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Sample records for cosmetics

  1. Cosmetics

    MedlinePlus

    Cosmetics are products you apply to your body to clean it, make it more attractive, or change ... include Hair dyes Makeup Perfumes Skin-care creams Cosmetics that treat or prevent diseases are also drugs. ...

  2. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  3. Cosmetic Dentistry

    MedlinePlus

    If you have stained, broken or uneven teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help. Cosmetic dentistry is different from orthodontic treatment, which can straighten your teeth with braces or other devices. Cosmetic dental procedures include Bleaching to make teeth whiter ...

  4. Cosmetic Dentistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Cosmetic Dentistry? Article Chapters What Is Cosmetic Dentistry? print ... namespace> What should I look for in a cosmetic dentist? In order to make sure your dentist ...

  5. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... image Body image and your kids Cosmetic surgery Eating disorders Pregnancy and body image Subscribe to Body Image ... Association of America http://www.adaa.org National Eating Disorders Association National Institute of Mental Health Information Center, ...

  6. Nail cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Madnani, Nina A; Khan, Kaleem J

    2012-01-01

    The nail as an anatomic structure protects the terminal phalanx of the digit from injury. Historically, it has served as a tool for protection and for survival. As civilizations developed, it attained the additional function of adornment. Nail beautification is a big industry today, with various nail cosmetics available, ranging from nail hardeners, polishes, extensions, artificial/sculpted nails, and nail decorations. Adverse events may occur either during the nail-grooming procedure or as a reaction to the individual components of the nail cosmetics. This holds true for both the client and the nail technician. Typically, any of the procedures involves several steps and a series of products. Separate "nail-bars" have been set up dedicated to serve women and men interested in nail beautification. This article attempts to comprehensively inform and educate the dermatologist on the services offered, the products used, and the possible/potential adverse effects related to nail-grooming and nail cosmetics.

  7. Cosmetics and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... general safety information. On This Page: What the Law Says About Cosmetic Safety How FDA Monitors Cosmetic ... That Are Not Cosmetics More Resources What the Law Says About Cosmetic Safety It’s important to know ...

  8. [Cosmetic radiofrequency].

    PubMed

    Huth, J

    2010-01-01

    Cosmetic radio frequency uses an electric current of high frequency that generates heat through the subcutaneous tissues enough to break the collagen fibers and allow synthesis of a neo-collagen. It permits cutaneous resurfacing, improving the tone and quality of the skin (wrinkles and enlarged pores), and delicately reshaping facial volumes. The principle of a type Ellman monopolar radiofrequency at a rate of 4 MHz Pellevé, Surgitron Dual RF S 5 is described. Its use inclines more towards anti-aging and natural rejuvenation of the face, neck and neckline. It may be associated with other rejuvenation techniques such as fillers and botulinum toxin within certain time limits.

  9. Cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christopher J; Tatum, Sherard A

    2006-08-01

    Patients seeking the expertise of facial plastic surgeons for facial aesthetic improvement may also desire or benefit from dental aesthetic procedures. This paper reviews current treatment options available in cosmetic dentistry. Many techniques exist to improve dental aesthetics in color, position, shape, size, alignment and overall smile appearance. Although orthodontic therapy is still an important modality for smile aesthetics, some simpler procedures can provide acceptable aesthetic results. Comparison of external dental bleaching techniques reveals similar long-term results for in-office and at-home bleaching; in-office treatments, however, may provide the benefit of faster results. Internal dental bleaching is an effective method for correcting nonvital teeth coloration. Enamel shaping via either direct tooth contouring or the application of resins or veneers to tooth surfaces can correct defects, asymmetries and shape or rotation problems. Veneers or crowns are also options to correct intrinsic dental stains not amenable to bleaching techniques. Treatments to refine gingival margins and borders are another proven beneficial cosmetic procedure. A myriad of techniques exist to correct a patient's particular concerns. Correction of discoloration is usually feasible as is the improvement of a patient's smile and overall dental aesthetics.

  10. Eye Cosmetic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... when they are new. FDA has an Import Alert in effect for cosmetics -- including eye cosmetics -- contaminated ... in the area of the eye. An import alert for cosmetics containing illegal colors lists several eye ...

  11. Hair cosmetics.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, M N

    1987-07-01

    Porosity, elasticity, and texture influence the hair's ability to be changed. The types of color--temporary, gradual, natural, semipermanent, and permanent--depend upon the size of the "coloring" molecule to determine whether they penetrate the cortex (permanent) or precipitate on the cuticle. Different types of hair--thick or coarse, fine or thin--have varying affinity for different products and coloring/waving methods. Damaged hair is treated differently from hair with healthy, less porous shafts. Because so many people have color-treated hair today, dermatologists should be aware of all the latest changes and improvements, in order to assist patients with damaged or congenitally deformed hair. Acid-based permanents are becoming the most commonly used. Daily care with shampooing and conditioning has attained its most sophisticated level with the use of anionic and cationic surfactants in all hair-care products. It is also important for the dermatologist to be aware of what help is available for his or her patients. Cosmetic companies are eager to help any patient with severe problems with texture, dullness, over-fine or congenitally defective hair. The physician should send the patient with a severe problem directly to the nearest company headquarters or major city office to have a hair analysis, and receive suggestions from the experts of that company. For patients with moderate to mild problems, the dermatologist should be able to recommend three or four good salons in the local area with which he or she is familiar. Our main goal as physicians is to take care of the entire patient and to enable him or her to have a good self-image.

  12. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  13. Concerns about cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at some ethical challenges in cosmetic surgery. Enhancement versus therapy, risks, patient autonomy, beneficence and informed consent are issues that need to be considered when considering cosmetic surgery in today's world.

  14. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  15. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Otoplasty — also known as cosmetic ear surgery — is a procedure to change the ... Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Cosmetic-Procedures/Ear-Surgery.html. Accessed June 16, 2015. ...

  16. Fragrances in Cosmetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... person more attractive, it’s a cosmetic under the law. Here are some examples of fragrance products that ... of use are treated as drugs under the law, or sometimes as both cosmetics and drugs. Here ...

  17. Lipopeptides in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Kanlayavattanakul, M; Lourith, N

    2010-02-01

    Lipopeptides are biosurfactants extensively used in cosmetics. The consumption of cosmetics containing lipopeptides is increasing as a result of the exceptional surface properties and diverse biological activities of lipopeptides which facilitate a vast number of applications not only in the pharmaceutics industry which includes cosmetics but also in the food industry. Cosmetics containing lipopeptides are available in various dosage forms according to their beneficial surface properties, which include anti-wrinkle and moisturizing activities and cleansing cosmetics. The microbial production of lipopeptides particularly those with biological and surface activities applicable to cosmetics are summarized based on appropriate studies and patents up to the year 2008 to manage the information and sufficiently review the data.

  18. Aging and cosmetic enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Roberta; Castle, David J

    2006-01-01

    Obsession with a youthful appearance has become commonplace in modern society and has resulted in an upswing in cosmetic procedures trying to reverse the aging process. We selectively review the literature on aging and cosmetic surgery, with particular regard for the aging face. We pay attention to psychosocial aspects of response to such cosmetic procedures, both in terms of outcome and with respect to risk factors for a poor outcome. PMID:18044108

  19. Nanotechnology in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Katz, Linda M; Dewan, Kapal; Bronaugh, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Nanomaterials are being used in cosmetic products for various effects. However, their use also raises potential safety concerns. Some of these concerns can be addressed by determining the type of nanomaterials used, as well as stability, potential for skin absorption, route of exposure, and how they are formulated in cosmetic products. There has been considerable effort internationally to harmonize approaches in order to address definitional issues and safety concerns related to the use of nanomaterials in cosmetic products. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Bad Reaction to Cosmetics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bad Reaction to Cosmetics? Tell FDA Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... M.D., director of the agency’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors. “So, consumers are one of FDA’s ...

  1. [Acute intoxication by cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Larcan, A; Lambert, H; Laprevote-Heully, M C; Nida, F

    1975-01-01

    Intoxications due to cosmetics are of various types, but certain substances may be particularly harmful, especially when the constituants include acetone, boric acid and borates, ethyl alcohol, bromates, formol, methyl alcohol, propylene glycol, thallium, thioglycolate.. Every cosmetic substance may induce accidental intoxications. Most often, fluid cosmetics are absorbed either by children or by feeble-minded subjects. In all intoxication, one must take account of the age and weight of the patient, of the quantity absorbed, of the toxicity and of the constituants of the substance.

  2. Hair Cosmetics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzoni Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis

    2015-01-01

    Hair cosmetics are an important tool that helps to increase patient's adhesion to alopecia and scalp treatments. This article reviews the formulations and the mode of action of hair cosmetics: Shampoos, conditioners, hair straightening products, hair dyes and henna; regarding their prescription and safetiness. The dermatologist's knowledge of hair care products, their use, and their possible side effects can extend to an understanding of cosmetic resources and help dermatologists to better treat hair and scalp conditions according to the diversity of hair types and ethnicity. PMID:25878443

  3. Cosmetic or esthetic dentistry?

    PubMed

    Touyz, L Z; Raviv, E; Harel-Raviv, M

    1999-04-01

    This article, through presentation of case studies, defines differences and suggests separate definitions for the terms cosmetic dentistry and esthetic dentistry. Dentistry strives to emulate harmonious form and function for therapy, and modification of appearance is an integral part of dental treatment. Cosmetic dentistry suggests a certain accommodation and is a compromise of current technology. Cosmetic dentistry is commonly selected as an interim procedure that does not necessarily function ideally and does not always emulate the pristine state of a natural dentition. Esthetic dentistry requires less accommodation, incorporates acceptable biologic technology for long-term survival, functions suitably, and mimics the pristine state of the natural dentition. Cosmetic and esthetic dentistry are different in definition, concept, and execution.

  4. [INABILITY TO TOLERATE COSMETICS].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2016-05-01

    Inability to tolerate cosmetics can result from distinct mechanisms which appear as the so-called sensitive skin corresponding to one aspect of invisible dermatosis, or which corresponds to manifestations of a contact allergic or irritation dermatitis.

  5. Non-comedogenic cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J E; Bradley, S; Aqundez, A; Black, T

    1976-02-01

    The need for a "comedogenic-free" cosmetic for acne patients led to this study using the only available mode, the rabbit. To facilitate the formulation of this benign cover-up, a range of cosmetics and ingredients was tested. Many cosmetics, fractions, and modifications of lanolins were comedogenic, as were emulsifiers such as butyl sterate, isopropyl myristate and sodium lauryl sulfate. From this data we incorporated non-comedogenic, into an acceptable cosmetic formulation for patients. The use of this formulation in susceptible acne-prone women reduced the rate of "acne cosmetica" in our clinic patients from 25% to less than 5%. We were unable to confirm a recent study suggesting that sulfur was a potent acnegen.

  6. Nanotechnology in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Howard A

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a subject of extensive global interest. The ability to control matter at the nanoscale level presents a revolutionary opportunity to benefit society in numerous disciplines. Nanotechnology is currently found in cosmetic products, particularly sunscreen products containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Published information in scientific journals suggests that nano-sized ingredients used in cosmetic products pose no more risk to human health than larger sized counterparts. The issue remains under investigation.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Zippin, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products is an increasing concern given the continual creation and introduction of new cosmetics to the public. This article presents an overview of how to evaluate a patient for patch testing, including common areas for cosmetic-induced dermatitis, common cosmetic allergens, and proper management.

  8. Microbiological analysis of cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Cosmetics are products of chemical or natural origin dedicated specifically for use in skin and mucosa. The constant development of the cosmetic industry has generated the necessity to carry out microbiological analysis on the raw materials used in the industrial production of cosmetics as well as the final products, with the purpose of obtaining products of good microbiological quality. Cosmetic products are recognized to be substrates for the survival and development of a large variety of microorganisms, since they possess some of the nutrients that facilitate growth such as: lipids, polysaccharides, alcohol, proteins, amino acids, glucosides, esteroids, peptides, and vitamins. Also, the conditions of readiness (oxygenation, pH, temperature, osmotic degree, superficial activity, perfume, and essential oils) present in the cosmetic products favor microbial multiplication. Routine analyses to determine the microbiological quality of a cosmetic product include the following: Count of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms. Most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms. Count of molds and yeasts. Absence/presence of Staphylococcus aureus probe. Absence/presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa probe.

  9. Hair cosmetics: dyes.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Tapia, A; Gonzalez-Guerra, E

    2014-11-01

    Hair plays a significant role in body image, and its appearance can be changed relatively easily without resort to surgical procedures. Cosmetics and techniques have therefore been used to change hair appearance since time immemorial. The cosmetics industry has developed efficient products that can be used on healthy hair or act on concomitant diseases of the hair and scalp. Dyes embellish the hair by bleaching or coloring it briefly, for temporary periods of longer duration, or permanently, depending on the composition of a dye (oxidative or nonoxidative) and its degree of penetration of the hair shaft. The dermatologist's knowledge of dyes, their use, and their possible side effects (contact eczema, cancer, increased porosity, brittleness) can extend to an understanding of cosmetic resources that also treat hair and scalp conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Mauro; Delbon, Paola; Conti, Adelaide; Capasso, Emanuele; Niola, Massimo; Bin, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB) was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery. PMID:28352816

  11. Self-preserving cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Varvaresou, A; Papageorgiou, S; Tsirivas, E; Protopapa, E; Kintziou, H; Kefala, V; Demetzos, C

    2009-06-01

    Preservatives are added to products for two reasons: first, to prevent microbial spoilage and therefore to prolong the shelf life of the product; second, to protect the consumer from a potential infection. Although chemical preservatives prevent microbial growth, their safety is questioned by a growing segment of consumers. Therefore, there is a considerable interest in the development of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics. In these formulations traditional/chemical preservatives have been replaced by other cosmetic ingredients with antimicrobial properties that are not legislated as preservatives according to the Annex VI of the Commission Directive 76/768/EEC and the amending directives (2003/15/EC, 2007/17/EC and 2007/22/EC). 'Hurdle Technology', a technology that has been used for the control of product safety in the food industry since 1970s, has also been applied for the production of self-preserving cosmetics. 'Hurdle Technology' is a term used to describe the intelligent combination of different preservation factors or hurdles to deteriorate the growth of microorganisms. Adherence to current good manufacturing practice, appropriate packaging, careful choice of the form of the emulsion, low water activity and low or high pH values are significant variables for the control of microbial growth in cosmetic formulations. This paper describes the application of the basic principles of 'Hurdle Technology' in the production of self-preserving cosmetics. Multifunctional antimicrobial ingredients and plant-derived essential oils and extracts that are used as alternative or natural preservatives and are not listed in Annex VI of the Cosmetic Directive are also reported.

  12. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. [Cosmetic treatments and acne].

    PubMed

    Poli, Florence

    2002-04-15

    Cosmetic products contribute to the efficacy of anti-acneic treatment. Cleaning bars without soap and lotions are to be preferred to soaps. Morning application of moisturizing creams compensate for dryness and irritation induced by topical treatment. Some of these cosmetic products may have a limited efficacy of the shiny appearance and/or acne lesions. Scrubs, abrasive sponges, masks and patches have a very limited usefulness. Make up and camouflage techniques are authorized, provided that the products have been tested non comedogenic and non acne-genic.

  14. Phototherapy in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Joshua; Wang, Stephanie; Tsoukas, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Light therapy has been incorporated into the art of healing and cosmesis for thousands of years and currently has found utility in many areas of medicine. Various modalities of cosmetic phototherapy are detailed, as well as the indications and mechanism of action for each modality. These modalities can be used to treat many common cosmetic conditions, including acne vulgaris, solar lentigo, and melasma. Phototherapy is considered a safe and effective option in the treatment of many of these disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cosmetics in acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Z D

    2001-09-01

    Cosmetics that are appropriate for use in patients with rosacea and acne must be noncomedogenic, nonacnegenic, nonirritating, and hypoallergenic. This requires a basic understanding of cosmetic fromulation and the selection of products that meet guidelines for sensitive skin.

  16. Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Hmong (Hmoob) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Chinese, Traditional ( ... English Whitening - Hmoob (Hmong) PDF California Dental Association Russian (Русский) Expand Section Cosmetic Dentistry: It can really ...

  17. Cosmetic Behavior Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, W. Paul

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the theoretical and practical applications of cosmetic behavior therapy in a private practice. Enhancement of physical appearance will frequently result in an enhancement of self-concept, and the client's attainment of physical attractiveness contributes to the probability of success in current culture. (Author/JAC)

  18. Cosmetic Behavior Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, W. Paul

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the theoretical and practical applications of cosmetic behavior therapy in a private practice. Enhancement of physical appearance will frequently result in an enhancement of self-concept, and the client's attainment of physical attractiveness contributes to the probability of success in current culture. (Author/JAC)

  19. Marketing the cosmetic dental practice.

    PubMed

    Levin, R P

    1997-01-01

    Marketing a cosmetic dental practice is a necessary element of patient education today. A professional relations coordinator is essential for developing integrated strategies that help patients understand the options available to them in cosmetic dentistry. Cosmetic dentistry is an evolving field that can be difficult for patients to fully understand. Only through patient education and marketing will dentists be able to expand their practices to include cosmetic dentistry.

  20. Allergy to selected cosmetic ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Adamczuk, Piotr; Wróblewska, Paula; Zwoliński, Jacek; Chmielewska-Badora, Jolanta; Krasowska, Ewelina; Galińska, Elżbieta M.; Cholewa, Grażyna; Piątek, Jacek; Koźlik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    In an era in which cosmetics are commonly used, their often prolonged contact with the human body should determine the safety of their use. Often cosmetics are the cause of many side effects, mainly hypersensitivity reactions. Common groups of cosmetic components responsible for side effects are fragrances, preservatives and dyes. This paper focuses on the most allergenic components. PMID:24353491

  1. Allergic contact dermatitis and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Shannon; Zippin, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a common dermatologic condition that can result from exposure to allergens at home or at work. Cosmetics represent a large diverse group of products that Americans apply to their skin to treat disease or enhance beauty. With increased use of cosmetics, the rate of sensitization to many allergenic components has increased. We review the more common allergens present in cosmetics as well as the types of cosmetics that are known to contain them. With proper education and patch testing, dermatologists will be able to identify contact allergies to cosmetic ingredients and help patients avoid the offending products.

  2. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  3. [Cosmetic eyelid surgery].

    PubMed

    Ruban, J-M; Barbier, J; Malet, T; Baggio, E

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetic eyelid surgery is becoming increasingly popular. It can rejuvenate the patient's appearance with relatively minor side effects. Its risk/benefit ratio is one of the best in facial cosmetic surgery. However, the patient does not always accurately assess the aesthetic appearance of his or her eyelids. This underscores the importance of clinical examination in order to determine the patient's wishes, and then make an accurate diagnosis and potential surgical plan. We currently oppose, in general, surgical techniques involving tissue removal (skin-muscle and/or fat) in favor of those involving tissue repositioning and grafting (autologous fat pearl transposition, obtained by liposuction, and lipostructure). Furthermore, the place of adjuvant therapies to blepharoplasty is steadily increasing. They mainly include surface treatments (peels and lasers), dermal fillers and anti-wrinkle botulinum toxin injections. They are also increasingly used in isolation in novel ways. In all cases, a perfect knowledge of anatomy and relevant skills and experience remain necessary.

  4. COSMETIC CAMOUFLAGE IN VITILIGO

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswari, K N

    2010-01-01

    Vitiligo is not a life–threatening nor a contagious disease. But the disfigurement of vitiligo can be devastating to its sufferers, especially dark-skinned individuals. Available treatment options are disappointing and sufferers often use various forms of camouflage. Remedial cosmetic cover creams help conceal the blemish of vitiligo at least temporarily. A high concentration of pigment is incorporated into water–free or anhydrous foundations to give a color that matches the patient’s skin, thereby concealing vitiligo patches. The article highlights the content and technique of application of these creams. PMID:21063508

  5. New and emerging cosmetic allergens.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rosie F; Johnston, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    Human skin is exposed to a large variety of cosmetic allergens. Most allergic contact dermatitis occurs after exposure to fragrance, preservatives, and hair dyes. Such reactions can often be occult. As a result, a high index of suspicion is needed in assessing the patient with facial or cosmetic dermatitis. This contribution looks at why such a large number of chemicals are in everyday usage, at how dermatologists monitor trends in allergy to cosmetics, and at a number of new and emerging allergens to consider in the assessment of suspected cosmetic allergy.

  6. Esthetic and cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto; Berger, Uwe; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy

    2008-01-01

    The field of esthetic and cosmetic dermatology has gained remarkable interest all over the world. The major advantage of recent years is the high scientific levels of the most significant new developments in techniques and pharmacotherapy and other nonsurgical approaches. The present paper reviews selected fields of interest under this view. Sexual hormones are involved in the aging process of men and women. Skin function, in particular the epidermal barrier, is affected by a loss of endocrine activity. Hormone replacement therapy has only recently been introduced in treatment of aging males. This is an area of gender-medicine in dermatology with a strong well-aging attempt. Botulinum toxin therapy for hyperfunctional lines has become not only well-established but evidence-based medicine on its highest level. Recent advantages were gained in objective evaluation and monitoring the effect. Digital imaging techniques with various facets have been introduced to assess the achievements of treatment in the most objective way. This may become an example for other techniques as peeling, laser therapy, or radiofrequency in esthetic and cosmetic dermatology. Botulinum toxin has become a valuable tool for brow lifts. Details of the technique are discussed. Cellulite is a strongly female gender-related condition. During the past decades numerous treatments had been recommended but only recently a more critical scientific approach led to improvements in therapy of this common and disfiguring condition. Three major approaches are developed: (a) skin loosing with techniques such as subcision, (b) skin tightening with radiofrequency and other approaches, and (c) improving circulation in blood and lymphatic microvasculature using both physical treatments and pharmacotherapy. The last two chapters are devoted to body sculpturing by lipotransfer and lipolysis. Lipotransfer for facial or body sculpturing has a history of about 100 years. Nevertheless, recently the role of adult stem

  7. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal complaints. Nasal deformity can be categorized as “cosmetic” or “functional.” Cosmetic deformity of the nose results in a less ... taste , nose bleeds and/or recurrent sinusitis . A cosmetic or functional nasal deformity may occur secondary to ...

  8. Anesthesia for cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Taub, Peter J; Bashey, Sameer; Hausman, Laurence M

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of plastic surgery procedures are performed in diverse environments, including traditional hospital operating rooms, outpatient surgery centers, and private offices. Just as plastic surgeons develop areas of specialization to better care for their patients, anesthesiologists have specialized in outpatient plastic surgery, both cosmetic and reconstructive. The methods they utilize are similar to those for other procedures but incorporate specific techniques that aim to better relieve preoperative anxiety, induce and awaken patients more smoothly, and minimize postoperative sequelae of anesthesia such as nausea and vomiting. It is important for plastic surgeons to understand these techniques since they are the ones who are ultimately responsible for their patients' care and are frequently called on to employ anesthesiologists for their practices, surgery centers, and hospitals. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients and the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia.

  9. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations.

  10. Cosmetic surgery and conscientious objection.

    PubMed

    Minerva, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, I analyse the issue of conscientious objection in relation to cosmetic surgery. I consider cases of doctors who might refuse to perform a cosmetic treatment because: (1) the treatment aims at achieving a goal which is not in the traditional scope of cosmetic surgery; (2) the motivation of the patient to undergo the surgery is considered trivial; (3) the patient wants to use the surgery to promote moral or political values that conflict with the doctor's ones; (4) the patient requires an intervention that would benefit himself/herself, but could damage society at large.

  11. The teratology testing of cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Spézia, François; Barrow, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, the developmental toxicity testing (including teratogenicity) of new cosmetic ingredients is performed according to the Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC: only alternatives leading to full replacement of animal experiments should be used. This chapter presents the three scientifically validated animal alternative methods for the assessment of embryotoxicity: the embryonic stem cell test (EST), the micromass (MM) assay, and the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

  12. Cosmetic procedures in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Chiarini, Luigi; Bertossi, Dario

    2011-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery produces cosmetic and functional effects, and patients should be evaluated for additional cosmetic improvements beyond those possible with orthognathic surgery. Soft tissue procedures can be performed on an outpatient basis in an office environment and can be combined with orthognathics and delayed in a second stage. Systematic accurate facial evaluation is necessary to focus on cosmetic soft tissue problems. Features that make the patient look unattractive, old, tired, out of shape, weak, or sad must be identified by accurate clinical analysis and 3-dimensional planning. Then it will be possible to select the treatment plan according to the patient's input, prioritizing the additional cosmetic improvements that can be added to primary surgery. It is particularly important to review the results and the patient's satisfaction by clinical examination, a questionnaire, and with 3-dimensional pictures, and to understand if the treatment options have been accurately chosen and their lasting effect on follow-up. The treatment sequence is analyzed, and if there are residual defects, a secondary cosmetic procedure can be planned to complete the result. The surgeon's goal must be the simultaneous treatment of malocclusions and facial esthetic disharmonies, and orthognathic surgical procedures and facial cosmetics must be performed simultaneously, if possible. Residual defects must be treated after at least 6 to 12 months. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cosmetic devices based on active transdermal technologies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica A; Banga, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    Active transdermal technology, commonly associated with drug delivery, has been used in recent years by the cosmetic industry for the aesthetic restoration of skin and delivery of cosmetic agents. In this article, we provide an overview of the skin's structure, various skin types, skin's self-repair mechanisms that are stimulated from the usage of cosmetic devices and discuss cosmetic applications. Summaries of the most common active transdermal technologies such as microneedles, iontophoresis, sonophoresis, lasers and microdermabrasion will be provided, in relation to the marketed cosmetic devices available that incorporate these technologies. Lastly, we cover combinations of active technologies that allow for more enhanced cosmetic results, and the current limitations of cosmetic devices.

  14. [Acne vulgaris. Role of cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Borelli, C; Schöllmann, C

    2010-02-01

    Appropriate cosmetics for skin cleansing are capable of contributing to a reduction of especially inflammatory lesions in acne-prone patients and to support pharmacological intervention in patients with manifest acne. Cleansing of acne-prone skin should employ acidified synthetic cleansers with a pH of 5.5 rather than soap. Furthermore, the ingredients of certain skin care products, i.e. nicotinamide, lactic acid, triethyl acetate/ethyllineolate, and prebiotic plant extracts, affect different mechanisms of acne pathogenesis and therefore may contribute to a decrease in acne lesions. At least some of these ingredients underscore the concept of evidence-based cosmetics. In contrast, the problem of acne lesions caused by comedogenic ingredients in cosmetics today is negligible.

  15. Biosurfactants in cosmetics and biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Varvaresou, A; Iakovou, K

    2015-09-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active biomolecules that are produced by various micro-organisms. They show unique properties i.e. lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility compared to their chemical counterparts. Glycolipids and lipopeptides have prompted application in biotechnology and cosmetics due to their multi-functional profile i.e. detergency, emulsifying, foaming and skin hydrating properties. Additionally, some of them can be served as antimicrobials. In this study the current status of research and development on rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, mannosyloerythritol lipids, trehalipids, xylolipids and lipopeptides particularly their commercial application in cosmetics and biopharmaceuticals, is described. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Female genital cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy; Lefebvre, Guylaine; Bouchard, Celine; Shapiro, Jodi; Blake, Jennifer; Allen, Lisa; Cassell, Krista; Leyland, Nicholas; Wolfman, Wendy; Allaire, Catherine; Awadalla, Alaa; Best, Carolyn; Dunn, Sheila; Heywood, Mark; Lemyre, Madeleine; Marcoux, Violaine; Menard, Chantal; Potestio, Frank; Rittenberg, David; Singh, Sukhbir; Shapiro, Jodi; Akhtar, Saima; Camire, Bruno; Christilaw, Jan; Corey, Julie; Nelson, Erin; Pierce, Marianne; Robertson, Deborah; Simmonds, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Objectif : Fournir aux gynécologues canadiens des directives factuelles en matière de chirurgie esthétique génitale chez la femme, en réponse au nombre grandissant de demandes (et d’interventions) de chirurgie vaginale et vulvaire se situant bien au-delà des reconstructions traditionnellement indiquées sur le plan médical. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2011 et en 2012 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (« female genital cosmetic surgery »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en mai 2012. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Recommandations 1. Un des rôles importants des obstétriciens-gynécologues devrait consister à aider les femmes à comprendre leur anatomie et à en respecter les variantes qui leur sont propres. (III-A) 2. Lorsqu’une femme demande la tenue d’interventions esthétiques vaginales, une anamnèse médicale, sexuelle et gynécologique exhaustive devrait être obtenue et l’absence de tout dysfonctionnement

  17. Cosmetics Safety Q&A: Shelf Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... page Labeling & Label Claims Potential Contaminants Products & Ingredients Product Testing Recalls & Alerts Resources for Consumers FDA Basics Cosmetics ... Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  18. FDA Suggests Limits on Lead in Cosmetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162726.html FDA Suggests Limits on Lead in Cosmetics Agency notes most products already below recommended level ... limit on how much lead can be in cosmetics ranging from lipstick and eye shadow to blush ...

  19. How Smart Are You About Cosmetics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... story + ' U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics and Colors ... hide --> U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics and Colors ...

  20. Colour legislation and cosmetics and toiletries.

    PubMed

    Foster, A

    1979-08-01

    Synopsis An historical reference is followed by a review of cosmetic colours' regulations based on the EEC Directive with particular reference to the U.K. Cosmetic Products Regulations and their effect on formulation.

  1. Lipogranuloma after facial cosmetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangfei; Chen, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Lipogranuloma is a rare inflammatory reactive process in the dermis and subcutis. We present a summary of the 6 cases of lipogranuloma after facial cosmetic procedures. We performed a retrospective review including patient demographic data, clinical symptoms, appearance on computed tomography, treatment, pathology results, and history of facial cosmetic procedures. In most cases, the nodules were painless and showed no significant growth. Computed tomography revealed ill-defined swellings in the buccal fat pad with heterogeneous density. Histopathological examinations revealed numerous variable-sized empty microcysts surrounded by abundant lymphocytes and foamy macrophages, the characteristic features of lipogranuloma. On further questioning, all of the patients revealed that they had undergone some form of facial cosmetic procedure in the preceding months to years. Among the 6 cases, facial autologous fat injection may have been the main cause of lipogranuloma. Lipogranulomas can develop months to years after facial cosmetic procedures distant from the injection sites. A thorough understanding of the patient's medical history and the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of lipogranuloma are necessary to make a definite diagnosis and allow appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Do underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Gikas, Panagiotis D; Mansfield, Lucy; Mokbel, Kefah

    2004-01-01

    Although animal and laboratory studies suggest a possible link between certain chemicals used in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer development, there is no reliable evidence that underarm cosmetics use increases breast cancer risk in humans. This article reviews the evidence for and against the possible link between breast cancer and underarm cosmetics and highlights the need for further research to clarify this issue.

  3. Camouflage Cosmetics in Dermatologic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Neil H.; Graff, Lee

    1987-01-01

    Psychological well-being is based on multiple factors, one of which is satisfaction with physical appearance. The use of cosmetics is helpful for many women, as has been shown in psychological studies and implied by market sales. People with obvious cutaneous defects (e.g., port-wine stains, pigmentary disorders) may suffer a range of distress reactions, including diminished self-esteem. Specially designed camouflage cosmetics are an ideal adjunct to other therapies for successful treatment of such skin conditions. New products are appealing because they are readily available, safe, and inexpensive. To enjoy optimum use of these products, patients should be assessed and advised in a professional setting. The results are extremely gratifying for both patients and physicians. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:21263958

  4. Nail cosmetics in nail disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorizzo, Matilde; Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Tosti, Antonella

    2007-03-01

    The clinical features of nail dystrophies depend on the part of the nail that has been damaged. Due to the important functions of fingernails and toenails, any abnormality of the nail causes impaired function of the hand or foot. Moreover, the aesthetic aspect of the nail may affect employability, self-esteem, and interaction with other people. Because the nails are often difficult to treat, cosmetology may be an effective support to medical treatment. Nail cosmetics may help the patient to cope with his or her nail dystrophy while waiting for treatment to show its efficacy. It may also be the only choice to hide nail dystrophy where the nail is irreversibly damaged. Nail cosmetics may also function at treatment for onychtillomania, nail biting, and nail ingrowing.

  5. Laser applications in cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toregard, B M

    1990-01-01

    The CO2-laser has proved to be an effective tool in the exciting field of cosmetic surgery. The ability to use the CO2-laserbeam either for vapourization or incision and its haemostatic effect makes it outstanding in many conditions in comparison with conventional methods. Teleangiectasias, portwine stains, decorative tattoos, scars, ageing skin and blepharoplasties are discussed. To obtain good results, experience, theoretical and practical understanding of the technique is a must, otherwise results will reflect poorly on the method.

  6. Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism.

    PubMed

    Klein, Holger J; Simic, Dario; Fuchs, Nina; Schweizer, Riccardo; Mehra, Tarun; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan A

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care. To investigate the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at our hospital as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, we retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. We reviewed medical records for patients' characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed. In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs. Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients' referral to secondary/tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. 4.

  7. Eye cosmetic usage and associated ocular comfort.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alison; Evans, Katharine; North, Rachel; Purslow, Christine

    2012-11-01

    Eye cosmetics usage is commonplace and whilst some products such as eyeliner are applied with close proximity to the ocular surface, there is little knowledge of the short- and long-term ocular effects of eye cosmetic formulations. This study aimed to investigate the use of eye cosmetics and identify any relationships between ocular comfort and cosmetic usage. Results were collated from an online survey comprising 23 questions that recorded demographics, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) score, extent and range of eye cosmetic use and perceived comfort differences with and without eye cosmetics. The 1360 female respondents (median age 25, interquartile range 20-34 years) completed the survey; 83% reported using eye cosmetics regularly (≥ 3 times per week) with mascara being most commonly used. Fifty three per cent used at least three different eye cosmetics products regularly. OSDI scores of cosmetics users were similar to non-users (p = 0.083), but perceived comfort was greater when cosmetics were not used (p < 0.001). In occasional cosmetics users (use of products < 3 times per week), 65% reported a reduction in comfort when cosmetics were used. Median OSDI scores suggested a trend towards reduced comfort amongst eyeliner users (p = 0.07) although frequency and type of cosmetic products used did not appear to influence OSDI scores. This study shows the use of multiple eye cosmetics is extensive and associated with the perception of ocular discomfort. With such widespread use of these products, more research is required to assess the effect on the ocular surface and tear film, which may be underestimated. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2012 The College of Optometrists.

  8. [Cosmetic colorants. Toxicology and regulation].

    PubMed

    Platzek, T; Krätke, R; Klein, G; Schulz, C

    2005-01-01

    Some recent publications raised concern over a possible link between hair dye use and the incidence of bladder tumours in a Californian population. The Scientific Committee for Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products intended for Consumers (SCCNFP) demanded the toxicological testing of all hair dyes used in Europe to exclude any risk. The EU commission initiated corresponding measures. Only safe hair dyes will be included on a positive list while all other hair dyes will be banned. The hair dye lawsone--the dyeing ingredient of henna--was evaluated by the SCCNFP as genotoxic but the BfR came to another conclusion. The regulation of both lawsone and henna remains an open question. Furthermore, some cosmetic colorants were critically discussed. The azo dyes CI 12150, CI 26100, CI 27290 and CI 20170 are allowed for use in cosmetics. On cleavage they form the carcinogenic aromatic amines o-anisidine, 4-aminoazobenzene and 2,4-xylidine, respectively. For three of these dyes the cleavage by human skin bacteria in vitro to the respective arylamine was shown experimentally. Further problems may arise from colorants used for tattoos and permanent makeup. These products up to now are not subject to legislation and there are no regulatory stipulations with respect to health safety and purity for colorants used for these purposes.

  9. Cosmetic surgery in Australia: a risky business?

    PubMed

    Parker, Rhian

    2007-08-01

    Cosmetic surgery is increasing in popularity in Australia and New Zealand, as it is across other Western countries. However, there is no systematic mechanism for gathering data about cosmetic surgery, nor about the outcomes of that surgery. This column argues that the business of cosmetic surgery in Australia has questionable marketing standards, is conducted with little scrutiny or accountability and offers patients imperfect knowledge about cosmetic procedures. It also argues that while medical practitioners debate among themselves over who should carry out cosmetic procedures, little attention has been paid to questionable advertising in the industry and even less to highlighting the real risks of undergoing cosmetic surgery. While consumers are led to believe that cosmetic surgery is accessible, affordable and safe, they are sheltered from the reality of invasive and risky surgery and from the ability to clearly discern that all cosmetic procedures carry risk. While doctors continue to undertake advertising and engage in a territorial war, they fail to address the really important issues in cosmetic surgery. These are: providing real evidence about what happens in the industry, developing stringent regulations under which the industry should operate and ensuring that all patients considering cosmetic surgery are fully informed as to the risks of that surgery.

  10. Cosmetic preservative labelling on the Thai market.

    PubMed

    Bunyavaree, Monthathip; Kasemsarn, Pranee; Boonchai, Waranya

    2016-04-01

    Preservatives are added to cosmetics and other consumer products to prevent microbial growth and product degradation. Many cosmetic preservatives are skin sensitizers and frequent causes of contact dermatitis. The use of preservatives may vary by country and/or region, according to legislation, and may be reflected in differences in the prevalence rates of preservative allergy worldwide. To examine the type and frequency of preservative use in cosmetics sold in Thai markets in metropolitan Bangkok, Thailand. Preservatives contained in 1000 different cosmetics sold in Thai markets were documented and analysed, based on the labelling of ingredients. Most of the cosmetic and skincare products sold in Thai markets were international brands, with only a small proportion of cosmetic products being produced in Thailand. International brand cosmetics were more likely to contain non-formaldehyde-releasing preservatives than domestically produced brands. Isothiazolinone-based preservatives, which are responsible for the current increase in the prevalence of contact allergy, were found at a significant frequency in domestically produced, leave-on cosmetic products. Preservatives in cosmetics were significantly different according to source of production and type of cosmetics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant.

  12. Dentistry between pathology and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2002-02-01

    In ancient and medieval times, the prevalence of caries and periodontal disease varied. There were no treatments for dental hard tissue, but dental cosmetics played an important role. In the late 19th century, caries levels reached a maximum in Europe and North America after refined sugar became a cheap staple food. Toothlessness became frequent even in young adults. Caries prevention, effective on a public health scale, began with the introduction of water fluoridation in the 1940s. By 1985, dental academia had acknowledged that substantial declines could also be obtained in entire populations through topical fluorides, mainly in toothpastes. While decreasing caries prevalence is irrefutable in affluent countries, the specific reasons of the decline are still a matter of debate. In countries where caries has declined substantially, activities of dentists are shifting towards cosmetic dentistry. However, caries continues to be a problem for the lower socioeconomic strata, even in affluent countries, and is a serious problem in developing countries. Thus, water fluoridation is still important, and salt fluoridation should be considered where water fluoridation is not feasible. Both measures are extremely cheap to implement. Controlled fluoridation has a great potential for developing countries and low social strata of affluent countries. Its reduced effectiveness in high socioeconomic strata of affluent countries, due to the widespread usage of fluoride in toothpastes and other oral care products, should not detract from the public health value of fluoridation.

  13. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  14. 21 CFR 700.11 - Cosmetics containing bithionol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cosmetics containing bithionol. 700.11 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.11 Cosmetics containing bithionol. (a) Bithionol has been used to some extent as an antibacterial agent in cosmetic preparations such as detergent...

  15. 21 CFR 700.11 - Cosmetics containing bithionol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cosmetics containing bithionol. 700.11 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.11 Cosmetics containing bithionol. (a) Bithionol has been used to some extent as an antibacterial agent in cosmetic preparations such as detergent...

  16. 21 CFR 700.11 - Cosmetics containing bithionol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cosmetics containing bithionol. 700.11 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.11 Cosmetics containing bithionol. (a) Bithionol has been used to some extent as an antibacterial agent in cosmetic preparations such as detergent...

  17. 21 CFR 700.11 - Cosmetics containing bithionol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Cosmetics containing bithionol. 700.11 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.11 Cosmetics containing bithionol. (a) Bithionol has been used to some extent as an antibacterial agent in cosmetic preparations such as detergent...

  18. 21 CFR 700.11 - Cosmetics containing bithionol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cosmetics containing bithionol. 700.11 Section 700...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.11 Cosmetics containing bithionol. (a) Bithionol has been used to some extent as an antibacterial agent in cosmetic preparations such as detergent...

  19. 21 CFR 700.35 - Cosmetics containing sunscreen ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Cosmetics containing sunscreen ingredients. 700.35... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.35 Cosmetics containing... protect the color of the product). To avoid consumer misunderstanding, if a cosmetic product contains...

  20. Metals in cosmetics: implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Sylwia; Brzóska, Malgorzata M

    2015-06-01

    Cosmetics, preparations repeatedly applied directly to the human skin, mucous membranes, hair and nails, should be safe for health, however, recently there has been increasing concern about their safety. Unfortunately, using these products in some cases is related to the occurrence of unfavourable effects resulting from intentional or the accidental presence of chemical substances, including toxic metals. Heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and nickel, as well as aluminium, classified as a light metal, are detected in various types of cosmetics (colour cosmetics, face and body care products, hair cosmetics, herbal cosmetics, etc.). In addition, necessary, but harmful when they occur in excessive amounts, elements such as copper, iron, chromium and cobalt are also present in cosmetic products. Metals occurring in cosmetics may undergo retention and act directly in the skin or be absorbed through the skin into the blood, accumulate in the body and exert toxic effects in various organs. Some cases of topical (mainly allergic contact dermatitis) and systemic effects owing to exposure to metals present in cosmetics have been reported. Literature data show that in commercially available cosmetics toxic metals may be present in amounts creating a danger to human health. Thus, the present review article focused on the problems related to the presence of heavy metals and aluminium in cosmetics, including their sources, concentrations and law regulations as well as danger for the health of these products users. Owing to the growing usage of cosmetics it is necessary to pay special attention to these problems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cosmetics for the eye area after cosmetic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ogden-West, N

    1999-01-01

    Cosmetic enhancement of the eye area after esthetic surgery allows the patient to get back into the mainstream of life faster. It also improves their psychic state by blocking out discoloration, helping to disguise incision scars and artistically coloring the face to enhance the results of the surgery. The patients automatically feel better, when they look better. After a surgical procedure, there are temporary and permanent structural changes that appear with blepharoplasty and laser surgery. Although these surgeries will take away loose skin, puffy fat deposits and wrinkles, they do not change the bone structure or eye placement. Before starting a makeup application, analyzation of the eyes for their structural features help the artist know the value of colors to be used. The measuring points of the brow along with the importance of framing the eye will also be discussed. Once the brows and the eyes have been analyzed, the artist needs to take into consideration the personality of the patient. This helps the artist decide on the colors, value, intensity and design which will be applied to the patient. Before eye makeup can be applied, the use of primers, concealers and/or camouflage creams will be used to block out any discoloration in the eye area. We will look at concerns in formulation of products that will go around the eyes after surgery. The application of cosmetic products should be used as an accessory. Women have a variety of dress styles: casual, business or evening. The style of makeup application should work in conjunction with what they are wearing and how they are feeling at the time. Just as there are many facets to a woman, there are various styles of application to fit her personality.

  2. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a) Mercury...

  3. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a) Mercury...

  4. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a) Mercury...

  5. COLOR PRESCRIPTION FORM FOR COSMETIC GLOVES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A technique is described for achieving more custom-like coloring of cosmetic gloves. The method involves the use of a color prescription form which...can be used to describe in greater detail the characteristics of those portions of the human hand of greater cosmetic significance.

  6. Miscalibrations in judgements of attractiveness with cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex L; Kramer, Robin S S; Ward, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Women use cosmetics to enhance their attractiveness. How successful they are in doing so remains unknown--how do men and women respond to cosmetics use in terms of attractiveness? There are a variety of miscalibrations where attractiveness is concerned--often, what one sex thinks the opposite sex finds attractive is incorrect. Here, we investigated observer perceptions about attractiveness and cosmetics, as well as their understanding of what others would find attractive. We used computer graphic techniques to allow observers to vary the amount of cosmetics applied to a series of female faces. We asked observers to optimize attractiveness for themselves, for what they thought women in general would prefer, and what they thought men in general would prefer. We found that men and women agree on the amount of cosmetics they find attractive, but overestimate the preferences of women and, when considering the preferences of men, overestimate even more. We also find that models' self-applied cosmetics are far in excess of individual preferences. These findings suggest that attractiveness perceptions with cosmetics are a form of pluralistic ignorance, whereby women tailor their cosmetics use to an inaccurate perception of others' preferences. These findings also highlight further miscalibrations of attractiveness ideals.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    González-Muñoz, P; Conde-Salazar, L; Vañó-Galván, S

    2014-11-01

    Contact dermatitis due to cosmetic products is a common dermatologic complaint that considerably affects the patient's quality of life. Diagnosis, treatment, and preventive strategies represent a substantial cost. This condition accounts for 2% to 4% of all visits to the dermatologist, and approximately 60% of cases are allergic in origin. Most cases are caused by skin hygiene and moisturizing products, followed by cosmetic hair and nail products. Fragrances are the most common cause of allergy to cosmetics, followed by preservatives and hair dyes; however, all components, including natural ingredients, should be considered potential sensitizers. We provide relevant information on the most frequent allergens in cosmetic products, namely, fragrances, preservatives, antioxidants, excipients, surfactants, humectants, emulsifiers, natural ingredients, hair dyes, sunscreens, and nail cosmetics.

