe comprises an integral component within the larger study of electroweak baryogenesis. In this work, I make a detailed investigation of the conventional analysis of the electroweak phase transition commonly found in literature, and explicitly demonstrate that results are not independent of the choice of gauge. In its place, I provide a manifestly gauge-independent method for the analysis, review sources of theoretical and numerical uncertainties, and explore avenues for further development. Next, I explore the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in two minimal extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Within these simple models, I describe a novel pattern of electroweak symmetry breaking favorable for baryogenesis that can serve as a paradigm for phase transition analysis in more complicated models.

  17. (Re-)inventing the relativistic wheel: gravity, cosets, and spinning objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Endlich, Solomon; Monin, Alexander; Penco, Riccardo; Riva, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Space-time symmetries are a crucial ingredient of any theoretical model in physics. Unlike internal symmetries, which may or may not be gauged and/or spontaneously broken, space-time symmetries do not admit any ambiguity: they are gauged by gravity, and any conceivable physical system (other than the vacuum) is bound to break at least some of them. Motivated by this observation, we study how to couple gravity with the Goldstone fields that non-linearly realize spontaneously broken space-time symmetries. This can be done in complete generality by weakly gauging the Poincaré symmetry group in the context of the coset construction. To illustrate the power of this method, we consider three kinds of physical systems coupled to gravity: superfluids, relativistic membranes embedded in a higher dimensional space, and rotating point-like objects. This last system is of particular importance as it can be used to model spinning astrophysical objects like neutron stars and black holes. Our approach provides a systematic and unambiguous parametrization of the degrees of freedom of these systems.

  18. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  19. Novel construction of boundary states in coset conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tani, Taro

    2003-01-01

    We develop a systematic method to solve the Cardy condition for the coset conformal field theory G/ H. The problem is equivalent to finding a non-negative integer valued matrix representation (NIM-rep) of the fusion algebra. Based on the relation of the G/ H theory with the tensor product theory G× H, we give a map from NIM-reps of G× H to those of G/ H. Our map provides a large class of NIM-reps in coset theories. In particular, we give some examples of NIM-reps not factorizable into the G and the H sectors. The action of the simple currents on NIM-reps plays an essential role in our construction. As an illustration of our procedure, we consider the diagonal coset SU(2) 5× SU(2) 3/ SU(2) 8 to obtain a new NIM-rep based on the conformal embedding su(2) 3⊕ su(2) 8⊂ sp(6) 1.

  20. Electroweak corrections and unitarity in linear moose models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, H.-J.; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the form of the corrections to the electroweak interactions in the class of Higgsless models which can be deconstructed to a chain of SU(2) gauge groups adjacent to a chain of U(1) gauge groups, and with the fermions coupled to any single SU(2) group and to any single U(1) group along the chain. The primary advantage of our technique is that the size of corrections to electroweak processes can be directly related to the spectrum of vector bosons ('KK modes'). In Higgsless models, this spectrum is constrained by unitarity. Our methods also allow for arbitrary background 5D geometry, spatially dependent gauge-couplings, and brane kinetic energy terms. We find that, due to the size of corrections to electroweak processes in any unitary theory, Higgsless models with localized fermions are disfavored by precision electroweak data. Although we stress our results as they apply to continuum Higgsless 5D models, they apply to any linear moose model including those with only a few extra vector bosons. Our calculations of electroweak corrections also apply directly to the electroweak gauge sector of 5D theories with a bulk scalar Higgs boson; the constraints arising from unitarity do not apply in this case.

  1. Electroweak Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Sekaric, J.; /Kansas U.

    2011-06-08

    The most recent Electroweak results from the Tevatron are presented. The importance of precise Standard Model measurements in the Higgs sector, quantum chromodynamics and searches for new physics is emphasized. Analyzed data correspond to 1-7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the period between 2002-2010. The main goal of the Electroweak (EW) physics is to probe the mechanism of the EW symmetry breaking. An important aspect of these studies is related to precise measurements of the Standard Model (SM) parameters and tests of the SU(2) x U(1) gauge symmetry. Deviations from the SM may be indicative of new physics. Thus, the interplay between the tests of the 'standard' physics and searches for a 'nonstandard' physics is an important aspect of the EW measurements. The observables commonly used in these measurements are cross sections, gauge boson couplings, differential distributions, asymmetries, etc. Besides, many EW processes represent a non-negligible background in a Higgs boson and top quark production, and production of supersymmetric particles. Therefore, the complete and detailed understanding of EW processes is a mandatory precondition for early discoveries of very small new physics signals. Furthermore, several EW analyses represent a proving ground for analysis techniques and statistical treatments used in the Tevatron Higgs searches.

  2. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.

  3. Novel effects in electroweak breaking from a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Jose Ramon

    2007-10-01

    The Higgs boson offers a unique window to hidden sector fields S{sub i}, singlets under the standard model gauge group, via the renormalizable interactions |H|{sup 2}S{sub i}{sup 2}. We prove that such interactions can provide new patterns for electroweak breaking, including radiative breaking by dimensional transmutation consistent with CERN LEP bounds, and trigger the strong enough first-order phase transition required by electroweak baryogenesis.

  4. Electroweak Sudakov Corrections using Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Golf, Frank; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-01-18

    Electroweak Sudakov corrections of the form {alpha}{sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub W,Z}{sup 2} are summed using renormalization group evolution in soft-collinear effective theory. Results are given for the scalar, vector, and tensor form factors for fermion and scalar particles. The formalism for including massive gauge bosons in soft-collinear effective theory is developed.

  5. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  6. Selected topics in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.G.; Hernandez Galeana, A.

    1986-06-20

    Developments in gauge field theory in the past fourteen years are discussed. The canonical description of electroweak and strong interactions is described including the role played by QCD and QFD. The Salam-Weinberg theory of electroweak interactions is reviewed with emphasis on Higgs mass and renormalization group analysis. Implications of hyper-color theories are discussed. Composite models of quarks and leptons are considered including hyperfermions as part of a subquark multiplet. (AIP)

  7. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  8. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  9. The electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2001-08-10

    After a short essay on the current state of particle physics, the author reviews the antecedents of the modern picture of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and then undertakes a brief survey of the SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} electroweak theory. The authors reviews the features of electroweak phenomenology at tree level and beyond, presents an introduction to the Higgs boson and the 1-TeV scale, and examines arguments for enlarging the electroweak theory. The author concludes with a brief look at low-scale gravity.

  10. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  11. Hyperscaling violation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Lawrance, Robert; Piai, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    We consider a class of simplified models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking built in terms of their five-dimensional weakly-coupled gravity duals, in the spirit of bottom-up holography. The sigma-model consists of two abelian gauge bosons and one real, non-charged scalar field coupled to gravity in five dimensions. The scalar potential is a simple exponential function of the scalar field. The background metric resulting from solving the classical equations of motion exhibits hyperscaling violation, at least at asymptotically large values of the radial direction. We study the spectrum of scalar composite states of the putative dual field theory by fluctuating the sigma-model scalars and gravity, and discuss in which cases we find a parametrically light scalar state in the spectrum. We model the spontaneous breaking of the (weakly coupled) gauge symmetry to the diagonal subgroup by the choice of IR boundary conditions. We compute the mass spectrum of spin-1 states, and the precision electroweak parameter S as a function of the hyperscaling coefficient. We find a general bound on the mass of the lightest spin-1 resonance, by requiring that the indirect bounds on the precision parameters be satisfied, that implies that precision electroweak physics excludes the possibility of a techni-rho meson with mass lighter than several TeV.

  12. Crucial role of neutrinos in the electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Adam

    2013-12-30

    Not only the top-quark condensate appears to be the natural significant source of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Provided the seesaw scenario, the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates contribute significantly to the electroweak scale as well. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry within the simplifying two-composite-Higgs-doublet model. Mandatory is to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV, and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that, the number of right-handed neutrinos participating on the seesaw mechanism turns out to be rather large, O(100–1000)

  13. TeV scale dark matter and electroweak radiative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Urbano, Alfredo

    2010-08-15

    Recent anomalies in cosmic rays data, namely, from the PAMELA Collaboration, can be interpreted in terms of TeV scale decaying/annihilating dark matter. We analyze the impact of radiative corrections coming from the electroweak sector of the standard model on the spectrum of the final products at the interaction point. As an example, we consider virtual one loop corrections and real gauge bosons emission in the case of a very heavy vector boson annihilating into fermions. We find electroweak corrections that are relevant, but not as big as sometimes found in the literature; we relate this mismatch to the issue of gauge invariance. At scales much higher than the symmetry breaking scale, one loop electroweak effects are so big that eventually higher orders/resummations have to be considered: we advocate for the inclusion of these effects in parton shower Monte Carlo models aiming at the description of TeV scale physics.

  14. Holographic renormalization and the electroweak precision parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Round, Mark

    2010-09-01

    We study the effects of holographic renormalization on an AdS/QCD inspired description of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Our model is a 5D slice of AdS{sub 5} geometry containing a bulk scalar and SU(2)xSU(2) gauge fields. The scalar field obtains a vacuum expectation value (VEV) which represents a condensate that triggers electroweak symmetry breaking. Fermion fields are constrained to live on the UV brane and do not propagate in the bulk. The two-point functions are holographically renormalized through the addition of boundary counterterms. Measurable quantities are then expressed in terms of well-defined physical parameters, free from any spurious dependence on the UV cutoff. A complete study of the precision parameters is carried out and bounds on physical quantities derived. The large-N scaling of results is discussed.

  15. Electroweak physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    The CDF collaboration is engaged in a broad program of electroweak measurements. The production of WW, WZ, ZZ, W{sub {gamma}}, Z{sub {gamma}} and the high mass Drell Yan charge asymmetry will be discussed, along with a status report on extracting a new W mass from the most recent 90 pb{sup {minus}1} data sample.

  16. Electroweak asymmetries from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, G.

    2002-06-01

    We present a summary of the results on electroweak asymmetries performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are final and are based, unless otherwise stated, on the full 1993-1998 data set of approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  17. Lepton flavor violation in a nonuniversal gauge interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Young

    2010-11-01

    The flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNC) are derived at tree level if the electroweak gauge group depends on the fermion family, which are absent in the standard model. We study the lepton flavor violation through the FCNC interactions in a nonuniversal gauge interaction model where the third generation fermions are subjected to the separate SU(2){sub L} gauge group.

  18. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  19. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron. Electroweak Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Schellman, Heidi; Sekaric, Jadranka

    2015-02-17

    We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984–2011) electroweak physics program that involves a variety of W and Z boson precision measurements. The relevance of these studies using single and associated gauge boson production to our understanding of the electroweak sector, quantum chromodynamics and searches for new physics is emphasized. Furthermore,we discuss the importance of the W boson mass measurement, the W/Z boson distributions and asymmetries, and diboson studies. We also highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  20. A vector model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we present a vector model for the electroweak interactions. The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between Dirac bispinors and an isotropic class of Yang-Mills vector fields. The isotropic Yang-Mills vector fields Fk =Ek +iHk with k=1,2,3, satisfy the condition that the matrix of scalar invariants (Fj ṡFk) equals a scalar multiple of the identity matrix. We show that all the bispinor observables commute with the Cartan isomorphism, including all gauge transformations, as well as Lorentz transformations. We derive the Yang-Mills equivalent Dirac equation. As a consequence of the vector model, we obtain a new Lagrangian for electroweak interactions, which is an alternative to the Weinberg-Salam Lagrangian. Moreover, we show that the vector model predicts that the Weinberg angle θw satisfies sin2 θw =0.25, which is close to the measured value of sin2 θw =0.23. The vector model accommodates all the lepton and quark flavors. Furthermore, it predicts the conservation of baryon number and lepton number, as well as electric charge in electroweak interactions. The vector model also gives a new interpretation to antiparticles. In the vector model, an antiparticle is characterized by its opposite baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge; yet both particles and antiparticles propagate forward in time with positive energies.

  1. Gauge-Higgs Unification in Orbifold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrucca, C. A.; Serone, M.; Silvestrini, L.; Wulzer, A.

    2004-02-01

    Six-dimensional orbifold models where the Higgs field is identified with some internal component of a gauge field are considered. We classify all possible T 2/Bbb Z N orbifold constructions based on a SU(3) electroweak gauge symmetry. Depending on the orbifold twist, models with two, one or zero Higgs doublets can be obtained. Models with one Higgs doublet are particularly interesting, as they lead to a prediction for the Higgs mass that is twice the W boson mass at leading order: m H = 2 m W . The electroweak scale is quadratically sensitive to the cut-off, but only through very specific localized operators. We study in detail the structure of these operators at one loop, and identify a class of models where they do not destabilize the electroweak scale at the leading order. This provides a very promising framework to construct realistic and predictive models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. Gauge unification of fundamental forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    The following sections are included: * I. Fundamental Particles, Fundamental Forces, and Gauge Unification * II. The Emergence of Spontaneously Broken SU(2)×U(1) Gauge Theory * III. The Present and Its Problems * IV. Direct Extrapolation from the Electroweak to the Electronuclear * A. The three ideas * B. Tests of electronuclear grand unification * V. Elementarity: Unification with Gravity and Nature of Charge * A. The quest for elementarity, prequarks (preons and pre-preons * B. Post-Planck physics, supergravity, and Einstein's dreams * C. Extended supergravity, SU(8) preons, and composite gauge fields * Appendix A: Examples of Grand Unifying Groups * Appendix B: Does the Grand Plateau really exist * References

  3. Optical multi-coset sampling of GHz-band chirped signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, George C.; Sefler, George A.; Shaw, T. J.; Smith, Stephen L.

    2015-03-01

    Direct digitization of long, wideband chirped RF signals in the GHz band requires power hungry ADCs and produces large data sets. Here we present an optical scheme to perform multi-coset sampling of such signals with reduced power consumption and smaller data sets. In our scheme a repetitively pulsed femtosecond laser is dispersed to the interpulse time, the RF is modulated on the optical field, and the field is directed to a pair of wavelength-division demultiplexers (WDM). The channels of the WDM are attenuated with a pseudo-random sequence to form a coset pattern that repeats at the laser repetition rate. After a photodiode, the photocurrent is integrated for the duration of the dispersed optical pulse so that the coset pattern non-uniformly samples the RF signal. Since the laser repetition rate is uncorrelated with the RF, each coset provides an independent measurement of the RF. Experimental and numerical results show that 4 properties of the RF chirp pulse can be determined from the multiple coset samples: carrier frequency, chirp rate, start time, and pulse duration. Results are presented for a 20MHz chirp on a 13 microsecond pulse at a carrier of 2.473 GHz.

  4. Electroweak baryogenesis with anomalous Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wu, Lei; Yue, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We investigate feasibility of efficient baryogenesis at the electroweak scale within the effective field theory framework based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In this framework the LHC Higgs boson is described by a singlet scalar field, which, therefore, admits new interactions. Assuming that Higgs couplings with the eletroweak gauge bosons are as in the Standard Model, we demonstrate that the Higgs cubic coupling and the CP-violating Higgs-top quark anomalous couplings alone may drive the a strongly first-order phase transition. The distinguished feature of this transition is that the anomalous Higgs vacuum expectation value is generally non-zero in both phases. We identify a range of anomalous couplings, consistent with current experimental data, where sphaleron rates are sufficiently fast in the `symmetric' phase and are suppressed in the `broken' phase and demonstrate that the desired baryon asymmetry can indeed be generated in this framework. This range of the Higgs anomalous couplings can be further constrained from the LHC Run 2 data and be probed at high luminosity LHC and beyond.

  5. Quartic gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian

    1998-08-01

    We review the recent progress in studying the anomalous electroweak quartic gauge boson couplings (QGBCs) at the LHC and the next generation high energy e±e- linear colliders (LCs). The main focus is put onto the strong electroweak symmetry breaking scenario in which the non-decoupling guarantees sizable new physics effects for the QGBCs. After commenting upon the current low energy indirect bounds and summarizing the theoretical patterns of QGBCs predicted by the typical resonance/non-resonance models, we review our systematic model-independent analysis on bounding them via WW-fusion and WWZ/ZZZ-production. The interplay of the two production mechanisms and the important role of the beam-polarization at the LCs are emphasized. The same physics may be similarly and better studied at a multi-TeV muon collider with high luminosity.

  6. On Canonical Quantization of the Gauged WZW Model with Permutation Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    In this paper we perform canonical quantization of the product of the gauged WZW models on a strip with boundary conditions specified by permutation branes. We show that the phase space of the N-fold product of the gauged WZW model G/H on a strip with boundary conditions given by permutation branes is symplectomorphic to the phase space of the double Chern-Simons theory on a sphere with N holes times the time-line with G and H gauge fields both coupled to two Wilson lines. For the special case of the topological coset G/G we arrive at the conclusion that the phase space of the N-fold product of the topological coset G/G on a strip with boundary conditions given by permutation branes is symplectomorphic to the phase space of Chern-Simons theory on a Riemann surface of the genus N-1 times the time-line with four Wilson lines.

  7. Fused RSOS lattice models as higher-level nonunitary minimal cosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Elena; Pearce, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the Forrester-Baxter RSOS lattice models with crossing parameter λ = (m‧-m)π/m‧ in Regime III. In the continuum scaling limit, these models are described by the minimal models { M }(m,{m}\\prime ). We conjecture that, for λ < π/n, the n × n fused RSOS models with n≥slant 2 are described by the higher-level coset {({A}1(1))}k\\otimes {({A}1(1))}n/{({A}1(1))}k+n at fractional level k = nM/(M‧-M)-2 with (M,{M}\\prime )=({nm}-(n-1){m}\\prime ,{m}\\prime ). To support this conjecture, we investigate the one-dimensional sums arising from Baxter’s off-critical corner transfer matrices. In unitary cases (m = m‧-1) it is known that, up to leading powers of q, these coincide with the branching functions {b}r,s,{\\ell }{m\\prime -n,{m}\\prime ,n}(q). For general nonunitary cases (m < m‧-1), we identify the ground state one-dimensional RSOS paths and relate them to the quantum numbers (r, s, ℓ) in the various sectors. For n = 1, 2, 3, we obtain the local energy functions H(a, b, c) in a suitable gauge and verify that the associated one-dimensional sums produce finitized forms that converge, as N becomes large, to the fractional level branching functions {b}r,s,{\\ell }M,{M\\prime ,n}(q). Extending the work of Schilling, we also conjecture finitized bosonic branching functions {b}r,s,{\\ell }M,{M\\prime ,n;(N)}(q) for general n and check that these agree with the one-dimensional sums for n = 1, 2, 3 out to system sizes N = 14. Lastly, the finitized Kac characters {χ }r,s,{\\ell }P,{P\\prime ,n;(N)}(q) of the n × n fused logarithmic minimal models { L }{ M }(p,{p}\\prime ) are obtained by taking the logarithmic limit m,{m}\\prime \\to ∞ with m‧/m→p‧/p+.

  8. Precision Tests of Electroweak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Akhundov, Arif

    2008-04-21

    The status of the precision tests of the electroweak interactions is reviewed in this paper. An emphasis is put on the Standard Model analysis based on measurements at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron. The results of the measurements of the electroweak mixing angle in the NuTeV experiment and the future prospects are discussed.

  9. Coset spaces and Einstein manifolds with l-conformal Galilei symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavsky, Dmitry

    2016-10-01

    The group theoretic construction is applied to construct a novel dynamical realization of the l-conformal Galilei group in terms of geodesic equations on the coset space. A peculiar feature of the geodesics is that all their integrals of motion, including the accelerations, are functionally independent. The analysis in the recent work [Chernyavsky and Galajinsky (2016) [35

  10. Coset construction of logarithmic minimal models: branching rules and branching functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-09-01

    Working in the Virasoro picture, it is argued that the logarithmic minimal models {LM}(p,p^{\\prime })= {LM}(p,p^{\\prime };1) can be extended to an infinite hierarchy of logarithmic conformal field theories {LM}(p,p^{\\prime };n) at higher fusion levels n\\in {N}. From the lattice, these theories are constructed by fusing together n × n elementary faces of the appropriate {LM}(p,p^{\\prime }) models. It is further argued that all of these logarithmic theories are realized as diagonal cosets {(A_1^{(1)})_k\\oplus (A_1^{(1)})_n}/{(A_1^{(1)})_{k+n}} where n is the integer fusion level and k=\\frac{np}{p^{\\prime }-p}-2 is a fractional level. These cosets mirror the cosets of the higher fusion level minimal models of the form {M}(M,M^{\\prime };n), but are associated with certain reducible representations. We present explicit branching rules for characters in the form of multiplication formulas arising in the logarithmic limit of the usual Goddard-Kent-Olive coset construction of the non-unitary minimal models {M}(M,M^{\\prime };n). The limiting branching functions play the role of Kac characters for the {LM}(p,p^{\\prime };n) theories.

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/whatever

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-10-16

    In the first of these two lectures the Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, which does not necessarily require the existence of Higgs bosons. The general consequences of the hypothesis that electroweak symmetry breaking is due to the Higgs mechanism are deduced just from gauge invariance and unitarity. In the second lecture the general properties are illustrated with three specific models: the Weinberg-Salam model, its minimal supersymmetric extension, and technicolor. The second lecture concludes with a discussion of the experiment signals for strong WW scattering, whose presence or absence will allow us to determine whether the symmetry breaking sector lies above or below 1 TeV. 57 refs.

  12. Contraction of electroweak model and neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2012-10-15

    The electroweak model, which lepton sector correspond to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) Multiplication-Sign U(1), j {yields} 0, whereas boson and quark sectors are standard one, is suggested. The field space of the model is fibered under contraction in such a way that neutrino fields are in the fiber and all other fields are in the base. Properties of the fibered field space are understood in context of semi-Riemannian geometry. This model describes in a natural manner why neutrinos so rarely interact with matter, as well as why neutrino cross section increase with the energy. Dimensionfull parameter of the model is interpreted as neutrino energy. Dimensionless contraction parameter j at low energy is connected with the Fermi constant of weak interactions and is approximated as j{sup 2} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -5}.

  13. Gedanken Worlds without Higgs: QCD-Induced Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook

    2009-01-01

    To illuminate how electroweak symmetry breaking shapes the physical world, we investigate toy models in which no Higgs fields or other constructs are introduced to induce spontaneous symmetry breaking. Two models incorporate the standard SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry and fermion content similar to that of the standard model. The first class--like the standard electroweak theory--contains no bare mass terms, so the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry within quantum chromodynamics is the only source of electroweak symmetry breaking. The second class adds bare fermion masses sufficiently small that QCD remains the dominant source of electroweak symmetry breaking and the model can serve as a well-behaved low-energy effective field theory to energies somewhat above the hadronic scale. A third class of models is based on the left-right-symmetric SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} {circle_times} U(1)B?L gauge group. In a fourth class of models, built on SU(4){sub PS} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} gauge symmetry, lepton number is treated as a fourth color. Many interesting characteristics of the models stem from the fact that the effective strength of the weak interactions is much closer to that of the residual strong interactions than in the real world. The Higgs-free models not only provide informative contrasts to the real world, but also lead us to consider intriguing issues in the application of field theory to the real world.

  14. The gauge-Higgs legacy of the LHC Run I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butter, Anja; Éboli, Oscar J. P.; Gonzalez-Fraile, J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The effective Lagrangian expansion provides a framework to study effects of new physics at the electroweak scale. To make full use of LHC data in constraining higher-dimensional operators we need to include both the Higgs and the electroweak gauge sector in our study. We first present an analysis of the relevant di-boson production LHC results to update constraints on triple gauge boson couplings. Our bounds are several times stronger than those obtained from LEP data. Next, we show how in combination with Higgs measurements the triple gauge vertices lead to a significant improvement in the entire set of operators, including operators describing Higgs couplings.

  15. Gauged Axions and their QCD Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coriano, Claudio; Mariano, Antonio; Guzzi, Marco

    2010-12-22

    We present a brief overview of axion models associated to anomalous abelian (gauge) symmetries, discussing their main phenomenological features. Among these, the mechanism of vacuum misalignment introduced at the QCD and at the electroweak phase transitions, with the appearance of periodic potentials, responsible for the generation of a mass for these types of axions.

  16. Electroweak properties of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-01

    In this talk, I will review the present understanding of nuclear electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions, as well as selected beta decays in A <= 10 nuclei. Emphasis will be on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electroweak currents. Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. D-branes in asymmetrically gauged WZW models and axial-vector duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Mark A.; Zhou, Jian-Ge

    2003-01-01

    We construct D-branes in a left-right asymmetrically gauged WZW model, with the gauge subgroup embedded differently on the left and the right of the group element. The symmetry-preserving boundary conditions for the group-valued field g are described, and the corresponding action is found. When the subgroup H= U(1), we can implement T-duality on the axially gauged WZW action; an orbifold of the vectorially gauged theory is produced. For the parafermion SU(2)/ U(1) coset model, a σ-model is obtained with vanishing gauge field on D-branes. We show that a boundary condition surviving from the SU(2) parent theory characterizes D-branes in the parafermion theory, determining the shape of A-branes. The gauge field on B-branes is obtained from the boundary condition for A-branes, by the orbifold construction and T-duality. These gauge fields stabilize the B-branes.

  18. Superstring theory on AdS 2× S2 as a coset supermanifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, N.; Bershadsky, M.; Hauer, T.; Zhukov, S.; Zwiebach, B.

    We quantize the superstring on the AdS 2× S2 background with Ramond-Ramond flux using a PSU(1,1|2)/ U(1)× U(1) sigma model with a WZ term. One-loop conformal invariance of the model is guaranteed by a general mechanism which holds for coset spaces G/ H where G is Ricci-flat and H is the invariant locus of a Z4 automorphism of G. This mechanism gives conformal theories for the PSU(1,1|2)× PSU(2|2)/ SU(2)× SU(2) and PSU(2,2|4)/ SO(4,1)× SO(5) coset spaces, suggesting our results might be useful for quantizing the superstring on AdS 3× S3 and AdS 5× S5 backgrounds.

  19. A Combination of Preliminary Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2003-05-15

    This note presents a combination of published and preliminary electroweak results from the four LEP collaborations and the SLD collaboration which were prepared for the 1997 summer conferences. Averages are derived for hadronic and leptonic cross-sections, the leptonic forward-backward asymmetries, the {tau} polarisation asymmetries, the b{bar b} and c{bar c} partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries and the q{bar q} charge asymmetry. The major changes with respect to results presented last year are updated results of A{sub LR} from SLD, and the inclusion of the first direct measurements of the W mass and triple-gauge-boson couplings performed at LEP. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments. The parameters of the Standard Model are evaluated, first using the combined LEP electroweak measurements, and then using the full set of electroweak results.

  20. Three-point functions in the 𝒩 = 4 orthogonal coset theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun; Kim, Hyunsu; Paeng, Jinsub

    2016-06-01

    We construct the lowest higher spin-2 current in terms of the spin-1 and the spin-1 2 currents living in the orthogonal SO(N+4) SO(N)×SO(4) Wolf space coset theory for general N. The remaining 15 higher spin currents are determined. We obtain the three-point functions of bosonic (higher) spin currents with two scalars for finite N and k (the level of the spin-1 current). By multiplying SU(2) × U(1) into the above Wolf space coset theory, the other 15 higher spin currents together with the above lowest higher spin-2 current are realized in the extension of the large 𝒩 = 4 linear superconformal algebra. Similarly, the three-point functions of bosonic (higher) spin currents with two scalars for finite N and k are obtained. Under the large N ’t Hooft limit, the two types of three-point functions in the nonlinear and linear versions coincide as in the unitary coset theory found previously.

  1. Three-point functions in the 𝒩 = 4 orthogonal coset theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun; Kim, Hyunsu; Paeng, Jinsub

    2016-06-01

    We construct the lowest higher spin-2 current in terms of the spin-1 and the spin-1 2 currents living in the orthogonal SO(N+4) SO(N)×SO(4) Wolf space coset theory for general N. The remaining 15 higher spin currents are determined. We obtain the three-point functions of bosonic (higher) spin currents with two scalars for finite N and k (the level of the spin-1 current). By multiplying SU(2) × U(1) into the above Wolf space coset theory, the other 15 higher spin currents together with the above lowest higher spin-2 current are realized in the extension of the large 𝒩 = 4 linear superconformal algebra. Similarly, the three-point functions of bosonic (higher) spin currents with two scalars for finite N and k are obtained. Under the large N ’t Hooft limit, the two types of three-point functions in the nonlinear and linear versions coincide as in the unitary coset theory found previously.

  2. Warped electroweak breaking without custodial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrer, Joan A.; von Gersdorff, Gero; Quirós, Mariano

    2011-03-01

    We propose an alternative to the introduction of an extra gauge (custodial) symmetry to suppress the contribution of KK modes to the T parameter in warped theories of electroweak breaking. The mechanism is based on a general class of warped 5D metrics and a Higgs propagating in the bulk. The metrics are nearly AdS in the UV region but depart from AdS in the IR region, towards where KK fluctuations are mainly localized, and have a singularity outside the slice between the UV and IR branes. This gravitational background is generated by a bulk stabilizing scalar field which triggers a natural solution to the hierarchy problem. Depending on the model parameters, gauge-boson KK modes can be consistent with present bounds on EWPT for mKK≳1 TeV at 95% CL. The model contains a light Higgs mode which unitarizes the four-dimensional theory. The reduction in the precision observables can be traced back to a large wave function renormalization for this mode.

  3. Electroweak bremsstrahlung for wino-like Dark Matter annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Comelli, Denis; Simone, Andrea De; Riotto, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: comelli@fe.infn.it E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch

    2012-06-01

    If the Dark Matter is the neutral Majorana component of a multiplet which is charged under the electroweak interactions of the Standard Model, its main annihilation channel is into W{sup +}W{sup −}, while the annihilation into light fermions is helicity suppressed. As pointed out recently, the radiation of gauge bosons from the initial state of the annihilation lifts the suppression and opens up an s-wave contribution to the cross section. We perform the full tree-level calculation of Dark Matter annihilations, including electroweak bremsstrahlung, in the context of an explicit model corresponding to the supersymmetric wino. We find that the fermion channel can become as important as the di-boson one. This result has significant implications for the predictions of the fluxes of particles originating from Dark Matter annihilations.

  4. The furry picture for the standard electroweak theory with a free non-Abelian external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. P.

    1992-10-01

    We describe the Furry representation formalism for Rξ-gauging of a spontaneously broken SU(2)×U(1) electroweak theory. We obtain the generating functional for mean values of physical quantities and the generating functional for probability amplitudes of processes.

  5. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Higgs Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Morrissey, David E.; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-03-13

    We explore the connection between the strength of the electroweak phase transition and the properties of the Higgs boson. Our interest is in regions of parameter space that can realize electroweak baryogenesis. We do so in a simplified framework in which a single Higgs field couples to new scalar fields charged under SU(3){sub c} by way of the Higgs portal. Such new scalars can make the electroweak phase transition more strongly first-order, while contributing to the effective Higgs boson couplings to gluons and photons through loop effects. For Higgs boson masses in the range 115 {approx}< m{sub h} {approx}< 130 GeV, whenever the phase transition becomes strong enough for successful electroweak baryogenesis, we find that Higgs boson properties are modified by an amount observable by the LHC. We also discuss the baryogenesis window of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which appears to be under tension. Furthermore, we argue that the discovery of a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings to gluons and photons will rule out electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM.

