Science.gov

Sample records for cosmic dust particles

  1. Reanalysis of porous chondritic cosmic dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapisinsky, I.; Figusch, V.; Ivan, J.; Izdinsky, K.; Zemankova, M.

    2001-10-01

    The particles reanalysed in this study were obtained from the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Cosmic Dust Collection. The reanalysis of the particle L2008 P9 indicates typical assemblage of olivine - pyroxene. This sample can be classified as a chondritic porous IDP with the metallic phase grain containing essential amount of nickel and copper (the latter element is most probably due to instrumental artefact). The chemical composition of the particle L2011 S5 corresponds mostly to an assemblage of pyroxene phase - (Mg,Fe,Ni)SiO_3 roughly 75 wt.% and a sulphide phase - probably pyrrhotite (Fe,Ni)S about 25 wt.%.

  2. Impact ionization experiments with porous cosmic dust particle analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibration of cosmic dust instruments using a linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Such an accelerator can accelerate conductive dust particles of sizes between ca. a few tens of microns, and a micron in size to speeds up to 80 km/s depending on particle size. Many different materials have been used for instrument calibration, from iron in the earlier days to carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, no comparative analysis has been made yet of compact particles versus porous or fluffy particles of the same material. Porous or fluffy particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system, e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko or aggregate grains from the plumes of Enceladus and recently also indications were found for low-density interstellar dust (ISD) from ISD data and trajectory simulations. These recalibrations are thus relevant for estimations of the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this talk we report about the calibrations being performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge after impact. We use the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser as an impact target. We then explain the experiment set-up, the preparation of the materials and the materials used. We elaborate on the technical challenges, and finally about the current status of the research at this stage. We conclude the talk with the relevance of the study, being the potential influence of such calibrations on the estimates of the mass distributions of interstellar and interplanetary dust.

  3. Cosmic dust or other similar outer-space particles location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aver, S.

    1973-01-01

    Cosmic dust may be serious radiation hazard to man and electronic equipment caught in its path. Dust detector uses two operational amplifiers and offers narrower areas for collection of cosmic dust. Detector provides excellent resolution as result of which recording of particle velocities as well as positions of their impact are more accurately determined.

  4. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-08-01

    The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s-1) particles.

  5. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo‐Sánchez, J. D.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s−1) particles. PMID:27478282

  6. Laboratory Studies of Optical Characteristics and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.

    2000-01-01

    Information about the optical characteristics and physical processes involving cosmic dust particles is vital for interpretation of astronomical observations and an understanding of the formation and processing of dust in the evolutionary cycle of matter in the interstellar medium. Cosmic dust particles are formed in a variety of astrophysical environments such as in cool stellar outflows and circumstellar envelopes. Definitive knowledge of the nature, composition, and physical processes of cosmic dust grains, however, can only be inferred from astronomical observations through laboratory experiments on the analogs of hypothesized dust particles and with modeling calculations. Laboratory investigations of the nature, composition, and optical characteristics of cosmic dust particles are being, carried out at many institutions with a variety of experimental techniques. Despite a wealth of available data, however, many basic issues remain unresolved. An experimental facility based on suspension of dust particles in electrodynamic balance in a pressure/temperature controlled environment in a cavity has been operational at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and is currently being employed for studies of dust particle charging mechanisms using electron beams and with UV radiation. In this paper, we discuss two general classes of experiments under planning stages that may be simultaneously carried out on this facility for cosmic dust investigations (i) Infrared optical characteristics (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) of the analogs of hypothesized of cosmic dust particles, such as natural and synthetic amorphous silicates with varying compositions, amorphous carbon grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and icy core-mantle particles etc. The initial spectral range under consideration is 1-25 micrometers, to be extended to the far infrared region in the future (ii) Condensation of volatile gases on nucleus dust particles to be

  7. Instrumentation for near-Earth measurement of orbital debris and cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Dust instrumentation based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust sensor arrays is described which will measure the masses, fluxes, velocities, and trajectories of orbital debris particles and natural micrometeoroids. Orbital debris particles are distinguished from natural particles (cosmic dust) by means of the velocity/trajectory information. The instrumentation will measure particle trajectory with a mean error of approximately 7 degrees (for isotropic flux) and is designed for measurements over the particle diameter range of approximately 2 to 200 micro-m. For future missions having Earth-return capabilities, arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the PVDF trajectory system would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust.

  8. Do some of the sub-micrometer cosmic dust particles come from the sun.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, C. L.; Erkes, J. W.; Greenberg, J. M.; Hallgren, D. S.; Schmalberger, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of cosmic dust particles collected at altitudes of 80 to 120 km over White Sands, New Mexico, and at times of noctilucent clouds over Kiruna, Sweden, indicate that an anomalously high atomic weight contribution is present within those particles collected at Kiruna. The elements observed are inconsistent with an origin due to atomic bomb fallout, meteoroidal crumbling, lunar ejecta, or comets. Many of these heavy elements may be stable in particulate form at the relatively high temperatures found in the coolest regions of the solar atmosphere. Some implications of the sun as the source of a significant component of cosmic dust are discussed.

  9. Trace Element Abundance Measurements on Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1996-01-01

    The X-Ray Microprobe on beamline X-26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to determine the abundances of elements from Cr through Sr in individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere and the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) on beamline X-1A at the NSLS was used to determine the carbon abundances and spatial distributions in IDPs. In addition, modeling was performed in an attempt to associate particular types of IDPs with specific types of parent bodies, and thus to infer the chemistry, mineralogy, and structural properties of those parent bodies.

  10. Electrodynamic Balance for Studies of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation and distribution of interstellar, interplanetary, and planetary dust grains, and their physical, chemical and optical characteristics provide valuable information about many issues dealing with the origin and formation of the solar system bodies, interplanetary and interstellar environments as well as various industrial processes. Understanding the microphysics of individual grains and their interaction with the surrounding, environment is key to properly model various conditions and interpret existing data. The theory and models of individual dust grains are well developed for environments that vary from dense planetary atmospheres to dusty plasmas to diffuse environments such as interplanetary space. However, experimental investigations of individual dust grains in equilibrium are less common, perhaps due to the difficulty of these experiments. Laboratory measurements of dust grains have primarily measured ensemble properties or transient properties of single grains. A technique developed in the 1950's for ion spectroscopy, generally referred to as a quadrupole trap has recently been employed as an electrodynamic balance to investigate single micron-sized dust grains and for atmospheric aerosol research. A description of the theoretical basis and the experimental setup of the electrodynamic balance being developed in our laboratory are given. This laboratory technique lends itself to many applications that relate to planetary atmospheres, heliospheric environments, pre-stellar and pre-planetary conditions, and industrial settings. We present results from some recent experiments carried out to investigate the equilibrium potential of dust grains exposed to far ultraviolet light or to an electron beam. Some future experiments using an electrodynamic balance to investigate the optical characteristics, and condensation process involving dust grains in various astrophysical environments are discussed.

  11. New low-Ni (igneous?) particles among the C and C? types of cosmic dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Kloeck, W.

    1993-03-01

    Low-Ni particles with major element abundances, optical properties, and morphologies sufficiently similar to chondritic interplanetery dust particles (IDP's) to receive JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog classifications of C or C?-types were shown to have trace element contents and mineralogies similar to igneous material. Examination of the JSC Catalog EDX spectra by Cooke et al. has shown that 13 percent of the C-type and 38 percent of the C?-type particles are potentially low-Ni particles. Two new low-Ni particles were identified, and it was shown that an additional fragment from the L2002*C cluster has an igneous composition. A newly analyzed fragment of the W7066*A cluster has a chondritic composition. The W7066*A cluster is important because it has yielded a fragment of igneous composition and another fragment having high concentrations of He and Ne suggesting an extraterrestrial origin.

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Craven, Paul D.; Spann, James F.; Tankosic, Dragana; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamics balance has been developing at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting a variety of experimental, of astrophysical interest. The objective of this research is to employ this innovative experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of cosmic grains of 0.2-10 micron size in a chamber with controlled pressure/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to investigate the microphysics of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. These measurements will provide the much-needed photoelectric emission data relating to individual particles as opposed to that for the bulk materials available so far. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles obtained by irradiating the particles with radiation from tunable infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. Specifically, the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1-25 micron spectral region will be determined. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The increase in the mass or m/q ratio due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data wild permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Preliminary results based on photoelectric emission experiments on 0.2-6.6 micron

  13. Space science applications for conducting polymer particles: synthetic mimics for cosmic dust and micrometeorites.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee A; Hillier, Jon K; Burchell, Mark J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-11

    Over the last decade or so, a range of polypyrrole-based particles have been designed and evaluated for space science applications. This electrically conductive polymer enables such particles to efficiently acquire surface charge, which in turn allows their acceleration up to the hypervelocity regime (>1 km s(-1)) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. Either organic latex (e.g. polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)) or various inorganic materials (such as silica, olivine or pyrrhotite) can be coated with polypyrrole; these core-shell particles are useful mimics for understanding the hypervelocity impact ionisation behaviour of micro-meteorites (a.k.a. cosmic dust). Impacts on metal targets at relatively low hypervelocities (<10 km s(-1)) generate ionic plasma composed mainly of molecular fragments, whereas higher hypervelocities (>10 km s(-1)) generate predominately atomic species, since many more chemical bonds are cleaved if the particles impinge with higher kinetic energy. Such fundamental studies are relevant to the calibration of the cosmic dust analyser (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which was designed to determine the chemical composition of Saturn's dust rings. Inspired by volcanism observed for one of the Jupiter's moons (Io), polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latexes have also been designed to help space scientists understand ionisation spectra originating from sulfur-rich dust particles. Finally, relatively large (20 μm diameter) polypyrrole-coated polystyrene latexes have proven to be useful for understanding the extent of thermal ablation of organic projectiles when fired at ultralow density aerogel targets at up to 6.1 km s(-1) using a Light Gas Gun. In this case, the sacrificial polypyrrole overlayer simply provides a sensitive spectroscopic signature (rather than a conductive overlayer), and the scientific findings have important implications for the detection of organic dust grains during the Stardust space mission.

  14. Space science applications for conducting polymer particles: synthetic mimics for cosmic dust and micrometeorites.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee A; Hillier, Jon K; Burchell, Mark J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-11

    Over the last decade or so, a range of polypyrrole-based particles have been designed and evaluated for space science applications. This electrically conductive polymer enables such particles to efficiently acquire surface charge, which in turn allows their acceleration up to the hypervelocity regime (>1 km s(-1)) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. Either organic latex (e.g. polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)) or various inorganic materials (such as silica, olivine or pyrrhotite) can be coated with polypyrrole; these core-shell particles are useful mimics for understanding the hypervelocity impact ionisation behaviour of micro-meteorites (a.k.a. cosmic dust). Impacts on metal targets at relatively low hypervelocities (<10 km s(-1)) generate ionic plasma composed mainly of molecular fragments, whereas higher hypervelocities (>10 km s(-1)) generate predominately atomic species, since many more chemical bonds are cleaved if the particles impinge with higher kinetic energy. Such fundamental studies are relevant to the calibration of the cosmic dust analyser (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which was designed to determine the chemical composition of Saturn's dust rings. Inspired by volcanism observed for one of the Jupiter's moons (Io), polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latexes have also been designed to help space scientists understand ionisation spectra originating from sulfur-rich dust particles. Finally, relatively large (20 μm diameter) polypyrrole-coated polystyrene latexes have proven to be useful for understanding the extent of thermal ablation of organic projectiles when fired at ultralow density aerogel targets at up to 6.1 km s(-1) using a Light Gas Gun. In this case, the sacrificial polypyrrole overlayer simply provides a sensitive spectroscopic signature (rather than a conductive overlayer), and the scientific findings have important implications for the detection of organic dust grains during the Stardust space mission. PMID:26458233

  15. Cosmic dust investigations II. Instruments for measurement of particle trajectory, velocity and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-07-01

    A series of experiments have been completed using accelerator dust particles in the mass range ~10-9-10-6 g and velocity range ~2-12 km/s to measure the velocity loss and degree of fragmentation for dust particles penetrating 6 and 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors. These measurements prove that even for a ratio of PVDF foil thickness to particle diameter as large as 0.6, the velocity loss and fragmentation is far less than expected from earlier reports in the literature. For example, for 28 μm thick PVDF foils the velocity loss is ~ 20%, the fraction of particles suffering serious fragmentation is ~ 50% and the angular dispersion or ``spray angle'' of the fragments from the incident particle direction is <= 3°. For 6 μm thick foils the velocity loss is <= 5%. These experiments are based on an extension of our earlier work which showed that two PVDF foils spaced a given distance apart could provide accurate time-of-flight (TOF) information due to the fast pulse rise time of PVDF detector response. We also report on our present state of development of PVDF position-sensing detectors which identify the x, y coordinates of particle impact, using detector and electronic pulse techniques adapted from our semiconductor position-sensing cosmic-ray detectors. Typical position errors of ~ 1 mm are readily achieved. Finally, we have combined the above developments into a dust-particle telescope which accurately (~ 1° angular accuracy) measures the trajectory of the incident particle as well as its mass and incident velocity, irrespective of whether it is a charged or neutral particle. We discuss how this practical dust telescope can be combined with dust capture cells for space flight and later recovery for laboratory determination of elemental and isotopic composition of captured dust. We also describe a simpler trajectory array based on discrete mosaics of thin detectors which would measure trajectories with a mean angular error of ~ 4°. We

  16. Physics of sub-micron cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory tests with simulated micrometeoroids to measure the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. Equations for ablation path length for electrically accelerated micrometeoroids entering a gas target are developed which yield guidelines for the laboratory measurement of the heat transfer coefficient. Test results are presented for lanthanum hexaboride (LaB sub 6) microparticles in air, argon, and oxygen targets. The tests indicate the heat transfer coefficient has a value of approximately 0.9 at 30 km/sec, and that it increases to approximately unity at 50 km/sec and above. Test results extend to over 100 km/sec. Results are also given for two types of small particle detectors. A solid state capacitor type detector was tested from 0.61 km/sec to 50 km/sec. An impact ionization type detector was tested from 1.0 to 150 km/sec using LaB sub 6 microparticles.

  17. The episodic influx of tin-rich cosmic dust particles during the last ice age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaViolette, Paul A.

    2015-12-01

    was found to contain tin-rich particles with a similar platy morphology and to have Sn and Pb weight abundances averaging 39% and 7.5% respectively, again approximating the interstellar Sn:Pb ratio. The relative absence of cosmic microspheres and the unmelted appearance of the tin-rich particles in both of these samples suggests that these particles entered the Earth's atmosphere at low velocity, implicating a gradual accumulation of dust from a dispersed state in the near Earth space environment. The unusual enhancement of Sn and Pb could be explained if these dust particles were originally present in the solar system's interstellar environment in a superconducting native metal state and were preferentially concentrated through Meissner effect forces by the passage of cosmic ray driven hydromagnetic shocks which may also have transported them into the solar system. The 49 kyrs BP event is estimated to have lasted over 6 years and to have deposited dust onto the Earth at a rate 104-105 times higher than present rates. This had a significant cooling effect on climate and resulted in a transient 33 fold increase in snow accumulation. Future discovery of these events in ice cores at other locations should void any lingering thoughts that this heavy metal enhancement may be due to sample contamination.

  18. The IAA cosmic dust laboratory: Experimental scattering matrices of clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results of measurements on solid particles performed at the Instituto de Astrofı´sica de Andalucı´a (IAA) cosmic dust laboratory located in Granada, Spain. The laboratory apparatus measures the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of aerosol particles. The measurements can be performed at a wavelength ( λ) of 483, 488, 520, 568, or 647 nm in the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. Results of special test experiments are presented which show that our experimental results for scattering matrices are not significantly contaminated by multiple scattering and that the sizes/shapes of the particles do not change during the measurements. Moreover, the measured scattering matrix for a sample of green clay particles is compared with measurements previously performed in the Amsterdam light scattering setup for the same sample. New measurements on a white clay sample at 488 and 647 nm are also presented. The apparatus is devoted to experimentally studying the angle dependence of scattering matrices of dust samples of astrophysical interest. Moreover, there is a great interest in similar studies of aerosols that can affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere of the Earth and other planets such as silicates, desert dust, volcanic ashes, and carbon soot particles.

  19. Chemical characterization of seven Large Area Collector particles by SXRF. [cosmic dust composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    Optical microscopy and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) are used to analyze the chemical composition of seven dark-appearing cosmic-dust particles obtained in the stratosphere during NASA Johnson Large Area Collector flights. The experimental setup and procedures are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables. Three of the particles had abundances similar to those of chondrites (except for low Ca values in one particle); two had a metallic appearance and spectra dominated by Fe and Zn; one contained Cu and Cr plus small amounts of Fe and Zn; and one had igneous-type abundances of minor and trace elements while containing all of the elements seen in chondritic particles, suggesting it may be of extraterrestrial origin.

  20. a Search for the Cosmic Dust Increment to Aerosol Particles at the Geographic South Pole.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Robert Edward

    1988-12-01

    An electrostatic precipitation (ESP) particle collector was constructed and deployed to sample the South Pole, Antarctica atmosphere for submicron-size cosmic dust particles. It was in operation between December, 1983 and January, 1987 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Clean Air Facility (CAF). The collector is most efficient for particles in the 0.3 mu m size range. An arrangement of isolation shutters and removable sampling plates allows for sample transfer, without contamination, to a remote laboratory for individual particle characterization by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) for elemental analysis and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) for crystallographic identifications. Beside the readily identifiable contaminants, including sulfuric acid droplets that make up a significant background and sooty carbonaceous-type material, a variety of rod-shaped grains and spheres have been noted. In addition, an iron-containing mineral has been observed as fragile filamentary or needle-like crystalline aggregates. Some rather rare particles that display single element EDS signature peaks of Ti, Cr, Co, Mg, Si, and Pb and a possible Cr, Fe intermetallic or mineral particle also have been observed. While it would not be surprising for cosmic dust grains to be small in size and to have simple compositions, any concrete evidence of an extraterrestrial origin for any of these grains is lacking. Two other types of particles show a stronger possibility of cosmic origin. These are an Al, Fe particle collected during a Perseids Meteor Event and a unique particle that contains Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Fe and Ni in chondritic proportions. After completion of the particle collection program, the collector was shut down and returned to the laboratory for evaluation. An area of one of the stainless steel plates from the first chamber of the collector, the particle -charging section, was

  1. Cosmic Dust Catalog. Volume 15; Particles from Collectors L2036 and L2021

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, J.; Watts, L.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Wentworth , S.; Dodson , A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially designed dust collectors are prepared for flight and processed after flight in an ultraclean (Class-100) laboratory constructed for this purpose at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Particles are individually retrieved from the collectors, examined and cataloged, and then made available to the scientific community for research. Cosmic dust thereby joins lunar samples and meteorites as an additional source of extraterrestrial materials for scientific study. This catalog summarizes preliminary observations on 468 particles retrieved from collection surfaces L2021 and L2036. These surfaces were flat plate Large Area Collectors (with a 300 cm2 surface area each) which was coated with silicone oil (dimethyl siloxane) and then flown aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft during a series of flights that were made during January and February of 1994 (L2021) and June 7 through July 5 of 1994 (L2036). Collector L2021 was flown across the entire southern margin of the US (California to Florida), and collector L2036 was flown from California to Wallops Island, VA and on to New England. These collectors were installed in a specially constructed wing pylon which ensured that the necessary level of cleanliness was maintained between periods of active sampling. During successive periods of high altitude (20 km) cruise, the collectors were exposed in the stratosphere by barometric controls and then retracted into sealed storage container-s prior to descent. In this manner, a total of 35.8 hours of stratospheric exposure was accumulated for collector L2021, and 26 hours for collector L2036.

  2. Polarized polymer films as electronic pulse detectors of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new type of dust particle detector has been developed which consists of a polarized film of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) having conducting electrons on its surface and operating with no bias voltage. Here, the response characteristics of PVDF detectors with areas in the range 4-150 sq cm and thickness in the range 2-28 microns to iron particles accelerated to velocities in the range 1-12 km/s are reported. The discussion also covers the mechanism of detection, fast pulse response, noise characteristics, and the dependence of the detector signal amplitude on particle mass and velocity. The detectors exhibit long-term stability and can be operated for extended periods of time over the temperature range -50 to +50 C; their response to dust particle impacts is unaffected by high background fluxes of charged particles.

  3. The radiation-induced rotation of cosmic dust particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.; Ratcliff, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    A crossed beam, horizontal optical trap, used to achieve laser levitation of particles in an effort to determine how solar radiation produces high spin rate in interplanetary dust particles, is described. It is suggested that random variations in albedo and geometry give rise to a nonzero effective torque when the influence of a unidrectional source of radiaton (due to the Sun) over the surface of a interplanetary dust particle is averaged. This resultant nonzero torque is characterized by an asymmetry factor which is the ratio of the effective moment arm to the maximum linear dimension of the body and is estimated to be 5 X 10 to the minus four power. It is hoped that this symmetry factor, which stabilizes the nonstatistical response of the particle, can be measured in a future Spacelab experiment.

  4. Mining cosmic dust from the blue ice lakes of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurette, M.; Brownlee, D. E.; Fehrenback, L.; Hammer, C.; Jehano, C.; Thomsen, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material, most of which invisible settles to Earth's surface as dust particles smaller than a millimeter in size were investigated. Particles of 1/10 millimeter size fall at a rate of one/sq m/yr collection of extraterrestrial dust is important because the recovered cosmic dust particles can provide important information about comets. Comets are the most important source of dust in the solar system and they are probably the major source of extraterrestrial dust that is collectable at the Earth's surface. A new collection site for cosmic dust, in an environment where degradation by weathering is minimal is reported. It is found that the blue ice lakes on the Greenland ice cap provide an ideal location for collection of extraterrestrial dust particles larger than 0.1 mm in size. It is found that the lakes contain large amounts of cosmic dust which is much better preserved than similar particles recovered from the ocean floor.

  5. Pallene dust torus observations by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiß, M.; Srama, R.; Sun, K.-L.; Seiler, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Spahn, F.

    2014-04-01

    The ISS cameras on-board the Cassini spacecraft have detected a faint dust torus along the orbit of Pallene [1]. It is believed that the source of the torus is the moon Pallene itself, where dust particles are ejected from its surface by micrometeoroid bombardment. Here, we present in-situ dust measurements of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on-board of the spacecraft Cassini which confirm the existence of a dust torus of micrometer-sized particles along the orbit of Pallene. The cross-section of the torus has been modeled by a double-Gaussian distribution, resulting in a radial and vertical full width at half maximum of 2300 km and 270 km, respectively, and a maximum particle density of n = 2.7 · 10-3m-3.

  6. Nano-Particles in Cosmic Plasma Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Ingrid

    2008-09-07

    Astronomical observations and in-situ measurements point to the existence of cosmic nano-particles, but in most cases their material composition and structure are not known. Nano-dust interacts differently than larger dust with the cosmic radiation and plasma environment. Its dynamics and behavior upon collision is not well studied.

  7. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) is designed to characterize the dust environment in interplanetary space, in the Jovian and in the Saturnian systems. The instrument consists of two major components, the Dust Analyzer (DA) and the High Rate Detector (HRD). The DA has a large aperture to provide a large cross section for detection in low flux environments. The DA has the capability of determining dust particle mass, velocity, flight direction, charge, and chemical composition. The chemical composition is determined by the Chemical Analyzer system based on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The DA is capable of making full measurements up to one impact/second. The HRD contains two smaller PVDF detectors and electronics designed to characterize dust particle masses at impact rates up to 10(exp 4) impacts/second. These high impact rates are expected during Saturn ring, plane crossings.

  8. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  9. Calibration of the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simolka, J.; Srama, R.; Albin, T.; Bugiel, S.; Kempf, S.; Li, Y.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Postberg, F.

    2015-10-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft detects micron and sub-micron sized particles in the Saturn environment since 2004. The impact ionization based instrument measures the positive and negatives charges of the impact plasma generated by striking particles. This signals yield the impact velocity and the particle mass. Therefor the instrument needs to be carefully calibrated. Calibration is performed utilizing the dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg which is able to accelerate micron and sub-micron sized dust particles to velocities relevant in space. Particles on circular orbits in Saturn's ring plane allow cross calibration of the dust telescope since their velocity and mass range is well known. However, since the initial calibration the scientific knowledge of the local dust environment has drastically improved (thanks to Cassini). At the same time laboratory testing facilities evolved over the years and allow a better recreation of actual conditions nowdays. Especially a larger variety of dust types particularly of mineral compositions is available nowadays.

  10. NASA Now: Origins and Evolution of the Universe: Cosmic Dust

    NASA Video Gallery

    This episode of NASA Now highlights recently discovered wonders of the universe as well as common cosmic dust. Discover how these microscopic particles floating in space could hold the key to the o...

  11. Experimental simulation of the atmospheric ablation of cosmic dust particles: implications for HPLA radar and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; James, Alexander; Janches, Diego; Plane, John

    2016-04-01

    The inner solar system is full of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating from cometary trails and collisions between asteroids. The entry and evaporation of IDPs in planetary atmospheres is related to a variety of phenomena including formation of mesospheric metal layers and clouds and stratospheric aerosol chemistry. The estimated mass flux into the Earth's Atmosphere from modelling of Zodiacal Cloud observations combined with results from our chemical ablation model (CABMOD) is consistent with the deposition rate of cosmic spherules on the ice caps. However, the fluxes derived from modelling HPLA radar observations, which also uses CABMOD, are significantly lower. In addition, all models underestimate the observed Na/Fe ratio in metal layers observed by LIDAR, and the radar-based model in particular does not predict differential ablation. In order to address these inconsistencies, we have built a laboratory meteor ablation simulator, which enables us to observe and characterise the ablation of metal atoms from meteoritic IDP analogues. CABMOD can be then benchmarked against the laboratory data. In this presentation, the implications of our experimental results for the interpretation of radar field observations, mass flux estimates and modelling of metal layers will be discussed.

  12. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Plane, John M C

    2012-10-01

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O(3) chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  13. COSMIC DUST AGGREGATION WITH STOCHASTIC CHARGING

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Shotorban, Babak

    2013-10-20

    The coagulation of cosmic dust grains is a fundamental process which takes place in astrophysical environments, such as presolar nebulae and circumstellar and protoplanetary disks. Cosmic dust grains can become charged through interaction with their plasma environment or other processes, and the resultant electrostatic force between dust grains can strongly affect their coagulation rate. Since ions and electrons are collected on the surface of the dust grain at random time intervals, the electrical charge of a dust grain experiences stochastic fluctuations. In this study, a set of stochastic differential equations is developed to model these fluctuations over the surface of an irregularly shaped aggregate. Then, employing the data produced, the influence of the charge fluctuations on the coagulation process and the physical characteristics of the aggregates formed is examined. It is shown that dust with small charges (due to the small size of the dust grains or a tenuous plasma environment) is affected most strongly.

  14. Sampling Interplanetary Dust Particles from Antarctic Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Lever, J. H.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Brownlee, D. E.; Messenger, S.; Littler, L. R.; Stroud, R. M.; Wozniakiewicz, P.; Clement, S.

    2016-08-01

    We are undertaking a NASA and NSF supported project to filter large volumes of clean Antarctic air to collect a broad range of cosmic dust, including CP-IDPs, rare ultra-carbonaceous particles and particles derived from specific meteor streams.

  15. Ion implantation effects in 'cosmic' dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Meunier, R.; Jouffrey, B.; Jouret, C.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic dust grains, whatever their origin may be, have probably suffered a complex sequence of events including exposure to high doses of low-energy nuclear particles and cycles of turbulent motions. High-voltage electron microscope observations of micron-sized grains either naturally exposed to space environmental parameters on the lunar surface or artificially subjected to space simulated conditions strongly suggest that such events could drastically modify the mineralogical composition of the grains and considerably ease their aggregation during collisions at low speeds. Furthermore, combined mass spectrometer and ionic analyzer studies show that small carbon compounds can be both synthesized during the implantation of a mixture of low-energy D, C, N ions in various solids and released in space by ion sputtering.