  8. REACH: impact on the US cosmetics industry?

    PubMed

    Pouillot, Anne; Polla, Barbara; Polla, Ada

    2009-03-01

    The Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals (REACH) is a recent European regulation on chemical substances meant to protect human health and the environment. REACH imposes the "precautionary principle" where additional data and definitive action are required when uncertainty is identified. The cosmetics industry is only partially concerned by REACH: while the stages of registration and evaluation apply to cosmetics, those of authorization and restriction most likely will not, as cosmetic ingredients are already subject to regulation by various agencies and directives. REACH has potential benefits to the industry including the possibility of reassuring consumers and improving their image of chemicals and cosmetics. However, REACH also has potential disadvantages, mainly with regard to impeding innovation. The American cosmetics industry will be affected by REACH, because all US manufacturers who export substances to Europe will have to fully comply with REACH.

  9. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2016-07-15

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  10. Role of proteins in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Chvapli, M; Eckmayer, Z

    1985-04-01

    Synopsis The review critically evaluates the safety and effectiveness of proteins or peptides in cosmetic formulations designed for skin and hair care. Special attention is paid to soluble collagen and the use of this fibrillar protein in combination with detergents. The authors indicate various misconceptions on the mechanism of the effect of collagen and possible risks if the formulations containing collagen are not used on intact skin. Besides the moisturizing effect of collagen on the stratum corneum, the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the skin or hair, and the formation of complexes with detergents and the mechanisms of the effectiveness of this protein are considered. Le role des proteines dans les cosmetiques.

  11. [Allergy to cosmetics. II. Preservatives].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata; Swierczyńska-Machura, Dominika

    2004-01-01

    Disinfectants are essential components of body care preparations, household goods and industrial products. They inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. Esters of parahydroxybenzoate acid and products that release small amounts of formaldehyde (Germal 115, Germal II, Dovicil 200, Bronopol, DMDM hydantoine) were most frequently used in the past. In the 1980s, Katon CG (5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one + 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) evoked the epidemics of contact dermatitis in Sweden, Finland, Germany, Italy and The Netherlands. In the next years, allergy to another preservative, Euxyl K 400 was dramatically growing. Studies carried out in 11 European countries showed that hypersensitivity increased from 0.7% in 1991 to 3.5% in 2000. It was revealed that not only cosmetics left on the skin sensitize, but also those washable. Apart from preservatives, allergic reactions are induced by emulgators, antioxidants, moisteners, lubricants, stabilizers and stickers.

  12. New alternatives to cosmetics preservation.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, S; Varvaresou, A; Tsirivas, E; Demetzos, C

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there is a considerable interest in the development of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics. The aim of our work was to develop new cosmetic formulations by replacing chemical preservatives with ingredients with antimicrobial properties that are not legislated as preservatives according to Annex VI of Commission Directive 76/768/EEC. This paper describes the preservative efficacy of the well-known antimicrobial extracts of Lonicera caprifoleum and Lonicera japonica in combination with glyceryl caprylate and/or levulinic acid, p-anisic acid, and ethanol. We prepared a series of acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous and O/W formulations, i.e., tonic lotion, shampoo, shower gel, conditioning cream, anticellulite cream, cleansing milk and peeling cream, containing (0.2% w/w) Lonicera extracts, alone in the case of tonic lotion and in combination with (1% w/w) glyceryl caprylate in the other products, and we performed challenge tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia procedures and criteria. Formulations such as shampoo, shower gel, and conditioning cream fulfilled criterion A, while tonic lotion, anticellulite cream, cleansing milk, and peeling cream fulfilled criterion B, in regard to contamination from A. niger. Furthermore, we evaluated the efficacy of the antimicrobial systems in two states of use: the intact product and after three weeks of consumer use. The results showed that A. niger was also detected during use by consumers in the products that satisfied only criterion B in challenge tests. The addition of antimicrobial fragrance ingredients such (< or = 0.3% w/w) levulinic acid or (0.1% w/w) p-anisic acid and/or (5% w/w) ethanol afforded products that met criterion A in challenge tests and were also microbiologically safe during use. The small quantity (5% w/w) of ethanol gave an important assistance in order to boost the self-preserving system and to produce stable and safe products.

  13. Biosurfactants in cosmetic formulations: trends and challenges.

    PubMed

    Vecino, X; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B; Rodrigues, L R

    2017-01-12

    Cosmetic products play an essential role in everyone's life. People everyday use a large variety of cosmetic products such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, skin care, perfume, make-up, among others. The cosmetic industry encompasses several environmental, social and economic impacts that are being addressed through the search for more efficient manufacturing techniques, the reduction of waste and emissions and the promotion of personal hygiene, contributing to an improvement of public health and at the same time providing employment opportunities. The current trend among consumers is the pursuit for natural ingredients in cosmetic products, as many of these products exhibit equal, better or additional benefits in comparison with the chemical-based products. In this sense, biosurfactants are natural compounds with great potential in the formulation of cosmetic products given by their biodegradability and impact in health. Indeed, many of these biosurfactants could exhibit a "prebiotic" character. This review covers the current state-of-the-art of biosurfactant research for cosmetic purposes and further discusses the future challenges for cosmetic applications.

  14. Fragrance allergens in 'specific' cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Andrea; Drieghe, Jacques; Claes, Lieve; Boey, Lies; Goossens, An

    2011-04-01

    Together with preservative agents, fragrance components are the most important sensitizing culprits in cosmetic products. To identify the nature of the fragrance ingredients responsible for allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from specific cosmetic products. Between 2000 and 2009, positive patch test reactions or positive usage tests with the patients' own cosmetic products, were recorded using a standardised form. Of the 806 cosmetic records, corresponding to 485 patient files, 344 concerned reactions to fragrance ingredients that according to the label were present ('Presence Confirmed' [PC n = 301]) or suspected to be present ('Presence Not Confirmed' [PNC n = 376]) in the causal cosmetic products used, which belonged to 15 different categories, toilet waters/fine perfumes being the most frequent. Geraniol in fragrance mix I (FM I) and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HICC) in FM II were the most frequent PC, and together with hydroxycitronellal and Evernia prunastri (oak moss) the most frequent PNC ingredients in the causal cosmetic products. Limonene was the most frequent PC confirmed fragrance allergen. This study not only underlines the usefulness of fragrance-ingredient labelling in order to identify the causal allergen(s) present in specific cosmetic products, but may also provide information on trends in the actual use of sensitizing fragrance ingredients in them. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Nanotechnology in cosmetics: Opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Silpa; Jose, Shoma; Sumod, U. S.; Sabitha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science of manipulating atoms and molecules in the nanoscale - 80,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. The world market for products that contain nanomaterials is expected to reach $2.6 trillion by 2015. The use of nanotechnology has stretched across various streams of science, from electronics to medicine and has now found applications in the field of cosmetics by taking the name of nanocosmetics. This widespread influence of nanotechnology in the cosmetic industries is due to the enhanced properties attained by the particles at the nano level including color, transparency, solubility etc. The different types of nanomaterials employed in cosmetics include nanosomes, liposomes, fullerenes, solid lipid nanoparticles etc. Recently, concerns over the safety of such nanocosmetics are raised and have forced the cosmetic industries to limit the use of nanotechnology in cosmetics and for enforcing laws to undergo a full-fledged safety assessment before they enter into the market. In this review, emphasis is made on the types of nanomaterials used in cosmetics by the various cosmetic brands, the potential risks caused by them both to human life and also to the environment and what all regulations have been undertaken or can be taken to overcome them. PMID:22923959

  16. Medicinal and cosmetic potentials of sophorolipids.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Ahn, Changha; Jeon, Sanggui; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2013-10-01

    Sophorolipids, a kind of glycolipids, regarded as the most promising bio-surfactant, are synthesized by a selected number of yeast species. Instead of offering, as an environmental friendly alternative to the petrochemical based surfactants, it also exhibits various bioactivities. Sophorolipids in particular are on the brink of being incorporated into several cosmetic application. The potential of this molecule is also screened in various industries like the cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and other medical applications. In this review, our aim is to provide an overview and updates on basic and applied research on Sophorolipid especially in terms of cosmetics and medicinal uses.

  17. Emergent and unusual allergens in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, David; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis from cosmetics is a common problem that is occasionally caused by new or rare allergens. When a patient has a positive patch test to a cosmetic product but to none of the common or commercially available allergens, it is important to further patch-test this patient to the ingredients of the product. Thorough testing with the breakdown of ingredients, usually obtained through cooperation with the manufacturer, often allows identification of the culprit allergen in the cosmetic product. In this article, we discuss emerging or rare allergens discovered by this method, including nail lacquer and lipstick allergens, copolymers, shellac, alkyl glucosides, glycols, protein derivatives, idebenone, and octocrylene.

  18. Marketing strategies for the cosmetic practice.

    PubMed

    Austin, C J

    1994-01-01

    Appropriate marketing business systems need to be in place to attract and sustain a cosmetic dentistry patient base. Marketing for this sector is most effective when consistently patterned after businesses with high-end consumer services and products. Motivating patients of record and potential new patients to choose cosmetic dental services involves implementing both basic marketing and a series of cosmetic-specific marketing strategies. Consultants are valuable for the process of developing a strategic plan and making recommendations for developing new marketing business systems.

  19. Facial Cosmetics and Attractiveness: Comparing the Effect Sizes of Professionally-Applied Cosmetics and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robin S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Forms of body decoration exist in all human cultures. However, in Western societies, women are more likely to engage in appearance modification, especially through the use of facial cosmetics. How effective are cosmetics at altering attractiveness? Previous research has hinted that the effect is not large, especially when compared to the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals due to differences in identity. In order to build a fuller understanding of how cosmetics and identity affect attractiveness, here we examine how professionally-applied cosmetics alter attractiveness and compare this effect with the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals. In Study 1, 33 YouTube models were rated for attractiveness before and after the application of professionally-applied cosmetics. Cosmetics explained a larger proportion of the variation in attractiveness compared with previous studies, but this effect remained smaller than variation caused by differences in attractiveness between individuals. Study 2 replicated the results of the first study with a sample of 45 supermodels, with the aim of examining the effect of cosmetics in a sample of faces with low variation in attractiveness between individuals. While the effect size of cosmetics was generally large, between-person variability due to identity remained larger. Both studies also found interactions between cosmetics and identity–more attractive models received smaller increases when cosmetics were worn. Overall, we show that professionally-applied cosmetics produce a larger effect than self-applied cosmetics, an important theoretical consideration for the field. However, the effect of individual differences in facial appearance is ultimately more important in perceptions of attractiveness. PMID:27727311

  20. Facial Cosmetics and Attractiveness: Comparing the Effect Sizes of Professionally-Applied Cosmetics and Identity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex L; Kramer, Robin S S

    2016-01-01

    Forms of body decoration exist in all human cultures. However, in Western societies, women are more likely to engage in appearance modification, especially through the use of facial cosmetics. How effective are cosmetics at altering attractiveness? Previous research has hinted that the effect is not large, especially when compared to the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals due to differences in identity. In order to build a fuller understanding of how cosmetics and identity affect attractiveness, here we examine how professionally-applied cosmetics alter attractiveness and compare this effect with the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals. In Study 1, 33 YouTube models were rated for attractiveness before and after the application of professionally-applied cosmetics. Cosmetics explained a larger proportion of the variation in attractiveness compared with previous studies, but this effect remained smaller than variation caused by differences in attractiveness between individuals. Study 2 replicated the results of the first study with a sample of 45 supermodels, with the aim of examining the effect of cosmetics in a sample of faces with low variation in attractiveness between individuals. While the effect size of cosmetics was generally large, between-person variability due to identity remained larger. Both studies also found interactions between cosmetics and identity-more attractive models received smaller increases when cosmetics were worn. Overall, we show that professionally-applied cosmetics produce a larger effect than self-applied cosmetics, an important theoretical consideration for the field. However, the effect of individual differences in facial appearance is ultimately more important in perceptions of attractiveness.

  1. Cosmetic Surgery: What to Know Beforehand

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff Cosmetic surgery, a branch of plastic surgery that includes surgical and nonsurgical procedures, might ... Jan. 18, 2016. Accredited facilities. American Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/articles-and-galleries/ ...

  2. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeons warn against taking part in growing surgery trend. Getting excited over a snazzy pair of Jimmy ... a stand and calling this an ill-advised trend. Cosmetic foot surgery runs the gamut, from injectable ...

  3. [Adjuvant dermato-cosmetic acne therapy].

    PubMed

    Bayerl, Christiane; Degitz, Klaus; Meigel, Eva; Kerscher, Martina

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant dermato-cosmetic therapy in acne is an essential part of the concept of treating acne after initiation and during maintenance therapy. Those are mechanical peeling, chemical peeling and its combination. It needs supervision by an experienced dermatologist.

  4. Anti-aging cosmetics: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Celem, Livia Ribeiro; Ramos-e-Silva, Stella; Fucci-da-Costa, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    The authors review ageing in its extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, as well as the therapies available for improving its effects, and present some of the facts and controversies related to anti-aging cosmetics.

  5. Allergy to cosmetics: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alani, Jennifer I; Davis, Mark Denis P; Yiannias, James A

    2013-01-01

    The term cosmetic has a broad definition and includes personal care products, hair care products, nail care products, and sunscreens. Modern cosmetics are safe for most users, and adverse reactions are very rare because the manufacturers invest heavily in safety, quality control, and product testing before releasing the product to the market. Despite these efforts, adverse reactions occur. Skin care products are major contributors to cosmetic allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), followed by hair care and nail care products. The most common allergens are fragrances and preservatives. The diagnosis of cosmetic allergy is established by reviewing the patient's clinical history and physical examination findings and confirmed with skin patch testing. Patch testing is the standard method for detecting allergens responsible for eliciting ACD. The purpose of this article was to review the prevalence, legislative laws, and role of patch testing in ACD.

  6. 21 CFR 720.4 - Information requested about cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Information requested about cosmetic products. 720... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.4 Information requested about cosmetic products. (a) Form FDA-2512 requests information on: (1) The name...

  7. Safety of cosmetic dermatologic procedures during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kachiu C; Korgavkar, Kaveri; Dufresne, Raymond G; Higgins, H William

    2013-11-01

    Safety of cosmetic procedures in pregnant women has not been extensively studied. Maternal and fetal health risks are important to consider in any procedure performed. With the increasing popularity of cosmetic procedures, dermatologic surgeons will be faced with scenarios necessitating knowledge regarding the safety of such procedures during pregnancy. Furthermore, dermatologic surgeons may inadvertently perform cosmetic procedures during the first trimester, before the patient is aware of the pregnancy. To investigate the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted of all English-language articles published from 1960 through 2012. Definitive recommendations on the safety of procedures such as chemical peels, injectables, fillers, and most laser therapies during pregnancy cannot be made. The safety of onabotulinum toxin usage is well documented in the neurology literature, although isolated events of miscarriage have been reported with high doses of toxin in women with a previous history of miscarriage. Carbon dioxide laser therapy for genital condylomas has considerable evidence supporting its safety during pregnancy. There is a lack of controlled trials addressing the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and postpartum periods. It is advisable to delay elective cosmetic procedures until after the baby is born. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. 700.13 Section 700.13...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in...

  10. Optimization of cosmetic preservation: water activity reduction.

    PubMed

    Kerdudo, A; Fontaine-Vive, F; Dingas, A; Faure, C; Fernandez, X

    2015-02-01

    Preservation of cosmetics is a prerequisite for industrialization, and among the proposed solutions, self-preserved cosmetics are of great interest. One key influencing parameter in self-preservation is water activity; its reduction can help to fight against microbial growth in cosmetic products. This work presents a study on the influence of humectants on water activity and its consequence on the preservation of cosmetic formulations. First, water-humectants mixtures were considered. The influence of glycol and glycerin content, glycol chemical structure, glycerin purity and formulation process on the water activity of the binary mixture was studied. Molecular modelling was performed for a better understanding of the impact of glycol chemistry. Then, the results were applied to five different cosmetic formulations to get optimized products. Challenge test on five strains was carried out in that sense. We showed that the higher the humectants concentration, the lower the water activity. Glycol chemical structure also influenced water activity: propan-1,2-diol was more efficient than propan-1,3-diol, certainly because of a better stabilization in water of propan-1,2-diol as shown by DFT calculation. A drop by drop introduction of glycol in water favoured aw reduction. The best water activity loss was 6.6% and was reached on the cream formulation whose preservation was improved as evidenced by challenge test. Fabrication process as well as humectants concentration were shown to influence water activity. The hydroxyl group positions as well as the presence of an alkyl group on the glycol carbon chain impacted water binding as suggested by DFT calculation. Reducing aw improved the preservation of a cosmetic cream, inhibiting or slowing down the growth of bacteria and fungi. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. [Prevalence of cosmetic sensitivity among beauticians].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Palacios, A; Shaman, F; Garcá, J A; Sánchez Palacios, M A

    1995-01-01

    Cosmetics are a frequent cause of contact dermatitis, not only in females but also in males. Men use cosmetics in the form of deodorant, hair dye and aftershave lotions. U.S.A men spent more than 6,000,000,000 million dollars in cosmetic products. Responsible substances of contact dermatitis are unidentified in many occasions, what impedes the estimation of morbidity data. It is calculated that 2-4% of dermatological consultations are due to contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics. The Spanish industry manufactures each year articles valued in several thousands of million pesetas, 14% of which are exported. Annual manufacturing is raising between 10 and 11%. The French journal Cosmetology (IMS) pointed as an example the fact that in the third trimester of 1978, the number of sold products was as follows: 87,880 units of cleansing milk; 128,020 creams; 237,200 tonics; 10,228 lip protectors. The Committee of European Unions for Perfumery and Cosmetology (COLIPA) reported in 1978 a yearly sale in Europe of 225,000,000 units of hair dyes, exclusively. Adverse reactions to cosmetics affect not only the skin in the form of irritant or contact dermatitis, but cases of conjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, rhinitis, angioedema, pneumonitis and anaphylaxis-like reactions due to cosmetic products, mainly hair bleaching agents, perm liquids and hair spray, have been also reported. The present work studied the prevalence of sensitizations to cosmetic products on the professional staff of a beauty salon in our city of Las Palmas (SEM). Twenty people came to our Unit of Allergology to fill a questionnaire and undergo a skin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. [Chemistry of cosmetics in antiquity].

    PubMed

    Tsoucaris, G; Martinetto, P; Walter, P; Lévêque, J L

    2001-11-01

    Several texts, statues and paintings denote the importance of make up and eye medicines since the earliest periods of Egyptian history. We have investigated cosmetic powders that were preserved in original alabaster and reed containers. Quantitative crystallographic and chemical analysis of the mineral and organic components revealed surprising facts. In addition to the well known galena PbS and cerussite PbCO3, two unexpected constituents have been identified: laurionite PbOHCl and phosgenite Pb2 (CO3) Cl2, which are rare halide minerals found in lead slag only in certain places where the sea water has weathered lead debris left over from silver mining operations in Antiquity. Alteration of natural lead minerals is also unlikely, given the excellent state of conservation of the reed vessels. This evidence indicates that laurionite and phosgenite were synthesised artificially. Support for this statement comes from recipes of medicinal products to be "used in ophthalmology" reported by Greco-Roman authors such as Dioscorides and Pline (1st Century B.C.): silver foam PbO is crushed and mixed with rock salt and sometimes with natron (Na2CO3). The reaction seems to be straightforward. However, our experiments in the laboratory have shown a major difficulty, arising from the concomitant production of alkali, which raises the pH and leads to different products. It follows that the Egyptians very early mastered this kind of chemical synthesis and technology, a fact of great importance in the History of Sciences. Fire-based technology had been mastered to manufacture Egyptian Blue pigments since the third millennium B.C. The present results now suggest that wet chemistry was already known 4000 years ago. This key finding provides a new insight into the chemical technology of far greater antiquity than has previously been believed. Yet, an important question remains relative to the ultimate motivation for these technological developments. If the Egyptians initially only

  13. An analysis of 101 primary cosmetic rhinoplasties.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Shahrokh C; Khan, Husain Ali; Jahangirnia, Alireza; Rad, Samiei Sahand; Mortazavi, Hossein

    2012-04-01

    Primary cosmetic rhinoplasty is one of the most complex of cosmetic surgical procedures in the maxillofacial area that requires precise consideration to both form and function. The complex and variable anatomy, highly visible position of the nose, and distinct patient desires contribute to the complexity of this procedure. This study reports the combined results of 101 consecutive primary cosmetic rhinoplasties at 2 centers. A retrospective chart review was completed on all patients who had primary cosmetic rhinoplasty with or without septoplasty and who were operated on by the senior authors (S.C.B. and H.M.) from June 2006 through December 2008. A standard physical examination, including photo documentation, was completed on each patient preoperatively. All patients were followed periodically after surgery for at least 12 months. Outcome was measured by both subjective and objective measures of cosmetic and functional (breathing) outcome. The following data were collected and analyzed: age of patient, gender, chief cosmetic and functional complaint, details of surgical procedure (including septoplasty, grafts, and donor sites), complications, and report of subjective outcome at final evaluation. One hundred one patients (n = 101, average age 24.4 ± 6.8 years old) were enrolled in the study. Most patients presented for consultation regarding cosmetic rhinoplasty (80%) versus septorhinoplasty (20%). Although most of the patients (63%) were treated with septorhinoplasty, the open rhinoplasty (transcollumellar) incision was used in 61% of patients versus the closed rhinoplasty (39%) technique. The most commonly performed combination of techniques used was the combination of nasal tip modification, with dorsal reduction and nasal osetotomies (54%), followed by tip modification with dorsal reduction (19%), and dorsal reduction with osteotomies (18%) and no tip modification. In the 50 patients who required a graft, in 80% the donor site was the nasal septum. Spreader

  14. Motives for cosmetic procedures in Saudi women.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Sahar H

    2014-01-01

    The media-fuelled obsession with beauty in modern society has led more women to seek elective cosmetic procedures to meet the portrayed ideals of beauty in different cultures. This study gives insights into incentives and desires to undergo cosmetic procedures in a conservative society with strict religious practices where women are veiled. Questionnaire data were obtained from 509 Saudi women who responded to a survey distributed randomly to a sample of Saudi women aged 17 to 72 years. At least 1 elective cosmetic procedure was performed in 42% of the women, of whom 77.8% wore a veil. Another 33% considered having a procedure. The motives for seeking a cosmetic procedure were to improve self-esteem in 83.7%, attract a husband in 63.3%, or prevent a husband from seeking another wife in 36.2%. The decision to seek a procedure was affected by the media, with high peer influence. Motivation for elective cosmetic procedures in Saudi women is influenced by a combination of emotional and cultural factors, level of education, marital status, and religious beliefs. The veil is not an impediment for seeking such procedures. The limitation of the study was missing data analysis as some items in the questionnaire were completed inaccurately or left unanswered.

  15. Assessing cosmetic results after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria João; Oliveira, Helder; Cardoso, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    "Taking less treating better" has been one of the major improvements of breast cancer surgery in the last four decades. The application of this principle translates into equivalent survival of breast cancer conserving treatment (BCT) when compared to mastectomy, with a better cosmetic outcome. While it is relatively easy to evaluate the oncological results of BCT, the cosmetic outcome is more difficult to measure due to the lack of an effective and consensual procedure. The assessment of cosmetic outcome has been mainly subjective, undertaken by a panel of expert observers or/and by patient self-assessment. Unfortunately, the reproducibility of these methods is low. Objective methods have higher values of reproducibility but still lack the inclusion of several features considered by specialists in BCT to be fundamental for cosmetic outcome. The recent addition of volume information obtained with 3D images seems promising. Until now, unfortunately, no method is considered to be the standard of care. This paper revises the history of cosmetic evaluation and guides us into the future aiming at a method that can easily be used and accepted by all, caregivers and caretakers, allowing not only the comparison of results but the improvement of performance.

  16. Chlorhexidine in cosmetic products - a market survey.

    PubMed

    Opstrup, Morten S; Johansen, Jeanne D; Bossi, Rossana; Lundov, Michael D; Garvey, Lene H

    2015-01-01

    Chlorhexidine may cause type I and type IV allergy. Some chlorhexidine-allergic individuals have been exposed in the healthcare setting as patients or healthcare workers, but for others the source of sensitization is unknown. Chlorhexidine may be used as a preservative or an antimicrobial agent in cosmetic products at a concentration up to 0.3%, as set by the European Cosmetics Directive (now Regulations). To identify cosmetic product types containing chlorhexidine, and to measure the concentration of chlorhexidine in selected products. Between February 2013 and April 2013, we checked for chlorhexidine in cosmetic products in 14 supermarkets, one hairdressing salon and one beauty and retail store in Copenhagen, Denmark by reading the ingredient labels. The chlorhexidine concentration was measured in 10 selected products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an ultraviolet (UV) detector. Chlorhexidine was found in 80 of 2251 checked products (3.6%) in the following categories: hair products (57/760), creams (9/324), face washes (4/24), wet wipes (4/63), skin tonics (3/22), make-up removers (2/25), and mouth washes (1/17). Chlorhexidine concentrations were 0.01-0.15%. We found chlorhexidine in various cosmetic product types, predominantly aimed at females, and in hair products. The measured chlorhexidine concentrations were all within the permitted limit. The relevance for allergic sensitization should be further explored. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cosmetic procedures for the aging face.

    PubMed

    Zins, James E; Moreira-Gonzalez, Andrea

    2006-08-01

    As the United States' population continues to age and as cosmetic procedures have become more accepted, adults from all age groups and socioeconomic brackets are seeking improvement in facial aging. Ideal correction includes improvement in the quality of skin, improvement in wrinkles, correction of soft tissue descent, removal of skin excess, and volume restoration. The physiologic rather than the chronologic age is the most important factor in determining the advisability of cosmetic surgery in elderly people. In addition to traditional cosmetic surgery procedures, the elderly population is amenable to several shortcuts, minimizing operative time and post-operative recovery. These can be performed alone or in combination with traditional procedures, improving the stigmata of facial aging and enhancing quality of life.

  18. Contact-Allergic Reactions to Cosmetics

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, An

    2011-01-01

    Contact-allergic reactions to cosmetics may be delayed-type reactions such as allergic and photo-allergic contact dermatitis, and more exceptionally also immediate-type reactions, that is, contact urticaria. Fragrances and preservative agents are the most important contact allergens, but reactions also occur to category-specific products such as hair dyes and other hair-care products, nail cosmetics, sunscreens, as well as to antioxidants, vehicles, emulsifiers, and, in fact, any possible cosmetic ingredient. Patch and prick testing to detect the respective culprits remains the golden standard for diagnosis, although additional tests might be useful as well. Once the specific allergens are identified, the patients should be informed of which products can be safely used in the future. PMID:21461388

  19. Adolescent girls' views on cosmetic surgery: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Ashikali, Eleni-Marina; Dittmar, Helga; Ayers, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined adolescent girls' views of cosmetic surgery. Seven focus groups were run with girls aged 15-18 years (N = 27). Participants read case studies of women having cosmetic surgery, followed by discussion and exploration of their views. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) dissatisfaction with appearance, (2) acceptability of cosmetic surgery, (3) feelings about undergoing cosmetic surgery and (4) cosmetic surgery in the media. Results suggest the acceptability of cosmetic surgery varies according to the reasons for having it and that the media play an important role by normalising surgery and under-representing the risks associated with it.

  20. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Verallo-Rowell, Vermén M

    2011-01-01

    The validated hypoallergenic (vh) rating system was initiated in 1988 to try to objectively validate the "hypoallergenic" claim in cosmetics. To show how the system rates cosmetic hypoallergenicity and to compare the prevalence of cosmetic contact dermatitis (CCD) among users of regular cosmetics versus cosmetics with high VH numbers. (1) Made a VH list based on top allergens from patch-test results published by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) and the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA); (2) reviewed global regulatory, cosmetic, drug, packaging, and manufacturing practices to show how allergens may contaminate products; (3) compared cosmetic ingredients lists against the VH list to obtain the VH rating (the more allergens absent, the higher the VH rating); and (4) obtained CCD prevalence among users of regular cosmetics versus users of cosmetics with high VH ratings. (1) Two VH lists (1988, 2003) included only cosmetic allergens in the NACDG surveys, the third (2007) included cosmetic and potential contaminant noncosmetic allergens, and the fourth (2010) adds ESSCA patch-test surveys. (2) CCD prevalence is 0.05 to 0.12% (average, 0.08%) among users of cosmetics with high VH ratings versus 2.4 to 36.3% among users of regular cosmetics. The VH rating system is shown to objectively validate the hypoallergenic cosmetics claim.

  1. Restoration and enhancement: is cosmetic dentistry ethical?

    PubMed

    Jenson, Larry

    2005-01-01

    The ethical ground for restoration (returning a patient to healthy form and function) differs from enhancement (using medical means to improve appearance). Physicians and dentists who argue that enhancements improve self-esteem must reconcile this claim with the fact that they are not licensed to practice psychology. The extreme views are that doctors either should provide cosmetic services as requested by patients or they should not. The middle position is that doctors must retain their fiduciary position of trust based on professional judgment and advocating for patients' health interests. Patient health always outweighs patients' cosmetic desires.

  2. Conservative cosmetic dentistry post-trauma.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Nicholas; Cochran, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Traumatized teeth can bleed internally, causing discoloration over time. When this occurs in the smile zone, masking the dark colorations can present challenges when attempting to practice conservative cosmetic dentistry. Implementing nonvital bleaching can significantly improve the dark colorations of the traumatized teeth and support very conservative cosmetic dentistry. Effective communication with the ceramist is essential to ensure the desired results. This article presents a case involving trauma with delayed root canal therapy on tooth No. 9, which produced a very dark front tooth, and the conservative treatment plan chosen to correct it through the use of nonvital bleaching and feldspathic veneers requiring zero or minimal preparation.

  3. The enlightenment from Malaysian consumers' perspective toward cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Ayob, Ain; Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Jafri, Juliana; Jamshed, Shazia; Ahmad, Hawa Mas Azmar; Hadi, Hazrina

    2016-01-01

    Variety of cosmetic products was used in our daily life, yet the amount and types of the cosmetic products used by the consumers were varied, which may be due to the different perspectives held by each of the consumers. To explore consumers' perspectives toward cosmetic products. An interview guide was developed with a set of 12 semistructured questions. Participants in Kuantan, Pahang were recruited via the purposive sampling, and they undergo in-depth face-to-face interviews. All of the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and were analyzed via thematic content analysis. For the awareness of cosmetic products, less aware about the cosmetic products in Malaysia were noted among the participants. In terms of perceptions about the cosmetic products, participants expressed positive perceptions toward natural cosmetic products, quality were seen as synonymous with branded products and halal certification. Next, for the attitude toward the use of cosmetic products, participants were influenced by ingredients, product brand, and halal certification. Based on personal experiences, they provide complaints and suggestions for the enhancement of cosmetic products' quality. Participants were found to have less awareness about the cosmetic products in Malaysia. Besides, they realized about the chemical ingredients and halal certification for the cosmetic products. Therefore, they held positive perceptions and practiced positive attitudes toward natural and halal cosmetic products. Finally, adverse reactions from the use of cosmetic products were commonly experienced by the participants, which contributed mainly by the ingredients. Thus, they hoped for serious approached to be enacted to solve this problem.

  4. The effect of veneers on cosmetic improvement.

    PubMed

    Nalbandian, S; Millar, B J

    2009-07-25

    This clinical study was designed to compare the patient's opinion of the cosmetic improvement after the placement of direct composite and indirect porcelain veneers. This retrospective study involved a survey of 145 patients (96 responses) each treated with 10 direct composite (Vitalescence) or 10 porcelain (Fortress) veneers. Patients subjectively evaluated multiple aspects of their smile using visual analogue scales before and after treatment for colour, shape, size, smile line and overall facial appearance. There were no statistical differences between the cosmetic improvement achieved for porcelain and composite (p > or = 0.05). Cost factors were not significant. Significant factors were: tooth conservation (p < or = 0.021), time (p < or = 0.012), repair costs (p < or = 0.009) and replacement costs (p < or = 0.024) and favoured the direct composite veneers over the porcelain veneers. Correlation findings relating to what patients feel as the key components of the smile for overall cosmetic improvement showed medium to high correlations (0.301 < or = r < or = 0.718) with tooth shape, colour and level of tooth display, gingival level, gingival symmetry and tooth whiteness. The choice of material (direct composite resin vs porcelain) when constructing maxillary anterior veneers does not significantly affect the patient's perception of cosmetic improvement. However, there was a preference towards accepting the composite veneer option. Overall aesthetic satisfaction is multifactorial. The results support the opinion that the more conservative composite veneers are justified and that, given the choice and information, patients may prefer this option.

  5. Increasing your practice with cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Cathy

    2006-05-01

    Incorporate these guidelines into your practice, and utilize patient financing to maximize your treatment acceptance, and the cosmetic aspect of your practice will likely boom. No matter how much you want to do something, or how great your ideas are, if you aren't able to execute the project, nothing will happen. Plan. Prepare. Present. Persevere.

  6. Cosmetics Advertising: A Look at the Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Nancy

    Social, economic, and popular scientific trends converged in the early twentieth century to support the mass popularity of cosmetics. Twentieth-century magazine ads for personal care and beauty products reflected the contemporary belief that "science" was on the verge of being able to cure almost anything, including physical flaws and…

  7. Cosmetics Advertising: A Look at the Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Nancy

    Social, economic, and popular scientific trends converged in the early twentieth century to support the mass popularity of cosmetics. Twentieth-century magazine ads for personal care and beauty products reflected the contemporary belief that "science" was on the verge of being able to cure almost anything, including physical flaws and…

  8. [Cosmetic acne and a test of comedogenicity].

    PubMed

    Valentino, A; Fimiani, M; Baiocchi, R; Bilenchi, R; Perotti, R; Castelli, A; Mancianti, M L; Raffaelli, M

    1984-10-30

    A comedogenic test was carried out on the internal ear canal of four adult, masculine, albino rabbits, using butter of cacao and linseed oil, both known to be present in various cosmetic products. Histologic observation after 14 days showed follicular hyperkeratosis conferming the validity of this test.

  9. Using technology to market cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S M

    1997-01-01

    The presentation of proposed dental treatment has been hampered by the absence of visual communication technologies. New high tech dentistry-related tools permit efficient production of case presentations for cosmetic dentistry and restorative dentistry. This review describes how to create computer-based case presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) and visual treatment proposals using Microsoft Word for Windows.

  10. Safety assessment of ammonium hectorites as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 4 ammonium hectorite compounds used in cosmetics: disteardimonium hectorite, dihydrogenated tallow benzylmonium hectorite, stearalkonium hectorite, and quaternium-18 hectorite. These ingredients function in cosmetics mainly as nonsurfactant suspending agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data and concluded that these ammonium hectorite compounds were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  11. Cosmetic tattooing as a treatment of port-wine stains.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, E M; de Jong, B D; van der Walle, H B; Stolz, E; Naafs, B

    1993-05-01

    Medical treatment for port-wine stains frequently is cosmetically unsatisfactory. An alternative possibility is cosmetic medical tattooing. By means of a traditional Japanese tattooing technique, five patients were treated in multiple sessions until the color of the lesion matched that of the surrounding skin. The results were excellent, the skin texture remained normal, and the patients could discontinue cosmetic camouflage. Cosmetic medical tattooing when carefully done is a valuable addition to the medical armamentarium and may replace more aggressive techniques.

  12. 75 FR 33740 - Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services; Excise Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 49 RIN 1545-BJ40 Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services... follows: Sec. 49.0-3 Introduction; cosmetic services. [The text of this proposed Sec. 49.0-3 is the same.... Subpart G is added to read as follows: Subpart G--Cosmetic Services Sec. 49.5000B-1 Indoor tanning...

  13. 75 FR 33763 - Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... International Trade Administration Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India AGENCY: International Trade... Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India (New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore), November 15-19, 2010. Led by a Department of Commerce official, the mission will assist U.S. beauty and cosmetics companies...

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis to preservatives and fragrances in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Tatyana; de Gannes, Gillian C

    2011-04-01

    Cosmetics are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Fragrances and preservatives are the two most clinically relevant allergens found in cosmetic products. Patch testing remains the gold standard for identification of causative allergens. Common cosmetic allergens are reviewed. Practical methods of allergen avoidance are also discussed.

  15. The male cosmetic surgery patient: a matched sample gender analysis of elective cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Nicki A; Honigman, Roberta J; Jackson, Alun C

    2010-06-01

    Plastic surgeons have traditionally perceived male patients as more psychologically disturbed than female patients. This study employed a matched sample design to explore the psychosocial experiences of 50 male and 50 female elective cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients. It also aimed to compare male and female patients on preoperative psychosocial dysfunction on standardized measures (psychiatric disturbance, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, dysmorphic concern, and low body image) and postoperative dissatisfaction. The findings revealed that there were many similarities between the self-reported appearance concerns, motivations for surgery, and expectations of surgery between male and female patients. Although male patients did not report higher levels of preoperative psychosocial dysfunction than their female counterparts, they were more likely to report postoperative dissatisfaction. Preoperative screening is recommended to identify the minority of male patients who will report an unsatisfactory outcome despite a technically good result.

  16. Practice and Educational Gaps in Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2016-07-01

    This article identifies gaps in the practice of cosmetic dermatology and cosmetics education, and how to overcome these limitations. There is a rapid development of new devices and procedures, with limited data, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research from which to develop best cosmetic practice. There is a need for increased research and funding dedicated to these goals, improved and convenient training for staff to adopt new devices/procedures, and continuous evolution of databases to pool outcome data and develop outcome sets. Resident education can be improved by dedicated resident cosmetic clinics, didactic teaching from visiting professors, attendance of cosmetic dermatology courses and meetings, and encouraging postresidency training.

  17. Nonsurgical Cosmetic Procedures For Men: Trends And Technique Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Arisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Once sought nearly exclusively by women, nonsurgical cosmetic procedures are increasingly being sought after by men. Reviewed here are survey data that characterize the spectrum of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures men are preferentially utilizing, the percentage of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures consumers who are men, and how some of these figures are changing with time. while men still comprise a small minority (approximately 10–20%) of those pursuing nonsurgical cosmetic procedures, this sector is growing, in particular for injection of neurotoxins. Practitioners performing nonsurgical cosmetic procedures on male patients need to be aware of anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and psychological factors unique to this demographic. PMID:28210397

  18. Polyphenols as active ingredients for cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Zillich, O V; Schweiggert-Weisz, U; Eisner, P; Kerscher, M

    2015-10-01

    Polyphenols are secondary plant metabolites with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity. They are ubiquitously distributed in the plant kingdom; high amounts contain, for example, green tea and grape seeds. Polyphenolic extracts are attractive ingredients for cosmetics and pharmacy due to their beneficial biological properties. This review summarizes the effects of polyphenols in the context of anti-ageing activity. We have explored in vitro studies, which investigate antioxidant activity, inhibition of dermal proteases and photoprotective activity, mostly studied using dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes cell lines. Possible negative effects of polyphenols were also discussed. Further, some physicochemical aspects, namely the possible interactions with emulsifiers and the influence of the cosmetic formulation on the skin delivery, were reported. Finally, few clinical studies, which cover the anti-ageing action of polyphenols on the skin after topical application, were reviewed.

  19. Central retinal artery occlusion following cosmetic blepharoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, P W; May, D R

    1980-01-01

    A case is presented of a 70-year-old white male who underwent a bilateral cosmetic lower lid blepharoplasty with fat removal. He subsequently developed a right orbital haemorrhage which resulted in the occlusion of the central retinal artery. The patient had no light perception with his right eye for approximately 1 hour, but vision was eventually restored to 20/20 after emergency therapeutic measures. There are many possible causes of visual loss following blepharoplasty, with orbital haemorrhage being the most common. Visual loss secondary to blepharoplasty can be prevented in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative phases of surgery. Blindness as a complication of cosmetic blepharoplasty can be reversible if recognised early and treated appropriately. These facts must be kept in mind by all surgeons who perform blepharoplasties. Images PMID:7448145

  20. Brief encounters: Assembling cosmetic surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Ruth; Bell, David; Cheung, Olive; Jones, Meredith; Probyn, Elspeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, mixed methods project which explores empirically and theoretically the rapidly growing but poorly understood (and barely regulated) phenomenon of cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore CST by drawing on theories of flows, networks and assemblages, aiming to produce a fuller and more nuanced account of - and accounting for - CST. This enables us to conceptualise CST as an interplay of places, people, things, ideas and practices. Through specific instances of assembling cosmetic surgery that we encountered in the field, and that we illustrate with material from interviews with patients, facilitators and surgeons, our analysis advances understandings and theorisations of medical mobilities, globalisation and assemblage thinking.

  1. New developments in genioplasty: functional versus cosmetic.

    PubMed

    Hookey, S R; Goodday, R H

    1989-03-01

    Since the orthodontist is frequently the first clinician to be consulted for dentofacial deformity, an awareness of potential surgical procedures available to correct such deformities is imperative. Despite the fact that isolated genioplasty is becoming rare, the role the procedure plays in corrective jaw surgery is not diminished. Functional and cosmetic aspects must be considered in case planning and the flexibility of the procedure lends itself well to deformity correction in all three dimensions.

  2. Amphibole content of cosmetic and pharmaceutical talcs.

    PubMed Central

    Blount, A M

    1991-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and cosmetic-grade talcs were examined for asbestiform amphibole content using a new density-optical method. Talcs under the Food and Drug Administration are not regulated as to asbestos content; however, all talcs were well below the level mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for industrial talcs. Only one was found to contain an amphibole particle size distribution typical of asbestos. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 7. PMID:1659533

  3. [Female cosmetic genital surgery: point-counterpoint].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H

    2012-01-01

    Cosmetic genitoplasty interventions, and especially reduction nymphoplasties, now seem to attract more and more patients, mainly among the younger who are more influenced by widely publicized pornographic than by anatomic reality they hardly suspect. However, they must be informed and warned against the trivialization of a still young surgery, insufficiently justified validated and supervised, especially on the psychological level, and with many unresolved ethical issues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-level efficacy of cosmetic preservatives.

    PubMed

    Lundov, M D; Johansen, J D; Zachariae, C; Moesby, L

    2011-04-01

    Preservation using combinations of preservatives has several advantages. This study shows that the concentration of some of the most frequently used allergenic preservatives can be markedly lowered when they are combined with phenoxyethanol. The antimicrobial efficacy of cosmetic preservatives and known allergens of various potency [diazolidinyl urea, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI), methylisothiazolinone (MI) and phenoxyethanol] was tested alone and in various combinations of two or three preservatives together. The preservatives were tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and possible synergy using fractional inhibitory concentration. MCI/MI was the only preservative showing low-level MIC against all four tested microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Different combinations of the preservatives indicated additive effects against the microorganisms. No combination of preservatives showed any inhibitory action on each other. Challenge tests with different concentrations and combinations were performed in a cosmetic cream. Diazolidinyl urea and MCI/MI alone were ineffective against C. albicans in a challenge test at concentrations up to 16 times higher than the observed MIC values. When combining phenoxyethanol with either one of the allergenic preservatives diazolidinyl urea, MCI/MI or MI, the cosmetic cream was adequately preserved at concentrations well below the preservatives' MIC values as well as 10-20 times below the maximum permitted concentrations. By using combinations of preservatives, effective preservation can be achieved with lower concentrations of allergenic preservatives. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  5. Phytoconstituents as photoprotective novel cosmetic formulations

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, S.; Kaur, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Phytoconstituents are gaining popularity as ingredients in cosmetic formulations as they can protect the skin against exogenous and endogenous harmful agents and can help remedy many skin conditions. Exposure of skin to sunlight and other atmospheric conditions causes the production of reactive oxygen species, which can react with DNA, proteins, and fatty acids, causing oxidative damage and impairment of antioxidant system. Such injuries damage regulation pathways of skin and lead to photoaging and skin cancer development. The effects of aging include wrinkles, roughness, appearance of fine lines, lack of elasticity, and de- or hyperpigmentation marks. Herbal extracts act on these areas and produce healing, softening, rejuvenating, and sunscreen effects. We have selected a few photoprotective phytoconstituents, such as curcumin, resveratrol, tea polyphenols, silymarin, quercetin and ascorbic acid, and have discussed the considerations to be undertaken for the development of herbal cosmetic formulations that could reduce the occurrence of skin cancer and delay the process of photoaging. This article is aimed at providing specific and compiled knowledge for the successful preparation of photoprotective herbal cosmetic formulations. PMID:22228936

  6. Cosmetic allergy: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Orton, David I; Wilkinson, John D

    2004-01-01

    A recent epidemiologic survey in the UK revealed that 23% of women and 13.8% of men experience some sort of adverse reaction to a personal care product over the course of a year. Although most of these reactions may be due to subjective sensory irritation, various studies reveal that up to 10% of dermatologic patients who are patch tested are allergic to cosmetic products or their constituent ingredients. Causative products include deodorants and perfumes, skin care products, hair care products, and nail cosmetics. Allergic contact dermatitis mainly results from fragrance chemicals and preservatives. Recent work has suggested that additional fragrance chemicals may need to be tested in order to identify those patients 'missed' by the current fragrance mix; in particular, hydroxy-isohexyl-3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HMPPC Lyral) has been singled out as an important sensitizing agent. The increased usage of natural fragrances and botanic extracts can also cause problems in their own right or through co-reactivity. The preservative methyldibromo glutaronitrile has also been recognized as an increasingly important sensitizer in Europe, which has led to the recent recommendation that it should be prohibited from 'leave-on' products until information on 'safe' consumer levels becomes available. Other emerging allergens include UV filters, tosylamide/formaldehyde resin, and nail acrylates. The diagnosis of cosmetic allergy should be confirmed with patch testing, including testing of 'whole' products, when necessary, and repeat open application tests can be used to confirm the relevance of reactions in cases of doubt.