  6. Heavy Flavor and Electroweak Theory - Proceedings of the International Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi; Huang, Chao-Shang

    1996-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Acknowledgement * Foreword * List of Participants * Optimal Renormalization Scales and Commensurate Scale Relations * Top Quark Production Dynamics in QCD * QCD Sum Rule Analysis to SU(3) Symmetry Breaking on Heavy Mesons * Renormalons and Perturbative Fixed Points * Hadronic Form Factors of Semileptonic Ml3 Decays * Gluon Fragmentation to Aligned Quarkonium * The Bc Meson and the Double Heavy Baryons * Hyperfine Splittings in Heavy Quarkonia from a New Improved Spin-Dependent Potential * bar {B} - B Mixing in the Nc Expansion * Soft Interactions of Heavy Fermions * Spacelike Penguin Effects in Charmless B Meson Decays and CP Violation * On the Definition of CP and P in General Gauge Theories * Semileptonic-Inclusive Decays and the Structure of B Mesons * Nonfactorization in B and D Decays * The 1/MQ Expansion in the B-S Formalism * Applications of Current Algebra or Chiral Symmetry to Tau Hadronic Decays * An Unified Effective Theory of Mesons and Its Implications on Meson Phenomenology * Precision Tests of the Electroweak Sector of the Standard Model * Is There an Exact S2 Symmetry in Quark Mass Matrices? * Equivalence Theorem and Its Application to Studying the Sensitivity of Probing the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Mechanism at the LHC * Direct Tests of Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking * Critical Review of the Electroweak Precision Tests * Tau Tests for New Physics * Some Remarks on Superstring Phenomenology * Top Quark Pair Production: Sensitivity to New Physics * One Loop Effects of Supersymmetry of Top Production at Tevatron * Some Phenomenology of the Top Quark with Non-Standard Couplings * Summary of the International Symposium on Heavy Flavor and Electroweak Theory

  7. Insensitive unification of gauge couplings with three vector-like families

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, Radovan

    2013-05-23

    The standard model extended by three vector-like families with masses of order 1 TeV - 100 TeV allows for unification of gauge couplings. The values of gauge couplings at the electroweak scale are highly insensitive to fundamental parameters. The grand unification scale is large enough to avoid the problem with fast proton decay. The electroweak minimum of the Higgs potential is stable.

  8. Two-step electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Satoru; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze electroweak baryogenesis during a two-step electroweak symmetry-breaking transition, wherein the baryon asymmetry is generated during the first step and preserved during the second. Focusing on the dynamics of C P violation required for asymmetry generation, we discuss general considerations for successful two-step baryogenesis. Using a concrete model realization, we illustrate in detail the viability of this scenario and the implications for present and future electric dipole moment (EDM) searches. We find that C P violation associated with a partially excluded sector may yield the observed baryon asymmetry while evading present and future EDM constraints.

  9. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  10. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  12. SUL(4) × U(1) model for electroweak unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayyazuddin; Riazuddin

    2004-12-01

    After some general remarks about SUL(4) electroweak unification, the model is extended to SUL(4) × UX(1) to accomodate fractionally charged quarks. The unification scale is expected to be in TeV region. A right-handed Majorana neutrino along with known lepton are put in the fundamental representation of SUL(4) with YX = 0. The see-saw mechanism for neutrino masses and flavor mixing in neutrino sector is a natural feature of the model. The lepton number violating processes can occure through dilepton gauge bosons contained in the model.

  13. Electroweak and b-physics at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.

    1994-04-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have collected integrated luminosities of 21 pb{sup {minus}1} and 16 pb{sup {minus}1}, respectively, in the 1992--1993 run (Run Ia) at the Fermilab Tevatron. Preliminary results on electroweak physics are reported from both experiments: the W mass, the leptonic branching ratios {Tau}(W {yields} {ell}{nu}), the total W width, gauge boson couplings, W decay asymmetry and W{prime}/Z{prime} search. Preliminary new results on b physics are presented: B{sup o} {minus} {bar B}{sup o} mixing from D0, and masses and lifetimes of B{minus}mesons from CDF.

  14. Gaussian effective potential for the standard model SU(2)xU(1) electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio; Marotta, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The Gaussian effective potential is derived for the non-Abelian SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory of electroweak interactions. At variance with naive derivations, the Gaussian effective potential is proven to be a genuine variational tool in any gauge. The role of ghosts is discussed and the unitarity gauge is shown to be the only choice which allows calculability without insertion of further approximations. The full non-Abelian calculation confirms the existence of a light Higgs boson in the nonperturbative strong coupling regime of the Higgs sector.

  15. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  16. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  17. Top, Higgs and Electroweak Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Paul L.

    2006-11-17

    Hadron colliders are, and will continue to be, an excellent venue for testing the standard model of particle physics. We describe the status of top-quark physics and the direct search for a standard model Higgs boson. We briefly describe the use of Tevatron and LEP data to indirectly infer the standard model Higgs mass through precision electroweak measurements.

  18. Moriond Electroweak 2006: Theory summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph D.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    A concise look at the big picture of particle physics, including the status of the Standard Model, neutrinos, supersymmetry, extra dimensions and cosmology. Based upon the theoretical summary presented at the XLIst Rencontres de Moriond on Electroweak Interactions and Unified Theories, La Thuile, 11-18 March 2006.

  19. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for ``new physics`` is described.

  20. A few words about resonances in the electroweak effective Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosell, Ignasi; Pich, Antonio; Santos, Joaquín; Sanz-Cillero, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models including both a light Higgs-like boson and massive spin-1 resonances are not in conflict with experimental constraints on the oblique S and T parameters. We use an effective Lagrangian implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU (2)L ⊗ SU (2)R → SU (2)L + R that contains the Standard Model gauge bosons coupled to the electroweak Goldstones, one Higgs-like scalar state h with mass mh = 126 GeV and the lightest vector and axial-vector resonance multiplets V and A. We have considered the one-loop calculation of S and T in order to study the viability of these strongly-coupled scenarios, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the calculation. Once we have constrained the resonance parameters, we do a first approach to the determination of the low energy constants of the electroweak effective theory at low energies (without resonances). We show this determination in the case of the purely Higgsless bosonic Lagrangian.

  1. An all-order discontinuity at the electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, M.; Shaposhnikov, M.

    1999-09-01

    We define a non-local gauge-invariant Green's function which can distinguish between the symmetric (confinement) and broken (Higgs) phases of the hot SU(2)/xU(1) electroweak theory to all orders in the perturbative expansion. It is related to the coupling of the Chern-Simons number to a massless Abelian gauge field. The result implies either that there is a way to distinguish between the phases, even though the macroscopic thermodynamical properties of the system have been observed to be smoothly connected, or that the perturbative Coleman-Hill theorem on which the argument is based, is circumvented by non-perturbative effects. We point out that this question could in principle be studied with three-dimensional lattice simulations.

  2. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  3. Lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the impact of the tau and bottom Yukawa couplings on the transport dynamics for electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Although it has generally been assumed in the literature that all Yukawa interactions except those involving the top quark are negligible, we find that the tau and bottom Yukawa interaction rates are too fast to be neglected. We identify an illustrative 'lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis' scenario in which the baryon asymmetry is induced mainly through the presence of a left-handed leptonic charge. We derive analytic formulas for the computation of the baryon asymmetry that, in light of these effects, are qualitatively different from those in the established literature. In this scenario, for fixed CP-violating phases, the baryon asymmetry has opposite sign compared to that calculated using established formulas.

  4. Fit to Electroweak Precision Data

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, Jens

    2006-11-17

    A brief review of electroweak precision data from LEP, SLC, the Tevatron, and low energies is presented. The global fit to all data including the most recent results on the masses of the top quark and the W boson reinforces the preference for a relatively light Higgs boson. I will also give an outlook on future developments at the Tevatron Run II, CEBAF, the LHC, and the ILC.

  5. Gauge mediated mini-split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ- b μ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 105 to 108 GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  6. A composite light scalar, electro-weak symmetry breaking and the recent LHC searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Piai, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    We construct a model in which electro-weak symmetry breaking is induced by a strongly coupled sector, which is described in terms of a five-dimensional model in the spirit of the bottom-up approach to holography. We compute the precision electro-weak parameters, and identify regions of parameter space allowed by indirect tests. We compute the spectrum of scalar and vector resonances, which contains a set of parametrically light states that can be identified with the electro-weak gauge bosons and a light dilaton. There is then a little desert, up to 2-3 TeV, where towers of resonances of the vector, axial-vector and scalar particles appear.

  7. Yang-Mills solutions and Spin(7)-instantons on cylinders over coset spaces with G 2-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Alexander S.

    2016-03-01

    We study {g} -valued Yang-Mills fields on cylinders Zleft(G/Hright)={R}× G/H , where G/H is a compact seven-dimensional coset space with G 2-structure, {g} is the Lie algebra of G, and Z(G/H) inherits a Spin(7)-structure. After imposing a general G-invariance condition, Yang-Mills theory with torsion on Z(G/H) reduces to Newtonian mechanics of a point particle moving in {{R}}^n under the influence of some quartic potential and possibly additional constraints. The kinematics and dynamics depends on the chosen coset space. We consider in detail three coset spaces with nearly parallel G 2-structure and four coset spaces with SU(3)-structure. For each case, we analyze the critical points of the potential and present a range of finite-energy solutions. We also study a higher-dimensional analog of the instanton equation. Its solutions yield G-invariant Spin(7)-instanton configurations on Z(G/H), which are special cases of Yang-Mills configurations with torsion.

  8. Progressive gauge U(1) family symmetry for quarks and leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2016-08-01

    The pattern of quark and lepton mass matrices is unexplained in the standard model of particle interactions. I propose the novel idea of a progressive gauge U (1 ) symmetry where it is a reflection of the regressive electroweak symmetry breaking pattern, caused by an extended Higgs scalar sector. Phenomenological implications of this new hypothesis are discussed.

  9. A Combination of Preliminary Electroweak Measurements And Constraints on the Standard Model (2004)

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaneo, D.

    2005-03-07

    This note presents a combination of published and preliminary electroweak results from the four LEP collaborations and the SLD collaboration which were prepared for the 2004 summer conferences. Averages from Z resonance results are derived for hadronic and leptonic cross sections, the leptonic forward-backward asymmetries, the {tau} polarization asymmetries, the b{bar b} and c{bar c} partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries and the q{bar q} charge asymmetry. Above the Z resonance, averages are derived for di-fermion cross sections and forward-backward asymmetries, photon-pair, W-pair, Z-pair, single-W and single-Z cross sections, electroweak gauge boson couplings, W mass and width and W decay branching ratios. Also, an investigation of the interference of photon and Z-boson exchange is presented, and colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlation analyses in W-pair production are combined. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in summer 2003 are updates to the W branching fractions and four-fermion cross sections measured at LEP-2, and the SLD/LEP heavy-flavour results measured at the Z pole. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably the final result on the electroweak mixing angle determined in neutrino-nucleon scattering by the NuTeV collaboration, the latest result in atomic parity violation in Caesium, and the measurement of the electroweak mixing angle in Moller scattering. The parameters of the Standard Model are evaluated, first using the combined LEP electroweak measurements, and then using the full set of high-Q{sup 2} electroweak results.

  10. Coset construction and character sum rules for the doubly extended N = 4 superconformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens Lyng; Taormina, Anne

    1993-06-01

    Character sum rules associated with the realization of the N = 4 superconformal algebra Ãγ on manifolds corresponding to the group cosets SU(3) k˜+ / U(1) are derived and developed as an important tool in obtaining the modular properties of Ãγ characters as well as information on certain extensions of that algebra. Their structure strongly suggests the existence of rational conformal field theories with central charges in the range 1 ⪕ c ⪕ 4. The corresponding characters appear in the massive sector of the sum rules and are completely specified in terms of the characters for the parafermionic theory SU(3)/(SU(2)×U(1)) and in terms of the branching functions of massless Ãγ characters into SU(2) k˜+× SU(2) 1 characters.

  11. ELECTROWEAK PHYSICS AND PRECISION STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIANO, W.

    2005-10-24

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current values of m{sub W}, sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}(m{sub Z}){sub {ovr MS}} and m{sub t} imply a relatively light Higgs which is below the direct experimental bound but possibly consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a 2{sigma} discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  12. Inflation at the electroweak scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Lloyd; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    We present a model for slow-rollover inflation where the vacuum energy that drives inflation is of the order of G(F) exp -2; unlike most models, the conversion of vacuum energy to radiation ('reheating') is moderately efficient. The scalar field responsible for inflation is a standard-model singlet, develops a vacuum expectation value of 4 x 10 exp 6 GeV, has a mass of about 1 GeV, and can play a role in electroweak phenomena. We also discuss models where the energy scale of inflation is somewhat larger, but still well below the unification scale.

  13. Electroweak corrections to W+W-Z and ZZZ production at the linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Le, D. N.; Sun, H.; Weber, M. M.

    2010-07-01

    We calculate the electroweak corrections to the production of WWZ and ZZZ at the linear collider in the Standard Model. These processes are important for the extraction of the quartic couplings of the massive gauge bosons which can be a window on the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We find that the weak corrections to some kinematic distributions show new features and hence cannot be explained by an overall scale factor.

  14. Electroweak relaxation from finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We study theories which naturally select a vacuum with parametrically small Electroweak Scale due to finite temperature effects in the early universe. In particular, there is a scalar with an approximate shift symmetry broken by a technically natural small coupling to the Higgs, and a temperature dependent potential. As the temperature of the universe drops, the scalar follows the minimum of its potential altering the Higgs mass squared parameter. The scalar also has a periodic potential with amplitude proportional to the Higgs expectation value, which traps it in a vacuum with a small Electroweak Scale. The required temperature dependence of the potential can occur through strong coupling effects in a hidden sector that are suppressed at high temperatures. Alternatively, it can be generated perturbatively from a one-loop thermal potential. In both cases, for the scalar to be displaced, a hidden sector must be reheated to temperatures significantly higher than the visible sector. However this does not violate observational constraints provided the hidden sector energy density is transferred to the visible sector without disrupting big bang nucleosynthesis. We also study how the mechanism can be implemented when the visible sector is completed to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at a high scale. Models with a UV cutoff of 10 TeV and no fields taking values over a range greater than 1012 GeV are possible, although the scalar must have a range of order 108 times the effective decay constant in the periodic part of its potential.

  15. Electroweak-scale resonant leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Underwood, Thomas E.J.

    2005-12-01

    We study minimal scenarios of resonant leptogenesis near the electroweak phase transition. These models offer a number of testable phenomenological signatures for low-energy experiments and future high-energy colliders. Our study extends previous analyses of the relevant network of Boltzmann equations, consistently taking into account effects from out of equilibrium sphalerons and single lepton flavors. We show that the effects from single lepton flavors become very important in variants of resonant leptogenesis, where the observed baryon asymmetry in the Universe is created by lepton-to-baryon conversion of an individual lepton number, for example, that of the {tau}-lepton. The predictions of such resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models for the final baryon asymmetry are almost independent of the initial lepton-number and heavy neutrino abundances. These models accommodate the current neutrino data and have a number of testable phenomenological implications. They contain electroweak-scale heavy Majorana neutrinos with appreciable couplings to electrons and muons, which can be probed at future e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} high-energy colliders. In particular, resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models predict sizable 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay, as well as e- and {mu}-number-violating processes, such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei, with rates that are within reach of the experiments proposed by the MEG and MECO collaborations.

  16. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter space that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.

  17. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter spacemore » that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.« less

  18. Cosmological properties of a gauged axion

    SciTech Connect

    Coriano, Claudio; Mariano, Antonio; Guzzi, Marco; Lazarides, George

    2010-09-15

    We analyze the most salient cosmological features of axions in extensions of the standard model with a gauged anomalous extra U(1) symmetry. The model is built by imposing the constraint of gauge invariance in the anomalous effective action, which is extended with Wess-Zumino counterterms. These generate axionlike interactions of the axions to the gauge fields and a gauged shift symmetry. The scalar sector is assumed to acquire a nonperturbative potential after inflation, at the electroweak phase transition, which induces a mixing of the Stueckelberg field of the model with the scalars of the electroweak sector, and at the QCD phase transition. We discuss the possible mechanisms of sequential misalignments which could affect the axions of these models, and generated, in this case, at both transitions. We compute the contribution of these particles to dark matter, quantifying their relic densities as a function of the Stueckelberg mass. We also show that models with a single anomalous U(1) in general do not account for the dark energy, due to the presence of mixed U(1)-SU(3) anomalies.

  19. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  20. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  1. Physics Beyond the Standard Model, search for non-perturbative models of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The Standard Model provides an elegant mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) via the introduction of a scalar Higgs field. However, the Standard Model Higgs mechanism is not the only way to explain EWSB. A class of models, broadly known as Technicolor, postulates the existence of a new strongly-interacting gauge sector at the TeV scale, coupled to the Standard Model through technifermions charged under electroweak. In technicolor, the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry triggers EWSB, with the resulting Goldstone bosons ``eaten'' by the massive W, Z gauge bosons. Because they are strongly-coupled and inherently non-perturbative, numerical lattice gauge theory provides an ideal arena in which technicolor can be explored. The maturation of lattice methods and availability of sufficient computing power has spurred the investigation of technicolor using lattice gauge theory techniques, in particular one variant known as ``walking'' technicolor. A technicolor model that resembles QCD is problematic that it does not satisfy the constraints of precision electro-weak observables, most notably those encapsulated by the Peskin-Takeuchi parameters, as well as the contraints on flavor-changing neutral currents. Walking technicolor is a class of models where the theory is near-conformal, i.e. the gauge coupling runs very slowly (``walks'') over some large range of energy scales. This walking behavior produces a large separation of scales between the natural cut-off for the theory and the EWSB scale, allowing one to naturally generate fermion masses without violating contrainsts on flavor-changing neutral currents. The dynamics of walking theories may also allow it to satisfy the bounds on the Peskin-Takeuchi parameters. We discuss the results of recent lattice calculations that explore the properties of walking technicolor models and the its implications on possible physics beyond the Standard Model.

  2. Electroweak Sudakov corrections to new physics searches at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Mauro; Montagna, Guido; Barzè, Luca; Moretti, Mauro; Nicrosini, Oreste; Piccinini, Fulvio; Tramontano, Francesco

    2013-09-20

    We compute the one-loop electroweak Sudakov corrections to the production process Z(νν)+n jets, with n=1, 2, 3, in pp collisions at the LHC. It represents the main irreducible background to new physics searches at the energy frontier. The results are obtained at the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy by implementing the general algorithm of Denner and Pozzorini in the event generator for multiparton processes alpgen. For the standard selection cuts used by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations, we show that the Sudakov corrections to the relevant observables can grow up to -40% at sqrt[s ]= 14 TeV. We also include the contribution due to undetected real radiation of massive gauge bosons, to show to what extent the partial cancellation with the large negative virtual corrections takes place in realistic event selections.

  3. On a model of dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, B. A.

    1992-08-01

    A model of dynamical breaking of the symmetry of the electroweak interaction is proposed. It is based on a self-consistent mechanism of the appearance of an additional gauge invariant vertex. The conditions of spontaneous symmetry breaking in the mass operators of W, Z and in the form factor of the vertex give a set of equations. There exist solutions breaking the symmetry which bear no contradiction to the existing data. The model defines the Weinberg mixing angle sin 2θw ≈ 0.34 with the possible accuracy of (20-30)%. The mechanism predicts strong W and Z multiple production in e+e- reactions at TeV energies.

  4. A gravitating electroweak bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational and electromagnetic (EM) field of electron is described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole solution with a topological defect. Regularization of this defect by the Higgs field leads to the smooth source which shares much in common with the known MIT- and SLAC- bag models, but has the advantage, of matching gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the electron. This model is flexible, and the rotating KN bag takes the shape of a thin disk with a circular string positioned on the sharp border of the disk. We consider the lowest excitations of the KN solution and the corresponding deformations of the bag surface, setting a preliminary correspondence with electroweak sector of the SM.

  5. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Colored Scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-02-15

    We consider the 2-loop finite temperature effective potential for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson, allowing Higgs boson couplings to additional scalars. If the scalars transform under color, they contribute 2-loop diagrams to the effective potential that include gluons. These 2-loop effects are perhaps stronger than previously appreciated. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, they can increase the strength of the phase transition by as much as a factor of 3.5. It is this effect that is responsible for the survival of the tenuous electroweak baryogenesis window of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We further illuminate the importance of these 2-loop diagrams by contrasting models with colored scalars to models with singlet scalars. We conclude that baryogenesis favors models with light colored scalars. This motivates searches for pair-produced di-jet resonances or jet(s) + = E{sub T}.

  6. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1994-08-09

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W`s and Z`s, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed.

  7. CP-Violating Sources for Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I derive the CP-violating sources for the squark number density in the MSSM generated by interactions with the spacetime-varying Higgs vev during a first-order electroweak phase transition.

  8. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  9. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, HyoJung

    2010-02-01

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb-1 containing 657 millions BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider.

  10. Bubble expansion and the viability of singlet-driven electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The standard picture of electroweak baryogenesis requires slowly expanding bubbles. This can be difficult to achieve if the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a gauge singlet scalar field changes appreciably during the electroweak phase transition. It is important to determine the bubble wall velocity in this case, since the predicted baryon asymmetry can depend sensitively on its value. Here, this calculation is discussed and illustrated in the real singlet extension of the Standard Model. The friction on the bubble wall is computed using a kinetic theory approach and including hydrodynamic effects. Wall velocities are found to be rather large ( v w ≳ 0.2) but compatible with electroweak baryogenesis in some portions of the parameter space. If the phase transition is strong enough, however, a subsonic solution may not exist, precluding non-local electroweak baryogenesis altogether. The results presented here can be used in calculating the baryon asymmetry in various singlet-driven scenarios, as well as other features related to cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe, such as the resulting spectrum of gravitational radiation.

  11. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  12. Vacuum stability and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an SO(10) dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum stability in the Standard Model is problematic as the Higgs quartic self-coupling runs negative at a renormalization scale of about 1010 GeV . We consider a nonsupersymmetric SO(10) grand unification model for which gauge coupling unification is made possible through an intermediate scale gauge group, Gint=SU (3 )C⊗SU (2 )L⊗SU (2 )R⊗U (1 )B -L . Gint is broken by the vacuum expectation value of a 126 of SO(10) which not only provides for neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism but also preserves a discrete Z2 that can account for the stability of a dark matter candidate, here taken to be the Standard Model singlet component of a bosonic 16 . We show that in addition to these features the model insures the positivity of the Higgs quartic coupling through its interactions to the dark matter multiplet and 126 . We also show that the Higgs mass squared runs negative, triggering electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus, the vacuum stability is achieved along with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and captures two more important elements of supersymmetric models without low-energy supersymmetry. The conditions for perturbativity of quartic couplings and for radiative electroweak symmetry breaking lead to tight upper and lower limits on the dark matter mass, respectively, and this dark matter mass region (1.35-2 TeV) can be probed in future direct detection experiments.

  13. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  14. Constraints on gauge-Higgs unification models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki; Sakai, Yuki

    2016-02-01

    We examine the possibility of observing the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons in gauge-Higgs unification models at the LHC with the energy s=14 TeV. We consider a benchmark model with the gauge symmetry SU(3)C×SU(3)W in five-dimensional spacetime, where SU(3)C is the gauge symmetry of the strong interaction and SU(3)W is that for the electroweak interaction and a Higgs doublet field. It is natural in general to introduce SU(3)C gauge symmetry in five-dimensional spacetime as well as SU(3)W gauge symmetry in gauge-Higgs unification (GHU) models. Since the fifth dimension is compactified to S1/Z 2 orbifold, there are KK modes of gluons in low-energy effective theory in four-dimensional spacetime. We investigate the resonance contribution of the first KK gluon to dijet invariant mass distribution at the LHC, and provide signal-to-noise ratios in various cases of KK gluon masses and kinematical cuts. Although the results are given in a specific benchmark model, we discuss their application to general GHU models with KK gluons. GHU models can be verified or constrained through the physics of the strong interaction, though they are proposed to solve the naturalness problem in electroweak symmetry breaking.

  15. Electro-Weak, QCD and top physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.T.

    1993-09-01

    The 1992--1993 Tevatron collider run ended yesterday. {approx}21 (16)pb{sup {minus}1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}S = 1800 GeV were collected at CDF (D0). New measurements of the W and Z cross section x branching ratios indicate that {Gamma}(W) is 2.033 {plus_minus} 0.069 {plus_minus} 0.057 GeV. The upper limit for the top quark mass, if it is produced in W decays, is 62 GeV/c{sup 3}. Gauge boson pair production studies are beginning to constrain electro-weak parameters. No neutral gauge bosons with mass > M{sub z} have appeared. Inclusive jet production and angular distribution studies are compared to NLO perturbative QCD predictions. A new topological jet analysis from CDF is sensitive to the low x gluon distribution. The direct photon cross section shows a steeper fall-off with E{sub t} than does the theory prediction. D0 has one candidate t{bar t} event in the dilepton mode. The lower limit on M{sub T{sub op}} has been raised to 99 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Neutrino signals from electroweak bremsstrahlung in solar WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Brennan, Amelia J.; Jacques, Thomas D. E-mail: a.brennan@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2012-10-01

    Bremsstrahlung of W and Z gauge bosons, or photons, can be an important dark matter annihilation channel. In many popular models in which the annihilation to a pair of light fermions is helicity suppressed, these bremsstrahlung processes can lift the suppression and thus become the dominant annihilation channels. The resulting dark matter annihilation products contain a large, energetic, neutrino component. We consider solar WIMP annihilation in the case where electroweak bremsstrahlung dominates, and calculate the resulting neutrino spectra. The flux consists of primary neutrinos produced in processes such as χχ→ν-bar νZ and χχ→ν-bar lW, and secondary neutrinos produced via the decays of gauge bosons and charged leptons. After dealing with the neutrino propagation and flavour evolution in the Sun, we consider the prospects for detection in neutrino experiments on Earth. We compare our signal with that for annihilation to W{sup +}W{sup −}, and show that, for a given annihilation rate, the bremsstrahlung annihilation channel produces a larger signal by a factor of a few.

  17. PARTICLES AND FIELDS Two loop electroweak corrections from heavy fermions to b → s + γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Yi; Feng, Tai-Fu

    2010-12-01

    Applying an effective Lagrangian method and an on-shell scheme, we analyze the electroweak corrections to the rare decay b → s + γ from some special two loop diagrams in which a closed heavy fermion loop is attached to the virtual charged gauge bosons or Higgs. At the decoupling limit where the virtual fermions in the inner loop are much heavier than the electroweak scale, we verify the final results satisfying the decoupling theorem explicitly when the interactions among Higgs and heavy fermions do not contain the nondecoupling couplings. Adopting the universal assumptions on the relevant couplings and mass spectrum of new physics, we find that the relative corrections from those two loop diagrams to the SM theoretical prediction on the branching ratio of B → Xsγ can reach 5% as the energy scale of new physics ΛNP = 200 GeV.

  18. Heavy fermions and two loop electroweak corrections to b → s + γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Yi; Feng, Tai-Fu

    2010-05-01

    Applying effective Lagrangian method and on-shell scheme, we analyze the electroweak corrections to the rare decay b → s + γ from some special two loop diagrams in which a closed heavy fermion loop is attached to the virtual charged gauge bosons or Higgs. At the decoupling limit where the virtual fermions in inner loop are much heavier than the electroweak scale, we verify the final results satisfying the decoupling theorem explicitly when the interactions among Higgs and heavy fermions do not contain the nondecoupling couplings. Adopting the universal assumptions on the relevant couplings and mass spectrum of new physics, we find that the relative corrections from those two loop diagrams to the SM theoretical prediction on the branching ratio of B → X s γ can reach 5% as the energy scale of new physics ΛNP = 200GeV.

  19. Electroweak supersymmetry in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Taoli; Li, Tianjun

    2013-07-01

    To explain all the available experimental results, we have proposed the electroweak supersymmetry (EWSUSY) previously, where the squarks and/or gluino are heavy around a few TeVs while the sleptons, sneutrinos, bino, winos, and/or Higgsinos are light within 1 TeV. In the next to minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, we perform the systematic χ2 analyses on parameter space scan for three EWSUSY scenarios: (I) R-parity conservation and one dark matter candidate, (II) R-parity conservation and multicomponent dark matter, (III) R-parity violation. We obtain the minimal χ2/(degreeoffreedom) of 10.2/15, 9.6/14, and 9.2/14 respectively for scenarios I, II, and III. Considering the constraints from the LHC neutralino/chargino and slepton searches, we find that the majority of viable parameter space preferred by the muon anomalous magnetic moment has been excluded except for the parameter space with moderate to large tan⁡β(≳8). Especially, the most favorable parameter space has relatively large tan⁡β, moderate λ, small μeff, heavy squarks/gluino, and the second lightest CP-even neutral Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV. In addition, if the left-handed smuon is nearly degenerate with or heavier than wino, there is no definite bound on wino mass. Otherwise, the wino with mass up to ˜450GeV has been excluded. Furthermore, we present several benchmark points for scenarios I and II, and briefly discuss the prospects of the EWSUSY searches at the 14 TeV LHC and ILC.

  20. Aspects of seven-dimensional and six-dimensional gauged supergravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, Der-Chyn

    2007-12-01

    We determine the conditions under which half-maximal matter coupled gauged supergravity in seven dimensions admits a chiral circle reduction to yield a matter coupled gauged supergravity in six dimensions with 8 real supersymmetry. Solving these conditions we find that the SO(2, 2) and SO(3, 1) gauged 7D supergravities give a U(1)R, and the SO(2, 1) gauged 7D supergravity gives an Sp(1)R gauged chiral 6D supergravity coupled to certain matter multiplets. In the 6D models obtained, with or without gauging, we show that the scalar fields of the matter sector parametrize the coset SO(p + 1, 4)/SO(p + 1) x SO(4), with the (p + 3) axions corresponding to its abelian isometries. We then derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a Killing spinor in N = (1, 0) gauge 6D supergravity coupled to a single tensor multiplet, vector multiplets and hypermultiplets. We show that these conditions imply most of the field equations. We also determine the remaining equations that need to be satisfied by an exact solution. In this framework, we find a novel 1/8 supersymmetric dyonic string solution with nonvanishing hypermultiplet scalars. The activated scalars parametrize a 4 dimensional submanifold of a quaternionic hyperbolic ball. The key point is that we employ an identity map between this submanifold and the internal space transverse to the string worldsheet, thereby finding a higher dimensional generalization of Gell-Mann-Zweibach tear-drop solution.

  1. Higgs boson signatures of MSSM electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Arjun; Morrissey, David E.

    2009-06-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis in the minimal supersymmetric standard model can account for the cosmological baryon asymmetry, but only within a restricted region of the parameter space. In particular, minimal supersymmetric standard model electroweak baryogenesis requires a mostly right-handed stop that is lighter than the top quark and a standard model-like light Higgs boson. In the present work we investigate the effects of the light stop on Higgs boson production and decay. Relative to the standard model Higgs boson, we find a large enhancement of the Higgs production rate through gluon fusion and a suppression of the Higgs branching fraction into photon pairs. These modifications in the properties of the Higgs boson are directly related to the effect of the light stop on the electroweak phase transition, and are large enough that they can potentially be tested at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  2. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  3. Electroweak phase transition in ultraminimal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Ryttov, Thomas A.

    2009-05-01

    We unveil the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in new extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics achieved by the means of multiple matter representations. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory introduced to describe ultra minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify regions of parameter space, which yield a strong first-order transition. A striking feature of the model is the existence of a second phase transition associated to the electroweak-singlet sector. The interplay between these two transitions leads to an extremely rich phase diagram.