  16. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  17. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  18. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  19. Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    micrometeorites) containing layer silicates indicative of parent-body aqueous alteration and the more distant anhydrous P and D asteroids exhibiting no evidence of (aqueous) alteration (Gradie and Tedesco, 1982). This gradation in spectral properties presumably extends several hundred AU out to the Kuiper belt, the source region of most short-period comets, where the distinction between comets and outer asteroids may simply be one of the orbital parameters ( Luu, 1993; Brownlee, 1994; Jessberger et al., 2001). The mineralogy and petrography of meteorites provides direct confirmation of aqueous alteration, melting, fractionation, and thermal metamorphism among the inner asteroids ( Zolensky and McSween, 1988; Farinella et al., 1993; Brearley and Jones, 1998). Because the most common grains in the ISM (silicates and carbonaceous matter) are not as refractory as those found in meteorites, it is unlikely that they have survived in significant quantities in meteorites. Despite a prolonged search, not a single presolar silicate grain has yet been identified in any meteorite.Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are the smallest and most fine-grained meteoritic objects available for laboratory investigation (Figure 1). In contrast to meteorites, IDPs are derived from a broad range of dust-producing bodies extending from the inner main belt of the asteroids to the Kuiper belt (Flynn, 1996, 1990; Dermott et al., 1994; Liou et al., 1996). After release from their asteroidal or cometary parent bodies the orbits of IDPs evolve by Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag (the combined influence of light pressure and radiation drag) ( Dermott et al., 2001). Irrespective of the location of their parent bodies nearly all IDPs under the influence of PR drag can eventually reach Earth-crossing orbits. IDPs are collected in the stratosphere at 20-25 km altitude using NASA ER2 aircraft ( Sandford, 1987; Warren and Zolensky, 1994). Laboratory measurements of implanted rare gases, solar flare tracks ( Figure 2

  20. Cosmic Dust Collection Facility: Scientific objectives and programmatic relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Fred (Editor); Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Grounds, D.; Grun, E.; Rummel, Y.; Quaide, W. L.; Walker, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The science objectives are summarized for the Cosmic Dust Collection Facility (CDCF) on Space Station Freedom and these objectives are related to ongoing science programs and mission planning within NASA. The purpose is to illustrate the potential of the CDCF project within the broad context of early solar system sciences that emphasize the study of primitive objects in state-of-the-art analytical and experimental laboratories on Earth. Current knowledge about the sources of cosmic dust and their associated orbital dynamics is examined, and the results are reviewed of modern microanalytical investigations of extraterrestrial dust particles collected on Earth. Major areas of scientific inquiry and uncertainty are identified and it is shown how CDCF will contribute to their solution. General facility and instrument concepts that need to be pursued are introduced, and the major development tasks that are needed to attain the scientific objectives of the CDCF project are identified.

  1. In situ dust measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer in 2014 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 11 years in orbit around Saturn. Many discoveries like the Saturn nanodust streams or the large extended Ering were achieved. CDA provided unique results regarding Enceladus, his plume and the liquid water below the icy crust. In 2014 and 2015 CDA focuses on extended inclination and equatorial scans of the ring particle densities. Furthermore, scans are performed of the Pallene and Helene regions. Special attention is also given to the search of the dust cloud around Dione and to the Titan region. Long integration times are needed in order to characterize the flux and composition of exogenous dust (including interstellar dust) or possible retrograde dust particles. Finally, dedicated observation campaigns focus on the coupling of nanodust streams to Saturn's magnetosphere and the search of possible periodicities in the stream data. Saturn's rotation frequency was identified in the impact rate of nanodust particles at a Saturn distance of 40 Saturn radii. A special geometry in 2014-065 lead to an occultation of the dust stream by the moon Titan and its atmosphere when Titan crossed the line-of-sight between Saturn and Cassini. Here, CDA pointed towards Saturn for the measurement of stream particles. Around closest approach when Cassini was behind Titan, the flux of stream particles went down to zero (Fig. 1). This "dust occultation" is a new method to analyse the properties of the stream particles (speed, composition, mass) or the properties of Titans atmosphere (density). Furthermore, the particle trajectories can be constrained for a better analysis of their origin. In the final three years CDA performs exogenous and interstellar dust campaigns, studies of the composition and origin of Saturn's main rings by unique ring ejecta measurements, long-duration nano-dust stream observations, high-resolution maps of small moon orbit crossings, studies of the dust cloud around Dione and studies

  2. Mathematical model of formation of Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sal'nikova, T. V.; Stepanov, S. Ya.

    2015-07-01

    The question of occurrence of cosmic dust clouds, which were found by Kordylewski in 1961 in the vicinity of libration point L 5 of the Earth-Moon system, still causes debates and concern. We explain theoretically the phenomenon of the apparent vanishing and appearance of the Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds in the vicinity of triangular libration points L 4 and L 5 of the Earth-Moon system. The possibility of occurrence of two such clouds rotating around libration points L 4 and two clouds rotating around point L 5 is shown and optimal times for their observation from the Earth are determined. The investigation is performed based on analysis of a stable periodic motion in a planar restricted circular problem of three bodies, Earth-Moon—Particle, allowing for perturbations from the Sun under the assumption that the orbits of the Earth and Moon are circular and lie in one plane.

  3. Collection of cosmic dust in earth orbit for exobiological analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy; Huntington, Judith L.; Carle, Glenn C.

    1989-01-01

    Two proposed NASA exobiology flight experiments are described in terms of the approaches to cosmic dust collection and the issues addressed by the analysis of the samples. A passive collector is planned for use with the Cosmic Dust Collection Facility, and an active system is described for attachment to the Space Station Freedom payload. Exobiological study of cosmic dust could provide insights on organic chemistry in the grains and on the relative abundances of biogenic elements in interstellar, cometary, and meteoric samples.

  4. Lunar soil movement registered by the Apollo 17 cosmic dust experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, O. E.; Wolf, H.; Rhee, J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites (LEAM) experiment of the Apollo 17 flight mission, placed in the Taurus-Littrow area of the moon. The objective of the experiment was to measure impact parameters of cosmic dust on the lunar surface. Preliminary data analysis led to the recognition that the bulk of events recorded by the LEAM experiment are not signatures of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles as expected, but are induced signatures of electrostatically charged and transported lunar fines.

  5. Cosmic censorship and test particles

    SciTech Connect

    Needham, T.

    1980-08-15

    In this paper one unambiguous prediction of cosmic censorship is put to the test, namely that it should be impossible to destroy a black hole (i.e. eliminate its horizon) by injecting test particles into it. Several authors have treated this problem and have not found their conclusions in contradiction with the prediction. Here we prove that if a general charged spinning particle (with parameters very much smaller than the respective hole parameters) is injected in an arbitrary manner into an extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, then cosmic censorship is upheld. As a by-product of the analysis a natural proof is given of the Christodoulou-Ruffini conditions on the injection of a spinless particle which yield a reversible black-hole transformation. Finally we consider the injection of particles with parameters that are not small compared with those of the hole, for which cosmic censorship is apparently violated. By assuming the validity of cosmic censorship we are led to a few conjectures concerning the extent of the particle's interaction with the hole while approaching it.

  6. The Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser CDA - A 10 year exploration of Saturn's dust environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after seven years of cruise phase. Since then, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) was operated continuously for 10 years in orbit around Saturn. The first discovery of CDA related to Saturn was the measurement of nanometer sized dust particles ejected by its magnetosphere to interplanetary space with speeds higher than 100 km/s. Their origin and composition was analysed and an their dynamical studies showed a strong link to the conditions of the solar wind plasma flow. A recent surprising result was, that stream particles stem from the interior of Enceladus. Since 2004 CDA measured millions of dust impacts characterizing the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument showed strong evidence for ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the salt-rich water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system lead to the discovery of liquid water below the crust connected to an ocean at depth feeding the icy jets. CDA was even capable to derive a spatially resolved compositional profile of the plume during close Enceladus flybys. A determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring (at least twice as large as previously known) allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturns E ring describing the observed properties. Cassini performed shadow crossings in the ring plane and dust grain charges were measured in shadow regions delivering important data for dust-plasma interaction studies. In the last years, dedicated measurement campaigns were executed by CDA to monitor the flux of interplanetary and interstellar dust particles reaching Saturn.

  7. The simulation of cosmic dust collection process with little damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danming; Li, Yali; Wu, Qingxiao; Dai, Peng

    2016-07-01

    To built a cosmic dust collector according to a predetermined concept, mateirals that can be used to buffer the poential high speed collision of the cosmic dust have been studied. In this study, aerogel was chosen as an ideal buffer material and analyzed with SPH modeling method which is embedded in ABAQUS FE code. This report presents the interactions of cosmic dust, varing composition, shape and velocity, with the buffer material. The results show that cosmic dust that moves at 6 Km/s or less can be captured with minor damage to the buffer material of certain length. The simulation provides favorable technical support for the structural design of the cosmic dust collector.

  8. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  9. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  10. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  11. Pristine Stratospheric Collections of Cosmic Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Clemett, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1981, NASA has routinely collected interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in the stratosphere by inertial impact onto silicone oil-coated flat plate collectors deployed on the wings of high-altitude aircraft [1]. The highly viscous oil traps and localizes the particles, which can fragment during collection. Particles are removed from the collectors with a micromanipulator and washed of the oil using organic solvents, typically hexane or xylene. While silicone oil is an efficient collection medium, its use is problematic. All IDPs are initially coated with this material (polydimethylsiloxane, n(CH3)2SiO) and traces of oil may remain after cleaning. The solvent rinse itself is also a concern as it likely removes indigenous organics from the particles. To avoid these issues, we used a polyurethane foam substrate for the oil-free stratospheric collection of IDPs.

  12. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  13. A possible mechanism for the capture of microparticles by the earth and other planets of the solar system. [planetary gravitation effects on cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, F.

    1973-01-01

    By application of Lyttleton's theory for the formation of comets, it is shown that a possible mechanism for the origin and formation of a concentration of cosmic particles around the earth and the other planets of the solar system exists. In the vicinity of the neutral point, where the velocity of colliding particles is not greater than 6 km/s, it is found that if the solid particles after collision must remain in a solid state, there can be no possibility of accretion for Mercury, Mars, and the Moon, where the maximum value of the distance of the center of the planet to the asymptotic trajectory is less than the radius of the planet. On the other hand, the capture radii of microparticles in solid form varies from a minimum of 2.95 planetary radii for Venus and 3.47 for the Earth, to about 986 for Jupiter.

  14. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  15. Compositional Analysis of Interstellar Dust as seen by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, K.; Trieloff, M.; Guglielmino, M.; Hillier, J.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Kempf, S.; Blum, J.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate constraints on the composition of interstellar dust (ISD) grains, obtained via impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. 25 ISD candidates have been extracted from the vast Cassini CDA data set, based on the evaluation of their dynamical properties. To derive chemical composition from time-of-flight mass spectra of high energy particle impacts, we calibrated the laboratory unit of the CDA [1], and the high resolution Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA) [2] with a specifically manufactured orthopyroxene dust analogue. For particle impact simulations we utilized a 2MV Van de Graaff accelerator at Heidelberg [3]. The dust analogue material was analyzed by geochemical standard techniques (scanning electron microscope - SEM; electron microprobe analysis - EMPA), and ground to sub-micron size and coated with a conductive Pt-layer for the acceleration through an electromagnetic field [4]. We inferred sensitivity coefficients for impact ionization TOF mass spectra, so that mass spectra from the CDA and LAMA could be compared with with typical compositions of terrestrial and cosmochemically relevant silicate minerals, and bulk compositions.The suite of ISD canditates can be divided into a Mg-rich fraction with low Ca-content and a Mg-rich fraction with higher Ca-content. Comparing the ISD candidate compositions to cosmochemically relevant reservoirs, it can be shown that the Mg-dominated ISD candidate data plot close to a solar or cosmic composition (CI), possibly slightly volatile depleted. References:[1]R. Srama, et al., The Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer. Space Sci. Rev., 114: 465-518 ( 2004). [2] R. Srama, et al., Laboratory Tests of the Large Area Mass Analyser. Dust in Planetary Systems, 643:209-212 (2007). [3]A. Mocker, et al., A 2mv van de graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research. Rev. Sci. Instr. (2011), [4] J. K

  16. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  17. A New Laboratory For Terahertz Characterization Of Cosmic Analog Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Thushara; Liu, Lunjun; Breyer, Fiona; Schonert, Ryan; O'Shea, Kyle; Roesner, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Most studies conducted with observatories such as ALMA, SOFIA, PLANCK, and Herschel will benefit from knowledge of (1) the predominant cosmic dust species in various environments and (2) the mm/sub-mm optical properties of cosmic dusts, including the temperature dependent-emissivity and spectral index. We have undertaken two efforts to enable the laboratory study of cosmic analogs dusts in the frequency range 60-2000 GHz. They are: (1) the construction of a novel compact Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) design coupled to a dry 4-K cryostat which houses a cooled sample exchanger (filter wheel) and a bolometer. (2) The production of Mg- and Fe-rich silicate dusts using sol-gel methods; various tests to determine their physical and chemical properties; embedding of samples in LDPE pellets for insertion into the novel FTS. This presentation will focus on the current status of the apparatus and data from its first few months of use.

  18. Cassini RPWS Measurement of Dust Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, S.; Sakai, S.; Morooka, M.; Wahlund, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust impacts when voltage pulses induced by the impact charges are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. Based on the data collected during the E-ring crossings and Enceladus flybys, we show that the size distribution of the dust particles can be characterized as dn/dr ∝ rμ, where μ~-4. We compare the density of dust particles above a certain size threshold calculated from the impact rate with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) High Rate Detector (HRD) data. When the monopole antenna is connected to the wideband receiver, the polarity of the dust impact signal is determined by the spacecraft potential and the location of the impact (on the spacecraft body or the antenna). Because the effective area of the antenna is relatively easy to estimate, we use the polarity ratio of the dust impacts to infer the effective area of the spacecraft body. RPWS onboard dust detection data is analyzed, from which we infer the sign of the spacecraft potential and the dust density within Saturn's magnetosphere. A new phenomenon called dust ringing has been found to reveal the electron density inside the Enceladus plume. The ringing frequencies, interpreted as the local plasma frequencies, are consistent with the values measured by other methods, i.e., Langmuir probe and upper hybrid resonance.

  19. Interplanetary Dust Particles and Asrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molster, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    Interplanetary Dust Particles are amongst the most pristine materials of the Solar System that can be studied gore on Earth. The study of these primitive particles gives a lot of information about the evolution or our solar system and about the delivery of (pre-)biothic material on Earth. Although the sample size of IDP's is small, typically 10-9 gram, this does not prevent the study of them and several techniques are available. At the moment the possibilities fro detailed astrobiology research are limited. But with the present day evolution of the different instruments, the time for detailed astrobiology research are limited. But with the present day evolution of the different instruments, the time for detailed astrobiology research of interplanetary dust particles is near.

  20. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  1. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  2. Adsorption of Acetylene and Formation of Benzene on Cosmic Dust in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria; James, Alexander; Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; Mangan, Thomas; Willacy, Karen; Plane, John

    2016-04-01

    The formation of the haze layers and tholins in Titan's atmosphere is unclear. One potential mechanism is that small precursors, such as acetylene (C2H2), adsorb onto un-ablated cosmic dust particles as they sediment through Titan's atmosphere. The uptake coefficient of C2H2 onto cosmic dust analogues was measured using low temperature dual flow tube apparatus. Synthesized olivines analogues (Mg2-2nFe2nSiO4 where 1 ≥ n ≥ 0) were used to represent the cosmic dust particles based on investigations of cometary dust. The results indicated that the adsorption of C2H2 was independent of the Mg:Fe ratio in the dust analogue with the mean uptake coefficient (at 181 K) as 1.7 × 10-4. In some cases, the uptake experiments were left until the surface had become saturated with C2H2. Here, a small benzene (C6H6) mass trace was detected indicating that cyclotrimerzation of C2H2 into C6H6 was occurring on the surface. Further experiments using ultrahigh vacuum apparatus were used to confirm this observation. The rate of C6H6 (formed through C2H2 cyclotrimerization) desorbing from un-ablated cosmic dust particles sedimenting through Titan's atmosphere was explored using a 1D model. The results revealed that this heterogeneous formation and desorption route was competitive with gaseous C6H6 formation rates suggesting that the dust could be acting as a seed for the formation of complex organic molecules (such as PAHs) and tholins and, through this, the formation of the haze layers.

  3. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  4. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  5. Counter data of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer aboard the Cassini spacecraft and possible “dust clouds” at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalisi, Emil; Srama, Ralf; Grün, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    We present the impact rates of dust particles recorded by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The “dust counters” evaluate the quality of an impact and give rise to the apparent density of dust particles in space. The raw data is pre-selected and refined to a new structure that serves to a better investigation of densities, flows, and properties of interplanetary dust grains. Our data is corrected for the dead time of the instrument and corresponds to an assumed Kepler orbit (pointing of the sensitive area). The processed data are published on the website for the Magnetosphere and Plasma Science (MAPSview), where it can be correlated with other Cassini instruments. A sample is presented for the Titan flyby on DOY 250/2006. We find that the dust density peaks at two times, at least, in a void region between Titan and Rhea. Such features may point to extended clouds of small particles drifting slowly in space. These density clouds seem to be stable for as long as several months or few years before dispersing.

  6. Progress toward a cosmic dust collection facility on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R. (Editor); Carey, William C. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Scientific and programmatic progress toward the development of a cosmic dust collection facility (CDCF) for the proposed space station is documented. Topics addressed include: trajectory sensor concepts; trajectory accuracy and orbital evolution; CDCF pointing direction; development of capture devices; analytical techniques; programmatic progress; flight opportunities; and facility development.

  7. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  8. Cosmic dust detection by the Cluster spacecraft: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Kero, Johan; Mann, Ingrid; Norberg, Carol; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Pitkänen, Timo

    2016-04-01

    There are several different techniques that are used to measure cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical methods. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites with the Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver (WBD). We first describe the concept of dust impact ionization and of the impact detection. Based on these considerations the mass and the velocity of the impinging dust grains can be estimated from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses. In the case of the Cluster instrument an automatic gain control adjusts the dynamic range of the recorded signals. Depending on the gain level the impact signal can both be affected by saturation or be too weak for analysis. We describe how this influences the duty cycle of the impact measurements. We finally discuss the suitability of this method for monitoring dust fluxes near Earth and compare it with other methods.

  9. Carbon and silicate grains in the laboratory as analogues of cosmic dust.

    PubMed

    Mennella, V; Brucato, J R; Colangeli, L

    2001-03-15

    Carbon and silicate grains are the two main components of cosmic dust. There is increasing spectroscopic evidence that their composition varies according to the cosmic environment and the experienced processing. Irradiation from ultraviolet photons and cosmic rays, as well as chemical interactions with the interstellar gas play a crucial role for grain transformation. The study of 'laboratory analogues' represents a powerful tool to better understand the nature and evolution of cosmic materials. In particular, simulations of grain processing are fundamental to outline an evolutionary pathway for interstellar particles. In the present work, we discuss the ultraviolet and infrared spectral changes induced by thermal annealing, ultraviolet irradiation, ion irradiation and hydrogen atom bombardment in carbon and silicate analogue materials. The laboratory results give the opportunity to shed light on the long-standing problems of the attribution of ultraviolet and infrared interstellar spectral features.

  10. Airborne dust particle counting techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S G; Prasad, B D

    2006-03-01

    The paper briefly describes an electro-optical system for counting of dust particles, which is based on the scattering phenomena. Utilizing the scattering of light by various size particles present in the environment, various particle counting techniques have been developed in order to measure the scattered intensity of light. Light scatters in all directions but much more in the so-called near forward direction 17( composite function) off axis, at 163( composite function) from the light source in the visible range. On the basis of two techniques, the right angle and forward angle scattering, opto-mechanical systems have been developed which measure scattered intensity and particulate matter. The forward scattering Nephelometer is more sensitive and therefore is more suitable for pollution monitoring than the right angle scattering Nephelometer. Whereas the right angle scattering Nephelometer has the utility in extremely low concentration in ppb level owing to the excellent light trap efficiency in comparison to forward scattering Nephelometer. In this paper measurement techniques and measurement results associated with design and development of a real time particle analyser are also discussed.

  11. Particle atlas of World Trade Center dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, Heather; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has begun a reassessment of the presence of World Trade Center (WTC) dust in residences, public buildings, and office spaces in New York City, New York. Background dust samples collected from residences, public buildings, and office spaces will be analyzed by multiple laboratories for the presence of WTC dust. Other laboratories are currently studying WTC dust for other purposes, such as health effects studies. To assist in inter-laboratory consistency for identification of WTC dust components, this particle atlas of phases in WTC dust has been compiled.

  12. Cosmic Ornament of Gas and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 4-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Silicon Gas Figure 2 Argon Figure 3 Dust Collection Figure 4

    This beautiful bulb might look like a Christmas ornament but it is the blown-out remains of a stellar explosion, or supernova. Called Cassiopeia A, this supernova remnant is located about 10,000 light-years away in our own Milky Way galaxy. The remains are shown here in an infrared composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Silicon gas is blue and argon gas is green, while red represents about 10,000 Earth masses worth of dust. Yellow shows areas where red and green overlap.

    The fact that these two features line up (as seen in yellow in the combined view) tells astronomers that the dust, together with the gas, was created in the explosion. This is the best evidence yet that supernovae are a significant source of dust in the early universe something that was postulated before, but not proven. Dust in our young universe is important because it eventually made its way into future stars, planets and even people.

    In figure 1, the upper left panel is a composite made up of three infrared views shown in the remaining panels. The bottom left view (figure 3) shows argon gas (green) that was synthesized as it was ejected from the star. The upper right panel (figure 2) shows silicon gas (blue) deep in the interior of the remnant. This cooler gas, called the unshocked ejecta, was also synthesized in the supernova blast. The bottom right view (figure 4) shows a collection of dust (red), including proto-silicates, silicate dioxide and iron oxide.

    The data for these images were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light apart to reveal the fingerprints of molecules and elements. In total, Spitzer collected separate 'spectra' at more than 1,700 positions across

  13. The impact of cosmic dust on supernova cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    2006-10-01

    Extinction by intergalactic grey dust introduces a magnitude redshift-dependent offset in the standard-candle relation of supernova Type Ia. This leads to overestimated luminosity distances compared to a dust-free universe. Quantifying the amplitude of this systematic effect is crucial for an accurate determination of the dark energy parameters. In this paper, we model the grey dust extinction in terms of the star formation history of the Universe and the physical properties of the dust grains. We focus on a class of cosmic dust models which satisfy current observational constraints. These can produce an extinction as large as 0.08 mag at z = 1.7 and potentially disrupt the dark energy parameter inference from future SN surveys. In particular depending on the dust model, we find that an unaccounted extinction can bias the estimation of a constant dark energy equation of state w by shifting its best-fitting value up to 20 per cent from its true value. Near-IR broad-band photometry will hardly detect this effect, while the induced decrement of the Balmer lines requires high signal-to-noise spectra. Indeed, IR-spectroscopy will be needed for high-redshift SNe. Cosmic dust extinction may also cause a detectable violation of the distance-duality relation. A more comprehensive knowledge of the physics of the intergalactic medium is necessary for an accurate modelling of intergalactic dust. Due to the large magnitude dispersion current luminosity distance measurements are insensitive to such possible extinction effects. In contrast, these must be taken into account if we hope to disclose the true nature of dark energy with the upcoming generation of SN Ia surveys.

  14. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Witherow, W. K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for conducting a variety of experiments on single isolated dust particles of astrophysical interest levitated in an electrodynamics balance has been developed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The objective of the research is to employ this experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of individual cosmic dust grains of 0.1-100 micron size in controlled pressure/temperatures environments simulating astrophysical conditions. The physical and optical properties of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains of known composition and size distribution will be investigated by this facility. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to study the micro-physics of cosmic dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) in the 1-30 micron region using infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the condensation of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The condensation experiments will involve levitated nucleus dust grains of known composition and initial mass (or m/q ratio), cooled to a temperature and pressure (or scaled pressure) simulating the astrophysical conditions, and injection of a volatile gas at a higher temperature from a controlled port. The increase in the mass due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data will permit determination of the sticking coefficients of volatile gases and growth rates of dust particles of astrophysical interest. Some preliminary results based on

  15. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  16. Ultrahigh-energy particles from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. . Astronomy and Astrophysics Center Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1991-02-01

    The idea of production of ultrahigh-energy particles in the present universe due to annihilation or collapse of topological defects is discussed. Topological defects, formed in symmetry-breaking phase transitions in the early universe, can survive till today owing to their topological stability. However, under certain circumstances, topological defects may be physically destroyed. When topological defects are destroyed, the energy contained in the defects can be released in the form of massive gauge- and Higgs bosons of the underlying spontaneously broken gauge theory. Subsequent decay of these massive particles can give rise to energetic particles ranging up to an energy on the order of the mass of the original particles released from the defects. This may give us a natural'' mechanism of production of extremely energetic cosmic ray particles in the universe today, without the need for any acceleration mechanism. To illustrate this idea, I describe in detail the calculation of the expected ultrahigh-energy proton spectrum due to a specific process which involves collapse or multiple self-intersections of a class of closed cosmic string loops formed in a phase transition at a grand unification energy scale. I discuss the possibility that some of the highest-energy cosmic ray particles are of this origin. By comparing with the observational results on the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, we derive an upper limit to the average fraction of the total energy in all primary'' cosmic string loops that may be released in the form of particles due to collapse or multiple self-intersections of these loops. No nuclei such as {alpha}'s or Fe's are in the spectrum. 43 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  18. On the Size of the Cosmic Dust Input to the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Janches, D.; Nesvorny, D.; Gardner, C. S.; Marsh, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input range from 2 to over 100 tons per day (t d-1), depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are flaws in perhaps both the interpretation of the experimental observations and the atmospheric models that have been used to make the estimates. This paper will describe three new estimates of the dust input, and attempt to reconcile them. The first is a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets, and that the dust is mostly in a near-prograde orbit and should enter the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s-1. However, relatively few of these slow particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Using coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation, ionization and radar detection to compute the probability of detecting a specified meteoroid in the Arecibo beam, an upper limit to the cosmic dust input of 16 t d-1 has been obtained from the radar obsevations. The second method is to use lidar measurements of the vertical Na atom flux at the Starfire Optical Range, combined with predictions of the relative geographic variations of the key wave-induced vertical transport processes from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The estimated global influx of cosmic dust is then 50 ± 13 t d-1. The final method is to model several of the mesospheric metal layers - Na, Fe, K and Ca - using WACCM with a full treatment of the gas-phase chemistry of these metals, together with the explicit formation and growth of meteoric smoke particles. The absolute densities of the metal layers can be satisfactorily modelled with a dust input of up to 25 t d-1 if the dust mass and velocity distribution is that predicted by the zodiacal dust cloud model referred to above.

  19. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  20. Shape effects in optical properties of composite dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, Robert S.; Rai, Rakesh K.

    2013-10-01

    We present optical features characteristic of the shape of composite dust particles, such as grain-aggregates formed under cosmic or atmospheric conditions. The discussion develops along two examples of realistic models for the formation of the composite particles, and constant refractive indices. That way, particular features exhibited in the optical cross section behaviors result from the particle structure only. The role of the ratio between optical particle cross section and the corresponding cross section of the coated sphere of same composition and volume is highlighted. Limited wavelength ranges are defined where the coated sphere model can be used to obtain the effective radius or the volume composition of the particle. Other wavelength domains are very dependent on the particle formation mechanisms, then giving constraints on the possible formation processes. Therefore, such an approach is able to provide inverse methods to obtain the actual values of physical parameters from definite features of optical quantities.

  1. Toward a complete inventory of stratospheric dust particles with implications and their classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.; Mckay, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    As the Earth travels about the Sun it continuously sweeps up material laying in its path. The material includes dust-sized fragments of the meteors, comets and asteroids that have passed by as well as much older particles from out between the stars. These grains first become caught in the mesosphere and then slowly pass down through the stratosphere and the troposphere, finally raining down upon the Earth's surface. In the stratosphere the cosmic dust particles encounter increasing amounts of contaminants from the Earth. At the highest reaches of Earth's atmosphere these contaminants consists mainly of dust from the most explosive volcanoes, rocket exhaust, and other manmade space debris. In the troposphere windborne particles and pollen become an increasingly larger fraction of the atmospheric dust load. An increased knowledge of the nature of cosmic particles is suggested.