  7. Cosmetic Outcomes of Sutureless Closure in Gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Andrzej; Bogusz, Bartosz; Soltysiak, Piotr; Tomasik, Przemyslaw; Wolnicki, Michal; Wedrychowicz, Andrzej; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Gorecki, Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Purpose A sutureless gastroschisis repair allows for spontaneous closure of abdominal wall defect. We report our experience focusing on final esthetic outcome. Methods Retrospective data were collected from medical reports of all neonates with gastroschisis operated from January 2009 to December 2013. Variables recorded included patients descriptors, management modality, and cosmetic outcome. Results From the overall group of 38 patients with gastroschisis, 20 infants treated with sutureless closure were included in this study. In the analyzed cohort, 17 (85%) children were operated under general anesthesia and 3 (15%) without intubation. Primary reduction was possible in 15 (75%) cases, and in 5 (25%) we used silo. There were two (10%) deaths in late postoperative course due to septic complications. Three (15%) infants needed laparotomy because of adhesions and bowel obstruction. There were no infectious complications of the wound. Only 55% (10/18) of children presented umbilical hernia prior to discharge. Only two (11%) children with umbilical hernia were operated until now. Almost all patients (16/18; 89%) present excellent final cosmetic result without scar formation. Conclusion Sutureless closure of uncomplicated gastroschisis is a safe technique that reduces need of intubation and provides excellent cosmetic results.

  8. [Contact allergy to preservatives contained in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata; Swierczyńska-Machura, Dominika

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assay the type of allergy to preservatives contained in cosmetics and to assess the usefulness of the composition of allergens included in a standard series for the diagnosis of occupational contact allergy used to date. The frequency of contact allergy to the standard series of preservatives (thimerosal, Euxyl K 400, formaldehyde, Kathon CG, Quaternium 15, parabens) was assayed in a group of 1937 subsequent patients referred to the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in L6di and examined in the years 2000-2005. The frequency and type of allergy to preservatives of a cosmetic series in a group of 113 patients with poor tolerance of cosmetics were also investigated. Allergy to thimerosal was found in 11.8% of patients tested with a standard series; to formaldehyde in 4.9%; and to Euxyl K 400 in 3.7%. Quaternium and parabens were less allergenic (0.8 and 0.3%, respectively). In the group of 113 patients subjected to patch test with a cosmetic series, allergy, i.e. at least one positive patch test, was observed in 49 (43.4%) patients. Of the 27 preservatives contained in cosmetics, 16 induced positive reaction to chemical compounds. Euxyl K 400 proved to be the basic allergenic preservative of this series, and induced allergy in 21 (18.6%) patients, whereas 17.7% of patients reacted to thimerosal. Only allergy to thimerosal applied to 8 persons, and 7 of them showed inflammatory lesions only on the face. Less allergic biocides were cocamidopropyl betaine (7.1%), Kathon CG (7.1%), Bronopol (5.3%), Germall II (4.4%), triethanolamine (3.5%), Germall 115 (2.6%), DMDM hydantoin (2.6%), Grotan BK (1.8%), sodium-2-pyridinethiol-1-oxide (1.8%), clioquinol (0.9%), Quaternium 15 (0.9%), and dimethylaminopropylamine (0.9%). The results of our study confirmed observations of other authors that allergy to preservatives present in numerous industrial products, especially Euxyl K 400, is still a growing problem. Like many other researchers, we are

  9. Psychological characteristics and outcomes of elective cosmetic surgery patients: the influence of cosmetic surgery history.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Nicki A; Jackson, Alun C; Honigman, Roberta J; Francis, Kate L

    2011-01-01

    The early cosmetic surgery literature suggested that individuals re-presenting for aesthetic surgical procedures (referred to as "insatiable patients") display poorer psychological functioning and satisfaction with surgical outcomes than those who request one procedure. The aim of the study was to compare 284 patients with and without a history of cosmetic procedures on demographic characteristics, appearance concerns, expectations of surgery, psychosocial dysfunction, and postoperative dissatisfaction. There were few differences between the groups, suggesting that the group of patients with a history of aesthetic surgeries did not represent the population that has been described as "surgery insatiable." Post hoc analyses of subgroups of patients with a history of surgeries also revealed few differences except for lower self-esteem and postoperative satisfaction. Further research is required to fully explore the applicability of the "insatiable patient" label in the context of increasing societal acceptance of cosmetic surgery.

  10. [Skin sensitizers in cosmetics and skin care products].

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    Cosmetics are defined as "articles with mild action on the human body, which are intended to be applied to the human body through rubbing, sprinkling or other methods, aiming to clean, beautify and increase the attractiveness, alter the appearance or to keep the skin or hair in good condition (The Pharmaceutical Affairs Law: Article 2)." Consequently, they include personal hygiene products such as shampoos, soaps and toothpaste. In Europe, 1% of the population is estimated to be allergic to fragrances and 2-3% to ingredients of cosmetics; 10% of outpatients patch-tested for cosmetics allergy were found to be positive. Allergenic ingredients of cosmetics can be fragrances, hair dye, preservatives, antioxidants, emollients, surfactants, UV absorbers, pigments or resins used in nail cosmetics. Among standard allergen series, eight substances are related to cosmetics; in Japan in 2003, p-phenylenediamine (hair dyes) induced allergic reactions with the highest rate of 7.9% in outpatients patch-tested (n=805), followed by fragrance mix No. 1 (4.0%, mixture of eight fragrances frequently used), colophony (3.2%, main contents of pine resin), lanolin alcohol (2.7%,emollients), and formaldehyde, parabens, Kathon CG (2.7% ,1.9% and 1.0%, respectively; preservatives). Cosmetic allergy symptoms tend to be mild except those caused by hair dye. However, the population exposed to cosmetics is huge and the number of ingredients used in cosmetics increased up to more than 6000. Here, major cosmetic ingredient allergens, mainly reported in Japan, are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Patch Testing in Suspected Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Cosmetics

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing use of cosmetics has contributed to a rise in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to cosmetics. It is estimated that 1–5.4% of the population is sensitized to a cosmetic ingredient. Patch testing helps to confirm the presence of an allergy and to identify the actual allergens which are chemical mixtures of various ingredients. Objectives. The aims of this study are to perform patch testing in suspected ACD to cosmetics and to identify the most common allergen and cosmetic product causing dermatitis. Methods. Fifty patients with suspected ACD to cosmetics were patch-tested with 38 antigens of the Indian Cosmetic Series and 12 antigens of the Indian Standard Series. Results. The majority (58%) of patients belonged to the 21–40 years age group. The presence of ACD to cosmetics was confirmed in 38 (76%) patients. Face creams (20%), hair dyes (14%), and soaps (12%) were the most commonly implicated. The most common allergens identified were gallate mix (40%), cetrimide (28%), and thiomersal (20%). Out of a total of 2531 patches applied, positive reactions were obtained in 3.75%. Conclusion. Incidence of ACD to cosmetics was greater in females. Face creams and hair dyes were the most common cosmetic products implicated. The principal allergens were gallate mix, cetrimide, and thiomersal. PMID:25295057

  12. The enlightenment from Malaysian consumers’ perspective toward cosmetic products

    PubMed Central

    Ayob, Ain; Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Jafri, Juliana; Jamshed, Shazia; Ahmad, Hawa Mas Azmar; Hadi, Hazrina

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: Variety of cosmetic products was used in our daily life, yet the amount and types of the cosmetic products used by the consumers were varied, which may be due to the different perspectives held by each of the consumers. Objectives: To explore consumers’ perspectives toward cosmetic products. Methods: An interview guide was developed with a set of 12 semistructured questions. Participants in Kuantan, Pahang were recruited via the purposive sampling, and they undergo in-depth face-to-face interviews. All of the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and were analyzed via thematic content analysis. Results: For the awareness of cosmetic products, less aware about the cosmetic products in Malaysia were noted among the participants. In terms of perceptions about the cosmetic products, participants expressed positive perceptions toward natural cosmetic products, quality were seen as synonymous with branded products and halal certification. Next, for the attitude toward the use of cosmetic products, participants were influenced by ingredients, product brand, and halal certification. Based on personal experiences, they provide complaints and suggestions for the enhancement of cosmetic products’ quality. Conclusions: Participants were found to have less awareness about the cosmetic products in Malaysia. Besides, they realized about the chemical ingredients and halal certification for the cosmetic products. Therefore, they held positive perceptions and practiced positive attitudes toward natural and halal cosmetic products. Finally, adverse reactions from the use of cosmetic products were commonly experienced by the participants, which contributed mainly by the ingredients. Thus, they hoped for serious approached to be enacted to solve this problem. PMID:27413352

  13. Quality of life before and after cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Jean-Charles; Bolton, Michael A; Pi, Sarah; Powell-Hicks, Allycin L; Postolova, Anna; Razani, Bahram; Reyes, Kevin; IsHak, Waguih William

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the literature regarding the impact of cosmetic surgery on health-related quality of life (QOL). Studies were identified through PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO searches from January 1960 to December 2011. Twenty-eight studies were included in this review, according to specific selection criteria. The procedures and tools employed in cosmetic surgery research studies were remarkably diverse, thus yielding difficulties with data analysis. However, data indicate that individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery began with lower values on aspects of QOL than control subjects, and experienced significant QOL improvement post-procedurally, an effect that appeared to plateau with time. Despite the complexity of measuring QOL in cosmetic surgery patients, most studies showed an improvement in QOL after cosmetic surgery procedures. However, this finding was clouded by measurement precision as well as heterogeneity of procedures and study populations. Future research needs to focus on refining measurement techniques, including developing cosmetic surgery-specific QOL measures.

  14. Safety Assessment of Achillea millefolium as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-11-01

    Cosmetic ingredients derived from Achillea millefolium function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous, skin-conditioning agents-humectants, and fragrance ingredients. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed relevant animal and human data to determine their safety in cosmetics and raised concerns about cosmetics containing linalool, thujone, quercetin, hydroquinone, or α-peroxyachifolid. Because final product formulations may contain multiple botanicals, each containing similar constituents of concern, formulators are advised to be aware of these components and to avoid reaching levels that may be hazardous to consumers. Additionally, industry was advised to use good manufacturing practices to limit impurities. The Panel concluded that achillea millefolium extract, achillea millefolium flower extract, and achillea millefolium flower/leaf/stem extract are safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetics when formulated to be nonsensitizing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Coffee silverskin: a possible valuable cosmetic ingredient.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Francisca; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno; Amaral, M Helena; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is a great tendency in cosmetic area to use natural extracts. Coffee silverskin (CS) is the most abundant solid by-product generated during roasting of coffee processing. To evaluate different CS extracts as promising cosmetic ingredients, regarding antioxidant, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic properties. Aqueous, hydroalcoholic and ethanolic CS extracts were obtained by an environmentally friendly procedure considering costs and pollution. Extracts were characterized for total phenolic and flavonoid contents (TPC and TFC, respectively), antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), antimicrobial activity expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and cytotoxicity using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays in two skin cell lines (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). The TPC of extracts was 18.33-35.25 mg of gallic acid equivalents per g of material on a dry basis (mg GAE/g db). The TFC of extracts was 1.08-2.47 µg cathechin equivalents per g dry material (µg CE/g db). The antioxidant activity was high, with values ranging between 95.95 and 216.40 µmol Fe(2+)/g for aqueous and alcoholic samples, respectively. Preliminary assays for antimicrobial potential showed that extracts display antibacterial activity. The MIC varied from 31.3 to 250 µg/mL for Gram-positive, and from 31.3 to 1000 µg/mL for Gram-negative. Extracts did not affect in vitro cell viability, with values near 100% in all concentrations tested. RESULTS seem show that CS is a safe source of natural antioxidants with antifungal and antibacterial activity and no cytotoxicity, with potential usefulness for cosmetic applications.

  16. Form and function in cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jerry

    2005-04-01

    The results of the case presented meet the aesthetic requirement of the patient as well as the biomechanical and functional requirements for long-term comfort, function, and stability. If not for the extra time spent with the patient uncovering the relationship between her occlusion and headaches and gaining her confidence by solving that problem first, we never would have had the opportunity to build a relationship that would allow her to proceed confidently with the cosmetic treatment that she described as the "best darn holiday present ever!"

  17. Cosmetic and medical causes of hair weathering.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Rodney

    2002-12-01

    To experts in any aesthetic field, scalp hair has 'life'. But in any scientific sense it is a dead structure made up of highly organized and orientated keratinized fibres and fibrils; and these can be modified by cosmetic procedures to give a seemingly infinite variety of beautiful and exciting styles. As the hair grows away from the scalp it degenerates or 'weathers' to some degree and this can be exaggerated by physical and chemical procedures such as overzealous brushing, bleaching, permanent waving and tricotillomania.

  18. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    PubMed

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-aging cosmetics and its efficacy assessment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms of skin aging, the active ingredients used in anti-aging cosmetics and evaluation methods for anti-aging cosmetics were surmised in this paper. And the mechanisms of skin aging were introduced in the intrinsic and extrinsic ways. Meanwhile, the anti-aging cosmetic active ingredients were classified in accordance with the mechanism of action. Various evaluation methods such as human evaluation, in vitro evaluation were also summarized.

  20. Safety Assessment of Galactomannans as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 16 galactomannans as used in cosmetics. These ingredients are legume polysaccharides that function mostly as hair/skin-conditioning agents and viscosity-increasing agents in cosmetic products. Their substantial molecular sizes suggest that skin penetration of these ingredients would be unlikely. The Panel concluded that these galactomannans are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Safety Assessment of Synthetic Fluorphlogopite as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (the Panel) reviewed the safety of synthetic fluorphlogopite as used in cosmetics. Synthetic fluorphlogopite functions as a bulking agent and a viscosity-increasing agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to this ingredient along with a previous safety assessment of other magnesium silicates. The Panel concluded that synthetic fluorphlogopite was safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Contact allergy caused by isothiazolinone derivatives: an overview of non-cosmetic and unusual cosmetic sources.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Olivier; Goossens, An; Lambert, Julien; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The isothiazolinone derivatives, methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI), methylisothiazolinone (MI), benzisothiazolinone (BIT), and octylisothiazolinone (OIT), owing to their strong bactericide, fungicide and algicide properties, are widely used in non-cosmetic products, such as chemical (industrial) products, household detergents, and water-based paints, and the former two derivatives are also used in cosmetic products. However, given their inherent sensitization potential (with MCI > MI > BIT > OIT), allergic contact dermatitis is frequently observed, both in consumers as well as workers in various industries. In this review, we provide an update on the use of MCI/MI and MI in cosmetics, highlighting certain aspects of MI; the use of excessive concentrations, the presence in some less familiar cosmetic products, and the association with unusual clinical manifestations. Furthermore, the use of isothiazolinones in dish-washing and washing-machine liquids, cleaning agents for dental care, and their general presence in multi-purpose household detergents, which may elicit (airborne) allergic contact dermatitis, is discussed. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the use of isothiazolinone derivatives in the paint and textile industry, and of OIT in the leather industry in particular.

  3. Safety Assessment of PEGylated oils as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Christina L; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    PEGylated oil is a terminology used to describe cosmetic ingredients that are the etherification and esterification products of glycerides and fatty acids with ethylene oxide. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered the safety of PEGylated oils, which function primarily as surfactants in cosmetic products. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that the 130 chemically related PEGylated oils were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Short-term cosmetic orthodontics for general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Maini, A

    2013-01-01

    The demand for cosmetic dental treatments in the UK has grown dramatically in the last decade possibly due to increased public awareness of new techniques coupled with greater media attention for celebrities following smile enhancement treatments. In view of this, the aim of this article and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference and Exhibition is to provide an overview of short-term cosmetic orthodontics for general dental practitioners. The presentation will cover the differences between short-term cosmetic orthodontics and comprehensive orthodontic treatment, and explain how using short-term orthodontics can be an effective tool to deliver minimally invasive cosmetic dentistry.

  5. [Research progress of Chinese herbal medicine raw materials in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-jun; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Yang, Shi-hai

    2015-10-01

    Advocating green, nature, environmental protection, safety and the pursuit of efficacy are the trends of cosmetics in the world. In recent years, more and more Chinese herbal extracts with mild, high safety and small irritation are applied to cosmetics as the natural additives. This has become a new hot spot. The recent application advances of Chinese medicine raw materials in cosmetics are overviewed according to their main functions. This review will provide useful references for the future development and application of Chinese medicinal herbs cosmetics.

  6. Accenting Fashion: Cosmetics, Toiletries and Fragrances. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, K. Denise; Ritz, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information on the manufacture of cosmetics, toiletries, and fragrances. Includes a design brief, giving context, challenge, objectives, material and equipment needs, evaluation, student outcomes, and quiz. (SK)

  7. Accenting Fashion: Cosmetics, Toiletries and Fragrances. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, K. Denise; Ritz, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information on the manufacture of cosmetics, toiletries, and fragrances. Includes a design brief, giving context, challenge, objectives, material and equipment needs, evaluation, student outcomes, and quiz. (SK)

  8. Optimizing revenue at a cosmetic surgery centre.

    PubMed

    Funk, Joanna M; Verheyden, Charles N; Mahabir, Raman C

    2011-01-01

    The demand for cosmetic surgery and services has diminished with recent fluctuations in the economy. To stay ahead, surgeons must appreciate and attend to the fiscal challenges of private practice. A key component of practice economics is knowledge of the common methods of payment. To review methods of payment in a five-surgeon group practice in central Texas, USA. A retrospective chart review of the financial records of a cosmetic surgery centre in Texas was conducted. Data were collected for the five-year period from 2003 to 2008, and included the method of payment, the item purchased (product, service or surgery) and the dollar amount. More than 11,000 transactions were reviewed. The most common method of payment used for products and services was credit card, followed by check and cash. For procedures, the most common form of payment was personal check, followed by credit card and financing. Of the credit card purchases for both products and procedures, an overwhelming majority of patients (more than 75%) used either Visa (Visa Inc, USA) or MasterCard (MasterCard Worldwide, USA). If the amount of the individual transaction surpassed US$1,000, the most common method of payment transitioned from credit card to personal check. In an effort to maximize revenue, surgeons should consider limiting the credit cards accepted by the practice and encourage payment through personal check.

  9. Optimizing revenue at a cosmetic surgery centre

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Joanna M; Verheyden, Charles N; Mahabir, Raman C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for cosmetic surgery and services has diminished with recent fluctuations in the economy. To stay ahead, surgeons must appreciate and attend to the fiscal challenges of private practice. A key component of practice economics is knowledge of the common methods of payment. OBJECTIVE: To review methods of payment in a five-surgeon group practice in central Texas, USA. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of the financial records of a cosmetic surgery centre in Texas was conducted. Data were collected for the five-year period from 2003 to 2008, and included the method of payment, the item purchased (product, service or surgery) and the dollar amount. RESULTS: More than 11,000 transactions were reviewed. The most common method of payment used for products and services was credit card, followed by check and cash. For procedures, the most common form of payment was personal check, followed by credit card and financing. Of the credit card purchases for both products and procedures, an overwhelming majority of patients (more than 75%) used either Visa (Visa Inc, USA) or MasterCard (MasterCard Worldwide, USA). If the amount of the individual transaction surpassed US$1,000, the most common method of payment transitioned from credit card to personal check. CONCLUSIONS: In an effort to maximize revenue, surgeons should consider limiting the credit cards accepted by the practice and encourage payment through personal check. PMID:22942656

  10. Contact urticaria to cosmetic and industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Davari, P; Maibach, H I

    2011-01-01

    Contact urticaria (CU) defines the weal-and-flare reaction that occurs after external cutaneous contact with a causative agent. These reactions often cause discomfort for patients, affect their quality of life, and in severe cases may be life-threatening. Some dyes are known to be urticariogens. Many people have daily exposure to these urticariogens, because of the widespread use of dyes, for example in textiles, cosmetics and foods. We reviewed industrial and cosmetic dyes such as hair dyes, basic blue 99 dye, patent blue dyes, henna, red dyes, curcumin and reactive dyes, which can potentially cause CU. Overall, the reported cases of CU lacked appropriate controls. Hair-dye constituents such as preservatives and intensifiers may play an important role as causative agents of CU. We recommend appropriate protection guidelines to reduce the incidence of CU in high-risk groups such as hairdressers, dye-factory workers or workers in dye-related industries. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  12. Psychiatric issues in cosmetic plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ericksen, William Leif; Billick, Stephen Bates

    2012-09-01

    The objective of cosmetic surgery is increased patient self-esteem and confidence. Most patients undergoing a procedure report these results post-operatively. The success of any procedure is measured in patient satisfaction. In order to optimize patient satisfaction, literature suggests careful pre-operative patient preparation including a discussion of the risks, benefits, limitations and expected results for each procedure undertaken. As a general rule, the patients that are motivated to surgery by a desire to align their outward appearance to their body-image tend to be the most satisfied. There are some psychiatric conditions that can prevent a patient from being satisfied without regard aesthetic success. The most common examples are minimal defect/Body Dysmorphic Disorder, the patient in crisis, the multiple revision patient, and loss of identity. This paper will familiarize the audience with these conditions, symptoms and related illnesses. Case examples are described and then explored in terms of the conditions presented. A discussion of the patient's motivation for surgery, goals pertaining to specific attributes, as well as an evaluation of the patient's understanding of the risks, benefits, and limitations of the procedure can help the physician determine if a patient is capable of being satisfied with a cosmetic plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgeons can screen patients suffering from these conditions relatively easily, as psychiatry is an integral part of medical school education. If a psychiatric referral is required, then the psychiatrist needs to be aware of the nuances of each of these conditions.

  13. 21 CFR 700.25 - Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.25 Section 700.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.25 Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products. (a) General. Because most cosmetic liquid...

  14. 21 CFR 700.25 - Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.25 Section 700.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.25 Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products. (a) General. Because most cosmetic liquid...

  15. 21 CFR 700.25 - Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.25 Section 700.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.25 Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products. (a) General. Because most cosmetic liquid...

  16. 21 CFR 740.11 - Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. 740.11... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.11 Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. (a)(1) The label of a cosmetic packaged in a self-pressurized container and intended...

  17. 21 CFR 740.11 - Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. 740.11... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.11 Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. (a)(1) The label of a cosmetic packaged in a self-pressurized container and intended...

  18. 21 CFR 700.25 - Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.25 Section 700.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.25 Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products. (a) General. Because most cosmetic liquid...

  19. 21 CFR 740.11 - Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. 740.11... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.11 Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. (a)(1) The label of a cosmetic packaged in a self-pressurized container and intended...

  20. 21 CFR 700.25 - Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.25 Section 700.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.25 Tamper-resistant packaging requirements for cosmetic products. (a) General. Because most cosmetic liquid...

  1. 21 CFR 740.11 - Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. 740.11... (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.11 Cosmetics in self-pressurized containers. (a)(1) The label of a cosmetic packaged in a self-pressurized container and...

  2. Better understanding of the EU regulatory frameworks for cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kirsten; Mech, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    This letter to the editor corrects some misunderstandings regarding the EU regulations covering cosmetic products stated in a recent publication by A. Sobek et al. "In the shadow of the cosmetics directive - Inconsistencies in EU environmental hazard classification requirements for UV-filters" published in Science of the Total Environment 461-462 (2013) 706-711.

  3. Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sohee; Kim, Nack In; Ro, Young Suck; Kim, Joung Soo; Park, Young Min; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Dong Kun; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Objective To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Methods A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings. Results In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among “functional cosmetics,” whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product. Conclusion Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea. PMID:28392645

  4. 76 FR 67461 - Cosmetic Microbiological Safety Issues; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... adverse events associated with microbial contamination of cosmetics; and any other issues relevant to the.../LaboratoryMethods/BacteriologicalAnalyticalManualBAM/ucm073598.htm ). ] Microbial contamination of cosmetic... product characteristics, such as high water content. Microorganisms can also be introduced by...

  5. Evaluation of Polyurethane as a Cosmetic Glove Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Polyurethane latex was evaluated for possible use as a cosmetic glove material. A two component latex system was used with a number of films and a... cosmetic glove being fabricated and evaluated with varying amounts of the two components. The mechanical properties indicate that the material is

  6. [Nanomaterials in cosmetics--present situation and future].

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetics are consumer products intended to contribute to increasing quality of life and designed for long-term daily use. Due to such features of cosmetics, they are required to ensure quality and safety at a high level, as well as to perform well, in response to consumers' demands. Recently, the technology associated with nanomaterials has progressed rapidly and has been applied to various products, including cosmetics. For example, nano-sized titanium dioxide has been formulated in sunscreen products in pursuit of improving its performance. As some researchers and media have expressed concerns about the safety of nanomaterials, a vague feeling of anxiety has been raised in society. In response to this concern, the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association (JCIA) has begun original research related to the safety assurance of nanomaterials formulated in cosmetics, to allow consumers to use cosmetics without such concerns. This paper describes the activities of the JCIA regarding safety research on nanomaterials, including a survey of the actual usage of nanomaterials in cosmetics, analysis of the existence of nanomaterials on the skin, and assessment of skin carcinogenicity of nano-sized titanium dioxide. It also describes the international status of safety assurance and regulation regarding nanomaterials in cosmetics.

  7. Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soyun; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Nack In; Ro, Young Suck; Kim, Joung Soo; Park, Young Min; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Dong Kun; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Jun

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings. In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among "functional cosmetics," whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product. Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea.

  8. 75 FR 21595 - Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... International Trade Administration Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India AGENCY: International Trade... Beauty and Cosmetics Trade Mission to India (New Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore), November 15-19, 2010. Led by a senior Department of Commerce official, the mission will assist U.S. beauty and...

  9. The multifunctional value of sunscreen-containing cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2011-01-01

    Cosmetic products containing ultraviolet light filtering agents are rapidly being developed and entering the marketplace. These advanced multifunctional formulations are intended to deliver both cosmetic and protective benefits. Herein, a brief discussion is presented of newer preparations and their features, as well as how their formulary attributes may contribute to improving photoprotection by encouraging adherence.

  10. [Analyses of cosmetic sanitary quality in Hunan Province in 2010].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Sun, Zhenqiu; Shi, Jingcheng; Shen, Minxue; Hu, Jingxuan; Lei, Shiyue; Hu, Ming

    2012-05-01

    To establish a scientific foundation for cosmetic supervision and administration based on the analysis of the sanitary quality of cosmetics in Hunan Province during 2010. According to Cosmetic Sanitary Standards (set by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China), 150 random samples of cosmetics in Hunan were assayed both for microbial items (including total plate count, fungus and yeast, fecal coliform, staphylococcus aureus, pseudomonas aeruginosa) and chemical items (including 17 kinds of prohibited substances and 14 kinds of restricted substances). The total rate of cosmetics failing to meet the standards was 22.0% of the 150 samples; specific rates for failing perfumes, skin care products (eye cream) and deodorant products were, relatively, 70.6%, 60.00%, and 44.4%. Four kinds of prohibited substances, including diethyl phthalate, acrylamide, asbestos and neodymium, as well as 2 kinds of restricted substances, including triclosan and formaldehyde, were found to exceed standards. None of microbial items exceeded standard levels. The sanitary quality control of cosmetics is lax. Administrative departments should not only reinforce their post-production supervision with respect to cosmetics, but also consolidate their control over the process of cosmetic production in order to solve the problem of toxic residues or illegal and intentional adulterations.

  11. 77 FR 24722 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Cosmetic Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... ``Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products.'' The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent FDA's current thinking on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic...

  12. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) in cosmetic dermal products.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Petersen, R D; Hommoss, A; Pardeike, J

    2007-07-10

    The first generation of lipid nanoparticles was introduced as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), the second, improved generation as nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Identical to the liposomes, the lipid nanoparticles (NLC) appeared as products first on the cosmetic market. The article gives an overview of the cosmetic benefits of lipid nanoparticles, that means enhancement of chemical stability of actives, film formation, controlled occlusion, skin hydration, enhanced skin bioavailability and physical stability of the lipid nanoparticles as topical formulations. NLC are on the market as concentrates to be used as cosmetic excipients, special formulation challenges for these products are discussed. NLC appeared also in a number of finished cosmetic products world-wide. An overview of these products is provided including their special effects due to the lipid nanoparticles, lipids used for their production and incorporated cosmetic actives.

  13. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Safety Assessment of Talc as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Boyer, Ivan; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of talc for use in cosmetics. The safety of talc has been the subject of much debate through the years, partly because the relationship between talc and asbestos is commonly misunderstood. Industry specifications state that cosmetic-grade talc must contain no detectable fibrous, asbestos minerals. Therefore, the large amount of available animal and clinical data the Panel relied on in assessing the safety of talc only included those studies on talc that did not contain asbestos. The Panel concluded that talc is safe for use in cosmetics in the present practices of use and concentration (some cosmetic products are entirely composed of talc). Talc should not be applied to the skin when the epidermal barrier is missing or significantly disrupted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Cosmetic surgery in inpatients with eating disorders: attitudes and experience.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Janelle W; Schreyer, Colleen C; Sarwer, David B; Heinberg, Leslie J; Redgrave, Graham W; Guarda, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Body image disturbance is frequent among individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery and core to the pathology of eating disorders (ED); however, there is little research examining cosmetic surgery in ED. This study examined body image related measures, ED behaviors, and depression as predictors of attitudes toward cosmetic surgery in 129 women with ED. Patients who had undergone surgery (n=16, 12%) were compared to those who had not. Having a purging diagnosis, linking success to appearance, and making physical appearance comparisons were predictive of more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes. All of those who had undergone surgery had purging diagnoses and, on average, were older, had higher BMIs, and were more likely to make physical appearance comparisons and know someone who had undergone surgery. In ED, acceptance and pursuit of cosmetic surgery appears to be related to social group influences more than weight and shape disturbance, media influences, or mood.

  16. Cosmetic potentials of Prunus domestica L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Stierlin, Emilie; Azoulay, Stéphane; Massi, Lionel; Fernandez, Xavier; Michel, Thomas

    2017-07-04

    The current study presents new insight on the phytochemical content and biological activities of five Prunus domestica L. varieties ('Quetsche blanche de Létricourt', 'Mirabelle de Nancy', 'Perdrigon violet', 'Mirabelle de Provence', 'Reine-claude dorée'). The plum leaves were found to possess promising anti-aging activities by their capacity to inhibit 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), elastase, hyaluronidase and lipoxygenase. After solid phase extraction (SPE), chlorogenic acid, rutin, quercetin and their derivatives were putatively identified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry using an electrospray ionization source (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS). The plum leaf, a by-product, provides an interesting valuable resource for use as a natural cosmetic product or as a food supplement. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Fullerene nanoparticle in dermatological and cosmetic applications.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S Zeinab; Nafisi, Shohreh; Maibach, Howard I

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles are equipped with exceptional properties which make them well suitable for diverse and novel applications. Fullerene is one of the nanomaterials that has valuable applications in the field of biomedicine. It possesses exceptional antioxidant capacity which has made it a promising core ingredient in many dermatological and skin care products. However, fullerene has the potentials to display a range of activities resulting in cell death or dysfunction. This review outlines the achievements made so far by reporting studies that have focused on incorporating fullerene in skin care products and cosmetics and assessed their beneficial effects. We have also documented reports that have assessed toxicity of this novel carbon allotrope toward skin cells and discussed its possible dermal reactions. Aside from pointing out the recent developments, areas that can benefit from further researches are identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial Stability of Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Products.

    PubMed

    Dao, Huy; Lakhani, Prit; Police, Anitha; Kallakunta, Venkataraman; Ajjarapu, Sankar Srinivas; Wu, Kai-Wei; Ponkshe, Pranav; Repka, Michael A; Narasimha Murthy, S

    2017-10-10

    This review gives a brief overview about microbial contamination in pharmaceutical products. We discuss the distribution and potential sources of microorganisms in different areas, ranging from manufacturing sites, pharmacy stores, hospitals, to the post-market phase. We also discuss the factors that affect microbial contamination in popular dosage forms (e.g., tablets, sterile products, cosmetics). When these products are contaminated, the microorganisms can cause changes. The effects range from mild changes (e.g., discoloration, texture alteration) to severe effects (e.g., changes in activities, toxicity). The most common method for countering microbial contamination is the use of preservatives. We review some frequently used preservatives, and we describe the mechanisms by which microorganisms develop resistance to these preservatives. Finally, because preservatives are inherently toxic, we review the efforts of researchers to utilize water activity and other non-preservative approaches to combat microbial contamination.

  19. Preparing Colorful Astronomical Images III: Cosmetic Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattare, L. M.; Levay, Z. G.

    2003-12-01

    We present cosmetic cleaning techniques for use with mainstream graphics software (Adobe Photoshop) to produce presentation-quality images and illustrations from astronomical data. These techniques have been used on numerous images from the Hubble Space Telescope when producing photographic, print and web-based products for news, education and public presentation as well as illustrations for technical publication. We expand on a previous paper to discuss the treatment of various detector-attributed artifacts such as cosmic rays, chip seams, gaps, optical ghosts, diffraction spikes and the like. While Photoshop is not intended for quantitative analysis of full dynamic range data (as are IRAF or IDL, for example), we have had much success applying Photoshop's numerous, versatile tools to final presentation images. Other pixel-to-pixel applications such as filter smoothing and global noise reduction will be discussed.

  20. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words.

  1. Cosmetic surgery prior to diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panjari, M; Bell, R J; Fradkin, P; Davis, S R

    2012-04-01

    Cosmetic breast surgery is amongst the top five most commonly performed cosmetic surgical procedures. With breast cancer being the most common non-skin malignancy in women, the likelihood that a woman undergoing cosmetic breast surgery may have an occult breast cancer needs to be considered. Most of the available data pertaining to breast cancer diagnosis in the setting of cosmetic surgery are from studies of cosmetic breast surgery populations. We report on the prevalence of breast cancer as an incidental finding during cosmetic breast surgery in the context of women subsequently diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The Bupa Health Foundation Health and Wellbeing after Breast Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study of 1684 women recruited within 12 months of their first diagnosis with invasive breast cancer. Participants completed an enrolment questionnaire and annual follow-up questionnaires for 5 years. At the second follow-up, 1.5% of women reported having undergone cosmetic breast surgery prior to being diagnosed with breast cancer, 16 had undergone breast reduction and seven had augmentations. Invasive breast cancer was diagnosed at the time of a cosmetic breast procedure in two women, in both an augmentation and a reduction procedure, which is 8.7% (95% confidence interval 23.5% to +20.9%) of the women in our study reporting a cosmetic breast procedure prior to diagnosis. Although prior cosmetic breast surgery was reported by few women, breast cancer was diagnosed in two women during the procedure. Surgeons performing elective breast surgery need to understand and apply consistent, reliable breast cancer screening practices.

  2. Factors Affecting Patients Undergoing Cosmetic Surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Rafie, Seyyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although, there have been extensive research on the motivations driving patient to undergo cosmetic procedures, there is still a big question mark on the persuasive factors which may lead individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery. The present study evaluated various factors affecting patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran. METHODS From 24th March 2011 to 24th March 2012, eighty-one women and 20 men who wished to be operated in Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Bushehr, Southern Iran and Pars Clinic, Iran were enrolled by a simple random sampling method. They all completed a questionnaire to consider reasons for cosmetic procedures. The collected data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Demographical, sociological and psychological factors such as age, gender, educational level, marital status, media, perceived risks, output quality, depression and self-improvement were determined as factors affecting tendency of individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery in this region. Trend to undergo cosmetic surgery was more prevalent in educational below bachelor degree, married subjects, women population of 30-45 years age group. Education level, age, marital status and gender were respectively the influential factors in deciding to undergo cosmetic surgery. Among the socio-psychological factors, self-improvement, finding a better job opportunity, rivalry, media, health status as well as depression were the most persuasive factors to encourage people to undergo cosmetic surgery too. Cost risk was not important for our samples in decision making to undergo cosmetic surgery. CONCLUSION We need to fully understand the way in which the combination of demographic, social and psychological factors influence decision-making to undergo cosmetic surgery. PMID:25734051

  3. Aqueous dispersions of organogel nanoparticles - potential systems for cosmetic and dermo-cosmetic applications.

    PubMed

    Kirilov, P; Rum, S; Gilbert, E; Roussel, L; Salmon, D; Abdayem, R; Serre, C; Villa, C; Haftek, M; Falson, F; Pirot, F

    2014-08-01

    The preparation and physicochemical characterization of organogel nanoparticles dispersed in water have been developed. These systems could be employed as nanocarrier for cosmetic applications or as hydrophobic reservoirs for drug delivery. Gelled particles of organic liquid and 12-hydroxystearic acid (organogelator) were obtained by hot emulsification (T>Tgel), with a surfactant (acetylated glycol stearate) and polymers (sodium hyaluronate and polyvinyl alcohol) as stabilizing agents, and cooling at room temperature (T

  4. Cosmetic Surgery Makeover Programs and Intentions to Undergo Cosmetic Enhancements: A Consideration of Three Models of Media Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    The recent proliferation of reality-based television programs highlighting cosmetic surgery has raised concerns that such programming promotes unrealistic expectations of plastic surgery and increases the desire of viewers to undergo such procedures. In Study 1, a survey of 170 young adults indicated little relationship between cosmetic surgery…

  5. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. 700.13 Section 700.13 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  6. Cosmetic Surgery Makeover Programs and Intentions to Undergo Cosmetic Enhancements: A Consideration of Three Models of Media Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    The recent proliferation of reality-based television programs highlighting cosmetic surgery has raised concerns that such programming promotes unrealistic expectations of plastic surgery and increases the desire of viewers to undergo such procedures. In Study 1, a survey of 170 young adults indicated little relationship between cosmetic surgery…

  7. 75 FR 10332 - In the Matter of: Corridor Communications Corp., International Cosmetics Marketing Co., PNV, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... Communications Corp., International Cosmetics Marketing Co., PNV, Inc., Questron Technology, Inc. (n/k/a Quti... current and accurate information concerning the securities of International Cosmetics Marketing Co...

  8. A review of psychosocial outcomes for patients seeking cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Roberta J; Phillips, Katharine A; Castle, David J

    2004-04-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on psychological and psychosocial outcomes for individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery, to address whether elective cosmetic procedures improve psychological well-being and psychosocial functioning and whether there are identifiable predictors of an unsatisfactory psychological outcome. They conducted a search of appropriate computerized databases for studies that evaluated psychological and psychosocial status both before and after elective cosmetic surgery. They identified 37 relevant studies of varying cosmetic procedures that utilized disparate methodologies. Overall, patients appeared generally satisfied with the outcome of their procedures, although some exhibited transient and some exhibited longer-lasting psychological disturbance. Factors associated with poor psychosocial outcome included being young, being male, having unrealistic expectations of the procedure, previous unsatisfactory cosmetic surgery, minimal deformity, motivation based on relationship issues, and a history of depression, anxiety, or personality disorder. Body dysmorphic disorder was also recognized by some studies as a predictor of poor outcome, a finding reinforced by reference to the psychiatric literature. The authors conclude that although most people appear satisfied with the outcome of cosmetic surgical procedures, some are not, and attempts should be made to screen for such individuals in cosmetic surgery settings.

  9. Metal Concentrations in Cosmetics Commonly Used in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Otaraku, Jonathan Oye

    2013-01-01

    Trace amounts of potentially toxic metals can be either intentionally added to cosmetics or present as impurities in the raw materials. In the present study, the levels of lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, and mercury have been assessed in 28 body creams and lotions, 10 powders, 3 soaps, 5 eye make-ups, and 4 lipsticks widely available on Nigerian markets. The increases over suggested or mandated levels of lead in these creams and lotions ranged from 6.1 to 45.9 and from 1.2 to 9.2 mg kg−1 when compared with Cosmetic Ingredients Review Expert Panel 2007 and German safe maximum permissible limit of lead in cosmetics, respectively. About 61% of the body cosmetics, the lotions, and the creams contained detectable levels of nickel ranging from 1.1 to 6.4–9.2 mg kg−1. Chromium and mercury were undetected in 100% of the cosmetic product. Taken together, lead and cadmium were high in creams and lotions. Most of the imported creams and creamy white coloured cosmetics contained higher levels of metal contaminants than the other colours. Regulatory Agencies in developing nations should take appropriate action for cosmetics that contain lead and cadmium beyond the reference limits. PMID:24385889

  10. Toxic metals contained in cosmetics: a status report.

    PubMed

    Bocca, Beatrice; Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro; Forte, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    The persistence of metals in the environment and their natural occurrence in rocks, soil and water cause them to be present in the manufacture of pigments and other raw materials used in the cosmetic industry. Thus, people can be exposed to metals as trace contaminants in cosmetic products they daily use. Cosmetics may have multiple forms, uses and exposure scenarios, and metals contained in them can cause skin local problems but also systemic effects after their absorption via the skin or ingestion. Even this, cosmetics companies are not obliged to report on this kind of impurities and so consumers have no way of knowing about their own risk. This paper reviewed both the concentration of metals in different types of cosmetics manufactured and sold worldwide and the data on metals' dermal penetration and systemic toxicology. The eight metals of concern for this review were antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb). This was because they are banned as intentional ingredients in cosmetics, have draft limits as potential impurities in cosmetics and are known as toxic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metal concentrations in cosmetics commonly used in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Otaraku, Jonathan Oye

    2013-01-01

    Trace amounts of potentially toxic metals can be either intentionally added to cosmetics or present as impurities in the raw materials. In the present study, the levels of lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, and mercury have been assessed in 28 body creams and lotions, 10 powders, 3 soaps, 5 eye make-ups, and 4 lipsticks widely available on Nigerian markets. The increases over suggested or mandated levels of lead in these creams and lotions ranged from 6.1 to 45.9 and from 1.2 to 9.2 mg kg⁻¹ when compared with Cosmetic Ingredients Review Expert Panel 2007 and German safe maximum permissible limit of lead in cosmetics, respectively. About 61% of the body cosmetics, the lotions, and the creams contained detectable levels of nickel ranging from 1.1 to 6.4-9.2 mg kg⁻¹. Chromium and mercury were undetected in 100% of the cosmetic product. Taken together, lead and cadmium were high in creams and lotions. Most of the imported creams and creamy white coloured cosmetics contained higher levels of metal contaminants than the other colours. Regulatory Agencies in developing nations should take appropriate action for cosmetics that contain lead and cadmium beyond the reference limits.

  12. Safety assessment of chromium by exposure from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Myungsil; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ja Young; Son, Bo Kyung; Yang, Seong Jun; Yun, Mi Ok; Choi, Sang Sook; Jang, Dong Deuk; Yoo, Tae Moo

    2009-02-01

    Low level impurities often reside in cosmetic products. The aim of the present study was to estimate the human exposure to chromium from cosmetic products purchased at a local market in South Korea, and to assess the risk on public health. Hexavalent chromium is an impurity substance that contaminates cosmetic products during manufacture. The potential for chromium to induce and elicit allergic contact dermatitis, as well as the degree of chromium exposure from cosmetic products, were assessed. Chromium exposure was estimated using the chromium concentrations found in cosmetic samples taken from the local market along with the expected user pattern data that was taken from the literature. Of the cosmetics we tested and available for purchase on the Korean market, seven had chromium contents above the detection limit of 0.1 ppm (0.1 microg/mL), ranging from 0.2 to 3.15 ppm. In risk assessment, scientifically defensible dose-response relationships must be established for the end points of concern. In the case of chromium contaminated cosmetic products, this includes conducting dose-response assessments for allergic contact dermatitis following dermal exposure. This dose-response information can then be integrated with site-specific exposure assessments to regulate consumer safety by use of these products. We found that dermal exposure to chromium concentrations ranging from 0.0002 to 0.003 microg/cm(2) does not appear to cause concern for eliciting allergic contact dermatitis.