  4. Automation of electroweak corrections for LHC processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, Mauro; Greiner, Nicolas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections will play an important role in Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Even though they are typically moderate at the level of total cross sections, they can lead to substantial deviations in the shapes of distributions. In particular, for the search for new physics, but also for a precise determination of Standard Model observables, their inclusion in theoretical predictions is mandatory for a reliable estimation of the Standard Model contribution. In this article we review the status and recent developments in electroweak calculations and their automation for LHC processes. We discuss general issues and properties of NLO electroweak corrections and present some examples, including the full calculation of the NLO corrections to the production of a W-boson in association with two jets computed using GoSam interfaced to MadDipole.

  5. Electroweak precision data and the Lee-Wick standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Thomas E. J.; Zwicky, Roman

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the electroweak precision constraints on the recently proposed Lee-Wick standard model at tree level. We analyze low-energy, Z-pole (LEP1/SLC) and LEP2 data separately. We derive the exact tree-level low-energy and Z-pole effective Lagrangians from both the auxiliary field and higher derivative formulation of the theory. For the LEP2 data we use the fact that the Lee-Wick standard model belongs to the class of models that assumes a so-called 'universal' form which can be described by seven oblique parameters at leading order in m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 1,2}{sup 2}. At tree level we find that Y=-m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 1}{sup 2} and W=-m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 2}{sup 2}, where the negative sign is due to the presence of the negative norm states. All other oblique parameters (S,X) and (T,U,V) are found to be zero. In the addendum we show how our results differ from previous investigations, where contact terms, which are found to be of leading order, have been neglected. The LEP1/SLC constraints are slightly stronger than LEP2 and much stronger than the low-energy ones. The LEP1/SLC results exclude gauge boson masses of M{sub 1}{approx_equal}M{sub 2}{approx}3 TeV at the 99% confidence level. Somewhat lower masses are possible when one of the masses assumes a large value. Loop corrections to the electroweak observables are suppressed by the standard {approx}1/(4{pi}){sup 2} factor and are therefore not expected to change the constraints on M1 and M{sub 2}. This assertion is most transparent from the higher derivative formulation of the theory.

  6. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  7. Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

  8. Electroweak naturalness and deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the question of electroweak naturalness within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) framework for supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The class of DMM models considered are nine-parameter theories that fall within the general classification of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. Our results show that these DMM models have regions of parameter space with very low electroweak fine-tuning, at levels comparable to the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. These parameter regions should be probed extensively in the current LHC run.

  9. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Hyo Jung

    2010-02-10

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb{sup -1} containing 657 millions BB-bar pairs collected at the UPSILON(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  10. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  11. A little more gauge mediation and the light Higgs mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana Mummidi, V.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2014-04-01

    We consider minimal models of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking with an extra U(1) factor in addition to the Standard Model gauge group. A U(1) charged, Standard Model singlet is assumed to be present which allows for an additional NMSSM like coupling, λHuHdS. The U(1) is assumed to be flavour universal. Anomaly cancellation in the MSSM sector requires additional coloured degrees of freedom. The S field can get a large vacuum expectation value along with consistent electroweak symmetry breaking. It is shown that the lightest CP even Higgs boson can attain mass of the order of 125 GeV.

  12. Implications of Gauge Invariance on a Heavy Diphoton Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Ian; Lykken, Joseph

    2015-12-30

    Assuming a heavy electroweak singlet scalar, which couples to the Standard Model gauge bosons only through loop-induced couplings, SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance imposes interesting patterns on its decays into electroweak gauge bosons, which are dictated by only two free parameters. Therefore experimental measurements on any two of the four possible electroweak channels would determine the remaining two decay channels completely. Furthermore, searches in the WW/ZZ channels probe a complimentary region of parameter space from searches in the gamma-gamma/Z-gamma channels. We derive a model-independent upper bound on the branching fraction in each decay channel, which for the diphoton channel turns out to be about 61%. Including the coupling to gluons, the upper bound on the diphoton branching fraction implies an upper bound on the mass scale of additional colored particles mediating the gluon-fusion production. Using an event rate of about 5 fb for the reported 750 GeV diphoton excess, we find the new colored particle must be lighter than O(1.7 TeV) and O(2.6 TeV) for a pure CP-even and a pure CP-odd singlet scalar, respectively.

  13. Higgs decays in gauge extensions of the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Don; Hubisz, Jay; Jain, Bithika

    2014-02-01

    We explore the phenomenology of virtual spin-1 contributions to the h→γγ and h→Zγ decay rates in gauge extensions of the standard model. We consider generic Lorentz and gauge-invariant vector self-interactions, which can have nontrivial structure after diagonalizing the quadratic part of the action. Such features are phenomenologically relevant in models where the electroweak gauge bosons mix with additional spin-1 fields, such as occurs in little Higgs models, extra dimensional models, strongly coupled variants of electroweak symmetry breaking, and other gauge extensions of the standard model. In models where nonrenormalizable operators mix field strengths of gauge groups, the one-loop Higgs decay amplitudes can be logarithmically divergent, and we provide power counting for the size of the relevant counterterm. We provide an example calculation in a four-site moose model that contains degrees of freedom that model the effects of vector and axial-vector resonances arising from TeV scale strong dynamics.

  14. Bulk Randall-Sundrum models, electroweak precision tests, and the 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Sridhar, K.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2016-04-01

    We present up-to-date electroweak fits of various Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. We consider the bulk RS, deformed RS, and the custodial RS models. For the bulk RS case we find the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the gauge boson to be ˜8 TeV , while for the custodial case it is ˜3 TeV . The deformed model is the least fine-tuned of all which can give a good fit for KK masses <2 TeV depending on the choice of the model parameters. We also comment on the fine-tuning in each case.

  15. Infinite-dimensional p-adic groups, semigroups of double cosets, and inner functions on Bruhat-Tits buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neretin, Yu A.

    2015-06-01

    We construct p-adic analogues of operator colligations and their characteristic functions. Consider a p-adic group \\mathbf G={GL}(α+k∞, Q_p), a subgroup L= O(k∞, Z_p) of \\mathbf G and a subgroup \\mathbf K= O(∞, Z_p) which is diagonally embedded in L. We show that the space Γ=\\mathbf K\\setminus\\mathbf G/\\mathbf K of double cosets admits the structure of a semigroup and acts naturally on the space of \\mathbf K-fixed vectors of any unitary representation of \\mathbf G. With each double coset we associate a `characteristic function' that sends a certain Bruhat-Tits building to another building (the buildings are finite-dimensional) in such a way that the image of the distinguished boundary lies in the distinguished boundary. The second building admits the structure of a (Nazarov) semigroup, and the product in Γ corresponds to the pointwise product of characteristic functions.

  16. Magnetic fields from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Tornkvist, O.

    1998-02-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  17. On the Ambjorn-Olesen electroweak condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Daniele; De Marchis, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    We obtain sufficient conditions for the existence of the Ambjorn-Olesen ["On electroweak magnetism," Nucl. Phys. B315, 606-614 (1989), 10.1016/0550-3213(89)90004-7] electroweak N-vortices in case N ⩾ 1 and therefore generalize earlier results [D. Bartolucci and G. Tarantello, "Liouville type equations with singular data and their applications to periodic multivortices for the electroweak theory," Commun. Math. Phys. 229, 3-47 (2002), 10.1007/s002200200664; J. Spruck and Y. Yang, "On multivortices in the electroweak theory I: Existence of periodic solutions," Commun. Math. Phys. 144, 1-16 (1992), 10.1007/BF02099188] which handled the cases N ∈ {1, 2, 3, 4}. The variational argument provided here has its own independent interest as it generalizes the one adopted by Ding et al. ["Existence results for mean field equations," Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Anal. Non Lineaire 16, 653-666 (1999), 10.1016/S0294-1449(99)80031-6] to obtain solutions for Liouville-type equations on closed 2-manifolds. In fact, we obtain at once a second proof of the existence of supercritical conformal metrics on surfaces with conical singularities and prescribed Gaussian curvature recently established by Bartolucci, De Marchis and Malchiodi [Int. Math. Res. Not. 24, 5625-5643 (2011), 10.1093/imrn/rnq285].

  18. Marginal deformations of WZNW and coset models from O( d, d) transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S. F.; Sen, Ashoke

    1993-09-01

    We show that the O(2, 2) transformation of the SU(2) WZNW model gives rise to marginal deformation of this model by the operator ∫ d2zJ(z) overlineJ( overlinez) where J, overlineJareU(1) currents in the Cartan subalgebra. Generalization of this result to other WZNW theories is discussed. We also consider the O(3, 3) transformation of the product of an SU(2) WZNW model and a gauged SU(2) WZNW model. The three-parameter set of models obtained after the transformation is shown to be the result of first deforming the product of two SU(2) WZNW theories by marginal operators of the form Σ i,j = 12 C ijJ ioverlineJj, and then gauging an appropriate U(1) subgroup of the theory. Our analysis leads to a general conjecture that O( d, d) transformations of any WZNW model correspond to marginal deformation of the WZNW theory by an appropriate combination of left and right moving currents belonging to the Cartan subalgebra; and O( d, d) transformations of a gauged WZNW model can be identified to the gauged version of such marginally deformed WZNW models.

  19. Is radiative electroweak symmetry breaking consistent with a 125 GeV Higgs mass?

    PubMed

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-04-12

    The mechanism of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking occurs through loop corrections, and unlike conventional symmetry breaking where the Higgs mass is a parameter, the radiatively generated Higgs mass is dynamically predicted. Padé approximations and an averaging method are developed to extend the Higgs mass predictions in radiative electroweak symmetry breaking from five- to nine-loop order in the scalar sector of the standard model, resulting in an upper bound on the Higgs mass of 141 GeV. The mass predictions are well described by a geometric series behavior, converging to an asymptotic Higgs mass of 124 GeV consistent with the recent ATLAS and CMS Collaborations observations. Similarly, we find that the Higgs self-coupling converges to λ=0.23, which is significantly larger than its conventional symmetry breaking counterpart for a 124 GeV Higgs mass. In addition to this significant enhancement of the Higgs self-coupling and HH→HH scattering, we find that Higgs decays to gauge bosons are unaltered and the scattering processes WL(+)WL(+)→HH, ZLZL→HH are also enhanced, providing signals to distinguish conventional and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking mechanisms.

  20. Singlet-catalyzed electroweak phase transitions in the 100 TeV frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; No, Jose Miguel; Winslow, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We study the prospects for probing a gauge singlet scalar-driven strong first-order electroweak phase transition with a future proton-proton collider in the 100 TeV range. Singlet-Higgs mixing enables resonantly enhanced di-Higgs production, potentially aiding discovery prospects. We perform Monte Carlo scans of the parameter space to identify regions associated with a strong first-order electroweak phase transition, analyze the corresponding di-Higgs signal, and select a set of benchmark points that span the range of di-Higgs signal strengths. For the b b ¯γ γ and 4 τ final states, we investigate discovery prospects for each benchmark point for the high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider and for a future p p collider with √{s }=50 , 100, or 200 TeV. We find that any of these future collider scenarios could significantly extend the reach beyond that of the high-luminosity LHC, and that with √{s }=100 TeV (200 TeV) and 30 ab-1 , the full region of parameter space favorable to strong first-order electroweak phase transitions is almost fully (fully) discoverable.

  1. Electroweak instantons/sphalerons at VLHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2003-03-01

    There is a close analogy between electroweak instanton-induced baryon plus lepton number (B+L) violating processes in Quantum Flavor Dynamics (QFD) and hard QCD instanton-induced chirality violating processes in deep-inelastic scattering. In view of the recent information about the latter both from lattice simulations and from the H1 experiment at HERA, it seems worthwhile to reconsider electroweak B+L violation at high energies. We present a state of the art evaluation of QFD instanton-induced parton-parton cross-sections, as relevant at future high energy colliders in the hundreds of TeV regime, such as the projected Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We find that the cross-sections are unobservably small in a conservative fiducial kinematical region inferred from the above mentioned QFD-QCD analogy. An extrapolation—still compatible with lattice results and HERA—beyond this conservative limit indicates possible observability at VLHC.

  2. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Historical Perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is a major milestone in our progress toward understanding the natural world. A particular aim of my review is to show how diverse ideas came together in the conception of electroweak symmetry breaking that led up to the discovery. Furthermore, I survey what we know now that we did not know before, what properties of the Higgs boson remain to be established, and what new questions we may now hope to address.

  3. Electroweak results from the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dorage, T., Padova University and I.N.F.N.

    1998-08-01

    We present the latest results on electroweak physics obtained from the analysis of p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV. The large data samples collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider allow measurements of the top quark mass to a 3% accuracy and of the W boson to a 0.1% accuracy. Many precision measurements that test the Standard Model and probe its possible extensions are also described.

  4. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Slominski, W; Szwed, J. |

    1996-04-02

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from {gamma}-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log{sup 2} behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ``resolved`` photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Cosmological Relaxation of the Electroweak Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2015-11-01

    A new class of solutions to the electroweak hierarchy problem is presented that does not require either weak-scale dynamics or anthropics. Dynamical evolution during the early Universe drives the Higgs boson mass to a value much smaller than the cutoff. The simplest model has the particle content of the standard model plus a QCD axion and an inflation sector. The highest cutoff achieved in any technically natural model is 108 GeV .

  6. On stability of electroweak vacuum during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkerin, A.; Sibiryakov, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study Coleman-De Luccia tunneling of the Standard Model Higgs field during inflation in the case when the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We verify that the tunneling rate is exponentially suppressed. The main contribution to the suppression is the same as in flat space-time. We analytically estimate the corrections due to the expansion of the universe and an effective mass term in the Higgs potential that can be present at inflation.

  7. Tevatron Measurements of Electroweak Boson Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Ryan J.; /Lewis U.

    2011-08-01

    With a large and still increasing dataset, W and Z boson physics studies at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider are particularly useful for testing many aspects of the Standard Model. In this proceeding, we present measurements of electroweak boson properties, distributions, and charge asymmetries. We examine both solitary W and Z production as well as production in association with jets. These measurements are compared to NLO QCD predictions, are used to extract fundamental Standard Model parameters, and constrain parton distribution functions.

  8. Gaugings of four-dimensional N =3 supergravity and AdS4/CFT3 holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karndumri, Parinya; Upathambhakul, Khem

    2016-06-01

    We study matter-coupled N =3 gauged supergravity in four dimensions with various semisimple gauge groups. When coupled to n vector multiplets, the gauged supergravity contains 3 +n vector fields and 3 n complex scalars parametrized by S U (3 ,n )/S U (3 )×S U (n )×U (1 ) coset manifold. Semisimple gauge groups take the form of G0×H ⊂S O (3 ,n )⊂S U (3 ,n ) with H being a compact subgroup of S O (n +3 -dim (G0)). The G0 groups considered in this paper are of the form S O (3 ), S O (3 ,1 ), S O (2 ,2 ), S L (3 ,R ) and S O (2 ,1 )×S O (2 ,2 ). We find that S O (3 )×S O (3 ), S O (3 ,1 ) and S L (3 ,R ) gauge groups admit a maximally supersymmetric AdS4 critical point. The S O (2 ,1 )×S O (2 ,2 ) gauge group admits a supersymmetric Minkowski vacuum while the remaining gauge groups admit both half-supersymmetric domain wall vacua and AdS4 vacua with completely broken supersymmetry. For the S O (3 )×S O (3 ) gauge group, there exists another supersymmetric N =3 AdS4 critical point with S O (3 )diag symmetry. We explicitly give a detailed study of various holographic RG flows between AdS4 critical points, flows to nonconformal theories, and supersymmetric domain walls in each gauge group. The results provide gravity duals of N =3 Chern-Simons-matter theories in three dimensions.

  9. SU(2/1) gauge-Higgs unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, E. K.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a question whether the observed Weinberg angle and Higgs mass are calculable in the formalism based on a construction in which the electroweak gauge group SU(2) × U(1)Y is embedded in the graded Lie group SU(2/1). Here, we follow original works of Ne’eman and Fairlie believing that bosonic fields take their values in the Lie superalgebra and fermionic fields take their values in its representation space. At the same time, our approach differs significantly. The main one is that while for them the gauge symmetry group is SU(2/1), here we consider only symmetries generated by its even subgroup, i.e. symmetries of the standard electroweak model. The reason is that such formalism fixes the quartic Higgs coupling and at the same time removes the sign and statistics problems. The main result is that the presented model predicts values of the Weinberg angle and the Higgs mass correctly up to the two-loop level. Moreover, the model sets the unification scale coinciding with the electroweak scale and automatically describes the fermions correctly with the correct quark and lepton charges.

  10. Radiative corrections to longitudinal and transverse gauge boson and Higgs production

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrer, Andreas; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Chiu, Jui-yu; Kelley, Randall

    2010-05-01

    Radiative corrections to gauge boson and Higgs production computed recently using soft-collinear effective theory require the one-loop high-scale matching coefficients in the standard model. We give explicit expressions for the matching coefficients for the effective field theory operators for qq{yields}VV and qq{yields}{phi}{sup {dagger}{phi}}for a general gauge theory with an arbitrary number of gauge groups. The group theory factors are given explicitly for the standard model, including both QCD and electroweak corrections.

  11. Quartic gauge boson couplings at linear colliders. Interplay of WWZ/ZZZ production and WW-fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; He, Hong-Jian; Yuan, C.-P.

    1998-03-01

    We study new physics effects to the quartic gauge boson couplings formulated by the electroweak chiral Lagrangian. Five next-to-leading order operators characterize the anomalous quartic gauge interactions which involve pure Goldstone boson dynamics for the electroweak symmetry breaking. We estimate the typical size of these couplings in different strongly-interacting models and examine the sensitivity to directly probing them via the WWZ/ZZZ triple gauge boson production at the high energy linear colliders. The important roles of polarized e- and e+ beams are stressed. We then compare the results with those from the W-pair production of the WW-fusion processes, and analyze the interplay of these two production mechanisms for an improved probe of the quartic gauge boson interactions.

  12. Light-Front Quantization of Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskey, Stanley

    2002-12-01

    Light-front wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their physical quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The light-front Hamiltonian formalism provides new nonperturbative methods for obtaining the QCD spectrum and eigensolutions, including resolvant methods, variational techniques, and discretized light-front quantization. A new method for quantizing gauge theories in light-cone gauge using Dirac brackets to implement constraints is presented. In the case of the electroweak theory, this method of light-front quantization leads to a unitary and renormalizable theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field leaving the light-front vacuum equal to the perturbative vacuum. I also discuss an ''event amplitude generator'' for automatically computing renormalized amplitudes in perturbation theory. The importance of final-state interactions for the interpretation of diffraction, shadowing, and single-spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions such as deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is emphasized.

  13. Higgs Boson Signatures of MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Arjun; Morrissey, David

    2010-02-10

    Electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM can account for the cosmological baryon asymmetry, but only with a very light scalar top and a SM-like Higgs boson. We investigate the effects of this light scalar top on Higgs boson production and decay. Relative to the standard model Higgs boson, we find a large enhancement of the Higgs production rate through gluon fusion and a suppression of the Higgs branching fraction into photon pairs. These modifications in the properties of the Higgs boson are large enough that they can potentially be tested at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  14. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-08-02

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m{sub w} and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} (m{sub z}){sub {ovr MS}} imply a relatively light Higgs {approx}< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  15. Electro-weak reactions for astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla

    2000-06-01

    The status of ''ab initio'' microscopic calculations of the {sup 2}H(p,{gamma}){sup 3}He and {sup 3}He(p,e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}){sup 4}He reactions is reviewed. The methods used to generate accurate nuclear ground- and scattering-state wave functions, and to construct realistic electro-weak transition operators are described. The uncertainties in the theoretical predictions, particularly those relevant to the p-{sup 3}He weak capture, are discussed. For the dp radiative capture, the theoretical results are compared with the TUNL data in the energy range 0--100 keV.

  16. Minimal electroweak model for monopole annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, T.H. ); Kephart, T.W.; Weiler, T.J. ); Yuan, T.C. )

    1992-02-03

    We construct the minimal (most economical in fields) extension of the standard model implementing the Langacker-Pi mechanism for reducing the grand unified theory (GUT) monopole cosmic density to an allowed level. The model contains just a single charged scalar field in addition to the standard Higgs doublet, and is easily embeddable in any GUT. We identify the region of parameter space where monopoles annihilate in the higher temperature early Universe. A particularly alluring possibility is that the demise of monopoles at the electroweak scale is in fact the origin of the Universe's net baryon number.

  17. Electroweak Baryogenesis from a Classical Force

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Prokopec, T.; Turok, N.

    1995-08-28

    We describe a new effect that produces baryons at a first order electroweak phase transition. It operates when there is a {ital CP}-violating field present on propagating bubble walls. The novel aspect is that it involves a purely classical force, which alters the motion of particles across the wall and through diffusion creates a chiral asymmetry in front of the wall. We develop a technique for computing the baryon asymmetry using the Boltzmann equation, and a fluid approximation which allows us to model strong scattering effects. The final formula for the baryon asymmetry has a remarkably simple form.

  18. Topics on Nuclear Structure with Electroweak Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya de Guerra, E.; Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Ramon, M.

    2012-05-01

    We study some relevant aspects of complex nuclei structure using electroweak probes within the framework of self-consistent mean field theories with Skyrme density-dependent two-body interactions, including pairing and spin-isospin RPA correlations where necessary. We apply the formalism to the study of single and double beta decays as normal modes of the system, as well as to the analysis of parity-violating electron scattering by nuclei. Finally, we profit from the studied processes to draw some conclusions on the neutrino nature (eigenstates mixing).

  19. The Kirchhoff gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Heras, Jose A. . E-mail: heras@phys.lsu.edu

    2006-05-15

    We discuss the Kirchhoff gauge in classical electrodynamics. In this gauge, the scalar potential satisfies an elliptical equation and the vector potential satisfies a wave equation with a nonlocal source. We find the solutions of both equations and show that, despite of the unphysical character of the scalar potential, the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the scalar and vector potentials are given by their well-known retarded expressions. We note that the Kirchhoff gauge pertains to the class of gauges known as the velocity gauge.

  20. Enabling electroweak baryogenesis through dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Marek; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Wells, James D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact on electroweak baryogenesis from a swifter cosmological expansion induced by dark matter. We detail the experimental bounds that one can place on models that realize it, and we investigate the modifications of these bounds that result from a non-standard cosmological history. The modifications can be sizeable if the expansion rate of the Universe increases by several orders of magnitude. We illustrate the impact through the example of scalar field dark matter, which can alter the cosmological history enough to enable a strong-enough first-order phase transition in the Standard Model when it is supplemented by a dimension six operator directly modifying the Higgs boson potential. We show that due to the modified cosmological history, electroweak baryogenesis can be realized, while keeping deviations of the triple Higgs coupling below HL-LHC sensitivies. The required scale of new physics to effectuate a strong-enough first order phase transition can change by as much as twenty percent as the expansion rate increases by six orders of magnitude.

  1. Modified magnetohydrodynamics around the electroweak transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Petar; Leite, Natacha; Sigl, Günter

    2016-06-01

    We analyse solutions of the MHD equations around the electroweak transition taking into account the effects of the chiral anomaly. It is shown that a transition that is not of the first order has direct consequences on the evolution of the asymmetry between left- and right-handed leptons. Assuming an initial chiral asymmetry in the symmetric phase at temperatures higher than the transition temperature, as well as the existence of magnetic fields, it is demonstrated that the asymmetry typically grows with time, until it undergoes a fast decrease at the transition, and then eventually gets damped at lower temperatures in the broken phase. We argue that it is unlikely to have any significant magnetic field amplification as a consequence of the electroweak transition in the Standard model, even when the chiral anomaly is introduced. The presence of a chiral asymmetry between left- and right-handed charge carriers naturally leads to the creation of helical magnetic fields from non-helical fields and this can have consequences on their subsequent evolution. Similarly, an initially vanishing chiral asymmetry is naturally created in the presence of a helical magnetic field.

  2. Electroweak Baryogenesis in R-symmetric Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate that electroweak baryogenesis can occur in a supersymmetric model with an exact R-symmetry. The minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric model contains chiral superfields in the adjoint representation, giving Dirac gaugino masses, and an additional set of "R-partner" Higgs superfields, giving R-symmetric \\mu-terms. New superpotential couplings between the adjoints and the Higgs fields can simultaneously increase the strength of the electroweak phase transition and provide additional tree-level contributions to the lightest Higgs mass. Notably, no light stop is present in this framework, and in fact, we require both stops to be above a few TeV to provide sufficient radiative corrections to the lightest Higgs mass to bring it up to 125 GeV. Large CP-violating phases in the gaugino/higgsino sector allow us to match the baryon asymmetry of the Universe with no constraints from electric dipole moments due to R-symmetry. We briefly discuss some of the more interesting phenomenology, particularly of the of the lightest CP-odd scalar.

  3. Higgs couplings and precision electroweak data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batell, Brian; Gori, Stefania; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-01-01

    In light of the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we revisit the status of the precision electroweak data, focusing on two discrepant observables: 1) the long-standing 2.4 σ deviation in the forward-backward asymmetry of the bottom quark A_{FB}^b , and 2) the 2.3 σ deviation in R b , the ratio of the Z to boverline{b} partial width to the inclusive hadronic width, which is now in tension after a recent calculation including new two-loop electroweak corrections. We consider possible resolutions of these discrepancies. Taking the data at face value, the most compelling scenario is that new physics directly affects A_{FB}^b and R b , bringing the prediction into accord with the measured values. We propose a modified `Beautiful Mirrors' scenario which contains new vector-like quarks that mix with the b quark, modifying the Zboverline{b} vertex and thus correcting A_{FB}^b and R b . We show that this scenario can lead to modifications to the production rates of the Higgs boson in certain channels, and in particular a sizable enhancement in the diphoton channel. We also describe additional collider tests of this scenario.

  4. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  5. A gauge model for right handed neutrinos as dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pinto, R. J.; Pérez-Lorenzana, A.

    2008-07-01

    We suggest a simple extension of the electroweak group, SU(2)L×U(1)Y×U(1)B-L, where the breaking of U(1)B-L symmetry provides masses for right handed neutrinos, N, at an acceptable range for them to be Dark Matter (DM). We study the contributions to Mo/ller and Bhabha scattering due to B-L neutral boson to constrain its gauge coupling. We analize N decay rates to determine the number of families that should be considered as DM candidates. The decoupling temperature between active and sterile neutrinos is also calculated.

  6. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up to the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.

  7. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up tomore » the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.« less

  8. Measurement of the electroweak production of dijets in association with a Z-boson and distributions sensitive to vector boson fusion in proton-proton collisions at = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Hoffmann, M. Dano; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Wemans, A. Do Valle; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Anjos, A. Dos; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Curull, X. Espinal; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Perez, S. Fernandez; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Bustos, A. C. Florez; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Walls, F. M. Garay; Garberson, F.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. 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Otero; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pages, A. Pacheco; Aranda, C. Padilla; Griso, S. Pagan; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Vazquez, J. G. Panduro; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Hernandez, D. Paredes; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Lopez, S. Pedraza; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Codina, E. Perez; García-Estañ, M. T. Pérez; Reale, V. 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T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reinsch, A.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. 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F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; De Bruin, P. H. Sales; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Ferrando, B. M. Salvachua; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Martinez, V. Sanchez; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Castillo, I. Santoyo; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Delgado, A. Tavares; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Castanheira, M. Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Pastor, E. Torró; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Cakir, I. Turk; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E. Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J. A. Valls; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Schroeder, T. Vazquez; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Perez, M. Villaplana; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vaque, F. Vives; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Wong, K. H. Yau; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of fiducial cross sections for the electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z-boson are presented. The measurements are performed using 20 .3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of = 8 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The electroweak component is extracted by a fit to the dijet invariant mass distribution in a fiducial region chosen to enhance the electroweak contribution over the dominant background in which the jets are produced via the strong interaction. The electroweak cross sections measured in two fiducial regions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations and the background-only hypothesis is rejected with significance above the 5 σ level. The electroweak process includes the vector boson fusion production of a Z-boson and the data are used to place limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings. In addition, measurements of cross sections and differential distributions for inclusive Z-boson-plus-dijet production are performed in five fiducial regions, each with different sensitivity to the electroweak contribution. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from the Sherpa and Powheg event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a

  10. Electroweak Prospects for Tevatron RunII

    SciTech Connect

    D. Glenzinski

    2002-10-21

    In RunI each experiment collected about 100 pb{sup -1} of data. During RunIIa, each experiment is expected to collect about 2 fb{sup -1} of data. The center-of-mass energy for RunII, {radical}s = 2.0 TeV, is a bit larger than the 1.8 TeV of RunI and results in an increase of about 10% (35%) in the production cross-sections for W and Z (t{bar t}) events. Additional gains in the event yield are expected due to improvements in the detector acceptance and performance. Taken together, the RunIIa upgrades are expected to yield 2300k (800) W (t{bar t}) events per experiment, including the effects of event selection and triggering, which can be compared to the RunI yields of 77k (20) events. With the RunI data-set, CDF and D0 produced a breadth of electroweak results and obtained the world's only sample of top quarks. While the RunII electroweak physics program is very similar, the RunII upgrade improvements should yield many precision results. The Tevatron began delivering steady data in about June, 2001. The first six months of data taking was ''commissioning dominated'' for CDF and D0. Starting around January, 2002, the experiments were largely commissioned and began taking ''analysis quality'' data. The physics results reported at this conference are based on about 10-20pb{sup -1} (depending on the data-set) per experiment. Thus, the presently available event samples are smaller than those available in RunI. At this early stage of RunII, it is interesting to compare the present detector performance to that assumed when making the RunII physics projections. In the following sections the author discusses some RunII projections for a few electroweak measurements of particular importance, namely the precision determinations of the W-boson mass, M{sub W}, and the top-quark mass, M{sub t}.

  11. Electroweak Interactions in the Nuclear Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven James

    1988-12-01

    We consider a variety of electroweak interactions with nucleons and nuclei as a means to yield tests of the Standard Model, to provide measurements of hadronic structure, and to serve as a guide to experimental efforts. In Part I, we study single nucleon elastic electroweak processes. The general formalism is outlined, and we present formulae for cross section for e^- and upsilon neutral current processes, upsilon charge-changing events, and parity violation. We have found means to extract both vector and axial form factors from experiment, at arbitrary q ^2. We present numerical predictions for these processes, assuming a set of phenomenological form factors. Low energy structure in charge-changing reactions would provide tests of CVC and a measurement of the pseudoscalar form factor. We present relations between the processes which yield tests of the Standard Model and provide an experimental means to determine the effects of intrinsic parity violation, isospin breaking, and heavy quark content. We discuss parity violation as a means to measure sin ^2theta_{W} in the low energy quark-lepton sector, and to measure the weak form factors of the nucleon. We consider sources of uncertainty, including poorly known electromagnetic neutron form factors, and axial weak form factors. We provide a means to detect anomalous effective axial isoscalar currents, and discuss the bounds on extra heavy neutral Z bosons a CEBAF parity experiment would provide. In Part II, we study coincidence cross sections. The formalism for electroweak single-particle coincidence experiments is outlined. We derive the general angular distribution for single-nucleon coincidence measurements on a deuterium (spin 1) target. We derive a general expression for single pion electroproduction on the nucleon, including the asymmetry in the inclusive cross section. We present numerical predictions in the region of the Delta(1232) in the hopes of providing another measurement of sin ^2theta_{W}. We derive

  12. Indirect probe of electroweak-interacting particles at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ichikawa, Koji; Kundu, Anirban; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Shirai, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Various types of electroweak-interacting particles, which have non-trivial charges under the SU(2) L × U(1) Y gauge symmetry, appear in various extensions of the Standard Model. These particles are good targets of future lepton colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the Future Circular Collider of electrons and positrons (FCC-ee). An advantage of the experiments is that, even if their beam energies are below the threshold of the production of the new particles, quantum effects of the particles can be detected through high precision measurements. We estimate the capability of future lepton colliders to probe electroweak-interacting particles through the quantum effects, with particular focus on the wino, the Higgsino and the so-called minimal dark matters, and found that a particle whose mass is greater than the beam energy by 100-1000 GeV is detectable by measuring di-fermion production cross sections with O(0.1)% accuracy. In addition, with the use of the same analysis, we also discuss the sensitivity of the future colliders to model independent higher dimensional operators, and found that the cutoff scales corresponding to the operators can be probed up to a few ten TeV.