  2. Trace Elements in Chondritic Cosmic Dust: Volatile Correlation with CA Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1992-07-01

    Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence (SXRF) allows high-sensitivity element abundance measurements from Cr to Br. Although abundances in individual chondritic cosmic dust particles generally scatter from 1/3xCI to 3xCI abundances (Flynn and Sutton, 1992a), enrichments are more common than depletions. We previously reported average compositions of 18 (Flynn and Sutton, 1991) and 24 (Flynn and Sutton, 1992b) chondritic cosmic dust particles showing volatile enrichments. Jessberger et al. (1991) reported similar results for 8 particles. Their average composition of 42 chondritic particles follows the previous trend. Each element from Cr to Br having a nebula condensation temperature lower than 1277 K is enriched over its CI meteorite concentration, generally by about the same factor as the depletion from CI exhibited by CII or CIII meteorites. Although many particles are volatile rich, two types have lower volatile contents. Low-Zn particles probably lost much of their initial Zn during atmospheric entry heating (Flynn and Sutton, 1992a; Flynn et al., 1992). Some low-Zn particles, presumably the most extremely heated survivors, are also depleted in other volatile elements (Cu, Ga, Ge, and Se). Since 10 low-Zn particles are included in the 42, the calculated average abundances may be lower than pre-atmospheric values, especially for very volatile elements. We have noted that Cu/Fe versus Se/Fe in almost all chondritic cosmic dust particles plots on the volatile-rich extension of the line defined by these ratios in the CI, CII, and CIII meteorites (Flynn and Sutton, 1992b). The eight particles that fall within the chondritic range (Cu/Fe and Se/Fe both <1.2 x CI) show much smaller deviations from CI for other elements. Their average volatile trace element content falls between CI and CII, except for a large Br enrichment. Schramm et al. (1989) indicate the porous (generally anhydrous) and smooth (generally hydrated) cosmic dust particles form two chemical groups, with Ca

  3. Detection of the Cosmic Dust and Micrometeorites in Sediments Using Their Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzina, D. M.; Nurgaliev, D. K.; Pechersky, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    Shown reliability of using magnetic properties (Curie temperature) for identification of cosmic dust and micrometeorites in sediments (Atlantic Ocean, Lake Baikal, Mongolian, Austrian, Russian sedimentary outcrops).

  4. Observing air showers from cosmic superluminal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    1998-06-01

    The Poincaré relativity principle has been tested at low energy with great accuracy, but its extrapolation to very high-energy phenomena is much less well established. Lorentz symmetry can be broken at Planck scale due to the renormalization of gravity or to some deeper structure of matter: we expect such a breaking to be a very high energy and very short distance phenomenon. If textbook special relativity is only an approximate property of the equations describing a sector of matter above some critical distance scale, an absolute local frame (the ``vacuum rest frame,'' VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related to new degrees of freedom not yet discovered experimentally. The new superluminal particles (``superbradyons,'' i.e. bradyons with superluminal critical speed) would have positive mass and energy, and behave kinematically like ``ordinary'' particles (those with critical speed in vacuum equal to c, the speed of light) apart from the difference in critical speed (we expect ci>>c, where ci is the critical speed of a superluminal sector). They may be the ultimate building blocks of matter. At speed v>c, they are expected to release ``Cherenkov'' radiation (``ordinary'' particles) in vacuum. Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss: a) the possible relevance of superluminal matter to the composition, sources and spectra of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signatures and experiments allowing to possibly explore such effects. Very large volume and unprecedented background rejection ability are crucial requirements for any detector devoted to the search for cosmic superbradyons. Future cosmic-ray experiments using air-shower detectors (especially from space) naturally fulfil both requirements.

  5. Observing air showers from cosmic superluminal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    1998-06-15

    The Poincare relativity principle has been tested at low energy with great accuracy, but its extrapolation to very high-energy phenomena is much less well established. Lorentz symmetry can be broken at Planck scale due to the renormalization of gravity or to some deeper structure of matter: we expect such a breaking to be a very high energy and very short distance phenomenon. If textbook special relativity is only an approximate property of the equations describing a sector of matter above some critical distance scale, an absolute local frame (the 'vacuum rest frame', VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related to new degrees of freedom not yet discovered experimentally. The new superluminal particles ('superbradyons', i.e. bradyons with superluminal critical speed) would have positive mass and energy, and behave kinematically like 'ordinary' particles (those with critical speed in vacuum equal to c, the speed of light) apart from the difference in critical speed (we expect c{sub i}>>c, where c{sub i} is the critical speed of a superluminal sector). They may be the ultimate building blocks of matter. At speed v>c, they are expected to release ''Cherenkov'' radiation ('ordinary' particles) in vacuum. Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss: a) the possible relevance of superluminal matter to the composition, sources and spectra of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signatures and experiments allowing to possibly explore such effects. Very large volume and unprecedented background rejection ability are crucial requirements for any detector devoted to the search for cosmic superbradyons. Future cosmic-ray experiments using air-shower detectors (especially from space) naturally fulfil both requirements.

  6. One century of cosmic rays - A particle physicist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  7. Collecting Comet Samples by ER-2 Aircraft: Cosmic Dust Collection During the Draconid Meteor Shower in October 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, Ron; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriquez, M.; Frank, D.; Gonzalez, C.; Robinson, G.-A.; Zolensky, M.; Brown, P.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Broce, S.; Kapitzke, M.; Moes, T.; Steel, D.; Williams, T.; Gearheart, D.

    2014-01-01

    Many tons of dust grains, including samples of asteroids and comets, fall from space into the Earth's atmosphere each day. NASA periodically collects some of these particles from the Earth's stratosphere using sticky collectors mounted on NASA's high-flying aircraft. Sometimes, especially when the Earth experiences a known meteor shower, a special opportunity is presented to associate cosmic dust particles with a known source. NASA JSC's Cosmic Dust Collection Program has made special attempts to collect dust from particular meteor showers and asteroid families when flights can be planned well in advance. However, it has rarely been possible to make collections on very short notice. In 2012, the Draconid meteor shower presented that opportunity. The Draconid meteor shower, originating from Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, has produced both outbursts and storms several times during the last century, but the 2012 event was not predicted to be much of a show. Because of these predictions, the Cosmic Dust team had not targeted a stratospheric collection effort for the Draconids, despite the fact that they have one of the slowest atmospheric entry velocities (23 km/s) of any comet shower, and thus offer significant possibilities of successful dust capture. However, radar measurements obtained by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar during the 2012 Draconids shower indicated a meteor storm did occur October 8 with a peak at 16:38 (+/-5 min) UTC for a total duration of approximately 2 hours.

  8. Highlights and discoveries of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) during its 15 years of exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Postberg, F.; Albin, T.; Auer, S.; Altobelli, N.; Beckmann, U.; Bugiel, S.; Burton, M.; Economou, T.; Fliege, K.; Grande, M.; Gruen, E.; Guglielmino, M.; Hillier, J. K.; Schilling, A.; Schmidt, J.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F.; Sterken, V.; Trieloff, M.

    2014-04-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after seven years of cruise phase. Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 10 years in orbit around Saturn. During the cruise phase CDA measured the interstellar dust flux at one AU distance from the Sun, the charge and composition of interplanetary dust grains and the composition of the Jovian nanodust streams. The first discovery of CDA related to Saturn was the measurement of nanometer sized dust particles ejected by its magnetosphere to interplanetary space with speeds higher than 100 km/s. Their origin and composition was analysed and an their dynamical studies showed a strong link to the conditions of the solar wind plasma flow. A recent surprising result was, that stream particles stem from the interior of Enceladus. Since 2004 CDA measured millions of dust impacts characterizing the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument showed strong evidence for ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the salt-rich water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system lead to the discovery of liquid water below the icy crust connected to an ocean at depth feeding the icy jets. CDA was even capable to derive a spatially resolved compositional profile of the plume during close Enceladus flybys. A determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturn's E ring describing the observed properties. The measured dust density profiles in the dense E ring revealed geometric asymmetries. Cassini performed shadow crossings in the ring plane and dust grain charges were measured in shadow regions delivering important data for dust-plasma interaction studies. In the last years, dedicated measurement campaigns were executed by CDA to monitor the flux of interplanetary and interstellar dust particles reaching

  9. Uptake of acetylene on cosmic dust and production of benzene in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; James, Alexander D.; Sánchez, Juan Diego Carrillo; Mangan, Thomas P.; Willacy, Karen; Poppe, Andrew R.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A low-temperature flow tube and ultra-high vacuum apparatus were used to explore the uptake and heterogeneous chemistry of acetylene (C2H2) on cosmic dust analogues over the temperature range encountered in Titan's atmosphere below 600 km. The uptake coefficient, γ, was measured at 181 K to be (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-4 and (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-4 for the uptake of C2H2 on Mg2SiO4, MgFeSiO4 and Fe2SiO4, respectively, indicating that γ is independent of Mg or Fe active sites. The uptake of C2H2 was also measured on SiO2 and SiC as analogues for meteoric smoke particles in Titan's atmosphere, but was found to be below the detection limit (γ < 6 × 10-8 and < 4 × 10-7, respectively). The rate of cyclo-trimerization of C2H2 to C6H6 was found to be 2.6 × 10-5 exp(-741/T) s-1, with an uncertainty ranging from ± 27 % at 115 K to ± 49 % at 181 K. A chemical ablation model was used to show that the bulk of cosmic dust particles (radius 0.02-10 μm) entering Titan's atmosphere do not ablate (< 1% mass loss through sputtering), thereby providing a significant surface for heterogeneous chemistry. A 1D model of dust sedimentation shows that the production of C6H6via uptake of C2H2 on cosmic dust, followed by cyclo-trimerization and desorption, is probably competitive with gas-phase production of C6H6 between 80 and 120 km.

  10. Flux and composition of interstellar dust at Saturn from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, N; Postberg, F; Fiege, K; Trieloff, M; Kimura, H; Sterken, V J; Hsu, H-W; Hillier, J; Khawaja, N; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Blum, J; Burton, M; Srama, R; Kempf, S; Gruen, E

    2016-04-15

    Interstellar dust (ISD) is the condensed phase of the interstellar medium. In situ data from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer on board the Cassini spacecraft reveal that the Saturnian system is passed by ISD grains from our immediate interstellar neighborhood, the local interstellar cloud. We determine the mass distribution of 36 interstellar grains, their elemental composition, and a lower limit for the ISD flux at Saturn. Mass spectra and grain dynamics suggest the presence of magnesium-rich grains of silicate and oxide composition, partly with iron inclusions. Major rock-forming elements (magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium) are present in cosmic abundances, with only small grain-to-grain variations, but sulfur and carbon are depleted. The ISD grains in the solar neighborhood appear to be homogenized, likely by repeated processing in the interstellar medium.

  11. Flux and composition of interstellar dust at Saturn from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, N; Postberg, F; Fiege, K; Trieloff, M; Kimura, H; Sterken, V J; Hsu, H-W; Hillier, J; Khawaja, N; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Blum, J; Burton, M; Srama, R; Kempf, S; Gruen, E

    2016-04-15

    Interstellar dust (ISD) is the condensed phase of the interstellar medium. In situ data from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer on board the Cassini spacecraft reveal that the Saturnian system is passed by ISD grains from our immediate interstellar neighborhood, the local interstellar cloud. We determine the mass distribution of 36 interstellar grains, their elemental composition, and a lower limit for the ISD flux at Saturn. Mass spectra and grain dynamics suggest the presence of magnesium-rich grains of silicate and oxide composition, partly with iron inclusions. Major rock-forming elements (magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium) are present in cosmic abundances, with only small grain-to-grain variations, but sulfur and carbon are depleted. The ISD grains in the solar neighborhood appear to be homogenized, likely by repeated processing in the interstellar medium. PMID:27081064

  12. Cosmic dust collection with a sub-satellite tethered to a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The number concentration and density of 1 micron and submicron sized grains in interplanetary space, as well as their relation to the larger zodical dust particles, and the importance of the Beta meteoroid phenomenon are currently being questioned. The best approach to collecting large numbers of intact micron and submicron sized cosmic dust particles in real time while avoiding terrestrial and man made contamination would be to employ a tethered subsatellite from a space station down into the Earth's atmosphere. Such a subsatellite tied to the space shuttle by a 100 km long tether is being developed. It is also possible that a permanent space station would allow the use of a tether even longer that 100 km. It should be noted that the same tethered collectors could also be employed to study the composition and flux of man made Earth orbiting debris in any direction within 100 km or so of the space station.

  13. Cosmic dust collection with a sub satellite tethered to a Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, George J.

    1987-01-01

    The number concentration and density of 1 micron and submicron sized grains in interplanetary space, as well as their relation to the larger zodical dust particles, and the importance of the beta meteoroid phenomenon are currently being questioned. The best approach to collecting large numbers of intact micron and submicron sized cosmic dust particles in real time while avoiding terrestrial and man made contamination would be to employ a tethered subsatellite from a space station down into the earth's atmosphere. Such a subsatellite tied to the space shuttle by a 100 km long tether is being developed. It is also possible that a permanent space station would allow the use of a tether even longer than 100 km. It should be noted that the same tethered collectors could also be employed to study the composition and flux of man made earth orbiting debris in any direction within 100 km or so of the space station.

  14. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Astronomers have made the first tentative observations of a long-speculated, but never before detected, source of natural radio waves in interstellar space. Data from the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va., show the faint, tell-tale signals of what appear to be dust grains spinning billions of times each second. This discovery eventually could yield a powerful new tool for understanding the interstellar medium - the immense clouds of gas and dust that populate interstellar space. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "What we believe we have found," said Douglas P. Finkbeiner of Princeton University's Department of Astrophysics, "is the first hard evidence for electric dipole emission from rapidly rotating dust grains. If our studies are confirmed, it will be the first new source of continuum emission to be conclusively identified in the interstellar medium in nearly the past 20 years." Finkbeiner believes that these emissions have the potential in the future of revealing new and exciting information about the interstellar medium; they also may help to refine future studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The results from this study, which took place in spring 1999, were accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. Other contributors to this paper include David J. Schlegel, department of astrophysics, Princeton University; Curtis Frank, department of astronomy, University of Maryland; and Carl Heiles, department of astronomy, University of California at Berkeley. "The idea of dust grains emitting radiation by rotating is not new," comments Finkbeiner, "but to date it has been somewhat speculative." Scientists first proposed in 1957 that dust grains could emit radio signals, if they were caused to rotate rapidly enough. It was believed, however, that these radio emissions would be negligibly small - too weak to be of any impact to

  15. Laboratory calibration of the cassini cosmic dust analyser (CDA) using new, low density projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, B. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Green, S. F.; Leese, M. R.; McBride, N.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Müller, M.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.; Armes, S. P.; Khan, M. A.

    The Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA), developed from the Galileo and Ulysses dust instruments with the addition of a Chemical Analyser, is currently travelling outward from the Earth (collecting data from March 1999 onward) to the Saturnian system (arrival 2004) via Jupiter. The Chemical Analyser will provide information on the elemental composition of impacting micrometeoroids through impact ionisation, time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A rigorous calibration programme primarily focussed upon the Chemical Analyser is in progress at the University of Kent at Canterbury. A 2-MV Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator and CDA laboratory model are used to simulate impacts. Acceleration of revolutionary low density, polymer dust particles has enabled an insight into the response of CDA to molecularly bonded material with increasing event velocity. These conducting polymer coated polystyrene latex particles represent significantly better analogues for carbonaceous cosmic grains than more traditionally accelerated projectiles (e.g. iron) and have enabled complex organic spectra to be produced in the laboratory. The current status of an ongoing programme is reported. Three samples are presented, two polypyrrole coated latexes of differing size and one PEDOT-coated latex sample.

  16. Mass Influx of Cosmic Dust Estimated From Vertical Transport of Meteoric Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang; Gardner, Chester S.

    2016-04-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles in the lower thermosphere and upper mesosphere. The vaporized atoms and ions are transported downward by waves and turbulence to chemical sinks below 85 km, where they form stable compounds. These compounds condense onto meteoric smoke particles and are then transported to the winter pole where they eventually settle onto the surface. The downward fluxes of the metal atoms are directly related to their meteoric influxes and chemical loss rates. In this paper we use Doppler lidar measurements of Na and Fe fluxes made by the University of Illinois and University of Colorado groups, and a chemical ablation model (CABMOD) developed at the University of Leeds, to constrain the velocity/mass distribution of the meteoroids entering the atmosphere and to derive an improved estimate for the global influx of cosmic dust. We find that the particles responsible for injecting a large fraction of the ablated material into the Earth's upper atmosphere, enter at relatively slow speeds and originate primarily from the Jupiter Family of Comets. The global mean Na influx is 21,500±1,100 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 372±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor and 186±24 t/d for the global influx of cosmic dust. The global mean Fe influx is 131,000±36,000 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 5.5±1.5 t/d for the global input of Na vapor.

  17. Laboratory investigation of electric charging of dust particles by electrons, ions, and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Jiri; Pinter, S.; Gruen, E.

    1989-01-01

    In many cosmic environments electric charging of dust particles occurs by electrons, ions, and UV radiation. In case of interstellar dust particles the value of their electric charge can have, for instance, very important consequences for their destruction rate in supernova remnant's shock waves and can globally influence the overall life cycle of dust particles in galaxies. For experimental simulation of charging processes a vacuum chamber was used in which the particles fall through an electron or ion beam of energies up to 10 KeV. The aim of the experiments was to attain maximum charge of dust particles. Furthermore the influence of the rest gas was also determined because electrons and ions produced by collisional ionization of the rest gas can result in significant effects. For measurement particles from 1 to 100 microns from glass, carbon, Al, Fe, MgO, and very loosely bound conglomerates of Al2O3 were used.

  18. Cosmic dust analog simulation in a microgravity environment: The STARDUST program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dell'aversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1995-01-01

    We have undertaken a project called STARDUST which is a collaboration with Italian and American investigators. The goals of this program are to study the condensation and coagulation of refractory materials from the vapor and to study the properties of the resulting grains as analogs to cosmic dust particles. To reduce thermal convective currents and to develop valuable experience in designing an experiment for the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility aboard Space Station, Freedom we have built and flown a new chamber to study these processes under periods of microgravity available on NASA's KC-135 Research Aircraft. Preliminary results from flights with magnesium and zinc are discussed.

  19. Cosmic dust analog simulation in a microgravity environment: the STARDUST program.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, F; Lilleleht, L U; Nuth, J; Stephens, J R; Bussoletti, E; Carotenuto, L; Colangeli, L; Dell'Aversana, P; Mele, F; Mennella, V; Mirra, C

    1995-03-01

    We have undertaken a project called STARDUST which is a collaboration with Italian and American investigators. The goals of this program are to study the condensation and coagulation of refractory materials from the vapor and to study the properties of the resulting grains as analogs to cosmic dust particles. To reduce thermal convective currents and to develop valuable experience in designing an experiment for the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility aboard Space Station Freedom we have built and flown a new chamber to study these processes under periods of microgravity available on NASA's KC-135 Research Aircraft. Preliminary results from flights with magnesium and zinc are discussed.

  20. An overview of the cosmic dust analogue material production in reduced gravity: the STARDUST experience.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, F; Lilleleht, L U; Nuth, J; Stephens, J R; Bussoletti, E; Colangeli, L; Mennella, V; Dell'Aversana, P; Mirra, C

    1993-01-01

    The formation, properties and chemical dynamics of microparticles are important in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields including synthesis of semiconductor crystals from the vapour, heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere and the formation of cosmic dust surrounding the stars. Gravitational effects on particle formation from vapors include gas convection and buoyancy and particle sedimentation. These processes can be significantly reduced by studying condensation and agglomeration of particles in microgravity. In addition, to accurately simulate particle formation near stars, which takes place under low gravity conditions, studies in microgravity are desired. We report here the STARDUST experience, a recent collaborative effort that brings together a successful American program of microgravity experiments on particle formation aboard NASA KC-135 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft and several Italian research groups with expertise in microgravity research and astrophysical dust formation. The program goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science. To do so we are developing techniques that are generally applicable to study particle formation and properties, taking advantage of the microgravity environment to allow accurate control of system parameters.

  1. An overview of the cosmic dust analogue material production in reduced gravity: the STARDUST experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Mirra, C.

    1993-01-01

    The formation, properties and chemical dynamics of microparticles are important in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields including synthesis of semiconductor crystals from the vapour, heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere and the formation of cosmic dust surrounding the stars. Gravitational effects on particle formation from vapors include gas convection and buoyancy and particle sedimentation. These processes can be significantly reduced by studying condensation and agglomeration of particles in microgravity. In addition, to accurately simulate particle formation near stars, which takes place under low gravity conditions, studies in microgravity are desired. We report here the STARDUST experience, a recent collaborative effort that brings together a successful American program of microgravity experiments on particle formation aboard NASA KC-135 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft and several Italian research groups with expertise in microgravity research and astrophysical dust formation. The program goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science. To do so we are developing techniques that are generally applicable to study particle formation and properties, taking advantage of the microgravity environment to allow accurate control of system parameters.

  2. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  3. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  4. Collective excitations and dust particles in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilra, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that observed bands at 2200 A and in the 10 micron region are most probably due to collective excitations of dust particles. The following specific conclusions are drawn: (1) the 2200 A interstellar band is very likely due to graphite particles; (2) these graphite particles should be very small, approximately spherical, and should have no coating whatsoever; (3) the identification of circumstellar and interstellar silicates from the observations in the 10 micron region does not seem to be correct; (4) very valuable information about the shape of the circumstellar and interstellar dust particles can be obtained directly from observations; and (5) narrow band polarization measurements in the spectral regions of these bands will be very helpful in determining the shape of the particles.

  5. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  6. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is discussed as a cause of rotational bursting, and of eventual elimination of asymmetric dust particles from the solar system, by a windmill effect. The predicted life span with this process for metallic particles with radii of 0.00001 to 0.01 cm ranges from 10 to 10,000 years. The effects of magnetic spin damping were considered. This depletion mechanism works faster than the traditional Poynting-Robertson effect by approximately one order of magnitude for metallic particles and about two orders of magnitude for nonmetallic particles.

  7. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure can cause rotational bursting and eventual elimination from the solar system of asymmetric dust particles by a windmill effect. The life span against this process for metallic particles with radii of 0.00001-0.01 cm ranges from 10 to 10,000 years. The effects of magnetic spin damping have been considered in this estimate. This depletion mechanism works faster than the traditional Poynting-Robertson effect by approximately one order of magnitude for metallic particles and about two-orders of magnitude for nonmetallic particles.

  8. Microanalytical study of some cosmic dust discovered in sea-floor sediments in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shijie, Z.; Hanchang, P.; Zhong, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The study of cosmic dust can provide useful data in the investigation of the origin of the Earth and the evolution of celestial bodies. Three types of cosmic dust (ferriginous, siliceous, and glassy) were discovered in the seafloor sediments near China. Their chemical composition and microstructure were examined by X-ray diffraction, fractography, and electron microscopy. The major mineral in an iron-containing cosmic dust is magnetite. The silicate spheres contain sundry metals and metal oxides. Glassy microtektites are similar in composition to tektites, and are found in all the major meteorite areas worldwide.

  9. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  10. Immersion freezing on mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Grothe, Hinrich; Pummer, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust is considered to play a major role in ice cloud nucleation in the troposphere. More than 1.000 Tg of mineral dust are aerosolized from the ground every year, 1-10% of these reach the upper troposphere [1]. At an altitude of about 8 km ice residual particle analysis has shown that about 50% of all ice nuclei (IN) are mineral dust[2]. In principle, natural occurring dusts may either be IN-active themselves or are carriers of organic and/or biological IN. Up to now the ice nucleation, i.e. cloud glaciation, has not been quantized. However, different authors report a high IN-activity for many mineral dust samples, although a systematic comparison between different minerals is still missing. Therefore, we studied selected mineral dust samples which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy before use. Oil immersion measurements were performed on the most common minerals, clay materials and volcanic ash. The median freezing temperatures range from -21°C up to homogenous freezing at 38°C. Even though quite a few dust samples show a reasonable high IN-activity, their median freezing temperatures are low compared to biological samples [3, 4]. Furthermore, heat treatment of the dusts was applied in order to decompose and to denaturize organic and/or biological surfactants. Finally, some dust samples had a high loss of activity and thus were subjects of further experiments. These mineral dust particles were suspended in water and after an incubation time were removed. In some cases the washing water had become IN-active, but lost its activity after enzymatic treatment. The observed high IN-activity can thus be explained by adsorbed biological materials. The results suggest that some mineral dusts are IN-active, and if it is not intrinsic they may even enhance IN-activity of organic and biological IN if these are adsorbed on the dust particle surface. A relatively high IN-activity of the pure mineral dusts was

  11. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  12. Raman spectra of seven interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yin-Lin; Yu, Min; Fan, Chang-Yun

    1992-01-01

    The Raman shift spectra of seven interplanetary dust particles, U2034(F10), U2034(F8), U2022(B1), W7074 18, W7074 C15, W7074 C3 and W7074 A7, were measured with a Spex-1403 Raman spectrograph. The exciting radiations were the 488 nm and 514 nm line of a 5W argon ion laser. All seven spectra exhibit the 1350 and 1600 Delta/cm arbon bands, implying that the Interplanetary dust particles were coated with hydrocarbon and incompletely crystallized carbon, the part of which may be the residue of hydrocarbon contents in the particles after water loss by the heating during their entry into the earth's atmosphere. A weak band structure in the 520-610/cm range could be caused by cyclosilicates, and a weak band at 2900/cm is tentatively identified as due to hydrocarbon molecules.

  13. Exposure to mineral sands dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Cunha, K.; Barros Leite, C. V.; Zays, Z.

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the airborne particles in a Brazilian region with high concentration of mineral sands (Buena village). In this study proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), plasma desorption mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry were used for analyses of airborne particles. The analyses of aerosol samples and lichen samples show that the inhabitants of the Buena village are exposed to airborne particles in the fine fraction of aerosols. The main anthropogenic sources of particles are the mineral sands processing plant and truck traffic, and natural sources as the sea, soil and the swamp. The results from the lichen samples show that at least during the last 15 years the inhabitants of the village have been exposed to monazite particles. The results from aerosols and lichens samples also suggested that the swamp is a source of 226Ra and 210Pb bearing particles besides the monazite dust.

  14. Plasma-Based Detector of Outer-Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Brinza, David E.; Henry, Michael D.; Clay, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    A report presents a concept for an instrument to be flown in outer space, where it would detect dust particles - especially those associated with comets. The instrument would include a flat plate that would intercept the dust particles. The anticipated spacecraft/dust-particle relative speeds are so high that the impingement of a dust particle on the plate would generate a plasma cloud. Simple electric dipole sensors located equidistantly along the circumference of the plate would detect the dust particle indirectly by detecting the plasma cloud. The location of the dust hit could be estimated from the timing of the detection pulses of the different dipoles. The mass and composition of the dust particle could be estimated from the shapes and durations of the pulses from the dipoles. In comparison with other instruments for detecting hypervelocity dust particles, the proposed instrument offers advantages of robustness, large collection area, and simplicity.

  15. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Rotationally induced bursting of interplanetary dust particles by a windmill effect stemming from solar radiation pressure, and eventual elimination of the particles from the solar system, is discussed. A life span on the order of 100,000 years for stony meteoritic material or tektite glass with radii of about 1 cm is arrived at for this process. A life span of a million years is computed for particles containing Fe, Ni, or Al with spin damping effects taken into cognizance. This depletion mechanism operates at a rate two orders of magnitude greater than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect in the case of nonmetallic particles and one order of magnitude greater in the case of metallic particles.

  16. Stochastic Acceleration of Dust Particles in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Marmolino, C.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-10-15

    Stochastic heating of dust particles resulting from dust charge fluctuations is considered in the conditions of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) in tokamak plasmas. It is shown that kinetic energies corresponding to velocities of {approx_equal}Km/s can be reached in times of order {approx_equal}1 ms by micron-size dust particles interacting with a background of stochastically heated nano-size dust particles.