  13. The influence of cosmetics on the properties of skin autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošiūnas, M.; Bertulytė, I.; Rečiūnaitė, I.; Jakštys, B.; Šatkauskienė, I.; Čepurnienė, K.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the changes of autofluorescence and sensitized fluorescence under the effect of cosmetics. We used a method of fluorescence spectroscopy in vivo and examined the mouse skin covering the tumour. Analysis of fluorescence spectral changes was made after differentiation of the cosmetics according to its effects: i) inducing temporary changes of skin autofluorescence after absorbtion into skin (lipsticks, face powders, body lotions, mascaras); ii) permanently changing the fluorescence of the skin (collagen containing products). Cosmetics have been shown to be optically active and capable to alter the fluorescence of exogenously accumulated photosensitizers and endogenous tissue fluorophores.

  14. Therapies to improve the cosmetic symptoms of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Rosacea is a commonly encountered chronic inflammatory skin disease with a predilection for highly visible areas of the skin such as the face. The cosmetic symptoms of rosacea can be substantial and may greatly reduce a patient's quality of life. Although there is no definitive cure for rosacea, effective treatment of symptoms can mitigate the deleterious effects of this condition and improve quality of life. In this article, we review both existing and emerging cosmetic treatments for rosacea, including topical medications, systemic pharmacologic therapies, light-based modalities, and procedural interventions, and assess their ability to improve the cosmetic symptoms of rosacea.

  15. Cosmetics considered in the context of physical attractiveness: a review.

    PubMed

    Graham, J A; Jouhar, A J

    1980-04-01

    Synopsis This review demonstrates the importance of outward appearance (especially of the face and head) in physical attractiveness and describes the methodology and results of objective experiments which assess interpersonal attraction, others' perceptions of the physically attractive and self-perception. It shows that, although cosmetics have been used, inter alia, to manipulate physical attractiveness in some of these experiments, there are little data showing benefit of cosmetics per se to the individual. Consequently, the review is a first step in designing objective studies to test the hypothesis that cosmetics are of demonstrable benefit to the user.

  16. Safety Assessment of Ethanolamides as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) rereviewed the safety of 28 ethanolamides and found them safe in the present practices of use and concentration when they are formulated to be nonirritating, and that these ingredients should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds may be formed. Most of the ethanolamides are reported to function in cosmetics as hair-conditioning agents, skin-conditioning agents, and surfactant-foam boosters. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, as well as information from previous CIR reports. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Inframammary pulse generator placement for maximizing cosmetic effect.

    PubMed

    Belott, P H; Bucko, D

    1983-11-01

    Today with the expanding clinical role of cardiac pacing and more advanced methods of detecting pacing problems, more and more young patients are being identified as candidates for permanent pacing. Concern has been expressed by young female patients over the cosmetic effects of pacemaker surgery. Two young female patients were evaluated from a physiologic and cosmetic point of view. The electrodes were placed via the percutaneous approach. The pulse generator was treated as a breast implant using the usual recommended plastic surgeon's inframammary approach. In both cases, optimal cosmetic effect was achieved without any external evidence of the pacemaker system.

  18. Cosmetic Lateral Canthoplasty: Preserving the Lateral Canthal Angle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Choi, Hong Lim; Jeong, Eui Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic lateral canthoplasty, in which the size of the eye is increased by extending the palpebral fissure and decreasing the degree of the eye slant, has become a prevalent procedure for East Asians. However, it is not uncommon for there to be complications or unfavorable results after the surgery. With this in mind, the authors have designed a surgical method to reduce complications in cosmetic lateral canthoplasty by preserving the lateral canthal angle. We discuss here the anatomy required for surgery, the surgical methods, and methods for reducing complications during cosmetic lateral canthoplasty. PMID:27462563

  19. Exploring the potential of using algae in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Ching-Chun; Huynh, Pauline; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    The applications of microalgae in cosmetic products have recently received more attention in the treatment of skin problems, such as aging, tanning and pigment disorders. There are also potential uses in the areas of anti-aging, skin-whitening, and pigmentation reduction products. While algae species have already been used in some cosmetic formulations, such as moisturizing and thickening agents, algae remain largely untapped as an asset in this industry due to an apparent lack of utility as a primary active ingredient. This review article focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to skin health and beauty, with the purpose of identifying serviceable algae functions in practical cosmetic uses.

  20. Plant stem cells as innovation in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Moruś, Martyna; Baran, Monika; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena; Skotnicka-Graca, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells thanks to their ability of unlimited division number or transformation into different cell types creating organs, are responsible for regeneration processes. Depending on the organism in which the stem cells exists, they divide to the plant or animal ones. The later group includes the stem cells existing in both embryo's and adult human's organs. It includes, among others, epidermal stem cells, located in the hair follicle relieves and also in its basal layers, and responsible for permanent regeneration of the epidermis. Temporary science looks for method suitable for stimulation of the epidermis stem cells, amongst the other by delivery of e.g., growth factors for proliferation that decrease with the age. One of the methods is the use of the plant cell culture technology, including a number of methods that should ensure growth of plant cells, issues or organs in the environment with the microorganism-free medium. It uses abilities of the different plant cells to dedifferentiation into stem cells and coming back to the pluripotent status. The extracts obtained this way from the plant stem cells are currently used for production of both common or professional care cosmetics. This work describes exactly impact of the plant stem cell extract, coming from one type of the common apple tree (Uttwiler Spätlauber) to human skin as one of the first plant sorts, which are used in cosmetology and esthetic dermatology.

  1. Marketing the cosmetic practice via television.

    PubMed

    Smith, R N; Smith, M E

    1995-01-01

    Everyone is marketing their dental practice whether they know it or not. It is far better to design the desired effect than to send mixed messages to your clients. All marketing must be carried out with a plan or mission that is internalized by the doctor and by each member of the staff. The mission coupled with creative talent becomes the proprietary personality of your office and the focus of your marketing efforts. Internal marketing is perhaps the most economical and effective--and most used--method of creating positive results for the practice. External marketing takes your office out to the public most often in print via newsletters, direct mailings, and the yellow pages. Getting the message out through newspapers, radio, and television has and will become increasingly important. This article takes you through the steps we used to identify and market to our cosmetic clients. The results of our demographic and psychographic studies afford unique insight into the type of person attracted by our services. Marketing to this group has to do with diversity in appeal, "the boomers," and experiential motivation.

  2. Environmentally compatible surfactants for the cosmetic industry.

    PubMed

    Berger, H

    1997-10-01

    From the application pattern of surfactant-containing cosmetic products, it is inevitable that the major part of the chemicals will be discharged into waste water and eventually will enter the environment. Because the environmental compatibility of the products is based on the ecological properties of their raw meterials, the biodegradability and ecotoxicological behaviour of the product components and particularly the surfactants, form the central elements of the environmental compatibility assessment. The tools for this evaluation are standardized test systems, which are described and discussed on the basis of the ecological data of selected surfactants. De par le type d'application des produits cosmetiques contenant des tensioactifs, il est inevitable que la plus grande partie des substances chimiques soit evacuee dans les eaux usees et finisse par arriver dans l'environnement. Puisque la compatibilite environnementale des produits est basee sur les proprietes ecologiques de leurs matieres premieres, la biodegradabilite et le comportement ecotoxicologique des composants des produits, et en particulier des tensioactifs, forment les elements majeurs de l'evaluation de la compatibilite environnementale. Les outils de cette evaluation sont des systemes d'essai normalises, qui sont decrits et commentes d'apres les donnees ecologiques de tensioactifs choisis.

  3. Beam shaping for cosmetic hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Tuttle, Tracie

    2007-09-01

    Beam shaping has the potential to provide comfort to people who require or seek laser based cosmetic skin procedures. Of immediate interest is the procedure of aesthetic hair removal. Hair removal is performed using a variety of wavelengths from 480 to 1200 nm by means of filtered Xenon flash lamps (pulsed light) or 810 nm diode lasers. These wavelengths are considered the most efficient means available for hair removal applications, but current systems use simple reflector designs and plane filter windows to direct the light to the surface being exposed. Laser hair removal is achieved when these wavelengths at sufficient energy levels are applied to the epidermis. The laser energy is absorbed by the melanin (pigment) in the hair and hair follicle which in turn is transformed into heat. This heat creates the coagulation process, which causes the removal of the hair and prevents growth of new hair [1]. This paper outlines a technique of beam shaping that can be applied to a non-contact based hair removal system. Several features of the beam shaping technique including beam uniformity and heat dispersion across its operational treatment area will be analyzed. A beam shaper design and its fundamental testing will be discussed in detail.

  4. Safety assessment of borosilicate glasses as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of calcium sodium borosilicate, calcium aluminum borosilicate, calcium titanium borosilicate, silver borosilicate, and zinc borosilicate as used in cosmetics. These borosilicate glasses function mostly as bulking agents. Available animal and human data were considered along with data from a previous safety assessment of magnesium silicates. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. Data submitted on calcium borosilicate, which is not a cosmetic ingredient, are also included as additional support for the safety of borosilicate glass ingredients. The Panel concluded that borosilicate glasses are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  5. "Cosmetic electrochemistry": the facile production of graphite microelectrode ensembles.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Nadeem A; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2010-03-14

    The facile and rapid production of microelectrode ensembles is shown to be possible using off-the-shelf cosmetic products and is exemplified with the electrochemical sensing of a toxic metal offering a novel fabrication methodology.

  6. BELOW-ELBOW COSMETIC CONDYLE-SUSPENDED PROSTHESIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    particular appeal to those amputees who desire a prosthesis for cosmetic reasons. However this type of prosthesis can be so built to provide a means for operating the active mechanical terminal device. (Author)

  7. Acceptance of cosmetic surgery: personality and individual difference predictors.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Bridges, Stacey; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the association between several attitudinal constructs related to acceptance of cosmetic surgery, and participant demographics, personality, and individual difference variables. A sample of 332 university students completed a battery of scales comprising the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale (ACSS) and measures of the Big Five personality factors, self-esteem, conformity, self-assessed attractiveness, and demographics. Multiple regressions showed that the predictor variables explained a large proportion of the variance in ACSS factors (Adj. R(2) ranging between .31 and .60). In addition, structural equation modelling revealed that distal factors (sex and age) were generally associated with acceptance of cosmetic surgery through the mediate influence of more proximate variables (in the first instance, the Big Five personality factors, followed by self-esteem and conformity, and finally self-assessed attractiveness). These results allow for the presentation of a preliminary model integrating personality and individual differences in predicting acceptance of cosmetic surgery.

  8. Safety assessment of alkyl benzoates as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    'Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2012-01-01

    The functions of alkyl benzoates in cosmetics include fragrance ingredients, skin-conditioning agents--emollient, skin-conditioning agents--miscellaneous, preservatives, solvents, and plasticizers. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed the relevant animal and human data and noted gaps in the available safety data for some of the alkyl benzoates. Similar structure activity relationships, biologic functions, and cosmetic product usage allowed the available data of many of the alkyl benzoates to be extended to the entire group. Carcinogenicity data were not available, but available data indicated that these alkyl benzoate cosmetic ingredients are not genotoxic. Also benzoic acid and tested component alcohols were not reproductive or developmental toxicants, are not genotoxic in almost all assays, and are not carcinogenic. These ingredients were determined to be safe in the present practices of use and concentration.

  9. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Esters as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 237 alkyl esters for use in cosmetics. The alkyl esters included in this assessment have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, with skin-conditioning agent being the most common function. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety on these ingredients, and where there were data gaps, similarity in structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients allowed for extrapolation of the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Ethylhexanoates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 16 alkyl ethylhexanoates for use in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentrations when formulated to be nonirritating. The alkyl ethylhexanoates primarily function as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetics. The highest concentration of use reported for any of the alkyl ethylhexanoates is 77.3% cetyl ethylhexanoate in rinse-off formulations used near the eye, and the highest leave-on use reported is 52% cetyl ethylhexanoate in lipstick formulations. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data related to these ingredients, and the similarities in structure, properties, functions, and uses of ingredients from previous CIR assessments on constituent alcohols that allowed for extrapolation of the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Case Reports: Low Back Pain in the Cosmetic Athlete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Carol E.

    1987-01-01

    Case studies indicate that the cosmetic athlete, who exercises primarily to attain or maintain an attractive physical appearance, may overwork unconditioned muscles and stress the spine and other structures. (Author/CB)

  12. Case Reports: Low Back Pain in the Cosmetic Athlete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Carol E.

    1987-01-01

    Case studies indicate that the cosmetic athlete, who exercises primarily to attain or maintain an attractive physical appearance, may overwork unconditioned muscles and stress the spine and other structures. (Author/CB)

  13. Current trends in sample preparation for cosmetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhixiong; Li, Gongke

    2017-01-01

    The widespread applications of cosmetics in modern life make their analysis particularly important from a safety point of view. There is a wide variety of restricted ingredients and prohibited substances that primarily influence the safety of cosmetics. Sample preparation for cosmetic analysis is a crucial step as the complex matrices may seriously interfere with the determination of target analytes. In this review, some new developments (2010-2016) in sample preparation techniques for cosmetic analysis, including liquid-phase microextraction, solid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, pressurized liquid extraction, cloud point extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, and microwave digestion, are presented. Furthermore, the research and progress in sample preparation techniques and their applications in the separation and purification of allowed ingredients and prohibited substances are reviewed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A review of selected chemical additives in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2014-01-01

    The addition of chemical additives to consumer cosmetic products is a common practice to increase cosmetic effectiveness, maintain cosmetic efficacy, and produce a longer-lasting, more viable product. Recently, manufacturers have come under attack for the addition of chemicals including dioxane, formaldehyde, lead/lead acetate, parabens, and phthalate, as these additives may prove harmful to consumer health. Although reports show that these products may indeed adversely affect human health, these studies are conducted using levels of the aforementioned chemicals at much higher levels of exposure than those found in cosmetic products. When cosmeceuticals are used as per manufacturer's instructions, it is estimated that the levels of harmful additives found in these products are considerably lower than reported toxic concentrations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mobile cosmetics advisor: an imaging based mobile service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Nina; Baker, Harlyn; Chao, Hui; Clearwater, Scott; Harville, Mike; Jain, Jhilmil; Lyons, Nic; Marguier, Joanna; Schettino, John; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Selecting cosmetics requires visual information and often benefits from the assessments of a cosmetics expert. In this paper we present a unique mobile imaging application that enables women to use their cell phones to get immediate expert advice when selecting personal cosmetic products. We derive the visual information from analysis of camera phone images, and provide the judgment of the cosmetics specialist through use of an expert system. The result is a new paradigm for mobile interactions-image-based information services exploiting the ubiquity of camera phones. The application is designed to work with any handset over any cellular carrier using commonly available MMS and SMS features. Targeted at the unsophisticated consumer, it must be quick and easy to use, not requiring download capabilities or preplanning. Thus, all application processing occurs in the back-end system and not on the handset itself. We present the imaging pipeline technology and a comparison of the services' accuracy with respect to human experts.

  16. Cosmetic results of supracondylar osteotomy for correction of cubitus varus.

    PubMed

    Barrett, I R; Bellemore, M C; Kwon, Y M

    1998-01-01

    From 1984 to 1995, 19 patients with cubitus varus resulting from supracondylar humeral fractures underwent lateral closing-wedge osteotomies at The Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children. As the indication for osteotomy in all cases was the cosmetically unacceptable cubitus varus, we reviewed the cosmetic results. Seventeen patients were available for review. Subjective reports from patients and parents, as well as objective clinical assessment by one of the authors, were used to assess these results. According to our grading system, 12 (76%) patients had excellent results. These patients and their parents were satisfied with the cosmetic results, and there was no clinical evidence of a bony prominence over the lateral condylar region or an unsightly operative scar. One patient had a poor result with a lateral bony prominence and an unsightly scar, both of which were clinically obvious. We report that lateral closing osteotomies in children who have not yet reached skeletal maturity produce excellent cosmetic results.

  17. Body Odor Based Personality Judgments: The Effect of Fragranced Cosmetics

    PubMed Central

    Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Sorokowski, Piotr; Havlíček, Jan

    2016-01-01

    People can accurately assess various personality traits of others based on body odor (BO) alone. Previous studies have shown that correlations between odor ratings and self-assessed personality dimensions are evident for assessments of neuroticism and dominance. Here, we tested differences between assessments based on natural body odor alone, without the use of cosmetics and assessments based on the body odor of people who were allowed to use cosmetics following their daily routine. Sixty-seven observers assessed samples of odors from 113 odor donors (each odor donor provided two samples – one with and one without cosmetic use); the donors provided their personality ratings, and the raters judged personality characteristics of the donors based on the provided odor samples. Correlations between observers’ ratings and self-rated neuroticism were stronger when raters assessed body odor in the natural body odor condition (natural BO condition; rs = 0.20) than in the cosmetics use condition (BO+cosmetics condition; rs = 0.15). Ratings of dominance significantly predicted self-assessed dominance in both conditions (rs = 0.34 for natural BO and rs = 0.21 for BO+cosmetics), whereas ratings of extraversion did not predict self-assessed extraversion in either condition. In addition, ratings of body odor attractiveness and pleasantness were significantly lower in natural BO condition than in BO+cosmetics condition, although the intensity of donors’ body odors was similar under both conditions. Our findings suggest that although olfaction seems to contribute to accurate first impression judgments of certain personality traits, cosmetic use can affect assessments of others based on body odor. PMID:27148138

  18. 21 CFR 700.15 - Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ingredients in cosmetic products. 700.15 Section 700.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.15 Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products. (a...

  19. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but where...

  20. 21 CFR 720.7 - Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notification of person submitting cosmetic product... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.7 Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement. When Form FDA...

  1. 21 CFR 710.6 - Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notification of registrant; cosmetic product... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY REGISTRATION OF COSMETIC PRODUCT ESTABLISHMENTS § 710.6 Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number. The...

  2. 21 CFR 710.6 - Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notification of registrant; cosmetic product... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY REGISTRATION OF COSMETIC PRODUCT ESTABLISHMENTS § 710.6 Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number. The...

  3. 21 CFR 700.15 - Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ingredients in cosmetic products. 700.15 Section 700.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.15 Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products. (a...

  4. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ingredient names established for cosmetic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Labeling of Specific Ingredients § 701.30 Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling. The Commissioner establishes the following...

  5. 21 CFR 720.7 - Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notification of person submitting cosmetic product... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.7 Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement. When Form FDA...

  6. 21 CFR 700.15 - Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ingredients in cosmetic products. 700.15 Section 700.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.15 Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products. (a...

  7. 21 CFR 710.6 - Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notification of registrant; cosmetic product... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY REGISTRATION OF COSMETIC PRODUCT ESTABLISHMENTS § 710.6 Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number. The...

  8. 21 CFR 720.7 - Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Notification of person submitting cosmetic product... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.7 Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement. When Form FDA...

  9. 16 CFR § 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... REGULATIONS § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but where...

  11. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but where...

  12. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ingredient names established for cosmetic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Labeling of Specific Ingredients § 701.30 Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling. The Commissioner establishes the following...

  13. 21 CFR 720.7 - Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notification of person submitting cosmetic product... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.7 Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement. When Form FDA...

  14. Materialism, Sociocultural Appearance Messages, and Paternal Attitudes Predict College Women's Attitudes about Cosmetic Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson-King, Donna; Brooks, Kelly D.

    2009-01-01

    Rates of cosmetic surgery procedures have increased dramatically over the past several decades, but only recently have studies of cosmetic surgery attitudes among the general population begun to appear in the literature. The vast majority of those who undergo cosmetic surgery are women. We examined cosmetic surgery attitudes among 218…

  15. 16 CFR 1500.81 - Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and... § 1500.81 Exemptions for food, drugs, cosmetics, and fuels. (a) Food, drugs, and cosmetics. Substances subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are exempted by section 2(f)(2) of the act; but where...

  16. 21 CFR 710.6 - Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notification of registrant; cosmetic product... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY REGISTRATION OF COSMETIC PRODUCT ESTABLISHMENTS § 710.6 Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number. The...

  17. 21 CFR 720.7 - Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notification of person submitting cosmetic product... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS VOLUNTARY FILING OF COSMETIC PRODUCT INGREDIENT COMPOSITION STATEMENTS § 720.7 Notification of person submitting cosmetic product ingredient statement. When Form FDA...

  18. 21 CFR 700.15 - Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredients in cosmetic products. 700.15 Section 700.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.15 Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products. (a...

  19. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an...

  20. Materialism, Sociocultural Appearance Messages, and Paternal Attitudes Predict College Women's Attitudes about Cosmetic Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson-King, Donna; Brooks, Kelly D.

    2009-01-01

    Rates of cosmetic surgery procedures have increased dramatically over the past several decades, but only recently have studies of cosmetic surgery attitudes among the general population begun to appear in the literature. The vast majority of those who undergo cosmetic surgery are women. We examined cosmetic surgery attitudes among 218…

  1. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  2. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Ingredient names established for cosmetic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Labeling of Specific Ingredients § 701.30 Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling. The Commissioner establishes the...

  3. 21 CFR 700.15 - Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ingredients in cosmetic products. 700.15 Section 700.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.15 Use of certain halogenated salicylanilides as ingredients in cosmetic products....

  4. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ingredient names established for cosmetic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Labeling of Specific Ingredients § 701.30 Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling. The Commissioner establishes the...

  5. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  6. 21 CFR 700.16 - Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing... SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.16 Use of aerosol cosmetic products containing zirconium. (a) Zirconium-containing complexes have been used as an...

  7. 21 CFR 701.30 - Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ingredient names established for cosmetic... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Labeling of Specific Ingredients § 701.30 Ingredient names established for cosmetic ingredient labeling. The Commissioner establishes the...

  8. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  9. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Hamayun; Nazir, Jaweria; Firdous, Syeda Sadiqa; Khalid, Abd-Ur-Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%), hair growth (11%), bad breath (12%), facial spots (9%), allergy, (9%), fairness (8%), wrinkles (8%), eye and lip care (9%). Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%), Leaves (25.2%), seeds (13.4%) and roots (8.9%). Women of older (>30 years) age group showed greater (67%) response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area. PMID:25068138

  10. Non-fragrance allergens in specific cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Ana Rita; Claes, Lieve; Boey, Lies; Drieghe, Jacques; Goossens, An

    2011-11-01

    Reports about the nature of the ingredients responsible for allergic contact dermatitis caused by specific cosmetic products are scarce. Between January 2000 and December 2010, the specific cosmetic products having caused allergic contact dermatitis, as well as the individual allergenic cosmetic ingredients present in them, were recorded by use of a standardized form. Among 11 different categories of cosmetic product, skin care products, followed by hair care and body-cleansing products, were most often involved. The presence of the allergenic ingredient(s) in a specific cosmetic product was confirmed according to the ingredient label in 959 of 1448 records. Six hundred and twenty-one of 959 concerned non-fragrance components, preservatives being responsible for 58% of them. Reactions to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers were most often correlated with body-cleansing products, particularly 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol and skin care products. They were followed by the methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone mixture, most frequently found as allergens in hair care and intimate hygiene products, and facial cleansers (in the last category together with diazolidinyl urea). Octocrylene was by far the most frequent (photo)allergen in sun care products. This study provides information on the presence and frequency of allergens in specific causal cosmetic products. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear.

  12. Cosmetic textiles with biological benefits: gelatin microcapsules containing vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuk Yan; Yuen, Marcus Chun Wah; Kan, Chi Wai; Cheuk, Kevin Ka Leung; Chui, Chung Hin; Lam, Kim Hung

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, textile materials with special applications in the cosmetic field have been developed. A new sector of cosmetic textiles is opened up and several cosmetic textile products are currently available in the market. Microencapsulation technology is an effective technique to control the release properties of active ingredients that prolong the functionality of cosmetic textiles. This study discusses the development of cosmetic textiles and addresses microencapsulation technology with respect to its historical background, significant advantages, microencapsulation methods and recent applications in the textile industry. Gelatin microcapsules containing vitamin C were prepared using emulsion hardening technique. Both the optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the newly developed microcapsules were in the form of core-shell spheres with relatively smooth surface. The particle size of microcapsules ranged from 5.0 to 44.1 microm with the average particle size being 24.6 microm. The gelatin microcapsules were proved to be non-cytotoxic based on the research findings of the toxicity studies conducted on human liver and breast cell lines as well as primary bone marrow culture obtained from patient with non-malignant haematological disorder. The gelatin microcapsules were successfully grafted into textile materials for the development of cosmetic textiles.

  13. EU legislations affecting safety data availability of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Marleen; Rogiers, Vera

    2007-12-01

    With the introduction of the 6th and 7th Amendments (OJ L151, 32-37, 23 June 1993; OJ L066, 26-35, 11 March 2003) to the Cosmetic Products Directive (OJ L262, 169-200, 27 September 1976), imposing a testing and marketing ban on cosmetic products tested on animals, the retrieval of toxicological data on individual ingredients became of greater need. Since the majority of cosmetic ingredients are used for many other purposes than their cosmetic function, they fall under the scope of more than one EU Directive. An overview is given of EU legislation that could potentially affect the availability and interpretation of cosmetic safety data. It will become clear that, although cosmetics are regulated by a specific so-called "vertical" legislation, "horizontal" influences from other products' legislations play a role since they determine the type and amount of data that theoretically could be found on the specific substances they regulate. This knowledge is necessary while performing extended searches in databases and becomes indispensable when initiating negotiations with manufacturers or suppliers for obtaining the safety data required.

  14. Safety assessment of modified terephthalate polymers as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The safety of 6 modified terephthalate polymers as cosmetic ingredients was assessed. These ingredients mostly function as exfoliants, bulking agents, hair fixatives, and viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is used in leave-on products up to 100% and in rinse-off products up to 2%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered that the PET used in cosmetics is chemically equivalent to that used in medical devices. The Panel determined that the Food and Drug Administration's determination of safety of PET in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, can be used as the basis for the determination of safety of PET and related polymers used in cosmetics. Use studies of cosmetic eye products that contain PET demonstrated no ocular irritation or dermal sensitization. The Panel concluded that modified terephthalate polymers were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Enterobacter gergoviae adaptation to preservatives commonly used in cosmetic industry.

    PubMed

    Périamé, M; Pagès, J-M; Davin-Regli, A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a better understanding regarding the origin of recurrent contamination by Enterobacter gergoviae in diverse cosmetic formula. We studied 65 isolates collected from various sources (clinical, food, cosmetics). RAPD analysis using AP12H, REP and ERIC-PCR was carried out for epidemiological typing. Evaluation of susceptibility to preservatives currently used in cosmetics for a representative panel of collection strains was measured. Preservative efficacy was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). Eighty per cent of isolates was unrelated. E. gergoviae showed significant levels of resistance to preservatives. MBC was higher than maximum permitted concentrations imposed by European Commission (EC). Association of preservatives showed in rare case additive effects, and no synergic effects were observed. Most of the cosmetic formulations are contaminated with unrelated E. gergoviae strains. Maximum allowed concentrations for sodium benzoate are inefficient to limit proliferation and control adaptability to this bacterium in cosmetic products. Efflux mechanisms should be involved in methylisothiazolinone-chloromethylisothiazolinone and triclosan adaptation. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Cosmetic psychopharmacology and the President's Council on Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience and biotechnology have heightened the urgency of the debate over "cosmetic psychopharmacology," the use of drugs to enhance mood and temperament in the absence of illness. Beyond Therapy: Biotechnology and the Pursuit of Happiness (2003), the report of the President's Council on Bioethics, has criticized the use of cosmetic psychopharmacology. The Council claimed that cosmetic psychopharmacology will necessarily lead to "severing the link between feelings of happiness and our actions and experiences in the world," but it provided no satisfactory arguments to support this claim and ignored the possibility that cosmetic psychopharmacology might actually enhance the link between happiness and experience. The Council's arguments against cosmetic psychopharmacology depend heavily on the mistaken belief that Prozac and similar antidepressants are mood brighteners in healthy subjects. The empirical evidence, however, clearly indicates that these drugs are not forms of cosmetic psychopharmacology, thus negating much of the Council's arguments. The use of pharmaceutical agents to enhance mood or personality in normal individuals should not be rejected a priori. Instead, the effects of each agent on the individual and on society must be weighed using sound ethical reasoning and the best evidence available.

  17. Cosmetic coloration in birds: occurrence, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Delhey, Kaspar; Peters, Anne; Kempenaers, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Colorful plumages are conspicuous social signals in birds, and the expression of these colors often reflects the quality of their bearers. Since mature feathers are dead structures, plumage color is often considered a static signal that does not change after molt. Feathers, however, can and do deteriorate between molts, and birds need to invest heavily in plumage maintenance. Here we argue that this need for preserving plumage condition and hence signaling content might have given rise to a novel type of sexual signal: cosmetic coloration. Cosmetic coloration occurs when the substances used for plumage maintenance change the color of the feathers, thereby becoming a signal themselves. Our review of cosmetic coloration in birds demonstrates that it is more widespread than currently realized, occurring in at least 13 bird families. Cosmetics have varied origins: they can be produced by the bird itself (uropygial and skin secretions, feather powder) or obtained from the environment (soil, iron oxide). Intraspecific patterns of cosmetic use (sex, age, and seasonal dimorphism) suggest that in many cases it may act as a sexual signal. However, more information is required on function, mechanisms, and costs to understand the evolution of cosmetic coloration and to confirm its signaling role.

  18. Persistence of Upper Blepharoptosis After Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin Type A.

    PubMed

    Steinsapir, Kenneth D; Groth, Michael J; Boxrud, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin is generally considered short-lived and responsive to apraclonidine ophthalmic drops. The authors present a series with persistent ptosis. To report a series of patients with persistent upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin. A retrospective case review series of 7 patients referred for management after developing visually significant upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin type A treatment. Patients in this series experienced persistent visually significant ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin lasting from 6 weeks to 13 months. Six of the 7 patients were treated with apraclonidine ophthalmic solution. Apraclonidine drops appeared to be clinically effective within 4 to 6 weeks of the resolution of ptosis. Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin can persist for many months after treatment. Based on this series, the authors propose that apraclonidine drops can be used at the time of initial assessment to predict the relative longevity of ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin treatment (Level 4 evidence recommendation). After a 1-week trial, responders can be advised that ptosis is likely to resolve in 4 to 6 weeks. Nonresponders should be counseled that resolution may take longer than 6 weeks.

  19. OCT monitoring of cosmetic creams in human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Hee; Yoon, Chang Han; Conroy, Leigh; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a tool currently used for noninvasive diagnosis of human disease as well as for monitoring treatment during or after therapy. In this study, OCT was used to examine penetration and accumulation of cosmetic creams on human hand skin. The samples varied in collagen content with one formulation containing soluble collagen as its primary active ingredient. Collagen is a major connective tissue protein that is essential in maintaining health vitality and strength of many organs. The penetration and localization of collagen in cosmetic creams is thought to be the main determinant of the efficacy of new collagen synthesis. Detection and quantification of collagen in cosmetic creams applied to skin may thus help predict the eventual efficacy of the product in skin collagen regeneration. We hypothesize that the topically applied collagen may be detectable by OCT through its modulation of skin scattering properties. To test this hypothesis, we used a FDML swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. A particular location on the skin of two male adult volunteers was used to investigate 4 different cosmetic creams. The duration of OCT monitoring of cosmetic penetration into skin ranged from 5 minutes to 2 hours following topical application. The results showed that OCT can discriminate between a cream with collagen and other collagen-free formulations. Thus it seems feasible that OCT intensity can monitor the in vivo effects of topical application of collagen contained in cosmetic formulations.

  20. Use and potential of nanotechnology in cosmetic dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Morganti, Pierfrancesco

    2010-01-01

    Biotechnology and nanotechnology are the key technologies of the twenty-first century, having enormous potential for innovation and growth. The academic and industrial goals for these technologies are the development of nanoscale biomolecular substances and analytical instruments for investigating cell biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Developments in nanotechnology will provide opportunities for cosmetic dermatology to develop new biocompatible and biodegradable therapeutics, delivery systems and more active compounds. Cosmetics have the primary function of keeping up a good appearance, changing the appearance, or correcting body odors, while maintaining the skin and its surroundings in good conditions. Thus cosmetic dermatology, recognizing the new realities of skin care products, has to emphasize the functional aspects of cosmetics through an understanding of their efficacy and safety in promoting good health. Nanoscience may help the scientific community to find more innovative and efficacious cosmetics. Understanding the physical model of the cell as a machine is essential to understand how all the cell components work together to accomplish a task. The efficacy and safety of new nanomaterials has to be deeply studied by ex vivo tests and innovative laboratory techniques. New delivery systems and natural nanocompounds, such as chitin nanofibrils for wound healing, are being used in cosmetic dermatology with good results, as are nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO sunscreens. The challenge is open. PMID:21437055

  1. A review of general cosmetic surgery training in fellowship programs offered by the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Handler, Ethan; Tavassoli, Javad; Dhaliwal, Hardeep; Murray, Matthew; Haiavy, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    We sought, first, to evaluate the operative experience of surgeons who have completed postresidency fellowships offered by the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS), and second, to compare this cosmetic surgery training to other surgical residency and fellowship programs in the United States. Finally, we suggest how new and existing oral and maxillofacial surgeons can use these programs. We reviewed the completed case logs from AACS-accredited fellowships. The logs were data mined for 7 of the most common cosmetic operations, including the median total number of operations. We then compared the cosmetic case requirements from the different residencies and fellowships. Thirty-nine case logs were reviewed from the 1-year general cosmetic surgery fellowships offered by the AACS from 2007 to 2012. The fellows completed a median of 687 total procedures. The median number of the most common cosmetic procedures performed was 14 rhinoplasties, 31 blepharoplasties, 21 facelifts, 24 abdominoplasties, 28 breast mastopexies, 103 breast augmentations, and 189 liposuctions. The data obtained were compared with the minimum cosmetic surgical requirements in residency and fellowship programs. The minimum residency requirements were as follows: no minimum listed for plastic surgery, 35 for otolaryngology, 20 for oral and maxillofacial surgery, 28 for ophthalmology, 0 for obstetrics and gynecology, and 20 for dermatology. The minimum fellowship requirements were as follows: 300 for the AACS cosmetic surgery fellowship, no minimum listed for facial plastic surgery and reconstruction, no minimum listed for aesthetic surgery, 133 for oculoplastic and reconstructive surgery, and 0 for Mohs dermatology. Dedicating one's practice exclusively to cosmetic surgery requires additional postresidency training owing to the breadth of the field. The AACS created comprehensive fellowship programs to fill an essential part in the continuum of cosmetic surgeons' education, training, and

  2. Safety assessment of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Christina L; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics as hair-conditioning agents and surfactant-cleansing agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics. The Panel concluded that lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration.

  3. Cosmetovigilance survey: are cosmetics considered safe by consumers?

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Carmen; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Loredana; Sautebin, Lidia

    2006-01-01

    Cosmetics are largely diffused substances topically applied to wash, to perfume or to improve the look, nevertheless the number of reported adverse reactions is very low, probably because of underreporting. This could be due to self-diagnosis and self-medication that is common in the presence of not severe reactions. In fact adverse reactions to cosmetics are generally not serious and frequently related to skin alterations. The aim of our study was to assess, through a questionnaire supplied by community pharmacists to the customers, the prevalence and characteristic of adverse cosmetic events (ACEs) reported by interviewed and the consequent measures adopted. To this aim ten Naples' community pharmacies were involved and pharmacists agreed to submit a specific questionnaire to all the customers of the pharmacy for two weeks between 9:00 a.m.-01:00 p.m. and 04:00 p.m.-08:00 p.m. from 1 to 15 June. The subjects interviewed were 4373, of them 845 refused to fill the questionnaire. Females responding to the questionnaire were 2716 and males 812. The 98.5% of the respondents reported to use cosmetics. Cosmetic users who experienced at least one ACE were 848 and 18.2% of them reported more than one event. Total adverse cosmetic events reported were 1507. A significant higher prevalence of adverse cosmetic events in women was observed, since the 26.5% of female cosmetic users experienced an adverse cosmetic event, whereas the percent was 17.4 for males. Concerning the type of adverse event, the 95.9% was a cutaneous event, whereas systemic events accounted for 4.1%. Among cutaneous reactions burning and itching were the most prominent and accounted for 36.3 and 32.9%, respectively. The most frequently reported systemic event was headache (40.3%) followed by nausea (24.2%). Product change (45.7%) and product suspension (39.6%), were the main specific measures adopted in the presence of ACEs. The general practitioner or the pharmacist were consulted only in the 6.8 and 6

  4. The impact of cosmetic interventions on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S

    2008-08-15

    In the last decade, the number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has rapidly increased. While physicians historically have focused on minimizing side effects and optimizing the physical outcome, a broad spectrum of patient needs also factors in treatment success. Unfortunately, few data are available regarding the effects of cosmetic procedures on patient's self-esteem, confidence, relationships, and acceptance by others. Quality of life represents a relevant and important long-term measurement of outcomes in these patients. Studies have shown that cosmetic surgery can have a positive impact on patient quality of life. In contrast, fewer data are available regarding the effects of nonsurgical cosmetic procedures on quality of life. Much of the quality-of-life data regarding nonsurgical cosmetic procedures focuses on patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated facial lipoatrophy, a condition associated with depression, problems with self-esteem and interpersonal relationships, in addition to nonadherence to the treatment. Recent data indicate that cosmetic treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related facial lipoatrophy with injectable facial rejuvenators can improve quality of life in these patients. However, there is a dearth of quality-of-life data on patients who undergo facial rejuvenation procedures using the newer injectable devices, such as hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and poly-L-lactic acid. Future studies should focus on developing standardized tests to assess quality of life in patients undergoing facial rejuvenation interventions. More data obtained from validated assessment tools are needed to systematically evaluate the effects specific treatments have on satisfying the needs of the cosmetic patient.

  5. A review of quality surveillance projects on cosmetics in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chung, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Chang; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Ming-Shin; Huang, Shou-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Pen; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2014-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration in Taiwan is responsible for the quality regulation and control of cosmetics. In order to have a clear understanding of the trends in the product quality monitoring outcomes and the regulatory control measures over the past years, this study has put together the reports of nine cosmetic surveillance projects conducted between 1982 and 2012. The findings can be used as a reference in developing a more solid quality monitoring plan and management system for cosmetic products. Results show that permanent wave products, hair dye products, and phthalate esters in cosmetic products have the highest average noncompliance rates at 39.2%, 14.2%, and 11.2%, respectively. These are followed by the average noncompliance rates of mercury in products, sunscreen products, and microorganisms in products, at 8.5%, 7.1%, and 5.5%, respectively, and the remaining three projects averaging below 4.1%. Since 1997, when new standards were announced and assistance to manufacturers was reinforced, the noncompliance rates of permanent wave products decreased annually, until 2007, when it was fully qualified for the standards. Overall, the study showed that the noncompliance rates of permanent wave products and for levels of phthalate esters, mercury, and hydroquinone in cosmetic products have all decreased in the previous years. The results of surveillance projects conducted after 2005 revealed only one noncompliance sample with lead, arsenic, and cadmium, whereas the surveillance projects on permanent wave products and chloroform- and 1,4-dioxane-containing products revealed full compliance with regulation standards. However, the noncompliance rates for microorganisms in cosmetics and the ingredients in hair dye products and sunscreen products were still high. These high-risk products must be monitored. These surveillance projects are conducted to ensure the safety of cosmetics in the market. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Psychosocial predictors in consideration of cosmetic surgery among women.

    PubMed

    Nerini, Amanda; Matera, Camilla; Stefanile, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of psychosocial factors on the consideration of cosmetic surgery. The authors hypothesized that the internalization of thin ideals and social comparisons mediate the relationship between media pressure, family and peer influence (appearance conversations, perception of teasing, and peer attributions), and the desire to pursue cosmetic surgery. The study participants were 429 Italian women (mean age, 33 years). They completed a questionnaire containing the Appearance Conversations With Friends Scale, the Perception of Teasing Scale for Friends, the Peer Attribution Scale, the "Pressure and Internalization-General" subscales of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3, the Feedback on Physical Appearance Scale, the Physical Appearance Comparison Scale, and the "Consider" subscale of the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale. Hierarchical linear regression was performed. The results indicated that media pressure and appearance conversations with peers predicted the outcome variable through the full mediation of internalization of thin ideals. The relation between peer attributions and interest in cosmetic surgery was partially mediated by internalization of thin ideals. Although social comparison was significantly related to both sociocultural variables and consideration of cosmetic procedures, it was not a significant mediator of this relationship. Neither family influence nor perception of teasing predicted the outcome variable. Overall, these results provide important information about the factors implicated in the consideration of cosmetic surgery by women. This research confirms that cosmetic surgeons need to adopt a base psychological approach. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Risk assessment of allergen metals in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Güngör, Zerrin; Erdem, Onur; Soykut, Buğra; Akay, Cemal; Aydin, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetics are one of the most common reasons for hospital referrals with allergic contact dermatitis. Because of the increased use of cosmetics within the population and an increase in allergy cases, monitoring of heavy metals, especially allergen metals, is crucial. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration of allergen metals, nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), and chromium (Cr), in the most commonly used cosmetic products including mascara, eyeliner, eye shadow, lipstick, and nail polish. In addition, for safety assessment of cosmetic products, margin of safety of the metals was evaluated. Forty-eight makeup products were purchased randomly from local markets and large cosmetic stores in Istanbul, Turkey, and an atomic absorption spectrometer was used for metal content determination. Risk assessment of the investigated cosmetic products was performed by calculating the systemic exposure dosage (SED) using Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety guideline. According to the results of this investigation in all the samples tested, at least two of the allergen metals, Ni and/or Co and/or Cr were detected. Moreover, 97% of the Ni-detected products, 96% of Cr- and 54% of Co-detected products, contained over 1 μg/g of this metals, which is the suggested ultimate target value for sensitive population and thereby can be considered as the possible allergen. On the basis of the results of this study, SED of the metals was negligible; however, contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics is most probably due to the allergen metal content of the products. In conclusion, to assess the safety of the finished products, postmarketing vigilance and routine monitoring of allergen metals are very important to protect public health.

  8. Perceived realism and Twitter use are associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; King, Kahlil

    2014-08-01

    Reality television programming is a popular type of television programming, and features shows about cosmetic surgery. Social media such as Facebook and Twitter are increasingly popular methods of sharing information. The authors surveyed college students to determine among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs whether perceived realism or social media use was associated with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Participants (n=126) were surveyed about their reality television cosmetic surgery program viewing habits, their perception of the realism of reality television programming, and social media topics of Twitter and Facebook. Outcome variables were the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scales of social, intrapersonal, and consider. Perceived realism was significantly associated with increased scores on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale subscales of social (p=0.004), intrapersonal (p=0.03), and consider (p=0.03). Following a character from a reality television program on Twitter was significantly associated with increased social scores (p=0.04). There was no significant association of Facebook behavior with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Cosmetic plastic surgeons may benefit by advertising their services on cosmetic surgery reality television programs. These reality television programs portray cosmetic surgery in a positive manner, and viewers with increased perceived realism will be a potential receptive audience toward such advertising. Also, advertising cosmetic surgery services on Twitter feeds that discuss cosmetic surgery reality television programs would be potentially beneficial.

  9. The PreFACE: A preoperative psychosocial screen for elective facial cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Roberta J; Jackson, Alun C; Dowling, Nicki A

    2011-01-01

    Currently no brief and objective screening protocol exists to assist surgeons and dentists in the identification of patients who are likely to report unsatisfactory outcomes after cosmetic surgery interventions. The aims of this study were to (1) investigate the relationship between postoperative dissatisfaction and preoperative characteristics (psychiatric disturbance, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, dysmorphic concern, and body image), and (2) empirically derive a preoperative psychosocial screening instrument to identify patients who may require preoperative assessment or counseling. The sample composed of 84 patients (69 women and 15 men) undergoing elective cosmetic facial surgery or cosmetic dentistry. Before surgery, a self-report questionnaire was administered to the patients, which comprised questions designed to evaluate many of the psychosocial characteristics thought to be associated with unsatisfactory outcomes. Six months after surgery, a questionnaire was administered to the patients, which included items evaluating postoperative satisfaction. The findings revealed that preoperative psychiatric disturbance, anxiety, depression, low appearance evaluation, and body areas dissatisfaction are psychosocial risk factors that indicate an increased likelihood of patient dissatisfaction with surgical outcomes. The PreFACE (Preoperative FAcial Cosmetic surgery Evaluation), a brief objective preoperative screening questionnaire that can be easily and efficiently administered to elective facial cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients, was empirically derived. It is able to identify most patients who are likely to express dissatisfaction and minimizes the selection of those who will express satisfaction. The PreFACE is recommended for validation using other cosmetic surgery populations. The routine use of PreFACE is recommended for identification of patients who may benefit from preoperative counseling.