  13. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  14. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to electroweak Zjj production in the POWHEG BOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Barbara; Schneider, Steven; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    We present an implementation of electroweak Z-boson production in association with two jets at hadron colliders in the POWHEG framework, a method that allows the interfacing of NLO-QCD calculations with parton-shower Monte Carlo programs. We focus on the leptonic decays of the weak gauge boson, and take photonic and non-resonant contributions to the matrix elements fully into account. We provide results for observables of particular importance for the suppression of QCD backgrounds to vector-boson fusion processes by means of central-jet-veto techniques. While parton-shower effects are small for most observables associated with the two hardest jets, they can be more pronounced for distributions that are employed in central-jet-veto studies.

  15. Low-energy electroweak model from E6×E'6 preons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sutapa

    1988-03-01

    A low-energy electroweak symmetry group is proposed from an E6×E'6 preon model which leads to SU(3)C×SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)YL×U(1)YR where SU(2)R can either be the usual left-right-symmetric model group or an ``inert SU(2)R'' with electromagnetically neutral gauge bosons. Additional discrete symmetries proposed in E6 models are obtained as a transformation of preons and conservation of quantum numbers. Among the results of this model are (i) the existence of two effective scales, metacolor (ΛM~1014 GeV) and hypercolor ΛH (1 TeV), (ii) preon substructures for vector leptons (both right and left handed), (iii) B-L number (1/3 for the g quark, (iv) neutral composite Higgs scalar bosons, and (v) small mixing angles between (E-d,e-),(d,g) states and neutrino mixing.

  16. Electroweak phase transition nucleation with the MSSM and electromagnetic field creation

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Johnson, Mikkel B.; Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2010-04-15

    Using EW-MSSM field theory, so the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) is first order, we derive the equations of motion (e.o.m.) for the gauge fields. With an isospin ansatz we derive e.o.m. for the electrically charged W fields uncoupled from all other fields. These and the lepton currents serve as the current for the Maxwell-like e.o.m. for the electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field arising during EWPT bubble nucleation without leptons is found. We then calculate the electron current contribution, which is seen to be quite large. This provides the basis for determining the magnetic field created by EWPT bubble collisions, which could seed galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields.

  17. PHYSICS OF ELECTROWEAK INTERACTIONS WITH NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2010-04-26

    In this series of lectures it is illustrated how one can study the strong dynamics of nuclei by means of the electroweak probe. In particular, the most important steps to derive the cross sections in first order perturbation theory are reviewed. In the derivation the focus is put on the main ingredients entering the hadronic part (response functions), i.e. the initial and final states of the system and the operators relevant for the reaction. Emphasis is put on the electromagnetic interaction with few-nucleon systems. The Lorentz integral transform method to calculate the response functions ab initio is described. A few examples of the comparison between theoretical and experimental results are shown. The dependence of the response functions on the nuclear interaction and in particular on three-body forces is emphasized.

  18. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  19. Electroweak and QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie

    2011-09-01

    The Tevatron collider has been remarkably successful and has so far delivered more than 11 fb{sup -1} of data to both the CDF and D0 experiments. Though the LHC has replaced the Tevatron as the world's most powerful collider, years of detector calibration, the huge size of the dataset and the nature of pp collisions will keep the Tevatron competitive in many selected topics in the near future. More than 10 fb{sup -1} of data has been collected by each experiment. Good understanding of the detector performance has been demonstrated by the high precision W boson mass ({Delta}M{sub W} = 31 MeV) and top quark mass ({Delta}M{sub t} = 1.06 GeV) measurements. We report the latest electroweak and QCD results from both experiments. Most analyses presented here used 4-6 fb{sup -1} of data.

  20. Mirror cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological relaxation mechanism proposed in [1] allows for a dynamically generated large separation between the weak scale and a theory cutoff, using a sharp change of theory behaviour upon crossing the limit between unbroken and broken symmetry phases. In this note we present a variation of this scenario, in which stabilization of the electroweak scale in the right place is ensured by the Z 2 symmetry exchanging the Standard Model (SM) with its mirror copy. We sketch the possible ways to produce viable thermal evolution of the Universe and discuss experimental accessibility of the new physics effects. We show that in this scenario the mirror SM can either have sizeable couplings with the ordinary one, or, conversely, can interact with it with a negligible strength. The overall cutoff allowed by such a construction can reach 109 GeV.

  1. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  2. Diphotons from electroweak triplet-singlet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Kiel; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.

    2016-08-01

    The neutral component of a real pseudoscalar electroweak (EW) triplet can produce a diphoton excess at 750 GeV, if it is somewhat mixed with an EW singlet pseudoscalar. This triplet-singlet mixing allows for greater freedom in the diboson branching ratios than the singlet-only case, but it is still possible to probe the parameter space extensively with 300 fb-1 . The charged component of the triplet is pair produced at the LHC, which results in a striking signal in the form of a pair of W γ resonances with an irreducible rate of 0.27 fb. Other signatures include multiboson final states from cascade decays of the triplet-singlet neutral states. A large class of composite models feature both EW singlet and triplet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons in their spectrum, with the diboson couplings generated by axial anomalies.

  3. Standard electroweak interactions and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.

    1984-09-01

    In the standard model, only one basic component remains to be found: the Higgs boson. The specifics of Higgs boson production and detection, with decay to t anti t and a particular t quark mass range in mind, have not been examined in detail. As such, the working group on Standard Electroweak Interactions and Higgs Bosons at this meeting decided to concentrate on Higgs boson production and detection at SSC energies in the particular case where the Higgs mass is in the range so as to make t anti t quark-antiquark pairs the dominant decay mode. The study of this case, that of the so-called intermediate mass Higgs, had already been launched in the Berkeley PSSC Workshop on Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, and was continued and extended here. The problems of t quark jet identification and detection efficiency and the manner of rejection of background (especially from b quark jets) with realistic detectors then occupied much of the attention of the group. The subject of making precise measurements of parameters in the standard model at SSC energies is briefly examined. Then we delve into the Higgs sector, with an introduction to the neutral Higgs of the standard model together with its production cross-sections in various processes and the corresponding potential backgrounds. A similar, though briefer, discussion for a charged Higgs boson (outside the Standard Model) follows. The heart of the work on identifying and reconstructing the t and then the Higgs boson in the face of backgrounds is discussed. The problems with semileptonic decays, low energy jet fragments, mass resolution, and b-t discrimination all come to the fore. We have tried to make a serious step here towards a realistic assessment of the problems entailed in pulling a signal out of the background, including a rough simulation of calorimeter-detector properties. 25 references.

  4. Monopole non-annihilation at the electroweak scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Evalyn; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Terning, John

    1992-06-01

    We examine the issue of monopole annihilation at the electroweak scale induced by flux tube confinement, concentrating first on the simplest possibility - one which requires no new physics beyond the standard model. Monopoles existing at the time of the electroweak phase transition may trigger W condensation which can confine magnetic flux into flux tubes. However, we show on very general grounds, using several independent estimates, that such a mechanism is impotent. We then present several general dynamical arguments limiting the possibility of monopole annihilation through any confining phase near the electroweak scale.

  5. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  6. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D. E-mail: membiela@mdp.edu.ar

    2015-03-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  7. Toward realistic gauge-Higgs grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Atsushi; Hosotani, Yutaka; Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    The SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is presented. The 4D Higgs field is identified as the zero mode of the fifth-dimensional component of the gauge potentials, or as the fluctuation mode of the Aharonov-Bohm phase θ along the fifth dimension. Fermions are introduced in the bulk in the spinor and vector representations of SO(11). SO(11) is broken to SO(4)×SO(6) by the orbifold boundary conditions, which is broken to SU2×U1×SU3 by a brane scalar. Evaluating the effective potential V(θ), we show that the electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken to U1. The quark-lepton masses are generated by the Hosotani mechanism and brane interactions, with which the observed mass spectrum is reproduced. Proton decay is forbidden thanks to the new fermion number conservation. It is pointed out that there appear light exotic fermions. The Higgs boson mass is determined with the quark-lepton masses given; however, it turns out to be smaller than the observed value.

  8. Higgs and gravitational scalar fields together induce Weyl gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Erhard

    2015-02-01

    A common biquadratic potential for the Higgs field and an additional scalar field , non minimally coupled to gravity, is considered in a locally scale symmetric approach to standard model fields in curved spacetime. A common ground state of the two scalar fields exists and couples both fields to gravity, more precisely to Weyl geometric scalar curvature . In Einstein gauge (, often called "Einstein frame"), also is scaled to a constant. This condition makes perfect sense, even in the general case, in the Weyl geometric approach. There it has been called Weyl gauge, because it was first considered by Weyl in the different context of his original scale geometric theory of gravity of 1918. Now it may get new meaning as a combined effect of electroweak theory and gravity, and their common influence on atomic frequencies.

  9. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  10. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-27

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  11. Geometric phase and gauge connection in polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Curt

    2012-05-14

    group applicable in the immediate vicinity of a two-state intersection is U(2), which factors to U(1) × SU(2). Gauging SU(2) yields three fields, whereas U(1) is not gauged, as the result cannot be brought into registry with electronic structure theory, and there are other problems as well. A parallel with spontaneous symmetry breaking in electroweak theory is noted. Loss of SU(2) symmetry as the energy gap between adiabats increases yields the inter-related U(1) symmetries of the upper and lower adiabats, with spinor character imprinted in the vicinity of the degeneracy.

  12. Testing the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis at the LHC and a circular electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Gu, Pei-Hong; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis in the framework of the effective field theory. Our study shows that the effective theory using the dimension-6 operators can enforce strong first order phase transition and provide sizable C P violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. Such dimension-6 operators can induce interesting Higgs phenomenology that can be verified at colliders such as the LHC and the planning CEPC. We then demonstrate that this effective theory can originate from vectorlike quarks and the triplet Higgs.

  13. Strongly first-order electroweak phase transition and classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinnia, Arsham; Ren, Jing

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility of realizing a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition within the minimal classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM), previously proposed and analyzed as a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. By introducing one complex gauge-singlet scalar and three (weak scale) right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the scenario was successfully rendered capable of achieving a radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry (by means of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism), inducing nonzero masses for the SM neutrinos (via the seesaw mechanism), presenting a pseudoscalar dark matter candidate (protected by the CP symmetry of the potential), and predicting the existence of a second CP-even boson (with suppressed couplings to the SM content) in addition to the 125 GeV scalar. In the present treatment, we construct the full finite-temperature one-loop effective potential of the model, including the resummed thermal daisy loops, and demonstrate that finite-temperature effects induce a first-order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the thermally driven first-order phase transition to be sufficiently strong at the onset of the bubble nucleation (corresponding to nucleation temperatures TN˜100-200 GeV) further constrains the model's parameter space; in particular, an O(0.01) fraction of the dark matter in the Universe may be simultaneously accommodated with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. Moreover, such a phase transition disfavors right-handed Majorana neutrino masses above several hundreds of GeV, confines the pseudoscalar dark matter masses to ˜1-2 TeV, predicts the mass of the second CP-even scalar to be ˜100-300 GeV, and requires the mixing angle between the CP-even components of the SM doublet and the complex singlet to lie within the range 0.2≲sinω ≲0.4. The obtained results are displayed in comprehensive exclusion plots, identifying the viable regions of the parameter space

  14. Identification of extra neutral gauge bosons at the LHC using b and t quarks.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Stephen; Martin, Travis A W

    2008-10-10

    New neutral gauge bosons (Z' 's) are predicted by many models of physics beyond the standard electroweak theory. It is possible that a Z' will be discovered by the Large Hadron Collider program. The next step would be to measure its properties to identify the underlying theory that gave rise to the Z'. Heavy quarks have the unique property that they can be identified in the final states. In this Letter we demonstrate that measuring Z' decays to b- and t-quark final states can act as an effective means of discriminating between models with extra gauge bosons.

  15. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  16. Electroweak contributions to squark pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, Jan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mirabella, Edoardo; Trenkel, Maike

    2010-02-10

    We present the tree-level and next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) contributions to squark - squark production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM).

  17. Indications for an extra neutral gauge boson in electroweak precision data

    PubMed

    Erler; Langacker

    2000-01-10

    A new analysis of the hadronic peak cross section at LEP 1 implies a small amount of missing invisible width in Z decays, while the effective weak charge in atomic parity violation has been determined recently to 0.6% accuracy, indicating a significantly negative S parameter. As a consequence, the data are described well if the presence of an extra Z' boson, such as predicted in grand unified theories, is assumed. Moreover, the data are now rich enough to study an arbitrary extra Z' boson and to determine its couplings in a model independent way. An excellent fit to the data is obtained in this case, suggestive of a family nonuniversal Z' similar to those predicted in a class of superstring theories. PMID:11015875

  18. Electroweak vacuum (in)stability in an inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Spencer-Smith, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Recent analysis shows that if the 125-126 GeV LHC resonance turns out to be the Standard Model Higgs boson, the electroweak vacuum would be a metastable state at 98% C.L. In this Letter we argue that, during inflation, the electroweak vacuum can actually be very short-lived, contrary to the conclusion that follows from the flat spacetime analysis. Namely, in the case of a pure Higgs potential the electroweak vacuum decays via the Hawking-Moss transition, which has no flat spacetime analogue. As a result, the Higgs vacuum is unstable, unless the rate of inflation is low enough: Hinf ≲109-1012 GeV. Models of inflation with such a low rate typically predict negligible tensor perturbations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). This is also true for models in which the perturbations are produced by a curvaton field. We also find that if the effective curvature of the Higgs potential at a local maximum (which may be induced by inflaton-Higgs interactions) is large enough, then the decay of the electroweak vacuum is dominated by the Coleman-de Luccia transition. The electroweak vacuum is also short-lived in this case, due to a negative effective self-interaction coupling. Based on our analysis of Higgs vacuum stability during inflation, we conclude that the observation of tensor perturbations by the Planck satellite would provide strong indirect evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model responsible for stabilisation of the electroweak vacuum.

  19. Electroweak Physics (diboson production) measurements with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, K.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of the ATLAS results on the production cross sections of gauge boson pairs using data from pp collisions at √{{s}} = 7 TeV for W γ, Z γ, W± W±, ZZ, W± Z and WV , where V = W± or Z decaying hadronically and √{{s}} = 8 TeV for ZZ, W± W±, W± Z and W± W± at the LHC at CERN. The cross sections are found to be in agreement with the expectations from the Standard Model within the estimated uncertainties. The production cross section measurements also allow for studies of anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings for which 95% confidence limits are set.

  20. Strong Coupling Gauge Theories in LHC ERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, H.; Harada, M.; Tanabashi, M.; Yamawaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Higgs, or techni-dilaton - composite Higgs near conformality / Koichi Yamawaki -- Phase diagram of strongly interacting theories / Francesco Sannino -- Resizing conformal windows / O. Antipin and K. Tuominen -- Nearly conformal gauge theories on the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Going beyond QCD in lattice gauge theory / G. T. Fleming -- Phases of QCD from small to large N[symbol]: (some) lattice results / A. Deuzeman, E. Pallante and M. P. Lombardo -- Lattice gauge theory and (quasi)-conformal technicolor / D. K. Sinclair and J. B. Kogut -- Study of the running coupling constant in 10-flavor QCD with the Schrodinger functional method / N. Yamada ... [et al.] -- Study of the running coupling in twisted Polyakov scheme / T. Aoyama ... [et al.].Running coupling in strong gauge theories via the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Higgsinoless supersymmetry and hidden gravity / Michael L. Graesser, Ryuichiro Kitano and Masafumi Kurachi -- The latest status of LHC and the EWSB physics / S. Asai -- Continuum superpartners from supersymmetric unparticles / Hsin-Chia Cheng -- Review of minimal flavor constraints for technicolor / Hidenori S. Fukano and Francesco Sannino -- Standard model and high energy Lorentz violation / Damiano Anselmi -- Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking and fourth family / Michio Hashimoto -- Holmorphic supersymmetric Nambu-Jona-Lasino model and dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking / Dong-Won Jung, Otto C. W. Kong and Jae Sik Lee -- Ratchet model of Baryogenesis / Tatsu Takeuchi, Azusa Minamizaki and Akio Sugamoto -- Classical solutions of field equations in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet gravity / P. Suranyi, C. Vaz and L. C. R. Wijewardhana -- Black holes constitute all dark matter / Paul H. Frampton -- Electroweak precision test and Z [symbol] in the three site Higgsless model / Tomohiro Abe -- Chiral symmetry and BRST symmetry breaking, quaternion reality and the lattice simulation / Sadataka Furui -- Holographic techni-dilaton, or

  1. Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking in the model of electroweak-scale right-handed neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Pham Quang; Le, Nguyen Nhu

    2016-04-01

    We present the Higgs mechanism in the context of the EW-scale νR model in which electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken by condensates of mirror quark and right-handed neutrino through the exchange of one fundamental Higgs doublet and one fundamental Higgs triplet, respectively. The formation of these condensates is dynamically investigated by using the Schwinger-Dyson approach. The occurrence of these condensates will give rise to the rich Higgs spectrum. In addition, the VEVs of Higgs fields is also discussed in this dynamical phenomenon.

  2. MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis and LHC Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Nardini, Germano; Quiros, Mariano; Wagner, Carlos E.M.

    2013-02-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is an attractive scenario for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe as its realization depends on the presence at the weak scale of new particles which may be searched for at high energy colliders. In the MSSM it may only be realized in the presence of light stops, and with moderate or small mixing between the left- and right-handed components. Consistency with the observed Higgs mass around 125 GeV demands the heavier stop mass to be much larger than the weak scale. Moreover the lighter stop leads to an increase of the gluon-gluon fusion Higgs production cross section which seems to be in contradiction with indications from current LHC data. We show that this tension may be considerably relaxed in the presence of a light neutralino with a mass lower than about 60 GeV, satisfying all present experimental constraints. In such a case the Higgs may have a significant invisible decay width and the stop decays through a three or four body decay channel, including a bottom quark and the lightest neutralino in the final state. All these properties make this scenario testable at a high luminosity LHC.

  3. Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables

    SciTech Connect

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2011-12-01

    Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

  4. Gravitational waves from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel; Sánchez, Alejandro D. E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    2012-10-01

    We study the generation of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider a few extensions of the Standard Model, namely, the addition of scalar singlets, the minimal supersymmetric extension, and the addition of TeV fermions. For each model we consider the complete dynamics of the phase transition. In particular, we estimate the friction force acting on bubble walls, and we take into account the fact that they can propagate either as detonations or as deflagrations preceded by shock fronts, or they can run away. We compute the peak frequency and peak intensity of the gravitational radiation generated by bubble collisions and turbulence. We discuss the detectability by proposed spaceborne detectors. For the models we considered, runaway walls require significant fine tuning of the parameters, and the gravitational wave signal from bubble collisions is generally much weaker than that from turbulence. Although the predicted signal is in most cases rather low for the sensitivity of LISA, models with strongly coupled extra scalars reach this sensitivity for frequencies f ∼ 10{sup −4} Hz, and give intensities as high as h{sup 2}Ω{sub GW} ∼ 10{sup −8}.

  5. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond E.

    1997-06-15

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s)

  6. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.

    1997-06-01

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Recent Electroweak Results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond

    2003-06-06

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff}, and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s).

  8. Electroweak Corrections at the LHC with MCFM

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2015-07-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections at the LHC can be enhanced at high energies due to soft/collinear radiation of W and Z bosons, being dominated by Sudakov-like corrections in the form of $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_W^2)$ $(n \\le 2l, \\alpha_W = \\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin\\theta_W^2))$ when the energy scale $Q$ enters the TeV regime. Thus, the inclusion of EW corrections in LHC predictions is important for the search of possible signals of new physics in tails of kinematic distributions. EW corrections should also be taken into account in virtue of their comparable size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) to that of higher order QCD corrections ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). We calculated the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak corrections to the neutral-current (NC) Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet producion, and implemented them in the Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding NLO QCD corrections. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their weak Sudakov approximation valid at high energies. The latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects, and having the exact result available as well allows to quantify the validity of the Sudakov approximation.

  9. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  10. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  11. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  12. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  13. Gauge coupling unification in gauge-Higgs grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    We discuss renormalization group equations for gauge coupling constants in gauge-Higgs grand unification on five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum warped space. We show that all four-dimensional Standard Model gauge coupling constants are asymptotically free and are effectively unified in SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unified theories on 5D Randall-Sundrum warped space.

  14. Natural Poincare gauge model

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrovandi, R.; Pereira, J.G.

    1986-05-15

    Because it acts on space-time and is not semisimple, the Poincare group cannot lead to a gauge theory of the usual kind. A candidate model is discussed which keeps itself as close as possible to the typical gauge scheme. Its field equations are the Yang-Mills equations for the Poincare group. It is shown that there exists no Lagrangian for these equations.

  15. G2HDM: Gauged Two Higgs Doublet Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    A novel model embedding the two Higgs doublets in the popular two Higgs doublet models into a doublet of a non-abelian gauge group SU(2) H is presented. The Standard Model SU(2) L right-handed fermion singlets are paired up with new heavy fermions to form SU(2) H doublets, while SU(2) L left-handed fermion doublets are singlets under SU(2) H . Distinctive features of this anomaly-free model are: (1) Electroweak symmetry breaking is induced from spontaneous symmetry breaking of SU(2) H via its triplet vacuum expectation value; (2) One of the Higgs doublet can be inert, with its neutral component being a dark matter candidate as protected by the SU(2) H gauge symmetry instead of a discrete Z 2 symmetry in the usual case; (3) Unlike Left-Right Symmetric Models, the complex gauge fields ( W 1 ' ∓ W 2 ' ) (along with other complex scalar fields) associated with the SU(2) H do not carry electric charges, while the third component W 3 ' can mix with the hypercharge U(1) Y gauge field and the third component of SU(2) L ; (4) Absence of tree level flavour changing neutral current is guaranteed by gauge symmetry; and etc. In this work, we concentrate on the mass spectra of scalar and gauge bosons in the model. Constraints from previous Z' data at LEP and the Large Hadron Collider measurements of the Standard Model Higgs mass, its partial widths of γγ and Zγ modes are discussed.

  16. Electroweak bremsstrahlung from neutron-neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.

    2009-09-15

    Background: Nucleon-nucleon (NN) bremsstrahlung processes NN{gamma} (nn{gamma}, np{gamma}, and pp{gamma}) have been extensively investigated. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering NN{nu}{nu} (nn{nu}{nu}, np{nu}{nu}, and pp{nu}{nu}) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars. The calculated NN{nu}{nu} cross sections (or emissivities) are found to be sensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations. Purpose and Method: A realistic one-boson-exchange (ROBE) model for NN interactions is used to construct the electroweak bremsstrahlung amplitudes using the well-known nucleon electromagnetic and weak interaction vertices. The constructed nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} amplitudes are investigated by applying them to calculate nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} cross sections, respectively. Results: (i) The 190-MeV ROBE nn{gamma} cross sections agree well with those calculated using the TuTts amplitude, but they are in disagreement with those calculated using the Low amplitude. (ii) The calculated nn{nu}{nu} cross sections using the ROBE amplitude at the neutrino-pair energy {omega} = 1 MeV are in quantitative agreement with those calculated by Timmermans et al.[Phys. Rev. C 65, 064007 (2002)], who used the leading-order term of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude. Conclusions: The nn{gamma} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which obeys the soft-photon theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the TuTts amplitude. The nn{nu}{nu} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which is consistent with the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude of Timmermans et al. in the low neutrino-pair energy region.

  17. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  18. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and Spin-0 Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jared; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-09-04

    We argue that theories of the strong electroweak symmetry breaking sector necessarily contain new spin 0 states at the TeV scale in the tt and tb/bt channels, even if the third generation quarks are not composite at the TeV scale. These states couple sufficiently strongly to third generation quarks to have significant production at LHC via gg->phi{sup 0} or gb->tphi{sup -}. The existence of narrow resonances in QCD suggests that the strong electroweak breaking sector contains narrow resonances that decay to tt or tb/bt, with potentially significant branching fractions to 3 or more longitudinal W and Z bosons. These may give new 'smoking gun' signals of strong electroweak symmetry breaking.

  19. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  20. Combined QCD and electroweak analysis of HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A simultaneous fit of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and electroweak parameters to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are the neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections which were previously used in the QCD analysis leading to the HERAPDF2.0 PDFs. In addition, the polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks, on the value of the electroweak mixing angle and the mass of the W boson are presented. The values obtained for the electroweak parameters are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  1. Collider search at the LHC for new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guiyu

    The turn-on of the Large Hadron Collider this year provides great opportunities to explore physics beyond Standard Model. We examine a few scenarios in the electroweak sector and study their LHC phenomenologies. First we assess the prospect of observing neutral Higgs bosons of mass 90--130 GeV produced with W/Z in its decay to two spin-zero states, a, which cascades into bottom or tau pairs. We show that LHC observation is possible, especially in channel h → aa → bbb b with large statistical significance. Next we study signals for Kaluza-Klein excitations of electroweak gauge bosons where SM fields propagate in a warped extra dimension. Fermionic decays of these states are overwhelmed by KK gluons decays. We show that due to enhanced couplings to longitudinal W/Z and Higgs, bosonic final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to 3 TeV KK scale with projected LHC luminosity. Finally, we demonstrate how to systematically test Type-II seesaw mechanism for neutrino mass generation at the LHC, which introduces a Higgs triplet. For small Higgs triplet vacuum expectation value vDelta , one can look for clean signals of lepton number violation in decays of doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons, thus distinguishing different neutrino mass spectrum. For large vDelta, one needs to observe the decays H+ → W +H1 and H+ → tb to confirm the triplet-doublet mixing and the implied interaction between lepton doublet and Higgs triplet responsible for the neutrino mass generation.

  2. Axisymmetric magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.L.; Alrick, K.R.; Fritz, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    Axisymmetric magnetic (ASM) gauges are useful diagnostic tools in the study of the conversion of energy from underground explosions to distant seismic signals. Requiring no external power, they measure the strength (particle velocity) of the emerging shock wave under conditions that would destroy most instrumentation. Shock pins are included with each gauge to determine the angle of the shock front. For the Non-Proliferation Experiment, two ASM gauges were installed in the ANFO mixture to monitor the detonation wave and 10 were grouted into boreholes at various ranges in the surrounding rock (10 to 64 m from the center of explosion). These gauges were of a standard 3.8-inch-diameter design. In addition, two unique Jumbo ASM gauges (3-ft by 3-ft in cross section) were grouted to the wall of a drift at a range of 65 m. We discuss issues encountered in data analysis, present the results of our measurements, and compare these results with those of model simulations of the experiment.

  3. Diagrammatic analysis of QCD gauge transformations and gauge cancellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. J.; Lam, C. S.

    1996-02-01

    Diagrammatic techniques are invented to implement QCD gauge transformations. These techniques can be used to discover how gauge-dependent terms are canceled among diagrams to yield gauge-invariant results in the sum. In this way a multiloop pinching technique can be developed to change ordinary vertices into background-gauge vertices. The techniques can also be used to design new gauges to simplify calculations by reducing the number of gauge-dependent terms present in the intermediate steps. Two examples are discussed to illustrate this aspect of the applications. ¢ 1996 The American Physical Society.

  4. Recent results in electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Giulia Manca

    2004-02-13

    The Run II physics program of CDF and D0 has just begun with the first 72 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data collected at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Electroweak measurements are among the first and most important benchmarks for the best understanding of the detectors and testing the Standard Model. We present measurements of the W and Z inclusive cross sections and decays asymmetries, recent results in di-boson physics and searches for new physics which make use of distinct electroweak signatures.

  5. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  6. Electroweak absorptive parts in the matching conditions of nonrelativistic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.

    2005-04-01

    Electroweak corrections associated with the instability of the top quark to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) total top pair threshold cross section in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation are determined. Our method is based on absorptive parts in electroweak matching conditions of the operators of nonrelativistic QCD and the optical theorem. The corrections lead to ultraviolet phase space divergences that have to be renormalized and lead to NLL mixing effects. Numerically, the corrections can amount to several percent and are comparable to the known NNLL QCD corrections.

  7. Electroweak phase transition in the U(1)' MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we have investigated the nature of the electroweak phase transition in the U(1) extended minimal supersymmetric standard model without introducing any exotic fields. The effective potential has been estimated exactly at finite temperature taking into account the whole particle spectrum. For reasonable values of the lightest Higgs and neutralino, we found that the electroweak phase transition could be strongly first order due to: (1) the interactions of the singlet with the doublets in the effective potential, and (2) the evolution of the wrong vacuum that delays the transition.

  8. Electroweak baryogenesis in the exceptional supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Wei

    2015-08-28

    We study electroweak baryogenesis in the E{sub 6} inspired exceptional supersymmetric standard model (E{sub 6}SSM). The relaxation coefficients driven by singlinos and the new gaugino as well as the transport equation of the Higgs supermultiplet number density in the E{sub 6}SSM are calculated. Our numerical simulation shows that both CP-violating source terms from singlinos and the new gaugino can solely give rise to a correct baryon asymmetry of the Universe via the electroweak baryogenesis mechanism.

  9. Fluctuation-driven electroweak phase transition. [in early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  10. Electroweak phase transition in the U(1){sup '} MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2011-02-15

    In this work, we have investigated the nature of the electroweak phase transition in the U(1) extended minimal supersymmetric standard model without introducing any exotic fields. The effective potential has been estimated exactly at finite temperature taking into account the whole particle spectrum. For reasonable values of the lightest Higgs and neutralino, we found that the electroweak phase transition could be strongly first order due to: (1) the interactions of the singlet with the doublets in the effective potential, and (2) the evolution of the wrong vacuum that delays the transition.

  11. The price of an electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; You, Tevong

    2016-05-01

    In a recent paper, Cho, Kim and Yoon (CKY) have proposed a version of the SU (2) × U (1) Standard Model with finite-energy monopole and dyon solutions. The CKY model postulates that the effective U(1) gauge coupling →∞ very rapidly as the Englert-Brout-Higgs vacuum expectation value →0, but in a way that is incompatible with LHC measurements of the Higgs boson H → γγ decay rate. We construct generalisations of the CKY model that are compatible with the H → γγ constraint, and calculate the corresponding values of the monopole and dyon masses. We find that the monopole mass could be < 5.5 TeV, so that it could be pair-produced at the LHC and accessible to the MoEDAL experiment.