  17. Kent in space: Cosmic dust to space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. A. M.

    1994-10-01

    The dusty heritage of the University of Kent's Space Group commenced at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire, U.K., the home of the largest steerable radio telescope. While Professor Bernard Lovell's 250 ft. diameter telescope was used to command the U.S. deep space Pioneer spacecraft, Professor Tony McDonnell, as a research student in 1960, was developing a space dust detector for the US-UK Ariel program. It was successful. With a Ph.D. safely under the belt, it seemed an inevitable step to go for the next higher degree, a B.T.A.] Two years with NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, provided excellent qualifications for such a graduation ('Been to America'). A spirited return to the University of Kent at Canterbury followed, to one of the green field UK University sites springing from the Robbins Report on Higher Education. Swimming against the current of the brain drain, and taking a very considerable reduction in salary, it was with some disappointment that he found that the UK Premier Harold Wilson's 'white-hot technological revolution' never quite seemed to materialize in terms of research funding] Research expertise, centered initially on cosmic dust, enlarged to encompass planetology during the Apollo program, and rightly acquired international acclaim, notching up a history of space missions over 25 years. The group now comprises 38 people supported by four sources: the government's Research Councils, the University, the Space Agencies and Industry. This paper describes the thrust of the group's Research Plan in Space Science and Planetology; not so much based on existing international space missions, but more helping to shape the direction and selection of space missions ahead.

  18. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  19. Helium-3 from the mantle - Primordial signal or cosmic dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    Helium-3 in hotspot magmas has been used as unambiguous evidence for the existence of a primordial, undegassed reservoir deep in the Earth's mantle. However, a large amount of helium-3 is delivered to the Earth's surface by interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Recycling of deep-sea sediments containing these particles to the mantle, and eventual incorporation in magma, can explain the high helium-3/helium-4 ratios of hotspot magmas. Basalts with high helium-3/helium-4 ratios may represent degassing of helium introduced by ancient (probably 1.5 to 2.0 billion years old) pelagic sediments rather than degassing of primordial lower mantle material brought to the surface in plumes. Influx of IDPs can also explain the neon and siderophile compositions of mantle samples.

  20. Cosmic rays and the birth of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Twenty years after the discovery of cosmic rays, the methods of research and resulting discoveries were dramatically changed by the introduction of experimental methods that made visible the passage of individual particles. Between 1932 and 1955, tracks of cosmic rays were found in cloud chambers and special photographic emulsions. From measurements of the ionization produced along these tracks, the mass, charge and energy of a single relativistic particle could be determined. The dynamics of decays and collisions could be analyzed. Positrons and then electron-positron pairs were discovered, followed by muons and pions and then the inhabitants of the 'particle zoo'. Fundamental concepts were challenged. From the mid- 1950s, larger accelerators began to produce many of the 'new' particles, displacing cosmic rays from their prime role in particle studies. But without the initial discoveries in cosmic rays, there might well not be the modern industrial-scale particle physics research.

  1. Nitrogen Isotopic Anomalies in a Hydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. B.; Dai, Z. R.; Weber, P. K.; Graham, G. A.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Bajt, S.; Ishii, H.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are the fine-grained end member (5 - 50 microns in size) of the meteoritic material available for investigation in the laboratory. IDPs are derived from either cometary or asteroidal sources. Some IDPs contain cosmically primitive materials with isotopic signatures reflecting presolar origins. Recent detailed studies using the NanoSIMS have shown there is a wide variation of isotopic signatures within individual IDPs; grains with a presolar signature have been observed surrounded by material with a solar isotopic composition. The majority of IDPs studied have been anhydrous. We report here results from integrated NanoSIMS/FIB/TEM/Synchrotron IR studies of a hydrous IDP, focused on understanding the correlations between the isotopic, mineralogical and chemical compositions of IDPs.

  2. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  3. Carbon in Comet Halley dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.

    1994-01-01

    Comets are small bodies of the solar system containing primarily a mixture of frozen gases and carbonaceous and mineral grains. They are likely to preserve volatile mineral from cold regions of the protosolar nebula and remnants of interstellar dust and gas. More than 2500 mass spectra of cometary grains with masses in the range 5 x 10 exp -17 to 5 x 10 exp -12 g were measured in situ by PUMA1 and PUMA2 mass spectrometers on board the VEGA spacecraft during flyby missions to Comet Halley. In this paper, we discuss different organic and inorganic C-containing components discovered so far in Comet Halley dust particles, the nature and abundance of which provide information about possible astrophysical sources of C and constrain models of interstellar grains.

  4. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  5. Purity and cleanness of aerogel as a cosmic dust capture medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Fleming, R. H.; Lindley, P. M.; Craig, A. Y.; Blake, D.

    1994-01-01

    The capability for capturing micrometeoroids intact through laboratory simulations and in space in passive underdense silica aerogel offers a valuable tool for cosmic dust research. The integrity of the sample handling medium can substantially modify the integrity of the sample. Intact capture is a violent hypervelocity event: the integrity of the capturing medium can cause even greater modification of the sample. Doubts of the suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium were raised at the 20th LPSC, and questions were raised again at the recent workshop on Particle Capture, Recovery, and Velocity Trajectory Measurement Technologies. Assessment of aerogel's volatile components and carbon contents have been made. We report the results of laboratory measurements of the purity and cleanliness of silica aerogel used for several Sample Return Experiments flown on the Get Away Special program.

  6. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  7. Early developments: Particle physics aspects of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays is the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. In subsequent cloud chamber investigations Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Measurements with nuclear emulsions by Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. The cloud chamber continued to be a powerful instrument in cosmic ray studies. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be shortlived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Also Λ's, Σ's, and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays. But after that accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A. Cosmic ray neutrino results were best explained by the assumption of neutrino oscillations opening a view beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of accelerators.

  8. Selective detector of cosmic particles based on diamond sensitive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altukhov, A. A.; Zaharchenko, K. V.; Kolyubin, V. A.; Lvov, S. A.; Nedosekin, P. G.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ibragimov, R. F.; Kadilin, V. V.; Nikolaev, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    The article describes the device for selective registration of electrons, protons and heavy ions fluxes from the solar and galactic cosmic rays in the twelve energy ranges, built on a base of diamond detector. The use of the diamond detectors allowed for the creation a device for registration of cosmic particles fluxes at the external spacecraft surface with the resource not less than 20 years. Selective detector is aimed for continuous monitoring of radiation situation on board the spacecrafts, in order to predict the residual life of their work and prompt measures to actively protect the spacecraft when the flow of cosmic particles is sharply increased.

  9. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  10. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  11. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Mark S; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release. PMID:27582221

  12. Repulsive and Attractive Forces on Dust Particles in a Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    The ordered structure of dust particles and forces acting on negatively charged dust particles in a cluster placed in a plasma produced between two electrodes in a microgravity condition is analyzed. Study of the dynamics of a collection of dust particles placed initially at the center of the plasma reveals the expansion of the cluster together with the formation of a certain ordered structure in the presence of collisions with plasma particles. The dynamic expansion of the cluster is a result of the Coulomb repulsion between negatively charged dust particles, while the ordered structure at a later time is a manifestation of the attractive force between a pair of dust particles. An electrostatic force between dust particles in a complex plasma is studied in a context of thermodynamic free energy stored in the dust cluster in the plasma where the overall charge neutrality is conserved. The excessive energy in the system is calculated. An attractive force between a pair of dust particles results from a release of the thermodynamic free energy in charged dust particles.

  13. Cometary dust particles fragmentation as observed with Rosetta COSIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Hornung, Klaus; Merouane, Sihane

    2016-07-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser - COSIMA - instrument on board ESA's Rosetta mission has collected dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Particles and particle agglomerates have been imaged and analyzed in the inner coma at distances between 400 km and 10 km off the cometary nucleus and between 1.3 to 3.4 AU from the Sun. The particles are collected at low impact velocities and constitute a sample of the cometary dust particles in the inner coma. On impact, most dust particles fragment and larger particles tend to stick, spread out or consist of single or a group of clumps, and the flocculent morphology of the fragmented particles is revealed. We discuss the observed particle size distributions and morphologies after collection and their impact on dust particle agglomeration models in the early solar system.

  14. The concept of a facility for cosmic dust research on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Juergen; Cabane, Michel; Fonda, Mark; Giovane, Frank; Gustafson, Bo A. S.; Keller, Horst U.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.; Levasseur-Regourd, Any-Chantal; Worms, Jean-Claude; Nuth, Joseph A.; Rogers, Fred

    1996-01-01

    A proposal for the development of a permanently operating facility for the experimental investigation of cosmic dust-related phenomena onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is presented. Potential applications for this facility are the convection-free nucleation of dust grains, studies of coagulation and aggregation phenomena in a microgravity environment, investigations of heat transport through, and dust emissions from, high-porosity cometary analogs, and experiments on the interaction of very fluffy dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and with low pressure gas flows. Possible extensions of such a facility are towards aerosol science and colloidal plasma research.

  15. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  16. Effect of dust particle polarization on scattering processes in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kodanova, S. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.

    2015-06-15

    Screened interaction potentials in dusty plasmas taking into account the polarization of dust particles have been obtained. On the basis of screened potentials scattering processes for ion-dust particle and dust particle-dust particle pairs have been studied. In particular, the scattering cross section is considered. The scattering processes for which the dust grain polarization is unimportant have been found. The effect of zero angle dust particle-dust particle scattering is predicted.

  17. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A {sub O} = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f{sub H{sub 2}} can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A {sub O}-D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A {sub O} is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H{sub 2} and stellar masses and higher f{sub H{sub 2}}. Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z.

  18. Ordering of dust particles in dusty plasmas under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Totsuji, Hiroo; Totsuji, Chieko; Ogawa, Takafumi; Tsuruta, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    Structure formation of dust particles in dusty plasmas under microgravity has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, at low temperatures, dust particles are organized into layered spherical shells. The number of shells is a function of the system size and the strength of screening by ambient plasma particles, while the dependency on the latter is much weaker. In the simulation, the condition of the charge neutrality satisfied by the system of dust particles and plasma particles is properly taken into account.

  19. Stardust Abundance Variations among Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar grain abundances reflect the degree of processing primitive materials have experienced. This is evidenced by the wide range of silicate stardust abundances among primitive meteorites (10 to 300 ppm) [1], attributable to parent body hydrothermal processing. Stardust abundance variations are also pronounced in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs), that have not experienced parent body processing (300 to > 10,000 ppm) [2-4]. The large range in stardust abundances among CP IDPs thus reflect nebular processing. Here we present results of a systematic search for stardust among cluster CP IDPs. Our goals are to establish mineralogical trends among IDPs with different stardust abundances. This may shed light into the nature of isotopically normal presolar grains (GEMS grains?; 5) if their abundances vary similarly to that of isotopically exotic stardust grains.

  20. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  1. Dust Particle Growth in a Sputtering Discharge with Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Tawidian, H.; Mikikian, M.; Lecas, T.; Boufendi, L.

    2011-11-29

    Dust particles are grown in the PKE chamber by sputtering materials. The sputtering efficiency and the gas phase reactions can be affected by the gas type and particularly by the ion mass. Due to the presence of growing dust particles, the huge loss of electrons can trigger many instabilities in the plasma. These instabilities, the growth kinetics and the structure of the dust cloud, are compared by using two different gases: argon and krypton.

  2. Determination of Plasma Sheath and Dust Parameters from Dust Particle Oscillation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Smith, Bernard; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Hyde, Truell

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental parameters of a complex dusty plasma system, including particle charge and dust Debye length, can be determined from the thermally excited oscillation modes of an arbitrary number of dust particles (either a dust cluster or plasma crystal) confined on a 2D plane within the plasma sheath produced above the lower electrode of a GEC reference cell [Ref. 1-2]. This paper will discuss an experimental technique allowing the strength of the confining potential well on the horizontal direction to be determined in the same manner. This technique will be further applied to systems of dust grains comprised of both melamine formaldehyde and ferromagnetic monodisperse particles.

  3. Reduction and analysis of data from cosmic dust experiments on Mariner 4, OGO 3, and Lunar Explorer 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The analysis of data from the cosmic dust experiment on three NASA missions is discussed. These missions were Mariner IV, OGO III, and Lunar Explorer 35. The analysis effort has included some work in the laboratory of the physics of microparticle hypervelocity impact. This laboratory effort was initially aimed at the calibration and measurements of the different sensors being used in the experiment. The latter effort was conducted in order to better understand the velocity and mass distributions of the picogram sized ejecta particles.

  4. Research in particles and fields. [cosmic rays, gamma rays, and cosmic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Buffington, A.; Davis, L., Jr.; Prince, T. A.; Vogt, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are reviewed. Energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons were used to carry out the investigations. Specific instruments mentioned are: the high energy isotope spectrometer telescope, the electron/isotope spectrometer, the heavy isotope spectrometer telescope, and magnetometers. Solar flares, planetary magnetospheres, element abundance, the isotopic composition of low energy cosmic rays, and heavy nuclei are among the topics receiving research attention.

  5. Metamorphism of Cosmic Dust: Processing from Circumstellar Outflows to the Cometary Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    Nucleation is a non-equilibrium process: the products of this process are seldom the most thermodynamically stable condensates but are instead those which form fastest. It should therefore not be surprising that grains formed in a circumstellar outflow will undergo some degree of metamorphism if they are annealed or are exposed to a chemically active reagent. Metamorphism of refractory particles continues in the interstellar medium (ISM) where the driving forces are sputtering by cosmic ray particles, annealing by high energy photons and grain destruction in supernova generated shocks. Studies of the depletion of the elements from the gas phase of the interstellar medium tell us that if grain destruction occurs with high efficiency in the ISM, then there must be some mechanism by which grains can be formed in the ISM. Various workers have shown that refractory mantles could form on refractory cores by radiation processing of organic ices. A similar process may operate to produce refractory inorganic mantles on grain cores which survived the supernova shocks. Most grains in a cloud which collapses to form a star will be destroyed; many of the surviving grains will be severely processed. Grains in the outermost regions of the nebula may survive relatively unchanged by thermal processing or hydration. It is these grains which we hope to find in comets. However, only those grains encased in ice at low temperature can be considered pristine since a considerable degree of hydrous alteration might occur in a cometary regolith if the comet enters the inner solar system. Some discussion of the physical, chemical and isotopic properties of a refractory grain at each stage of its life cycle will be attempted based on the limited laboratory data available to date. Suggestions will be made concerning the types of experimental data which are needed in order to better understand the processing history of cosmic dust.

  6. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  7. Effects of dust enrichment on oxygen fugacity of cosmic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, Alexei V.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    The degree to which dust enrichment enhances the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a system otherwise solar in composition depends on the dust composition. Equilibrium calculations were performed at 10-3 bar in systems enriched by a factor of 104 in two fundamentally different types of dust to investigate the iron oxidation state in both cases. One type of dust, called SC for solar condensate, stopped equilibrating with solar gas at too high a temperature for FeO or condensed water to be stabilized in any form, and thus has the composition expected of a nebular condensate. The other has CI chondrite composition, appropriate for a parent body that accreted from SC dust and low-temperature ice. Upon total vaporization at 2300 K, both systems have high fO2, >IW. In the SC dust-enriched system, FeO of the bulk silicate reaches ~10 wt% at 1970 K but decreases to <1 wt% below 1500 K. The FeO undergoes reduction because consumption of gaseous oxygen by silicate recondensation causes a precipitous drop in fO2. Thus, enrichment in dust having the composition of likely nebular condensates cannot yield a sufficiently oxidizing environment to account for the FeO contents of chondrules. The fO2 of the system enriched in water-rich, CI dust, however, remains high throughout condensation, as gaseous water remains uncondensed until very low temperatures. This allows silicate condensates to achieve and maintain FeO contents of 27-35 wt%. Water-rich parent bodies are thus excellent candidate sources of chondrule precursors. Impacts on such bodies may have created the combination of high dust enrichment, total pressure, and fO2 necessary for chondrule formation.

  8. Investigation of Drag and Heat Transfer for Martian Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Takayanagi, H.; Fujita, K.

    2011-05-01

    A Mars non-stop dust sample return project has been going on in a Mars exploration mission at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. In the project, sampling of Martian dust particles is planned between 35 and 45 km, and thus, the survivability of micron-size particles during traveling through a hot-temperature shock is crucial. In this work, the dust particle heating was investigated from macroscopic and microscopic viewpoints. Drag and heat transfer coefficients calculated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method were found to agree well with Koshmarov and Svirshevskii and free-molecule models at both altitudes, and particle heating estimations calculated by these models were validated.

  9. Estimating the Global Cosmic Dust Input from Lidar Observations of the Vertical Fluxes of Mesospheric Na and Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Marsh, D. R.; Plane, J. M.; Liu, A. Z.; Chu, X.; Huang, W.; Vargas, F.

    2013-12-01

    Current estimates of the global influx of cosmic dust are highly uncertain. Most approaches involve making a variety of assumptions based upon an incomplete understanding or knowledge of the crucial ablation, atmospheric transport and surface deposition processes. Cosmic dust is the source of the metal layers in the mesopause region. Once the metal atoms are ablated from the dust particles, they are transported downward below the mesopause, where they are eventually converted to stable compounds. These compounds either form or condense on meteoric smoke particles that settle into the lower atmosphere and are eventually deposited on the Earth's surface. The production of the metal atoms by ablation, mostly above 90 km, is balanced by their downward transport and complete removal near 80 km by chemical processes. The abundances of the mesospheric metals are directly related to their influx (atoms/cm2/s) and their lifetime, which is a function of the speed of downward transport to their chemical sinks. Consequently, the cosmic influxes of atomic Na and Fe should be equal to their vertical fluxes in the region below their nominal ablation altitudes and above their chemical sinks. The vertical gravity wave fluxes of Na and temperature have been measured between 85 and 100 km with Doppler lidars at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, Haleakala, Maui, Table Mountain, CO and Cerro Pachon, Chile. In addition Fe fluxes have also been measured at Table Mountain, CO. We use these observations to estimate the global influx of these species and of the total ablated mass. We discuss the limitations of extrapolating point measurements to obtain the global influx and describe how current global circulation models such as WACCM can help reduce the uncertainties.

  10. Atmospheric cosmic rays and solar energetic particles at aircraft altitudes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Friedberg, W; Sauer, H H; Smart, D F

    1996-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays, which are thought to be produced and accelerated by a variety of mechanisms in the Milky Way galaxy, interact with the solar wind, the earth's magnetic field, and its atmosphere to produce hadron, lepton, and photon fields at aircraft altitudes that are quite unlike anything produced in the laboratory. The energy spectra of these secondary particles extend from the lowest possible energy to energies over an EeV. In addition to cosmic rays, energetic particles, generated on the sun by solar flares or coronal mass ejections, bombard the earth from time to time. These particles, while less energetic than cosmic rays, also produce radiation fields at aircraft altitudes which have qualitatively the same properties as cosmic rays. The authors have calculated atmospheric cosmic-ray angular fluxes, spectra, scalar fluxes, and ionization, and compared them with experimental data. Agreement with these data is seen to be good. These data have been used to calculate equivalent doses in a simplified human phantom at aircraft altitudes and the estimated health risks to aircraft crews. The authors have also calculated the radiation doses from several large solar energetic particle events (known as GLEs, or Ground Level Events), which took place in 1989, including the very large event known as GLE 42, which took place on September 29th and 30th of that year. The spectra incident on the atmosphere were determined assuming diffusive shock theory. Unfortunately, there are essentially no experimental data with which to compare these calculations.

  11. Validation of Cosmic Ray Ionization Model CORIMIA applied for solar energetic particles and Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenovski, S.; Velinov, P.; Mateev, L.

    2016-02-01

    Based on the electromagnetic interaction between the cosmic ray (CR) and the atmospheric neutral constituents, CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model) gives an estimation of the dynamical ionization condition of the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere (about 30-120 km). Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), modified by solar wind and later by geomagnetic and atmospheric cut offs, produce ionization in the entire atmosphere. In this paper we show the GCR ionization in periods of solar minimum and maximum. Despite the considerably lower energies than GCR, Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACR) contribute to the ionization state mostly over the polar regions and as we present here this contribution is comparable with those of GCR. Solar energetic particles (SEP), which differ vastly from one another for different solar events, can be responsible for significant ionization over the high latitude regions. Here we compare flows of SEP caused by two of the most powerful solar proton events at February 23, 1956 and January 20, 2005.

  12. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  13. The Distortion of the Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum Due to Intergalactic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imara, Nia; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Infrared emission from intergalactic dust might compromise the ability of future experiments to detect subtle spectral distortions in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the early universe. We provide the first estimate of foreground contamination of the CMB signal due to diffuse dust emission in the intergalactic medium. We use models of the extragalactic background light to calculate the intensity of intergalactic dust emission and find that emission by intergalactic dust at z ≲ 0.5 exceeds the sensitivity of the planned Primordial Inflation Explorer to CMB spectral distortions by 1-3 orders of magnitude. In the frequency range ν = 150-2400 GHz, we place an upper limit of 0.06% on the contribution to the far-infrared background from intergalactic dust emission.

  14. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  15. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  16. Astroelectrochemistry: the role of redox reactions in cosmic dust chemistry.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Daren J; Holt, Katherine B

    2010-04-01

    We propose that redox reactions on the surface of interstellar dust grains contribute to the synthesis of some polyatomic species that have been identified by spectroscopic signatures. Most of the dust is found in clouds along with a rich abundance of molecular and atomic species, creating a thermodynamically distinct region in the interstellar medium (ISM) where chemistry can be supported. Using knowledge of redox process at the solid/liquid interface, a hypothesis is presented for processing mechanisms involving electron transfer between surface adsorbed species and the solid dust grains found in the ISM. The hypothesis is based on the interaction of dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and plumes of ionised gas, which electrostatically charge dust grains leading to an adjustment of the Fermi energy of electrons on the surface of individual grains. This process is equivalent to applying an external electrochemical potential to an electrode, to drive redox chemistry on an electrode surface in electrolysis or dynamic electrochemistry. Here the individual grains act as 'single electrode' electrochemical reactors in the gas phase. In this paper we highlight a gap in understanding of redox reactions at the solid/gas interface, which is potentially a very fruitful and interesting area of research. PMID:20237693

  17. Astroelectrochemistry: the role of redox reactions in cosmic dust chemistry.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Daren J; Holt, Katherine B

    2010-04-01

    We propose that redox reactions on the surface of interstellar dust grains contribute to the synthesis of some polyatomic species that have been identified by spectroscopic signatures. Most of the dust is found in clouds along with a rich abundance of molecular and atomic species, creating a thermodynamically distinct region in the interstellar medium (ISM) where chemistry can be supported. Using knowledge of redox process at the solid/liquid interface, a hypothesis is presented for processing mechanisms involving electron transfer between surface adsorbed species and the solid dust grains found in the ISM. The hypothesis is based on the interaction of dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and plumes of ionised gas, which electrostatically charge dust grains leading to an adjustment of the Fermi energy of electrons on the surface of individual grains. This process is equivalent to applying an external electrochemical potential to an electrode, to drive redox chemistry on an electrode surface in electrolysis or dynamic electrochemistry. Here the individual grains act as 'single electrode' electrochemical reactors in the gas phase. In this paper we highlight a gap in understanding of redox reactions at the solid/gas interface, which is potentially a very fruitful and interesting area of research.

  18. Carbon dust particles in a beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, O. A.; Vizgalov, V.; Shalpegin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on dynamics of micro-sized carbon dust grains in beam-plasma discharge (BPD) plasmas. It was demonstrated that injected dust particles can be captured and transported along the discharge. Longitudinal average velocity of the particles in the central area of the plasma column was 17 m/sec, and 2 m/sec in the periphery. Dust injection caused a decrease of emission intensity of metastable nitrogen molecular ion. This effect is suggested for a spectroscopy method for particles’ potential measurements. Five-micron radius carbon dust grains obtained potential above 500 V in the experiments on PR-2 installation, proving the feasibility of BPDs for the charging of fine dust particles up to high potential values, unattainable in similar plasma conditions.

  19. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Nabiyev, Sh.

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index-orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  20. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  1. Cosmic reionization on computers. Ultraviolet continuum slopes and dust opacities in high redshift galaxies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khakhaleva-Li, Zimu; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-03-30

    In this study, we compare the properties of stellar populations of model galaxies from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project with the exiting UV and IR data. Since CROC simulations do not follow cosmic dust directly, we adopt two variants of the dust-follows-metals ansatz to populate model galaxies with dust. Using the dust radiative transfer code Hyperion, we compute synthetic stellar spectra, UV continuum slopes, and IR fluxes for simulated galaxies. We find that the simulation results generally match observational measurements, but, perhaps, not in full detail. The differences seem to indicate that our adopted dust-follows-metals ansatzes are notmore » fully sufficient. While the discrepancies with the exiting data are marginal, the future JWST data will be of much higher precision, rendering highly significant any tentative difference between theory and observations. It is, therefore, likely, that in order to fully utilize the precision of JWST observations, fully dynamical modeling of dust formation, evolution, and destruction may be required.« less

  2. Nanoflow Separation of Amino Acids for the Analysis of Cosmic Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids to the early Earth by interplanetary dust particles, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have been a significant source of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory. Amino acids are central to modern terrestrial biochemistry as major components of proteins and enzymes and were probably vital in the origin of life. A variety of amino acids have been detected in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison, many of which are exceptionally rare in the terrestrial biosphere including a-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline. AIB has also been detected in a small percentage of Antarctic micrometeorite grains believed to be related to the CM meteorites We report on progress in optimizing a nanoflow liquid chromatography separation system with dual detection via laser-induced-fluorescence time of flight mass spectrometry (nLC-LIF/ToF-MS) for the analysis of o-phthaldialdehydelN-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) labeled amino acids in cosmic dust grains. The very low flow rates (<3 micro-L/min) of nLC over analytical LC (>0.1 ml/min) combined with <2 micron column bead sizes has the potential to produce efficient analyte ionizations andchromatograms with very sharp peaks; both increase sensitivity. The combination of the selectivity (only primary amines are derivatized), sensitivity (>4 orders of magnitude lower than traditional GC-MS techniques), and specificity (compounds identities are determined by both retention time and exact mass) makes this a compelling technique. However, the development of an analytical method to achieve separation of compounds as structurally similar as amino acid monomers and produce the sharp peaks required for maximum sensitivity is challenging.

  3. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  4. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  5. Nano-Diamonds in Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Joswiak, D. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Hill, H. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ acid etching of ultramicrotomed thin sections has lead to the identification of nano-diamonds in interplanetary dust particles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, Jochen Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  7. Neutral Hydrogen Structures Trace Dust Polarization Angle: Implications for Cosmic Microwave Background Foregrounds.

    PubMed

    Clark, S E; Hill, J Colin; Peek, J E G; Putman, M E; Babler, B L

    2015-12-11

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-Hi) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise dominated, the Hi data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either Hi-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The Hi data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. PMID:26705622

  8. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  9. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  10. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  11. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  12. Polyvinylidene fluoride dust detector response to particle impacts.

    PubMed

    James, D; Hoxie, V; Horanyi, M

    2010-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors have flown on many space missions since their first use on the Vega 1 and 2 spacecraft. The fundamental operating principle of these detectors is the production of a charge upon impact by a hypervelocity dust particle. This measured signal, N, depends on the speed, v, and mass, m, of the particle. The relationship between N, v, and m was first empirically derived by Simpson and Tuzzolino. All of the PVDF dust instruments prior to the Student Dust Counter on the New Horizons mission use their formula for the calibration of the detectors. This paper provides additional dust impact calibration data, proposes a modification in the exponents for m and v, and investigates the relationship between detector temperature and detector signal.