  10. Differential trends in racial preferences for cosmetic surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Tahira I; Ong'uti, Sharon K; Ortega, Gezzer; Khoury, Amal L; Onwuka, Ekene; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Cornwell, Edward E; Paul, Henry

    2011-08-01

    There appears to be an increasing acceptance of cosmetic surgery procedures among minority populations in America. Our objective was to determine trends in elective cosmetic procedure utilization as they apply to racial/ethnic differences. A retrospective analysis was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Adult patients undergoing elective cosmetic procedures defined by the appropriate International Classification of Disease 9 Clinical Modification procedure codes were included. Demographic characteristics and hospital course particulars were evaluated. There were 71,775 patients meeting the inclusion criteria. Median age was 48 years. The majority were female (90%), and white (65%). The median household income for the patient's zip code was most commonly in the highest economic quartile (4th quartile, 40%). The most common cosmetic procedure was liposuction (67%). The overall mean percentage change in the frequency of these procedures showed a 1.8 per cent decline among white patients, whereas Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American patients had an increase of 7.5 per cent, 4.7 per cent, 14.5 per cent, and 105.5 per cent, respectively. We conclude that there is an identified increasing trend in the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities represented among the recipients of cosmetic surgery procedures.

  11. Cosmetic Surgery: Regulatory Challenges in a Global Beauty Market.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Danielle; Mullock, Alex

    2017-02-28

    The market for cosmetic surgery tourism is growing with an increase in people travelling abroad for cosmetic surgery. While the reasons for seeking cosmetic surgery abroad may vary the most common reason is financial, but does cheaper surgery abroad carry greater risks? We explore the risks of poorly regulated cosmetic surgery to society generally before discussing how harm might be magnified in the context of cosmetic tourism, where the demand for cheaper surgery drives the market and makes surgery accessible for increasing numbers of people. This contributes to the normalisation of surgical enhancement, creating unhealthy cultural pressure to undergo invasive and risky procedures in the name of beauty. In addressing the harms of poorly regulated surgery, a number of organisations purport to provide a register of safe and ethical plastic surgeons, yet this arguably achieves little and in the absence of improved regulation the risks are likely to grow as the global market expands to meet demand. While the evidence suggests that global regulation is needed, the paper concludes that since a global regulatory response is unlikely, more robust domestic regulation may be the best approach. While domestic regulation may increase the drive towards foreign providers it may also have a symbolic effect which will reduce this drive by making people more aware of the dangers of surgery, both to society and individual physical wellbeing.

  12. [Spectroscopic analysis of sun protection factor (SPF) of sunscreen cosmetic].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zheng-Jun; Lu, Jiang-Feng; He, Yong; Fang, Hui

    2007-07-01

    Sunscreen index is the primary indicator of the protection effect of sunscreen cosmetics. A handheld spectrometer was used to study the relationship between sunscreen index and reflectance spectra. Three kinds of Dingjiayi brand sunscreen cosmetics, which is SPF15, SPF20 and SPF30, were chosen as experimental material. The sunscreen cosmetics were divided into 75 samples, and 60 of them were used as calibrated samples, while the other 15 samples were used as prediction samples. The reflectance spectra data were collected by the spectrometer. The data from the wavelength range between 400 and 960 nm were processed by principal component analysis method, and the results showed that the cumulate reliabilities of PC1 and PC2 (the first two principal components) reached 91%. Then partial least square analysis method was applied to build prediction models, and the remaining 15 prediction samples were disposed by this model. The results show that the prediction correlation coefficient is 0.967 7, and the prediction precision is good. So the spectral analysis method proposed in the present paper has good performance in classification and discrimination of sunscreen cosmetics, and is a new approach to test the SPF of cosmetics.

  13. Coupled exposure to ingredients of cosmetic products: III. Ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Uter, Wolfgang; Gonçalo, Margarida; Yazar, Kerem; Kratz, Eva-Maria; Mildau, Gerd; Lidén, Carola

    2014-09-01

    The use of cosmetics exposes consumers to mixtures of ingredients, many of which are potential allergens. Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used not just in sunscreens, but also in other products. Many UV filters are known contact allergens and photoallergens. To examine the pattern of co-exposure to UV filters in cosmetics. A survey of products marketed in Germany, conducted in 2006-2009 by the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Office in Karlsruhe, identified 4447 products (of all 5667 cosmetic products examined) (i) that were categorizable according to Annex I to the Cosmetics Directive, and (ii) with information on the presence of UV filters or zinc oxide. The occurrence and co-occurrence of UV filters were analysed and presented in tabular and graphical format. UV filters or zinc oxide were present in 22.5% of all 4447 products, ranging from almost 100% in sunscreens to a few per cent in, for example, some hair products; they were absent in two product categories. Frequently, several different UV filters were included in one product, for example in sunscreens (median 4) and in perfumes (median 3). The overall most frequent UV filters were butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane and titanium dioxide, combined mostly with octocrylene in sunscreens and with ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate in creams. The frequent co-occurrence of UV filters in cosmetic products possibly facilitates sensitization, and may explain why patients often react to chemically unrelated UV filters. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mercury content in marketed cosmetics: analytical survey in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is one of the skin-lightening ingredients in cosmetics as mercury ions are thought to inhibit the synthesis of the skin pigment melanin in melanocyte cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mercury levels of cosmetics currently marketed in Shijiazhuang, a northern city in China. We collected 146 random cosmetic samples and analyzed for mercury concentrations or levels by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Among the 146 samples, 134 (91.8%) were positive for mercury, and the concentrations of mercury ranged from not detectable to 592 ng/g. Cosmetic samples for children and babies had the highest detection rate (100%), followed by shampoo and hair conditioner (92.3%) and skin-lightening cream (92.0%). All of them were lower than the acceptable limit (1 μg/g) in China. Cosmetics for skin had the highest mean mercury content (45 ng/g), followed by hair products (42.1 ng/g). The concentrations of mercury detected in samples were lower than the current legal limit in China, indicating it may not pose a risk to consumers.

  15. Coupled exposure to ingredients of cosmetic products: II. Preservatives.

    PubMed

    Uter, Wolfgang; Yazar, Kerem; Kratz, Eva-Maria; Mildau, Gerd; Lidén, Carola

    2014-04-01

    The use of cosmetics exposes consumers to mixtures of ingredients, many of which are potential allergens. Many cosmetics contain one or several preservatives, some being important contact allergens. To examine the pattern of co-exposure to preservatives in different categories of cosmetics. A survey of products marketed in Germany, conducted in 2006-2009 by the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Office in Karlsruhe, identified 4680 products categorizable according to Annex I to the Cosmetics Directive with information on the presence of preservatives. The occurrence and co-occurrence of preservatives were analysed and presented in tabular and graphical format. Thirty per cent of all products were not declared to contain any preservatives; for 8%, no INCI labelling was present. For the remainder, the number of preservatives used tended to be higher in leave-on than in rinse-off products. Most often, combinations of (up to all five) parabens were used (39% of all products). Combinations with phenoxyethanol were also frequent. Formaldehyde releasers were found in 8% of products overall. The pattern of co-exposure to preservatives in important categories of cosmetic products illustrates the 'cocktail' of allergens that may facilitate sensitization, although, conversely, the combination of preservatives allows individual use levels to be kept lower, thereby possibly reducing sensitization risk. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Investigation on formaldehyde release from preservatives in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lv, C; Hou, J; Xie, W; Cheng, H

    2015-10-01

    To understand formaldehyde residue in cosmetics, an investigation on formaldehyde release from eight preservatives (methenamine - MA, paraformaldehyde - PF, poly(p-toluenesulfonamide-co-formaldehyde) -PTSAF, quaternium-15 - QU, imidazolidinyl urea - IU, diazolidinyl urea - DU, dimethyloldimethyl hydantoin - DMDM and bronopol - BP) under various conditions was performed. The concentration of released formaldehyde was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The amounts of formaldehyde release were in the order of PF > DU > DMDM ≈ QU ≈ IU > MA > BP > PTSAF. The releasing amounts of formaldehyde were the highest in the presence of aqueous matrices for the releasers except QU and IU, and the releasing effect was also relative to pH. More formaldehyde was released with longer storage time and higher temperature. Furthermore, all preservatives in cosmetic matrices released fewer amounts of formaldehyde than in pure aqueous or organic matrices, and the formaldehyde-releasing amounts were also cosmetic specific. Formaldehyde release was dependent on the matrix, pH, time and mainly temperature, and the releasing effect was also cosmetic specific. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Formaldehyde may be found in cosmetic products even when unlabelled

    PubMed Central

    Blaziene, Audra; Chomiciene, Anzelika; Isaksson, Marléne

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers remains common among patients with allergic contact dermatitis. Concentration of free formaldehyde in cosmetic products within allowed limits have been shown to induce dermatitis from short-term use on normal skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the formaldehyde content of cosmetic products made in Lithuania. 42 samples were analysed with the chromotropic acid (CA) method for semi-quantitative formaldehyde determination. These included 24 leave-on (e.g., creams, lotions) and 18 rinse-off (e.g., shampoos, soaps) products. Formaldehyde releasers were declared on the labels of 10 products. No formaldehyde releaser was declared on the label of the only face cream investigated, but levels of free formaldehyde with the CA method was >40 mg/ml and when analysed with a high-performance liquid chromatographic method – 532 ppm. According to the EU Cosmetic directive, if the concentration of formaldehyde is above 0.05% a cosmetic product must be labelled “contains formaldehyde“. It could be difficult for patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid contact with products containing it as its presence cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling with certainty. The CA method is a simple and reliable method for detecting formaldehyde presence in cosmetic products.

  18. Effects of lavender olfactory input on cosmetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Grunebaum, Lisa Danielle; Murdock, Jennifer; Castanedo-Tardan, Mari Paz; Baumann, Leslie S

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of the aroma of essential oil of lavender against placebo on subjects' pain perceptions and levels of anxiety when undergoing elective cosmetic facial injections of botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX(®) COSMETIC) for the correction of glabellar wrinkles. Subjects (N=30) who had not previously received any cosmetic facial injections were randomized to essential oil of lavender aroma exposure or to placebo during elective cosmetic facial injections of BOTOX(®) (12 U) for the correction of glabellar wrinkles. Evaluations of subjects' pain perceptions and levels of anxiety assessed by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at baseline, before, and after injections. Subjects exposed to essential lavender oil showed a significant reduction in HR after the injection as compared to the pre-injection HR. Subjects exposed to the placebo did not show any significant difference in BP or HR between pre-injection and postinjection. Although essential oil of lavender did not have an effect on the subjects' perception of pain during a facial injection, subjects showed significant increases in parasympathetic activity when exposed to the lavender aroma. Lavender aromatherapy has the potential to ease anxiety in patients undergoing minimally invasive facial cosmetic procedures. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Human vulnerability under cosmetic surgery. A bioethic analysis].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Rocha de Viesca, Mariablanca

    2012-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery is one of the best examples of the current health empowerment. Aesthetic surgical interventions have been criticized because they expose the healthy individual to an unnecessary risk. In modern society the body has turned into a beauty depository with a commercial value. In published bioethics papers, analyses of the cosmetic problem pointed their attention on the freedom, autonomy and distributive justice. Mexico occupies fifth place in the world of cosmetic surgeries. Vulnerability is an inherent condition of man's existence and marks the limit of human dignity. UNESCO agrees that some populations are more inclined to vulnerability. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that those who wish to make a physical change had given up to social coercion and psychological problems.

  20. Safety assessment of alkyl PEG ethers as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2012-01-01

    The CIR Expert Panel assessed the safety of Alkyl PEG Ethers as used in cosmetics. These ingredients primarily function in cosmetics as surfactants, and some have additional functions as skin-conditioning agents, fragrance ingredients, and emulsion stabilizers. The Panel reviewed available relevant animal and clinical data, as well as information from previous CIR reports; when data were not available for individual ingredients, the Panel extrapolated from the existing data to support safety. The Panel concluded that the Alkyl PEG ethers are safe as used when formulated to be nonirritating, and the same applies to future alkyl PEG ether cosmetic ingredients that vary from those ingredients recited herein only by the number of ethylene glycol repeat units.

  1. Factors influencing cosmetic results after conservation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M E; Perez, C A; Halverson, K J; Kuske, R R; Philpott, G W; Garcia, D M; Mortimer, J E; Myerson, R J; Radford, D; Rush, C

    1995-02-15

    Host, tumor, and treatment-related factors influencing cosmetic outcome are analyzed for patients receiving breast conservation treatment. Four-hundred and fifty-eight patients with evaluable records for cosmesis evaluation, a subset of 701 patients treated for invasive breast cancer with conservation technique between 1969 and 1990, were prospectively analyzed. In 243 patients, cosmetic evaluation was not adequately recorded. Cosmesis evaluation was carried out from 3.7 months to 22.3 years, median of 4.4 years. By pathologic stage, tumors were 62% T1N0, 14% T1N1, 15%, T2N0, and 9% T2N1. The majority of patients were treated with 4-6 MV photons. Cosmetic evaluation was rated by both patient and physician every 4-6 months. A logistic regression analysis was completed using a stepwise logistic regression. P-values of 0.05 or less were considered significant. Excellent cosmetic scores were used in all statistical analyses unless otherwise specified. At most recent follow-up, 87% of patients and 81% of physicians scored their cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. Eighty-two percent of physician and patient evaluations agreed with excellent-good vs. fair-poor rating categories. Analysis demonstrated a lower proportion of excellent cosmetic scores when related to patient age > 60 years (p = 0.001), postmenopausal status (p = 0.02), black race (p = 0.0034), and T2 tumor size (p = 0.05). Surgical factors of importance were: volume of resection > 100 cm3 (p = 0.0001), scar orientation compliance with the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project (NSABP) guidelines (p = 0.0034), and > 20 cm2 skin resected (p = 0.0452). Extent of axillary surgery did not significantly affect breast cosmesis. Radiation factors affecting cosmesis included treatment volume (tangential breast fields only vs. three or more fields) (p = 0.034), whole breast dose in excess of 50 Gy (p = 0.0243), and total dose to tumor site > 65 Gy (p = 0.06), as well as optimum dose distribution with compensating

  2. Factors that motivate people to undergo cosmetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Adrian; Levitas, James

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 204 British participants completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude toward cosmetic surgery as well as measures of self-esteem, life satisfaction, self-rated physical attractiveness, religiosity and media consumption. Two factors emerged from a factor analysis of their attitudes toward surgery: likelihood to undergo, and benefits of undergoing, cosmetic surgery. Females with low self-esteem, low life satisfaction, low self-rated attractiveness and little religious beliefs who were heavy television watchers reported a greater likelihood of undergoing cosmetic surgery. Stepwise regression analysis with the two attitude factors as criterion variables showed two major predictors for likelihood: religiousness and low self-esteem, and four major predictors for benefit: religousness, media consumption, life satisfaction and sex. The role of religion is considered in this context. PMID:24294026

  3. Female genital cosmetic surgery: a review of techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Cheryl B; Yurteri-Kaplan, Ladin; Alinsod, Red

    2013-12-01

    The aesthetic and functional procedures that comprise female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) include traditional vaginal prolapse procedures as well as cosmetic vulvar and labial procedures. The line between cosmetic and medically indicated surgical procedures is blurred, and today many operations are performed for both purposes. The contributions of gynecologists and reconstructive pelvic surgeons are crucial in this debate. Aesthetic vaginal surgeons may unintentionally blur legitimate female pelvic floor disorders with other aesthetic conditions. In the absence of quality outcome data, the value of FGCS in improving sexual function remains uncertain. Women seeking FGCS need to be educated about the range and variation of labia widths and genital appearance, and should be evaluated for true pelvic support disorders such as pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. Women seeking FGCS should also be screened for psychological conditions and should act autonomously without coercion from partners or surgeons with proprietary conflicts of interest.

  4. Factors that motivate people to undergo cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Furnham, Adrian; Levitas, James

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 204 British participants completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude toward cosmetic surgery as well as measures of self-esteem, life satisfaction, self-rated physical attractiveness, religiosity and media consumption. Two factors emerged from a factor analysis of their attitudes toward surgery: likelihood to undergo, and benefits of undergoing, cosmetic surgery. Females with low self-esteem, low life satisfaction, low self-rated attractiveness and little religious beliefs who were heavy television watchers reported a greater likelihood of undergoing cosmetic surgery. Stepwise regression analysis with the two attitude factors as criterion variables showed two major predictors for likelihood: religiousness and low self-esteem, and four major predictors for benefit: religousness, media consumption, life satisfaction and sex. The role of religion is considered in this context.

  5. Characterisation, quantity and sorptive properties of microplastics extracted from cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Napper, Imogen E; Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-10-15

    Cosmetic products, such as facial scrubs, have been identified as potentially important primary sources of microplastics to the marine environment. This study characterises, quantifies and then investigates the sorptive properties of plastic microbeads that are used as exfoliants in cosmetics. Polyethylene microbeads were extracted from several products, and shown to have a wide size range (mean diameters between 164 and 327 μm). We estimated that between 4594 and 94,500 microbeads could be released in a single use. To examine the potential for microbeads to accumulate and transport chemicals they were exposed to a binary mixture of (3)H-phenanthrene and (14)C-DDT in seawater. The potential for transport of sorbed chemicals by microbeads was broadly similar to that of polythene (PE) particles used in previous sorption studies. In conclusion, cosmetic exfoliants are a potentially important, yet preventable source of microplastic contamination in the marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety Assessment of Alkyl PEG Sulfosuccinates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of alkyl polyethylene glycol (PEG) sulfosuccinates, which function in cosmetics mostly as surfactants/cleansing agents. Although these ingredients may cause ocular and skin irritation, dermal penetration is unlikely because of the substantial polarity and molecular size of these ingredients. The Panel considered the negative oral carcinogenicity and reproductive and developmental toxicity data on chemically related laureths (PEG lauryl ethers) and negative repeated dose toxicity and skin sensitization data on disodium laureth sulfosuccinate supported the safety of these alkyl PEG sulfosuccinates in cosmetic products, but. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that the alkyl PEG sulfosuccinates are safe in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Chitosan beads loaded with essential oils in cosmetic formulations.

    PubMed

    Anchisi, C; Meloni, M C; Maccioni, A M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the stability and release of chitosan beads loaded with volatile molecules of Mentha piperita essential oil (E.O.) in a cosmetic formulation. The ability of the beads to quickly release Mentha piperita E.O. during use of a cosmetic formulation such as a bath foam is also assessed. The chitosan beads were produced with three different chitosan dispersions gelled with two different gelling solutions: (a) a 10% solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and (b) a 4% solution of sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP). A few properties of six bead samples loaded with Mentha piperita E.O. are assessed. The properties are morphology, size, swelling ability, encapsulation efficiency, stability in time, and fast release of Mentha piperita E.O. during the use phase of the cosmetic formulation.

  8. In vivo studies of substances used in the cosmetic industry

    PubMed Central

    Gościańska, Joanna; Witkowska, Beata; Nowak, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic producers are obliged to guarantee the safety and stability of their products. The current legal regulations are based on the European Union Directive (1223/2009) of 30 November 2009. The main aim of the directive is to formulate criteria of safety of a cosmetic product and requirements that it must meet to be placed on the market. A new cosmetic product is subjected to thorough investigation prior to its introduction on the market. It should be studied not only with respect to its safety, but also with respect to its effectiveness declared by the producer. The studies are performed in vivo, by the contact or epidermal patch tests on the human skin. PMID:27512349

  9. Caffeine's mechanisms of action and its cosmetic use.

    PubMed

    Herman, A; Herman, A P

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is being increasingly used in cosmetics due to its high biological activity and ability to penetrate the skin barrier. This alkaloid is frequently used as a hydrophilic model substance in human and animal skin penetration as well as different synthetic membrane using Franz diffusion cell experiments. The commercially available topical formulations of caffeine normally contain 3% caffeine. As for a cosmetic purpose, caffeine is used as an active compound in anti-cellulite products because it prevents excessive accumulation of fat in cells. This alkaloid stimulates the degradation of fats during lipolysis through inhibition of the phosphodiesterase activity. Caffeine has potent antioxidant properties. It helps protect cells against the UV radiation and slows down the process of photoaging of the skin. Moreover, caffeine contained in cosmetics increases the microcirculation of blood in the skin and also stimulates the growth of hair through inhibition of the 5-α-reductase activity.

  10. Final amended safety assessment of hydroquinone as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, F Alan; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Hydroquinone is an aromatic compound that functions in cosmetics as an antioxidant, fragrance, reducing agent, or polymerization inhibitor. Hydroquinone is also used as a skin bleaching agent. Safety and toxicity information indicate that hydroquinone is dermally absorbed in humans from both aqueous and alcoholic formulations and is excreted mainly as the glucuronide or sulfate conjugates. Hydroquinone is associated with altered immune function in vitro and in vivo in animals and an increased incidence of renal tubule cell tumors and leukemia in F344 rats, but the relevance to humans is uncertain. Quantitatively, however, the use of hydroquinone in cosmetics is unlikely to result in renal neoplasia through this mode of action. Thus, hydroquinone is safe at concentrations of ≤1% in hair dyes and is safe for use in nail adhesives. Hydroquinone should not be used in other leave-on cosmetics.

  11. The Real Cost of "Cosmetic Tourism" Cost Analysis Study of "Cosmetic Tourism" Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Ryan; Berlund, Paul; Eccles-Smith, Jade; Sawhney, Raja

    2015-01-01

    "Cosmetic Tourism," the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Our aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from "cosmetic tourism" and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve "cosmetic tourism" patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis. The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The "cosmetic tourism" model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad. This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

  12. Safety of Cosmetic Procedures in Elderly and Octogenarian Patients.

    PubMed

    Yeslev, Max; Gupta, Varun; Winocour, Julian; Shack, R Bruce; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2015-09-01

    The proportion of elderly patients in North America is increasing. This has resulted in an increased number of elderly patients undergoing cosmetic procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative complications in elderly patients (age ≥65) undergoing elective aesthetic plastic surgical procedures compared with younger patients. A total of 183,914 cosmetic surgical procedures were reviewed using the prospectively enrolled cohort of patients in the CosmetAssure database. Comorbidities and postoperative complications in elderly and younger patient groups were recorded and compared. A separate analysis of postoperative complications was performed in the octogenarian subgroup (age ≥80). A total of 6786 elderly patients who underwent cosmetic procedures were included in the study. Mean ages (±standard deviation) in elderly and younger patients were 69.1 ± 4.1 and 39.2 ± 12.5 years, respectively. The elderly patient population had more men, a higher mean body mass index (BMI), a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and fewer smokers compared with the younger patients. The overall postoperative complication rate was not significantly different between elderly and younger patients. When stratified by type of cosmetic procedure, only abdominoplasty was associated with a higher postoperative complication rate in elderly compared with younger patients. The most common postoperative complications in elderly patients were hematoma and infection. The overall postoperative complication rate in octogenarians was 2.2%, which was not significantly different from the younger population. Cosmetic procedures in elderly patients, including octogenarians, remain safe with an acceptable complication rate compared to younger patients. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin.

    PubMed

    Wortsman, X; Wortsman, J; Orlandi, C; Cardenas, G; Sazunic, I; Jemec, G B E

    2012-03-01

    While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated with the presence of those agents. We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Fillers are recognizable on ultrasound and generate different patterns of echogenicity and posterior acoustic artefacts. Cosmetic fillers were identified in 118 dermatological patients; most commonly hyaluronic acid among degradable agents and silicone oil among non-degradable. Fillers deposits were loosely scattered throughout the subcutaneous tissue, with occasional infiltration of local muscles and loco-regional lymph nodes. Accompanying dermatopathies were represented by highly localized inflammatory processes unresponsive to conventional treatment, morphea-like reactions, necrosis of fatty tissue and epidermal cysts; in the case of non-degradable agents, the associated dermatopathies were transient, resolving upon disappearance of the filler. Cosmetic filler agents may be detected and identified during routine ultrasound of dermatological lesions; the latter appear to be pathologically related to the cosmetic procedure. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. [BCT, breast conserving treatment--cosmetism and radicality].

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Fujio

    2006-03-01

    In performing BCT with radicality and cosmetism, the attitudes of breast oncologists in Japan and western countries are different at present. In Japan, our problem is to get surgical margin negative almost sacrificing the cosmetism. On the contrary, in western countries, they evaluate RT irrespective of margin status. Contrary to our expectation, results are almost equal in the point of radicality and IBTR. If both results are almost the same, it would be better and reasonable for us to adopt the western convenience and rationalism, of cause continuing our earnest attitude utmost.

  15. Safety assessment of nylon as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Christina; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of nylon polymers, which function in cosmetics primarily as bulking and opacifying agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to these large polymers and determined that they are not likely to penetrate the skin. Whatever residual monomers may be present were not present at a sufficient level to cause any reactions in test subjects at the maximum ingredient use concentration. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Minimally invasive cosmetic dentistry: alignment, bleaching and bonding (ABB).

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Tif

    2011-11-01

    This article will outline how combining existing techniques in a new and unique manner can potentially redefine the traditional approach to smile design planning and execution. Alignment, tooth whitening and edge bonding with new highly polishable nano-hybrid composites can make cosmetic dentistry far simpler and less invasive. Patients' perceptions of their end smile result can change dramatically if they are allowed to see their teeth improve gradually. This technique will highlight a choice of pathways available in cosmetic dentistry making it much less invasive for the patient and less risky for dentists.

  17. Safety Assessment of Dimethicone Crosspolymers as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-05-26

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 62 dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as absorbents, bulking agents, film formers, hair-conditioning agents, emollient skin-conditioning agents, slip modifiers, surface modifiers, and nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to these polymers and addressed the issue of residual monomers. The Panel concluded that these dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients are safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  18. Discount cosmetic surgery: industry trends and strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-08-01

    Discount cosmetic surgery is a topic of interest to plastic surgeons. To understand this trend and its effects on plastic surgeons, it is necessary to review the economics of cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery's practice environment, and the broader business principles of service industries. Recent work looked at the economics of the plastic surgery market. This analysis demonstrated that increased local density of plastic surgeons was associated with lower adjusted fees for cosmetic procedures. A survey of plastic surgeons about their practice environment revealed that 93 percent categorized the majority of their patients as very or moderately price-sensitive. Fully 98 percent described their business climate as very or moderately competitive and most plastic surgeons thought they lost a sizable number of cosmetic patients within the last year for reasons of price.A standard industry analysis, when applied to cosmetic surgery, reveals the following: an increased number of surgeons leads to lower fees (reducing their bargaining power as suppliers), patients are price-sensitive (increasing their bargaining power as buyers), and there are few barriers to entry among providers (allowing potential new entrants into the market). Such a situation is conducive to discounting taking hold-and even becoming the industry norm. In this environment, business strategy dictates there are three protocols for success: discounting, differentiation, and focus. Discounting joins the trend toward cutting fees. Success comes from increasing volume and efficiency and thus preserving profits. Differentiation creates an industrywide perception of uniqueness; this requires broadly positioning plastic surgeons as holders of a distinct brand identity separate from other "cosmetic surgeons." The final strategy is to focus on a particular buyer group to develop a market niche, such as establishing a "Park Avenue" practice catering to patients who demand a prestigious surgeon, although this is

  19. Safety Assessment of Pentaerythrityl Tetraesters as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 16 pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds as used in cosmetics. These ingredients mostly function as hair-conditioning agents, skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous and binders, skin-conditioning agents-occlusive, viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous, and skin-conditioning agents-emollient. The Panel reviewed the available animal and human data related to these ingredients and previous safety assessments of the fatty acid moieties. The Panel concluded that pentaerythrityl tetraisostearate and the other pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds were safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Safety Assessment of Dialkyl Malates as Used in Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6 dialkyl malate compounds used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as skin-conditioning agents-emollients. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredients along with a previous safety assessment of malic acid. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these dialkyl maleate compounds are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [Analysis of preservatives in cosmetics by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Xiao-fang

    2002-05-01

    The wide bore capillary column HP-1701(15 m x 0.53 mm i.d. x 1.0 micron) has been used to analyze benzyl alcohol, methyl-p-hydroxy benzoate, ethyl-p-hydroxy benzoate, propyl-p-hydroxy benzoate, and butyl-p-hydroxy benzoate in cosmetics. The results showed that these preservatives could be separated with the capillary column completely and their peaks were not interfered with those of other components in cosmetics. The detection limits were 13 ng, 70 ng, 70 ng, 100 ng and 100 ng respectively and the linear range was 50 ng-500 ng.

  2. Preoperative and postoperative care in cosmetic laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Adam T.; Becker, Daniel G.

    2001-05-01

    Advances in laser technology have allowed the application of lasers to cosmetic facial skin resurfacing. While this application has been extremely advantageous to patients, the development of pre- and postoperative therapeutic regimens was necessary to mitigate potential complications associated with laser resurfacing. Potential complications of laser resurfacing include prolonged postoperative erythema, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, herpetic, bacterial or candidal infection, and other concerns including scarring and abnormal wound healing. In this report we review the state of the art of preoperative and postoperative care for cosmetic laser resurfacing.

  3. Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel amended safety assessment of Calendula officinalis-derived cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Andersen, F Alan; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Calendula officinalis extract, C officinalis flower, C officinalis flower extract, C officinalis flower oil, and C officinalis seed oil are cosmetic ingredients derived from C officinalis. These ingredients may contain minerals, carbohydrates, lipids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, sterols and steroids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, triterpenes, tocopherols, quinones, amino acids, and resins. These ingredients were not significantly toxic in single-dose oral studies using animals. The absence of reproductive/developmental toxicity was inferred from repeat-dose studies of coriander oil, with a similar composition. Overall, these ingredients were not genotoxic. They also were not irritating, sensitizing, or photosensitizing in animal or clinical tests but may be mild ocular irritants. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics in the practices of use and concentration given in this amended safety assessment.

  4. 77 FR 14405 - Preparation for International Cooperation on Cosmetics Regulations; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Preparation for International Cooperation on Cosmetics... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting entitled ``International Cooperation... information and receive comments on the International Cooperation on Cosmetics Regulations (ICCR) as well as...

  5. Long-term Evaluation of Cosmetic Appearance of Repaired Lacerations: Validation of Telephone Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Judd E; Valentine, Sharon M; McCuskey, Charles F; Turque, Theo; Singer, Adam J

    1998-01-01

    See editorial Objective: Patients with lacerations are most concerned about the ultimate cosmetic appearance of their wound. We evaluated methods to assess the long-term cosmetic appearance by telephone survey.

  6. Facial cosmetics have little effect on attractiveness judgments compared with identity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex L; Kramer, S S

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of women in modern societies use facial cosmetics, which modify facial cues to attractiveness. However, the size of this increase remains unclear--how much more attractive are individuals after an application of cosmetics? Here, we utilised a 'new statistics' approach, calculating the effect size of cosmetics on attractiveness using a within-subjects design, and compared this with the effect size due to identity--that is, the inherent differences in attractiveness between people. Women were photographed with and without cosmetics, and these images were rated for attractiveness by a second group of participants. The proportion of variance in attractiveness explained by identity was much greater than the variance within models due to cosmetics. This result was unchanged after statistically controlling for the perceived amount of cosmetics that each model used. Although cosmetics increase attractiveness, the effect is small, and the benefits of cosmetics may be inflated in everyday thinking.

  7. Cosmetic clitoridectomy in a 33-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Veale, David; Daniels, Joe

    2012-06-01

    The Female Genital Mutilation Act (2003) in England allows for mental health exceptions for cosmetic surgery resulting from perceived abnormality. Similar legislation exists in other countries. There are no reported cases of clitoridectomy for cosmetic reasons or any discussion in the literature of mental health exceptions to the Act. This is a single case report on a 33-year-old married, heterosexual woman who had already had a cosmetic labiaplasty and was seeking a clitoridectomy for aesthetic reasons. At assessment, there were no psychiatric contra-indications or unrealistic expectations and the patient proceeded with a clitoridectomy. At 9 and 22 months follow-up, she was reassessed and was very pleased with the outcome. There were improvements in the satisfaction with her genital appearance, sexual satisfaction, and quality of life related to body image. Assessments for cosmetic clitoridectomy will continue to be rare, but this case may provide some guidance for practitioners who are confronted with such requests for body modification. However there remains only limited understanding of the motivation for such a request.

  8. Sensory characterization of virgin olive oil-based cosmetic creams.

    PubMed

    Parente, Maria Emma; Gámbaro, Adriana; Boinbaser, Lucia; Roascio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    The influence of olive oil concentration and sensory profile on the odor of virgin olive oil-based cosmetic creams was studied. Four olive oils were selected on the basis of different intensities of positive and defective odor attributes: two extra virgin olive oils, one virgin olive oil, and one ordinary virgin olive oil. Thirty cosmetic creams were prepared, by both cold and hot processing methods, using each of the above oils at concentrations of 3%, 5%, and 10%, in addition to mineral oil controls. A trained sensory panel evaluated the fruitiness and defectiveness intensities in the odor of creams, using unstructured 10-cm scales ranging from "none at all" to "much." The fruity and defective attributes perceived in the odor of creams were significantly influenced by the sensory profile of the starting olive oil, oil concentration, and preparation method. Overall, these findings suggest that virgin olive oils of only slightly fruity odor may be conveniently used for the preparation of cold-processed cosmetic creams, whereas ordinary virgin olive oils appear to be suitable for the preparation of cosmetic creams only by hot processing of the emulsion at a low oil concentration.

  9. Bilateral irreversible severe vision loss from cosmetic iris implants.

    PubMed

    George, Mathew K; Tsai, James C; Loewen, Nils A

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of bilateral neovascular glaucoma with central retinal vein occlusions secondary to cosmetic iris implantation. Interventional case report. setting: Tertiary care center; ophthalmology clinic. patient: A 25-year-old woman presented with persistent bilateral blurry vision after simultaneous bilateral cosmetic iris implantation. Examination showed best-corrected visual acuity of hand motion in the right and 20/400 in the left eye with intraocular pressures (IOP) of 48 mm Hg in the right and 40 mm Hg in the left eye on maximal medical therapy. She had bilateral neovascularization of the iris and angle with synechial angle closure, surgical aniridia, central retinal vein occlusion, and end-stage glaucomatous optic neuropathy. She was diagnosed with neovascular glaucoma in both eyes, associated with cosmetic iris implants. intervention procedures: Humphrey 24-2 visual field testing, optic nerve coherence tomography, and fundus imaging were performed. After bilateral intravitreal bevacizumab and panretinal photocoagulation, Ahmed glaucoma drainage devices were implanted in both eyes. main outcome measures: IOP, anterior chamber inflammation, neovascularization. Despite aggressive treatment, severe permanent bilateral vision loss ensued. We strongly advise against the use of anterior chamber iris implants for cosmetic indications. Close monitoring of implanted individuals is necessary. Explantation should be considered at the earliest sign of adverse reaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety Evaluation of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Compounds for Cosmetic Use

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chan Young; Kim, Kyu-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are products of condensed ethylene oxide and water that can have various derivatives and functions. Since many PEG types are hydrophilic, they are favorably used as penetration enhancers, especially in topical dermatological preparations. PEGs, together with their typically nonionic derivatives, are broadly utilized in cosmetic products as surfactants, emulsifiers, cleansing agents, humectants, and skin conditioners. The compounds studied in this review include PEG/PPG-17/6 copolymer, PEG-20 glyceryl triisostearate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, and PEG-60 hydrogenated castor oil. Overall, much of the data available in this review are on PEGylated oils (PEG-40 and PEG-60 hydrogenated castor oils), which were recommended as safe for use in cosmetics up to 100% concentration. Currently, PEG-20 glyceryl triisostearate and PEGylated oils are considered safe for cosmetic use according to the results of relevant studies. Additionally, PEG/PPG-17/6 copolymer should be further studied to ensure its safety as a cosmetic ingredient. PMID:26191379

  11. Selection of fragrance for cosmetic cream containing olive oil.

    PubMed

    Parente, María Emma; Gámbaro, Adriana; Boinbaser, Lucía; Roascio, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions of essences for potential use in the development of a line of cosmetic emulsions containing olive oil were studied. Six cream samples prepared with six essences selected in a preliminary study were evaluated for overall liking and intention to purchase by a 63-women sample. A check-all-that-apply (CATA) question consisting of 32 terms was used to gather information about consumer perceptions of fragrance, affective associations, effects on the skin, price, target market, zones of application, and occasions of use. Hierarchical cluster analysis led to the identification of two consumer clusters with different frequency of use of face creams. The two clusters assigned different overall liking scores to the samples and used the CATA terms differently to describe them. A fragrance with jasmine as its principal note was selected for further development of cosmetic creams, as it was awarded the highest overall liking scores by respondents of the two clusters, and was significantly associated with cosmetic features including nourishing, moisturizing, softening, with a delicious and mild smell, and with a natural image, as well as being considered suitable for face and body creams. The use of CATA questions enabled the rapid identification of attributes associated by respondents with a cosmetic cream's fragrance, in addition to contributing relevant information for the definition of marketing and communication strategies.

  12. Influence of the cosmetic treatment of hair on drug testing.

    PubMed

    Jurado, C; Kintz, P; Menéndez, M; Repetto, M

    1997-01-01

    An important issue of concern for drug analysis in hair is the change in the drug concentration induced by the cosmetic treatment of hair. The products used for this treatment are strong bases and they are expected to cause hair damage. As a result drugs may be lost from the hair matrix or, under conditions of environmental contamination, be more easily incorporated into the hair matrix. We investigated the effects of cosmetic treatment in vivo by analysing hair samples selected from people who had treated their hair by bleaching or dyeing before sample collection. All of the subjects admitted a similar drug consumption during the time period for which the strands were analysed. Samples were viewed under a microscope to establish the degree of hair damage. Treated and untreated portions from each lock of hair were then selected, separated and analysed by standard detection procedures for cocaine, opiates, cannabinoids and nicotine. In all cases the drug content in hair that had undergone cosmetic treatment decreased in comparison to untreated hair. The majority of the mean differences were in the range of 40%-60% (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine and THC-COOH). For morphine the mean difference was higher than 60%, and two cases (THC and nicotine) differed by approx. 30%. These differences depended not only on the type of cosmetic treatment, as bleaching produced higher decreases than dyeing, but also on the degree of hair damage i.e. the more damaged the hair, the larger the differences in the concentration levels of drugs.

  13. Makeup and Menstrual Cycle: Near Ovulation, Women Use More Cosmetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gueguen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that women near ovulation change their appearance in order to look more attractive. I hypothesized that, near ovulation, women would use more cosmetics. In a first study, female participants received an LH test in a laboratory setting to determine their fertility risk. Participants estimated the time they had spent…

  14. Adverse reactions to cosmetics and methods of testing.

    PubMed

    Nigam, P K

    2009-01-01

    Untoward reactions to cosmetics, toiletries, and topical applications are the commonest single reason for hospital referrals with allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, these are only mild or transient and most reactions being irritant rather than allergic in nature. Various adverse effects may occur in the form of acute toxicity, percutaneous absorption, skin irritation, eye irritation, skin sensitization and photosensitization, subchronic toxicity, mutagenicity/genotoxicity, and phototoxicity/photoirritation. The safety assessment of a cosmetic product clearly depends upon how it is used, since it determines the amount of substance which may be ingested, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin or mucous membranes. Concentration of ingredients used in the different products is also important. Various test procedures include in vivo animal models and in vitro models, such as open or closed patch test, in vivo skin irritation test, skin corrosivity potential tests (rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance test, Episkin test), eye irritation tests (in vivo eye irritancy test and Draize eye irritancy test), mutagenicity/genotoxicity tests (in vitro bacterial reverse mutation test and in vitro mammalian cell chromosome aberration test), and phototoxicity/photoirritation test (3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity test). Finished cosmetic products are usually tested in small populations to confirm the skin and mucous membrane compatibility, and to assess their cosmetic acceptability.

  15. Evaluation of the efficiency and safety in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Uckaya, Meryem; Uckaya, Fatih; Demir, Nazan; Demir, Yasar

    2016-02-29

    Chemicals used in cosmetics have to interact with enzymes for beneficial or destroy purpose after they enter in our body. Active sections of enzymes that catalyze reactions have three dimensions and they are active optically. When these limitations of catalytic sections are considered, it may be considered that defining geometric specifications of chemical materials and functional groups they contain may contribute on safety evaluations of cosmetic products. In this study, defining similarities and differences of geometric structures of chemicals that are prohibited to be used in cosmetic products and chemical that are allowed to be used by using group theory and analyze of functional groups that are often encountered in these chemicals are aimed. Molecule formulas related to chemical material of, 276 pieces chemicals that are prohibited to be used in cosmetic products and 65 pieces chemicals that are allowed, are used as the material. Two and three-dimension structures of these formulas are drawn and types and quantity of functional groups they contain are defined. And as a method, freeware (Free Trial) version of "Chem-BioOffice Ultra 13.0 Suite" chemical drawing program to draw two and three-dimension of formulas, "Campus-Licensed" version that are provided for use by our university of "Autodesk 3DS Max" for three-dimension drawings are used. In order to analyze geometric specifications of drawn molecules according to Group Theory and define type and quantity of available functional groups, Excel applications developed by Prof. Dr. Yaşar Demir are used.

  16. 76 FR 46677 - Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 49 RIN 1545-BJ40 Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public hearing on...

  17. Myth 6: Cosmetic Use of Multiple Selection Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman-Nimz, Reva

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, armed with the courage of her convictions and a respectable collection of empirical evidence, the author articulated what she considered to be a compelling argument against the cosmetic use of multiple selection criteria as a guiding principle for identifying children and youth with high potential. To assess the current…

  18. Makeup and Menstrual Cycle: Near Ovulation, Women Use More Cosmetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gueguen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that women near ovulation change their appearance in order to look more attractive. I hypothesized that, near ovulation, women would use more cosmetics. In a first study, female participants received an LH test in a laboratory setting to determine their fertility risk. Participants estimated the time they had spent…

  19. Myth 6: Cosmetic Use of Multiple Selection Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman-Nimz, Reva

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, armed with the courage of her convictions and a respectable collection of empirical evidence, the author articulated what she considered to be a compelling argument against the cosmetic use of multiple selection criteria as a guiding principle for identifying children and youth with high potential. To assess the current…

  20. Cosmetic Surgery and the Cultural Construction of Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie; Shalmon, Maya

    2005-01-01

    Throughout history, certain members of nearly all cultures have deliberately altered their body's natural appearance. Today, people live in a time when medicine can cure the body and also reshape it. Hence, many people use biomedical means, such as steroids and hormones to alter their bodies. Additionally, cosmetic surgery is becoming increasingly…

  1. Database search for safety information on cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Marleen; Rogiers, Vera

    2007-12-01

    Ethical considerations with respect to experimental animal use and regulatory testing are worldwide under heavy discussion and are, in certain cases, taken up in legislative measures. The most explicit example is the European cosmetic legislation, establishing a testing ban on finished cosmetic products since 11 September 2004 and enforcing that the safety of a cosmetic product is assessed by taking into consideration "the general toxicological profile of the ingredients, their chemical structure and their level of exposure" (OJ L151, 32-37, 23 June 1993; OJ L066, 26-35, 11 March 2003). Therefore the availability of referenced and reliable information on cosmetic ingredients becomes a dire necessity. Given the high-speed progress of the World Wide Web services and the concurrent drastic increase in free access to information, identification of relevant data sources and evaluation of the scientific value and quality of the retrieved data, are crucial. Based upon own practical experience, a survey is put together of freely and commercially available data sources with their individual description, field of application, benefits and drawbacks. It should be mentioned that the search strategies described are equally useful as a starting point for any quest for safety data on chemicals or chemical-related substances in general.

  2. Cosmetic Surgery and the Cultural Construction of Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie; Shalmon, Maya

    2005-01-01

    Throughout history, certain members of nearly all cultures have deliberately altered their body's natural appearance. Today, people live in a time when medicine can cure the body and also reshape it. Hence, many people use biomedical means, such as steroids and hormones to alter their bodies. Additionally, cosmetic surgery is becoming increasingly…

  3. Liver function in workers exposed of the cosmetics industry.

    PubMed

    Casale, T; Caciari, T; Rosati, M V; Biagi, M; De Sio, S; Andreozzi, G; Schifano, M P; Capozzella, A; Pimpinella, B; Tomei, G; Tomei, F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether occupational exposure to substances used in the cosmetic factories may cause effects on the liver and blood counts in exposed workers. The study included 48 exposed workers and 86 unexposed controls. All workers included in the study underwent blood count, white blood count, total, direct and indirect bilirubin, transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and cholinesterase. The differences between the means and frequencies were compared using the Student's t-test and chi-square test with Yates correction and were considered significant when the p value was <0.05. The analysis of the results shows that 35.4% of workers in the cosmetics industry had liver test values above the range. We noted a statistically significant higher prevalence of GPT (p <0.05) and total bilirubin (p <0.05) in the workers of the cosmetics industry compared with the control group. The results obtained suggest that occupational exposure to low doses of substances used in the cosmetic industry is able to influence some liver parameters in occupationally exposed workers.