  12. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  13. Radiative contribution to the effective potential in composite Higgs models from lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Golterman, Maarten; Jay, William I.; Neil, Ethan T.; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    We develop methods to calculate the electroweak gauge boson contribution to the effective Higgs potential in the context of composite Higgs models, using lattice gauge theory. The calculation is analogous to that of the electromagnetic mass splitting of the pion multiplet in QCD. We discuss technical details of carrying out this calculation, including modeling of the momentum and fermion-mass dependence of the underlying current-current correlation function, direct integration of the correlation function over momentum, and fits based on the minimal-hadron approximation. We show results of a numerical study using valence overlap fermions, carried out in an SU(4) gauge theory with two flavors of Dirac fermions in the two-index antisymmetric representation.

  14. Spontaneous SU(2) symmetry violation in the SU(2){sub L} Multiplication-Sign SU(2){sub R} Multiplication-Sign SU(4) electroweak model

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2012-09-15

    A new approach to electroweak (EW) composite scalars is developed starting from the fundamental gauge interaction on high scale. The latter is assumed to have the group structure SU(2){sub L} Multiplication-Sign SU(2){sub R} Multiplication-Sign SU(4), where SU(4) is the Pati-Salam color-lepton group. The topological EW vacuum filled by instantons is explicitly constructed and the resulting equations for fermion masses exhibit spontaneous SU(2) flavor symmetry violation with possibility of very large mass ratios.

  15. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  16. Third generation sfermion decays into Z and W gauge bosons: Full one-loop analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid

    2005-05-01

    The complete one-loop radiative corrections to third-generation scalar fermions into gauge bosons Z and W{sup {+-}} is considered. We focus on f-tilde{sub 2}{yields}Zf-tilde{sub 1} and f-tilde{sub i}{yields}W{sup {+-}}f-tilde{sub j}{sup '}, f,f{sup '}=t,b. We include SUSY-QCD, QED, and full electroweak corrections. It is found that the electroweak corrections can be of the same order as the SUSY-QCD corrections. The two sets of corrections interfere destructively in some region of parameter space. The full one-loop correction can reach 10% in some supergravity scenario, while in model independent analysis like general the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the one-loop correction can reach 20% for large tan{beta} and large trilinear soft breaking terms A{sub b}.

  17. Exploiting Small Leakages in Masks to Turn a Second-Order Attack into a First-Order Attack and Improved Rotating Substitution Box Masking with Linear Code Cosets

    PubMed Central

    DeTrano, Alexander; Karimi, Naghmeh; Karri, Ramesh; Guo, Xiaofei; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Masking countermeasures, used to thwart side-channel attacks, have been shown to be vulnerable to mask-extraction attacks. State-of-the-art mask-extraction attacks on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm target S-Box recomputation schemes but have not been applied to scenarios where S-Boxes are precomputed offline. We propose an attack targeting precomputed S-Boxes stored in nonvolatile memory. Our attack targets AES implemented in software protected by a low entropy masking scheme and recovers the masks with 91% success rate. Recovering the secret key requires fewer power traces (in fact, by at least two orders of magnitude) compared to a classical second-order attack. Moreover, we show that this attack remains viable in a noisy environment or with a reduced number of leakage points. Eventually, we specify a method to enhance the countermeasure by selecting a suitable coset of the masks set. PMID:26491717

  18. Exploiting Small Leakages in Masks to Turn a Second-Order Attack into a First-Order Attack and Improved Rotating Substitution Box Masking with Linear Code Cosets.

    PubMed

    DeTrano, Alexander; Karimi, Naghmeh; Karri, Ramesh; Guo, Xiaofei; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Masking countermeasures, used to thwart side-channel attacks, have been shown to be vulnerable to mask-extraction attacks. State-of-the-art mask-extraction attacks on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm target S-Box recomputation schemes but have not been applied to scenarios where S-Boxes are precomputed offline. We propose an attack targeting precomputed S-Boxes stored in nonvolatile memory. Our attack targets AES implemented in software protected by a low entropy masking scheme and recovers the masks with 91% success rate. Recovering the secret key requires fewer power traces (in fact, by at least two orders of magnitude) compared to a classical second-order attack. Moreover, we show that this attack remains viable in a noisy environment or with a reduced number of leakage points. Eventually, we specify a method to enhance the countermeasure by selecting a suitable coset of the masks set. PMID:26491717

  19. Extended gauge sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1995-02-01

    Present and future prospects for the discovery of new gauge bosons, Z{prime} and W{prime}, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider searches for the W{prime} of the Left-Right Symmetric Model.

  20. Finite quantum gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  1. Global Equity Gauge Alliance.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, Antoinette

    2007-01-01

    The lack of attention to equity in health, health care and determinants of health is a burden to the attainment of good health in many countries. With this underlying problem as a basis, a series of meetings took place between 1999 and 2000, culminating in the creation the Global Equity Gauge Alliance (GEGA). G EGA is an international network of groups in developing countries, mainly Asia, Africa and Latin America, which develop projects designed to confront and mitigate inequities in health, know as Equity Gauges. Equity Gauges aim to contribute towards the sustained decline in inequities in both the broad sociopolitical determinants of health, as well as inequities in the health system. Their approach is based on three broad spheres of action, known as "pillars": 1) measurement and monitoring, 2) advocacy, and 3) community empowerment. Through a series of examples from local or national level gauges, this paper showcases their work promoting the interaction between research and evidence-based policy formulation and implementation, and the interaction between the community and policy makers. PMID:17665716

  2. Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch

    2011-07-01

    The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only.

  3. Measurement of Electroweak Top Quark Production at {D\\O}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yun-Tse

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model-independent measurement of the electroweak single top-quark production cross section in proton-antiproton (p- $\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the DØ detector.

  4. Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.

    2006-08-01

    We determine the real parts of electroweak matching conditions relevant for top quark pair production close to threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order. Numerically the corrections are comparable to the NNLL QCD corrections.

  5. Measurements of Z{sup 0} Electroweak Couplings at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Mancinelli, Giampero

    1999-06-17

    In this paper we report a summary of the results of several electroweak measurements performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are preliminary and are based, unless otherwise indicated, on the full 1993-1998 dataset of 560,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  6. Sakurai Prize Lecture: Thirty Years of Precision Electroweak Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirlin, Alberto

    2002-04-01

    We discuss the development of the theory of electroweak radiative corrections and its role in testing the Standard Model, predicting the top quark mass, constraining the Higgs boson mass, and searching for deviations that may signal the presence of new physics.

  7. Some comments on unitarity gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Osorio, M. A.; Martinez-Pascual, E.; Toscano, J. J.

    2004-04-01

    A pedagogical discussion on the unitarity gauge within the context of Hamiltonian path integral formalism is presented. A model based on the group O(N), spontaneously broken down to the subgroup O(N - 1), is used to illustrate the main aspects of this gauge-fixing procedure. Among the issues, discussed with some extent, are: (1) the structure of model's constraints following the Dirac's method, (2) the gauge-fixing procedure, using the unitarity gauge for the massive gauge fields and the Coulomb one for the massless gauge fields, (3) the absence of BRST symmetry in this gauge-fixing procedure and its implications on the renormalizability of the theory, and (4) the static role of the ghost and anti-ghost fields associated with the massive gauge fields and how their contributions can be eliminated by using the dimensional regularization scheme.

  8. String completion of an SU(3)c ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ U(1)X electroweak model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea; Valle, J. W. F.; Vaquera-Araujo, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The extended electroweak SU(3)c ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ U(1)X symmetry framework "explaining" the number of fermion families is revisited. While 331-based schemes can not easily be unified within the conventional field theory sense, we show how to do it within an approach based on D-branes and (un)oriented open strings, on Calabi-Yau singularities. We show how the theory can be UV-completed in a quiver setup, free of gauge and string anomalies. Lepton and baryon numbers are perturbatively conserved, so neutrinos are Dirac-type, and their lightness results from a novel TeV scale seesaw mechanism. Dynamical violation of baryon number by exotic instantons could induce neutron-antineutron oscillations, with proton decay and other dangerous R-parity violating processes strictly forbidden.

  9. LHC diphoton resonance at 750 {GeV} as an indication of SU(3)_L× U(1)_X electroweak symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The LHC collaborations ATLAS and CMS recently reported on the excess of the events in the diphoton final states at the invariant mass of about 750 {GeV}. In this article we speculate on the possibility that the excess arises from the neutral CP-even component φ of the scalar triplet Φ of the SU(3)c× SU(3)L× U(1)X (3{-}3{-} 1) model that has a U(1)X charge equal to X=-1/3 and acquires a vacuum expectation value larger than the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. The interactions of the scalar field φ with the photon and gluon pairs are mediated by the virtual vector-like fermions which appear as components of the anomaly-free chiral fermion representations of the 3{ -}3{-}1 gauge group.

  10. Triple neutral gauge boson couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang

    2002-05-01

    It has been shown recently that the triple neutral gauge boson couplings are not uniquely determined in noncommutative extension of the Standard Model (NCSM). Depending on specific schemes used, the couplings are different and may even be zero. To distinguish different realizations of the NCSM, additional information either from theoretical or experimental considerations is needed. In this Letter we show that these couplings can be uniquely determined from considerations of unification of electroweak and strong interactions. Using SU(5) as the underlying theory and integrating out the heavy degrees of freedom, we obtain unique non-zero new triple γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, ZZZ, γGG, ZGG and GGG couplings at the leading order in the NCSM. We also briefly discuss experimental implications.

  11. Gauge-Higgs unification and quark-lepton phenomenology in the warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Y.; Noda, S.; Sakamura, Y.; Shimasaki, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the dynamical gauge-Higgs unification of electroweak interactions in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime, the Higgs boson mass is predicted in the range 120-290 GeV, provided that the spacetime structure is determined at the Planck scale. Couplings of quarks and leptons to gauge bosons and their Kaluza-Klein excited states are determined by the masses of quarks and leptons. All quarks and leptons other than top quarks have very small couplings to the Kaluza-Klein excited states of gauge bosons. The universality of weak interactions is slightly broken by magnitudes of 10{sup -8}, 10{sup -6}, and 10{sup -2} for {mu}-e, {tau}-e and t-e, respectively. Yukawa couplings become substantially smaller than those in the standard model, by a factor cos(1/2){theta}{sub W} where {theta}{sub W} is the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm phase (the Wilson line phase) associated with dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking.

  12. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  13. Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Tereza; Cucchieri, Attilio; Mihara, Antonio

    2007-02-27

    The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

  14. 27 CFR 19.289 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production gauge. 19.289... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Gauging Rules for Gauging § 19.289 Production gauge. (a) General requirements for production gauges. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by...

  15. Electro-Weak Dark Matter: Non-perturbative effect confronting indirect detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Eung Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2015-11-01

    We update indirect constraints on Electro-Weak Dark Matter (EWDM) considering the Sommerfeld-Ramsauer-Townsend (SRT) effect for its annihilations into a pair of standard model gauge bosons assuming that EWDM accounts for the observed dark matter (DM) relic density for a given DM mass and mass gaps among the multiplet components. For the radiative or smaller mass splitting, the hypercharged triplet and higher multiplet EWDMs are ruled out up to the DM mass ≈ 10- 20 TeV by the combination of the most recent data from AMS-02 (antiproton), Fermi-LAT (gamma-ray), and HESS (gamma-line). The Majorana triplet (wino-like) EWDM can evade all the indirect constraints only around Ramsauer-Townsend dips which can occur for a tiny mass splitting of order 10 MeV or less. In the case of the doublet (Higgsino-like) EWDM, a wide range of its mass ≳ 500 GeV is allowed except Sommerfeld peak regions. Such a stringent limit on the triplet DM can be evaded by employing a larger mass gap of the order of 10 GeV which allows its mass larger than about 1 TeV. However, the future CTA experiment will be able to cover most of the unconstrained parameter space.

  16. One-loop Electroweak Radiative Corrections for Polarized Møller Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkanova, Svetlana; Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Ilyichev, Alexander; Kolomensky, Yury; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2011-04-01

    Møller scattering measurements are a clean, powerful probe of new physics effects. However, before physics of interest can be extracted from the experimental data, radiative corrections must be taken into account very carefully. Using two different approaches, we perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete one-loop set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry at low energies relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at JLab. Although contributions from some of the self-energies and vertex diagrams calculated in the two approaches can differ significantly, our full gauge-invariant set still guarantees that the total relative weak corrections are in excellent agreement for the two methods of calculation. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and the relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. We also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  17. Search for supersymmetry in electroweak production with photons and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. 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D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. 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R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Kumar, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-08-01

    Results are reported from a search for supersymmetry with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking in electroweak production. Final states with photons and large missing transverse energy (ETmiss) were examined. The data sample was collected in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to 7.4fb-1. The analysis focuses on scenarios in which the lightest neutralino has bino- or wino-like components, resulting in decays to photons and gravitinos, where the gravitinos escape undetected. The data were obtained using a specially designed trigger with dedicated low thresholds, providing good sensitivity to signatures with photons, ETmiss , and low hadronic energy. No excess of events over the standard model expectation is observed. The results are interpreted using the model of general gauge mediation. With the wino mass fixed at 10GeV above that of the bino, wino masses below 710GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. Constraints are also set in the context of two simplified models, for which the analysis sets the lowest cross section limits on the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles.

  18. Toward verification of electroweak baryogenesis by electric dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuyuto, Kaori; Hisano, Junji; Senaha, Eibun

    2016-04-01

    We study general aspects of the CP-violating effects on the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU) and electric dipole moments (EDMs) in models extended by an extra Higgs doublet and a singlet, together with electroweak-interacting fermions. In particular, the emphasis is on the structure of the CP-violating interactions and dependences of the BAU and EDMs on masses of the relevant particles. In a concrete mode, we investigate a relationship between the BAU and the electron EDM for a typical parameter set. As long as the BAU-related CP violation predominantly exists, the electron EDM has a strong power in probing electroweak baryogenesis. However, once a BAU-unrelated CP violation comes into play, the direct correlation between the BAU and electron EDM can be lost. Even in such a case, we point out that verifiability of the scenario still remains with the help of Higgs physics.

  19. Strong electroweak phase transition from Supersymmetric Custodial Triplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pepin, Mateo; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    The Supersymmetric Custodial Triplet Model, a supersymmetric generalization of the Georgi-Machacek model, has proven to be an interesting modification of the MSSM. It extends the MSSM Higgs sector by three extra SU(2) L triplets in such a way that approximate custodial invariance is preserved and ρ-parameter deviations are kept under control. By means of a sizeable triplet contribution to electroweak breaking the model is able to generate a barrier at tree level between the false vacuum and the electroweak one. This will result in a strong first order phase transition for an important region of the parameter space. We also look at the gravitational waves that could be generated as a result of the phase transition and show how future interferometers could be used as a probe of the model.

  20. Pinning down electroweak dipole operators of the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Markus; Soreq, Yotam

    2016-08-01

    We consider hadronic top quark pair production and pair production in association with a photon or a Z boson to probe electroweak dipole couplings in tbar{b}W, t bar{t}γ , and t bar{t}Z interactions. We demonstrate how measurements of these processes at the 13 TeV LHC can be combined to disentangle and constrain anomalous dipole operators. The construction of cross section ratios allows us to significantly reduce various uncertainties and exploit orthogonal sensitivity between the t bar{t}γ and t bar{t}Z couplings. In addition, we show that angular correlations in tbar{t} production can be used to constrain the remaining tbar{b}W dipole operator. Our approach yields excellent sensitivity to the anomalous couplings and can be a further step toward precise and direct measurements of the top quark electroweak interactions.

  1. Electroweak corrections to high energy processes using effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Golf, Frank; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-03-01

    Electroweak Sudakov logarithms at high energy, of the form ({alpha}/sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}){sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub Z,W}{sup 2}, are summed using effective theory methods. The corrections are computed to processes involving two external particles in the standard model. The results include nonzero particle masses, such as the t-quark mass, electroweak mixing effects which lead to unequal W and Z masses, and radiative Higgs corrections proportional to the Yukawa couplings. We show that the matching at the scale M{sub W,Z} has a term at most linear in logs/{mu}{sup 2} to all orders. The effective theory formalism is compared with, and extends, previous work based on infrared evolution equations.

  2. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2007 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and width and the mass of the top quark.

  3. Precision electroweak measurements and constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results obtained at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2009 are new combinations of results on the width of the W boson and the mass of the top quark.

  4. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-11-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2008 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and the mass of the top quark.

  5. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    The , ALEPH, CDF, D0, ...

    2009-12-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2008 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and the mass of the top quark.

  6. Dark matter as the trigger of strong electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed; Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Zhang, Yue E-mail: miha@ictp.it E-mail: yuezhang@ictp.it

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new possible connection between dark matter relic density and baryon asymmetry of the universe. The portal between standard model sector and dark matter not only controls the relic density and detections of dark matter, but also allows the dark matter to trigger the first order electroweak phase transition. We discuss systematically possible scalar dark matter candidates, starting from a real singlet to arbitrary high representations. We show that the simplest realization is provided by a doublet, and that strong first-order electroweak phase transition implies a lower bound on the dark matter direct detection rate. The mass of dark matter lies between 45 and 80 GeV, allowing for an appreciable invisible decay width of the Standard Model Higgs boson, which is constrained to be lighter than 130 GeV for the sake of the strong phase transition.

  7. Electroweak and flavor dynamics at hadron colliders - I

    SciTech Connect

    Elchtent, E.; Lane, K.

    1998-02-01

    This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at {anti p}p and pp colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling {alpha}{sub TC}, and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies {radical}{cflx s}{approx_lt} 1 TeV. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).

  8. Standard model CP violation and cold electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tranberg, Anders

    2011-10-15

    Using large-scale real-time lattice simulations, we calculate the baryon asymmetry generated at a fast, cold electroweak symmetry breaking transition. CP-violation is provided by the leading effective bosonic term resulting from integrating out the fermions in the Minimal Standard Model at zero-temperature, and performing a covariant gradient expansion [A. Hernandez, T. Konstandin, and M. G. Schmidt, Nucl. Phys. B812, 290 (2009).]. This is an extension of the work presented in [A. Tranberg, A. Hernandez, T. Konstandin, and M. G. Schmidt, Phys. Lett. B 690, 207 (2010).]. The numerical implementation is described in detail, and we address issues specifically related to using this CP-violating term in the context of Cold Electroweak Baryogenesis.

  9. A strong electroweak phase transition from the inflaton field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-09-01

    We study a singlet scalar extension of the Standard Model. The singlet scalar is coupled non-minimally to gravity and assumed to drive inflation, and also couple sufficiently strongly with the SM Higgs field in order to provide for a strong first order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the model to describe inflation successfully, be compatible with the LHC data, and yield a strong first order electroweak phase transition, we identify the regions of the parameter space where the model is viable. We also include a singlet fermion with scalar coupling to the singlet scalar to probe the sensitivity of the constraints on additional degrees of freedom and their couplings in the singlet sector. We also comment on the general feasibility of these fields to act as dark matter.

  10. Electroweak baryogenesis and the Fermi gamma-ray line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Profumo, Stefano; Wainwright, Carroll L.

    2013-04-01

    Many particle physics models attempt to explain the 130 GeV gamma-ray feature that the Fermi large area telescope observes in the Galactic center. Neutralino dark matter in nonminimal supersymmetric models, such as the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard Model (NMSSM), is an especially well-motivated theoretical setup that can explain the line. We explore the possibility that regions of the NMSSM consistent with the 130 GeV line can also produce the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe via electroweak baryogenesis. We find that such regions can, in fact, accommodate a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition (due to the singlet contribution to the effective potential), while also avoiding a light stop and producing a Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs in the observed mass range. Simultaneously, CP violation from a complex phase in the wino-Higgsino sector can account for the observed baryon asymmetry through resonant sources at the electroweak phase transition, while satisfying current constraints from dark matter, collider, and electric dipole moment experiments. This result is possible by virtue of a relatively light pseudoscalar Higgs sector with a small degree of mixing, which yields efficient s-channel resonant neutralino annihilation consistent with indirect detection constraints, and of the moderate values of μ required to obtain a binolike lightest supersymmetric particle consistent with the line. The wino mass is essentially a free parameter that one can tune to satisfy electroweak baryogenesis. Thus, the NMSSM framework can potentially explain the origins of both baryonic and dark matter components in the Universe. The tightness of the constraints we impose on this scenario makes it extraordinarily predictive and conclusively testable in the near future by modest improvements in electric dipole moment and dark matter search experiments.

  11. Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-26

    Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  12. Local and nonlocal defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Davis, A.; Prokopec, T.; Trodden, M. |||

    1996-04-01

    We consider the effects of particle transport in topological defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis scenarios. We analyze the cases of both thin and thick defects and demonstrate an enhancement of the original mechanism in both cases due to an increased effective volume in which baryogenesis occurs. This phenomenon is a result of an imperfect cancellation between the baryons and antibaryons produced on opposite faces of the defect. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Electroweak absolute, meta-, and thermal stability in neutrino mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Patel, Hiren H.; Radovčić, Branimir

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the stability of the electroweak vacuum in neutrino mass models containing right-handed neutrinos or fermionic isotriplets. In addition to considering absolute stability, we place limits on the Yukawa couplings of new fermions based on metastability and thermal stability in the early Universe. Our results reveal that the upper limits on the neutrino Yukawa couplings can change significantly when the top quark mass is allowed to vary within the experimental range of uncertainty in its determination.

  14. Electroweak symmetry breaking without the μ2 term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that from a low-energy perspective a viable breaking of the electroweak symmetry, as present in nature, can be achieved without the (negative sign) μ2 mass term in the Higgs potential, thereby avoiding completely the appearance of relevant operators, featuring coefficients with a positive mass dimension, in the theory. We show that such a setup is self-consistent and not ruled out by Higgs physics. In particular, we point out that it is the lightness of the Higgs boson that allows for the electroweak symmetry to be broken dynamically via operators of D ≥4 , consistent with the power expansion. Beyond that, we entertain how this scenario might even be preferred phenomenologically compared to the ordinary mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, as realized in the Standard Model, and argue that it can be fully tested at the LHC. In the Appendix, we classify UV completions that could lead to such a setup, considering also the option of generating all scales dynamically.

  15. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  16. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  17. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  18. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  19. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  20. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2016-07-12

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  1. Gauge Blocks - A Zombie Technology.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Gauge blocks have been the primary method for disseminating length traceability for over 100 years. Their longevity was based on two things: the relatively low cost of delivering very high accuracy to users, and the technical limitation that the range of high precision gauging systems was very small. While the first reason is still true, the second factor is being displaced by changes in measurement technology since the 1980s. New long range sensors do not require master gauges that are nearly the same length as the part being inspected, and thus one of the primary attributes of gauge blocks, wringing stacks to match the part, is no longer needed. Relaxing the requirement that gauges wring presents an opportunity to develop new types of end standards that would increase the accuracy and usefulness of gauging systems. PMID:27096119

  2. Topics of Higher Order Electroweak Processes and Nonleptonic Weak Processes in Standard Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong-Huah, Lo.

    This thesis is devoted to the calculation of higher order electroweak processes and nonleptonic weak interaction processes in the framework of the standard model. Primarily to standardize the notation, the thesis begins with a brief discussion of the Feynman rules and the dimensional regularization in a general renormalizable gauge for a spontaneously broken gauge theory. A typical process where higher order corrections are significant is the s(--->)d(gamma) transition. Amplitude including QCD radiative corrections for this process is calculated using a free quark model, which is then used to compute hyperon weak radiative decays. Explicit evaluation of the transition amplitude of the (SIGMA)(--->)P(gamma) mode is given. The quark fields are expanded in terms of MIT bag modes, so as to be consistent with quark confinement. We rederive the traditional baryon-pole model result and discover some evidence for a (V + A) weak hadronic current. The thesis also contains a phenomenological Lagrangian model for charmed meson decays. The model consists of a SU(,L)(3) x SU(,R)(3) nonlinear chiral Lagrangian with gauge fields. The charmed meson triplet (D('0), D('-), F('-)) is incorporated into the Lagrangian following the general framework proposed by Coleman, Wess and Zumino. The model can describe many body decay processes as well as two body decay processes. It also gives a unified description of pseudo-scalar, vector and axial vector meson decay modes of the charmed mesons. The model gives a one-parameter prediction of all two body and three body decay data. We predict the life time ratio (tau)(D)/(tau)(D('0)) = 3.75 and branching ratio of D('0) decay modes, namely B(,r)(D('0)( --->)K('0)(pi)('0))/B(,r)(D('0)(--->)K('-)(pi)('+)) = 1.04. These are in good agreement with experimental results. Several results of the flavor symmetry model, e.g. the sum rule for the D meson decay amplitudes, are rederived in the model. Dalitz plots of three body decay processes are also

  3. Dynamically solving the {mu}/B{sub{mu}}problem in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-06-01

    We provide a simple solution to the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem in the gauge-mediated Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. In this model the messenger sector contains one pair of 3+{bar 3} and one pair of 2+{bar 2} messengers. These two messenger pairs couple to different gauge singlets in the hidden sector in which supersymmetry (SUSY) is broken. Such a gauge-mediation structure can naturally arise in many backgrounds. Because of the two effective SUSY breaking scales / in the messenger sector, the renormalization group evolutions of the soft SUSY breaking parameters can be properly modified, leading to a negative enough singlet soft mass square m{sub N}{sup 2}({Lambda}{sub EW}) and hence reasonable {mu}/B{sub {mu}} values. In most of the perturbative (up to the GUT scale) parameter region, as a result, the electroweak scale is stabilized and phenomenologically interesting mass spectra of particles and superparticles are obtained. In addition, this model favors large values of tan {beta}: 5 {approx} 50 and a heavy scalar spectrum. With the relatively large tan {beta}, the light U(1){sub R} pseudoscalar (mainly appearing in the low-scale gauge-mediated SUSY breaking models) becomes extremely singlet-like, and is no longer a problem in this model. These features apply to all cases of low-, intermediate- and high-scale gauge-mediated SUSY breaking.

  4. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  5. R2SM: a package for the analytic computation of the R 2 Rational terms in the Standard Model of the Electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzelli, M. V.; Malamos, I.

    2011-03-01

    The analytical package written in FORM presented in this paper allows the computation of the complete set of Feynman Rules producing the Rational terms of kind R2 contributing to the virtual part of NLO corrections in the Standard Model of the Electroweak interactions. Building block topologies filled by means of generic scalars, vectors and fermions, allowing to build these Feynman Rules in terms of specific elementary particles, are explicitly given in the R ξ gauge class, together with the automatic dressing procedure to obtain the Feynman Rules from them. The results in more specific gauges, like the 't Hooft Feynman one, follow as particular cases, in both the HV and the FDH dimensional regularization schemes. As a check on our formulas, the gauge independence of the total Rational contribution (R1+R2) to renormalized S-matrix elements is verified by considering the specific example of the H→ γγ decay process at 1-loop. This package can be of interest for people aiming at a better understanding of the nature of the Rational terms. It is organized in a modular way, allowing a further use of some its files even in different contexts. Furthermore, it can be considered as a first seed in the effort towards a complete automation of the process of the analytical calculation of the R2 effective vertices, given the Lagrangian of a generic gauge theory of particle interactions.

  6. Methods of Contemporary Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2002-08-01

    Preface; Part I. Path Integrals: 1. Operator calculus; 2. Second quantization; 3. Quantum anomalies from path integral; 4. Instantons in quantum mechanics; Part II. Lattice Gauge Theories: 5. Observables in gauge theories; 6. Gauge fields on a lattice; 7. Lattice methods; 8. Fermions on a lattice; 9. Finite temperatures; Part III. 1/N Expansion: 10. O(N) vector models; 11. Multicolor QCD; 12. QCD in loop space; 13. Matrix models; Part IV. Reduced Models: 14. Eguchi-Kawai model; 15. Twisted reduced models; 16. Non-commutative gauge theories.

  7. Methods of Contemporary Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Path Integrals: 1. Operator calculus; 2. Second quantization; 3. Quantum anomalies from path integral; 4. Instantons in quantum mechanics; Part II. Lattice Gauge Theories: 5. Observables in gauge theories; 6. Gauge fields on a lattice; 7. Lattice methods; 8. Fermions on a lattice; 9. Finite temperatures; Part III. 1/N Expansion: 10. O(N) vector models; 11. Multicolor QCD; 12. QCD in loop space; 13. Matrix models; Part IV. Reduced Models: 14. Eguchi-Kawai model; 15. Twisted reduced models; 16. Non-commutative gauge theories.

  8. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  9. Gauge mediation with a small {mu} term and light squarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, John D.

    2009-07-01

    We consider a solution to the {mu} problem in the context of nonminimal gauge mediation with two singlets and low-scale messengers. This solution reduces tuning associated with the 'little hierarchy' problem by permitting a naturally small {mu} term, O(100-300 GeV), due to small mixing between the singlets. The smallness of {mu} also relies crucially on compressing the gauge mediated sparticle spectrum resulting in 330-400 GeV squarks. In addition to a small {mu} term, the theory achieves m{sub Higgs}>114.4 GeV through a large Higgs quartic coupling when tan{beta}{approx}1.5. The vacua studied are globally stable with all couplings perturbative to the grand unified theory scale. The amount of tuning required to get the correct electroweak scale is O(10%), with a similar residual tuning associated with the region of parameter space where the lightest CP-even Higgs mass is above the LEP bound.

  10. Coannihilation with a chargino and gauge boson pair production at one-loop

    SciTech Connect

    Baro, N.; Chalons, G.; Hao, Sun

    2010-02-10

    We present a complete calculation of the electroweak one-loop corrections to the relic density within the MSSM framework. In the context of the neutralino as dark matter candidate, we review different scenarios of annihilation and coannihilation with a chargino. In particular we investigate predictions for the annihilation into gauge boson pairs for different kinds of neutralino: bino-, wino- and higgsino-like. We present some interesting effects which are not present at tree-level and show up at one-loop. To deal with the large number of diagrams occurring in the calculations, we have developed an automatic tool for the computation at one-loop of any process in the MSSM. We have implemented a complete on-shell gauge invariant renormalization scheme, with the possibility of switching to other schemes. We emphasize the variations due to the choice of the renormalization scheme, in particular the one-loop definition of the parameter tan beta.

  11. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  12. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  13. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  14. String Theory and Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Maldacena, Juan

    2009-02-20

    We will see how gauge theories, in the limit that the number of colors is large, give string theories. We will discuss some examples of particular gauge theories where the corresponding string theory is known precisely, starting with the case of the maximally supersymmetric theory in four dimensions which corresponds to ten dimensional string theory. We will discuss recent developments in this area.

  15. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  16. Top quark and Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, L.

    2010-10-01

    We present recent preliminary measurements at the Tevatron of t{bar t} and single top production cross section, top quark mass and width, top pair spin correlations and forward-backward asymmetry. In the electroweak sector, we present the Tevatron average of the W boson width, and preliminary measurements of the W and Z forward-backward asymmetries and WZ, ZZ diboson production cross sections. All measurements are based on larger amount of collision data than previously used and are in agreement with the standard model.

  17. Electroweak vacuum stabilized by moduli during/after inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the present electroweak vacuum is likely to be metastable and it may lead to a serious instability during/after inflation. We propose a simple solution to the problem of vacuum instability during/after inflation. If there is a moduli field which has Planck-suppressed interactions with the standard model fields, the Higgs quartic coupling in the early universe naturally takes a different value from the present one. A slight change of the quartic coupling in the early universe makes the Higgs potential absolutely stable and hence we are free from the vacuum instability during/after inflation.