  13. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Sriama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA's Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, "mud-like" dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars [1-4]. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet's surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (less than 1 micrometer to 50 micrometers) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time [5]. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  14. Modeling light scattering by mineral dust particles using spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Nousiainen, Timo

    Suspended dust particles have a considerable influence on light scattering in both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and can therefore have a large effect on the interpretation of remote sensing measurements. Assuming dust particles to be spherical is known to produce inaccurate results when modeling optical properties of real mineral dust particles. Yet this approximation is widely used for its simplicity. Here, we simulate light scattering by mineral dust particles using a distribution of model spheroids. This is done by comparing scattering matrices calculated from a dust optical database of Dubovik et al. [2006] with those measured in the laboratory by Volten et al. [2001]. Wavelengths of 441,6 nm and 632,8 nm and refractive indexes of Re = 1.55 -1.7 and Im = 0.001i -0.01i were adopted in this study. Overall, spheroids are found to fit the measurements significantly better than Mie spheres. Further, we confirm that the shape distribution parametrization developed in Nousiainen et al. (2006) significantly improves the accuracy of simulated single-scattering for small mineral dust particles. The spheroid scheme should therefore yield more reliable interpretations of remote sensing data from dusty planetary atmospheres. While the spheroidal scheme is superior to spheres in remote sensing applications, its performance is far from perfect especially for samples with large particles. Thus, additional advances are clearly possible. Further studies of the Martian atmosphere are currently under way. Dubovik et al. (2006) Application of spheroid models to account for aerosol particle nonspheric-ity in remote sensing of desert dust, JGR, Vol. 111, D11208 Volten et al. (2001) Scattering matrices of mineral aerosol particles at 441.6 nm and 632.8 nm, JGR, Vol. 106, No. D15, pp. 17375-17401 Nousiainen et al. (2006) Light scattering modeling of small feldspar aerosol particles using polyhedral prisms and spheroids, JQSRT 101, pp. 471-487

  15. Volatile Acquisition During Early Terrestrial Accretion — Constraints from Implanted Solar Neon in Cosmic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Gail, H.-P.; Hopp, J.; Ott, U.; Trieloff, M.

    2016-08-01

    Implanted Ne-B in particles with large surface/volume ratio has to be considered as source for terrestrial noble gases. Significant contributions of irradiated dust during Earth's accretion possibly explain the solar Ne signature of Earth's mantle.

  16. The LS-CODAG experiment for light scattering measurements by dust particles and their aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Cabane, M.; Chassefière, E.; Haudebourg, V.; Worms, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Light scattering measurements are needed to provide links between the currently available observations of scattering by dust in the solar system, and the still unknown properties of the clouds of dust particles and aggregates. The fragility, the fluffiness, and the size of the aggregates make it almos impossible to obtain realistic measurements through computational models or classical laboratory measurements. In order to measure the scattering by dust particles and their aggregates, we have conceived the Light Scattering (LS) experiment for the COsmic Dust AGgregation (CODAG) module. This small and compact instrument has been developed to operate under microgravity conditions, jointly with the CODAG Sounding Rocket experiment (Blum et al., 1998), during ESA rocket flights. The purpose of the experiment is to determine accurately the intensity and the polarization phase functions of the particles that are dispersed in a low pressure chamber, and to document the temporal evolution of their scattering properties, while an aggregation process representative of the solar system formation is starting and spreading out. The instrumental principle relies on simultaneous measurements, performed on a large number of phase angles, from back to forward scattering, of the two polarized components of the scattered intensity.

  17. Temperature Spectra of Interstellar Dust Grains Heated by Cosmic Rays. I. Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-06-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating, f T , s-1, determines how often a certain temperature T CR, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with a comprehensive and updated data set on CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of f T and T CR spectra for bare olivine grains with radius a of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μm and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1a and 0.3a. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with A V = 2 mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the srim program. We report full T CR spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. We also provide frequencies for a range of minimum T CR values. The calculated data set can be simply and flexibly implemented in astrochemical models. The results show that, in the case of translucent clouds, the currently adopted rate for heating of whole grains to temperatures in excess of 70 K is underestimated by approximately two orders of magnitude in astrochemical numerical simulations. Additionally, grains are heated by CRs to modest temperatures (20-30 K) with intervals of a few years, which reduces the possibility of ice chemical explosions.

  18. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  19. Interstellar dust particles and chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelowski, Jacek

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain known molecular bands: of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH+, NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) commonly believed to be carried by some complex, carbon bearing molecules (chain species based on a carbon scheleton, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes). DIBs are optical features observed in absorption in starlight crossing tarnslucent interstellar clouds. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. This is unfortunate, as an identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles, discovered by Sarre et al. (1995) and Kerr et al. (1998), indicate that DIBs are likely molecular features of gas phase species. Sofar only three DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond a doubt. Extinction is likely caused by interstellar dust particles of various sizes and shapes. The recent surveys of the extinction law demonstrate a great variety of the observed curves which proves that grains differ from cloud to cloud. A majority of distant OB stars is observed through several clouds and thus we observe usually an ill-defined average which does not differ substantially from one distant object to another. The most popularly observed CH molecule does correlate with the extinction but it is a poor correlation. The abundance of CN molecule is completely uncorrelated with the colour excess. Seemingly an exceptionally high abundance of CN is observed together with high far-UV extinction and very low intensity of diffuse interstellar bands. Interstellar molecules can be formed either in the gas phase or on grain surfaces. Small grains, responsible for the far

  20. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  1. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  2. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-10-15

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} or higher, and low temperature {approx}1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  4. Measuring the Dust Flux and Dust Particle Mass Distribution in the Saturn Rings with HRD Dust Instrument on the Cassini Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    In July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft will go into the Saturn orbit and start a 4 year intensive investigation of the planet itself, its multiple satellites and its rings with a multinational instrument payload. The High Rate Detectors (HRD) instrument provided by the Laboratory of Astrophysics and Space Research of the University of is part of the German Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and its main scientific objective is to provide quantitative measurements and mass distributions of dust particles in the rings of Saturn in the 10-11 to 10-4 grams mass range. The HRD instrument consists of two dust detectors -- a 20 and a 200 cm2 polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors -- and an electronic box that contains all the analog and digital electronics and in addition provides interface between the HRD and CDA instrument. The CDA stores all the HRD data in its memory and transmits the data to Earth. The HRD weighs 1.7 kg and consumes 1.8 W of power [1]. The HRD instrument was fully calibrated through the entire mass range using two dust particle accelerators at Heidelberg and Munich in Germany. The HRD electronics is very fast and it will provide spatial and time distributions of up to 0.1 second. It can handle rates up to 104 counts/sec expected to be encountered during the Saturn ring crossings without any dead time. The HRD instrument operated successfully during all of the time that it was under power and detected many interplanetary dust particles. Almost all of these particles were close to the lowest mass threshold. References 1 A.J. TUZZOLINO, T.E. ECONOMOU, R.B. MCKIBBEN, J.A. SIMPSON, J.A.M. MCDONNELL, M.J. BURCHELL, B.A.M. VAUGHAN, P. TSOU, M.S. HANNER, B.C. CLARK AND D.E. BROWNLEE. THE DUST FLUX MONITOR INSTRUMENT FOR THE STARDUST MISSION TO COMET WILD-2, J. GEOPHYS. RES., 108, DOI:10.1029/2003JE002091, 2003.

  5. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  6. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than ‑ 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  7. Capture of cosmic dusts and exposure of organics on the International Space Station: Objectives of the Tanpopo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei

    Finding of a wide variety of organic compounds contained in extraterrestrial bodies such as carbonaceous chondrites and comets suggested that they were important materials for the first life on the Earth. Cosmic dusts (interplanetary dust particles; IDPs) were believed to have been important carriers of extraterrestrial organics, since IDPs could deliver organics to the primitive Earth more safely than asteroids and comets. Since most IDPs have been collected in such terrestrial environments as ocean sediments, Antarctic ices, and air in stratosphere, it is difficult to judge whether biooranics found in IDPs were extraterrestrial origins or not. Thus it would be of importance to collect IDPs out of the terrestrial biosphere. We are planning the Tanpopo Mission by utilizing the Exposed Facility of Japan Experimental Module (JEM/EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Two types of experiments will be done in the Tanpopo Mission: Capture experiments and exposure experiments. In order to collect cosmic dusts (including IDPs) on the ISS, we are going to use extra-low density aerogel, since both cosmic dusts and ISS are moving at 8 km s-1 or over. We have developed novel aerogel whose density is 0.01 g cm-3. After the return of the aerogel blocks after 1 to a few years’ stay on JEM/EF, organic compounds in the captured dusts will be characterized by a wide variety of analytical techniques including FT-IR, XANES, and MS. Amino acid enantiomers will be determined after HF digestion and acid hydrolysis. A number of amino acids were detected in water extract of carbonaceous chondrites. It is controversial whether meteorites contain free amino acids or amino acid precursors. When dusts are formed from meteorites or comets in interplanetary space, they are exposed to high-energy particles and photons. In order to evaluate stability and possible alteration of amino acid-related compounds, we chose amino acids (glycine and isovaline) and hydantoins (precursors of amino

  8. Time-Correlated Particles Produced by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, George F.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Nakae, Les F.; Pawelczak, Iwona; Snyderman, Neal J.; Sheets, Steven A.; Wurtz, Ron E.

    2015-05-06

    This report describes the NA-22 supported cosmic ray experimental and analysis activities carried out at LLNL since the last report, dated October 1, 2013. In particular we report on an analysis of the origin of the plastic scintillator signals resembling the signals produced by minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). Our most notable result is that when measured in coincidence with a liquid scintillator neutron signal the MIP-like signals in the plastic scintillators are mainly due to high energy tertiary neutrons.

  9. Dust in Cometary Comae: Present Understanding of the Structure and Composition of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Zolensky, M.; Lasue, J.

    2007-01-01

    In situ probing of a very few cometary comae has shown that dust particles present a low albedo and a low density, and that they consist of both rocky material and refractory organics. Remote observations of solar light scattered by cometary dust provide information on the properties of dust particles in the coma of a larger set of comets. The observations of the linear polarization in the coma indicate that the dust particles are irregular, with a size greater (on the average) than about one micron. Besides, they suggest, through numerical and experimental simulations, that both compact grains and fluffy aggregates (with a power law of the size distribution in the -2.6 to -3 range), and both rather transparent silicates and absorbing organics are present in the coma. Recent analysis of the cometary dust samples collected by the Stardust mission provide a unique ground truth and confirm, for comet 81P/Wild 2, the results from remote sensing observations. Future space missions to comets should, in the next decade, lead to a more precise characterization of the structure and composition of cometary dust particles.

  10. The Intricate Role of Cold Gas and Dust in Galaxy Evolution at Early Cosmic Epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Dominik Alexander; Capak, Peter; Carilli, Christopher; Walter, Fabian

    2015-08-01

    Cold molecular and atomic gas plays a central role in our understanding of early galaxy formation and evolution. It represents the material that stars form out of, and its mass, distribution, excitation, and dynamics provide crucial insight into the physical processes that support the ongoing star formation and stellar mass buildup. We will discuss the most recent progress in studies of gas-rich galaxies out to the highest redshifts through detailed investigations with the most powerful facilities across the electromagnetic spectrum, with a particular focus on new observations obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Atacama Large (sub-) Millimeter Array (ALMA). These studies cover a broad range in galaxy properties, and provide a detailed comparison of the physical conditions in massive, dust-obscured starburst galaxies and star-forming active galactic nuclei hosts within the first billion years of cosmic time. Facilitating the impressive sensitivity of ALMA, this investigation also includes the first direct, systematic study of the star-forming interstellar medium, gas dynamics, and dust obscuration in (much less luminous and massive) "typical" galaxies at such early epochs. These new results show that "typical" z>5 galaxies are significantly metal-enriched, but not heavily dust-obscured, consistent with a decreasing contribution of dust-obscured star formation to the star formation history of the universe towards the earliest cosmic epochs.

  11. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  12. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  13. Fluctuation of charge on dust particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Srivastava, Sweta

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the evaluation of the fluctuation of the charge on the dust particles in a complex plasma. In contrast to earlier analyses, which ignored the effect of dust particles on density and temperature of electrons and ions, the present model takes into account the number and energy balance of electrons and ions. Three cases, viz., (i) no emission, (ii) thermionic emission, and (iii) photoelectric emission of electrons from the dust particles, have been considered. The results have been graphically illustrated for typical parameters. It is seen that the plasma parameters, and hence the fluctuations, are considerably affected by the consideration of number and energy balance of electrons and ions. A comparison of the results of the present analysis with those of earlier works has also been made.

  14. Dynamics of Charged Dust Particle near Conducting Wall in TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    A substantial amount of dust has been observed to be present near the first walls of fusion devices. The impact of dust on plasma parameters in current and future fusion devices is not clear and may cause a significant safety threat. It is therefore important to understand the dynamics of dust particles after formation. A surface charge is induced on the wall of a conducting material in the presence of a charged particle. The charged particle is then attracted to the wall by this induced charge causing the charge in the wall to redistribute and thus increasing the force of attraction further. In this work we study the dynamics of this attraction and the dissipation of electromagnetic energy via joule heating within the conducting wall.

  15. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  16. Polluted dust promotes new particle formation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wei; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Tao; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; George, Christian; Xue, Likun; Wang, Wenxing; Zhang, Qingzhu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Qi, Ximeng; Gao, Xiaomei; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Xiuqun; Fu, Congbin; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Understanding new particle formation and their subsequent growth in the troposphere has a critical impact on our ability to predict atmospheric composition and global climate change. High pre-existing particle loadings have been thought to suppress the formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles due to high condensation and coagulation sinks. Here, based on field measurements at a mountain site in South China, we report, for the first time, in situ observational evidence on new particle formation and growth in remote ambient atmosphere during heavy dust episodes mixed with anthropogenic pollution. Both the formation and growth rates of particles in the diameter range 15–50 nm were enhanced during the dust episodes, indicating the influence of photo-induced, dust surface-mediated reactions and resulting condensable vapor production. This study provides unique in situ observations of heterogeneous photochemical processes inducing new particle formation and growth in the real atmosphere, and suggests an unexpected impact of mineral dust on climate and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:25319109

  17. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Norman, G E; Timofeev, A V

    2011-11-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dust particles system is performed. A mechanism of dust particle average kinetic energy increase is suggested on the basis of theoretical analysis of the simulation results. It is shown that heating of dust particles' vertical motion is initiated by forced oscillations caused by the dust particles' charge fluctuations. The process of energy transfer from vertical to horizontal motion is based on the phenomenon of the parametric resonance. The combination of parametric and forced resonances explains the abnormally high values of the dust particles' kinetic energy. Estimates of frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the experimental values.

  18. Dust particles investigation for future Russian lunar missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnikov, Gennady; Horanyi, Mihaly; Esposito, Francesca; Zakharov, Alexander; Popel, Sergey; Afonin, Valeri; Borisov, Nikolay; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Vorobyova, Elena; Petrov, Oleg; Lisin, Evgeny

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On light side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution dust particle by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind, solar

  19. Dynamics of Cometary Dust Particles in Electromagnetic Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranen, Joonas; Markkanen, Johannes; Penttilä, Antti; Muinonen, Karri

    2016-10-01

    The formation of cometary dust tails and comae is based on solar radiation pressure. The pressure effects of electromagnetic radiation were originally conceptualized in Kepler's observations of the tails of comets and formulated mathematically by Maxwell in 1873. Today, the dynamics of cometary dust are known to be governed by gravity, electromagnetic forces, drag, solar wind, and solar radiation pressure.Solar radiation pressure has its roots in absorption, emission, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation. Due to modern advances in so-called integral equation methods in electromagnetics, a new approach of studying the effect of radiation pressure on cometary dust dynamics can be constructed. We solve the forces and torques due to radiation pressure for an arbitrarily shaped dust particle using volume integral equation methods.We then present a framework for solving the equations of motion of cometary dust particles due to radiative interactions. The solution is studied in a simplified cometary environment, where the radiative effects are studied at different orbits. The rotational and translational equations of motion are solved directly using a quaternion-based integrator. The rotational and translational equations of motion affect dust particle alignment and concentration. This is seen in the polarization of the coma. Thus, our direct dynamical approach can be used in modelling the observed imaging photo-polarimetry of the coma.In future studies, the integrator can be further extended to an exemplary comet environment, taking into account the drag, and the electric and magnetic fields. This enables us to study the dynamics of a single cometary dust particle based on fundamental physics.Acknowledgments. Research supported, in part, bythe European Research Council (ERC, grant Nr. 320773).

  20. Close Range Remote Sensing of Levitated Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Higgs, A. J.; Pocock, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    A simple technique is highlighted to demonstrate how to detect and establish the coordinates of moving dust particles, in proximity to a single camera. This could be applied to planetary landers and rovers, or used from low orbit around comets and dusty asteroids. The only requirement would be the addition of a LED flash bulb close to the camera lens resulting in near zero phase illumination lighting conditions. Using this simple low cost, low mass setup, the 3D trajectory, colour, and other physical parameters of micron scale dust particles could be determined.

  1. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  2. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Shao, L. Y.

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite). CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3). Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  3. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  4. An Apparent Redshift Dependence of Quasar Continuum: Implication for Cosmic Dust Extinction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., αν12 (1000 ˜ 2000 Å) and αν24 (2000 ˜ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher αν) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both αν12 and αν24 show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed αν - z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσv ˜ 10-5h Mpc-1 at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  5. AN APPARENT REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM: IMPLICATION FOR COSMIC DUST EXTINCTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., α{sub ν12} (1000 ∼ 2000 Å) and α{sub ν24} (2000 ∼ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher α{sub ν}) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both α{sub ν12} and α{sub ν24} show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed α{sub ν} − z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσ{sub v} ∼ 10{sup −5}h Mpc{sup −1} at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  6. Detection of cosmic superstrings by geodesic test particle motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Betti; Sirimachan, Parinya; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2011-02-15

    (p,q)-strings are bound states of p F-strings and q D-strings and are predicted to form at the end of brane inflation. As such, these cosmic superstrings should be detectable in the Universe. In this paper we argue that they can be detected by the way that massive and massless test particles move in the space-time of these cosmic superstrings. In particular, we study solutions to the geodesic equation in the space-time of field theoretical (p,q)-strings. The geodesics can be classified according to the test particles' energy, angular momentum and momentum in the direction of the string axis. We discuss how the change of the magnetic fluxes, the ratio between the symmetry-breaking scale and the Planck mass, the Higgs-to-gauge-boson mass ratios and the binding between the F- and D-strings, respectively, influence the motion of the test particles. While massless test particles can move only on escape orbits, a new feature as compared to the infinitely thin string limit is the existence of bound orbits for massive test particles. In particular, we observe that--in contrast to the space-time of a single Abelian-Higgs string--bound orbits for massive test particles in (p,q)-string space-times are possible if the Higgs boson mass is larger than the gauge boson mass. We also compute the effect of the binding between the p- and the q-string on observables such as the light deflection and the perihelion shift. While light deflection can also be caused by other matter distributions, the possibility of a negative perihelion shift seems to be a feature of finite width cosmic strings that could lead to the unmistakable identification of such objects. In Melvin space-times, which are asymptotically nonconical, massive test particles have to move on bound orbits, while massless test particles can escape to infinity only if their angular momentum vanishes.

  7. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  8. Inhomogeneous particle model for light-scattering by cometary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Johannes; Penttilä, Antti; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Muinonen, Karri

    2015-12-01

    We introduce an inhomogeneous irregular-particle model for reproducing the typical light-scattering features of cometary dust such as the negative polarization near the backscattering direction, and the weak increase of the backscattering intensity. The model is based on the hierarchical Voronoi-partitioning and the algorithm provides fast generation of irregular particles with a flexible control of inhomogeneity. The input parameters of the model are refractive indices, their volumetric abundances, and the number of constituents on each level. The light-scattering properties of these particles with parameters relevant to cometary dust are solved by the volume-integral-equation method. The light-scattering features of inhomogeneous particles are compared with the mixtures of homogeneous particles, and particles with the refractive index obtained by the effective-medium approximation. We show that with the inhomogeneity size of order 0.2 μm, the different models produce qualitatively similar scattering features while some quantitative differences are observed which have an effect on the retrieved material composition of dust.

  9. Cosmic ray particle dosimetry and trajectory tracing. [cosmic ray track analysis for Apollo 17 BIOCORE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruty, M. R.; Benton, E. V.; Turnbill, C. E.; Philpott, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Five pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were flown on Apollo XVII, each with a solid-state (plastic) nuclear track detector implanted beneath its scalp. The subscalp detectors were sensitive to HZE cosmic ray particles with a LET greater than or approximately equal to 0.15 million electron volts per micrometer (MeV/micron). A critical aspect of the dosimetry of the experiment involved tracing individual particle trajectories through each mouse head from particle tracks registered in the individual subscalp detectors, thereby establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a trajectory location in the tissue and the presence or absence of a lesion. The other major aspect was the identification of each registered particle. An average of 16 particles with Z greater than or equal to 6 and 2.2 particles with Z greater than or equal to 20 were found per detector. The track density, 29 tracks/sq cm, when adjusted for detection volume, was in agreement with the photographic emulsion data from an area dosimeter located next to the flight package.

  10. Dust Particle Probes in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela; Hyde, Truell; Matthews, Lorin; Pope, Michael; Smith, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    In dusty plasma experiments within a GEC rf reference cell, the confining potential is generally assumed to be parabolic. The validity of this assumption can be tested in a number of ways. One noninvasive method is to utilize the particles themselves as system probes. In this experiment a cw laser (0.1-5W, 532nm) was used to apply a radiation pressure force on a single MF particle. The particle's trajectory while the laser was on and off was recorded and the confining potential calculated. System power, pressure, DC bias, and cutout size of the plate placed on the powered electrode were varied in order to better understand their effects on the shape of the confining potential.

  11. Phototelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and the equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much higher than the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approximately 0.09 to 8 microns radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with W radiation at 120 to 160 nm wavelengths. The measured values and the size dependence of the yields are found to be substantially different from the bulk values given in the literature.

  12. Abundance and Community Structure of Bacteria on Asian Dust Particles Collected in Beijing, China, during the Asian Dust Season.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Baba, Takashi; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Himezawa, Yuka; Enoki, Kanami; Saraya, Makoto; Li, Pin-Fang; Nasu, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 180 t/km(2) of Asian dust particles are estimated to fall annually on Beijing, China, and there is significant concern about the influence of microbes transported by Asian dust events on human health and downwind ecosystems. In this study, we collected Asian dust particles in Beijing, and analyzed the bacterial communities on these particles by culture-independent methods. Bacterial cells on Asian dust particles were visualized first by laser scanning microscopy, which demonstrated that Asian dust particles carry bacterial cells to Beijing. Bacterial abundance, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was 10(8) to 10(9) cells/g, a value about 10 times higher than that in Asian dust source soils. Inter-seasonal variability of bacterial community structures among Asian dust samples, as compared by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), was low during the Asian dust season. Several viable bacteria, including intestinal bacteria, were found in Asian dust samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Clone library analysis targeting 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences demonstrated that bacterial phylogenetic diversity was high in the dust samples, and most of these were environmental bacteria distributed in soil and air. The dominant species in the clone library was Segetibacter aerophilus (Bacteroidetes), which was first isolated from an Asian dust sample collected in Korea. Our results also indicate the possibility of a change in the bacterial community structure during transportation and increases in desiccation-tolerant bacteria such as Firmicutes.

  13. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; Meighan, T.; James, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  14. Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation and solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2007-01-01

    Several investigations of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes have been undertaken during solar cycle 23 which occurred in the period 1993-2003. The radiation field is produced by the passage of galactic cosmic rays and their nuclear reaction products as well as solar energetic particles through the Earth's atmosphere. Galactic cosmic rays reach a maximum intensity when the sun is least active and are at minimum intensity during solar maximum period. During solar maximum an increased number of coronal mass ejections and solar flares produce high energy solar particles which can also penetrate down to aircraft altitudes. It is found that the very complicated field resulting from these processes varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. By employing several active and passive detectors, the whole range of radiation types and energies were encompassed. In-flight data was obtained with the co-operation of many airlines and NASA. The EURADOS Aircraft Crew in-flight data base was used for comparison with the predictions of various computer codes. A brief outline of some recent studies of exposure to radiation in Earth orbit will conclude this contribution. PMID:17846031

  15. Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation and solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2007-01-01

    Several investigations of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes have been undertaken during solar cycle 23 which occurred in the period 1993-2003. The radiation field is produced by the passage of galactic cosmic rays and their nuclear reaction products as well as solar energetic particles through the Earth's atmosphere. Galactic cosmic rays reach a maximum intensity when the sun is least active and are at minimum intensity during solar maximum period. During solar maximum an increased number of coronal mass ejections and solar flares produce high energy solar particles which can also penetrate down to aircraft altitudes. It is found that the very complicated field resulting from these processes varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. By employing several active and passive detectors, the whole range of radiation types and energies were encompassed. In-flight data was obtained with the co-operation of many airlines and NASA. The EURADOS Aircraft Crew in-flight data base was used for comparison with the predictions of various computer codes. A brief outline of some recent studies of exposure to radiation in Earth orbit will conclude this contribution.

  16. Anomalies in cosmic rays: New particles versus charm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balayan, G. L.; Khodjamirian, A. Y.; Oganessian, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    For a long time two anomalies are observed in cosmic rays at energies E approx. = 100 TeV: (1) the generation of long-flying cascades in the hadron calorimeter (the so-called Tien-Shan effect) and; (2) the enhancement of direct muon yield as compared with the accelerator energy region. The aim is to discuss the possibility that both anomalies have common origins arising from production and decays of the same particles. the main conclusions are the following: (1) direct muons cannot be generated by any new particles with mass exceeding 10+20 GeV; and (2) if both effects are originated from the charmed hadrons, then the needed charm hadroproduction cross section is unexpectedly large as compared with the quark-gluon model predictions.

  17. Characterization of biogenic elements in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    Those particles that were designated cometary are aggregates of amorphous materials including carbon, iron-magnesium silicates, sulfides, metal and trace amounts of unusual phases. Most aggregates are carbon-rich with major and minor element abundances similar to a fine grained matrix of carbonaceous chondrites. Several particles were analyzed by a laser microprobe. The negative ionic species identified to date include carbon clusters, protonated carbon clusters, CN-, HCN-, CNO-, PO2-, PO3-, S-, S2- asnd OH-. These species are similar to those observed in cometary spectra and they support the assumption that organic materials are present. The occurance of phosphate ions suggests the presence of apatite or whitlockite. Cometary particle characteristics may indicate that the component grains represent primitive unaltered dust whose overall properties are extremely similar to altered primitive dust in carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Trace element content of chondritic cosmic dust: Volatile enrichments, thermal alterations, and the possibility of contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.

    1993-03-01

    Trace element abundances in 51 chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDP's) were measured by Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence (SXRF). The data allow us to determine an average composition of chondritic IDP's and to examine the questions of volatile loss during the heating pulse experienced on atmospheric entry and possible element addition due to contamination during atmospheric entry, stratospheric residence, and curation.

  19. Direct observation of completely processed calcium carbonate dust particles.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-01-01

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9-11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  20. Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-05-27

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  1. Hydrocarbon analogs of cosmic dust to trace the solid carbon abundance in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadallah, Kamel A. K.

    2015-01-01

    The spectral changes of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) could show variable distributions of solid carbon abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM). The variable optical properties of HAC analogs, produced by the laser ablation in a high vacuum, depends on the variation in its atomic and electronic structures. The fraction of hydrogen atoms in HAC increases proportionally with the laser's power. The available solid carbon tied up in the interstellar HAC, being the carrier of the interstellar 3.4 μ m and 4.6 μ m-1 bands, is indicated by the strength of these bands. Comparing the strength of these bands with those of laboratory data indicates that the amount of carbon in HAC analogs is not inherently sufficient. The lack in the solid carbon (locked solid carbon) in these analogs can be analytically estimated to facilitate the simulation of cosmic carbon dust. The results show a reduction in the locked solid carbon when the fraction of hydrogen atoms in HAC analogs increases. When this fraction becomes approximately 0.52 relative to the total number of hydrogen and carbon atoms, there is no lack of carbon in HAC analogs. The interstellar distribution of variable solid carbon abundance is attributed to the modification of cosmic HAC, which occurs as a result of the variation in its hydrogen atom fraction and the UV processing taking place in the interstellar environments. This distribution reveals more solid carbon abundances reside in the dust phase and may assist in resolving the carbon crisis.

  2. Weak cosmic censorship, superradiance, and quantum particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiz, Ibrahim; Düztaş, Koray

    2015-11-01

    Starting in 2007, a string of papers argue about if the weak cosmic censorship conjecture (WCCC) can be violated by classically forbidden interactions between particles and slightly subextremal black holes, occurring via the quantum nature of the particles; and where backreaction and/or superradiance are pointed out as effects working in the direction of preserving the WCCC. We correct/modify a backreaction argument, point out that transmission/reflection coefficients for relativistic wave equations are not the respective probabilities, and conclude that superradiance does not prevent single particles from being captured by the black hole; even if this capture would lead to WCCC violation. Then we consider the spontaneous emission (which we call the Zel'dovich-Unruh "ZU" effect) of particles by the black hole, and point out that it completely invalidates the mentioned single- or few-particle thought experiments. We find that at least for scalars, the ZU effect can be understood without second quantization; and reevaluate our previous work on scalar fields interacting with black holes in view of this new understanding, finding that it becomes inconclusive.