  4. Factors influencing surgeons' decisions in elective cosmetic surgery consultations.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sharon A; Rosser, Robert; James, M Ian; Kaney, Sue; Salmon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Current guidelines for surgeons' decisions about whether to offer cosmetic surgery are ineffective. Therefore, surgeons have to make difficult decisions on a case-by-case basis. The authors sought to identify the patient variables that influence surgeons' decisions in practice. A qualitative study first delineated, from observation of consultations and interviews with surgeons and other staff, variables that might influence their decisions. Then, in a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking cosmetic surgery, the authors measured these variables and tested whether they predicted the surgeons' decisions to offer surgery. Participants were 6 consultant plastic surgeons who assess cosmetic surgery referrals and 276 new patients aged 16 years or older referred to these surgeons. The qualitative study suggested that, as well as clinical factors (the probability of a satisfactory surgical outcome and the risks v. benefits of surgery), surgery was more likely to be offered where it was of low cost (i.e., minor skin surgery), physical symptoms or dysfunction were present, and abnormality of appearance was extreme. The role of patients' quality of life was unclear. The quantitative study confirmed that the probability of surgery was increased where requests were for minor skin procedures and by abnormality of patients' appearance. In patients seeking major body procedures, surgery was less likely when patients reported poor quality of life. Surgeons' decisions about whether to offer elective cosmetic surgery follow systematic rules. By incorporating the factors that surgeons use in their decision making, more effective guidelines about elective cosmetic surgery provision than are presently available could be developed.

  5. Mineral oil and synthetic hydrocarbons in cosmetic lip products.

    PubMed

    Niederer, M; Stebler, T; Grob, K

    2016-04-01

    Lipsticks and lip care products may contain saturated hydrocarbons which either stem from mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) or are synthetic, that is polyolefin oligomeric saturated hydrocarbons (POSH). Some of these hydrocarbons are strongly accumulated and form granulomas in human tissues, which prompted Cosmetics Europe (former Colipa) to issue a recommendation for their use in lip care and oral products. From 2012 to 2014, MOSH+POSH were determined in 175 cosmetic lip products taken from the Swiss market in order to estimate their contribution to human exposure. Mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons and POSH were extracted and analysed by GC with FID. Areas were integrated as a total as well as by mass ranges with cuts at n-C25 and n-C34 to characterize the molecular mass distribution. About 68% of the products contained at least 5% MOSH+POSH (total concentration). For regular users, these products would be major contributors to their MOSH+POSH exposure. About 31% of the products contained more than 32% MOSH+POSH. Their regular usage would amount in an estimated MOSH+POSH exposure exceeding the highest estimated dietary exposure. The majority of the products contained hydrocarbons with a molecular mass range which was not in line with the recommendations of Cosmetics Europe. Taking into account that material applied to the lips largely ends up being ingested, MOSH and POSH levels should be reduced in the majority of cosmetic lip products. As the extensive evaluation of the data available on MOSH (EFSA J., 10, 2012, 2704) did not enable the specification of limits considered as safe, the present level of dietary exposure and its evaluation as 'of potential concern' provide the relevant bench mark, which means that lip products should contain clearly less than 5% MOSH+POSH. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Galloyl-RGD as a new cosmetic ingredient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cosmetics market has rapidly increased over the last years. For example, in 2011 it reached 242.8 billion US dollars, which was a 3.9% increase compared to 2010. There have been many recent trials aimed at finding the functional ingredients for new cosmetics. Gallic acid is a phytochemical derived from various herbs, and has anti-fungal, anti-viral, and antioxidant properties. Although phytochemicals are useful as cosmetic ingredients, they have a number of drawbacks, such as thermal stability, residence time in the skin, and permeability through the dermal layer. To overcome these problems, we considered conjugation of gallic acid with a peptide. Results We synthesized galloyl-RGD, which represents a conjugate of gallic acid and the peptide RGD, purified it by HPLC and characterized by MALDI-TOF with the aim of using it as a new cosmetic ingredient. Thermal stability of galloyl-RGD was tested at alternating temperatures (consecutive 4°C, 20°C, or 40°C for 8 h each) on days 2, 21, 41, and 61. Galloyl-RGD was relatively safe to HaCaT keratinocytes, as their viability after 48 h incubation with 500 ppm galloyl-RGD was 93.53%. In the group treated with 50 ppm galloyl-RGD, 85.0% of free radicals were removed, whereas 1000 ppm galloyl-RGD suppressed not only L-DOPA formation (43.8%) but also L-DOPA oxidation (54.4%). Conclusions Galloyl-RGD is a promising candidate for a cosmetic ingredient. PMID:25103826

  7. Galloyl-RGD as a new cosmetic ingredient.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Hun; Jung, Dae Hyun; Kim, Soo Jung; Kim, Sung Han; Park, Kyung Mok

    2014-08-08

    The cosmetics market has rapidly increased over the last years. For example, in 2011 it reached 242.8 billion US dollars, which was a 3.9% increase compared to 2010. There have been many recent trials aimed at finding the functional ingredients for new cosmetics. Gallic acid is a phytochemical derived from various herbs, and has anti-fungal, anti-viral, and antioxidant properties. Although phytochemicals are useful as cosmetic ingredients, they have a number of drawbacks, such as thermal stability, residence time in the skin, and permeability through the dermal layer. To overcome these problems, we considered conjugation of gallic acid with a peptide. We synthesized galloyl-RGD, which represents a conjugate of gallic acid and the peptide RGD, purified it by HPLC and characterized by MALDI-TOF with the aim of using it as a new cosmetic ingredient. Thermal stability of galloyl-RGD was tested at alternating temperatures (consecutive 4°C, 20°C, or 40°C for 8 h each) on days 2, 21, 41, and 61. Galloyl-RGD was relatively safe to HaCaT keratinocytes, as their viability after 48 h incubation with 500 ppm galloyl-RGD was 93.53%. In the group treated with 50 ppm galloyl-RGD, 85.0% of free radicals were removed, whereas 1000 ppm galloyl-RGD suppressed not only L-DOPA formation (43.8%) but also L-DOPA oxidation (54.4%). Galloyl-RGD is a promising candidate for a cosmetic ingredient.

  8. Nanoemulsion: process selection and application in cosmetics--a review.

    PubMed

    Yukuyama, M N; Ghisleni, D D M; Pinto, T J A; Bou-Chacra, N A

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, considerable and continuous growth in consumer demand in the cosmetics field has spurred the development of sophisticated formulations, aiming at high performance, attractive appearance, sensorial benefit and safety. Yet despite increasing demand from consumers, the formulator faces certain restrictions regarding the optimum equilibrium between the active compound concentration and the formulation base taking into account the nature of the skin structure, mainly concerning to the ideal penetration of the active compound, due to the natural skin barrier. Emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible phases, and the interest in nanoscale emulsion has been growing considerably in recent decades due to its specific attributes such as high stability, attractive appearance and drug delivery properties; therefore, performance is expected to improve using a lipid-based nanocarrier. Nanoemulsions are generated by different approaches: the so-called high-energy and low-energy methods. The global overview of these mechanisms and different alternatives for each method are presented in this paper, along with their benefits and drawbacks. As a cosmetics formulation is reflected in product delivery to consumers, nanoemulsion development with prospects for large-scale production is one of the key attributes in the method selection process. Thus, the aim of this review was to highlight the main high- and low-energy methods applicable in cosmetics and dermatological product development, their specificities, recent research on these methods in the cosmetics and consideration for the process selection optimization. The specific process with regard to inorganic nanoparticles, polymer nanoparticles and nanocapsule formulation is not considered in this paper. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Reconstruction Techniques of Choice for the Facial Cosmetic Units.

    PubMed

    Russo, F; Linares, M; Iglesias, M E; Martínez-Amo, J L; Cabo, F; Tercedor, J; Costa-Vieira, R; Toledo-Pastrana, T; Ródenas, J M; Leis, V

    2017-10-01

    A broad range of skin flaps can be used to repair facial surgical defects after the excision of a tumor. The aim of our study was to develop a practical guideline covering the most useful skin grafts for each of the distinct facial cosmetic units. This was a multicenter study in which 10 dermatologists with extensive experience in reconstructive surgery chose their preferred technique for each cosmetic unit. The choice of flaps was based on personal experience, taking into account factors such as suitability of the reconstruction technique for the specific defect, the final cosmetic result, surgical difficulty, and risk of complications. Each dermatologist proposed 2 flaps in order of preference for each cosmetic subunit. A score of 10 was given to the first flap and a score of 5 to the second. The total score obtained for each of the options proposed by the participating dermatologists was used to draw up a list of the 3 best grafts for each site. There was notable unanimity of criteria among most of the dermatologists for reconstructive techniques such as the glabellar flap for defects of the medial canthus of the eye, the bilateral advancement flag flap or H flap for the forehead, the rotary door flap for the auricle of the ear, the Mustarde flap for the infraorbital cheek, the O-Z rotation flap for the scalp, the Tenzel flap for the lower eyelid, and the island flap for the upper lip. The results of this study will be useful as a practical guide to choosing the best reconstruction technique for each of the facial cosmetic units. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. 26 CFR 49.0-3T - Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). 49... Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). On and after July 1, 2010, this part 49 also applies to taxes imposed by chapter 49 of the Internal Revenue Code, relating to cosmetic services. See part 40 of this...

  11. 26 CFR 49.0-3T - Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). 49... Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). On and after July 1, 2010, this part 49 also applies to taxes imposed by chapter 49 of the Internal Revenue Code, relating to cosmetic services. See part 40 of this...

  12. 26 CFR 49.0-3T - Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). 49... Introduction; cosmetic services (temporary). On and after July 1, 2010, this part 49 also applies to taxes imposed by chapter 49 of the Internal Revenue Code, relating to cosmetic services. See part 40 of this...

  13. 75 FR 12546 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cosmetic Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Cosmetic Labeling Regulations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... on information collection provisions in FDA's cosmetic labeling regulations. DATES: Submit written or... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Cosmetic Labeling Regulations--21 CFR Part 701 (OMB...

  14. Attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients: the role of culture and social contact.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kim-Pong; Ng, Henry Kin-Shing; Kim, Young-Hoon; Yeung, Victoria Wai-Lan; Cheung, Francis Yue-Lok

    2012-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery is increasingly popular globally, but how cosmetic surgery patients are socially evaluated is largely unknown. The present research documents attitudes toward these patients in multiple cultures (Hong Kong, Japan, and the United States). Across these cultures, attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients were predominantly negative: Participants ascribed more negative attributes to cosmetic surgery patients and found cosmetic surgery not acceptable. Also, participants in Hong Kong and Japan were not willing to form social relationships, particularly intimate ones, with these patients. These attitudes were less negative in the United States than in Hong Kong and Japan, partly because social contact, which reduced negativity in attitudes toward cosmetic surgery patients, was more prevalent in the United States. These findings bear important implications for the subjective well-being of cosmetic surgery patients, who very often expect improvement in their social relationships through the surgery.

  15. Regulating bodily integrity: cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Aileen

    2012-12-01

    Cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation share a number of features. Both procedures are patient-driven forms of body shaping that can only be performed by surgeons, and therefore the procedures require the imprimatur of the medical profession to be lawful. Both invoke identity construction as a central legitimating factor that renders the procedures therapeutic. The legal regulation of surgery is subsumed within general principles regulating medical practice, where autonomy and consent are constituted as fundamental authorising principles. The legitimacy of consent to surgical intervention operates unevenly in relation to these two forms of surgery. Amputation of healthy limbs is presumed to be non-therapeutic. Capacity is closely interrogated and minutely scrutinised. Consent to cosmetic surgery, by contrast, is presumed to be a valid expression of autonomy and self-determination.

  16. Temporary blindness after an anterior chamber cosmetic filler injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Eom, Jin-Sup; Kim, Jae Yong

    2015-06-01

    Blindness is a rare but devastating complication of cosmetic filler injection. A primary cause of blindness following hyaluronic acid filler injection is retrograde intravascular embolization into the small ocular arteries. We here report a case of temporary blindness associated with the injection of hyaluronic acid filler into the anterior chamber of eye. This is the first report of temporary blindness after cosmetic filler injection into the anterior chamber, and the first described case that recovered completely after the filler was removed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  17. Lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC) in cosmetic and pharmaceutical dermal products.

    PubMed

    Pardeike, Jana; Hommoss, Aiman; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-01-21

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) are distinguishable from nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) by the composition of the solid particle matrix. Both are an alternative carrier system to liposomes and emulsions. This review paper focuses on lipid nanoparticles for dermal application. Production of lipid nanoparticles and final products containing lipid nanoparticles is feasible by well-established production methods. SLN and NLC exhibit many features for dermal application of cosmetics and pharmaceutics, i.e. controlled release of actives, drug targeting, occlusion and associated with it penetration enhancement and increase of skin hydration. Due to the production of lipid nanoparticles from physiological and/or biodegradable lipids, this carrier system exhibits an excellent tolerability. The lipid nanoparticles are a "nanosafe" carrier. Furthermore, an overview of the cosmetic products currently on the market is given and the improvement of the benefit/risk ratio of the topical therapy is shown.

  18. Influence of different cosmetic formulations on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K; Heinrich, U; Tronnier, H

    2014-01-01

    The human skin barrier is an important part of the skin's intactness and its functionality is a precondition for healthy skin. Ingredients in cosmetic formulations, especially penetration enhancers, can influence this barrier function as they transport active agents into deeper skin layers. In this study different cosmetic formulations were tested by 60 healthy female volunteers over a period of 4 weeks. The skin hydration and barrier function before and during the application were measured. Significant changes in both parameters were determined. A negative influence on the barrier function by penetration enhancers could be observed, but it was also found that lamellar lipid structures (DermaMembranSysteme®, DMS®) are able to enhance the skin barrier. Both penetration enhancers as well as DMS can increase skin hydration. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Medicinal and cosmetics soap production from Jatropha oil.

    PubMed

    Shahinuzzaman, M; Yaakob, Zahira; Moniruzzaman, M

    2016-06-01

    Soap is the most useful things which we use our everyday life in various cleansing and cosmetics purposes. Jatropha oil is nonedible oil which has more benefits to soap making. It has also cosmetics and medicinal properties. But the presence of toxic Phorbol esters in Jatropha oil is the main constrains to use it. So it is necessary to search a more suitable method for detoxifying the Jatropha oil before the use as the main ingredient of soap production. This review implies a more suitable method for removing phorbol esters from Jatropha oil. Several parameters such as the % yield of pure Jatropha oil soap, TFM value of soap, total alkali content, free caustic alkalinity content, pH, the antimicrobial activity, and CMC value of general soap should be taken into consideration for soap from detoxified Jatropha oil.

  20. Production of mannosylerythritol lipids and their application in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2013-06-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants abundantly produced by different basidiomycetous yeasts such as Pseudozyma, and show not only excellent interfacial properties but also versatile biochemical actions. These features of MELs make their application in new technology areas possible. Recently, the structural and functional variety of MELs was considerably expanded by advanced microbial screening methods. Different types of MELs bearing different hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts have been reported. The genes responsible for MEL biosynthesis were identified, and their genetic study is now in progress, aiming to control the chemical structure. The excellent properties leading to practical cosmetic ingredients, i.e., moisturization of dry skin, repair of damaged hair, activation of fibroblast and papilla cells and antioxidant and protective effects in skin cells, have been demonstrated on the yeast glycolipid biosurfactants. In this review, the current status of research and development on MELs, particularly the commercial application in cosmetics, is described.

  1. Dr. Newell Sill Jenkins: progenitor of cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hyson, John M; Swank, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Dr. Newell Sill Jenkins was one of the pioneer American dentists who took "American dentistry" to Europe. Among his patients were Composer Richard Wagner, and among his friends, Author Mark Twain. He treated some of the crown head of Europe, and yet found time to participate in organized dentistry and conduct research in cosmetic dentistry. He was the father of the porcelain revival in both Europe and America. Unfortunately, Jenkins' Legacy as the chief proponent of cosmetic dentistry in the late 19th and early 20th centuries has been largely ignored by dental historians. In a 20-year period (1896 to 1916), Jenkins published 32 articles in the dental literature on the esthetic advantages of porcelain fillings. It is time to give Jenkins his just recognition.

  2. Microwave Sanitization of Color Additives Used in Cosmetics: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Jasnow, S. B.; Smith, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave exposure has been explored as a method of microbiologically sanitizing color additives used in cosmetic products. Selected microbiologically unacceptable cosmetic color additives, D&C red no. 7 Ca lake (certified synthetic organic color), carmine (natural organic color not subject to certification), and chromium hydroxide green (inorganic color not subject to certification), were submitted to microwave exposure. Gram-negative bacteria were eliminated, as verified by enrichment procedures, and levels of gram-positive bacteria were reduced. Generally, analytical and dermal safety studies indicated no significant alterations in physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of the colors. Sanitization was also successfully performed on other colors (D&C red no. 9 Ba lake, D&C red no. 12 Ba lake, D&C green no. 5, and FD&C red no. 4); initial physical and chemical tests were satisfactory. Results indicated that this method of sanitization is feasible and warrants further investigation. PMID:1164010

  3. Moisturizing effect of topical cosmetic products applied to dry skin.

    PubMed

    Polaskova, Jana; Pavlackova, Jana; Vltavska, Pavlina; Mokrejs, Pavel; Janis, Rahula

    2013-01-01

    One of the complications of "diabetes mellitus" is termed diabetic foot syndrome, the first symptoms of which include changes in the skin's condition and properties. The skin becomes dehydrated, dry, and prone to excessive formation of the horny layer, its barrier function becoming weakened. This function can be restored by applying suitable cosmetic excipients containing active substances. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of commercially available cosmetic products (CPs) designed for the care of diabetic foot, through a group of selected volunteers using noninvasive bioengineering methods. Statistical surveys (p < 0.05) evaluated these CPs as regards to their hydration effect and barrier properties. Special attention was devoted to CPs with the declared content of 10% urea, and that the influence of this preparation's ability to hydrate and maintain epidermal water in the epidermis was confirmed.

  4. Kinetics of moisturizing and firming effects of cosmetic formulations.

    PubMed

    Xhauflaire-Uhoda, E; Fontaine, K; Piérard, G E

    2008-04-01

    The assessment of cosmetic efficacy is rarely performed in studies comparing different concentrations of active compounds. The aim of the present study was to determine the skin hydrating and the skin firming dose-response effects of cosmetic formulations enriched in compounds derived from algae and fish collagen. A series of factors were studied including the type of formulation (cream or serum), the concentration in active ingredients, the effect of repetitive applications, as well as any residual effect of the formulations after stopping their applications. The serum enriched in marine compounds showed a better moisturizing effect in short term. The cream appeared more active later, particularly following repeat applications. A sustained tensor (firming) effect was observed during treatment with both the lotion and the cream. However, no remnant firming effect was perceived after stopping treatment.

  5. Electroanalytical determination of the sunscreen agent octocrylene in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Júnior, J B G; Araujo, T A; Trindade, M A G; Ferreira, V S

    2012-02-01

    An electroanalytical method was developed to detect and quantify the sunscreen agent octocrylene (OCR) in cosmetic products. The method was based on electrochemical reduction, using voltammetric techniques. OCR was reduced at -0.97 V vs. Ag/AgCl on a glassy carbon electrode using a mixture of Britton-Robinson buffer (0.04 mol L(-1)) and ethanol (7 : 3, v/v) as the supporting electrolyte solution. Under optimized conditions and square-wave voltammetry, OCR response was linear from 5.0 × 10(-6) to 8.0 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) (r = 0.9995), with a limit of detection of 2.8 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). The proposed electroanalytical method proved simple, fast and suitable for detection and quantification of OCR in samples of cosmetic products, with satisfactory results in the recovery test and analytical determination in real samples.

  6. [EU-Cosmetics: timetables for the replacement of animal experiments].

    PubMed

    Ruhdel, Irmela Wiltrud

    2005-01-01

    According to the 7(th) Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive the European Commission had to establish timetables for the phasing out of the various animal tests for the safety evaluation of ingredients used in cosmetics. However, the published timetables do not reflect the objectives of the 7(th) Amendment but contain longer deadlines for the ban on animal experiments of several endpoints. The European Commission also had to draw up a Directive for establishing an Annex IX that should list validated alternative methods which are not already listed in Annex V of the Dangerous Substances Directive. Although various alternative methods could have been listed in this Annex IX, the Commission published an empty table. From the point of view of the German Animal Welfare Federation amendments of the timetables and the Directive establishing Annex IX are urgently required. Additionally, the Commission has to provide optimal conditions for the replacement of alternative methods.

  7. Risk assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics: a European union perspective.

    PubMed

    Henkler, Frank; Tralau, Tewes; Tentschert, Jutta; Kneuer, Carsten; Haase, Andrea; Platzek, Thomas; Luch, Andreas; Götz, Mario E

    2012-11-01

    In Europe, the data requirements for the hazard and exposure characterisation of chemicals are defined according to the REACH regulation and its guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment (Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), and its guidance documents; available at: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2006:396:0001:0849:EN:PDF ; and at: http://guidance.echa.europa.eu/docs/guidance_document/information_requirements_en.htm ). This is the basis for any related risk assessment. The standard reference for the testing of cosmetic ingredients is the SCCP's 'Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and their Safety Evaluation' (The SCCP's Notes of Guidance for the testing of cosmetic ingredients and their safety evaluation (2006); available at: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_sccp/docs/sccp_o_03j.pdf ), which refers to the OECD guidelines for the testing of chemicals (The OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals as a collection of the most relevant internationally agreed testing methods used by government, industry and independent laboratories to assess the safety of chemical products; available at: http://www.oecd.org/topic/0,2686,en_2649_34377_1_1_1_1_37407,00.html ). According to the cosmetics directive [76/768/EEC], compounds that are classified as mutagenic, carcinogenic or toxic to reproduction are banned for the use in cosmetic products. Since December 2010, the respective labelling is based on the rules of regulation (EC) No. 1272/2008 (Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 December 2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, amending and repealing Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC, and amending Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Official Journal L 353, 31

  8. Influence of cosmetics on emotional, autonomous, endocrinological, and immune reactions.

    PubMed

    Pössel, P; Ahrens, S; Hautzinger, M

    2005-12-01

    Recent findings indicate that cosmetics increase positive valence of emotions and thereby influence the autonomous nerve system. Other studies showed the effects of emotions on the endocrinological and the immune system. Based on this preliminary conclusion, the aim of the present study was to prove whether cosmetics are able to decrease the level of the stress hormone cortisol and strengthen the immune system. Four slides of made up or unvarnished women each, integrated in another 16 slides each of equivalent valence and arousal, were presented to 60 women. During stimulus presentation, subjective (valence), autonomous (heart rate), endocrinological (salivary cortisol) as well as immunological reactions [secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA)] were recorded. As expected subjective ratings concerning the slides of made up women reported more positive valence than those concerning unvarnished women. Furthermore, heart rate decreased under presentation of made up women, which indicates the positive influence of these slides on the autonomous nerve system. Furthermore, in half of the volunteers a decrease of cortisol and an increase of sIgA level while presenting the made up women was measurable in contrast to the presentation of unvarnished women. Maybe this is due to a short presentation time and the endocrinological as well as the immune system can be hardly influenced that quick. Another explanation could be that the volunteers were in part so called psychophysiological non-responders who show no reaction to emotional stimuli in the endocrinological and the immune system. It has to be considered that only the influence of visual stimuli and not the influence of social care (e.g. positive statements of other, etc.), which is normally connected with the use of cosmetics, was assessed, so that these delineated positive results show the lower limit of cosmetic effects.

  9. Borrowed beauty? Understanding identity in Asian facial cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Yves Saint James; Steinkamp, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    This review aims to identify (1) sources of knowledge and (2) important themes of the ethical debate related to surgical alteration of facial features in East Asians. This article integrates narrative and systematic review methods. In March 2014, we searched databases including PubMed, Philosopher's Index, Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts, and Communication Abstracts using key terms "cosmetic surgery," "ethnic*," "ethics," "Asia*," and "Western*." The study included all types of papers written in English that discuss the debate on rhinoplasty and blepharoplasty in East Asians. No limit was put on date of publication. Combining both narrative and systematic review methods, a total of 31 articles were critically appraised on their contribution to ethical reflection founded on the debates regarding the surgical alteration of Asian features. Sources of knowledge were drawn from four main disciplines, including the humanities, medicine or surgery, communications, and economics. Focusing on cosmetic surgery perceived as a westernising practice, the key debate themes included authenticity of identity, interpersonal relationships and socio-economic utility in the context of Asian culture. The study shows how cosmetic surgery of ethnic features plays an important role in understanding female identity in the Asian context. Based on the debate themes authenticity of identity, interpersonal relationships, and socio-economic utility, this article argues that identity should be understood as less individualistic and more as relational and transformational in the Asian context. In addition, this article also proposes to consider cosmetic surgery of Asian features as an interplay of cultural imperialism and cultural nationalism, which can both be a source of social pressure to modify one's appearance.

  10. Efficacy, safety, and ethics of cosmetic neurology far from settled.

    PubMed

    Flower, K; Li, L; Chen, C-Y A; Baggott, M J; Galloway, G P; Mendelson, J

    2010-10-01

    In this issue, Larriviere and colleagues discuss the emerging use of drugs to enhance cognitive function. Several cautions they raise warrant amplification. People have tried to pharmacologically improve cognitive function for millennia, but Larriviere and colleagues postulate that new, more effective drugs will lead to the emergence of  "cosmetic neurology." The ethics of using drugs to improve performance, as opposed to treating disease or restoring normal function, are far from settled.

  11. [Cosmetic surgery, certificates and the 'head-baker' of Eeclo].

    PubMed

    Keeman, J N

    2003-12-20

    The legend of the head-baker of Eeclo, an imaginary cosmetic surgeon, clearly illustrates that the improvement of the human physionomy was of great interest to people as long ago as the mid-16th century. In order to display their credentials the surgeons of that time and in the succeeding centuries would display certificates that testified in glowing terms to their knowledge and expertise. One only has to open a modern newspaper to see that this phenomenon has not died out.

  12. Trade-offs between better hearing and better cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Witt, Shelley A; Dunn, Camille C

    2004-12-01

    A case study is reported of an adult bilateral cochlear implant patient who owns both a pair of ear-level and body-worn speech processors and chooses to wear them in unique configurations, knowingly compromising his auditory performance. The aim was to determine if differences in hearing could be quantified between these devices and to examine the size of these effects that would lend themselves to trading between performance and cosmetics. The patient reported wearing bilateral ear-level speech processors (programmed with the Cochlear Corporation spectral PEAK [SPEAK] coding strategy) 75% of the time for cosmetic and convenience reasons even though he "heard the best" with bilateral body-worn speech processors (programmed with the Cochlear Corporation advanced combination encoder strategy [ACE]). Speech perception and localization tests confirmed that this patient performed significantly better on monosyllabic phonemes in quiet (a difference from 60% to 75%) and localization (a total root-mean-squared-error difference from 22 degrees to 12degrees ) with bilateral body-worn speech processors and consistently rated various speech sounds as more clear than with bilateral ear-level units. There was a 2-dB difference in sentence reception threshold in noise, which was not statistically significant. These results suggest that clinicians should consider and provide options to patients when there are trade-offs to be made regarding understanding performance and cosmetics. Some individuals may choose better speech perception over cosmetics, and the ability to choose might result in greater compliance. The observations made here are relevant to hearing aid users as well.

  13. [Analysis of the phthalates in cosmetics by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Xing

    2004-05-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) for the detection of the six phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP)) in the cosmetics was developed. The phthalates were extracted from cosmetics with methanol under ultrasonication and then separated with high-speed centrifugation. The supernatant was dehydrated and filtrated through membrane with 0.5 microm pore diameter. The filtrate was injected into the GC system for analysis. Then the positive results observed in the GC-FID chromatogram were confirmed by gas chromatography-electron impact-mass detection (GC-EI-MS) analysis. Retention times of the peaks could be applied for qualitative analysis. External standard method was used for quantitative analysis. The recoveries of the six phthalates were between 82.90% and 109.50%. The relative standard deviations were between 2.1% and 4.6%. The detection limits of the method were: 0.1 ng for DMP, DEP, DBP and BBP, and 0.5 ng for DEHP and DOP, respectively. The method presented the advantages of high precision, high sensitivity, small sample size, and simple pretreatment. The method can be used to test the six phthalates in the cosmetics.

  14. Texture analysis of cosmetic/pharmaceutical raw materials and formulations.

    PubMed

    Tai, A; Bianchini, R; Jachowicz, J

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify textural properties of cosmetic and pharmaceutical raw materials. Textural parameters such as hardness, consistency, cohesiveness, index of viscosity, stickiness and resilience were evaluated. The measurements were performed using texture analyser - a tensile metre equipped with special probes (in the form of acrylic cylinder and stainless steel sphere), which can penetrate the measured sample of a product recording the force, distance and time. The instrument simulates the action of a human finger touching the surface and probing the properties of an object. The set-up has been previously shown to quantify the rheological/textural properties of cosmetic and pharmaceutical products such as creams, lotion and gels as well as rheological behaviour of human skin. The results include the analysis of water, glycerine and mineral oil as well as aqueous solutions of thickeners such as Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer (Ultrez-20 obtained from Noveon) and carbomer. Solutions of common surfactants and complex surfactant formulations such as shampoos have also been investigated. The results, in the form plots of force as a function of time or distance, resulting from slow bidirectional probe movement (submergence and desubmergence) in the analysed fluid, were interpreted by considering buoyancy, drag and viscous drag force given by Stokes equation. The data can be used to correlate with tactile evaluations of products by trained panel evaluations. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  15. Common commercial cosmetic products induce arthritis in the DA rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sverdrup, B; Klareskog, L; Kleinau, S

    1998-01-01

    Many different agents, including mineral oil and silicone, have the capacity to act as immunological adjuvants, i.e., they can contribute to the activation of the immune system. Some adjuvants, including mineral oil, are known to induce arthritis in certain strains of rats after intradermal injection or percutaneous application. The aim of this study was to determine if common commercial cosmetic products containing mineral oil could induce arthritis in the highly susceptible DA (Dark Agouti) rat. Intradermal injection of five out of eight assayed cosmetic products without further additives resulted in arthritis with synovitis. One of the products induced a very aggressive arthritis, which had declined after 5-9 weeks. When this product was also assayed for arthritogenicity upon percutaneous administration, it induced a mild and transient arthritis in 5 out of 10 DA rats, whereas control animals showed no clinical signs of joint involvement. No arthritic reaction was seen in rats after peroral feeding with the most arthritogenic product or by intravaginal application of Freund's adjuvants. Silicone gel implants in DA rats did not cause arthritis. We conclude that mineral oils included in common commercially available products retain their adjuvant properties and are arthritogenic in the presently investigated arthritis-prone rat strain. There is yet no evidence that mineral oils present in cosmetics may contribute to arthritis in humans, but we suggest that this question should be subject to further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9417771

  16. Cosmetic dentistry for patients who can't afford it.

    PubMed

    Kurthy, R

    2000-12-01

    As I noted earlier, all things being equal, patients prefer tooth-colored restorations. This technique has removed virtually all the barriers to treatment and makes things a lot more equal. There's the cost factor (Dramatically reduced!) There's the fear-of-needle factor (Gone!) There's the time factor (Minimized!). In fact, prepping and placing these occlusal veneers is so fast I can now do 8 to 10 amalgam rehabs in one appointment. Doing so many in a short time is extremely profitable, even at the reduced fee. This technique certainly does not qualify as "great dentistry," but it brings "desire-motivated" cosmetic dentistry to an entirely new universe and those patients are appreciative. They're even referring their friends! In my practice, veneering amalgam has brought cosmetic dentistry to many patients who would never agree to have their restorations replaced with traditional composite resin. And it has brought me several additional thousand dollars in collections each month. So this is a classic "win-win" situation. Patients are getting cosmetic restorations they didn't think they could afford, and I'm making a great profit doing it.

  17. A cosmetic prosthetic digit with bioinspired embedded touch feedback.

    PubMed

    Barone, Diego; D'Alonzo, Marco; Controzzi, Marco; Clemente, Francesco; Cipriani, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Partial hand amputation is the most frequent amputation level worldwide, accounting for approximately 90% of all upper limb amputations. Passive cosmetic prostheses represent one of the possible choices for its treatment, probably the most affordable one. However, these devices restore very limited motor function and subtle sensory feedback. The latter is an important component for restoring the body schema. In this work we present a simple yet potentially effective and low cost cosmetic digital prosthesis that embeds touch feedback; we dubbed this DESC-finger. It delivers short-lasting vibrotactile bursts when it makes and breaks contact with the environment, based on the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy. One prototype was developed and used by one amputee at home, for two months. The effectiveness of the device was experimentally assessed by means of an interview and a virtual eggs test, which showed, albeit preliminarily, that time discrete feedback can improve the motor control of a partial hand prosthesis in daily life conditions. Besides targeting people that already use cosmetic digits, the DESC-finger targets those that do not use them complaining for loss of sensibility. The production costs and manufacturing process makes the DESC-finger suitable for exploitation in high- and low-income countries.

  18. On cosmetically treated hair--aspects and pitfalls of interpretation.

    PubMed

    Skopp, G; Pötsch, L; Moeller, M R

    1997-01-17

    Popular hair cosmetic treatments like bleaching or permanent waving were found to affect the stability of incorporated drugs and to cause alterations of the fibers at an ultrastructural level. This may result in a partial or complete loss of drug substances, depending on the particular drug molecule and on its concentration prior to the cosmetic treatment. Moreover, from literature, there is some evidence that drug molecules are not only incorporated into the growing fiber by passive diffusion from blood into the matrix cells and melanocytes, but that the substances enter the hair also via perspiration such as sweat and sebum. Since permed and bleached hair shows an enhanced sorption capacity, the risk of false positives or an unusually high drug concentration in cosmetically treated hair was under investigation. Virgin, permed, mildly as well as severely bleached tresses were exposed to artificial sweat or sebum containing cocaine, benzoylecgonine, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and codeine (500 ng/g). Except codeine, the concentrations measured by GC/MS were very small and quite close to the detection limit indicating a minor importance of drug uptake into hair fiber from the endogenous-exogenous shunt via sebum or sweat. From the results it is concluded that an increased risk of false positive results in hair analysis on bleached and permanent waved hair fibers does exist, but is not particularly severe.

  19. Cosmetics use and age at menopause: is there a connection?

    PubMed

    Chow, Erika T; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi

    2016-09-15

    Cosmetics contain a vast number of chemicals, most of which are not under the regulatory purview of the Food and Drug Administration. Only a few of these chemicals have been evaluated for potential deleterious health impact: parabens, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and siloxanes. A review of the ingredients in the best-selling and top-rated products of the top beauty brands in the world, as well as a review of highlighted chemicals by nonprofit environmental organizations, reveals 11 chemicals and chemical families of concern: butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene, coal tar dyes, diethanolamine, formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, parabens, phthalates, 1,4-dioxane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, talc/asbestos, and triclosan. Age at menopause can be affected by a variety of mechanisms, including endocrine disruption, failure of DNA repair, oxidative stress, shortened telomere length, and ovarian toxicity. There is a lack of available studies to make a conclusion regarding cosmetics use and age at menopause. What little data there are suggest that future studies are warranted. Women with chronic and consistent use of cosmetics across their lifespan may be a population of concern. More research is required to better elucidate the relationship and time windows of vulnerability and the effects of mixtures and combinations of products on ovarian health. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Probabilistic assessment of exposure to nail cosmetics in French consumers.

    PubMed

    Ficheux, A S; Morisset, T; Chevillotte, G; Postic, C; Roudot, A C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess probabilistic exposure to nail cosmetics in French consumers. The exposure assessment was performed with base coat, polish, top coat and remover. This work was done for adult and child consumers. Dermal, inhalation and oral routes were taken into account for varnishes. Exposure evaluation was performed for the inhalation route with polish remover. The main route of exposure to varnishes was the ungual route. Inhalation was the secondary route of exposure, followed by dermal and oral routes. Polish contributed most to exposure, regardless of the route of exposure. For this nail product, P50 and P95 values by ungual route were respectively equal to 1.74 mg(kg bw week)(-1) and 8.55 mg(kg bw week)(-1) for women aged 18-34 years. Exposure to polish by inhalation route was equal to 0.70 mg(kg bw week)(-1) (P50) and 5.27 mg(kg bw week)(-1) (P95). P50 and P95 values by inhalation route were respectively equal to 0.08 mg(kg bw week)(-1) and 1.14 mg(kg bw week)(-1) for consumers aged 18-34 years exposed to polish remover. This work provided current exposure data for nail cosmetics, and a basis for future toxicological studies of the uptake of substances contained in nail cosmetics in order to assess systemic exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Generic method for determination of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Da, Jing; Huang, Xianglu; Wang, Gangli; Cao, Jin; Zhang, Qingsheng

    2014-11-01

    A generic screening, confirmation and determination method was established based on 36 commonly used volatile organic solvents in cosmetics by headspace gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method included a database for pilot screening and identifi- cation of those solvents and their quantitative method. Pilot screening database was composed by two sections, one was household section built by two columns with opposite polarities (col- umn VF-1301 ms and DB-5 ms) using retention index in different column systems as qualitative parameter, and the other was NIST MS search version 2.0. Meanwhile, the determination method of the 36 volatile solvents was developed with GC-MS. Cosmetic samples were dissolved in water and transferred to a headspace vial. After 30 min equilibration at 60 °C, the samples were analyzed by GC-MS equipped with a capillary chromatographic column VF-1301 ms. The external calibration was used for quantification. The limits of detection were from 0.01 to 3.3 μg/g, and the recoveries were from 60.77% to 126.6%. This study provided a generic method for pilot screening, identification, and quantitation of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics, and may solve the problem that different analytical methods need to be developed for different targeted compounds and pilot screening for potential candidate solvent residues.

  2. Vetiver Essential Oil in Cosmetics: What Is New?

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Pauline; Landreau, Anne; Watson, Marie; Janci, Laurent; Cassisa, Viviane; Kempf, Marie; Azoulay, Stéphane; Fernandez, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vetiver is a key ingredient for the perfume industry nowadays. However, with the constant and rapid changes of personal tastes, this appeal could vanish and this sector could decline quite quickly. New dissemination paths need to be found to tap this valuable resource. Methods: In this way, its potential use in cosmetics either as an active ingredient per se (with cosmeceutical significance or presenting antimicrobial activity) has hence been explored in vitro. Results: In this contribution, we demonstrated that vetiver essential oil displays no particularly significant and innovative cosmetic potential value in formulations apart from its scent already largely exploited. However, evaluated against twenty bacterial strains and two Candida species using the in vitro microbroth dilution method, vetiver oil demonstrated notably some outstanding activities against Gram-positive strains and against one Candida glabrata strain. Conclusions: Based on these findings, vetiver essential oil appears to be an appropriate aspirant for the development of an antimicrobial agent for medicinal purposes and for the development of a cosmetic ingredient used for its scent and displaying antimicrobial activity as an added value. PMID:28930256

  3. A physical method for preservation of cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Lintner, K; Genet, V

    1998-04-01

    To date, the microbiological stability of cosmetics products is assured by means of chemical preservatives, with well-known possible side effects such as irritation or cutaneous allergic events. This paper describes a new concept to protect all types of cosmetic formulae from microbiological contamination: the osmotic effect of a particular form of glycerylpolyacrylate gels. The latter allows the formulator to conceive numerous preservative-free formulae. The basis of its activity lies in the strong osmotic properties of the hydrogel: it absorbs water from its surroundings, thus depriving germs of the vital aqueous environment needed for survival. Challenge tests on various microorganisms, repeat insult challenges and time-stability tests performed on these hydrogels in cosmetic formulas were carried out. At the same time, the hydrogel exhibited high skin moisturizing power. The hydrogel is non-toxic and non-irritant as the Primary Cutaneous Irritation Index observed after 48 h of occlusive patches in 10 adult volunteers is only of 0.10.

  4. Cosmetics use and age at menopause: Is there a connection?

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Erika; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Short Narrative Abstract Cosmetics contain a vast number of chemicals, most of which are not under the regulatory purview of the Food and Drug Administration. Only a few of these chemicals have been evaluated for potential deleterious health impact – parabens, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and siloxanes. A review of the ingredients in the best-selling and top rated products of the top beauty brands in the world, as well as a review of highlighted chemicals by non-profit environmental organizations reveal 11 chemicals and chemical families of concern: butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene, coal tar dyes, diethanolamine, formaldehyde releasing preservatives, parabens, phthalates, 1,4 dioxane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, talc/asbestos, and triclosan. Age at menopause can be affected by a variety of mechanisms, including endocrine disruption, failure of DNA repair, oxidative stress, shortened telomere length, and ovarian toxicity. There is a lack of available studies to make a conclusion regarding cosmetics use and age at menopause. What little data there is suggests future studies are warranted. Women with chronic and consistent use of cosmetics across their lifespan may be a population of concern. More research is required to better elucidate the relationship and time windows of vulnerability and the effects of mixtures and combinations of products on ovarian health. PMID:27545020

  5. Safety and risk assessment of ceramide 3 in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seul Min; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide 3 is used mainly as a moisturizer in various cosmetic products. Although several safety studies on formulations containing pseudo-ceramide or ceramide have been conducted at the preclinical and clinical levels for regulatory approval, no studies have evaluated the systemic toxicity of ceramide 3. To address this issue, we conducted a risk assessment and comprehensive toxicological review of ceramide and pseudo-ceramide. We assumed that ceramide 3 is present in various personal and cosmetic products at concentrations of 0.5-10%. Based on previously reported exposure data, the margin of safety (MOS) was calculated for product type, use pattern, and ceramide 3 concentration. Lipsticks with up to 10% ceramide 3 (MOS = 4111) are considered safe, while shampoos containing 0.5% ceramide 3 (MOS = 148) are known to be safe. Reported MOS values for body lotion applied to the hands (1% ceramide 3) and back (5% ceramide 3) were 103 and 168, respectively. We anticipate that face cream would be safe up to a ceramide 3 concentration of 3% (MOS = 149). Collectively, the MOS approach indicated no safety concerns for cosmetic products containing less than 1% ceramide 3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Para rubber seed oil: new promising unconventional oil for cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lourith, Nattaya; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Sucontphunt, Apirada; Ondee, Thunnicha

    2014-01-01

    Para rubber seed was macerated in petroleum ether and n-hexane, individually, for 30 min. The extraction was additionally performed by reflux and soxhlet for 6 h with the same solvent and proportion. Soxhlet extraction by petroleum ether afforded the greatest extractive yield (22.90 ± 0.92%). Although antioxidant activity by means of 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay was insignificantly differed in soxhleted (8.90 ± 1.15%) and refluxed (9.02 ± 0.71%) by n-hexane, soxhlet extraction by n-hexane was significantly (p < 0.05) potent scavenged 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothaiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid) or ABTS radical with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of 66.54 ± 6.88 mg/100 g oil. This extract was non cytotoxic towards normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, oleic acid and palmitic acid were determined at a greater content than in the seed of para rubber cultivated in Malaysia, although linoleic and stearic acid contents were not differed. This bright yellow extract was further evaluated on other physicochemical characters. The determined specific gravity, refractive index, iodine value, peroxide value and saponification value were in the range of commercialized vegetable oils used as cosmetic raw material. Therefore, Para rubber seed oil is highlighted as the promising ecological ingredient appraisal for cosmetics. Transforming of the seed that is by-product of the important industrial crop of Thailand into cosmetics is encouraged accordingly.

  7. Vetiver Essential Oil in Cosmetics: What Is New?

    PubMed

    Burger, Pauline; Landreau, Anne; Watson, Marie; Janci, Laurent; Cassisa, Viviane; Kempf, Marie; Azoulay, Stéphane; Fernandez, Xavier

    2017-06-16

    Background: Vetiver is a key ingredient for the perfume industry nowadays. However, with the constant and rapid changes of personal tastes, this appeal could vanish and this sector could decline quite quickly. New dissemination paths need to be found to tap this valuable resource. Methods: In this way, its potential use in cosmetics either as an active ingredient per se (with cosmeceutical significance or presenting antimicrobial activity) has hence been explored in vitro. Results: In this contribution, we demonstrated that vetiver essential oil displays no particularly significant and innovative cosmetic potential value in formulations apart from its scent already largely exploited. However, evaluated against twenty bacterial strains and two Candida species using the in vitro microbroth dilution method, vetiver oil demonstrated notably some outstanding activities against Gram-positive strains and against one Candida glabrata strain. Conclusions: Based on these findings, vetiver essential oil appears to be an appropriate aspirant for the development of an antimicrobial agent for medicinal purposes and for the development of a cosmetic ingredient used for its scent and displaying antimicrobial activity as an added value.

  8. Determination of ultraviolet filter activity on coconut oil cosmetic cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyati, Eni

    2017-08-01

    A research on determination of ultraviolet (UV) filter activity of cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material has been done. The cream was made by mixing the oil phase (coconut oil, stearic acid, lanolin and cetyl alcohol) at 70°C and the water phase (glycerin, aquadest and triethanolamine) at 70°C, while stirring until reached a temperature of 35°C. It was made also a cream with inorganic sunscreen TiO2 and organic sunscreen benzophenone-3 as a comparison. To study the UV filter activity, each cream was determined the UV absorption using UV spectrophotometer. The results show that cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material absorbs UV rays in the region of UV-C, whereas the cream with TiO2 absorbs the UV rays from UV-C to UV-A and cream with benzophenone-3 absorbs the UV rays from UV-B to UV-A region. This means that, the cosmetic cream with coconut oil as raw material has an activity as UV-C filter. If this cream is expected to have an activity as a sunscreen, it must be added an inorganic or organic sunscreen or a mixture of both as an active materials.