  18. Minimal but non-minimal inflation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Racioppi, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    We consider the most minimal scale invariant extension of the standard model that allows for successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and inflation. The framework involves an extra scalar singlet, that plays the rôle of the inflaton, and is compatibile with current experimental bounds owing to the non-minimal coupling of the latter to gravity. This inflationary scenario predicts a very low tensor-to-scalar ratio r ≈ 10‑3, typical of Higgs-inflation models, but in contrast yields a scalar spectral index ns simeq 0.97 which departs from the Starobinsky limit. We briefly discuss the collider phenomenology of the framework.

  19. Significant enhancement of neutralino dark matter annihilation from electroweak bremsstrahlung.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Torsten; Calore, Francesca

    2014-02-21

    Indirect searches for the cosmological dark matter have become ever more competitive during the past years. Here, we report the first full calculation of leading electroweak corrections to the annihilation rate of supersymmetric neutralino dark matter. We find that these corrections can be huge, partially due to contributions that have been overlooked so far. Our results imply a significantly enhanced discovery potential of this well motivated dark matter candidate with current and upcoming cosmic ray experiments, in particular for gamma rays and models with somewhat small annihilation rates at the tree level.

  20. Electroweak radiative corrections to polarized Mo/ller scattering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Marciano, William J.

    1996-02-01

    One loop electroweak radiative corrections to left-right parity-violating Mo/ller scattering (e-e--->e-e-) asymmetries are presented. They reduce the standard model (tree level) prediction by 40+/-3% where the main shift and uncertainty stem from hadronic vacuum polarization loops. A similar reduction also occurs for the electron-electron atomic parity-violating interaction. That effect can be attributed to an increase of sin2θW(q2) by 3% in running from q2=m2Z to 0. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to ``new physics'' is also discussed.

  1. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  2. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  3. Gauge invariants and correlators in flavoured quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Paolo; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the construction of holomorphic gauge invariant operators for general quiver gauge theories with flavour symmetries. Using a characterisation of the gauge invariants in terms of equivalence classes generated by permutation actions, along with representation theory results in symmetric groups and unitary groups, we give a diagonal basis for the 2-point functions of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators. This involves a generalisation of the previously constructed Quiver Restricted Schur operators to the flavoured case. The 3-point functions are derived and shown to be given in terms of networks of symmetric group branching coefficients. The networks are constructed through cutting and gluing operations on the quivers.

  4. Electroweak vacuum stability and finite quadratic radiative corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masina, Isabella; Nardini, Germano; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-08-01

    If the Standard Model (SM) is an effective theory, as currently believed, it is valid up to some energy scale Λ to which the Higgs vacuum expectation value is sensitive throughout radiative quadratic terms. The latter ones destabilize the electroweak vacuum and generate the SM hierarchy problem. For a given perturbative ultraviolet (UV) completion, the SM cutoff can be computed in terms of fundamental parameters. If the UV mass spectrum involves several scales, the cutoff is not unique and each SM sector has its own UV cutoff Λi. We have performed this calculation assuming the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) is the SM UV completion. As a result, from the SM point of view, the quadratic corrections to the Higgs mass are equivalent to finite threshold contributions. For the measured values of the top quark and Higgs masses, and depending on the values of the different cutoffs Λi, these contributions can cancel even at renormalization scales as low as multi-TeV, unlike the case of a single cutoff where the cancellation only occurs at Planckian energies, a result originally obtained by Veltman. From the MSSM point of view, the requirement of stability of the electroweak minimum under radiative corrections is incorporated into the matching conditions and provides an extra constraint on the focus point solution to the little hierarchy problem in the MSSM. These matching conditions can be employed for precise calculations of the Higgs sector in scenarios with heavy supersymmetric fields.

  5. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking via UV Insensitive Anomaly Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Kribs, Graham D.; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2004-02-19

    Anomaly mediation solves the supersymmetric flavor and CP problems. This is because the superconformal anomaly dictates that supersymmetry breaking is transmitted through nearly flavor-blind infrared physics that is highly predictive and UV insensitive. Slepton mass squareds, however, are predicted to be negative. This can be solved by adding D-terms for U(1)_Y and U(1)_{B-L} while retaining the UV insensitivity. In this paper we consider electroweak symmetry breaking via UV insensitive anomaly mediation in several models. For the MSSM we find a stable vacuum when tanbeta< 1, but in this region the top Yukawa coupling blows up only slightly above the supersymmetry breaking scale. For the NMSSM, we find a stable electroweak breaking vacuum but with a chargino that is too light. Replacing the cubic singlet term in the NMSSM superpotential with a term linear in the singlet wefind a stable vacuum and viable spectrum. Most of the parameter region with correct vacua requires a large superpotential coupling, precisely what is expected in the"Fat Higgs'" model in which the superpotential is generated dynamically. We have therefore found the first viable UV complete, UV insensitive supersymmetry breaking model that solves the flavor and CP problems automatically: the Fat Higgs model with UV insensitive anomaly mediation. Moreover, the cosmological gravitino problem is naturally solved, opening up the possibility of realistic thermal leptogenesis.

  6. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  7. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-01

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  8. Hearing the echoes of electroweak baryogenesis with gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Wan, Youping; Wang, Dong-Gang; Cai, Yi-Fu; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first joint analysis of observational signatures from the electroweak baryogenesis in both gravitational wave (GW) detectors and particle colliders. With an effective extension of the Higgs sector in terms of the dimension-six operators, we derive a strong first-order phase transition associated with a sizable CP violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. We calculate the GW spectrum resulting from the bubble nucleation, plasma transportation, and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of this process that occurred after the big bang and find that it yields GW signals testable with the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, and Big Bang Observer. We further identify collider signals from the same mechanism that are observable at the planning Circular Electron Positron Collider. Our analysis bridges astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics by providing significant motivation for searches for GW events peaking at the (1 0-4,1 ) Hz range, which are associated with signals at colliders, and highlights the possibility of an interdisciplinary observational window into baryogenesis. The technique applied in analyzing early Universe phase transitions may enlighten the study of phase transitions in applied science.

  9. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  10. Beyond the standard gauging: gauge symmetries of Dirac sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Deser, Andreas; Jonke, Larisa; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the general conditions that have to be met for a gauged extension of a two-dimensional bosonic σ-model to exist. In an inversion of the usual approach of identifying a global symmetry and then promoting it to a local one, we focus directly on the gauge symmetries of the theory. This allows for action functionals which are gauge invariant for rather general background fields in the sense that their invariance conditions are milder than the usual case. In particular, the vector fields that control the gauging need not be Killing. The relaxation of isometry for the background fields is controlled by two connections on a Lie algebroid L in which the gauge fields take values, in a generalization of the common Lie-algebraic picture. Here we show that these connections can always be determined when L is a Dirac structure in the H-twisted Courant algebroid. This also leads us to a derivation of the general form for the gauge symmetries of a wide class of two-dimensional topological field theories called Dirac σ-models, which interpolate between the G/G Wess-Zumino-Witten model and the (Wess-Zumino-term twisted) Poisson sigma model.

  11. Weyl gauge-vector and complex dilaton scalar for conformal symmetry and its breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohanian, Hans C.

    2016-03-01

    Instead of the scalar "dilaton" field that is usually adopted to construct conformally invariant Lagrangians for gravitation, we here propose a hybrid construction, involving both a complex dilaton scalar and a Weyl gauge-vector, in accord with Weyl's original concept of a non-Riemannian conformal geometry with a transport law for length and time intervals, for which this gauge vector is required. Such a hybrid construction permits us to avoid the wrong sign of the dilaton kinetic term (the ghost problem) that afflicts the usual construction. The introduction of a Weyl gauge-vector and its interaction with the dilaton also has the collateral benefit of providing an explicit mechanism for spontaneous breaking of the conformal symmetry, whereby the dilaton and the Weyl gauge-vector acquire masses somewhat smaller than {m}_{P} by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Conformal symmetry breaking is assumed to precede inflation, which occurs later by a separate GUT or electroweak symmetry breaking, as in inflationary models based on the Higgs boson.

  12. Gauge-independent overline{MS} renormalization in the 2HDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Jenniches, Laura; Lang, Jean-Nicolas; Sturm, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We present a consistent renormalization scheme for the CP-conserving Two-Higgs-Doublet Model based on overline{MS} renormalization of the mixing angles and the soft- Z 2-symmetry-breaking scale M sb in the Higgs sector. This scheme requires to treat tadpoles fully consistently in all steps of the calculation in order to provide gauge-independent S-matrix elements. We show how bare physical parameters have to be defined and verify the gauge independence of physical quantities by explicit calculations in a general R ξ -gauge. The procedure is straightforward and applicable to other models with extended Higgs sectors. In contrast to the proposed scheme, the overline{MS} renormalization of the mixing angles combined with popular on-shell renormalization schemes gives rise to gauge-dependent results already at the one-loop level. We present explicit results for electroweak NLO corrections to selected processes in the appropriately renormalized Two-Higgs-Doublet Model and in particular discuss their scale dependence.

  13. Fractal calculus involving gauge function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmankhaneh, Alireza K.; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    Henstock-Kurzweil integral or gauge integral is the generalization of the Riemann integral. The functions which are not integrable because of singularity in the senses of Lebesgue or Riemann are gauge integrable. In this manuscript, we have generalized Fα-calculus using the gauge integral method for the integrating of the functions on fractal set subset of real-line where they have singularities. The suggested new method leads to the wider class of functions on the fractal subset of real-line that are *Fα-integrable. Using gauge function we define *Fα-derivative of functions their Fα-derivative is not exist. The reported results can be used for generalizing the fundamental theorem of Fα-calculus.

  14. Sequestered gravity in gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Benakli, Karim; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mechanism of supersymmetry breaking embeddable in string theory and simultaneously sharing the main advantages of (sequestered) gravity and gauge mediation. It is driven by a Scherk-Schwarz deformation along a compact extra dimension, transverse to a brane stack supporting the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. This fixes the magnitude of the gravitino mass, together with that of the gauginos of a bulk gauge group, at a scale as high as 10^{10} GeV. Supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the observable sector dominantly by gauge interactions using massive messengers transforming non-trivially under the bulk and Standard Model gauge groups and leading to a neutralino LSP as dark matter candidate. The Higgsino mass μ and soft Higgs-bilinear B_μ term could be generated at the same order of magnitude as the other soft terms by effective supergravity couplings as in the Giudice-Masiero mechanism.

  15. Hard amplitudes in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, S.J.

    1991-03-01

    In this lecture series 1 presents recent developments in perturbation theory methods for gauge theories for processes with many partons. These techniques and results are useful in the calculation of cross sections for processes with many final state partons which have applications in the study of multi-jet phenomena in high-energy colliders. The results illuminate many important and interesting properties of non-abelian gauge theories. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10/sup -6/ Torr to 100..mu... A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed.

  17. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  18. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  19. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  20. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  1. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure gauge. 229.107 Section 229.107....107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge that correctly indicates the pressure. The steam pressure gauge shall be graduated to not less than one and one-half...

  2. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  3. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  4. 27 CFR 19.91 - Gauging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or wine shall be made in accordance with 27 CFR part 30 and as provided in this part. However, the... alcoholic flavoring materials be gauged by the methods provided in 27 CFR part 30. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859..., Wines Or Alcoholic Flavoring Materials § 19.91 Gauging. (a) Gauging of spirits and wine. Gauges shall...

  5. 49 CFR 230.73 - Air gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air gauges. 230.73 Section 230.73 Transportation... Signal Equipment § 230.73 Air gauges. (a) Location. Air gauges shall be so located that they may be conveniently read by the engineer from his or her usual position in the cab. No air gauge may be more than...

  6. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  7. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  8. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  9. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  10. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.43 Gauge siphon. The steam gauge supply pipe shall have a siphon on it of ample capacity to prevent steam from entering the gauge. The supply pipe shall directly enter the boiler and be maintained...

  11. Evidence for electroweak production of W±W±jj in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, G; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerio, B; Cerny, K; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cerv, M; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chan, K; Chang, P; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Charfeddine, D; Charlton, D G; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, K; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Chwastowski, J J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciocio, A; Cirkovic, P; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coffey, L; Cogan, J G; Coggeshall, J; Cole, B; Cole, S; Colijn, A P; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Colon, G; Compostella, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Conidi, M C; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consonni, S M; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Côté, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; 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    2014-10-01

    This Letter presents the first study of W(±)W(±)jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets, using 20.3 fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data at sqrt[s] = 8  TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two reconstructed same-charge leptons (e(±)e(±), e(±)μ(±), and μ(±)μ(±)) and two or more jets are analyzed. Production cross sections are measured in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. First evidence for W(±)W(±)jj production and electroweak-only W(±)W(±)jj production is observed with a significance of 4.5 and 3.6 standard deviations, respectively. The measured production cross sections are in agreement with standard model predictions. Limits at 95% confidence level are set on anomalous quartic gauge couplings.

  12. Evidence for Electroweak Production of W±W±jj in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-03

    This paper presents the first study of W± W± jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets, using 20.3 fb₋1 of proton-proton collision data at √s= 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two reconstructed same-charge leptons (e± e± , e± μ± , and μ± μ± ) and two or more jets are analyzed. Production cross sections are measured in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. First evidence for W± W± jj production and electroweak-only W± W± jj production is observed with a significance ofmore » 4.5 and 3.6 standard deviations, respectively. The measured production cross sections are in agreement with standard model predictions. Limits at 95% confidence level are set on anomalous quartic gauge couplings.« less

  13. K{sup 0}-K{sup 0} mixing beyond the standard model and CP-violating electroweak penguins in quenched QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, Ronald; Howard, Joseph; Rebbi, Claudio; Garron, Nicolas; Hoelbling, Christian; Lellouch, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    We present results for the {delta}S=2 matrix elements which are required to study neutral kaon mixing in the standard model (SM) and beyond . We also provide leading chiral order results for the matrix elements of the electroweak penguin operators which give the dominant {delta}I=3/2 contribution to direct CP violation in K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays. Our calculations were performed with Neuberger fermions on two sets of quenched Wilson gauge configurations at inverse lattice spacings of approximately 2.2 GeV and 1.5 GeV. All renormalizations were implemented nonperturbatively in the regularization-independent/momentum (RI/MOM) scheme, where we accounted for subleading operator product expansion corrections and discretization errors. We find ratios of non-SM to SM matrix elements which are roughly twice as large as in the only other dedicated lattice study of these amplitudes. On the other hand, our results for the electroweak penguin matrix elements are in good agreement with two recent domain-wall fermion calculations. As a by-product of our study, we determine the strange quark mass. Our main results are summarized and discussed in Sec. VII. Within our statistics, we find no evidence for scaling violations.

  14. Evidence for electroweak production of W±W±jj in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thong, W M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tran, H L; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urquijo, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wright, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Zeniš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2014-10-01

    This Letter presents the first study of W(±)W(±)jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets, using 20.3 fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data at sqrt[s] = 8  TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two reconstructed same-charge leptons (e(±)e(±), e(±)μ(±), and μ(±)μ(±)) and two or more jets are analyzed. Production cross sections are measured in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. First evidence for W(±)W(±)jj production and electroweak-only W(±)W(±)jj production is observed with a significance of 4.5 and 3.6 standard deviations, respectively. The measured production cross sections are in agreement with standard model predictions. Limits at 95% confidence level are set on anomalous quartic gauge couplings. PMID:25325632

  15. Experiments and analysis of lateral piezoresistance gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.K.W.

    1993-07-01

    The response of lateral piezoresistance gauges to shock wave uniaxial strain loading has been examined in a combined experimental and calculational effort. Plate impact experiments provided lateral gauge data which were analyzed using quasi-static and dynamic inclusion analyses. Experimental data showed that the response of the lateral gauge output depended upon the matrix material and gauge emplacement method. The calculations indicated that these differences were due to complex gauge-matrix interactions. These interactions were influenced by the stress and strain distributions in and around the gauge, plasticity effects, properties of the gauge and matrix materials, and emplacement conditions.

  16. Electric dipole moment constraints on minimal electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stephan J.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2007-02-01

    We study the simplest generic extension of the standard model which allows for conventional electroweak baryogenesis, through the addition of dimension-six operators in the Higgs sector. At least one such operator is required to be CP-odd, and we study the constraints on such a minimal setup, and related scenarios with minimal flavor violation, from the null results of searches for electric dipole moments (EDMs), utilizing the full set of two-loop contributions to the EDMs. The results indicate that the current bounds are stringent, particularly that of the recently updated neutron EDM, but fall short of ruling out these scenarios. The next generation of EDM experiments should be sufficiently sensitive to provide a conclusive test.

  17. CDF electroweak studies and the search for the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron Collider ended on May 30. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988-1989 run. The author presents new results on electroweak physics, including the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections, and the charge asymmetry in W decay. He gives a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988-1989 data on W-{gamma} production are also presented. The status of the search for the top quark in the dilepton modes is described. In addition a status report of the ongoing search in the lepton + jets mode is given.

  18. Electroweak scale invariant models with small cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil

    2015-07-01

    We consider scale invariant models where the classical scale invariance is broken perturbatively by radiative corrections at the electroweak scale. These models potentially offer an elegant and simple solution to the hierarchy problem. If we further require the cosmological constant to be small then such models are also highly predictive. Indeed, the minimal such model, comprizing a Higgs doublet and a real singlet, has the same number of parameters as the standard model. Although this minimal model is disfavored by recent LHC data, we show that two specific extensions incorporating neutrino masses and dark matter are fully realistic. That is, consistent with all experiments and observations. These models predict a light pseudo-Goldstone boson, h, with mass around 10 GeV or less. A fermionic-bosonic mass relation is also predicted. The specific models considered, as well as more generic scale invariant models, can be probed at the LHC.

  19. Dispersion relations for electroweak observables in composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contino, Roberto; Salvarezza, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of S O (5 )/S O (4 ) composite Higgs models. We show how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. We then use the dispersion relation for the parameter ɛ3 to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the one-loop level. Finally, we show that the sign of the contribution to the S ^ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  20. Mass of the Higgs boson in the standard electroweak model

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, Jens

    2010-03-01

    An updated global analysis within the standard model (SM) of all relevant electroweak precision and Higgs boson search data is presented with special emphasis on the implications for the Higgs boson mass, M{sub H}. Included are, in particular, the most recent results on the top quark and W boson masses, updated and significantly shifted constraints on the strong coupling constant, {alpha}{sub s}, from {tau} decays and other low-energy measurements such as from atomic parity violation and neutrino deep inelastic scattering. The latest results from searches for Higgs production and decay at the Tevatron are incorporated together with the older constraints from LEP 2. I find a trimodal probability distribution for M{sub H} with a fairly narrow preferred 90% C.L. window, 115 GeV{<=}M{sub H{<=}}148 GeV.

  1. The electroweak axion, dark energy, inflation and baryonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2015-03-15

    In a previous paper [1], the standard model was generalized to include an electroweak axion which carries baryon plus lepton number, B + L. It was shown that such a model naturally gives the observed value of the dark energy, if the scale of explicit baryon number violation A was chosen to be of the order of the Planck mass. In this paper, we consider the effect of the modulus of the axion field. Such a field must condense in order to generate the standard Goldstone boson associated with the phase of the axion field. This condensation breaks baryon number. We argue that this modulus might be associated with inflation. If an additional B − L violating scalar is introduced with a mass similar to that of the modulus of the axion field, we argue that decays of particles associated with this field might generate an acceptable baryon asymmetry.

  2. Electroweak radiative corrections to triple photon production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wei-Hua; Duan, Peng-Fei; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the precision predictions for three photon production in the standard model (SM) at the ILC including the full next-to-leading (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections, high order initial state radiation (h.o.ISR) contributions and beamstrahlung effects. We present the LO and the NLO EW + h.o.ISR + beamstrahlung corrected total cross sections for various colliding energy when √{ s} ≥ 200 GeV and the kinematic distributions of final photons with √{ s} = 500 GeV at ILC, and find that the NLO EW corrections, the h.o.ISR contributions and the beamstrahlung effects are important in exploring the process e+e- → γγγ.

  3. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-24

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  4. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-01

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  5. Recent Run II Electroweak and QCD Results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Kehoe

    2003-12-17

    The D0 Detector is a hermetic, multipurpose detector residing at one interaction region designated for p{bar p} collisions at 2 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Both the detector and accelerator have undergone major upgrades to increase the luminosity and handle higher interaction rates. This paper presents recent results from Run II data which explore QCD and electroweak physics at the energy frontier. The dijet mass cross section and a search for Z' in dielectron decays are presented, and these are already approaching sensitivities seen in Run I. Additionally, the first measurement of the {sigma}{sub Z} * BR(Z {yields} {mu}{mu}) is given for the new collision energy.

  6. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1370 - Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. 154.1370 Section 154.1370 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1370 Pressure gauge and vacuum gauge marking. Each pressure gauge and...

  11. Investigating Electroweak Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Pin-Ju

    The basic principle of naturalness has driven the majority of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program, but so far all searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) have come up empty. On the other hand, a few existing measurements of SM processes contain interesting anomalies, for instance in the measurement of the WW cross section. The deviation of WW cross section was seen both at ATLAS and CMS and both at 7 and 8 TeV. The discrepancy also became larger at 8 TeV. Combined results with LHC 7 TeV and 8 TeV implies around a three sigma deviation from the SM NLO calculation. This allows for the possibility of new physics with mass scales very close to the Electroweak Scale. We show that the addition of physics beyond the SM at electroweak scale can improve the agreement with the data. In particular supersymmetric models involving charginos, stops and sleptons all provide better fits with the data. In the case of models of sleptons that agree better with the WW data, they can also explain dark matter and the (g-2) anomaly. Furthermore, we show that there are several different classes of stop driven scenarios that not only evade all direct searches, but improve the agreement with the data in the SM measurement of the WW cross section. We also demonstrate that even if these anomalies are not due to new physics, the WW channel can also be used to derive new exclusion limits which are more powerful than existing results using the same ATLAS and CMS datasets. By examining the differential WW cross section we show that the gap between LHC and LEP exclusions can be start to be closed. In particular, we lay out a program under which the diffcult to search for regions of new physics models with large SM backgrounds can be investigated.

  12. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  13. Quantum gauge theories from geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galehouse, Daniel C.

    2006-03-01

    Geometrical theories have been developed to describe quantum interacting particles with full mathematical covariance. They possess a sophisticated gauge structure that derives from the fundamental properties of the geometry. These theories are all implicitly quantized and come in three known types: Weyl, non-compactified Kaluza-Klein, and, as presented here, Dirac. The spin one-half particle is a conformal wave in an eight dimensional Riemannian space. The coordinates transform locally as spinors and project into space time to give the known gravitational and electromagnetic forces. The gauge structure of the weak interactions appears as well, as in this space the electron transforms into a neutrino under hyper-rotations. The possibility of including the strong interactions and the corresponding gauge system is discussed.

  14. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  15. Self-modulating pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, D. Jr.; Lanni, C.P.

    1979-08-07

    An ion gauge is disclosed having a reduced x-ray limit and means for measuring that limit. The gauge comprises an ion gauge of the Bayard-Alpert type having a short collector and having means for varying the grid-collector voltage. The x-ray limit (i.e. the collector current resulting from x-rays striking the collector) may then be determined by the formula: I/sub x/ = ..cap alpha..I/sub l/ - I/sub h//..cap alpha.. - l where: I/sub x/ = x-ray limit, I/sub l/ and I/sub h/ = the collector current at the lower and higher grid voltage respectively; and, ..cap alpha.. = the ratio of the collector current due to positive ions at the higher voltage to that at the lower voltage.

  16. Electroweak W+W- jj prodution at NLO in QCD matched with parton shower in the POWHEG-BOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Barbara; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2013-04-01

    We present an implementation of electroweak W + W - jj production at hadron colliders in the POWHEG framework, a method that allows the interfacing of a next-to-leading order QCD calculation with parton shower Monte Carlo programs. We provide results for both, fully and semi-leptonic decay modes of the weak bosons, taking resonant and non-resonant contributions and spin correlations of the final-state particles into account. To illustrate the versatility of our implementation, we provide phenomenological results for two representative scenarios with a light and with a heavy Higgs boson, respectively, and in a kinematic regime of highly boosted gauge bosons. The impact of the parton shower is found to depend on the setup and the observable under investigation. In particular, distributions related to a central-jet veto are more sensitive to these effects. Therefore the impact of radiation by the parton shower on next-to-leading order predictions should be assessed carefully on a case-by-case basis.

  17. Electroweak bosons in heavy-ion collisions with the CMS detector at =2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florent, Alice; Cms Collaboration

    2013-09-01

    Electroweak gauge bosons W and Z, do not interact strongly, and thus constitute clean probes of the initial state of nucleus-nucleus collisions. The comparison of their production cross-sections in pp and in nuclear collisions provides an estimate of the nuclear parton distribution functions. Despite the low production cross section of weak bosons compared to other nuclear processes, the relatively clean signal of their leptonic decay channel allows their detection. This paper reports measurements of Z and W bosons, produced in PbPb and pp collisions both at nucleon-nucleon center of mass energy =2.76 TeV with the CMS detector. The Z boson yield and the nuclear modification factor (RAA) corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 150 μb-1 for PbPb collisions are presented. The search for W bosons has been performed in the muon plus neutrino channel, using the data sample with integrated luminosity of 7.2 μb-1 for PbPb collisions. Event centrality an muon pseudorapidity dependencies are studied for the complete W candidate sample as well as samples separated by charge (W+ and W-).

  18. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, Scott A

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  19. Electroweak corrections and Bloch-Nordsieck violations in 2-to-2 processes at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the effect of next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections to Standard Model 2 → 2 processes, taking into account the potentially large double logarithms originating from both real and virtual corrections. A study of the leading Sudakov logarithms is presented and Bloch-Nordsieck (BN) violations are discussed for processes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In particular, we focus on the processes Z/γ+jet and also the ratio of Z to γ production. This ratio is known to be insensitive to NLO QCD corrections but this is not expected to be the case for the electroweak corrections. We also comment on the effect of electroweak corrections and the presence of BN violation for QCD processes, in particular dijet production, and also for purely electroweak processes such as W + H and W + Z associated production.

  20. Electroweak corrections to squark--anti-squark pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, W.; Mirabella, E.

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the complete NLO electroweak contributions to the production of diagonal squark--anti-squark pairs at the LHC. We discuss their effects for the production of squarks of the first two generations, in different SUSY scenarios.

  1. Dark coupling and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Rigolin, S. E-mail: llopezho@ulb.ac.be E-mail: stefano.rigolin@pd.infn.it

    2010-11-01

    We study a coupled dark energy-dark matter model in which the energy-momentum exchange is proportional to the Hubble expansion rate. The inclusion of its perturbation is required by gauge invariance. We derive the linear perturbation equations for the gauge invariant energy density contrast and velocity of the coupled fluids, and we determine the initial conditions. The latter turn out to be adiabatic for dark energy, when assuming adiabatic initial conditions for all the standard fluids. We perform a full Monte Carlo Markov Chain likelihood analysis of the model, using WMAP 7-year data.

  2. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  3. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andrasi, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > The Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge of QCD contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term. > We investigate the UV divergences from higher order graphs. > We find that they cannot be absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. - Abstract: In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  5. Dynamics of gauge field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marcianò, Antonino

    2015-05-05

    We analyze the existence and stability of dynamical attractor solutions for cosmological inflation driven by the coupling between fermions and a gauge field. Assuming a spatially homogeneous and isotropic gauge field and fermion current, the interacting fermion equation of motion reduces to that of a free fermion up to a phase shift. Consistency of the model is ensured via the Stückelberg mechanism. We prove the existence of exactly one stable solution, and demonstrate the stability numerically. Inflation arises without fine tuning, and does not require postulating any effective potential or non-standard coupling.

  6. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  7. Supersymmetric N=2 gauge theory with arbitrary gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchiev, Michael Yu.

    2010-10-01

    A new universal model to implement the Seiberg-Witten approach to low-energy properties of the supersymmetric N=2 gauge theory with an arbitrary compact simple gauge group, classical or exceptional, is suggested. It is based on the hyperelliptic curve, whose genus equals the rank of the gauge group. The weak and strong coupling limits are reproduced. The magnetic and electric charges of light dyons, which are present in the proposed model comply with recent predictions derived from the general properties of the theory. The discrete chiral symmetry is implemented, the duality condition is reproduced, and connections between monodromies at weak and strong coupling are established. It is found that the spectra of monopoles and dyons are greatly simplified when vectors representing the scalar and dual fields in the Cartan algebra are aligned along the Weyl vector. This general feature of the theory is used for an additional verification of the model. The model predicts the identical analytic structures of the coupling constants for the theories based on the SU(r+1) and Sp(2r) gauge groups.

  8. Improvement of the Gyocenter-Gauge (G-Gauge) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhi; Qin, Hong

    2011-10-01

    The gyrocenter-gauge (g-gauge) algorithm was improved to simulate rf waves propagating in the three-dimensional sheared magnetic field. The conventional local gyro-center coordinate system (X , Y , Z , μ , θ , u) is constructed on the local magnetic field. When particle travel in a sheared magnetic field, the coordinates of particles must be transformed between different local coordinate systems. To avoid these transformation, a new geometric approach is developed to construct a global Cartesian gyro-center coordinate system (X , Y , Z ,vx ,vy ,vz) , where (X , Y , Z) is the coordinate of the gyro-center, and (vx ,vy ,vz) is the velocity of particle. In the g-gauge theory, the perturbation of distribution function, is obtained from the Lie derivative of gyro-center distribution function F along the perturbing vector field G. The evolution of the first order perturbed distribution contains a term LτLG F =L[τ, G] F , where τ is the Hamilton vector field of unperturbed world-line of particles. It is proved that vector field [τ , G] may be directly solved from the electromagnetic fields. In the improved algorithm, LG F is calculated by integrating along the unperturbed world-line. The improved g-gauge algorithm has been successfully applied to study the propagation and evolution of rf waves in three-dimensional inhomogeneous magnetic field.

  9. Implications of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with vector-like quarks and a ~125 GeV Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.; Wells, James D.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the implications of models that achieve a Standard Model-like Higgs boson of mass near 125 GeV by introducing additional TeV-scale supermultiplets in the vector-like 10+\\bar{10} representation of SU(5), within the context of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study the resulting mass spectrum of superpartners, comparing and contrasting to the usual gauge-mediated and CMSSM scenarios, and discuss implications for LHC supersymmetry searches. This approach implies that exotic vector-like fermions t'_{1,2}, b',and \\tau' should be within the reach of the LHC. We discuss the masses, the couplings to electroweak bosons, and the decay branching ratios of the exotic fermions, with and without various unification assumptions for the mass and mixing parameters. We comment on LHC prospects for discovery of the exotic fermion states, both for decays that are prompt and non-prompt on detector-crossing time scales.

  10. Topics in electroweak baryogenesis: The sphaleron and t-violation

    SciTech Connect

    SeungKoog, L.

    1993-12-07

    Assuming that beyond the standard model physics can be parametrized in terms of high dimensional operators, we examine their effects on the energy of the sphaleron and the classical solution of the gauge and Higgs fields. In the absence of fermions, all of the six dimension 6 operators which are SU(2) symmetric have a small effect when calculated perturbatively. However, calculated non-perturbatively, one of the operators alters the boundary conditions of the equations of motion of the Higgs and gauge fields involved, and another operator gives rise to an abrupt change in the sphaleron energy at a small but definite Higgs quartic coupling. The magnitude of the T-violating muon polarization induced by electromagnetic final state interaction in the radiative Kaon decay K{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{mu}{gamma} is order of 10{sup {minus}3}.