  3. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  4. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: VII. Cosmic ray particle dosimetry and trajectory tracing.

    PubMed

    Cruty, M R; Benton, E V; Turnbill, C E; Philpott, D E

    1975-04-01

    Five pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were flown on Apollo XVII, each with a solid-state (plastic) nuclear track detector implanted beneath its scalp. The subscalp detectors were sensitive to HZE cosmic ray particles with a LET larger than or equal to 0.15 million electron volts per micrometer (MeV/mjm). A critical aspect of the dosimetry of the experiment involved tracing individual particle trajectories through each mouse head from particle tracks registered in the individual subscalp detectors, thereby establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a trajectory location in the tissue and the presence or absence of a lesion. The other major aspect was the identification of each registered particle. An average of 16 particles with Z larger than or equal to 6 and 2.2 particles with Z larger than or equal to 20 were found per detector. The track density, 29 tracks/cm2, when adjusted for detection volume, was in agreement with the photographic emulsion data from an area dosimeter located next to the flight package.

  5. DDA simulation of lightscattering by cometary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, E. S.; Shkuratov, Y. G.

    Developing of the remote sensing techniques of cometary comas requires to study of lightscattering properties of dust particles. Analytic investigations of irregular particles meet great difficulties. We study lightscattering by irregular particles with the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) approach. This allows calculating lightscattering by particles of irregular shape. The original algorithm of generation of dust particle was used: a certain number of cubic cells (105div 106) randomly form an approximately spherical volume. Then some cells randomly chosen in a surface layer are marked as seeds of empty space and some cells randomly chosen under the surface layer are marked as seeds of material. Each cell other than the seed cells is marked as the same of the nearest seed cell. We examined two types of irregular particles. The first type corresponds to fluffy particles that were generated with 100 seeds of space and 50 seeds of material. The second one is compact particles (1200 seeds of empty space and 150 seeds of material). Three values of a refractive index were tested: m = 1.313 + 0i (``ice''), m = 1.5 + 0.1i (``organic''), and m = 1.6 + 0.0005i (``silicate''). The size parameter x was changing from 2 up to 16 (x = 2π r/λ , where λ is the wavelength and r is the radius of the initial volume). The main results of our studies are follows: (1) Fluffy irregular particles produce smooth phase curves of intensity and polarization, compact particles produce oscillating curves that resemble slightly to the proper curves for the sphere of equivalent volume. (2) Irregular particles of both types produce the enhancement of intensity and negative polarization branch at small phase angles. (3) The asymmetric negative polarization branch appears from x= 4 to x = 16. (4) Usually the negative polarization branch of compact particles is deeper than that of fluffy ones.

  6. Dust Particle Growth and Application in Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-23

    Dust particle nucleation and growth has been widely studied these last fifteen years in different chemistries and experimental conditions. This phenomenon is correlated with various electrical changes at electrodes, including self-bias voltage and amplitudes of the various harmonics of current and voltage [1]. Some of these changes, such as the appearance of more resistive plasma impedance, are correctly attributed to loss of electrons in the bulk plasma to form negative molecular ions (e.g. SiH{sub 3}{sup -}) and more precisely charged nanoparticles. These changes were studied and correlated to the different phases on the dust particle formation. It is well known now that, in silane argon gas mixture discharges, in the first step of this particle formation we have formation of nanometer sized crystallites. These small entities accumulate and when their number density reaches a critical value, about 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -1}, they start to aggregate to form bigger particles. The different phases are well defined and determined thanks to the time evolution of the different electrical parameter changes. The purpose of this contribution is to compare different chemistries to highlight similarities and/or differences in order to establish possible universal dust particle growth mechanisms. The chemistries we studied concern SiH{sub 4}-Ar, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} and Sn(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}[2]. We also refer to works performed in other laboratories in different discharge configurations [3]. Different applications have already developed or are foreseen for these nanoparticles. The first application concerns the inclusion of nanosized dust crystallites in an amorphous matrix in order to modify the optoelectronic and mechanical properties [4-5]. At the present time a very active research programs are devoted towards single electron devises where nanometer sized crystallites play a role of quantum dots. These nanoparticles can be produced in low pressure cold

  7. New Manganese Silicide Mineral Phase in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.; Kloeck, W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup was identified as a source of an Earth-crossing dust stream with low Earth-encounter velocities, with peak anticipated fluxes during April in 2003 and 2004 [1]. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections using high altitude aircraft to target potential interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream in April 2003. Several IDPs from this collection have shown unusually low noble gas abundances [2] consistent with the predicted short space exposure ages of Grigg-Skjellerup dust particles [1]. High abundances of large D enrichments [3] and presolar grains [4] in IDPs from this collection are also consistent with an origin from the comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Here we report a new mineral from one of the cluster IDPs of the "Grigg-Skjellerup" collection, L2055. Our report focuses on an unusual manganese-iron-chromium silicide phase that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature. This unique phase may also shed light on the genesis of the enigmatic low-Fe,Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine that has been previously reported in IDPs and meteorites [5].

  8. Cosmic microwave background constraint on residual annihilations of relic particles

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Patrick; Scherrer, Robert J.; Walker, Terry P.

    2001-01-15

    Energy injected into the cosmic microwave background at redshifts z{approx}<10{sup 6} will distort its spectrum permanently. In this paper we discuss the distortion caused by annihilations of relic particles. We use the observational bounds on deviations from a Planck spectrum to constrain a combination of annihilation cross section, mass, and abundance. For particles with an (s-wave) annihilation cross section <{sigma}|v|>(equivalent to){sigma}{sub 0}, the bound is f(m{sub X}/MeV){sup -1}[({sigma}{sub 0}/6x10{sup -27} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1})({Omega}{sub X{bar X}}h{sup 2}){sup 2}]<0.2, where m{sub X} is the particle mass, {Omega}{sub X{bar X}} is the fraction of the critical density the particle and its antiparticle contribute if they survive to the present time, h=H{sub 0}/100 kms{sup -1}Mpc{sup -1}, H{sub 0} is the Hubble constant, and f is the fraction of the annihilation energy that interacts electromagnetically. We also compute the less stringent limits for p-wave annihilation. We update other bounds on residual annihilations and compare them to our CMB bound.

  9. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L. E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

  10. Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and dust particle size fractions adherent to skin in indoor dust, Pretoria, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kefeni, Kebede Keterew; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2014-03-01

    In order to determine human exposure to the indoor toxicant, selection of dust fraction and understanding dust particle size distribution in settled indoor dust are very important. This study examined the influence of dust particle size on the concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) congeners, assessed the distribution of dust particle size and characterized the main indoor emission sources of PBDEs. Accordingly, the concentrations of PBDE congeners determined in different indoor dust fractions were found to be relatively higher in the order of dust particle size: 45-106 μm>(<45 μm)>106-150 μm. The finding shows arbitrary selection of dust fractions for exposure determination may result in wrong conclusions. Statistically significant moderate correlation between the concentration of Σ9PBDEs and organic matter content calculated with respect to the total dust mass was also observed (r=0.55, p=0.001). On average, of total dust particle size <250 μm, 93.4 % (m/m%) of dust fractions was associated with less than 150 μm. Furthermore, of skin adherent dust fractions considered (<150 μm), 86 % (v/v%) is in the range of particle size 9.25-104.7 μm. Electronic materials treated with PBDEs were found the main emission sources of PBDE congeners in indoor environment. Based on concentrations of PBDEs determined and mass of indoor dust observed, 150 μm metallic sieve is adequate for human exposure risk assessment. However, research in this area is very limited and more research is required to generalize the fact.

  11. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N(d) on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N(d) leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), discharge current density 10(-1)-10(1) mA/cm(2), and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 microm. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  12. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  13. Influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Coulomb Coupling between Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2005-10-31

    The influence of ultraviolet light on the Coulomb coupling between dust particles was experimentally investigated in Radio-Frequency (RF, 13.56MHz) inductively coupled plasma. Flask shape dust cloud and the filamentary structure of dust particles were observed by adopting two turn ring far from the RF antenna. The ultraviolet radiation seemed to be not easy to pick up the polarization of the dust particles in the laboratory.

  14. Migration of Dust Particles and Their Collisions with the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    Our review of previously published papers on dust migration can be found in [1], where we also present different distributions of migrating dust particles. We considered a different set of initial orbits for the dust particles than those in the previous papers. Below we pay the main attention to the collisional probabilities of migrating dust particles with the planets based on a set of orbital elements during their evolution. Such probabilities were not calculated earlier.

  15. Effects of plasma particle trapping on dust-acoustic solitary waves in an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Mushtaq, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-03-15

    Dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma containing dust of opposite polarity (adiabatic positive and negative dust), non-isothermal electrons and ions (following vortex like distribution) are theoretically investigated by employing pseudo-potential approach, which is valid for arbitrary amplitude structures. The propagation of small but finite amplitude solitary structures is also examined by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic properties of large (small) amplitude solitary structures are investigated by analyzing the energy integral (modified Korteweg-de Vries equation). It is shown that the effects of dust polarity, trapping of plasma particles (electrons and ions), and temperatures of dust fluids significantly modify the basic features of the dust-acoustic solitary structures that are found to exist in such an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium. The relevance of the work in opposite polarity dust-plasma, which may occur in cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, is briefly discussed.

  16. Registration of new stable heavy charged particles in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhutov, Yu. N.

    2001-08-01

    A telescope of two coaxial scintillation detectors (an upper ∅63x0.35 mm 2 thin CsI crystal and a lower thick ∅150x100 mm 2 NaI crystal) positioned vertically on the Earth surface has recorded 23 events within T=106 hours. All the events (except for three background events) are within two standard deviations from a curve calculated for singl?-charged non-relativistic particles with mass ME = (175±25) GeV/c 2 that traverse the telescope from a vertical. On assumption that the particles recorded are not relativistic, from the geometrical size of the telescope it follows that their lifetime is τE>1.5·10 -9 s. Their intensity in cosmic rays on the Earth surface JE = (1.8±0.4)10 -6 cm -2 sr -1 s -1 (at EE≤6 GeV, PE≤50 GeV/c). This particles recorded conform completely to our phenomenological predictions, to our earlier experimental results obtained when searching for particles like those, and to the predictions of the «mirror» model that offers theoretical support to the existence of the hypothetical stable heavy hadrons (Erzions). INTRODUCTION. The hypothesis about new penetrating stable heavy hadrons [1,2] was proposed to explain the anomalous slope of cosmic muon energy spectra [3,4,5]. Many of the characteristics of the hypothesized hadrons (mass, charge, lifetime, intensity, nuclear interaction mode, interaction and absorption paths) were predicted phenomenologically to harmonize the very copious anomalous and ordinary experimental cosmic ray data and to make them consistent. There are many different experiments in cosmic rays, which indicate on existence of stable heavy particles [6-15], but there are no any simple and correct proofs until now. Later, we made attempts to find them experimentally [16-21] and to construct a model that would offer a theoretical support to their long lifetime (τ>10 -5 s), given their very high mass (M>30 GeV/c 2 ). The pioneer attempts were made using the super symmetrical model [22], but the use of the «mirror» model

  17. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  18. Dust Particles Alignments and Transitions in a Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, J. D. E.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The alignments and transitions of two dust particles in a plasma sheath have been investigated. It is shown that the Hamiltonian description of a non-Hamiltonian system can be used to predict qualitative features of possible equilibria in a variety of confinement potentials and can provide useful plasma diagnostics. The results compare favorably with simulation and are used to create new experimental hypotheses. In particular, the symmetry breaking transition of the particles as they leave the horizontal plane admits a Hamiltonian description which is used to elucidate the wake parameter.

  19. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND CONSTRAINTS OF DECAYING DARK MATTER PARTICLE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, S.; Chan, M. H.; Chu, M.-C.

    2012-08-20

    If a component of cosmological dark matter is made up of massive particles-such as sterile neutrinos-that decay with cosmological lifetime to emit photons, the reionization history of the universe would be affected, and cosmic microwave background anisotropies can be used to constrain such a decaying particle model of dark matter. The optical depth depends rather sensitively on the decaying dark matter particle mass m{sub dm}, lifetime {tau}{sub dm}, and the mass fraction of cold dark matter f that they account for in this model. Assuming that there are no other sources of reionization and using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year data, we find that 250 eV {approx}< m{sub dm} {approx}< 1 MeV, whereas 2.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr {approx}< {tau}{sub dm}/f {approx}< 1.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} yr. The best-fit values for m{sub dm} and {tau}{sub dm}/f are 17.3 keV and 2.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} yr, respectively.

  20. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  1. Quantification of Spore-forming Bacteria Carried by Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Cholakian, Tanya; Gao, Wenming; Osman, Shariff; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish a biological contamination transport model for predicting the cross contamination risk during spacecraft assembly and upon landing on Mars, it is important to understand the relationship between spore-forming bacteria and their carrier particles. We conducted air and surface sampling in indoor, outdoor, and cleanroom environments to determine the ratio of spore forming bacteria to their dust particle carriers of different sizes. The number of spore forming bacteria was determined from various size groups of particles in a given environment. Our data also confirms the existence of multiple spores on a single particle and spore clumps. This study will help in developing a better bio-contamination transport model, which in turn will help in determining forward contamination risks for future missions.

  2. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-09-07

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r{sup 2}) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F{sub es} (c/r{sup 3})) and shadowing (F{sub shadow} = -(d/r{sup 2})) forces.

  3. Large-scale traces of Solar system cold dust on cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, M.; Burigana, C.; Gruppuso, A.; Finelli, F.; Diego, J. M.

    2011-08-01

    We explore the microwave anisotropies on large angular scales produced by the emission from cold and large dust grains, expected to exist in the outer parts of the Solar system, using a simple toy model for this diffuse emission. Its amplitude is constrained in the far-IR by the COBE data and is compatible with simulations found in the literature. We analyse the templates derived after subtracting our model from the WMAP ILC 7-yr maps and investigate on the cosmological implications of such a possible foreground. The anomalies related to the low quadrupole of the angular power spectrum, the two-point correlation function, the parity and the excess of signal found in the ecliptic plane are significantly alleviated. An impact of this foreground on some cosmological parameters characterizing the spectrum of primordial density perturbations, relevant for on-going and future cosmic microwave background anisotropy experiments, is found.

  4. Nonviscous motion of a slow particle in a dust crystal under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Fortov, V E; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Naumkin, V N; Thomas, H M; Ivlev, A V; Schwabe, M; Morfill, G E

    2012-07-01

    Subsonic motion of a large particle moving through the bulk of a dust crystal formed by negatively charged small particles is investigated using the PK-3 Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station. Tracing the particle trajectories shows that the large particle moves almost freely through the bulk of the plasma crystal, while dust particles move along characteristic α-shaped pathways near the large particle. In the hydrodynamic approximation, we develop a theory of nonviscous dust particle motion about a large particle and calculate particle trajectories. Good agreement with experiment validates our approach.

  5. High Precision Oxygen Three Isotope Analysis of Wild-2 Particles and Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Matrajt, G.; Kita, N. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries from comet Wild-2 samples was observation of crystalline silicate particles that resemble chondrules and CAIs in carbonaceous chondrites. Previous oxygen isotope analyses of crystalline silicate terminal particles showed heterogeneous oxygen isotope ratios with delta(sup 18)O to approx. delta(sup 17)O down to -50% in the CAI-like particle Inti, a relict olivine grain in Gozen-sama, and an olivine particle. However, many Wild-2 particles as well as ferromagnesian silicates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) showed Delta(sup 17)O values that cluster around -2%. In carbonaceous chondrites, chondrules seem to show two major isotope reservoirs with Delta(sup 17)O values at -5% and -2%. It was suggested that the Delta(sup 17)O = -2% is the common oxygen isotope reservoir for carbonaceous chondrite chondrules and cometary dust, from the outer asteroid belt to the Kuiper belt region. However, a larger dataset with high precision isotope analyses (+/-1-2%) is still needed to resolve the similarities or distinctions among Wild-2 particles, IDPs and chondrules in meteorites. We have made signifi-cant efforts to establish routine analyses of small particles (< or =10micronsm) at 1-2% precision using IMS-1280 at WiscSIMS laboratory. Here we report new results of high precision oxygen isotope analyses of Wild-2 particles and anhydrous chondritic IDPs, and discuss the relationship between the cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrite chondrules.

  6. Seed particle formation for silicate dust condensation by SiO nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, H.-P.; Wetzel, S.; Pucci, A.; Tamanai, A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Dust formation in stellar outflows is initiated by the formation of some seed particles that form the growth centres for macroscopic dust grains. The nature of the seed particles for silicate dust in stellar outflows with an oxygen-rich element mixture is still an open question. Clustering of the abundant SiO molecules has been discussed several times as a possible mechanism and investigated both theoretically and by laboratory experiments. The initial results seemed to indicate, however, that condensation temperatures obtained by model calculations based on this mechanism are significant lower than what is really observed, which renders SiO nucleation unlikely. Aims: This negative result strongly rests on experimental data on the vapour pressure of SiO. The case for SiO nucleation may be not as bad as it previously seemed and needs to be discussed again because new determinations of the vapour pressure of SiO molecules over solid SiO have shown the older data on SiO vapour pressure to be seriously in error. Here we aim to check again the possibility that SiO nucleation triggers the cosmic silicate dust formation in light of improved new data. Methods: First we present results of our measurements of vapour pressure of solid SiO. Second, we use the improved vapour pressure data to recalibrate existing experimental data on SiO nucleation from the literature. Third, we use the recalibrated data on SiO nucleation in a simple model program for dust-driven winds to determine the condensation temperature of silicate in stellar outflows from AGB stars. Results: Our measurements extend the temperature range of measurements for the vapour pressure to lower temperatures and pressures than ever before. This improves the reliability of the required extrapolation from the temperature range where laboratory data can be obtained to the temperature range where circumstellar dust condensation is observed. We determine an analytical fit for the nucleation rate of SiO from

  7. Enrichment of Mineral Dust Storm Particles with Sea Salt Elements - Using bulk and Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Y.; Perrino, C.; Yossef, O.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral aerosol emitted from African and Asian deserts plays an important role in the atmosphere. During their long-range transport, the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust particles change due to heterogeneous reactions with trace gases, coagulation with other particles, and in-cloud processing. These processes affect the optical and hygroscopic properties of dust particles, and in general influencing the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Four African and Arabian dust storm episodes affecting the East Mediterranean Coast in the spring of 2006 have been characterized, to determine if atmospheric natural dust particles are enriched with sea salt and anthropogenic pollution. Particle samplers included PM10 and manual dichotomous sampler that collected fine and coarse particles. Three sets of filters were used: Teflon filters for gravimetric, elemental and ionic analyses; Pre-fired Quartz-fiber filters for elemental and organic carbon; and Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (Philips XL 30 ESEM) was used to analyze single particle, for morphology, size and chemistry of selected filter samples. A detailed chemical and microscopical characterization has been performed for the particles collected during dust event days and during clear days. The Saharan and Arabian air masses increased significantly the daily mass concentrations of the coarse and the fine particle fractions. Carbonates, mostly as soil calcites mixed with dolomites, and silicates are the major components of the coarse fraction, followed by sea salt particles. In addition, the levels of anthropogenic heavy metals and sea salt elements registered during the dust episode were considerably higher than levels recorded during clear days. Sea salt elements contain Na and Cl, and smaller amounts of Mg, K, S and Br. Cl ranges from 300 to 5500 ng/m3 and Na from 100 to almost 2400 ng/m3. The Cl to Na ratio on dusty days in

  8. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  9. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S. Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J.; Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation as a potential sulphate-coating mechanism of atmospheric mineral dust particles and implications of coated dust on new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Napari, I.; Timmreck, C.; VehkamäKi, H.; Pirjola, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lauri, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2003-09-01

    The plausibility of heterogeneous conucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia as a pathway leading to soluble coating of atmospheric mineral dust is investigated. In addition, the effect of such sulphate-coated dust on the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is addressed. The simulated new particle formation mechanism is ternary nucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia vapors, while in the condensational growth process the effect of condensable organic vapor is also studied. The results indicate that soluble coating of dust by heterogeneous nucleation can occur at atmospheric sulphuric acid concentrations. In addition, the simulations show that homogeneous ternary nucleation and subsequent growth are decoupled. Although observed (or even higher) dust concentrations are unable to inhibit new particle formation, coated dust particles acting as condensation and coagulation sinks can prevent the growth of newly formed particles to detectable sizes. This is particularly true in desert areas, where organic vapor concentrations are low.

  11. MicroMED: a dust particle counter for the characterization of airborne dust close to the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, Fabio; Esposito, Francesca; Molfese, Cesare; Cortecchia, Fausto; Saggin, Bortolino; D'amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of airborne dust is very important in planetary climatology. Indeed, dust absorbs and scatter solar and thermal radiation, severely affecting atmospheric thermal structure, balance and dynamics (in terms of circulations). Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. Dust is permanently present in the atmosphere of Mars and its amount varies with seasons. During regional or global dust storms, more than 80% of the incoming sunlight is absorbed by dust causing an intense atmospheric heating. Airborne dust is therefore a crucial climate component on Mars which impacts atmospheric circulations at all scales. Main dust parameters influencing the atmosphere heating are size distribution, abundance, albedo, single scattering phase function, imaginary part of the index of refraction. Moreover, major improvements of Mars climate models require, in addition to the standard meteorological parameters, quantitative information about dust lifting, transport and removal mechanisms. In this context, two major quantities need to be measured for the dust source to be understood: surface flux and granulometry. While many observations have constrained the size distribution of the dust haze seen from the orbit, it is still not known what the primary airborne dust (e.g. the recently lifted dust) is made of, size-wise. MicroMED has been designed to fill this gap. It will measure the abundance and size distribution of dust, not in the atmospheric column, but close to the surface, where dust is lifted, so to be able to monitor dust injection into the atmosphere. This has never been performed in Mars and other planets exploration. MicroMED is an Optical Particle Counter, analyzing light scattered from single dust particles to measure their size and abundance. A proper fluid-dynamic system, including a pump and a

  12. Cosmic meteor dust: potentially the dominant source of bio-available iron in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Marsh, D. R.; Del Castillo, C. E.; Fentzke, J.; Lopez-Rosado, R.; Behrenfeld, M.

    2012-12-01

    Johnson, 2001 [Johnson, Kenneth. S. (2001), Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean: Is extraterrestrial dust a significant source of bioavailable iron?, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 15(1), 61-63, doi:10.1029/2000GB001295], first suggested that meteoric particulate flux could be a significant source of bio-available iron, particularly in regions with little or no eolean sources, such as the Southern Ocean. While these calculations raised intriguing questions, there were many large unknowns in the input calculations between meteor flux and bio-available ocean molecular densities. There has been significant research in the intervening decade on related topics, such as the magnitude (~200 ktons per year) and composition of the meteoric flux, its atmospheric evaporation, transport, mesospheric formation of potentially soluble meteoric smoke, and extraterrestrial iron isotope identification. Paramount of these findings are recent NCAR WACCM atmosphere model results demonstrating that the majority of meteoric constituents are transported towards the winter poles and the polar vortex. This may lead to a focusing of meteoritic iron deposition towards the Southern Ocean. We present a proposed research plan involving Southern Ocean sample collection and analysis and atmospheric and biological modeling to determine both the current relevance of meteoric iron, and examine the past and future consequences of cosmic dust under a changing climate.

  13. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 4: Cosmic Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Beatty, J. J.; Buckley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; Cushman, P.; Dodelson, S.; Galbiati, C.; Honscheid, K.; Hooper, D.; Kaplinghat, M.; Kusenko, A.; Matchev, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A. E.; Olinto, A.; Profumo, S.; Robertson, H.; Rosenberg, L.; Sinnis, G.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 4, on the Cosmic Frontier, discusses the program of research relevant to cosmology and the early universe. This area includes the study of dark matter and the search for its particle nature, the study of dark energy and inflation, and cosmic probes of fundamental symmetries.

  14. Separating Continental Mineral Dust from Cosmic Dust using Platinum Group Element Concentrations and Osmium Isotopes in Ancient Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. H.; Jackson, B.; Osterberg, E. C.; Sharma, M.

    2015-12-01

    The platinum group element (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, and Ru) accumulation in ancient polar archives have been argued to trace cosmic dust and "smoke" from larger meteors but the PGE concentration data lack specificity. For example, the extent to which the terrestrial volcanism/dust has contributed to the PGE inventory of polar ice cannot be readily evaluated. Since the Os isotope compositions (187Os/188Os ratio) of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources are distinctly different from each other, the PGE concentrations when combined with Os isotope composition have the potential to untangle contributions from these sources. Platinum group element concentration determinations in polar ice cores are highly challenging due to their extremely low concentrations (down to 10-15 g/g or fg/g). Here, a new procedure is presented that allows PGEs and Os isotope compositions to be determined from a ~50 g sample of polar ice. Decontaminated ice-melt is spiked with 101Ru, 106Pd, 190Os, 191Ir, and 198Pt and frozen at -20 °C in quartz-glass ampoules. A mixture of purified HNO3 and H2O2 is then added and the sample is heated to 300 °C at 128bar using a High Pressure Asher. This allows all spikes to be equilibrated with the sample PGEs and all Os species are oxidized to OsO4. The resulting OsO4 is extracted using distillation, purified, and measured using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. PGEs are then separated and purified using two stage column chromatography and their concentrations determined by isotope dilution using a triple quadruople inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer coupled to an Apex de-solvation nebulizer. The developed method was applied to modern Greenland firn and snow. The PGE concentrations of the firn are 4.0 fg/g for Ir, 20 fg/g for Ru, 590 fg/g for Pt, 38 fg/g for Pd, and 1.3 fg/g for Os, while those of the snow are 3.0 fg/g for Ir, 53 fg/g for Ru, 360 fg/g for Pt, 32 fg/g for Pd, and 0.4 fg/g for Os, respectively. A comparison

  15. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  16. The atmospheric cosmic- and solar energetic particle radiation environment at aircraft altitudes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Friedberg, W; Smart, D F; Sauer, H H

    1998-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays interact with the solar wind, the earth's magnetic field and hadron, lepton and photon fields at aircraft altitudes. In addition to cosmic rays, energetic particles generated by solar activity bombard the earth from time to time. These particles, while less energetic than cosmic rays, also produce radiation fields at aircraft altitudes which have qualitatively the same properties as atmospheric cosmic rays. We have used a code based on transport theory to calculate atmospheric cosmic-ray quantities and compared them with experimental data. Agreement with these data is seen to be good. We have then used this code to calculate equivalent doses to aircraft crews. We have also used the code to calculate radiation doses from several large solar energetic particle events which took place in 1989, including the very large event that occurred on September 29th and 30th of that year. The spectra incident on the atmosphere were determined assuming diffusive shock theory.

  17. Extraction and microanalysis of cosmic dust captured during sample return missions: laboratory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Butterworth, A. L.; Bland, P. A.; Burchell, M. J.; McPhail, D. S.; Chater, R.; Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.

    2004-01-01

    Particles of cometary and asteroidal origin collected at source using dedicated capture cell technologies will be returned to Earth within the next 8 years. Furthermore, coincidental capture of interplanetary dust particles will occur on the exposed surfaces of the Genesis spacecraft. Laboratory simulations using both light-gas-gun and Van de Graaff accelerators have impacted dust analogues at velocities ranging from 5 km s -1 to ca. 72 km s -1 into comparable silicon and aerogel targets. Analysis of the impacts on silicon has shown complete spallation of impact residues for silicate projectiles of 38-53 μm in diameter, however craters formed by 1 μm iron projectiles show that near-intact residues can be preserved. An olivine grain embedded in aerogel has been characterized in situ using Raman micro-spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments have shown that analytical scanning electron microscopy can also be used to characterize embedded grains. Development of a novel particle extraction methodology using a 266 nm UV laser micro-dissection system has resulted in the recovery of an olivine grain. The extracted particle was then "cleaned up" using focused ion beam (FIB) milling to remove excess aerogel that was fused on the grain surface.