  9. Cosmetic Concerns Related to the Posttraumatic Nose without Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Farrior, Edward H; Eisler, Lindsay S

    2015-06-01

    Because of its prominent position on the facial skeleton, the nose is commonly injured. Though significant trauma can result in nasal obstruction, there is also considerable concern for potential cosmetic deformity. Repairing traumatic deformities is complex and can involve all aspects of the nose, including the bony and cartilaginous framework as well as the soft tissue envelope. Trauma can result in deflection, asymmetry, and deformity of the bony nasal dorsum, midvault, and nasal tip. Any serious nasal trauma places patients at risk for complications that may include nasal septal hematoma, septal perforation, and possible cerebral spinal fluid leak. Unrecognized or untreated septal hematomas can result in cartilaginous septal necrosis followed by saddle nose deformity. Though damage to structural scaffolding is often the cause of cosmetic deformity following nasal trauma, the nasal soft tissue envelope is also commonly affected. This can result in lacerations, avulsions, and traumatic tattooing. The following will discuss the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these cosmetic concerns relating to nasal trauma.

  10. Cosmetics as endocrine disruptors: are they a health risk?

    PubMed

    Nicolopoulou-Stamati, Polyxeni; Hens, Luc; Sasco, Annie J

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to chemicals from different sources in everyday life is widespread; one such source is the wide range of products listed under the title "cosmetics", including the different types of popular and widely-advertised sunscreens. Women are encouraged through advertising to buy into the myth of everlasting youth, and one of the most alarming consequences is in utero exposure to chemicals. The main route of exposure is the skin, but the main endpoint of exposure is endocrine disruption. This is due to many substances in cosmetics and sunscreens that have endocrine active properties which affect reproductive health but which also have other endpoints, such as cancer. Reducing the exposure to endocrine disruptors is framed not only in the context of the reduction of health risks, but is also significant against the background and rise of ethical consumerism, and the responsibility of the cosmetics industry in this respect. Although some plants show endocrine-disrupting activity, the use of well-selected natural products might reduce the use of synthetic chemicals. Instruments dealing with this problem include life-cycle analysis, eco-design, and green labels; in combination with the committed use of environmental management systems, they contribute to "corporate social responsibility".

  11. A five-year study of cosmetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Adams, R M; Maibach, H I

    1985-12-01

    During 64 months (1977 to 1983), twelve dermatologists from various sections of the United States studied a total of 713 patients with cosmetic dermatitis out of an estimated total of 13,216 patients with contact dermatitis. The number of patients seen for all causes during this period was 281,100. An important finding was that half of the patients or physicians were unaware that a cosmetic was responsible for their dermatitis. Skin care products, hair preparations (including colors), and facial makeup were responsible for the majority of the reactions. The most important objective was identification of causative ingredients. Eighty-seven percent of the subjects had patch tests. Fragrance, preservatives (Quaternium-15, formaldehyde, imidazolidinyl urea, and parabens), p-phenylenediamine, and glyceryl monothioglycolate were the most frequently identified allergic sensitizers, in that order. In addition to the clinical data, the study permitted assessment of the frequency of cosmetic reactions, although the data may not be entirely representative of the country at large because of the special interests of the dermatologists involved.

  12. 21 CFR 700.14 - Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... propellant of cosmetic aerosol products. 700.14 Section 700.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.14 Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products...

  13. 21 CFR 700.14 - Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... propellant of cosmetic aerosol products. 700.14 Section 700.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.14 Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products...

  14. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been...

  15. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been...

  16. 21 CFR 700.14 - Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... propellant of cosmetic aerosol products. 700.14 Section 700.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.14 Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products...

  17. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been...

  18. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been...

  19. 21 CFR 700.14 - Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... propellant of cosmetic aerosol products. 700.14 Section 700.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.14 Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products...

  20. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been...

  1. Symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder among people presenting for cosmetic dental treatment: a comparative study of cosmetic dental patients and a general population sample.

    PubMed

    De Jongh, A; Aartman, I H A; Parvaneh, H; Ilik, M

    2009-08-01

    To determine appearance concerns of patients presenting for cosmetic treatment. This cross-sectional comparative study included consecutive patients of six different cosmetic clinics (n = 170), and a sample of the general population (n = 878). A study-specific self-report questionnaire was administered to document demographic and appearance concerns. Presence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) was assessed based on DSM-IV criteria. Cosmetic dental patients did not differ from the reference sample with regard to happiness and satisfaction as regards their appearance. However, differences were found with regard to frequency of previous general cosmetic (16.5% versus 5.9%) and cosmetic dental (47.9% versus 24.8%) procedures. Furthermore, a significantly higher proportion of the cosmetic dental patients sufficed for the two key screening criteria of BDD (9.5% versus 5.5%), and for the full diagnostic screening of BDD (4.2% versus 1.5%) compared with the respondents of the reference group. The results suggest that symptoms of BDD are relatively common among patients attending cosmetic clinics. It is important to assess the long-term effects of comprehensive cosmetic procedures, particularly in patients with disproportionate appearance concerns.

  2. Cosmetic surgery training in Canadian plastic surgery residencies: are we training competent surgeons?

    PubMed

    Chivers, Quinton J; Ahmad, Jamil; Lista, Frank; Warren, Richard J; Arkoubi, Amr Y; Mahabir, Raman C; Murray, Kenneth A; Islur, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    With the demand for cosmetic surgery continuing to rise, it is necessary to reevaluate the current state of cosmetic surgery training during plastic surgery residency. An evaluation of cosmetic surgery training in US plastic surgery residency programs in 2006 identified several areas for improvement, resulting in changes to both the duration and content of training. The authors assess the current state of cosmetic surgery training in Canadian plastic surgery residency programs. A paper survey of all graduating Canadian plastic surgery residents eligible to complete the 2009 Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada fellowship examinations was performed (N = 29). The survey was conducted primarily at the Canadian Plastic Surgery Review Course in February 2009, with surveys collected from absent residents by e-mail within 1 month after the course. The survey covered 2 broad areas: (1) specifics regarding resident cosmetic surgery training and (2) confidence and satisfaction associated with this experience. Of the 29 residents surveyed, 28 responded (96%). The majority of Canadian plastic surgery residency programs (75%) have a designated cosmetic surgery rotation, but 90% of respondents felt it has become increasingly difficult to gain exposure to cosmetic procedures as most are performed at private surgery centers. Elective rotations at cosmetic surgery practices and resident cosmetic clinics were considered the most beneficial for cosmetic surgery education. Residents considered cosmetic surgery procedures of the face (such as rhinoplasty and facelift) more challenging, but they had more confidence with breast and body contouring procedures. Canadian plastic surgery residency programs need to ensure that residents continue to receive comprehensive exposure to both surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures to ensure our specialty's continued leadership in this evolving and highly competitive field. A multidimensional approach utilizing a variety of

  3. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Milothridis, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Leonidas; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Panagopoulou, Efharis

    2016-01-01

    Background: A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Methods: Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Results: Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social networks, their psychological characteristics, such as body image, self-esteem and other personality traits and for specific psychopathology and found that these may either positively or negatively predict their motivation to seek and undergo a cosmetic procedure. Conclusions: The review examined the psychosocial characteristics associated with an interest in cosmetic surgery. Understanding cosmetic patients’ characteristics, motivation and expectation for surgery is an important aspect of their clinical care to identify those patients more likely to benefit most from the procedure. PMID:28216822

  4. The role of media and peer influences in Australian women's attitudes towards cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gemma; Tiggemann, Marika; Mattiske, Julie

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of media and peers on attitudes towards cosmetic surgery using a sociocultural framework. A sample of 351 Australian women aged 18-69 years completed measures of media exposure, friend conversations, internalisation of appearance ideals, appearance comparison, body dissatisfaction, and attitudes towards cosmetic surgery. Correlational analysis showed that almost all media and friend variables were significantly correlated with positive attitudes towards cosmetic surgery. A structural equation model based on the sociocultural model showed a good level of fit to the data. The effects of media exposure and friend conversations on body dissatisfaction and attitudes towards cosmetic surgery were mediated by internalisation. We concluded that media exposure and friend conversations affected attitudes towards cosmetic surgery both directly and indirectly. Our results contribute to the understanding of the sociocultural mechanisms underlying women's motivations for cosmetic surgery.

  5. A correlational and experimental examination of reality television viewing and interest in cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Markey, Charlotte N; Markey, Patrick M

    2010-03-01

    Two studies are presented that examine the influence of media messages about cosmetic surgery on youths' interest in altering their own physical appearance. In Study 1, 170 participants (59% female; M age=19.77 years) completed surveys assessing their impression of reality television shows featuring cosmetic surgery, appearance satisfaction, self-esteem, and their interest in cosmetic surgery. Results indicated that participants who reported favorable impressions of reality television shows featuring cosmetic surgery were more likely to indicate interest in pursuing surgery. One hundred and eighty-nine participants (51% female; M age=19.84 years) completed Study 2. Approximately half of the participants were exposed to a television message featuring a surgical make-over; the other half was exposed to a neutral message. Results indicated that participants who watched a television program about cosmetic surgery wanted to alter their own appearance using cosmetic surgery more than did participants who were not exposed to this program.

  6. Evaluation of headache relief with cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Neal D; Dorton, Leighanne H; Marcum, Kristin K; Gilbert, Ryan M; Sandoval, Laura F

    2014-09-01

    Chronic headaches are common and can have a significant effect on quality of life. Approved treatment options are vast and include the use botulinum toxin injections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of purely cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) injections on the frequency and severity of chronic headaches. Patients seeking treatment of hyperfunctional facial lines were enrolled to complete pre- and posttreatment questionnaires assessing headache symptoms. Quantitative data was compared using paired two-tailed student t-tests between groups of patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA injections, both onabotulinumtoxinA and hyaluronic acid (Restylane) injections, and hyaluronic acid injections. One hundred and ten patients were enrolled; 73 completed the study. Of the 45 patients with pretreatment headaches, 76% (22/29) that received cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections alone and 69% (27/39) that received onabotulinumtoxinA with or without hyaluronic acid injections reported overall improvement in headaches. Patients who received only onabotulinumtoxinA reported a significant decrease in the frequency (P = 0.0016) and severity (P = 0.0002) of headaches, and the number of days over-the-counter medications were taken (P = 0.0238). It took an average 9.5 days for headache improvement vs. 4.4 days for an appearance change. In patients who received only hyaluronic acid injections (n = 6), no significant improvement in headaches was reported. Overall satisfaction was high and unaffected by whether patients experienced headache relief. The majority of patients (93%) reported that they would "definitely" or "likely" receive onabotulinumtoxinA injections again in the future. Purely cosmetic onabotulinumtoxinA injections of doses between 15-50 units can significantly decrease the severity and frequency of headaches. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Multiple color changes following laser therapy of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Gloria; Weiss, Eduardo; Spencer, James M

    2002-02-01

    To emphasize the wisdom of small test areas when treating cosmetic tattoos and the need for multiple laser systems. A 48-year-old woman requested removal of permanent makeup (cosmetic tattoos) of her eyebrows and around her lips. Physical examination revealed a brown tattoo of both eyebrows and dark red lip liner around both lips. A test area was performed on the red tattoo of the lips. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 2.0 J/cm2, 2 mm spot size) was used for the lip area, while the same laser at 1064 nm, 3.9 J cm2, 2 mm spot size was utilized for the eyebrows. The lip area immediately turned black. The patient returned for follow-up 1 month later; the black ink on the lip was treated with the same laser at 1064 nm, 3 mm spot size, 4.2 J/cm2, with satisfactory resolution in two monthly treatments. Both brown eyebrow turned bright orange and were treated with 532 nm, 3 mm, 3.0 J/cm2. One month later the eyebrows were a mixture of yellow ink and dark green. The yellow area was treated with 532 nm, 3 mm, 2.3 J/cm2, while the dark green was treated with the 1064 nm, 3 mm spot size, 4.2 J/cm2. One month later little improvement was noted, so Q-switched ruby laser at 694 nm, 6 mm spot size, 16 J/cm2 was utilized. An additional four monthly treatments were given utilizing a combination of both ruby and 532 nm ND:YAG lasers for green and yellow pigment, respectively. Significant but incomplete resolution of the tattoo ink was achieved. Multiple laser systems are needed to remove cosmetic tattoos. Test areas must be done before treatment.

  8. Investigation of a low cost method to quantify cosmetic defect.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Thomas; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2012-01-01

    For many patients, the motivation in seeking treatment is the improvement of their appearance rather than to correct an underlying skeletal deformity, so cosmetic concerns and the psychosocial impacts of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are important factors in the clinical decision-making process. In the current environment of evidence based medicine there is a growing need to quantify back surface shape and general body asymmetry with the objective of producing an agreed scoring to be used in developing treatment plans and assessing outcomes but to date many clinics continue to rely on qualitative or expensive methods to describe cosmetic deformity. In November 2010, Microsoft® Corporation launched the low cost Kinect™ camera with 18 million units sold (as at January 2012) throughout the world. The device incorporates proprietary light coding technology that reconstructs the three dimensional location of an estimated 50,000 projected points illuminating objects within its field of view in approximately 1/30th of a second. The aim of the research was to investigate the capabilities of a low cost, reliable and inherently safe apparatus based on Kinect depth sensing and video technology to simultaneously acquire back surface shape and the locations of bony landmarks with the goal of providing data to describe cosmetic defect. Work has been completed using both the apparatus and a commercially available optical motion capture system (Vicon Motion Systems, Oxford, U.K.) to acquire data from a test object representing an unaffected human torso. Results were obtained to compare tri-dimensional bony landmark reconstruction accuracy and combined with analyses of point cloud data to describe back shape. Early indications are that the proposed apparatus has potential to be a clinically useful tool.

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity and phototoxicity study of cosmetics colorants.

    PubMed

    Tomankova, K; Kejlova, K; Binder, S; Daskova, A; Zapletalova, J; Bendova, H; Kolarova, H; Jirova, D

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the work was early identification of preventable risk factors connected with the consumers usage of products of everyday use, such as cosmetics, toys and children products, and other materials intended for contact with human skin. The risk factor is represented by substances with irritation potential and subsequent possible sensitisation, resulting in negative impact on human physical and psychical health with social and societal consequences. The legislation for cosmetics, chemical substances and other products requires for hazard identification the application of alternative toxicological methods in vitro without the use of animals. For this reason we used a battery of alternative assays in vitro, based on cell cultures. Progressive methods of molecular biology, based on fluorimetry and fluorescence, were employed for identification of early morphological and functional changes on cellular level. Four colorants frequently used in cosmetics (P-WS Caramel, Chlorophyllin, Unicert Red K 7054-J and Unicert Red K 7008-J) were tested on cell line NIH3T3 (mouse fibroblast cell) and 3T3 Balb/c with/without UV irradiation (dose 5 J cm(-2)). Fluorescence methods for the study of cell damage using fluorescence probes offer results for the evaluation of cytotoxicity and cell viability of adherent cells. We detected intracellular production of ROS investigated by molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA, which is primarily sensitive to the increased production of hydrogen peroxide or its downstream products. Toxic effects on the cellular level were identified by viability tests using Neutral Red uptake and MTT assay, where the live cells reduce yellow soluble 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) to insoluble formazan crystals. The reaction was investigated on mitochondrial membrane of living cells and the type of cell death was determined using Apoptosis detection kit. Cytotoxicity tests revealed health risks of using Chlorophyllin and Unicert Red

  10. A novel cosmetic approach to treat thinning hair.

    PubMed

    Davis, M G; Thomas, J H; van de Velde, S; Boissy, Y; Dawson, T L; Iveson, R; Sutton, K

    2011-12-01

    Many of today's treatments associated with 'thinning hair', such as female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium, are focused on two of the key aspects of the condition. Over-the-counter or prescription medications are often focused on improving scalp hair density while high-quality cosmetic products work to prevent further hair damage and minimize mid-fibre breakage. Fibre diameter is another key contributor to thinning hair, but it is less often the focus of medical or cosmetic treatments. To examine the ability of a novel leave-on technology combination [caffeine, niacinamide, panthenol, dimethicone and an acrylate polymer (CNPDA)] to affect the diameter and behaviour of individual terminal scalp hair fibres as a new approach to counteract decreasing fibre diameters. Testing methodology included fibre diameter measures via laser scan micrometer, assessment of fibre mechanical and behavioural properties via tensile break stress and torsion pendulum testing, and mechanistic studies including cryoscanning electron microscopy and autoradiographic analysis. CNPDA significantly increased the diameter of individual, existing terminal scalp hair fibres by 2-5 μm, which yields an increase in the cross-sectional area of approximately 10%. Beyond the diameter increase, the CNPDA-thickened fibres demonstrated the altered mechanical properties characteristic of thicker fibres: increased suppleness/pliability (decreased shear modulus) and better ability to withstand force without breaking (increased break stress). Although cosmetic treatments will not reverse the condition, this new approach may help to mitigate the effects of thinning hair. © 2011 Procter & Gamble. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Cosmetics and the esthetic patient and laboratory communication.

    PubMed

    Feeley, R T

    1995-08-01

    With increasing consumer awareness of the innovative procedures available for cosmetic dentistry, this area of practice is growing rapidly and has become an excellent source for patient referrals. Unfortunately, it can also be a large source of stress for the practitioner. Esthetics has been described by The Pocket Oxford Dictionary as "the philosophy of beautiful"; its perception varies from individual to individual. In the field of dentistry, there are criteria which define one tooth as being more esthetic than another and one individual's smile as more pleasing than another. However, that which is esthetically pleasing to the clinician may not be esthetically pleasing to the patient.

  12. Transformative Possibilities: Politics and Cosmetic Surgery in the Bolivarian Revolution.

    PubMed

    Gulbas, Lauren E

    2017-07-13

    I examine the intersection of politics and aesthetics in a public hospital in Caracas, Venezuela in the first years of the twenty-first century. Given Venezuela's long-standing embrace of physical enhancement and the contradictions of the medical values of cosmetic surgery with those of Bolivarian socialism, the changing surgical practices at a well-established public site offer a significant case for considering how different actors negotiate the dialectics of care. In the face of increasing resource shortages, negotiations of aesthetic care contributed to tensions in the clinical encounter as patients creatively pushed Bolivarian policies to support their pursuits of aesthetic self-improvement.

  13. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  14. Ulcerative Lupus Vulgaris Over Nose, Leading to Cosmetic Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A; Mehta, Malay J; Patel, Bhumi B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV), is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced. PMID:25657427

  15. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris over nose, leading to cosmetic deformity.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pragya A; Mehta, Malay J; Patel, Bhumi B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV), is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced.

  16. Negative pressure pulmonary edema in healthy cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Tam; Upjohn, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Anesthetic complications are uncommon in young and healthy patients undergoing cosmetic surgery. We report 2 cases of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) in young patients, 1 who underwent rhinoplasty and another who underwent augmentation mammaplasty and suction-assisted lipoplasty of the thighs and buttocks This rare and potentially fatal complication requires admission to an intensive-care unit and delayed discharge. Although cases of NPPE have been reported in the medical and anesthetic literature, NPPE in plastic surgery has never been reported previously.

  17. Cosmetic Makeover Ensuring Patient Input in a Multidisciplinary Treatment.

    PubMed

    Magid-Katz, Sabrina; Magid, Kenneth S; Mantzikos, Theo

    2015-07-01

    A cosmetic smile makeover has become a sought after procedure in our esthetically driven society. To promote patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes, all parties involved, including the patient, must be aware of the results that can be achieved and what it will require to achieve them. Although treatment can be redone, it cannot be undone. Therefore, much patient input must be solicited and considered before beginning treatment and before the final restorations are cemented. This article provides a treatment sequence that minimizes the possibility of an unhappy patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous determination of chlorinated bacteriostats in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Tso, Mey; Chin, Chun-Yu

    2005-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for simultaneous determination of triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether) and triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide) in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The two compounds could be separated on a Nucleosil C(18) column and eluted with acetonitrile and water (70:30, v/v) as the mobile phase and detected with a differential refractive index detector. The retention times of triclosan and triclocarban were 5.81 and 2.99 min, respectively. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by a differential pulse voltammetric method.

  19. Assessment of metals in cosmetics commonly used in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Salama, Ahmed K

    2015-10-01

    Cosmetics are one of the most important sources of releasing heavy metals. Different varieties of chemicals are used in cosmetic products as ingredients and some are used as preservatives. There are concerns regarding the presence of harmful chemicals in these products. Among the harmful chemicals, cosmetic products contain heavy metals. The present study was conducted to determine the content of certain heavy metals in the products made in different countries and marketed in Saudi Arabia. Thirty-one products of different brands or misbrands of commonly used cosmetic products (hair cream, beauty cream, skin cream, hair food formula, hair gel, whitening daily scrub, shampoo, shower gel, body care, body lotion, hand wash, daily fairness, shaving cream, toothpaste, germ and beauty soap, and cream soap) were purchased from local markets of Saudi Arabia. Samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of ten metals (lead, aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, mercury, and arsenic) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Based on the maximum concentrations, the heavy metal contents were arranged in the following decreasing order: Al > Cu > Mn > Pb > Cr > Ni > Hg > Co > As > Cd in cream products, Al > Pb > Cu > Cr > Mn > Ni > Hg > As > Co > Cd in shampoo products, Al > Cu > Pb > Cr > Mn > Ni > As > Co > Hg > Cd in soap products, and Al > Cu > Mn > Pb > Cr > Co > Ni > Cd > As > Hg in toothpaste products. Since the metal concentrations may relate to specific brands, product type, color, or cost, industrialist would have to check the raw materials before they are gathered into the final products to track the source of these contaminants.

  20. Cosmetic neurology: the controversy over enhancing movement, mentation, and mood.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2004-09-28

    Advances in cognitive neuroscience and neuropharmacology are yielding exciting treatments for neurologic diseases. Many of these treatments are also likely to have uses for people without disease. Here, I review the ways in which medicine might make bodies and brains function better by modulating motor, cognitive, and affective systems. These potential "quality of life" interventions raise ethical concerns, some related to the individual and others related to society. Despite these concerns, I argue that major restraints on the development of cosmetic neurology are not likely. Neurologists and other clinicians are likely to encounter patient-consumers who view physicians as gatekeepers in their own pursuit of happiness.

  1. Comedogenicity in rabbit: some cosmetic ingredients/vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Shawn H; Dang, Thao P; Maibach, Howard I

    2007-01-01

    The rabbit external ear canal was used to define which chemicals caused comedone formation on topical application. Some of the tested ingredients are currently used in topically applied formulations. Certain raw materials have been shown to produce follicular hyperkeratosis in the rabbit ear assay. This study quantifies comedogenic potential of cosmetic materials, including: isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl myristate, butyl stearate, isopropyl isostearate, decyl oleate, isostearyl neopentanoate, isocetyl stearate, myristle myristate, cocoa butter, cetyl alcohol, paraffin, stearyl alcohol sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and petrolatum. The first nine were deemed positive. Factors aiding clinical relevance are listed.

  2. Nanosystems for skin delivery: from drugs to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Reis, Catarina P; Rijo, Patrícia; Pereira, Paula; Antunes, Ana F

    2017-03-05

    Skin delivery is an exciting and challenging area. There are numerous skin delivery systems currently available on the market. However, this market still remains limited to a narrow range of substances. Thus, several strategies have been developed to improve the performance of those substances, including the development of nanosystems. The aim of this review is to elucidate the nanosystems applied to the skin. In order to contextualize this subject, anatomy and physiology of the skin will be first briefly described and then general concepts and the various examples of these nanosystems, both cosmetic and pharmaceutical field, will be also accessed.

  3. Creating a Business Plan and Projecting Revenue for a Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Establishing a Laser Center Creating a Business Plan and Projecting Revenue for a Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital Captain Matthew T...Revenue for A Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task...Establishing a Laser Center 1 Abstract In the United States today, cosmetic laser surgery is rapidly increasing as a popular method for physicians to

  4. Changes in European legislation make it timely to introduce a transparent market surveillance system for cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie; Ungerth, Louise; Serup, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Marketing of cosmetics often makes strong claims linked to active ingredients. This is especially so for anti-ageing products, where the presentation and content of "active" ingredients may create new difficulties in their classification as cosmetics or medicinal products. A recent change in European legislation classifies a product as medicinal by virtue of its "function", in addition to the previous definition of "presentation" (i.e. marketing linked to diseases). Thus, formulations that also restore, correct or modify physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action should henceforth be covered by the Medicinal Products Directive. A cosmetic product must be suitable for its purpose and should not lead to adverse reactions that are disproportional in relation to its intended effect. However, the forthcoming ban on animal testing of cosmetic ingredients and the new European regulation, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals), which aims to ensure a high level of chemical safety to protect human health and the environment, will probably have limited impact on the safety assessment of cosmetics. In order to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions, greater transparency in the process of assessing the performance of cosmetics is needed. Introduction of a more transparent system, enabling consumers and professionals to examine the scientific evidence for the claimed effect and the safety assessment of cosmetics, is therefore timely. Lack of transparency increases the risk of consumers wasting money on cosmetics that do not deliver the desired effects. This may jeopardize public trust in the cosmetic industry.

  5. Awareness and attitude of healthcare workers to cosmetic surgery in osogbo, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Opeyemi Adeniyi; Oseni, Ganiyu Oladiran; Olaitan, Peter Babatunde

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding the level of awareness and elucidates the attitude and disposition of healthcare workers to cosmetic surgery in Osogbo, Nigeria. A questionnaire-based survey was done at LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, in 2012. Questionnaires were administered to 213 workers and students in the hospital. These were then analysed using SPSS version 16.0 with frequencies, means, and so forth. Respondents were 33 doctors, 32 nurses, 79 medical students, 60 nursing students, 4 administrative staff, 1 pharmacist, and 4 ward maids. There is fair awareness about cosmetic surgery generally with 94.5% and its availability in Nigeria with 67.0%. A fewer proportion of the respondents (44.5%) were aware of the facility for cosmetic surgery in their locality. A large percentage (86.5%) favorably considers facilities outside Nigeria when making choice of facility to have cosmetic surgery done. 85.5% considered the information about cosmetic surgery reliable while 19.0% objected going for cosmetic surgery of their choice even if done free. Only 34.0% consider cosmetic surgery socially acceptable. Although the awareness of health workers about cosmetic surgery is high, their disposition to it is low. There is a need to increase the awareness in order to increase cosmetic surgery practice in Nigeria.

  6. The different decomposition properties of diazolidinyl urea in cosmetics and patch test materials.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takahiro; Kajimura, Keiji; Taguchi, Shuzo

    2011-08-01

    Diazolidinyl urea is a formaldehyde-releasing compound that releases formaldehyde through its decomposition. However, there have been few reports about the decomposition properties of diazolidinyl urea in cosmetics and patch test materials. The aim of this study was to show how diazolidinyl urea decomposes in cosmetics and patch test vehicles, and to determine which cosmetic compounds should be evaluated in patch test studies of diazolidinyl urea. We fractionated diazolidinyl urea-dissolving buffers or diazolidinyl urea-containing cosmetics with high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA), and characterized them in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Diazolidinyl urea-containing cosmetics and diazolidinyl urea patch test materials were also analysed with HPLC-PDA and LC-MS. Diazolidinyl urea was decomposed to (4-hydroxymethyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidine-4-yl)-urea (HU) and (3,4-bis-hydroxymethyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidine-4-yl)-urea (3,4-BHU) in most of the cosmetic samples tested. The peak patterns of the patch test materials analysed with the HPLC-PDA were different from those of the cosmetic samples. CONCLUSIONS. The diazolidinyl urea-derived decomposition products differed between the cosmetics and patch test preparations. To test the contact sensitivity of the diazolidinyl urea present in cosmetics, patch tests with HU and 3,4-BHU in petrolatum should be performed. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Contamination versus preservation of cosmetics: a review on legislation, usage, infections, and contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Lundov, Michael Dyrgaard; Moesby, Lise; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2009-02-01

    Cosmetics with high water content are at a risk of being contaminated by micro-organisms that can alter the composition of the product or pose a health risk to the consumer. Pathogenic micro-organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are frequently found in contaminated cosmetics. In order to avoid contamination of cosmetics, the manufacturers add preservatives to their products. In the EU and the USA, cosmetics are under legislation and all preservatives must be safety evaluated by committees. There are several different preservatives available but the cosmetic market is dominated by a few preservatives: parabens, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. Allergy to preservatives is one of the main reasons for contact eczema caused by cosmetics. Concentration of the same preservative in similar products varies greatly, and this may indicate that some cosmetic products are over preserved. As development and elicitation of contact allergy is dose dependent, over preservation of cosmetics potentially leads to increased incidences of contact allergy. Very few studies have investigated the antimicrobial efficiency of preservatives in cosmetics, but the results indicate that efficient preservation is obtainable with concentrations well below the maximum allowed.

  8. The dental public health implications of cosmetic dentistry: a scoping review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doughty, J; Lala, R; Marshman, Z

    2016-09-01

    The popularity of cosmetic surgery has seen a rapid increase recently, with the trend mirrored in dentistry. The Department of Health expressed concerns about the potential for biological and psychosocial harm of these cosmetic procedures. Furthermore, the dental public health implications (DPH) of the growing uptake of cosmetic dental procedures have not been explored. Conduct a scoping review to explore the DPH implications of cosmetic dentistry and identify gaps for future research. A fivestage scoping review was conducted of studies identified using the search terms cosmetic AND dentistry. Data from the studies meeting the inclusion criteria were extracted, collated and summarised into themes. Fifty-seven papers met the inclusion criteria (11 cross-sectional studies, 10 literature reviews and 36 opinion pieces). The DPH implications were summarised into five emergent themes: dento-legal and ethical, marketing, psychosocial, biological and workforce. These themes revealed patients' increased expectations, expanding commercialisation of the profession, psychological risks to vulnerable patients, the iatrogenic consequences of invasive cosmetic dental procedures and workforce implications of the current trends. The scoping review found that existing literature on cosmetic dentistry is predominately anecdotal - professional opinions and discussions. Despite this, our findings demonstrated workforce training and governance implications due to increased demand for cosmetic dentistry. Further empirical research is needed to understand the DPH implications of the increasing demand and uptake of cosmetic dental procedures to guide evidence-based policy to safeguard patients and improve the quality of dental services.

  9. [The European regulation for cosmetics : Legislative aspect from the German point of view].

    PubMed

    Butschke, A; Dross, A

    2010-06-01

    Implementation of a European regulation for cosmetics is the next logical step to enhance harmonization of cosmetic legislation in the European Union. However, the regulation of cosmetics alone will not be able to cure all deficits owing to different enforcement approaches in the Member States and deficiencies in cooperation. The regulation for cosmetics sets new standards that have to be fulfilled in practical work. Especially for a federal state like Germany, further harmonization with centralized reporting systems and transboundary cooperation is a great challenge. Some examples of such challenges for the Member States and Germany are addressed.

  10. Safety assessment of Vitis vinifera (grape)-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 24 Vitis vinifera (grape)-derived ingredients and found them safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics mostly as skin-conditioning agents, but some function as antioxidants, flavoring agents, and/or colorants. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data to determine the safety of these ingredients. Additionally, some constituents of grapes have been assessed previously for safety as cosmetic ingredients by the Panel, and others are compounds that have been discussed in previous Panel safety assessments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The experience of teasing in elective cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alun C; Dowling, Nicki A; Honigman, Roberta J; Francis, Kate L; Kalus, Allan M

    2012-01-01

    The role of teasing as a motivator for patients undertaking elective cosmetic surgery was investigated. Pre-operative data were collected, using a range of standardized tests in addition to open ended questions about their experience of teasing, from 449 patients aged 18 to 70 undergoing elective cosmetic surgery in Australia. Just under half of the sample indicated that they had been teased or bullied about their appearance. Teased patients showed significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and dysmorphic concern; lower levels of physical attractiveness and appearance satisfaction; and lower levels of satisfaction with discrete aspects of their appearance than nonteased patients. Teasing also contributed to longer periods of considering surgery as an answer to body dissatisfaction concerns, even when controlling for age. Prevention education initiatives on appearance-related teasing should be targeted at school students. This, along with earlier detection of the psychological impacts of weight and appearance-related teasing, fewer people, if offered strategies for coping through counseling, may contemplate surgery as a response to this teasing.

  12. Nursing students' perceptions of clients undergoing elective cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leah Beth

    2007-01-01

    Aesthetic obsession is commonplace in current society. Supermarket a isles dedicated to beauty products, makeup, and anti-aging creams seem to expand daily. Television and publications flood the public with messages of what constitutes beauty and how to achieve the ideal. Surgical alteration of the body is swiftly becoming a form of self-care technique along with other heath-promoting behavior. Since 2003, the general acceptance of plastic surgery among all Americans surpassed 50% (American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 2003). Elective cosmetic surgical procedures have increased by an astounding 444% since 1997 (American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 2006). This quest for body satisfaction based on modern cultural norms increases the public's need for accurate information and understanding from those in the healthcare profession. Despite a transformation in the general population's conception of cosmetic surgery and its clients, stigma still lies in many individuals, including those in the healthcare profession. As this progressively growing patient population emerges, many in healthcare question their attitudes toward plastic surgery and the patients receiving aesthetic operations. With clients undergoing plastic surgery becoming increasingly visible within the healthcare system, some unique aspects of patient care must be addressed.

  13. Prediction of Skin Temperature Distribution in Cosmetic Laser Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Kuen; Chen, Kuen-Tasnn; Cheng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Wen-Shiung; Chang, Cheng-Ren

    2008-01-01

    The use of lasers in cosmetic surgery has increased dramatically in the past decade. To achieve minimal damage to tissues, the study of the temperature distribution of skin in laser irradiation is very important. The phenomenon of the thermal wave effect is significant due to the highly focused light energy of lasers in very a short time period. The conventional Pennes equation does not take the thermal wave effect into account, which the thermal relaxation time (τ) is neglected, so it is not sufficient to solve instantaneous heating and cooling problem. The purpose of this study is to solve the thermal wave equation to determine the realistic temperature distribution during laser surgery. The analytic solutions of the thermal wave equation are compared with those of the Pennes equation. Moreover, comparisons are made between the results of the above equations and the results of temperature measurement using an infrared thermal image instrument. The thermal wave equation could likely to predict the skin temperature distribution in cosmetic laser surgery.

  14. Interest in cosmetic vulvar surgery and perception of vulvar appearance.

    PubMed

    Yurteri-Kaplan, Ladin A; Antosh, Danielle D; Sokol, Andrew I; Park, Amy J; Gutman, Robert E; Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether reproductive-age women are more likely to perceive their vulva as abnormal compared with older-aged women. Women aged 18-44 years (group 1) and 45-72 years (group 2) completed a survey on demographics, grooming patterns, vulvar perceptions, and source of information about the vulva. There was no difference between group 1 and group 2 in how often women looked at their vulva or their perception of having a normal vulva (91% vs 93%, P = .76). Both groups were satisfied with the appearance of their vulva (81% vs 82%, P = .71). A higher percentage in group 2 would consider cosmetic surgery if cost were not an issue versus group 1 (15% vs 8%, P = .05). A woman's age does not have an impact on her perception of a normal vulva. The majority of women perceived their vulva to be normal and were satisfied with its appearance. However, older women are more interested in cosmetic vulvar surgery. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phototoxicity assessment of drugs and cosmetic products using E. coli.

    PubMed

    Verma, K; Agrawal, N; Misra, R B; Farooq, M; Hans, R K

    2008-02-01

    A gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli (Dh5alpha strain) was developed as an alternate test system of phototoxicity. Eight drugs (antibiotics) and cosmetic products (eight face creams) were examined for their phototoxicity using this test system. Five known phototoxic compounds were used to validate the test system. UVA-radiation induced phototoxicity of these compounds was tested by agar gel diffusion assay. Decrease in colony forming units (CFU) was taken as an end point of phototoxicity. The phototoxic compounds and antibiotics produced significant reduction in CFU (p<0.001) at 80 microg/ml concentrations under exposure to UVA-radiation (5.4-10.8 J/cm(2)). One face cream was found phototoxic and produced significant decrease in CFU of E. coli at 1.0mg/ml concentration under UVA exposure (10.8 J/cm(2)). The minimum effective concentration of tetracycline and dose of UVA-radiation were also determined by observing growth inhibition of E. coli through disc diffusion assay. The observations suggested that E. coli can be used as an alternative test system for phototoxicity evaluation of chemicals. A battery of test systems is required to conclude the toxic/phototoxic potential of a chemical agent. In view of the speed, easiness, sensitivity and low cost, E. coli is introduced as one of the alternate test system for phototoxicity studies in safety evaluation of various chemical ingredients or formulations used in cosmetics and drugs.

  16. Stability of cosmetic emulsion containing different amount of hemp oil.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M; Ziomek, M; Żbikowska, A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the optimal conditions, that is the content of hemp oil and time of homogenization to obtain stable dispersion systems. For this purpose, six emulsions were prepared, their stability was examined empirically and the most correctly formulated emulsion composition was determined using a computer simulation. Variable parameters (oil content and homogenization time) were indicated by the optimization software based on Kleeman's method. Physical properties of the synthesized emulsions were studied by numerous techniques involving particle size analysis, optical microscopy, Turbiscan test and viscosity of emulsions. The emulsion containing 50 g of oil and being homogenized for 6 min had the highest stability. Empirically determined parameters proved to be consistent with the results obtained using the computer software. The computer simulation showed that the most stable emulsion should contain from 30 to 50 g of oil and should be homogenized for 2.5-6 min. The computer software based on Kleeman's method proved to be useful for quick optimization of the composition and production parameters of stable emulsion systems. Moreover, obtaining an emulsion system with proper stability justifies further research extended with sensory analysis, which will allow the application of such systems (containing hemp oil, beneficial for skin) in the cosmetic industry. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Metals in cosmetics: an a posteriori safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marinovich, Marina; Boraso, Maria Serena; Testai, Emanuela; Galli, Corrado L

    2014-08-01

    According to EU Regulation No. 1223/2009/CE cosmetic products for daily use can contain 'technically unavoidable traces' of metals. This definition is too vague. Authorities should set well-defined limits, considering the risks associated with metal contamination of personal care products (PCPs). This paper characterizes the risk arising from a number of metals (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, mercury, nickel, lead) that may occur in 'unavoidable traces" in raw materials and, consequently, in PCPs. A 'worst case scenario' was adopted, based on the following assumptions: (i) the individual ingredients contained the maximum amount in traces allowed for each metal; (ii) the hypothetical PCP was produced exclusively with that single ingredient; (iii) when absorption through the skin was not known, data related to oral absorption were used. Risk characterization was performed calculating the Systemic Exposure Dosage (SED) and the Margin of Safety (MoS=NOAEL or BMDL10/SED). Exposure to the allegedly 'technically unavoidable' maximum amounts of metals in cosmetic ingredients resulted in MoSs exceeding 100 (safety threshold) with one exception. This suggests that the availability of experimental dermal absorption rates could enable significant improvement in MoS, thus increasing safety levels. Although results are reassuring, the authors recommend minimization of contamination, according to the state of the art of manufacturing methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cosmetic evaluation of surgical scars after external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Saquib, Mohammad; Maheshwari, Rakesh; Gupta, Yogesh; Iqbal, Zafar; Maheshwari, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the surgical scars of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) cosmetically. METHODS Totally 50 consecutive cases of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) were included in the study. Surgical scars were assessed by the patients and two independent observers at 2, 6 and 12wk postoperatively on the basis of visibility of the scars and still photographs respectively and were graded from 0-3. Kappa test was utilised to check the agreement of scar grading between the two observers. Wilcoxan signed ranks test was used to analyse the improvement of scar grading. RESULTS Thirty-four (68%) patients graded their incision site as very visible (grade 3) at 2wk. At 6 and 12wk, incision site was observed as grade 3 by 7 (14%) and 1 (2%) patients respectively. Photographic evaluation of patients by 2 observers showed an average score of 2.75, 1.94 and 0.94 at 2, 6 and 12wk respectively. Change in scar grading from grade 3 to grade 0 in consecutive follow-up (2, 6 and 12wk) was found to be highly significant both for the patient as well for the observers (P<0.0001). CONCLUSION The external DCR is a highly effective and safe procedure and in view of low percentage of cases who complained of marked scarring in the present study, thus scarring should not be the main ground for deciding the approach to DCR surgery, even in young cosmetically conscious patients. PMID:28003973

  19. Iritis and pupillary distortion after periorbital cosmetic alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Tseng, Po-Chen; Chen, Chun-Chen; Woung, Lin-Chung; Liou, Shiow-Wen

    2011-05-01

    To describe a case of ocular complications associated with laser-assisted periorbital cosmetic treatment and to recommend consideration of the ocular damage caused by dermatological laser therapy, including pupillary distortion and anterior uveitis. Case report. A 29-year-old Caucasian woman underwent cosmetic alexandrite laser therapy in the left upper eyelid area without protective eye shields. She complained of an irregular oval pupil, photophobia, and blurred vision in her left eye. Initially, her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 30/25 (OD) and 30/25 (OS). Slit-lamp biomicroscopy revealed a distorted left pupil with 3+ cell activity in the anterior chamber, but normal intraocular pressure. She was treated with topical corticosteroids. However, marked anterior chamber activity, pigment dispersion over the iris surface, and deteriorating BCVA of 10/25 (OS) had developed at the two-week follow-up. The ocular inflammation subsided gradually and her BCVA returned to normal after intensive steroid treatment. At the six-month follow-up, an ocular examination showed poor pupillary motility and persistent pigment over the iris surface. The patient still suffered from glare in dim light and experienced problems with dark adaptation. Alexandrite laser treatment of the upper eyelid region may penetrate the eyelid, causing anterior uveitis and irreversible damage to the iris. We recommended appropriate eye protection during this therapeutic procedure.

  20. Current practices and controversies in cosmetic hair restoration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ken L

    2013-05-01

    Hair restoration surgery has evolved into a scientifically based cosmetic surgical discipline over the last half century. A recent hair surgical technique to evolve, Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE), is a donor harvesting technique removing single "follicular units "one unit at a time" with a small round punch. Describe the origins, current practices and controversies in hair restoration surgery; and challenges in adopting donor harvesting with the FUE technique. The medical literature is reviewed in regards to the improvements in surgical hair restoration techniques. Publicly available direct marketing campaigns, promotional material, and Internet advertising of certain FUE devices are reviewed. After two decades of technique improvement cosmetic outcomes with hair restoration surgery are observed with FUE and Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) techniques. Although FUT remains the gold standard in hair restoration surgery, FUE has clinically demonstrated comparable patient outcomes and satisfaction. Certain FUE device manufacturers market the illegal concept of expanding the hair technicians role hair restoration surgery. FUE is a complementary and satisfactory donor harvesting method to FUT. The evolving trend for new or inexperienced surgeons to delegate partial or total surgical care and clinical oversight to non-licensed is discussed. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Stability of Organoleptic Agents in Pharmaceuticals and Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Patil, Akash; Bhide, Supriya; Bookwala, Mustafa; Soneta, Bhavik; Shankar, Vijaykumar; Almotairy, Ahmed; Almutairi, Mashan; Narasimha Murthy, S

    2017-09-12

    Organoleptic agents constitute an important niche in the field of pharmaceutical excipients. These agents encompass a range of additives responsible for coloring, flavoring, sweetening, and texturing formulations. All these agents have come to play a significant role in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to their ability to increase patient compliance by elevating a formulation's elegance and esthetics. However, it is essential to review their physical and chemical attributes before use, as organoleptic agents, similar to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), are susceptible to physical and chemical instability leading to degradation. These instabilities can be triggered by API-organoleptic agent interaction, exposure to light, air and oxygen, and changes in pH and temperature. These organoleptic agent instabilities are of serious concern as they affect API and formulation stability, leading to API degradation or the potential for manifestation of toxicity. Hence, it is extremely critical to evaluate and review the physicochemical properties of organoleptic agents before their use in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. This literature review discusses commonly used organoleptic agents in pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical formulations, their associated instabilities, and probable approaches to overcoming them.

  2. Cosmetic mesotherapy: between scientific evidence, science fiction, and lucrative business.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ibrahim, Amir E; Dibo, Saad A

    2008-11-01

    Mesotherapy, originally conceived in Europe, is a minimally invasive technique that consists of the intra- or subcutaneous injection of variable mixtures of natural plant extracts, homeopathic agents, pharmaceuticals, vitamins, and other bioactive substances in microscopic quantities through dermal multipunctures. Its application in cosmetic medicine and surgery is gaining in popularity and acceptance and is rapidly growing in profile at an alarming rate. Despite their attraction as purported rejuvenating and ''fat-dissolving'' injections, the safety and efficacy of these novel cosmetic treatments remain ambiguous, making mesotherapy vulnerable to criticism by the generally more skeptical medical community. The technique is shrouded in mystery and the controversy surrounding it pertains to its efficacy and potential adverse effects that are subject of much concern. As with any new technology, it is important to assess the benefits, safety, experience, and standardization of mesotherapy. More studies are necessary before it can be advocated as a safe and effective treatment for body contouring and facial rejuvenation. Although the claims made about mesotherapy may be hard to believe at face value, we must be cautious about rejecting new ideas. Just as absence of proof is not proof of absence, lack of scientific validation is not proof that it does not work.