  11. Gauge-Higgs unification, neutrino masses, and dark matter in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Medina, Anibal D.; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-05-01

    Gauge-Higgs unification in warped extra dimensions provides an attractive solution to the hierarchy problem. The extension of the standard model gauge symmetry to SO(5)xU(1){sub X} allows the incorporation of the custodial symmetry SU(2){sub R} plus a Higgs boson doublet with the right quantum numbers under the gauge group. In the minimal model, the Higgs mass is in the range 110-150 GeV, while a light Kaluza-Klein excitation of the top quark appears in the spectrum, providing agreement with precision electroweak measurements and a possible test of the model at a high luminosity LHC. The extension of the model to the lepton sector has several interesting features. We discuss the conditions necessary to obtain realistic charged lepton and neutrino masses. After the addition of an exchange symmetry in the bulk, we show that the odd neutrino Kaluza-Klein modes provide a realistic dark-matter candidate, with a mass of the order of 1 TeV, which will be probed by direct dark-matter detection experiments in the near future.

  12. Meteorology Gauges for Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometers have been commercially available for many years. In addition, many versions have been built at JPL for various projects. This activity is aimed at improving the accuracy of such interferometers from the 1-30 nanometer level to the picometer level for use in the proposes Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) as metrology gauges.

  13. Gauge fields, nonlinear realizations, supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    This is a brief survey of the all-years research activity in the Sector "Supersymmetry" (the former Markov Group) at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics. The focus is on the issues related to gauge fields, spontaneously broken symmetries in the nonlinear realizations approach, and diverse aspects of supersymmetry.

  14. Bakeable McLeod gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreisman, W. S. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A low pressure gauge of the McLeod type demonstrating superior performance and measuring characteristics is described. A mercury reservoir which is kept in a vacuum at all times as well as bakeable glass components to reduce contamination are featured.

  15. Gauged multisoliton baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of U (1 ) gauged modification of the 2 +1 -dimensional planar Skyrme model with a particular choice of the symmetry breaking potential term which combines a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. In the absence of the gauge interaction, the multisolitons of the model are aloof, as they consist of the individual constituents which are well separated. A peculiar feature of the model is that there are usually several different stable static multisoliton solutions of rather similar energy in a topological sector of given degree. We investigate the pattern of the solutions and find new previously unknown local minima. It is shown that coupling of the aloof planar multi-Skyrmions to the magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, their energies, and magnetic fluxes on the strength of the gauge coupling. It is found that, generically, in the strong coupling limit, the coupling to the gauge field results in effective recovery of the rotational invariance of the configuration.

  16. Supersymmetric composite gauge fields with compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2016-06-01

    We study supersymmetric composite gauge theory, supplemented with compensator mechanism. As our first example, we give the formulation of N = 1 supersymmetric non-Abelian composite gauge theory without the kinetic term of a non-Abelian gauge field. The important ingredient is the Proca-Stueckelberg-type compensator scalar field that makes the gauge-boson field equation non-singular, i.e., the field equation can be solved for the gauge field algebraically as a perturbative expansion. As our second example, we perform the gauging of chiral-symmetry for N = 1 supersymmetry in four dimensions by a composite gauge field. These results provide supporting evidence for the consistency of the mechanism that combines the composite gauge field formulations and compensator formulations, all unified under supersymmetry.

  17. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  18. Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    A. Taffard

    2003-06-12

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

  19. Electroweak baryogenesis in a scalar-assisted vectorlike fermion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming-Lei; Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2016-07-01

    We extend the standard model to a scalar-assisted vectorlike fermion model to realize electroweak baryogenesis. The extended Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, due to the mixing among the vectorlike quark and the standard model quarks, provides additional sources of the C P violation. Together with the enhancement from a large vectorlike quark mass, a large enough baryon-to-photon ratio could be obtained. The strongly first-order phase transition could be realized via the potential barrier which separates the broken minimum and the symmetric minimum in the scalar potential. We investigate in detail the one loop temperature-dependent effective potential and perform a random parameter scan to study the allowed parameter region that satisfies the strongly first order phase transition criteria vc≥Tc. Several distinct patterns of phase transition are classified and discussed. Among these patterns, a large trilinear mass term between the Higgs boson and the scalar is preferred, for it controls the width of the potential barrier. Our results indicate large quartic scalar couplings and a moderate mixing angle between the Higgs boson and the new scalar. This parameter region could be further explored at the Run 2 LHC.

  20. Parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in {rvec e} p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; Kevin Fissum; A.Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G.Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-Ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis de Jager; David Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J.Jorda; Christophe Jutier; Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; Min Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M.Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R.Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Charles Perdrisat; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Vina Punjabi; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; Tatsuo Terasawa; J.Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R.Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from protons. Significant contributions to this asymmetry could arise from the contributions of strange form factors in the nucleon. The measured asymmetry is A = -15.05 {+-} 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point <{theta}{sub lab}> = 12.3{sup o} and = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Based on these data as well as data on electromagnetic form factors, we extract the linear combination of strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.014 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.010 where the first error arises from this experiment and the second arises from the electromagnetic form factor data. This paper provides a full description of the special experimental techniques employed for precisely measuring the small asymmetry, including the first use of a strained GaAs crystal and a laser-Compton polarimeter in a fixed target parity-violation experiment.

  1. Gravitational waves from a very strong electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider extensions of the Standard Model which can give very strongly first-order phase transitions, such that the transition fronts either propagate as detonations or run away. To compute the bubble wall velocity, we estimate the friction with the plasma and take into account the hydrodynamics. We track the development of the phase transition up to the percolation time, and we calculate the gravitational wave spectrum generated by bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves. For the kinds of models we consider, we find parameter regions for which the gravitational waves are potentially observable at the planned space-based interferometer eLISA. In such cases, the signal from sound waves is generally dominant, while that from bubble collisions is the least significant of them. Since the sound waves and turbulence mechanisms are diminished for runaway walls, the models with the best prospects of detection at eLISA are those which do not have such solutions. In particular, we find that heavy extra bosons provide stronger gravitational wave signals than tree-level terms.

  2. Electroweak precision observables at one loop in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Kamenik, Jernej F.

    2011-03-01

    We study the viability of generic Higgsless models at low energies when compliance with electroweak precision observables and unitarity constraints up to the TeV scale are imposed. Our analysis shows that consistency with S and T can be achieved at the one-loop level even with a single light vector state, m{sub V} < or approx. 500 GeV. However, this scenario turns out to be strongly disfavored when direct resonance searches at the Tevatron are also taken into account. We show that a fully consistent picture can be obtained if an axial state is introduced. Interestingly, m{sub V} is still predicted to be light (below 1 TeV) while typical values of m{sub A} span over the window 1.2m{sub V}{<=}m{sub A}{<=}1.4m{sub V}. Our results for the vector channel are rather robust and well within the reach of present-day colliders, while the axial channel is more loosely constrained.

  3. Electroweak Structure of Three- and Four-Body Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Marcucci

    2000-06-01

    This work reports results for (i) the elastic electromagnetic form factors of the trin- of ucleons; (ii) the nuclear response functions of interest in ~ experiments, 3 He(~e; e 0 ) experiments, at VERSITY excitation energies below the deuteron breakup threshold; (iii) the astrophysical ark S-factor for proton weak capture on 3 He (the hep reaction). The initial and nal using state wave functions are calculated using the correlated hyperspherical harmonics onsisting method, from a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of the Argonne v 18 two-nucleon uclear and Urbana IX three-nucleon interactions. The nuclear electroweak charge and ts. current operators include one- and many-body components. The predicted mag- netic form factor of 3 H, charge form factors and static properties of both 3 H and ntal 3 He, are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. However, the po- sition of the zero in the magnetic form factor of 3 He is underpredicted by theory. disintegration The calculated nuclear response functions in 3 He electrodisintegration at thresh- er old are in good agreement with the experimental data, which have however rather s large errors. Finally, the astrophysical S-factor for the hep reaction is predicted ortant ' 4.5 larger than the value adopted in the standard-solar-model, with important consequences for the solar neutrino spectrum measured by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration.

  4. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  5. Gauge Configurations for Lattice QCD from The Gauge Connection

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Gauge Connection is an experimental archive for lattice QCD and a repository of gauge configurations made freely available to the community. Contributors to the archive include the Columbia QCDSP collaboration, the MILC collaboration, and others. Configurations are stored in QCD archive format, consisting of an ASCII header which defines various parameters, followed by binary data. NERSC has also provided some utilities and examples that will aid users in handling the data. Users may browse the archive, but are required to register for a password in order to download data. Contents of the archive are organized under four broad headings: Quenched (more than 1200 configurations); Dynamical, Zero Temperature (more than 300 configurations); MILC Improved Staggered Asqtad Lattices (more than 7000 configurations); and Dynamical, Finite Temperature (more than 1200 configurations)

  6. Relic density at one-loop with gauge boson pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Baro, N.; Boudjema, F.; Chalons, G.; Hao Sun

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the full one-loop corrections (electroweak as well as QCD) to processes contributing to the relic density of dark matter in the minimal supersymmetric standard model where the lightest supersymmetric particle is the lightest neutralino. We cover scenarios where the most important channels are those with gauge boson pair production. This includes the case of a bino with some wino admixture, a Higgsino and a wino. In this paper we specialize to the case of light dark matter much below the TeV scale. The corrections can have a non-negligible impact on the predictions and should be taken into account in view of the present and forthcoming increasing precision on the relic density measurements. Our calculations are made with the help of SLOOPS, an automatic tool for the calculation of one-loop processes in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The renormalization scheme dependence of the results as concerns tan{beta} is studied.

  7. WIMP dark matter and unitarity-conserving inflation via a gauge singlet scalar

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlhoefer, Felix; McDonald, John E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk

    2015-11-01

    A gauge singlet scalar with non-minimal coupling to gravity can drive inflation and later freeze out to become cold dark matter. We explore this idea by revisiting inflation in the singlet direction (S-inflation) and Higgs Portal Dark Matter in light of the Higgs discovery, limits from LUX and observations by Planck. We show that large regions of parameter space remain viable, so that successful inflation is possible and the dark matter relic abundance can be reproduced. Moreover, the scalar singlet can stabilise the electroweak vacuum and at the same time overcome the problem of unitarity-violation during inflation encountered by Higgs Inflation, provided the singlet is a real scalar. The 2-σ Planck upper bound on n{sub s} imposes that the singlet mass is below 2 TeV, so that almost the entire allowed parameter range can be probed by XENON1T.

  8. Higher order QCD predictions for associated Higgs production with anomalous couplings to gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Verónica; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-08-01

    We present predictions for the associated production of a Higgs boson at NLO+PS accuracy, including the effect of anomalous interactions between the Higgs and gauge bosons. We present our results in different frameworks, one in which the interaction vertex between the Higgs boson and Standard Model W and Z bosons is parameterized in terms of general Lorentz structures, and one in which Electroweak symmetry breaking is manifestly linear and the resulting operators arise through a six-dimensional effective field theory framework. We present analytic calculations of the Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model contributions, and discuss the phenomenological impact of the higher order pieces. Our results are implemented in the NLO Monte Carlo program MCFM, and interfaced to shower Monte Carlos through the Powheg box framework.

  9. 27 CFR 19.768 - Gauge record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proprietor shall prepare a gauge record to show: (a) Serial number, commencing with “1” at the start of each calendar or fiscal year; (b) Reason for making the gauge: (1) Production gauge and entry for deposit in the... the production account for redistillation; (4) Repackaging of spirits of 190 degrees or more of...

  10. 27 CFR 19.304 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Production of Spirits § 19.304 Production gauge. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by determining the quantity... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Production gauge....

  11. 27 CFR 19.304 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production gauge. 19.304... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Production of Spirits § 19.304 Production gauge. A proprietor must gauge all spirits by determining the...

  12. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  13. A practical GMSB model for explaining the muon (g-2) with gauge coupling unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2014-03-01

    We present a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking model having weak SU(2) triplet, color SU(3) octet and SU(5) 5-plet messengers, that can simultaneously explain the muon (g-2) data within 1σ and the observed Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV. Gauge coupling unification is nontrivially maintained. Most of the parameter space satisfying both is accessible to the 14 TeV LHC. The lighter of the two staus weighs around (100-200) GeV, which can be a potential target of the ILC. When the left-right stau mixing term proportional to (mτμtan β) is large, the charge breaking global minimum can appear. The life-time of the electroweak vacuum restricts the size of the μtan β, which depends of course on the stau soft mass parameters [24,25]. However, this constraint is not very decisive in our case. In fact, the LEP bound on the stau mass is stronger in the relevant region of the parameter space [26]. LHC constraints on electroweak gauginos/sleptons also restrict the relevant parameter space. Searches for three leptons plus missing energy put a constraint on the wino mass [27]. In the region consistent with the muon g-2 at 1σ level, the left handed sleptons are some what heavier than the wino. In this case, the final state leptons are the taus rather electrons/muons, giving the constraint m≃m≳(300-350) GeV[27,28]. Note that in some regions of the parameter space, the wino and the left-handed sleptons are nearly degenerate in mass. These regions are difficult to be constrained. Besides, separate (but, not so tight) constraints exist on the left-handed sleptons, namely, m≳300 GeV[29]. The restrictions on the right-handed sleptons are, however, much less stringent.

  14. Gauge Adjusted Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMAP_GAUGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, T.; Ushio, T.; Yoshida, S.; Kawasaki, Z.; Kubota, T.; Kachi, M.; Aonashi, K.; Shige, S.

    2013-12-01

    precipitation instantaneously, while the ground based rain gauges collects precipitation particles for one hour at a certain point. This discrepancy can cause the mismatch between the two estimates, and we need to fill the gap of the precipitation estimates between the satellite and rain gauge attributable to the spatial and temporal resolution difference. To that end, the gauge adjusted product named as GSMaP_Gauge has been developed. In this product, the CPC global gauge data analysis by Xie et al. (2007) and Chen et al. (2008) is used for the adjustment of the GSMaP_MVK data. In this presentation, the algorithm concept, examples of the product, and some validation results are presented.

  15. General gauge mediation and deconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2010-11-01

    We locate a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector and supersymmetric standard model on different lattice points of an orbifold moose. The hidden sector is encoded in a set of current correlators and the effects of the current correlators are mediated by the lattice site gauge groups with "lattice hopping" functions and through the bifundamental matter that links the lattice sites together. We show how the gaugino mass, scalar mass and Casimir energy of the lattice can be computed for a general set of current correlators and then give specific formulas when the hidden sector is specified to be a generalised messenger sector. The results reproduce the effect of five dimensional gauge mediation from a purely four dimensional construction.

  16. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K.; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics—based on approximate Bayesian inference—has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  17. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl J

    2016-03-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics--based on approximate Bayesian inference--has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  18. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  19. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl J

    2016-03-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics--based on approximate Bayesian inference--has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception.

  20. Non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    Building a universal quantum computer is a central goal of emerging quantum technologies, which has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Unfortunately, this future does not seem to be very close at hand. However, quantum computers built for a special purpose, i.e. quantum simulators , are currently developed in many leading laboratories. Many schemes for quantum simulation have been proposed and realized using, e.g., ultracold atoms in optical lattices, ultracold trapped ions, atoms in arrays of cavities, atoms/ions in arrays of traps, quantum dots, photonic networks, or superconducting circuits. The progress in experimental implementations is more than spectacular. Particularly interesting are those systems that simulate quantum matter evolving in the presence of gauge fields. In the quantum simulation framework, the generated (synthetic) gauge fields may be Abelian, in which case they are the direct analogues of the vector potentials commonly associated with magnetic fields. In condensed matter physics, strong magnetic fields lead to a plethora of fascinating phenomena, among which the most paradigmatic is perhaps the quantum Hall effect. The standard Hall effect consists in the appearance of a transverse current, when a longitudinal voltage difference is applied to a conducting sample. For quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors at low temperatures placed in very strong magnetic fields, the transverse conductivity, the ratio between the transverse current and the applied voltage, exhibits perfect and robust quantization, independent for instance of the material or of its geometry. Such an integer quantum Hall effect, is now understood as a deep consequence of underlying topological order. Although such a system is an insulator in the bulk, it supports topologically robust edge excitations which carry the Hall current. The robustness of these chiral excitations against backscattering explains the universality of the quantum Hall effect. Another

  1. Novel Principle of Contactless Gauge Block Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Buchta, Zdeněk; Řeřucha, Šimon; Mikel, Břetislav; Čížek, Martin; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel principle of contactless gauge block calibration is presented. The principle of contactless gauge block calibration combines low-coherence interferometry and laser interferometry. An experimental setup combines Dowell interferometer and Michelson interferometer to ensure a gauge block length determination with direct traceability to the primary length standard. By monitoring both gauge block sides with a digital camera gauge block 3D surface measurements are possible too. The principle presented is protected by the Czech national patent No. 302948. PMID:22737012

  2. Small neutrino masses and gauge coupling unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M.; Fonseca, Renato M.; González-Canales, Félix; Valle, José W. F.

    2015-02-01

    The physics responsible for gauge coupling unification may also induce small neutrino masses. We propose a novel gauge-mediated radiative seesaw mechanism for calculable neutrino masses. These arise from quantum corrections mediated by new S U (3 )C⊗S U (3 )L⊗U (1 )X (3-3-1) gauge bosons and the physics driving gauge coupling unification. Gauge couplings unify for a 3-3-1 scale in the TeV range, making the model directly testable at the LHC.

  3. PVT gauging with liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dresar, Neil T.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) liquid quantity gauging of a 0.17 m 3 liquid nitrogen tank pressured with ambient temperature helium in the normal gravity environment. A previously reported PVT measurement procedure has been improved to include helium solubility in liquid nitrogen. Gauging data was collected at nominal tank fill levels of 80%, 50% and 20% and at nominal tank pressures of 0.3, 1.0, and 1.7 MPa. The test tank was equipped with a liquid pump and spray manifold to circulate and mix the fluid contents and therefore create near-isothermal conditions throughout the tank. Silicon diode sensors were distributed throughout the tank to monitor temperatures. Close-spaced arrays of silicon diode point sensors were utilized to precisely detect the liquid level at the nominal 80%, 50%, and 20% fill levels. The tests simulated the cryogenic tank-side conditions only; helium mass added to the tank was measured by gas flowmeters rather than using pressure and temperature measurements from a dedicated helium supply bottle. Equilibrium data for cryogenic nitrogen and helium mixtures from numerous sources was correlated to predict soluble helium mole fractions. Results show that solubility should be accounted for in the PVT gauging calculations. Mole fractions predicted by Dalton's Law were found to be in good agreement with the compiled equilibrium data within the temperature-pressure range of interest. Therefore, Dalton's Law was deemed suitable for calculating ullage composition. Gauging results from the PVT method agreed with the reference liquid level measurements to within 3%.

  4. Asymptotically Free Gauge Theories. I

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilczek, Frank; Gross, David J.

    1973-07-01

    Asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions are constructed and analyzed. The reasons for doing this are recounted, including a review of renormalization group techniques and their application to scaling phenomena. The renormalization group equations are derived for Yang-Mills theories. The parameters that enter into the equations are calculated to lowest order and it is shown that these theories are asymptotically free. More specifically the effective coupling constant, which determines the ultraviolet behavior of the theory, vanishes for large space-like momenta. Fermions are incorporated and the construction of realistic models is discussed. We propose that the strong interactions be mediated by a "color" gauge group which commutes with SU(3)xSU(3). The problem of symmetry breaking is discussed. It appears likely that this would have a dynamical origin. It is suggested that the gauge symmetry might not be broken, and that the severe infrared singularities prevent the occurrence of non-color singlet physical states. The deep inelastic structure functions, as well as the electron position total annihilation cross section are analyzed. Scaling obtains up to calculable logarithmic corrections, and the naive lightcone or parton model results follow. The problems of incorporating scalar mesons and breaking the symmetry by the Higgs mechanism are explained in detail.

  5. Rain gauge calibration and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, John

    1994-01-01

    Prior to the Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE), 42 Model 100 series optical gauges were tested in the rain simulator facility at Wallops Island before shipment to the field. Baseline measurements at several rain rates were made simultaneously with collector cans, tipping bucket, and a precision weighing gauge and held for post-COARE evaluation with a repeat set of measurements that were to be recorded after the instruments were returned. This was done as a means of detecting any calibration changes that might have occurred while deployed. Although it was known that the artificial rain in the simulator did not contain the required exponential distribution for accurate optical rain gauge rate measurements, use of the facility was necessary because it was the only means available for taking controlled observations with instruments that were received, tested, and shipped out in groups over a period of months. At that point, it was believed that these measurements would be adequately precise for detecting performance changes over time. However, analysis of the data by STI now indicates that this may not be true. Further study of the data will be undertaken to resolve this.

  6. Tensor gauge condition and tensor field decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ben-Chao; Chen, Xiang-Song

    2015-10-01

    We discuss various proposals of separating a tensor field into pure-gauge and gauge-invariant components. Such tensor field decomposition is intimately related to the effort of identifying the real gravitational degrees of freedom out of the metric tensor in Einstein’s general relativity. We show that as for a vector field, the tensor field decomposition has exact correspondence to and can be derived from the gauge-fixing approach. The complication for the tensor field, however, is that there are infinitely many complete gauge conditions in contrast to the uniqueness of Coulomb gauge for a vector field. The cause of such complication, as we reveal, is the emergence of a peculiar gauge-invariant pure-gauge construction for any gauge field of spin ≥ 2. We make an extensive exploration of the complete tensor gauge conditions and their corresponding tensor field decompositions, regarding mathematical structures, equations of motion for the fields and nonlinear properties. Apparently, no single choice is superior in all aspects, due to an awkward fact that no gauge-fixing can reduce a tensor field to be purely dynamical (i.e. transverse and traceless), as can the Coulomb gauge in a vector case.

  7. Uncovering the single top: observation of electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Jorge Armando

    2009-01-01

    The top quark is generally produced in quark and anti-quark pairs. However, the Standard Model also predicts the production of only one top quark which is mediated by the electroweak interaction, known as 'Single Top'. Single Top quark production is important because it provides a unique and direct way to measure the CKM matrix element Vtb, and can be used to explore physics possibilities beyond the Standard Model predictions. This dissertation presents the results of the observation of Single Top using 2.3 fb-1 of Data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis includes the Single Top muon+jets and electron+jets final states and employs Boosted Decision Tress as a method to separate the signal from the background. The resulting Single Top cross section measurement is: (1) σ(p$\\bar{p}$→ tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is p = 1.9 x 10-6. This corresponds to a standard deviation Gaussian equivalence of 4.6. When combining this result with two other analysis methods, the resulting cross section measurement is: (2) σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 ± 0.88 pb, and the corresponding measurement significance is 5.0 standard deviations.

  8. Investigation of Supersymmetric Left-Right Theories of Electroweak Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyaya, Asim

    We studied supergravity induced radiative breaking of SU(,R)(2)XU(1) group in left-right symmetric theories of electroweak interactions. We find that in order to have a minimum that breaks SU(,R)(2)XU(1) symmetry leaving SU(,L)(2) intact, the parity has to be broken at a scale much above the Tev region. We show that if a parity odd singlet is introduced in the theory that picks up VEV at superheavy scale then SU(,R)(2)XU(1) group breaks down radiatively via a nonzero VEV acquired by right handed s-neutrino. We analyse the resulting mass spectrum of charged and neutral fermions and find that theory does allow two low mass fermionic states that are predominantly tau lepton and the corresponding neutrino. Then calculating the K(,L)-K(,S) mass difference we find that supersymmetric contributions negate a well known constraint on right handed mass scale (M(,W(,R)) > 1.6TeV). This implies that left-right theories could be a nontrivial alternative to standard model at low energies. We prescribed a method of deriving renormalisation group equations (RGE) in explicitely broken supersymmetric theories using fully superspace methods. We claim that, to study the divergence structure of the theory efficiently, all supersymmetry breaking terms should be written in D -type form. Since calculating the divergent part is much easier in supergraphs than in component language, our prescriptions drastically reduce the work involved in derivation of RGE's. To corroborate our claims we derive the RGE's for a well known nontrivial model and reproduce all the equations that were obtained by component method.

  9. Magnetic fields at first order phase transition: a threat to electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Nardini, Germano; Quirós, Mariano; Riotto, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    The generation of the observed baryon asymmetry may have taken place during the electroweak phase transition, thus involving physics testable at LHC, a scenario dubbed electroweak baryogenesis. In this paper we point out that the magnetic field which is produced in the bubbles of a first order phase transition endangers the baryon asymmetry produced in the bubble walls. The reason being that the produced magnetic field couples to the sphaleron magnetic moment and lowers the sphaleron energy; this strengthens the sphaleron transitions inside the bubbles and triggers a more effective wash out of the baryon asymmetry. We apply this scenario to the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) where, in the absence of a magnetic field, successful electroweak baryogenesis requires the lightest CP-even Higgs and the right-handed stop masses to be lighter than about 127 GeV and 120 GeV, respectively. We show that even for moderate values of the magnetic field, the Higgs mass required to preserve the baryon asymmetry is below the present experimental bound. As a consequence electroweak baryogenesis within the MSSM should be confronted on the one hand to future measurements at the LHC on the Higgs and the right-handed stop masses, and on the other hand to more precise calculations of the magnetic field produced at the electroweak phase transition.

  10. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao Jing

    2007-12-15

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kaehler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV-100 TeV range.

  11. Quantum field theory of gravity with spin and scaling gauge invariance and spacetime dynamics with quantum inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Treating the gravitational force on the same footing as the electroweak and strong forces, we present a quantum field theory of gravity based on spin and scaling gauge symmetries. A biframe spacetime is initiated to describe such a quantum gravity theory. The gravifield sided on both locally flat noncoordinate spacetime and globally flat Minkowski spacetime is an essential ingredient for gauging global spin and scaling symmetries. The locally flat gravifield spacetime spanned by the gravifield is associated with a noncommutative geometry characterized by a gauge-type field strength of the gravifield. A coordinate-independent and gauge-invariant action for the quantum gravity is built in the gravifield basis. In the coordinate basis, we derive equations of motion for all quantum fields including the gravitational effect and obtain basic conservation laws for all symmetries. The equation of motion for the gravifield tensor is deduced in connection directly with the total energy-momentum tensor. When the spin and scaling gauge symmetries are broken down to a background structure that possesses the global Lorentz and scaling symmetries, we obtain exact solutions by solving equations of motion for the background fields in a unitary basis. The massless graviton and massive spinon result as physical quantum degrees of freedom. The resulting Lorentz-invariant and conformally flat background gravifield spacetime is characterized by a cosmic vector with a nonzero cosmological mass scale. The evolving Universe is, in general, not isotropic in terms of conformal proper time. The conformal size of the Universe becomes singular at the cosmological horizon and turns out to be inflationary in light of cosmic proper time. A mechanism for quantum scalinon inflation is demonstrated such that it is the quantum effect that causes the breaking of global scaling symmetry and generates the inflation of the early Universe, which is ended when the evolving vacuum expectation value of the

  12. Scalar representations in the light of electroweak phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    AbdusSalam, Shehu S.; Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed E-mail: chowdhu@sissa.it

    2014-05-01

    The extension of the standard model's minimal Higgs sector with an inert SU(2){sub L} scalar doublet can provide light dark matter candidate and simultaneously induce a strong phase transition for explaining Baryogenesis. There is however no symmetry reasons to prevent the extension using scalars with higher SU(2){sub L} representations. By making random scans over the models' parameters, we show that in the light of electroweak physics constraints, strong first order electroweak phase transition and the possibility of having sub-TeV cold dark matter candidate the higher representations are rather disfavored compared to the inert doublet. This is done by computing generic perturbativity behavior and impact on electroweak phase transitions of higher representations in comparison with the inert doublet model. Explicit phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology within the context of the inert triplet and quartet representations are used for detailed illustrations.

  13. Dynamical symmetry breaking in chiral gauge theories with direct-product gauge groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan-Liang; Shrock, Robert

    2016-09-01

    We analyze patterns of dynamical symmetry breaking in strongly coupled chiral gauge theories with direct-product gauge groups G . If the gauge coupling for a factor group Gi⊂G becomes sufficiently strong, it can produce bilinear fermion condensates that break the Gi symmetry itself and/or break other gauge symmetries Gj⊂G . Our comparative study of a number of strongly coupled direct-product chiral gauge theories elucidates how the patterns of symmetry breaking depend on the structure of G and on the relative sizes of the gauge couplings corresponding to factor groups in the direct product.

  14. Unitary Representations of Gauge Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano, Ruth Stella

    I generalize to the case of gauge groups over non-trivial principal bundles representations that I. M. Gelfand, M. I. Graev and A. M. Versik constructed for current groups. The gauge group of the principal G-bundle P over M, (G a Lie group with an euclidean structure, M a compact, connected and oriented manifold), as the smooth sections of the associated group bundle is presented and studied in chapter I. Chapter II describes the symmetric algebra associated to a Hilbert space, its Hilbert structure, a convenient exponential and a total set that later play a key role in the construction of the representation. Chapter III is concerned with the calculus needed to make the space of Lie algebra valued 1-forms a Gaussian L^2-space. This is accomplished by studying general projective systems of finitely measurable spaces and the corresponding systems of sigma -additive measures, all of these leading to the description of a promeasure, a concept modeled after Bourbaki and classical measure theory. In the case of a locally convex vector space E, the corresponding Fourier transform, family of characters and the existence of a promeasure for every quadratic form on E^' are established, so the Gaussian L^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space is constructed. Chapter III finishes by exhibiting the explicit Hilbert space isomorphism between the Gaussian L ^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space and the complexification of its symmetric algebra. In chapter IV taking as a Hilbert space H the L^2-space of the Lie algebra valued 1-forms on P, the gauge group acts on the motion group of H defining in an straight forward fashion the representation desired.

  15. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/..cap alpha.., where ..cap alpha.. is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs.

  16. Anatomy of a gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk . E-mail: kreimer@ihes.fr

    2006-12-15

    We exhibit the role of Hochschild cohomology in quantum field theory with particular emphasis on gauge theory and Dyson-Schwinger equations, the quantum equations of motion. These equations emerge from Hopf- and Lie algebra theory and free quantum field theory only. In the course of our analysis, we exhibit an intimate relation between the Slavnov-Taylor identities for the couplings and the existence of Hopf sub-algebras defined on the sum of all graphs at a given loop order, surpassing the need to work on single diagrams.

  17. Superpotentials for Quiver Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aspinwall, Paul S.; Fidkowski, Lukasz M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-10

    We compute superpotentials for quiver gauge theories arising from marginal D-Brane decay on collapsed del Pezzo cycles S in a Calabi-Yau X. This is done using the machinery of A{sub {infinity}} products in the derived category of coherent sheaves of X, which in turn is related to the derived category of S and quiver path algebras. We confirm that the superpotential is what one might have guessed from analyzing the moduli space, i.e., it is linear in the fields corresponding to the Exts of the quiver and that each such Ext multiplies a polynomial in Exts equal to precisely the relation represented by the Ext.

  18. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-07-15

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  19. Electro-Weak Penguin and Leptonic Decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lodovico, F.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-09-08

    Electro-weak penguin and leptonic decays provide an indirect probe for physics beyond the Standard Model and contribute to the determination of Standard Model parameters. Copious quantities of B mesons produced at the B-Factories permit precision measurements of the electro-weak penguin decays and searches for leptonic decays. We review the current experimental status of b {yields} s(d){gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{gamma}, b {yields} s{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and finally B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays at BABAR.