  18. Parameters of Dust Particles in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Zh. M.; Morozhenko, A. V.

    2001-11-01

    A critical analysis of the methods and results of estimating the optical thickness of the dust component in the Martian atmosphere τ_0, the particle size r_0, and the imaginary part of the refractive index n_ihas shown the following. (1) Observational data on the brightness distribution over the Martian disk as well as the phase dependences of diffusely reflected light and the azimuthal dependences of diffusely transmitted light are most appropriate to use only for verifying the reliability of the aerosol parameters determined by other methods. (2) If the morning and evening fogs in the atmosphere are disregarded, the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer method used to analyze the solar-brightness attenuation measured on the planetary surface yields overestimated extraatmospheric solar intensity I_0and atmospheric optical depth τ_0. At the Viking 1landing site, I_0and τ_0could be overestimated by a factor of 1.7 and by 0.35, respectively. (3) The aerosol size determined by analyzing measurements of the azimuthal dependences for the Martian sky brightness at low elevations of the Sun most likely corresponds to the fog particles. (4) If overestimated values of I_0were used to standardize the observations of the solar radiation transmitted by the Martian atmosphere, then n_iwere also overestimated; using overestimated τ_0also affected the reliability of the latter. (5) The problem of reliability of the available τ_0and r_0estimates for periods of high atmospheric transparency is yet to be solved. For the highest activity of the dust storm in 1971, it was found that 4.5 <= r_0<= 7.5 μm for the lognormal particle size distribution with σ^2= 0.2 and the optical thickness of a dust cloud τ_0>= 15. (6) The spectral values of the apparent albedo of Mars measured in October 1971 at a phase angle of 42° in the spectral range 0.250 <= λ <= 0.717 allowed the imaginary part of the refractive index to be estimated in terms of a model of a dust cloud composed of spherical particles with

  19. Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Leibovitz, B.; Donathan, R.; Fisher, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The ciliated protozoan Paramecium was used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nickel particles. The biological response of these eukaryotic cells to pure nickel powder and iron-nickel powder was assayed and compared to the effect of the inorganic carcinogen nickel subsulfide. Cytotoxicity was determined by the percent survival of treated cells. Genotoxicity was indicated by significant increases in the fraction of nonviable offspring (presumed index of lethal mutations) found after self-fertilization (autogamy) in parents from the nickel-treated versus neutral control groups. The cells were exposed to the dusts and the biological effects determined. Only the nickel subsulfide consistently showed a significant increase in offspring lethality.

  20. Migration of Dust Particles from Comet 2P Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets (except for Pluto), radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag for Beta equal to 0.002, 0.004, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of Beta correspond to diameters equal to about 200, 100, 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively. We used the Bulirsh-Stoer method of integration, and the relative error per integration step was taken to be less than lo-'. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbit of Comet 2P Encke. We considered initial particles near perihelion (runs denoted as Delta tsub o, = 0), near aphelion (Delta tsub o, = 0.5), and also studied their initial positions when the comet moved for Pa/4 after perihelion passage (such runs are denoted as Delta tsub o, =i 0.25), where Pa is the period of the comet. Variations in time T when perihelion was passed was varied with a step 0.1 day for series 'S' and with a step 1 day for series 'L'. For each Beta we considered N = 101 particles for "S" runs and 150 particles for "L" runs.

  1. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-04-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  2. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  3. Effective Dose Equivalent due to Cosmic Ray Particles and Their Secondary Particles on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Kanako; Hareyama, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shingo; Karouji, Yuzuru; Sakurai, K.; Sihver, Lembit; Hasebe, N.

    Estimation of radiation dose on and under the lunar surface is quite important for human activity on the Moon and for the future lunar bases construction. Radiation environment on the Moon is much different from that on the Earth. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) directly penetrate the lunar surface because of no atmosphere and no magnetic field around the Moon. Then, they generate many secondary particles such as neutrons, gamma rays and other charged particles by nuclear interactions with soils and regolith breccias under the lunar surface. Therefore, the estimation of radiation dose from them on the surface and the underground of the Moon are essential for safety human activities. In this study, the effective dose equivalents at the surface and various depths of the Moon were estimated using by the latest cosmic rays observation and developed calculation code. The largest contribution to the dose on the surface is primary charged particles in GCRs and SEPs, while in the ground, secondary neutrons are the most dominant. In particular, the dose from neutrons becomes maximal at 70-80 g/cm2 in depth of lunar soil, because fast neutrons with about 1.0 MeV are mostly produced at this depth and give the largest dose. On the lunar surface, the doses originated from large SEPs are very hazardous. We estimated the effective dose equivalents due to such large SEPs and the effects of aluminum shield for the large flare on the human body. In the presentation, we summarize and discuss the improved calculation results of radiation doses due to GCR particles and their secondary particles in the lunar subsurface. These results will provide useful data for the future exploration of the Moon.

  4. Portable cosmic particle detectors for subsurface density mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, László; Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Hamar, Gergö; Surányi, Gergely; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    Muography deduces the density length in the interior of the investigated geological object, such as a mountain or volcano by the measurement of the cosmic muon absorption along different paths through the object. If path lengths (average densities) are measured, the average density (path length) can be deduced along the muon paths. A portable, low power consumption cosmic particle tracking detector based on Close Cathode multi-wire proportional chambers [1,2] has been developed for muography based on our earlier developments and experiences at the Wigner RCP of the HAS in Budapest [3,4,5]. The newly developed tracking system consists of six layers with the sensitive area of 0.25 m2 [6]. The spatial resolution of 2 mm provides an angular resolution of 15 mrad. This instrument has been optimized for underground and outdoor measurements: it has a Raspberry pi controlled data acquisition system which includes a custom designed board with a coincidence unit and allows high level remote control, data management and analysis. The individual trigger signals, number of missed triggers, analogue signals from chambers and the temperature are recorded. The duration of data readout (dead time) is 100 microsec. The DAQ software runs on the Raspberry Pi. For standard operation, a graphical user interface has been developed, running on any remote computer with Internet connection (both of wired and wireless) to the Raspberry Pi. A temperature-controlled high-voltage power supply provides a stable and reasonable (> 95 %) tracking performance for the measurements. With total power consumption of 5W, a portable tracking detector can operate for 5 days with a standard 50 Ah battery and with gas (non flammable Ar-CO2 mixture) consumption of 0.5 liter per hour, a 10 l bottle at pressure of 150 bar is enough for four month. The portability (total weight of less than 30 kg) allowed that our tracking detectors have been applied in underground caverns for subsurface density mapping. The

  5. Layer-like Structure of Radio-Frequency Discharge with Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. Y.; Vakulenko, A. V.; Lisitchenko, T. Y.; Levada, G. I.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper we are carried out the computer simulation of the dust particles dynamics in the radio frequency discharges at the microgravity conditions using PIC/MCC method for electrons and ions and hydrodynamics model for dust particles. The moving of dust particles is governed by the electrostatic force, ion and neutral drag forces, which are averaged over period of RF discharge. The obtained results show that dust particles form layers with sharp boundaries in the discharge chamber that is response on the instability of the radio-frequency discharge.

  6. Light scattering by clouds of cosmic dust analogues with carbonaceous compounds (PROGRA2 experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, Edith; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Lasue, Jeremie

    Carbonaceous compounds are found in numerous clouds of solid particles in the Solar System (e.g. Cometary comae, Interplanetary dust, Titan's aerosols). Fluffy aggregates of submicron sized grains and more compact particles up to some tens of micrometers were present in the particles captured by the Stardust mission in the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 [1]. Complex organic refractories were found in the particles together with silicates [2,3], while CHON particles were detected by mass spectrometer, as previously by Vega 1 and Giotto at 1P/Halley [4,5]. Titan's aerosols are complex organics (CxNyHz) and their light scattering properties can only be interpreted if they present a fluffy aggregates structure [6]. The light scattered by the dust particles is partially linearly polarized with a polarization degree depending on the physical properties of the dust and on the geometry (phase angle) and wavelength of observations [7]. Laboratory scattering measurements with the PROGRA2 experiment [8] (in A300- CNES and ESA dedicated microgravity flights or on ground for low density particles) offer an alternative to simulate the scattering properties of real particles particularly for structures too large or too complex to be handled easily by numerical simulations. Experimental simulations have been performed on numerous samples underlying the characteristics of the polarimetric phase curves such as maximum and minimum polarization as a function of the properties of the particles (grains and particles size, structure, refractive index) [9,10]. These results were used to interpret variations in polarization in cometary comae [11,12] or in the Titan's atmosphere [13]. In this presentation we emphasize the optical properties due to the presence of organics and C-bearing materials and compare them to the optical properties of more transparent materials included or not in organics. Finally we give some examples of application to the interpretation of Solar System dust observations

  7. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  8. Optical Investigations of Dust Particles Distribution in RF and DC Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V.

    2008-09-07

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to study dust particles movement and conditions of a formation of ordered plasma-dust structures in a capacitively coupled RF discharge. 3D binocular diagnostics of plasma-dust structures in dc discharge was made.

  9. Seasonal and Particle Size-Dependent Variations of Hexabromocyclododecanes in Settled Dust: Implications for Sampling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhiguo; Xu, Fuchao; Li, Wenchao; Sun, Jianhui; Shen, Mohai; Su, Xianfa; Feng, Jinglan; Yu, Gang; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-09-15

    Particle size is a significant parameter which determines the environmental fate and the behavior of dust particles and, implicitly, the exposure risk of humans to particle-bound contaminants. Currently, the influence of dust particle size on the occurrence and seasonal variation of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) remains unclear. While HBCDs are now restricted by the Stockholm Convention, information regarding HBCD contamination in indoor dust in China is still limited. We analyzed composite dust samples from offices (n = 22), hotels (n = 3), kindergartens (n = 2), dormitories (n = 40), and main roads (n = 10). Each composite dust sample (one per type of microenvironment) was fractionated into 9 fractions (F1-F9: 2000-900, 900-500, 500-400, 400-300, 300-200, 200-100, 100-74, 74-50, and <50 μm). Total HBCD concentrations ranged from 5.3 (road dust, F4) to 2580 ng g(-1) (dormitory dust, F4) in the 45 size-segregated samples. The seasonality of HBCDs in indoor dust was investigated in 40 samples from two offices. A consistent seasonal trend of HBCD levels was evident with dust collected in the winter being more contaminated with HBCDs than dust from the summer. Particle size-selection strategy for dust analysis has been found to be influential on the HBCD concentrations, while overestimation or underestimation would occur with improper strategies. PMID:26301772

  10. Investigation of the dynamics of nanometer-size dust particles in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'brien, L.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and size distribution of submicron-sized interplanetary dust particles at 1 AU is highly variable due to the nature of its production and transport through the solar system. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009]. Simulations of nano-dust dynamics are performed to gain an understanding of their transport in the inner heliosphere and distribution near 1 AU where they can potentially be detected. Simulations show that the temporal variation in nano-dust detection, as suggested by the STEREO observations, can be described by the dust's interaction with the complex structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) [Juhasz and Horanyi, 2013]. The dust trajectories and their distribution near Earth's orbit is a function of the initial conditions of both nano-dust particles and the IMF. Le Chat et al. (2015) reported on the correlation between high nano-dust fluxes observed by STEREO and the observed Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). We present the results from simulating nano-dust interaction with ICMEs that are modeled as magnetic clouds, and report that the dust trajectories and, thus, their distribution and velocities at 1 AU are significantly altered.

  11. Dynamical behaviour of interstellar dust particles in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Klačka, Jozef

    2004-11-01

    Motion and possible capture of interstellar dust particles (ISDPs) in the Solar System are investigated. Gravitational force of the Sun, solar electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation and interplanetary magnetic field are considered. The effect of solar electromagnetic radiation plays an important role in the sense that nonspherical ISDPs can be captured (and survive) much more effectively than spherical particles. It turns out that particles of effective radii ≈ 0.4 μm, moving initially near the solar equatorial plane and with impact parameter 400 RS ≲ b ≲ 500 RS (solar radii) exhibit a high probability of capture and survival in the Solar System. Only a very small number of spherical particles can be captured. Survived nonspherical ISDPs orbiting around the Sun are characterized by a quantity analogous to the Kepler's third law: /T2, where T is orbital period and is time average of cubed solar distance over the period T. The value of the quantity /T2 is 0.673 ± 0.002 [AU3 /year2 ].

  12. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  13. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of amorphous silicate layers and nanostructures as cosmic dust analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, A.; Tozzetti, L.; Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, A.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; Della Ventura, G.; Zhao, Haifeng; Pan, Zhiyun; Li, Wenjie; Guan, Yong; Pace, E.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic dust grains (CD) are part of the evolution of stars and planetary systems and pervade the interstellar medium. Thus, their spectral signature may be used to deduce the physical features of the observed astronomical objects or to study many physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium. However, CD samples are available only from sample-and-return space missions. Thus, they are rare and not sufficient to be used to perform laboratory experiments of astrophysical interest, such as to produce reference spectra. In this contribution, we describe a new physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique that allows the production of amorphous samples with controlled chemical and morphological characteristics. In particular, this technique was developed to grow uniform or microstructured layers of Mg-Fe amorphous silicates (olivine or pyroxene) that are materials of wide interest for laboratory experiments. We discuss the first results that were achieved by applying this new synthesis method. The layers were studied by combining infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray microscopy was used for the first time to characterize the internal structure of the grains in these synthetic samples. Finally, future improvements of the technique and foreseen applications are discussed.

  14. Ultrahigh-energy particle flux from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-04-01

    We estimate the expected flux of ultrahigh-energy (> 10{sup 18}eV) protons in the present epoch due to a process which involves collapse or multiple self-intersections of a special class of closed cosmic string loops in the universe. We compare this flux with the observed flux of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and discuss the implications. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Yabushita, A.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.

    2006-04-13

    Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  17. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. PMID:23712117

  18. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant.

  19. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlů, J.; Richterová, I.; Fujita, D.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2008-09-01

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  20. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Fujita, D.

    2008-09-07

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  1. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Maechling, C. R.; Zare, R. N.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the first definitive measurements of specific organic molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's)) in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). An improved version of the microbeam-two-step laser mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two IDP's gave similar mass spectra showing an abundance of PAH's. Control samples, including particles of probable terrestrial origin from the same stratospheric collector, gave either null results or quite different spectra. We conclude that the PAH's are probably indigenous to the IDP's and are not terrestrial contaminants. The instrument used to study the particles is a two-step laser mass spectrometer. Constituent neutral molecules of the sample are first desorbed with a pulsed infrared laser beam focussed to 40 micrometers. In the second step, PAH's in the desorbed plume are preferentially ionized by a pulsed UV laser beam. Resulting ions produced by resonant absorption are extracted into a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This instrument has high spatial resolution, high ion transmission, unlimited mass range, and multichannel detection of all ion masses from a single laser shot.

  2. FROST - FReezing Of coated and uncoated duST particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, H.

    2009-04-01

    In April 2008, the measurement campaign FROST (FReezing Of coated and uncoated duST particles) was conducted at the ACCENT (Atmospheric Composition Change - the European NeTwork of excellence) infrastructure site LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator). During the campaign, size selected coated and uncoated Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles were characterized with respect to shape, chemical composition, hygroscopic growth and activation, and their ability to act as IN (Ice Nuclei). The ATD particles were dispersed by means of a fluidized bed generator. Coatings were applied in different furnaces, operated at different temperatures. The coatings were either succinic acid, sulphuric acid, or ammonium sulphate. A DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) was used for selecting particles with a mobility diameter of 300 nm. The following measurements were done: Three AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometers, e.g. Schneider et al. (2005) and references therein) were used to determine particle composition. Particles were collected on grids for subsequent TEM (Transmission Electron Micoscropy) analysis. Hygroscopic growth factors were determined by means of a HH-TDMA (High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) that measured up to relative humidities (RH) of 98% (Hennig et al. (2005)). The critical super-saturations needed for the activation of the investigated particles into cloud droplets were measured with a continuous flow CCNc (Cloud Condensation Nucleus counter) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technologies, Roberts and Nenes (2005)). The LACIS flow tube was extended to a length of 8 m, so LACIS could be used to examine the immersion freezing behaviour of the coated and uncoated ATD particles. By a bulk analysis and by the AMS measurements, the ATD particles were found to contain water soluble material, however in small quantities. By means of the online AMS measurements, it was possible to distinguish between thin and thick H2SO4 coatings. For the thin coatings

  3. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Close-up on Dust Particle Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Kissel, J.; Langevin, Y.; Briois, C.; von Hoerner, H.; Koch, A.; Schulz, R.; Silén, J.; Altwegg, K.; Colangeli, L.; Cottin, H.; Engrand, C.; Fischer, H.; Glasmachers, A.; Grün, E.; Haerendel, G.; Henkel, H.; Höfner, H.; Hornung, K.; Jessberger, E. K.; Lehto, H.; Lehto, K.; Raulin, F.; Le Roy, L.; Rynö, J.; Steiger, W.; Stephan, T.; Thirkell, L.; Thomas, R.; Torkar, K.; Varmuza, K.; Wanczek, K.-P.; Altobelli, N.; Baklouti, D.; Bardyn, A.; Fray, N.; Krüger, H.; Ligier, N.; Lin, Z.; Martin, P.; Merouane, S.; Orthous-Daunay, F. R.; Paquette, J.; Revillet, C.; Siljeström, S.; Stenzel, O.; Zaprudin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser instrument on board ESA's Rosetta mission has collected dust particles in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. During the early-orbit phase of the Rosetta mission, particles and particle agglomerates have been imaged and analyzed in the inner coma at distances between 100 km and 10 km off the cometary nucleus and at more than 3 AU from the Sun. We identified 585 particles of more than 14 μm in size. The particles are collected at low impact speeds and constitute a sample of the dust particles in the inner coma impacting and fragmenting on the targets. The sizes of the particles range from 14 μm up to sub-millimeter sizes and the differential dust flux size distribution is fitted with a power law exponent of -3.1. After impact, the larger particles tend to stick together, spread out or consist of single or a group of clumps, and the flocculent morphology of the fragmented particles is revealed. The elemental composition of the dust particles is heterogeneous and the particles could contain typical silicates like olivine and pyroxenes, as well as iron sulfides. The sodium to iron elemental ratio is enriched with regard to abundances in CI carbonaceous chondrites by a factor from ˜1.5 to ˜15. No clear evidence for organic matter has been identified. The composition and morphology of the collected dust particles appear to be similar to that of interplanetary dust particles.

  4. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  5. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    W.U. Boeglin, A.L. Roquemore, and R. Maqueda

    2009-03-06

    Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed. 2008 American Institute of Physics. __________________________________________________

  6. Interplanetary dust particles, not wind blown dust, control high altitude ice clouds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, Owen B.

    2016-10-01

    Water ice clouds on Mars are commonly observed at high altitudes. However, current generation Mars three-dimensional general circulation models (GCM) struggle to reproduce clouds above approximately 20-30 km. On Mars, as on Earth, ice cloud formation likely initiates by heterogeneous nucleation, which requires a population of suspended ice nuclei contiguous with supersaturated atmospheric water vapor. Although supersaturation is observed at high altitudes and has been reproduced in models, models predict very few ice nuclei. The small number of ice nuclei in the upper atmosphere is due to the assumption in Mars GCMs that the only source of ice nuclei is dust from the Martian surface. However, terrestrial mesospheric noctilucent clouds have been shown to form by ice nucleation on particles originating from ablated micrometeroids. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that a population of micrometeoric ablation biproducts on Mars exists and can act as a site for cloud nucleation at high altitudes. We present simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model for Mars (MarsCAM) based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model for Earth,coupled with a physically based, state-of-the-art cloud and dust physics model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to show that ablating micrometeoroids can yield abundant ice nuclei throughout the upper atmosphere of Mars. We find that simulations including a constant annual micrometeoroid flux allows us to reproduce the observed properties of high altitude water ice clouds including vertical distribution and particle size. In general, effective radius decreases with increasing altitude. We have additionally explored the impact of variable ablation rates. Preliminary results suggest that relatively high ablation rates, near or greater than 50%, are required to reproduce observed cloud features.

  7. Interplanetary Dust Particles of Micron Size Probably Associated with the Leonid Meteor Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. M.; McCracken, C. W.; LaGow, H. E.

    1961-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle event, coincident with the Leonid meteor shower and lasting approximately 70 hours, was recorded by a sensor on the Vanguard III satellite. During this interval the satellite's microphone system registered impacts of approximately 2800 dust particles with momenta exceeding 10(exp -2) dyne-second. The impact rate varied by as much as two orders of magnitude within a few hours. The microphone system was almost omnidirectional, so the radiants of the dust particles cannot be defined. Association of these dust particles with the Leonid meteor stream is suggested by the coincidence in time and by the location of the satellite. Vanguard III traversed five major meteor streams, but the impact rates significantly exceeded the background rate only during this one interval. This is the first case in which a significant increase in the directly measured impact rate of dust particles possibly can be associated with a major meteor stream.

  8. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  9. Mineralogical properties and internal structures of individual fine particles of Saharan dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Park, Mi Yeon; Kandler, Konrad; Nousiainen, Timo; Kemppinen, Osku

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing radiation, gases, other aerosols, and clouds. The assessment of its optical and chemical impacts requires knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of bulk dust and single particles. Despite the existence of a large body of data from field measurements and laboratory analyses, the internal properties of single dust particles have not been defined precisely. Here, we report on the mineralogical organization and internal structures of individual fine ( < 5 µm) Saharan dust particles sampled at Tenerife, Canary Islands. The bulk of Tenerife dust was composed of clay minerals (81 %), followed by quartz (10 %), plagioclase (3 %), and K-feldspar (2 %). Cross-sectional slices of Saharan dust particles prepared by the focused ion beam technique were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to probe the particle interiors. TEM analysis showed that the most common particle type was clay-rich agglomerate, dominated by illite-smectite series clay minerals with subordinate kaolinite. Submicron grains of iron (hydr)oxides (goethite and hematite) were commonly dispersed through the clay-rich particles. The median total volume of the iron (hydr)oxide grains included in the dust particles was estimated to be about 1.5 % vol. The average iron content of clay minerals, assuming 14 wt % H2O, was determined to be 5.0 wt %. Coarse mineral cores, several micrometers in size, were coated with thin layers of clay-rich agglomerate. Overall, the dust particles were roughly ellipsoidal, with an average axial ratio of 1.4 : 1.0 : 0.5. The mineralogical and structural properties of single Saharan dust particles provide a basis for the modeling of dust radiative properties. Major iron-bearing minerals, such as illite-smectite series clay minerals and iron (hydr)oxides, were commonly submicron- to nano-sized, possibly enhancing their biogeochemical availability to remote marine ecosystems lacking micronutrients.

  10. Exploring results of the possibility on detecting cosmic ray particles by acoustic way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Li, Y.; Chen, D.; Zheng, R.; Song, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that high energy particles produce detectable sounds in water. However, no one has been able to detect an acoustic signal generated by a high energy cosmic ray particle in water. Results show that transient ultrasonic signals in a large lake or reservoir are fairly complex and that the transient signals under water may arise mainly from sound radiation from microbubbles. This field is not explored in detail. Perhaps, the sounds created by cosmic ray particles hide in these ultrasonic signals. In order to develop the technique of acoustic detection, it is most important to make a thorough investigation of these ultrasonic signals in water.

  11. Calibration of particle detectors for secondary cosmic rays using gamma-ray beams from thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovsepyan, G.

    2015-09-01

    After observation of hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) we measure energy spectra of particles originated in clouds and directed towards Earth. We use these "beams" for calibration of cosmic ray detectors located beneath the clouds at an altitude of 3200 m at Mount Aragats in Armenia. The calibrations of particle detectors with fluxes of TGE gamma rays are in good agreement with simulation results and allow estimation of the energy thresholds and efficiencies of numerous particle detectors used for studying galactic and solar cosmic rays.

  12. Laboratory far-infrared spectroscopy of terrestrial sulphides to support analysis of cosmic dust spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusentsova, T.; Peale, R. E.; Maukonen, D.; Figueiredo, P.; Harlow, G. E.; Ebel, D. S.; Nissinboim, A.; Sherman, K.; Lisse, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    As an aid in interpreting data from space far-infrared (far-IR) missions, such as the Herschel Space Observatory with its Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, this paper presents spectroscopic studies of selected naturally occurring terrestrial sulphide minerals in the wavelength range 15-250 μm. The data can also be used to support the return from other, both past and planned, IR space missions, such as the Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer, SOFIA, SPiCA and Millimetron. In this study, we present far-IR spectra for 11 natural sulphide minerals in the form of dispersed powders of micron particle dimensions. Samples of various sulphides from the American Museum of Natural History mineral collection were selected based on criteria of diversity and potential astrophysical relevancy, based on their identification in Stardust, in stratospheric interplanetary dust particle samples, or in meteorites. Mineral species include digenite, galena, alabandite, sphalerite, wurtzite, covellite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, chalcopyrite and stibnite. Most of the sulphides examined possess prominent and characteristic features in the far-IR range. Spectra obtained are compared to those available from previous studies. Far-IR peak frequencies and mass absorption coefficient values are tabulated. Effects of particle size distribution, low temperature, and provenance on IR spectra are demonstrated for selected samples.

  13. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  14. Interplanetary Dust Particles as Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Brunetto, R.; Demeo, F. E.; Djouadi, Z.; Dumas, C.; Merouane, S.; Mousis, O.; Zanda, B.

    2015-06-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  15. Composition of Dust Particles Collected in the Inner Coma of Comet 67P/Churymumo-Gerasimenko by Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Kissel, J.; Langevin, Y.; Briois, C.; Koch, A.; Schulz, R.; Silen, J.; Altobelli, N.; Altwegg, K.; Baklouti, D.; Bardyn, A.; Colangeli, L.; Cottin, H.; Engrand, C.; Fischer, H.; Fray, N.; Glasmachers, A.; Grün, E.; Haerendel, G.; Henkel, H.; Höfner, H.; Hornung, K.; Jessberger, E.-K.; Lehto, H.; Ligier, N.; Martin, P.; Merouane, S.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Paquette, J.; Raulin, F.; Le Roy, L.; Rynö, J.; Silieström, S.; Steiger, W.; Stenzel, O.; Stephan, T.; Thirkell, L.; Thomas, R.; Torkar, K.; Varmuza, K.; Wanczek, K.-P.; Zaprudin, B.

    2016-08-01

    The dust particle instrument COSIMA - COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser - on board ESA’s ROSETTA mission is collecting and analyzing dust particles in the inner coma of Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

  16. Shielding of a Moving Charged Dust Particle in the Nonequilibrium Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Momot, A. I.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2008-09-07

    Study of shielding of a moving charged dust particle in the nonequilibrium plasma was performed. It is known that in the collisionless so-called Vlasov plasma the electric field of a slowly moving charged particle at high distances corresponds to quadrupole [1, 2, 3]. It was found that in the collisional plasma the electric field of a moving dust particle had the dipole component and the long distance behavior of the electric fields was defined by this component. Therefore the interaction of dust particles in plasma flow became dependent on the relative orientation of the interpaticle radius-vector and the flow velocity vector.

  17. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: IX Results of examination of the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kraft, L M; Vogel, F S; Lloyd, B; Benton, E V; Cruty, M R; Haymaker, W; Leon, A; Billingham, J; Turnbill, C E; Teas, V; Look, B C; Suri, K; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Samorajski, T; Bailey, O T; Zeman, W

    1975-04-01

    The olfactory epithelium, but not the nasal respiratory epithelium, of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived their flight on Apollo XVII showed both diffuse alterations and numerous disseminated focal lesions. The olfactory mucosa of the mouse that died during flight was also affected, but to a minor degree insofar as could be determined. All this was in contrast to the normal appearance of the olfactory mucosa of the numerous control animals. A number of possible causes were considered: systemic or regional infection; inhaled particulate material (seed dust); by-products from the KO2 bed in aerosol or particulate form; gas contaminants originating in the flight package; volatile substances from the dead mouse; weightlessness; and cosmic ray particle radiation. Where feasible, studies were conducted in an effort to rule in or rule out some of these potentially causative factors. No definitive conclusions were reached as to the cause of the lesions in the flight mice.