  3. Neural activity associated with enhanced facial attractiveness by cosmetics use.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Aya; Ito, Ayahito; Kawasaki, Iori; Kawachi, Yousuke; Yoshida, Kazuki; Murakami, Yui; Sakai, Shinya; Iijima, Toshio; Matsue, Yoshihiko; Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2014-04-30

    Previous psychological studies have shown that make-up enhances facial attractiveness. Although neuroimaging evidence indicates that the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) shows greater activity for faces of attractive people than for those of unattractive people, there is no direct evidence that the OFC also shows greater activity for the face of an individual wearing make-up than for the same face without make-up. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated neural activity while subjects viewed 144 photographs of the same faces with and without make-up (48 with make-up, 48 without make-up, and 48 scrambled photographs) and assigned these faces an attractiveness rating. The behavioral data showed that the faces with make-up were rated as more attractive than those without make-up. The imaging data revealed that the left OFC and the right hippocampus showed greater activity for faces with make-up than for those without make-up. Furthermore, the activities of the right anterior cingulate cortex, left hippocampus, and left OFC increased with increasing facial attractiveness resulting from cosmetics use. These results provide direct evidence of the neural underpinnings of cosmetically enhanced facial attractiveness.

  4. Modeling and analysis of cosmetic treatment effects on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunderstaedt, Reinhart A.; Hopermann, Hermann; Hillemann, Thomas

    2000-10-01

    In view of treatment effects of cosmetics, quality management becomes more and more important. Due to the efficiency reasons it is desirable to quantify these effects and predict them as a function of time. For this, a mathematical model of the skin's surface (epidermis) is needed. Such a model cannot be worked out purely analytically. It can only be derived with the help of measurement data. The signals of interest as output of different measurement devices consist of two parts: noise of high (spatial) frequencies (stochastic signal) and periodic functions (deterministic signal) of low (spatial) frequencies. Both parts can be separated by correlation analysis. The paper introduces in addition to the Fourier Transform (FT) with the Wavelet Transform (WT), a brand new, highly sophisticated method with excellent properties for both modeling the skin's surface as well as evaluating treatment effects. Its main physical advantage is (in comparison to the FT) that local irregularities in the measurement signal (e.g. by scars) remain at their place and are not represented as mean square values as it is the case when applying the FT. The method has just now been installed in industry and will there be used in connection with a new in vivo measurement device for quality control of cosmetic products. As texture parameter for an integral description of the human skin the fractal dimension D is used which is appropriate for classification of different skin regions and treatment effects as well.

  5. Engineered inorganic nanoparticles and cosmetics: facts, issues, knowledge gaps and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wiechers, Johann W; Musee, Ndeke

    2010-10-01

    The cosmetic industry is among the first adaptors of nanotechnology through the use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to enhance the performance of their products and meet the customers' needs. Recently, there have been increasing concerns from different societal stakeholders (e.g., governments, environmental activist pressure groups, scientists, general public, etc.) concerning the safety and environmental impact of ENPs used in cosmetics. This review paper seeks to address the twin concerns of the safety of cosmetics and the potential environmental impacts due to the constituent chemicals-the ENPs. The safety aspect is addressed by examining recently published scientific data on the possibility of ENPs penetrating human skin. Data indicates that although particular types of ENPs can penetrate into the skin, until now no penetration has been detected beyond the stratum corneum of the ENPs used in cosmetics. Yet, important lessons can be learned from the more recent studies that identify the characteristics of ENPs penetrating into and permeating through human skin. On the part of the environmental impact, the scientific literature has very limited or none existent specific articles addressing the environmental impacts of ENPs owing to the cosmetic products. Therefore, general ecotoxicological data on risk assessment of ENPs has been applied to ascertain if there are potential environmental impacts from cosmetics. Results include some of the first studies on the qualitative and quantitative risk assessment of ENPs from cosmetics and suggest that further research is required as the knowledge is incomplete to make definitive conclusions as is the case with skin penetration. The authors conclude that the cosmetic industry should be more transparent in its use of nanotechnology in cosmetic products to facilitate realistic risk assessments as well as scientists and pressure groups being accurate in their conclusions on the general applicability of their findings

  6. Preservatives in Personal Hygiene and Cosmetic Products, Topical Medications, and Household Cleaners in Spain.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Nieto, María Antonia; Alcántara-Nicolás, Francisco; Melgar-Molero, Virginia; Pérez-Mesonero, Raquel; Vergara-Sánchez, Aránzazu; Martín-Fuentes, Adriana; González-Muñoz, Patricia; de Eusebio-Murillo, Ester

    2017-10-01

    Preservatives are added to cosmetic, household cleaning, and other industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Unfortunately, exposure to these substances can cause sensitization. Between January and June 2015, we analyzed the ingredients of 2300 products commercially available in Spain to identify the frequency of a wide variety of preservatives in different product categories. We analyzed 1093 skin care and cosmetic products sold exclusively in pharmacies (dermocosmetics), 458 household cleaning and personal hygiene and cosmetic products sold in supermarkets, 636 topical medications, and 113 cosmetic products sold in a herbal shop. Phenoxyethanol, citric acid, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate were very common in all the cosmetic product categories. Parabens were present in 16.1% of dermocosmetic products, 14.45% of cosmetic products available in supermarkets, 0.88% of cosmetic products available in the herbal shop, 5.18% of topical medications, and in none of the cleaning products. Isothiazolinones were identified in 2.56% of dermocosmetic products, 18% of cosmetic products in supermarkets, 7.9% of cosmetic products in the herbal shop, 63.63% of household cleaners, and in none of the topical medications. Formaldehyde releasers were detected in 5.76% of dermocosmetic products, 6.42% of cosmetic products sold in supermarkets, 7.96% of cosmetic products sold in the herbal shop, 3.93% of topical medications, and 16.74% of household cleaners. Evaluation of the presence of preservatives in everyday products allows us to indirectly estimate exposure levels to each one. Measures restricting the use of the most problematic preservatives need to be strengthened. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective analysis of the mutagenicity/genotoxicity data of the cosmetic ingredients present on the Annexes of the Cosmetic EU legislation (2000-12).

    PubMed

    Ates, Gamze; Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the mutagenicity/genotoxicity of cosmetic ingredients at the regulatory level, usually a battery of three in vitro tests is applied. This battery, designed to be very sensitive, produces a high number of positive results, imposing the need for in vivo follow-up testing to clear the substance under study. In Europe, the use of experimental animals has become impossible for cosmetic ingredients due to the implementation of animal testing and marketing bans. Consequently, the possibility to 'de-risk' substances with positive in vitro results disappear and potentially safe cosmetic substances will be lost for the EU market unless currently used in vitro assays can be adapted or new non-animal mutagenicity/genotoxicity studies become available. Described strategies to improve the specificity of existing in vitro assays include optimisation of the used cell type and cytotoxicity assay and lowering of the applied top concentration. A reduction of the number of tests in the battery from three to two also has been suggested. In this study, the performance of the 'standard' in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity testing battery is analysed for a number of cosmetic ingredients. We composed a database with toxicological information on 249 cosmetic ingredients, mainly present on the Annexes of the European cosmetic legislation. Results revealed that the in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity tests showed a low specificity for the cosmetic ingredients concerned, comparable to the specificity published for chemicals. Non-confirmed or 'misleading' positive results amounted up to 93% for the in vitro test batteries. The cell type and top concentrations did not have a major impact on the specificity. With respect to cytotoxicity determinations, different end points were used, potentially leading to different testing concentrations, suggesting the need for a consensus in this matter. Overall, the results of this retrospective analysis point to an urgent need of better regulatory

  8. Self-reported psychological development in cosmetic breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, María Ángeles; Martín-Rodríguez, Agustín; Arias-Moreno, María Jesús; Rincón-Fernández, María Esther; Ortega-Martínez, José Ignacio

    2016-12-01

    Cosmetic breast surgery is the only therapeutic alternative for psychological and physical complications associated with micromasty, breast ptosis, and macromasty. We analyzed the effects of 2 variables, time, and type of cosmetic breast surgery, on anxiety symptomatology and quality of life.Following a mixed 3 × 4 design, 3 groups of women with breast augmentation (n = 63), mastopexy (n = 42), and breast reduction (n = 30) were selected and evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey at 4 different times, the preoperative stage, and at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperative. Pearson's chi square, Welch's U, Games-Howell tests, mixed analysis of variance, and Cohen's d and w for effect size were calculated.Results relating to anxiety (state and trait) showed that the time factor was significant (P < 0.001) with differences between the preoperative stage (higher anxiety levels) and the 3 postoperative stages: at 1 month (P < 0.001), 6 months (P < 0.001), and 12 months (P < 0.001). In quality of life, type of surgery and time factors were found to have interactive effects on vitality (P = 0.044) and role-emotional (P = 0.023) dimensions. Compared to the other 2 groups, women who had undergone mastopexy felt worse (vitality) at 1 month since surgery than in the other stages, and better at 6 months since surgery (role-emotional). In the rest of the dimensions, and focusing on the most relevant effect sizes, the type of surgery made a difference in the physical functioning (P = 0.005) and role-physical (P = 0.020) dimensions, where women who had had breast reduction felt worse than those who had had augmentation. Time also resulted in differences in the physical functioning (P < 0.001), role-physical (P < 0.001), and bodily pain (P < 0.001) dimensions, where women felt worse at 1 month since surgery than during the rest of the stages, as well as in the social functioning dimension (P < 0

  9. Self-reported psychological development in cosmetic breast surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, María Ángeles; Martín-Rodríguez, Agustín; Arias-Moreno, María Jesús; Rincón-Fernández, María Esther; Ortega-Martínez, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cosmetic breast surgery is the only therapeutic alternative for psychological and physical complications associated with micromasty, breast ptosis, and macromasty. We analyzed the effects of 2 variables, time, and type of cosmetic breast surgery, on anxiety symptomatology and quality of life. Following a mixed 3 × 4 design, 3 groups of women with breast augmentation (n = 63), mastopexy (n = 42), and breast reduction (n = 30) were selected and evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey at 4 different times, the preoperative stage, and at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperative. Pearson's chi square, Welch's U, Games-Howell tests, mixed analysis of variance, and Cohen's d and w for effect size were calculated. Results relating to anxiety (state and trait) showed that the time factor was significant (P < 0.001) with differences between the preoperative stage (higher anxiety levels) and the 3 postoperative stages: at 1 month (P < 0.001), 6 months (P < 0.001), and 12 months (P < 0.001). In quality of life, type of surgery and time factors were found to have interactive effects on vitality (P = 0.044) and role-emotional (P = 0.023) dimensions. Compared to the other 2 groups, women who had undergone mastopexy felt worse (vitality) at 1 month since surgery than in the other stages, and better at 6 months since surgery (role-emotional). In the rest of the dimensions, and focusing on the most relevant effect sizes, the type of surgery made a difference in the physical functioning (P = 0.005) and role-physical (P = 0.020) dimensions, where women who had had breast reduction felt worse than those who had had augmentation. Time also resulted in differences in the physical functioning (P < 0.001), role-physical (P < 0.001), and bodily pain (P < 0.001) dimensions, where women felt worse at 1 month since surgery than during the rest of the stages, as well as in the social functioning dimension (P

  10. Celebrity worship and incidence of elective cosmetic surgery: evidence of a link among young adults.

    PubMed

    Maltby, John; Day, Liz

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore among young adults whether celebrity worship predicted the incidence of elective cosmetic surgery within the period of 8 months after controlling for several known predictors of elective cosmetic surgery. A total of 137 young adults completed questionnaire measures of attitudes toward a celebrity whose body image they admired, previous and vicarious experience of elective cosmetic surgery, attitudes toward cosmetic surgery, and a range of psychological and demographic measures at time 1. Participants were then asked to report whether they had undergone elective cosmetic surgery 8 months later. After controlling for several known predictors of elective cosmetic surgery, intense-personal celebrity worship of a celebrity whose body shape was admired by the participant predicted the incidence of elective cosmetic surgery within an 8-month period. The current findings suggest that the type of para-social relationship that young adults form with celebrities, particularly with those whose body shape is admired, may need to be considered by those when speaking to, and educating, young people about their choices around elective cosmetic surgery. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 710.6 - Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... permanent registration number will be assigned to each cosmetic product establishment registered in... establishment registration number. 710.6 Section 710.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... ESTABLISHMENTS § 710.6 Notification of registrant; cosmetic product establishment registration number. The...

  12. 76 FR 18767 - Preparation for International Cooperation on Cosmetics Regulations; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Preparation for International Cooperation on Cosmetics... information and receive comments on the International Cooperation on Cosmetics Regulations (ICCR) as well as.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting entitled ``International...

  13. Cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and ACOG recommendations: a review.

    PubMed

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    To conduct a methodological review of the existing scientific literature within the field of cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and to establish their relevance to the ACOG Committee Opinion No. 378. The appropriate medical subject heading terms were selected and applied in the search of the Internet multiple databases since 1900 until January 2010. Articles focusing on cosmetic gynecology were reviewed. Also, anecdotal and advertising literatures were analyzed. A methodological review of the literatures was conducted. In peer review journals, 72 relevant articles related to cosmetic gynecology were identified. Anecdotal information was identified in 3 sources and over 1,100 published marketing literatures were identified on the Internet and no scientific journals. Among reviewed articles on cosmetic gynecology, only two articles met the level II-2 in evidence-based medicine. The absence of documentations on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic vaginal procedures in the scientific literatures was ACOG's main concern. Practicing cosmetic gynecology within ACOG recommendations is desirable and possible. Currently, the standard of practice of cosmetic gynecology cannot be determined due to the absence of the documentation on safety and effectiveness. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be called cosmetic procedures, since it is a deceptive form of practice and marketing. Creating medical terminology trademarks and establishing a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical.

  14. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women’s changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p < 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the women considered cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy. PMID:27043593

  15. 77 FR 26737 - Foreign-Trade Zone 235-Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 235--Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC (Fragrance Bottling); Holmdel, NJ Cosmetic Essence Innovations...

  16. 77 FR 55455 - Foreign-Trade Zone 235-Lakewood, NJ, Authorization of Production Activity, Cosmetic Essence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 235--Lakewood, NJ, Authorization of Production Activity, Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC, (Fragrance Bottling), Holmdel, NJ Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC (CEI...

  17. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-30

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women's changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p < 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the women considered cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy.

  18. Human health risk assessment of heavy metals in cosmetics in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, John K; Odiba; Orisakwe, Orish E; Ukaebgu, Linda D; Sokaibe, Chinwetuto; Udowelle, Nnaemeka A

    2015-01-01

    Forty two different cosmetics were purchased from supermarkets and cosmetic shops within Unitsha Main Market and Eke-Awka markets in Anambra, Nigeria. Of the cosmetics, 16% were locally manufactured in Nigeria while 83.33% were imported into Nigeria. The cosmetics were ashed before digestion and filtration. The filtrates were assayed for lead, cadmium, manganese, nickel, chromium, mercury, and arsenic with atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 205 Å. The health risk assessment methods developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency were employed to explore the potential human health risk of heavy metals in cosmetics. About 61.91% of the cosmetic samples contained lead with concentration in the range of 0.10-42.12 mg/kg. Cadmium levels of the cosmetics ranged from 0.01 to 1.32 mg/kg, manganese from 0.02 to 67.65 mg/kg, nickel from 0.05 to 17.34 mg/kg, chromium from 0.11 to 9.81 mg/kg, mercury from 0.003 to 0.07 mg/kg, and arsenic from 0.002 to 0.005 mg/kg. Although the target hazard quotients and the hazard indices suggest a measure of safety, cosmetics may add to the body burden of potential toxic metals after chronic exposure.

  19. Cooperative Education. Cosmetic Science: A Career Option for Majors in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtin, J. Leon; Radd, Billie L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the growing field of cosmetic science as a career option for chemistry majors. Outlines the design, formulation, manufacture, stabilization, evaluation, control management, safety, mechanism of action, and claim substantiation of cosmetic products. Provides information on the concerns and professional responsibilities of the cosmetic…

  20. Cooperative Education. Cosmetic Science: A Career Option for Majors in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtin, J. Leon; Radd, Billie L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the growing field of cosmetic science as a career option for chemistry majors. Outlines the design, formulation, manufacture, stabilization, evaluation, control management, safety, mechanism of action, and claim substantiation of cosmetic products. Provides information on the concerns and professional responsibilities of the cosmetic…

  1. Attitudes toward Cosmetic Surgery in Middle-Aged Women: Body Image, Aging Anxiety, and the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slevec, Julie; Tiggemann, Marika

    2010-01-01

    Our study investigated factors that influence attitudes toward cosmetic surgery in middle-aged women. A sample of 108 women, aged between 35 and 55 years, completed questionnaire measures of body dissatisfaction, appearance investment, aging anxiety, media exposure (television and magazine), and attitudes toward cosmetic surgery (delineated in…

  2. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Neel; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12) consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient's own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78%) patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%), 18 (27%), and 1 (1%) patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3%) patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52%) patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31%) patients and thiomersal in 7 (24%) patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy. PMID:25132846

  3. Want to increase cosmetic dentistry? Targeted internal marketing is your secret weapon.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger P

    2007-12-01

    Designing internal marketing strategies with strong emotional appeal is the key to attracting more cosmetic patients to the practice. Dentists who use cost-effective and highly targeted internal marketing strategies will appeal to a broader range of patients. These methods also help practices increase their credibility and forge a stronger image in the community as an office with cosmetic expertise.

  4. Attitudes toward Cosmetic Surgery in Middle-Aged Women: Body Image, Aging Anxiety, and the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slevec, Julie; Tiggemann, Marika

    2010-01-01

    Our study investigated factors that influence attitudes toward cosmetic surgery in middle-aged women. A sample of 108 women, aged between 35 and 55 years, completed questionnaire measures of body dissatisfaction, appearance investment, aging anxiety, media exposure (television and magazine), and attitudes toward cosmetic surgery (delineated in…

  5. [Simultaneous determination of pantothenic acid and D-panthenol in cosmetics by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiqin; Hu, Xia; Pan, Wei

    2010-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method (HPLC) and sample pretreatment method were developed for the simultaneous determination of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and D-panthenol (provitamin B5) in cosmetics with different matrices (including of creams, lotions, aqueous cosmetics, oily cosmetics, wax-based cosmetics, nail polish etc). A liquid-liquid extraction system composed of water and water-immiscible solvent was used to preliminarily separate the target components from other oil-soluble components and surfactants in cosmetics, then macromolecular water-soluble matrices in cosmetics were removed by coprecipitation with potassium ferrocyanide-zinc acetate precipitating agent, and then under acid condition, pantothenic acid and D-panthenol were enriched on a C18 solid-phase extraction sorbent. After the removal of other water-soluble impurities, target components were eluted by 40% methanol and then separated and quantitatively analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with external standard method. Good linear relationship was achieved in the concentration range of 0.1-10 microg/g for pantothenic acid and D-panthenol. The linear correlation coefficients were separately 0.998 9 and 0.999 6. The average recoveries of the target components in cosmetics were more than 90%. Limit of detection of the method was 30 microg/g and the limit of quantification was 100 microg/g. This method can be used to simultaneously determine pantothenic acid and D-panthenol in cosmetics. The results are accurate and reliable.

  6. Consumer exposure to certain ingredients of cosmetic products: The case for tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Bernhard O

    2017-10-01

    Reliable exposure data are essential to evaluate the safety of ingredients in cosmetics. The study reported here was carried out on behalf of the Australian Tea Tree Industry Association in order to support safety assessment of TTO in consumer cosmetic products. Data regarding the use of TTO-containing cosmetic products were collected through a web-survey among 2535 qualified users of validated TTO-containing cosmetics in 5 European countries. Data regarding the percentage of TTO present in the individual products (TTO-inclusion) were collected from the suppliers of those products. Beyond TTO exposure-measures there were several significant findings: One is a special "TTO-effect" for several categories of TTO-containing cosmetic products showing a positive correlation between consumers' strength of TTO-orientation and frequency of product use, combined with a negative correlation between frequency of product use and amount of product used per application. Another is significant differences regarding the intensity of product use between TTO-containing cosmetics and respective types of products in general. Thus it seems not to be appropriate to evaluate the toxicological safety of certain ingredients of cosmetic products from exposure data on "generic" types of cosmetic products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Corneal tattooing (keratopigmentation) with new mineral micronised pigments to restore cosmetic appearance in severely impaired eyes.

    PubMed

    Alio, Jorge L; Sirerol, Belucha; Walewska-Szafran, Anna; Miranda, Mauricio

    2010-02-01

    To investigate keratopigmentation (KTP) with new mineral micronised pigments as a surgical alternative to improve cosmetic appearance in severely impaired eyes. 40 eyes underwent KTP alternatively to invasive cosmetic reconstructive surgery. Corneal staining with mineral micronised pigments was performed using an intralamellar or superficial technique. One year postoperatively, all but two patients (95%) were satisfied. Pigmented eyes were improving patient's appearance. Eight cases needed a second KTP. Two patients with preoperative corneal oedema did not obtain an adequate cosmetic appearance due to progressive pigment clearance observed from 6 months postoperatively. Three eyes with traumatic aniridia observed good cosmetic outcome and a significant reduction in glare. KTP achieves good cosmetic results and is associated with high patient satisfaction, avoiding extensive and mutilating reconstructive surgery.

  8. Different element ratios of red cosmetics excavated from ancient burials of Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Minami, T; Yamada, G; Tohno, Y; Tohno, S; Ikeda, Y; Tashiro, T; Kohno, Y; Kawakami, K

    1997-07-01

    Marker elements of red cosmetics, collected from ancient burials of Matsuyama, Tokushima and Nara Japan, were determined by emission spectrometry (ICP/AES). The mass ratios of Hg, Fe, Cu, and Zn were different between samples. Element levels were compared with reference to relative amounts of sulfur. Of the possible contaminants from the bone and sand of burials, the relative amounts of Hg and Fe to S were most commonly available to evaluate the difference between the cosmetics. The cosmetics were divided into four groups; type I (high Hg with less Fe), type II (both moderate Hg and Fe), type III (moderate Hg with high Fe) and type IV (less Hg with high Fe). The main constituents of cosmetics are mercury sulfide (cinnabar) or ferric oxide mixed with trace metals. Zinc contents differ between the Fe and Hg amounts for the three areas. Cosmetic compositions varied with each burial site, suggesting that they were derived from different mines of ancient Japan.

  9. Cosmetics alter biologically-based factors of beauty: evidence from facial contrast.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex L; Russell, Richard; Ward, Robert

    2015-02-28

    The use of cosmetics by women seems to consistently increase their attractiveness. What factors of attractiveness do cosmetics alter to achieve this? Facial contrast is a known cue to sexual dimorphism and youth, and cosmetics exaggerate sexual dimorphisms in facial contrast. Here, we demonstrate that the luminance contrast pattern of the eyes and eyebrows is consistently sexually dimorphic across a large sample of faces, with females possessing lower brow contrasts than males, and greater eye contrast than males. Red-green and yellow-blue color contrasts were not found to differ consistently between the sexes. We also show that women use cosmetics not only to exaggerate sexual dimorphisms of brow and eye contrasts, but also to increase contrasts that decline with age. These findings refine the notion of facial contrast, and demonstrate how cosmetics can increase attractiveness by manipulating factors of beauty associated with facial contrast.

  10. Safety assurance of cosmetics in Japan: current situation and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Pharmaceutical Affairs Law distinguishes cosmetics from quasi-drugs, and specifies that they must have a mild effect on the human body and must be safe to use over the long term. Therefore, the safety of cosmetics needs to be thoroughly evaluated and confirmed, taking into account the type of cosmetic, application method, conditions of use and so on. Post-marketing surveys of customers' complaints and case reports of adverse effects are important to monitor and confirm the safety of products. Although manufacturing and marketing of cosmetics are becoming more globalized, the regulations relevant to cosmetics safety still vary from country to country. Thus, compliance with different regulations in various markets is a major issue for producers. In particular, further development of alternatives to animal testing remains an urgent global issue.

  11. Cosmetic surgery attitudes among midlife women: Appearance esteem, weight esteem, and fear of negative appearance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, Jamie L; Schulz, Jessica L; Markey, Charlotte N

    2016-04-25

    Previous research has examined factors thought to influence individuals' interest in cosmetic surgery, yet few studies have examined these issues among midlife women. This study examines predictors of cosmetic surgery attitudes among midlife women (N = 114; age = 45-65 years; Mage = 53.7) and considers a previously unexplored variable: fear of negative appearance evaluation. Results indicated that lower weight and appearance esteem were associated with more positive cosmetic surgery attitudes and greater fear of negative appearance evaluation. Furthermore, fear of negative appearance evaluation mediated the relationship between appearance and weight esteem and cosmetic surgery attitudes. We conclude that fear of negative appearance evaluation is an important factor to consider in examining cosmetic surgery attitudes.

  12. Overview of skin whitening agents with an insight into the illegal cosmetic market in Europe.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; Rogiers, V; Grosber, M; Deconinck, E; De Paepe, K

    2016-06-01

    Lightening skin tone is an ancient and well-documented practice, and remains common practice among many cultures. Whitening agents such as corticosteroids, tretinoin and hydroquinone are medically applied to effectively lighten the skin tone of hyperpigmented lesions. However, when these agents are used cosmetically, they are associated with a variety of side-effect. Alternative agents, such as arbutin and its derivatives kojic acid and nicotinamide have been subsequently developed for cosmetic purposes. Unfortunately, some cosmetics contain whitening agents that are banned for use in cosmetic products. This article provides an overview of the mode of action and potential side-effects of cosmetic legal and illegal whitening agents, and the pattern of use of these types of products. Finally, an EU analysis of the health problems due to the presence of illegal products on the market is summarized. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Literature Review of Cosmetic Procedures in Men: Approaches and Techniques are Gender Specific.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Brandon E; Bashey, Sameer; Wysong, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    The proportion of men receiving non-surgical cosmetic procedures has risen substantially in recent years. Various physiologic, anatomic, and motivational considerations differentiate the treatments for male and female patients. Nevertheless, research regarding approaches to the male cosmetic patient is scarce. We sought to provide an overview and sex-specific discussion of the most popular cosmetic dermatologic procedures pursued by men by conducting a comprehensive literature review pertaining to non-surgical cosmetic procedures in male patients. The most common and rapidly expanding non-surgical interventions in men include botulinum toxin, filler injection, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, laser resurfacing, laser hair removal, hair transplantation, and minimally invasive techniques for adipose tissue reduction. Important sex-specific factors associated with each of these procedures should be considered to best serve the male cosmetic patient.

  14. Cosmetic Head and Face Surgery—Ethnic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Harold E.

    1980-01-01

    In recent years there has developed an “image awareness” among various racial and ethnic groups throughout the world. Perhaps because people live longer, a greater sense of self-esteem based on the way one looks has developed. The communications media are highly promotional of interest in one's self. People want to feel good and look good, even if it requires blepharoplasty, face-lift, rhinoplasty, dermabrasion, or other types of cosmetic surgery. It is interesting that persons born in one place, and for business or personal reasons transposed to another part of the world, soon desire to remold their physical and cultural images in accordance with the practices and customs of their new milieux. This paper addresses these problems. PMID:6991711

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  16. Identification of chlorite and serpentine in cosmetic or pharmaceutical talc.

    PubMed Central

    Blount, A M; Vassiliou, A H

    1983-01-01

    Chlorite is the most common accessory mineral group found in high purity talc ore used in cosmetic or pharmaceutical consumer talcum products. X-ray diffraction and wet chemical analytical data obtained on geologic samples representing commercial talc ore deposits of high purity and on processed samples representing talc found in consumer talcum products indicate that clinochlore and penninite are the two chlorite minerals most commonly found in all talc samples irrespective of origin or source, but sheridanite is also found in some samples representing talc deposits that are associated with serpentinite rocks. The chlorite minerals exhibit certain well-defined X-ray diffraction characteristics which differentiate them from each other as well as from those of serpentine minerals, including the hazardous chrysotile asbestos. PMID:6641661

  17. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  18. Mercury toxicity due to use of a cosmetic cream.

    PubMed

    McRill, C; Boyer, L V; Flood, T J; Ortega, L

    2000-01-01

    The Arizona Department of Health Services performed an investigation to determine the health effects associated with the use of a mercury-containing beauty cream. A urine test for mercury was offered to cream users who contacted the Arizona Department of Health Services. Those with urine mercury levels > 20 micrograms/L were offered clinical evaluation. Eighty-nine urine specimens were submitted for testing. Of these, 66 showed an elevated urine mercury level (> 20 micrograms/L), and 55 people were evaluated in clinic. There were no major abnormalities found through physical examination or laboratory testing. Urine mercury levels declined from an initial mean of 170 micrograms/L to 32 micrograms/L at the final test (mean, 139 days later). The high urine mercury levels indicate that the use of this cosmetic cream constitutes a significant exposure. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were frequently reported, but few objective signs were noted.

  19. Physico-chemical separation process of nanoparticles in cosmetic formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retamal Marín, R. R.; Babick, F.; Stintz, M.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the world of nanoparticles, especially their interactions with the environment, begins with their correct detection and successive quantification. To achieve this purpose, one needs to perform correctly developed standard operating procedures (SOPs). Furthermore, the study of nanoparticles frequently requires their characterisation in complex media (e.g. in cosmetic formulations). In this study, a set of sample preparation procedures for the detection and extraction of NMs in emulsion-based formulations is proposed and their performance for model and real-life products is discussed. A separation or extraction of lipid phases is achieved by means of organic solvents. The polarity of the lipid phases is decisive for selecting an optimum solvent. The use of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) may clearly support this decision.

  20. Final safety assessment of Coal Tar as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant--antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. Coal Tar is a nearly black, viscous liquid, heavier than water, with a naphthalene-like odor and a sharp burning taste, produced in cooking ovens as a by-product in the manufacture of coke. Crude Coal Tar is composed of 48% hydrocarbons, 42% carbon, and 10% water. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. In short-term studies, mice fed a diet containing Coal Tar found it unpalatable, but no adverse effects were reported other than weight loss; rats injected with Coal Tar experienced malaise in one study and decreased water intake and increased liver weights in another; rabbits injected with Coal Tar residue experienced eating avoidance, respiratory difficulty, sneezing, and weight loss. In a subchronic neurotoxicity study using mice, a mixture of phenols, cresols, and xylenols at concentrations approximately equal to those expected in Coal Tar extracts produced regionally selective effects, with a rank order of corpus striatum > cerebellum > cerebral cortex. Coal Tar applied to the backs of guinea pigs increases epidermal thickness. Painting female rabbits with tar decreases the absolute and relative weights of the ovaries and decreased the number of interstitial cells in the ovary. Four therapeutic Coal Tar preparations used in the treatment of psoriasis were mutagenic in the Ames assay. Urine and blood from patients treated with Coal Tar

  1. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  2. Composition of eye cosmetics (kohls) used in Oman.

    PubMed

    Hardy, A D; Vaishnav, R; Al-Kharusi, S S; Sutherland, H H; Worthing, M A

    1998-04-01

    A total of 47 kohl samples, primarily used as traditional eye cosmetics, were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that, of the 18 Omani-made kohls, the main component of five was galena (PbS). Of the other 13, 12 were based on amorphous carbon and one on hematite (Fe2O3). The remaining samples were made in other countries and were found to contain one of the following as the main component: galena, minium (Pb3O4), amorphous carbon, magnetite (Fe3O4), zincite (ZnO), calcite (CaCO3) or sassolite (H3BO3).

  3. Advantages and disadvantages of computer imaging in cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Koch, R J; Chavez, A; Dagum, P; Newman, J P

    1998-02-01

    Despite the growing popularity of computer imaging systems, it is not clear whether the medical and legal advantages of using such a system outweigh the disadvantages. The purpose of this report is to evaluate these aspects, and provide some protective guidelines in the use of computer imaging in cosmetic surgery. The positive and negative aspects of computer imaging from a medical and legal perspective are reviewed. Also, specific issues are examined by a legal panel. The greatest advantages are potential problem patient exclusion, and enhanced physician-patient communication. Disadvantages include cost, user learning curve, and potential liability. Careful use of computer imaging should actually reduce one's liability when all aspects are considered. Recommendations for such use and specific legal issues are discussed.

  4. Hair as a filler material for reconstructive or cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaakedjian, G; Taylor, P

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible use of hair as a filler material for reconstructive or cosmetic surgery. Many implant materials tested so far have proved to be of limited usefulness due to a lack of staying power or to fears of a host immune response, among other problems. In this study, pellets of rat hair were placed subcutaneously or beneath the pectoral muscle of Lewis rats (10 rats per group). A thin vascularized fibrous pouch containing inflammatory cells had formed around the hair pellet at 4 months. By 8 to 12 months, the hair had compacted, and the fibrous matrix of the pouch showed very few inflammatory cells surrounding the embedded hairs. There was no evidence of implant rejection, granuloma formation, or hair degradation up to 12 months after implantation. The results indicate that hair merits further study as a surgical implant material.

  5. [Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity of certain preservative agents in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Jantová, S; Hojerová, J; Hanusová, B; Mikulásová, M

    2001-09-01

    Cytotoxic effects of the preservative compounds for cosmetics JMAC TD, Bronopol, CA 24, and Euxyl K100 were studied. Bronopol demonstrated the highest cytotoxic effect on the proliferation of V79 and VH10 fibroblast cell lines--the IC100 values being 10 mg/l during the whole experiment. The preservatives CA 24 and Euxyl K100 showed 4-times and 5-times smaller cytotoxic activity than Bronopol IC100 = 42 or 50.3 mg/l). The preservative compounds on silver chloride ions JMAC TD manifested the lowest cytotoxicity of the preservatives tested (IC100 = 150 mg/l); 15-times smaller than Bronopol, 3.5-times smaller than CA 24 and 3-times smaller than Euxyl K100. The biocide JMAC TD did not exhibit mutagenic effects on the bacteria Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100.

  6. Applications of ternary systems in specific cosmetic formulations.

    PubMed

    Comelles, F; Megias, V; Sánchez, J; Parra, J L; Coll, J; Balaguer, F; Pelejero, C

    1989-02-01

    Synopsis The study of ternary systems leads to the understanding of the physico-chemical aspect and allows the contribution of the different components to a cosmetic formulation to be developed. The present investigation was centred in the zone of transparent get belonging to a previously studied ternary system containing a broad variety of different structural compositions. The possibility of including an active sunscreen as well as the ability to increase the water content of the gel was studied. The microscopical study of the compositions with polarized light allowed us to assign the corresponding different structures. A correlation between these structures and their physico-chemical properties, with special emphasis to rheology, has been established.

  7. 76 FR 22672 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Allegro Mfg. Inc. (Distribution of Cosmetic, Organizer and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Cosmetic, Organizer and Electronic Bags and Accessories), Commerce, CA Pursuant to its authority under the..., therefore, the Board hereby grants authority for subzone status for activity related to cosmetic, organizer...

  8. 75 FR 4344 - Foreign-Trade Zone 50-Long Beach, California Application for Subzone Allegro Mfg. Inc. (Cosmetic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Mfg. Inc. (Cosmetic, Organizer and Electronic Bags and Accessories) Commerce, CA An application has..., Commerce, California. The facility is used for the storage and distribution of cosmetic, organizer and...

  9. Long-term followup of hypospadias: functional and cosmetic results.

    PubMed

    Rynja, Sybren P; Wouters, Gerlof A; Van Schaijk, Maaike; Kok, Esther T; De Jong, Tom P; De Kort, Laetitia M

    2009-10-01

    We assessed long-term results after hypospadias surgery with respect to urinary and sexual function, cosmetic appearance and intimate relationships. We contacted 116 patients who are now adults and who underwent surgery between 1987 and 1992. Participation included mailed questionnaires containing the International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of Erectile Function and the Dutch Survey of Intimate Relations (Nederlandse Relatie Vragenlijst) as well as uroflowmetry and cosmesis assessment using the Pediatric Penile Perception Score. A control group of 151 male students completed the International Prostate Symptom Score and International Index of Erectile Function, and underwent uroflowmetry. A total of 91 patients (78%) were traceable, 57% returned the questionnaires and 27% visited the clinic. Hypospadias was distal, mid shaft and proximal in 47, 8 and 11 patients, respectively. International Prostate Symptom Score was greater than 7 in 9 of 64 patients (14%) compared to 10 of 151 controls (7%). Patients with distal hypospadias complained more about micturition. Patients with proximal hypospadias had lower maximum urine flow than other patients and controls. For sexuality the total International Index of Erectile Function did not differ between patients and controls. Patients with proximal hypospadias reported less satisfaction with penile length and objectively penile length was less than the average of all patients (10.8 vs 12.1 cm). Cosmetic outcome was considered satisfactory. Outcomes in the 33 patients who returned the Dutch Survey of Intimate Relations correctly were above average, especially for sexuality and independence. Patients with distal hypospadias have a higher International Prostate Symptom Score and patients with proximal hypospadias have lower maximum urine flow than controls. Sexual function and cosmesis are rated good. The quality of intimate relationships is above average.

  10. Migration of Cosmetic Products into the Tear Film.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alison; Evans, Katharine; North, Rachel V; Purslow, Christine

    2015-09-01

    To examine, record, and quantify the migration of a conventional eye cosmetic pencil when applied to periocular skin in two different locations: behind the lash line (ELI) and along the periocular skin (ELO). This was a pilot study (prospective, randomized crossover design) involving two visits on separate days. Three female subjects were randomly assigned one of two eyeliner application conditions: ELI (inside the lash line) or ELO (anterior to the lash line). Pencil eyeliner ("Glimmerstick" in Graphite; Avon, Northampton, United Kingdom) was applied to the subject's upper and lower right eyelid by the examiner. Slitlamp video recording of glitter particles suspended within the tear film was conducted for 30 sec on 10 occasions up to 2 hr post-eyeliner application. The number of glitter particles suspended in the tear film, analyzed using ImageJ software, is reported. The migration of the glitter particles occurred more readily in ELI application, with maximum contamination of the tear film achieved 5 to 10 min post-application. The migration of eyeliner following ELO application was comparatively slower and reduced compared with ELI application. The quantity of glitter particles suspended in the tear film varied between subjects; however, 2 hr post-application, contamination of the tear film from pencil eyeliner was negligible. Pencil eyeliner migrates most readily and maximally contaminates the tear film when applied posterior to the lash line. This has implications for contact lens wearers and patients with dry eye syndrome or sensitive eyes. Eye cosmetic usage for participants involved in anterior eye and contact lens research should be carefully considered in the design of studies.

  11. Sensory analysis of cosmetic powders: personal care ingredients and emulsions.

    PubMed

    Moussour, M; Lavarde, M; Pensé-Lhéritier, A-M; Bouton, F

    2017-02-01

    The powders are ingredients increasingly used in the formulation of cosmetic products for the sensory qualities they give. The objective of this study was the development of a lexicon and a referential for sensory characterization of these pure raw materials as well as formulations which contain them. Eleven expert panellists from Ecole de biologie industrielle de Cergy (France) developed a lexicon and a referential based on 12 powders of different chemical natures. The selected attributes were then used for performing a quantitative descriptive profile of two powders and an emulsion containing or not one of these two powders. A lexicon has been established through a consensus approach of the panel. It contains seven attributes that allow the evaluation of the powders in four phases: the appearance, the pickup, the application and the after-feel. This lexicon contains definitions and assessment protocols and provides references products. The quantitative descriptive profile of two powders of the same chemical nature, but different in physical quality showed significant differences in sensory level between products. These same attributes used to evaluate an emulsion containing the powder or not allowed to prove the contribution of these raw materials on the sensory specificities of the emulsion. The lexicon developed in this study can be used for assessment of other powders but also to define the quantities necessary to put in the formulation to meet the sensory characteristics of these raw materials powder. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. Standardized extract of Syzygium aqueum: a safe cosmetic ingredient.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, U D; Ling, L T; Manaharan, T; Sivapalan, V; Subramaniam, T; Helme, M H; Masilamani, T

    2011-06-01

    Syzygium aqueum, a species in the Myrtaceae family, commonly called the water jambu is native to Malaysia and Indonesia. It is well documented as a medicinal plant, and various parts of the tree have been used in traditional medicine, for instance as an antibiotic. In this study, we show S. aqueum leaf extracts to have a significant composition of phenolic compounds, protective activity against free radicals as well as low pro-oxidant capability. Its ethanolic extract, in particular, is characterized by its excellent radical scavenging activity of EC(50) of 133 μg mL(-1) 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), 65 μg mL(-1) 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and 71 μg mL(-1) (Galvinoxyl), low pro-oxidant capabilities and a phenolic content of 585-670 mg GAE g(-1) extract. The extract also displayed other activities, deeming it an ideal cosmetic ingredient. A substantial tyrosinase inhibition activity with an IC(50) of about 60 μg mL(-1) was observed. In addition, the extract was also found to have anti-cellulite activity tested for its ability to cause 98% activation of lipolysis of adipocytes (fat cells) at a concentration of 25 μg mL(-1). In addition, the extract was not cytotoxic to Vero cell lines up to a concentration of 600 μg mL(-1). Although various parts of this plant have been used in traditional medicine, this is the first time it has been shown to have cosmeceutical properties. Therefore, the use of this extract, alone or in combination with other active principles, is of interest to the cosmetic industry.

  13. A CASE OF ACCIDENTAL OCULAR INJURY FROM COSMETIC LASER BURN.

    PubMed

    Shum, Jennifer W H; Iu, Lawrence P L; Cheung, Danny N; Wong, Ian Y H

    2016-01-01

    To report the clinical course of a patient sustaining a ocular laser injury from 1,064-nm Nd:YAG cosmetic laser machine. A 31-year-old beauty parlor aesthetician was operating an Nd:YAG cosmetic laser machine of 1,064 nm wavelength. However, the probe was held in the opposite direction, and on firing, the laser shot fired into her left eye. The patient heard a "pop" sound followed by immediate floaters and blurring of vision. Her clinical course was followed for 6 weeks, with investigations including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiogram, and Humphrey's visual field examination performed. Optical coherence tomography taken over the injured area showed thickened retina and preretinal hyperreflectivities. Fluorescein angiogram showed hypofluorescence superonasal to the disk with late staining of vessels. Humphrey's visual field showed a dense scotoma emanating from the blind spot. The lesion eventually scarred down, and the patient's vision recovered. The eye is the most susceptible body part to laser light injury. A review of reported laser accidents revealed the majority to be ocular injuries. The retina is particularly vulnerable, as laser light with wavelength between 400 nm and 1,400 nm is focused by the cornea and lens onto the retina, increasing the retinal irradiance as a result. Most injuries were parafoveal, suggesting that most injuries occurred during laser beam alignment. The prognosis is generally favorable. As laser use becomes more widespread and its application increasingly heterogeneous, regulation of laser use and monitoring of laser safety are crucial but at the same time challenging.

  14. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: A legally imposed challenge to science

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, M.; Rogiers, V.

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  15. Adolescent Desire for Cosmetic Surgery: Associations with Bullying and Psychological Functioning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kirsty; Guy, Alexa; Dale, Jeremy; Wolke, Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent bullying may be a key driver of interest in cosmetic surgery. This study examined the extent of such interest and whether any effect was sex-specific, and examined psychological functioning as a potential mechanism through which bullying involvement may lead to a wish for cosmetic surgery. A two-stage design was used. In the first stage, 2782 adolescents (aged 11 to 16 years) were screened for bullying involvement using self-reports and peer nominations. In the second stage, 752 adolescents who were bullies, victims, bully-victims, or uninvolved in bullying reported their desire for cosmetic surgery. Psychological functioning was constructed as a composite of self-esteem and emotional problems (assessed at stage 1) and body-esteem scores (assessed at stage 2). Adolescents involved in bullying in any role were significantly more interested in cosmetic surgery than uninvolved adolescents. Desire for cosmetic surgery was greatest in adolescents who were bullied (victims and bully-victims) and girls. Desire for cosmetic surgery was highest in girls, but sex did not interact with bullying role. Being victimized by peers resulted in poor psychological functioning, which increased desire for cosmetic surgery. In contrast, desire for cosmetic surgery in bullies was not related to psychological functioning, which was in the normal range. Bullying victimization is related to poor psychological functioning, and both are related to a greater desire for cosmetic surgery in adolescents. Cosmetic surgeons should screen candidates for psychological vulnerability and may want to include a short screening questionnaire for a history of peer victimization.

  16. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: a legally imposed challenge to science.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, M; Rogiers, V

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  17. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  18. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  19. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  20. 78 FR 62709 - Calendar Year 2013 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... BUDGET Calendar Year 2013 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by... the cost of outpatient medical, dental and cosmetic surgery services furnished by military treatment... Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery rates referenced are effective upon publication of this...