  20. Electroweak properties of octet baryons in a light-cone quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    We study the electroweak properties of ground state octet baryons in a relativistic quark-spectator-diquark model, with a light-front formalism applied to take relativistic effects into account. Our model provides a consistent picture of the electroweak properties of the ground state octet baryons in the low momentum transfer region. The Melosh-Wigner rotation is applied as the transformation relation between spinors in the instant form and front form. Numerical results are presented for the magnetic moments, weak transition charges, and Sachs form factors. Our results are in good agreement with experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  1. Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0+0.9-1.3GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the DØ detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb-1 of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tqb + X) = 3.03+0.78-0.66 pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using

  2. Supergravity Higgs inflation and shift symmetry in electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Einhorn, Martin B. E-mail: meinhorn@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2010-12-01

    We present a model of inflation in a supergravity framework in the Einstein frame where the Higgs field of the next to minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) plays the role of the inflaton. Previous attempts which assumed non-minimal coupling to gravity failed due to a tachyonic instability of the singlet field during inflation. A canonical Kähler potential with minimal coupling to gravity can resolve the tachyonic instability but runs into the η-problem. We suggest a model which is free of the η-problem due to an additional coupling in the Kähler potential which is allowed by the Standard Model gauge group. This induces directions in the potential which we call K-flat. For a certain value of the new coupling in the (N)MSSM, the Kähler potential is special, because it can be associated with a certain shift symmetry for the Higgs doublets, a generalization of the shift symmetry for singlets in earlier models. We find that K-flat direction has H{sub u}{sup 0} = −H{sub d}{sup 0*}. This shift symmetry is broken by interactions coming from the superpotential and gauge fields. This flat direction fails to produce successful inflation in the MSSM but yields a more interesting model in the NMSSM, even though it does not pass existing cosmological constraints. We point out that, in building more sophisticated models of this type, one may also need to take into account their implications for axion searches or other elementary particle constraints.

  3. Altered Maxwell equations in the length gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    2013-09-01

    The length gauge uses a scalar potential to describe a laser field, thus treating it as a longitudinal field rather than as a transverse field. This distinction is manifested by the fact that the Maxwell equations that relate to the length gauge are not the same as those for transverse fields. In particular, a source term is necessary in the length-gauge Maxwell equations, whereas the Coulomb-gauge description of plane waves possesses the basic property of transverse fields that they propagate with no source terms at all. This difference is shown to be importantly consequential in some previously unremarked circumstances; and it explains why the Göppert-Mayer gauge transformation does not provide the security that might be expected of full gauge equivalence.

  4. Entanglement of Distillation for Lattice Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Acoleyen, Karel; Bultinck, Nick; Haegeman, Jutho; Marien, Michael; Scholz, Volkher B.; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We study the entanglement structure of lattice gauge theories from the local operational point of view, and, similar to Soni and Trivedi [J. High Energy Phys. 1 (2016) 1], we show that the usual entanglement entropy for a spatial bipartition can be written as the sum of an undistillable gauge part and of another part corresponding to the local operations and classical communication distillable entanglement, which is obtained by depolarizing the local superselection sectors. We demonstrate that the distillable entanglement is zero for pure Abelian gauge theories at zero gauge coupling, while it is in general nonzero for the non-Abelian case. We also consider gauge theories with matter, and show in a perturbative approach how area laws—including a topological correction—emerge for the distillable entanglement. Finally, we also discuss the entanglement entropy of gauge fixed states and show that it has no relation to the physical distillable entropy.

  5. The Planar Gauge in a New Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibbrandt, George; Nyeo, Su-Long

    The main feature of the planar gauge, apart from the decoupling of ghosts, is the nontransversality of the Yang-Mills self-energy with the resulting appearance of a pincer diagram in the Ward identity. We employ the general prescription for axial-type gauges, recently developed by one of the authors, to check this Ward identity and derive BRS-invariant counterterms in the planar gauge.

  6. The planar gauge in a new formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Leibbrandt, G.; Nyeo, S.L.

    1988-09-01

    The main feature of the planar gauge, apart from the decoupling of ghosts, is the nontransversatility of the Yang-Mills self-energy with the resulting appearance of a pincer diagram in the Ward identity. The authors employ the general prescription for axial-type gauges, recently developed by one of the authors, to check this Ward identity and derive BRS-invariant counterterms in the planar gauge.

  7. Probing anomalous gauge boson couplings at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Valencia, G.

    1994-12-31

    We bound anomalous gauge boson couplings using LEP data for the Z {yields} {bar {integral}}{integral} partial widths. We use an effective field theory formalism to compute the one-loop corrections resulting from non-standard model three and four gauge boson vertices. We find that measurements at LEP constrain the three gauge boson couplings at a level comparable to that obtainable at LEPII.

  8. Adaptive gauge cooling for complex Langevin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiovanni, L.; Aarts, G.; Seiler, E.; Sexty, D.; Stamatescu, I. O.

    In the case of nonabelian gauge theories with a complex weight, a controlled exploration of the complexified configuration space during a complex Langevin process requires the use of SL(N,C) gauge cooling, in order to minimize the distance from SU(N). Here we show that adaptive gauge cooling can lead to an efficient implementation of this idea. First results for SU(3) Yang-Mills theory in the presence of a nonzero theta-term are presented as well.

  9. Tank gauging apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gauging the amount of liquid in a container of liquid and gas under flow or zero gravity net conditions includes an accumulator and appropriate connector apparatus for communicating gas between the accumulator and the container. In one form of the invention, gas is removed from the container and compressed into the accumulator. The pressure and temperature of the fluid in the container is measured before and after removal of the gas; the pressure and temperature of gas in the accumulator is measured before and after compression of the gas into the accumulator from the container. These pressure and temperature measurements are used in determining the volume of gas in the container, whereby the volume of liquid in the container can be determined from the difference between the known volume of the container and the volume of gas in the container. Gas from the accumulator may be communicated into the container in a similar process as a verification of the gauging of the liquid volume, or as an independent process for determining the volume of liquid in the container.

  10. Tank gauging apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for gauging the amount of liquid in a container of liquid and gas under low or zero gravity net conditions includes an accumulator and appropriate connector apparatus for communicating gas between the accumulator and the container. In one form of the invention, gas is removed from the container and compressed into the accumulator. The pressure and temperature of the fluid in the container is measured before and after removal of the gas; the pressure and temperature of the gas in the accumulator is measured before and after compression of the gas into the accumulator from the container. These pressure and temperature measurements are used to determine the volume of gas in the container, whereby the volume of the liquid in the container can be determined from the difference between the known volume of the container and the volume of gas in the container. Gas from the accumulator may be communicated into the container in a similar process as a verification of the gauging of the liquid volume, or as an independent process for determining the volume of liquid in the container.

  11. 27 CFR 19.618 - Gauge record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... formula number for denatured spirits; (f) The proof of distillation (not required for denatured spirits... identification, tank number, volumetric or weight gauge details, proof, and wine gallons; (2)...

  12. Extended gauge sectors at future colliders: Report of the New Gauge Boson Subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-12-01

    The author summarizes the results of the New Gauge Boson Subgroup on the physics of extended gauge sectors at future colliders as presented at the 1996 Snowmass workshop. He discusses the direct and indirect search reaches for new gauge bosons at both hadron and lepton colliders as well as the ability of such machines to extract detailed information on the couplings of these particles to the fermions and gauge bosons of the Standard Model. 41 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary...

  18. Characterizing invisible electroweak particles through single-photon processes at high energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Youl; Han, Tao; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, the masses of which are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1 /2 Higgsino SU(2 ) L doublets, (b) a spin-1 /2 wino SU(2 ) L triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2 ) L doublet. Due to the mass degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the e+e- collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy e+e- collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at e+e- colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy of the associated hard photon and to determine the spin of the nearly invisible particles unambiguously through the threshold behavior in the photon energy distribution.

  19. Electroweak radiative effects in the single $W$-production at Tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Akushevich; A. Ilyichev; N. Shumeiko; V. Zykunov

    2003-08-01

    An alternative calculation of the lowest order electroweak radiative corrections to the single W-boson production in hadron-hadron collision in the framework of the quark parton model without any absorption of the collinear quark singularity into the parton distributions is carried out. Numerical analysis under Tevatron and LHC kinematic conditions is performed.

  20. Probing electroweak symmetry breaking at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider): A no-lose corollary

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1987-02-11

    Low energy theorems are derived for scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z's, providing the basis for an estimate of the observable signal at the SSC if electroweak symmetry breaking is due to new physics at the TeV scale.

  1. Large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    We discuss a possibility of large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} from recent experimental data. The experimental data may be suggesting that there are some discrepancies between the data and theoretical estimation in the branching ratios of them. In B{yields}K{pi} decays, to explain it, a large electroweak penguin contribution and large strong phase differences seem to be needed. The contributions should appear also in B{yields}{pi}{pi}. We show, as an example, a solution to solve the discrepancies in both B{yields}K{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{pi}. However the magnitude of the parameters and the strong phase estimated from experimental data are quite large compared with the theoretical estimations. It may be suggesting some new physics effects are included in these processes. We will have to discuss about the dependence of the new physics. To explain both modes at once, we may need large electroweak penguin contribution with new weak phases and some SU(3) breaking effects by new physics in both QCD and electroweak penguin-type processes.

  2. Global Fits of the Electroweak Standard Theory: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baak, M.; Haller, J.; Mönig, K.

    2016-10-01

    The last decades have seen tremendous progress in the experimental techniques for measuring key observables of the Standard Theory (ST) as well as in theoretical calculations that has led to highly precise predictions of these observables. Global electroweak fits of the ST compare the precision measurements of electroweak observables from lepton and hadron colliders at CERN and elsewhere with accurate theoretical predictions of the ST calculated at multi-loop level. For a long time, global fits have been used to assess the validity of the ST and to constrain indirectly (by exploiting contributions from quantum loops) the remaining free ST parameters, like the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson before their direct discovery. With the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the electroweak sector of the ST is now complete and all fundamental ST parameters are known. Hence the global fits are a powerful tool to probe the internal consistency of the ST, to predict ST parameters with high precision, and to constrain theories describing physics beyond the ST. In this chapter we review the global fits of the electroweak sector of the ST from an experimentalist's perspective. We briefly recall the most important achievements from the past (mainly driven by the precise measurements of Z pole observables), discuss the present situation after the accurate measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, and present prospects of the fits as expected from new measurements at the LHC and future lepton colliders.

  3. Effect of Vacuum Properties on Electroweak Processes - A Theoretical Interpretation of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2008-06-01

    Recently for discharges in fluids induced nuclear transmutations have been observed. It is our hypothesis that these reactions are due to a symmetry breaking of the electroweak vacuum by the experimental arrangement. The treatment of this hypothesis is based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents. The dynamical law of these fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. Phenomenological quantities of electroweak processes follow from the derivation of corresponding effective theories obtained by algebraic weak mapping theorems where the latter theories depend on the spinor field propagator, i. e. a vacuum expectation value. This propagator and its equation are studied for conserved and for broken discrete symmetries. For combined CP- and isospin symmetry breaking it is shown that the propagator corresponds to the experimental arrangements under consideration. The modifications of the effective electroweak theory due to this modified propagator are discussed. Based on these results a mechanism is sketched which offers a qualitative interpretation of the appearance of induced nuclear transmutations. A numerical estimate of electron capture is given.

  4. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  5. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, Albert L.

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads.

  6. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, A.L.

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads. 13 figures.

  7. Numerical techniques for lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1981-02-06

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice is reviewed. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are then discussed for these systems. Finally, the Monte Carlo methods are combined with renormalization group analysis to give strong numerical evidence for confinement of quarks by non-Abelian gauge fields.

  8. Neutralino Dark Matter in Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kyu Jung

    2008-11-23

    The lightest neutralino is one of the best candidate for dark matter. In gauge messenger models, It is generic that bino and wino masses are almostly degenerate. Because of this, neutralino annihilation becomes more efficient. Also, gauge messenger models have squeezed mass spectrum so that there are many resonance and co-annihilation regions, and can give correct amount of neutralino relic density.

  9. 49 CFR 229.53 - Brake gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Brake gauges. 229.53 Section 229.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Brake System § 229.53 Brake gauges....

  10. 49 CFR 229.53 - Brake gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Brake gauges. 229.53 Section 229.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Brake System § 229.53 Brake gauges....

  11. 49 CFR 229.53 - Brake gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Brake gauges. 229.53 Section 229.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Brake System § 229.53 Brake gauges....

  12. 49 CFR 229.53 - Brake gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake gauges. 229.53 Section 229.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Brake System § 229.53 Brake gauges....

  13. 49 CFR 229.53 - Brake gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Brake gauges. 229.53 Section 229.53 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Brake System § 229.53 Brake gauges....

  14. 27 CFR 19.319 - Production gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production gauge. 19.319... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production § 19.319 Production gauge. (a) General... production is completed. Except as otherwise specifically provided in this section, quantities may...

  15. A lattice formulation of chiral gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.

    1996-08-01

    We present a method for implementing gauge theories of chiral fermions on the lattice. Discussed topics include: the lattice as a UV regulator, a chiral QED model, modification of the fermion determinant, large gauge-field momenta, and a non-perturbative problem.

  16. Nonquadratic gauge fixing and ghosts for gauge theories on the hypersphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2011-10-15

    It has been suggested that using a gauge fixing Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge fixing condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost action that is to be associated with gauge fixing, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this nonquadratic gauge fixing Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.

  17. Fast Neutral Pressure Gauges in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; R. Gernhardt; T. Provost; T.R. Jarboe; V. Soukhanovskii

    2004-04-26

    Successful operation in NSTX of two prototype fast-response micro ionization gauges during plasma operations has motivated us to install five gauges at different toroidal and poloidal locations to measure the edge neutral pressure and its dependence on the type of discharge (L-mode, H-mode, CHI) and the fueling method and location. The edge neutral pressure is also used as an input to the transport analysis codes TRANSP and DEGAS-2. The modified PDX-type Penning gauges are well suited for pressure measurements in the NSTX divertor where the toroidal field is relatively high. Behind the NSTX outer divertor plates where the field is lower, an unshielded fast ion gauge of a new design has been installed. This gauge was developed after laboratory testing of several different designs in a vacuum chamber with applied magnetic fields.

  18. Nonperturbative Regulator for Chiral Gauge Theories?

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Dorota M; Kaplan, David B

    2016-05-27

    We propose a nonperturbative gauge-invariant regulator for d-dimensional chiral gauge theories on the lattice. The method involves simulating domain wall fermions in d+1 dimensions with quantum gauge fields that reside on one d-dimensional surface and are extended into the bulk via gradient flow. The result is a theory of gauged fermions plus mirror fermions, where the mirror fermions couple to the gauge fields via a form factor that becomes exponentially soft with the separation between domain walls. The resultant theory has a local d-dimensional interpretation only if the chiral fermion representation is anomaly free. A physical realization of this construction would imply the existence of mirror fermions in the standard model that are invisible except for interactions induced by vacuum topology, and which could gravitate differently than conventional matter. PMID:27284646

  19. Gauge-Invariant Formulation of Circular Dichroism.

    PubMed

    Raimbault, Nathaniel; de Boeij, Paul L; Romaniello, Pina; Berger, J A

    2016-07-12

    Standard formulations of magnetic response properties, such as circular dichroism spectra, are plagued by gauge dependencies, which can lead to unphysical results. In this work, we present a general gauge-invariant and numerically efficient approach for the calculation of circular dichroism spectra from the current density. First we show that in this formulation the optical rotation tensor, the response function from which circular dichroism spectra can be obtained, is independent of the origin of the coordinate system. We then demonstrate that its trace is independent of the gauge origin of the vector potential. We also show how gauge invariance can be retained in practical calculations with finite basis sets. As an example, we explain how our method can be applied to time-dependent current-density-functional theory. Finally, we report gauge-invariant circular dichroism spectra obtained using the adiabatic local-density approximation. The circular dichroism spectra we thus obtain are in good agreement with experiment. PMID:27295541

  20. Flavor mixing in gauge-Higgs unification

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Y.; Kurahashi, N.; Lim, C. S.; Maru, N.; Tanabe, K.

    2012-07-27

    Gauge-Higgs unification is the fascinating scenario solving the hierarchy problem without supersymmetry. In this scenario, the Standard Model (SM) Higgs doublet is identified with extra component of the gauge field in higher dimensions and its mass becomes finite and stable under quantum corrections due to the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. On the other hand, Yukawa coupling is provided by the gauge coupling, which seems to mean that the flavor mixing and CP violation do not arise at it stands. In this talk, we discuss that the flavor mixing is originated from simultaneously non-diagonalizable bulk and brane mass matrices. Then, this mechanism is applied to various flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) processes via Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson exchange at tree level and constraints for compactification scale are obtained.

  1. Can (electric-magnetic) duality be gauged?

    SciTech Connect

    Bunster, Claudio; Henneaux, Marc

    2011-02-15

    There exists a formulation of the Maxwell theory in terms of two vector potentials, one electric and one magnetic. The action is then manifestly invariant under electric-magnetic duality transformations, which are rotations in the two-dimensional internal space of the two potentials, and local. We ask the question: Can duality be gauged? The only known and battle-tested method of accomplishing the gauging is the Noether procedure. In its decanted form, it amounts to turning on the coupling by deforming the Abelian gauge group of the free theory, out of whose curvatures the action is built, into a non-Abelian group which becomes the gauge group of the resulting theory. In this article, we show that the method cannot be successfully implemented for electric-magnetic duality. We thus conclude that, unless a radically new idea is introduced, electric-magnetic duality cannot be gauged. The implication of this result for supergravity is briefly discussed.

  2. Symplectic gauge fields and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Asorey, M.; García-Álvarez, D.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of symplectic gauge fields provides a consistent framework for fundamental interactions based on spin-3 gauge fields. One remarkable property is that symplectic gauge fields only have minimal couplings with gravitational fields and not with any other field of the Standard Model. Interactions with ordinary matter and radiation can only arise from radiative corrections. In spite of the gauge nature of symplectic fields they acquire a mass by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism which generates Higgs-like mass terms where the gravitational field is playing the role of a Higgs field. Massive symplectic gauge fields weakly interacting with ordinary matter are natural candidates for the dark matter component of the Universe.

  3. On gauge independence for gauge models with soft breaking of BRST symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    A consistent quantum treatment of general gauge theories with an arbitrary gauge-fixing in the presence of soft breaking of the BRST symmetry in the field-antifield formalism is developed. It is based on a gauged (involving a field-dependent parameter) version of finite BRST transformations. The prescription allows one to restore the gauge-independence of the effective action at its extremals and therefore also that of the conventional S-matrix for a theory with BRST-breaking terms being additively introduced into a BRST-invariant action in order to achieve a consistency of the functional integral. We demonstrate the applicability of this prescription within the approach of functional renormalization group to the Yang-Mills and gravity theories. The Gribov-Zwanziger action and the refined Gribov-Zwanziger action for a many-parameter family of gauges, including the Coulomb, axial and covariant gauges, are derived perturbatively on the basis of finite gauged BRST transformations starting from Landau gauge. It is proved that gauge theories with soft breaking of BRST symmetry can be made consistent if the transformed BRST-breaking terms satisfy the same soft BRST symmetry breaking condition in the resulting gauge as the untransformed ones in the initial gauge, and also without this requirement.

  4. Topological Quantum Phase Transition in Synthetic Non-Abelian Gauge Potential: Gauge Invariance and Experimental Detections

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fadi; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Ye, Jinwu; Fan, Heng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The method of synthetic gauge potentials opens up a new avenue for our understanding and discovering novel quantum states of matter. We investigate the topological quantum phase transition of Fermi gases trapped in a honeycomb lattice in the presence of a synthetic non-Abelian gauge potential. We develop a systematic fermionic effective field theory to describe a topological quantum phase transition tuned by the non-Abelian gauge potential and explore its various important experimental consequences. Numerical calculations on lattice scales are performed to compare with the results achieved by the fermionic effective field theory. Several possible experimental detection methods of topological quantum phase transition are proposed. In contrast to condensed matter experiments where only gauge invariant quantities can be measured, both gauge invariant and non-gauge invariant quantities can be measured by experimentally generating various non-Abelian gauges corresponding to the same set of Wilson loops. PMID:23846153

  5. The (IR-)relevance of the Gribov ambiguity in SU(2)×U(1) gauge theories with fundamental Higgs matter

    SciTech Connect

    Capri, M.A.L.; Dudal, D.; Guimaraes, M.S.; Justo, I.F.; Sorella, S.P.; and others

    2014-04-15

    It is well accepted that dealing with the Gribov ambiguity has a major impact on correlation functions in gauge-fixed Yang–Mills theories, in particular in the low momentum regime where standard perturbation theory based on the Faddeev–Popov approach fails. Recent results, derived from functional tools (Dyson–Schwinger equations or exact RG) or the effective Gribov–Zwanziger action method, pointed towards e.g. gauge boson correlation functions that are not compatible with the properties of observable degrees of freedom. Although such an observation is a welcome feature for gauge theories exhibiting confinement, it would be a discomfort for gauge theories supplemented with Higgs fields, cf. the experimental success of the electroweak model based on a SU(2)×U(1) gauge group. The purpose of this short note is to assure that the effective action resolution to the Gribov ambiguity reduces to the standard Faddeev–Popov method in the perturbative regime of sufficiently small coupling/large Higgs condensate, thereby not compromising the physical particle spectrum of massive gauge bosons and a massless photon for the SU(2)×U(1) gauge–Higgs model. The closer the theory gets to the limit of vanishing Higgs condensate, the more the Gribov problem resurfaces with all its consequences. We give some speculations w.r.t. the Fradkin–Shenker insights about the phase diagram. -- Highlights: •Gribov horizon influences gauge propagators in a strong-coupling regime. •No influence of Gribov horizon in weak-coupling. •Inclusion of U(1) factor leads to very rich behavior of propagators.

  6. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: comparison of 22-gauge and 25-gauge Whitacre needles with 26-gauge Quincke needles.

    PubMed

    Shutt, L E; Valentine, S J; Wee, M Y; Page, R J; Prosser, A; Thomas, T A

    1992-12-01

    We have studied 150 women undergoing elective Caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. They were allocated randomly to have a 22-gauge Whitacre, a 25-gauge Whitacre or a 26-gauge Quincke needle inserted into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The groups were compared for ease of insertion, number of attempted needle insertions before identification of cerebrospinal fluid, quality of subsequent analgesia and incidence of postoperative complications. There were differences between groups, but they did not reach statistical significance. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) was experienced by one mother in the 22-gauge Whitacre group, none in the 25-gauge Whitacre group and five in the 26-gauge Quincke group. Five of the six PDPH occurred after a single successful needle insertion. Seven of the 15 mothers in whom more than two needle insertions were made experienced backache, compared with 12 of the 129 receiving two or less (P < 0.001). We conclude that the use of 22- and 25-gauge Whitacre needles in elective Caesarean section patients is associated with a low incidence of PDPH and that postoperative backache is more likely when more than two attempts are made to insert a spinal needle.

  7. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: comparison of 22-gauge and 25-gauge Whitacre needles with 26-gauge Quincke needles.

    PubMed

    Shutt, L E; Valentine, S J; Wee, M Y; Page, R J; Prosser, A; Thomas, T A

    1992-12-01

    We have studied 150 women undergoing elective Caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. They were allocated randomly to have a 22-gauge Whitacre, a 25-gauge Whitacre or a 26-gauge Quincke needle inserted into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The groups were compared for ease of insertion, number of attempted needle insertions before identification of cerebrospinal fluid, quality of subsequent analgesia and incidence of postoperative complications. There were differences between groups, but they did not reach statistical significance. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) was experienced by one mother in the 22-gauge Whitacre group, none in the 25-gauge Whitacre group and five in the 26-gauge Quincke group. Five of the six PDPH occurred after a single successful needle insertion. Seven of the 15 mothers in whom more than two needle insertions were made experienced backache, compared with 12 of the 129 receiving two or less (P < 0.001). We conclude that the use of 22- and 25-gauge Whitacre needles in elective Caesarean section patients is associated with a low incidence of PDPH and that postoperative backache is more likely when more than two attempts are made to insert a spinal needle. PMID:1467102

  8. 49 CFR 230.42 - Location of gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.42 Location of gauges. Every boiler shall have at least one steam gauge which...

  9. 49 CFR 230.42 - Location of gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.42 Location of gauges. Every boiler shall have at least one steam gauge which...

  10. 49 CFR 230.42 - Location of gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.42 Location of gauges. Every boiler shall have at least one steam gauge which...

  11. 49 CFR 230.42 - Location of gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.42 Location of gauges. Every boiler shall have at least one steam gauge which...

  12. 49 CFR 230.42 - Location of gauges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Gauges § 230.42 Location of gauges. Every boiler shall have at least one steam gauge which...

  13. Non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    Building a universal quantum computer is a central goal of emerging quantum technologies, which has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Unfortunately, this future does not seem to be very close at hand. However, quantum computers built for a special purpose, i.e. quantum simulators , are currently developed in many leading laboratories. Many schemes for quantum simulation have been proposed and realized using, e.g., ultracold atoms in optical lattices, ultracold trapped ions, atoms in arrays of cavities, atoms/ions in arrays of traps, quantum dots, photonic networks, or superconducting circuits. The progress in experimental implementations is more than spectacular. Particularly interesting are those systems that simulate quantum matter evolving in the presence of gauge fields. In the quantum simulation framework, the generated (synthetic) gauge fields may be Abelian, in which case they are the direct analogues of the vector potentials commonly associated with magnetic fields. In condensed matter physics, strong magnetic fields lead to a plethora of fascinating phenomena, among which the most paradigmatic is perhaps the quantum Hall effect. The standard Hall effect consists in the appearance of a transverse current, when a longitudinal voltage difference is applied to a conducting sample. For quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors at low temperatures placed in very strong magnetic fields, the transverse conductivity, the ratio between the transverse current and the applied voltage, exhibits perfect and robust quantization, independent for instance of the material or of its geometry. Such an integer quantum Hall effect, is now understood as a deep consequence of underlying topological order. Although such a system is an insulator in the bulk, it supports topologically robust edge excitations which carry the Hall current. The robustness of these chiral excitations against backscattering explains the universality of the quantum Hall effect. Another

  14. Maxwell superalgebra and superparticles in constant gauge backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Bonanos, Sotirios; Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Lukierski, Jerzy

    2010-03-01

    We present the Maxwell superalgebra, an N=1, D=4 algebra with two Majorana supercharges, obtained as the minimal enlargement of a Poincaré superalgebra containing the Maxwell algebra as a subalgebra. The new superalgebra describes the supersymmetries of generalized N=1, D=4 superspace in the presence of a constant Abelian supersymmetric field strength background. Applying the techniques of nonlinear coset realization to the Maxwell supergroup we propose a new kappa-invariant massless superparticle model providing a dynamical realization of the Maxwell superalgebra.

  15. Unifying Geometrical Representations of Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsid, Scott; Serna, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We unify three approaches within the vast body of gauge-theory research that have independently developed distinct representations of a geometrical surface-like structure underlying the vector-potential. The three approaches that we unify are: those who use the compactified dimensions of Kaluza-Klein theory, those who use Grassmannian models (also called gauge theory embedding or models) to represent gauge fields, and those who use a hidden spatial metric to replace the gauge fields. In this paper we identify a correspondence between the geometrical representations of the three schools. Each school was mostly independently developed, does not compete with other schools, and attempts to isolate the gauge-invariant geometrical surface-like structures that are responsible for the resulting physics. By providing a mapping between geometrical representations, we hope physicists can now isolate representation-dependent physics from gauge-invariant physical results and share results between each school. We provide visual examples of the geometrical relationships between each school for electric and magnetic fields. We highlight a first new result: in all three representations a static electric field (electric field from a fixed ring of charge or a sphere of charge) has a hidden gauge-invariant time dependent surface that is underlying the vector potential.

  16. Gauge Factor and Stretchability of Silicon-on-Polymer Strain Gauges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shixuan; Lu, Nanshu

    2013-01-01

    Strain gauges are widely applied to measure mechanical deformation of structures and specimens. While metallic foil gauges usually have a gauge factor slightly over 2, single crystalline silicon demonstrates intrinsic gauge factors as high as 200. Although silicon is an intrinsically stiff and brittle material, flexible and even stretchable strain gauges have been achieved by integrating thin silicon strips on soft and deformable polymer substrates. To achieve a fundamental understanding of the large variance in gauge factor and stretchability of reported flexible/stretchable silicon-on-polymer strain gauges, finite element and analytically models are established to reveal the effects of the length of the silicon strip, and the thickness and modulus of the polymer substrate. Analytical results for two limiting cases, i.e., infinitely thick substrate and infinitely long strip, have found good agreement with FEM results. We have discovered that strains in silicon resistor can vary by orders of magnitude with different substrate materials whereas strip length or substrate thickness only affects the strain level mildly. While the average strain in silicon reflects the gauge factor, the maximum strain in silicon governs the stretchability of the system. The tradeoff between gauge factor and stretchability of silicon-on-polymer strain gauges has been proposed and discussed. PMID:23881128

  17. Toward the camera rain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamano, P.; Croci, A.; Laio, F.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel technique based on the quantitative detection of rain intensity from images, i.e., from pictures taken in rainy conditions. The method is fully analytical and based on the fundamentals of camera optics. A rigorous statistical framing of the technique allows one to obtain the rain rate estimates in terms of expected values and associated uncertainty. We show that the method can be profitably applied to real rain events, and we obtain promising results with errors of the order of ±25%. A precise quantification of the method's accuracy will require a more systematic and long-term comparison with benchmark measures. The significant step forward with respect to standard rain gauges resides in the possibility to retrieve measures at very high temporal resolution (e.g., 30 measures per minute) at a very low cost. Perspective applications include the possibility to dramatically increase the spatial density of rain observations by exporting the technique to crowdsourced pictures of rain acquired with cameras and smartphones.

  18. Gauge equivalence in two-dimensional gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, T. ); Igarashi, Y. ); Kubo, J. ); Tabei, T. )

    1993-08-15

    Two-dimensional quantum gravity is identified as a second-class system which we convert into a first-class system via the Batalin-Fradkin (BF) procedure. Using the extended phase space method, we then formulate the theory in the most general class of gauges. The conformal gauge action suggested by David, Distler, and Kawai is derived from first principles. We find a local, light-cone gauge action whose Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin invariance implies Polyakov's curvature equation [partial derivative][sub [minus

  19. Origin of gauge invariance in string theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    A first quantization of the space-time embedding Chi exp mu and the world-sheet metric rho of the open bosonic string. The world-sheet metric rho decouples from S-matrix elements in 26 dimensions. This formulation of the theory naturally includes 26-dimensional gauge transformations. The gauge invariance of S-matrix elements is a direct consequence of the decoupling of rho. Second quantization leads to a string field Phi(Chi exp mu, rho) with a gauge-covariant equation of motion.

  20. Dark matter and strong electroweak phase transition in a radiative neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah E-mail: snasri@uaeu.ac.ae

    2013-07-01

    We consider an extension of the standard model (SM) with charged singlet scalars and right handed (RH) neutrinos all at the electroweak scale. In this model, the neutrino masses are generated at three loops, which provide an explanation for their smallness, and the lightest RH neutrino, N{sub 1}, is a dark matter candidate. We find that for three generations of RH neutrinos, the model can be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, lepton flavor violating processes, N{sub 1} can have a relic density in agreement with the recent Planck data, and the electroweak phase transition can be strongly first order. We also show that the charged scalars may enhance the branching ratio h→γγ, where as h→γZ get can get few percent suppression. We also discuss the phenomenological implications of the RH neutrinos at the collider.