  18. Metamorphism of cosmic dust: Processing from circumstellar outflows to the cometary regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1989-01-01

    Metamorphism of refractory particles continues in the interstellar medium (ISM) where the driving forces are sputtering by cosmic ray particles, annealing by high energy photons, and grain destruction in supernova generated shocks. Studies of the depletion of the elements from the gas phase of the interstellar medium tell us that if grain destruction occurs with high efficiency in the ISM, then there must be some mechanism by which grains can be formed in the ISM. Most grains in a cloud which collapses to form a star will be destroyed; many of the surviving grains will be severely processed. Grains in the outermost regions of the nebula may survive relatively unchanged by thermal processing or hydration. It is these grains which one hopes to find in comets. However, only those grains encased in ice at low temperature can be considered pristine since a considerable degree of hydrous alteration might occur in a cometary regolith if the comet enters the inner solar system. The physical, chemical and isotopic properties of a refractory grain at each stage of its life cycle will be discussed.

  19. Preliminary cosmic ray all-particle spectrum from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podorozhny, Dmitry

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distributions. Methods of identification of charge and energy reconstruction and a preliminary cosmic ray all-particle spectrum are presented and discussed. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  20. MCNP6 Cosmic & Terrestrial Background Particle Fluxes -- Release 4

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.; Wilcox, Trevor

    2015-01-23

    Essentially a set of slides, the presentation begins with the MCNP6 cosmic-source option, then continues with the MCNP6 transport model (atmospheric, terrestrial) and elevation scaling. It concludes with a few slides on results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  1. Particle pair diffusion of inertial particles such as dust in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem; Tereda, Yoseph; Usama, Syed

    2016-04-01

    The transport of particles in turbulent flows is ubiquitous in industrial applications and also in nature such as in dust storms and pollens. The mathematical equations that describe the motion of individual inertial particles (i.e. particles with weight and friction) is not fully developed yet, although simplified descriptions in specific contexts have been proposed, such as by Maxey and Riley [1]. The relative motion of groups of particles is equally important to understand, and this can usually be related to the relative motion of two particles, or pair diffusion. In 1926 Richardson [2] proposed a pioneering theory of pair diffusion of fluid particles based upon the idea of a separation dependent pair diffusivity, K(l), where l is the distance between two particles. Richardson advanced the theory based on a locality hypothesis in which only energy in the turbulent scales similar to the pair separation l is effective in further increasing the pair separation, leading to the famous 4/3-scaling, K˜ l4/3. Recent studies in turbulent particle pair diffusion [3] has suggested that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process inside the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number turbulence containing generalised power-law energy spectra, E(k)˜ k-p with 1

  2. The development and the tests of the electrostatic probe for dust particle collection in thermonuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Voityuk, A. N.; Zakharov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Formation of dust particles in thermonuclear reactors can greatly affect the plasma parameters and lead to accumulation of tritium. The rates of formation and deposition of dust need to be measured, and the parameters of formation of dust particles and clusters need to be studied. A model of a device for collection of fine conductive particles capable of removing them from the reactor chamber for future research is proposed in this paper. The dust collector's operation is based on a principle of applied electrostatic field. The model was tested in different operating conditions: in vacuum, at the atmospheric pressure in the atmosphere of air and dry nitrogen. The experiments were conducted with a stationary system and with the dust collector in motion relative to the dusty surface. It is shown that, during the probe moving relative to the surface, it can remove up to 95% of fine tungsten particles with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 μm.

  3. Automated SIMS Isotopic Analysis Of Small Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gyngard, F.; Morgand, A.; Zinner, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of sub-μm to μm sized dust grains are of increasing interest in cosmochemistry, nuclear forensics and terrestrial aerosol research. Because of its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the tool of choice for measuring isotopes in such small samples. Indeed, SIMS has enabled an entirely new sub-field of astronomy: presolar grains in meteorites. In recent years, the development of the Cameca NanoSIMS ion probe has extended the reach of isotopic measurements to particles as small as 100 nm in diameter, a regime where isotopic precision is strongly limited by the total number of atoms in the sample. Many applications require obtaining isotopic data on large numbers of particles, necessitating the development of automated techniques. One such method is isotopic imaging, wherein images of multiple isotopes are acquired, each containing multiple dispersed particles, and image processing is used to determine isotopic ratios for individual particles. This method is powerful, but relatively inefficient for raster-based imaging on the NanoSIMS. Modern computerized control of instrumentation has allowed for another approach, analogous to commercial automated SEM-EDS particle analysis systems, in which images are used solely to locate particles followed by fully automated grain-by-grain analysis. The first such system was developed on the Carnegie Institution’s Cameca ims-6f, and was used to generate large databases of presolar grains. We have recently developed a similar system for the NanoSIMS, whose high sensitivity allows for smaller grains to be analyzed with less sample consumption than is possible with the 6f system. The 6f and NanoSIMS systems are functionally identical: an image of dispersed grains is obtained with sufficient statistical precision for an algorithm to identify the positions of individual particles, the primary ion beam is deflected to each particle in turn and rastered in a small

  4. A note on the stochastic nature of particle cohesive force and implications to threshold friction velocity for aerodynamic dust entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yaping; Klose, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable interest to determine the threshold for aeolian dust emission on Earth and Mars. Existing schemes for threshold friction velocity are all deterministic in nature, but observations show that in the dust particle size range the threshold friction velocity scatters strongly due to stochastic inter-particle cohesion. In the real world, there always exists a certain amount of free dust which can be easily lifted from the surface by weak winds or even turbulence, as exemplified by dust devils. It has been proposed in the dust-devil research community, that the pressure drop at dust-devil center may be a major mechanism for dust-devil dust emission, known as the Δp effect. It is questioned here whether the Δp effect is substantial or whether the elevated dust concentration in dust devils is due to free dust emission. A simple analysis indicates that the Δp effect appears to be small and the dust in dust devils is probably due to free dust emission and dust convergence. To estimate free dust emission, it is useful to define a lower limit of dust-particle threshold friction velocity. A simple expression for this velocity is proposed by making assumptions to the median and variance of inter-particle cohesive force. The simple expression is fitted to the data of the Arizona State University Vortex Generator. While considerable uncertainty remains in the scheme, this note highlights the need for additional research on the stochastic nature of dust emission.

  5. The nature of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust particles detected with MIDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannel, T.; Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.; Schmied, R.

    2015-10-01

    The MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) onboard Rosetta collects dust particles and produces three-dimensional images with nano- to micrometre resolution. To date, several tens of particles have been detected, allowing determination of their properties at the smallest scale. The key features will be presented, including the particle size, their fragile character, and their morphology. These findings will be compared with the results of other Rosetta dust experiments.

  6. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  7. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  8. Mass-particle size distributions of atmospheric dust and the dry deposition of dust to the remote ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Ray, B. J.; Lewis, N. F.; Tomza, U.; Duce, R. A.

    1997-07-01

    Size-separated mineral aerosol samples were collected and analyzed to investigate the relationships between the mass-particle size distributions (MSDs) of dust particles and the dust loadings in the atmosphere. The data also were used to assess the changes in the MSDs of dust in relation to transport processes and especially the associated effects on dry deposition. Atmospheric dust concentrations, as indicated by aluminum or scandium, in samples collected from three sites in the remote North Atlantic were higher than those in samples collected during a cruise in the North Pacific on board the R/V Moana Wave. However, the mass median diameters (MMDs) for the North Pacific samples were both larger on average (˜3 μm versus ˜2 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter) and more variable than those from the North Atlantic; this difference was attributed to wet conditions and particle aggregation over the North Pacific. In addition, for the ensemble of all samples the geometric standard deviations of the mass-particle size distributions, which are analogous to the sorting values used to characterize sedimentary materials, tended to vary inversely and nonlinearly with the mass median diameters. Model-derived dry deposition velocities for the samples were at most weakly related to either the dust concentrations or the MMDs. However, the dry deposition velocities for two subsets of samples were correlated with the geometric standard deviations of the distributions; this is further evidence that the mass flux of dust via dry deposition can be controlled by a relatively small fraction of aerodynamically large particles.

  9. Motions of dust particles in a complex plasma with an axisymmetric nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the motions of dust particles in a complex plasma by applying an axisymmetric nonuniform magnetic field, B , introduced with a permanent magnet. The magnetic field changes its direction from upward to downward within the experimental area. The distribution of dust particles is conical in the meridional plane, and its central area is a void. The dust particles are generally stagnant in the vertical direction and distributed in multiple layers. The horizontal plane is separated into two regions where the vertical component of B can and cannot be regarded as zero. The distribution of the dust particles in the horizontal plane is concentric. The dust particles along the inner and outer edges rotate in opposite directions due to the direction of the vertical component of B and generate shear flow at a certain height. The rotation velocities of the particles at the edges are compared with the theory of Kaw et al. [Phys. Plasmas 9, 387 (2002)]. The vortex-like structure is not easy to observe even in the presence of a shear flow because of the influence of the other dust particles as well as the small Reynolds number of the dust fluid.

  10. Determination of electron production rates caused by cosmic ray particles in ionospheres of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Buchvarova, M. B.; Mateev, L.; Ruder, H.

    Cosmic rays (CR) create the lower parts of planetary ionospheres. The observed CR spectrum can be distributed into the following five intervals: I ( E = 3.10 6 — 10 11 GeV/n), II ( E = 3.10 2 — 3.10 6 GeV/n), III ( E = 30 MeV/n — 3.10 2GeV/n), IV ( E = 1 — 30 MeV/n) and V ( E = 10 KeV/n — 1 MeV/n), where E is the kinetic energy of the particles (Dorman, 1977; Velinov, 2000). Some methods exist for calculating ionization by relativistic particles in CR intervals I, II and III. For the high latitude and polar ionosphere, however, intervals III, IV and V are also significant since they contain solar cosmic ray and anomalous cosmic ray components. Formulas for the electron production rate q (cm -3s -1) at height h in the planetary ionosphere as a result of penetration of energetic particles from intervals III, IV and V are deduced in this paper. For this purpose the law of particle energy transformation by penetration through the ionosphere — atmosphere system is obtained. A model for the calculation of the cosmic ray spectrum on the basis of satellite measurements is created. This computed analytical model gives a practical possibility for investigation of experimental data from measurements of galactic cosmic rays and their anomalous component.

  11. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  12. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 μm, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0-2.5 μm. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters.

  13. Cosmic dust in the atmosphere and in the interplanetary space at 1 AU today and in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.

    1973-01-01

    A description of techniques used in recent experiments to detect and analyze cosmic dust and micrometeorites is given and the results both from the study of lunar crater statistics and from in situ measurements are reviewed. The results from lunar crater statistics show an agreement with the results obtained from in situ measurements in interplanetary space and derived from zodiacal light measurements. The near earth results show an enhancement in the flux numbers. This can be caused either by secondary lunar debris or by disintegration of low density fireballs in the outer atmosphere.

  14. Dosimeter design, construction, and implantation. [for recording HZE cosmic particle tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, D. L.; Suri, K.; Durso, J. A.; Cota, F. L.; Ashley, W. W.; Binnard, R. M.; Haymaker, W.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Zeman, W.

    1975-01-01

    To detect the passage of cosmic ray particles through the heads of the pocket mice during the Apollo XVII flight, a 'monitor' (dosimeter) composed of plastics was prepared and implanted under the scalp. The monitor was mounted on a platform, the undersurface of which fitted the contour of the skull. Numerous tests were run to assure that the presence of the monitor assembly beneath the scalp would be compatible with the well-being of the mice and that the capacity of the monitor to detect the traversal of cosmic ray particles would be preserved over the several weeks during which it would remain under the scalp.

  15. Limits on deeply penetrating particles in the 10(17) eV cosmic ray flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, J. W.; Loh, P. R.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    Deeply penetrating particles in the 10 to the 17th power eV cosmic ray flux were investigated. No such events were found in 8.2 x 10 to the 6th power sec of running time. Limits were set on the following: quark-matter in the primary cosmic ray flux; long-lived, weakly interacting particles produced in p-air collisions; the astrophysical neutrino flux. In particular, the neutrino flux limit at 10 to the 17th power eV implies that z, the red shift of maximum activity is 10 in the model of Hill and Schramm.

  16. Dust Devils on Mars: Effects of Surface Roughness on Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neakrase, Lynn D.; Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.; Balme, Matthew L.; Foley, Daniel J.; Eddlemon, Eric E.

    2005-01-01

    Dust devils have been proposed as effective mechanisms for lofting large quantities of dust into the martian atmosphere. Previous work showed that vortices lift dust more easily than simple boundary layer winds. The aim of this study is to determine experimentally the effects of non-erodable roughness elements on vortex particle threshold through laboratory simulations of natural surfaces. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  17. Ice Nucleating Particle Properties in the Saharan Air Layer Close to the Dust Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Y.; Garcia, I. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Linke, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Nickovic, S.; Lohmann, U.; Kanji, Z. A.; Sierau, B.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2013 and 2014 measurements of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations, aerosol particle size distributions, chemistry and fluorescence were conducted at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory located at 2373 m asl on Tenerife, west off the African shore. During summer, the observatory is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to dust. Absolute INP concentrations and activated fractions at T=-40 to -15°C and RHi=100-150 % were measured. In this study, we discuss the in-situ measured INP properties with respect to changes in the chemical composition, the biological content, the source regions as well as transport pathways and thus aging processes of the dust aerosol. For the first time, ice crystal residues were also analyzed with regard to biological content by means of their autofluorescence signal close to a major dust source region. Airborne dust samples were collected with a cyclone for additional offline analysis in the laboratory under similar conditions as in the field. Both, in-situ and offline dust samples were chemically characterized using single-particle mass spectrometry. The DREAM8 dust model extended with dust mineral fractions was run to simulate meteorological and dust aerosol conditions for ice nucleation. Results show that the background aerosol at Izaña was dominated by carbonaceous particles, which were hardly ice-active under the investigated conditions. When Saharan dust was present, INP concentrations increased by up to two orders of magnitude even at water subsaturated conditions at T≤-25°C. Differences in the ice-activated fraction were found between different dust periods which seem to be linked to variations in the aerosol chemical composition (dust mixed with changing fractions of sea salt and differences in the dust aerosol itself). Furthermore, two biomass burning events in 2014 were identified which led to very low INP concentrations under the investigated temperature and relative humidity

  18. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  19. A detailed petrological analysis of hydrated, low-nickel, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed petrological analysis of three low-Ni, K-bearing, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles is performed, and these particles are compared to products of high-energy, explosive (Plinian-type) volcanic events. The analytical electron microscope (AEM) analyses show pervasive layer silicates, carbonate and goethite, and chemical fractionation in the matrix of these particles similar to hydrothermal alteration in volcanic ejecta. Along with low Ni content and the presence of potassium, the texture and mineralogy of particles L2001-18, L2001-20, and L2002 C2 are similar to at least two nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles of the igneous subgroup for which an extraterrestrial origin has been suggested based on their minor- and trace-element abundances. The petrological characteristics of some low-Ni, K-bearing nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles supports a probable terrestrial volcanic origin, but the AEM data alone cannot exclude an extraterrestrial origin for these particles.

  20. Particle size and metals concentrations of dust from a paint manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siew Lai; Yin, Chun-Yang; Yap, Siaw Yang

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the particle size distribution and concentration of metallic elements of solvent- and water-based paint dust from bulk dust collected from dust-collecting hoppers were determined. The mean particle size diameter over a 12-week sampling period was determined using a particle size analyzer. The metals composition and concentration of the dust were determined via acid digestion technique followed by concentration analysis using inductively coupled plasma. The volume weighted mean particle diameters were found to be 0.941+/-0.016 and 8.185+/-0.201 microm for solvent- and water-based paint dust, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in solvent-based paint dust were found to be 100+/-20.00 microg/g (arsenic), 1550+/-550.00 microg/g (copper), 15,680+/-11,780.00 microg/g (lead) and 30,460+/-10,580.00 microg/g (zinc) while the mean concentrations of metals in water-based paint dust were found to be 20.65+/-6.11 microg/g (arsenic), 9.14+/-14.65 microg/g (copper), 57.46+/-22.42 microg/g (lead) and 1660+/-1260 microg/g (zinc). Both paint dust types could be considered as hazardous since almost all of the dust particles were smaller than 10 microm. Particular emphasis on containment of solvent-based paint dust particles should be given since it was shown that they were very fine in size (<1 microm) and had high lead and zinc concentrations.

  1. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2013-10-10

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, τ{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of τ{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ∼< St ∼< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with τ{sub p} ≅ 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with τ{sub p} ∼> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ≅ 1, reaches a maximum at τ{sub p} ≅ 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as τ{sub p}{sup -1/2} for τ{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

  2. The near-earth enhancement of asteroidal over cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    The study deals with a theory suggesting a cometary origin for most of the stratospheric cosmic dust. It is argued, though, that the stratospheric cosmic dust, as well as dust sampled by earth-orbiting collectors, is not representative of the true composition of the zodiacal cloud. A substantial near-earth collection bias enhances the low-velocity component in stratospheric and earth-orbiting collectors. This arises from gravitational focusing, which substantially biases all near-earth micrometeorite collections in favor of the low-velocity component of the interplanetary dust, and atmospheric entry heating, which further biases the stratospheric cosmic dust in favor of the low-velocity component of the interplanetary dust. It is noted that, in addition to these two effects, the increasing collision probability between a dust particle and a nongravitating planet will bias the near-earth collection farther in favor of dust with lower geocentric velocity at the collection opportunity.

  3. Comparison of Contributions of Wind-blown and Anthropogenic Fugitive Dust Particles to Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Gong, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new wind-blown-dust emissions module was recently implemented into AURAMS, a Canadian regional air quality model (Park et al., 2009; Park et al., 2007), to investigate the relative impact of wind-blown dust vs. anthropogenic fugitive dust on air quality in North America. In order to apply the wind-blown dust emissions module to the entire North American continent, a soil-grain-size-distribution map was developed using the outputs of four monthly runs of AURAMS for 2002 and available PM2.5 dust-content observations. The simulation results using the new soil-grain-size-distribution map showed that inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions is essential to predict the impact of dust aerosols on air quality in North America, especially in the western U.S.. The wind-blown dust emissions varied widely by season, whereas the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions did not change significantly. In the spring (April), the continental monthly average emissions rate of wind-blown dust was much higher than that of anthropogenic fugitive dust. The total amount of wind-blown dust emissions in North America predicted by the model for 2002 was comparable to that of anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions. Even with the inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions, however, the model still had difficulty simulating dust concentrations. Further improvements are needed, in terms of both limitations of the wind-blown-dust emission module and uncertainties in the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions inventories, for improved dust modelling. References Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C.A. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Sensitivity of surface characteristics on the simulation of wind-blown dust source in North America, Atmospheric Environment, 43 (19), 3122-3129, 2009. Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, T.L. Zhao, R.J. Vet, V.S. Bouchet, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Simulation of entrainment and transport of dust particles within North America in April 2001 ("Red

  4. On the height variation of the E-region cowling conductivity - effect of charged dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, P.; Kulkarni, V. H.

    2006-11-01

    Height profiles of the Cowling conductivity in the electrojet region, estimated using the atmospheric parameters given by the existing models like CIRA or MSIS and measured electron density profiles, consistently show the heights of the electrojet current intensity peak to be more than 3 km below those estimated from in-situ measurements using magnetometers on board sounding rockets. Kulkarni and Muralikrishna (2005) attempted to explain this to be due to the effect of neutral dust particles. They reported that neutral dust particles, when they exist in sufficient numbers, can modify the collision parameters, especially in the lower E-region, where dust particles of meteoric origin are known to exist in large numbers, and thereby can modify the Cowling conductivity profile in the electrojet region. This work is extended here to include the effect of charged dust particles. Dust particles can become charged negatively by the attachment of ambient free electrons, and can thus reduce the number density of free electrons especially below the electrojet peak. This can alter the vertical profile of the east-west Hall current driven by the vertical Hall polarization field, thereby causing a net reduction in the electrojet current. Such a decrease in the electrojet current may be observed on the ground magnetograms. This mechanism, as proposed here, can operate only during periods of strong meteor shower activity, when the dust particle density at the assumed deposit height of 103 km can reach extreme values (for example, 5×104 cm-3 of 1-µm diameter dust particles). Such a dense dust layer may even cause a reversal in the normally upward vertical Hall polarization field, within the dust layer, causing a reversal of the electrojet currents below the current peak.

  5. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B S; Said, Syed A M; Al-Aqeeli, N; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  6. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B S; Said, Syed A M; Al-Aqeeli, N; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  7. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  8. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  9. Dissipation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves on Energetic Particles: Impact on Interstellar Turbulence and Cosmic Ray Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, V.S.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Jones, F.C.; Strong, A.W.; Zirakashvili, V.N.; /Troitsk, IZMIRAN /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-01-17

    The physical processes involved in diffusion of Galactic cosmic rays in the interstellar medium are addressed. We study the possibility that the nonlinear MHD cascade sets the power-law spectrum of turbulence which scatters charged energetic particles. We find that the dissipation of waves due to the resonant interaction with cosmic ray particles may terminate the Kraichnan-type cascade below wavelengths 10{sup 13} cm. The effect of this wave dissipation has been incorporated in the GALPROP numerical propagation code in order to asses the impact on measurable astrophysical data. The energy-dependence of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient found in the resulting self-consistent model may explain the peaks in the secondary to primary nuclei ratios observed at about 1 GeV/nucleon.

  10. Effects of particle drift on the transport of cosmic rays. IV - More realistic diffusion coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Davila, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results from numerical simulations of cosmic-ray modulations by the solar wind are presented which show that the scattering mean free path should be larger than the particle gyroradius in the average magnetic field. It is found that the difference between drift and no-drift solutions is not as great as in previous simulations, which violated the mean free path constraint stated. Profound effects are still noted for the drifts, which determine the origin of the bulk of the cosmic rays seen at any given time in the inner solar system. Accordingly, during the 1975 solar minimum, the positively charged cosmic rays seen in the inner solar system came primarily from the outer boundary near the heliospheric poles while negative particles came from the equatorial regions of the boundary.

  11. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  12. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  13. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented. PMID:27250421

  14. Impacts of fast meteoroids and the separation of dust particles from the surface of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, S. I.; Golub', A. P.; Lisin, E. A.; Izvekova, Yu. N.; Atamaniuk, B.; Dol'nikov, G. G.; Zakharov, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of the separation of dust particles owing to impacts of micrometeoroids on the surface of the Moon has been discussed. It has been shown that this effect is significant and should be taken into account when determining the number of particles rising over the surface of the Moon at the formation of a plasma-dust system. The average number of regolith particles leaving the surface of the Moon owing to the impacts of fast meteoroids has been determined for various altitudes over the Moon. The size distribution function of particles leaving the surface of the Moon because of impacts of meteoroids has been determined. It has been shown that impacts of meteoroids constitute an important source of dust microparticles in the plasma-dust system over the surface of the Moon.

  15. The origin of low mass particles within and beyond the dust coma envelopes of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Ksanfomality, L. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements from the Dust Counter and Mass Analyzer (DUCMA) instruments on VEGA-1 and -2 revealed unexpected fluxes of low mass (up to 10 to the minus 13th power g) dust particles at very great distances from the nucleus (300,000 to 600,000 km). These particles are detected in clusters (10 sec duration), preceded and followed by relatively long time intervals during which no dust is detected. This cluster phenomenon also occurs inside the envelope boundaries. Clusters of low mass particles are intermixed with the overall dust distribution throughout the coma. The clusters account for many of the short-term small-scale intensity enhancements previously ascribed to microjets in the coma. The origin of these clusters appears to be emission from the nucleus of large conglomerates which disintegrate in the coma to yield clusters of discrete, small particles continuing outward to the distant coma.

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  17. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  18. Measurement of Characteristics of Micron Size Individual Dust Particles of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, P. D.; Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamic balance has been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains of 0.2-20 micron size under controlled pressures/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. We plan three classes of experiments using this facility: (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains: The photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation found from these measurements will provide much-needed photoelectric emission data for individual dust particles; (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles: Specifically, we will determines the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1- 25 micron spectral region; (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres: The measured data will permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Brief descriptions of the experimental setup for the last two classes of experiments will be given. We will present results of measurements of photoelectric emission using 0.2-6.6 micron size silica particles exposed to UV radiation at 120-200 nm and also results of radiation pressure measurements using the same size silica particles and laser light at 5320 Angstrom.

  19. How micron-sized dust particles determine the chemistry of our Universe.

    PubMed

    Dulieu, François; Congiu, Emanuele; Noble, Jennifer; Baouche, Saoud; Chaabouni, Henda; Moudens, Audrey; Minissale, Marco; Cazaux, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    In the environments where stars and planets form, about one percent of the mass is in the form of micro-meter sized particles known as dust. However small and insignificant these dust grains may seem, they are responsible for the production of the simplest (H(2)) to the most complex (amino-acids) molecules observed in our Universe. Dust particles are recognized as powerful nano-factories that produce chemical species. However, the mechanism that converts species on dust to gas species remains elusive. Here we report experimental evidence that species forming on interstellar dust analogs can be directly released into the gas. This process, entitled chemical desorption (fig. 1), can dominate over the chemistry due to the gas phase by more than ten orders of magnitude. It also determines which species remain on the surface and are available to participate in the subsequent complex chemistry that forms the molecules necessary for the emergence of life. PMID:23439221

  20. Observations of ultraheavy cosmic ray particles at 10 GV cutoff rigidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanagimachi, T.; Hisano, K.; Ito, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Doke, T.; Hamasaki, R.; Hayashi, T.; Yakenaka, T.; Nagata, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraheavy cosmic ray particles with Z 45 and Fe were observed in two balloon flights at a mean geomagnetic cutoff rigidity of 10 GV. Fluxes of these particles at the top of the atmosphere are presented. A ratio of (Z 45)/(Fe) is compared with other experimental results. The ratio decreases with increasing energy in the energy range from 1 to 10 GeV/amu. A possibility is presented to explain the variation of the ratio with energy.

  1. Porosity of an Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, M. M.; Thomas, K. L.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Determination of the density and porosity of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) is important in the dynamics of collisional and orbital evolution of small-sized particles. These measurements are also useful to suggest possible sources for IDPs based on comparisons with known extraterrestrial materials (e.g., chondrites). Previous work on IDPs shows a wide range of densities from very low (0.08 g/cm3 [1]) through low (0.3 g/cm3 [2]) to high (6.2 g/cm3 [3]), with an average density at 2.0 g/cm3 for 150 particles [2]. In another study, IDPs fall into two distinct density groups with mean values of 0.6 g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 [3]. In general, chondritic IDPs with lower density values most likely have appreciable porosity, suggesting they are primitive, uncompacted particles. It is believed that porosities greater than 70% are rare [2]. Sample In this study, porosity measurements were determined for one IDP, Clu17. This chondritic particle is a fragment of a large-sized IDP (L2008#5) known as a cluster particle. The cluster is composed of 53 fragments >5 micrometers in diameter; a detailed description of the cluster is given in [4]. IDP Clu17 has ~12 wt.% C and contains chondritic abundances (within 2xCI) for major elements. This fragment is dominated by fine-grained aggregates, also known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide [5]), and contains some olivine, pyroxene, Fe-Ni sulfides, and carbonaceous material. Methods IDP Clu17 was analyzed for light elements quantitatively analysis using scanning electron microscopy and thin-window energy dispersive spectrometry [details of technique in 4]. Following the initial bulk chemical analysis, the particle was embedded in epoxy, thin sectioned using an ultramicrotome, and examined with a JEOL 2000 FX transmission electron microscope. Many of the sections were not complete; individual grains in some sections are lost during microtoming. Photos from nine of the best sections were digitized by scanning at 1200 dpi. The

  2. Collection and curation of interplanetary dust particles recovered from the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Warren, Jack L.

    1994-01-01

    Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) from Earth's stratosphere. Specially designed dust collectors are prepared for flight and processed after flight in an ultraclean (Class-100) laboratory constructed for this purpose at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Particles are individually retrieved from the collectors, examined, and cataloged, and then made available to the scientific community for research. Interplanetary dust thereby joins lunar samples and Antarctic meteorites as a critical extraterrestrial material being curated at JSC.

  3. Effect of turbulence on collisions of dust particles with planetesimals in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, H.; Guillot, T.; Bec, J.; Ormel, C. W.; Ida, S.; Tanga, P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planetesimals in gaseous protoplanetary disks may grow by collecting dust particles. Hydrodynamical studies show that small particles generally avoid collisions with the planetesimals because they are entrained by the flow around them. This occurs when St, the Stokes number, defined as the ratio of the dust stopping time to the planetesimal crossing time, becomes much smaller than unity. However, these studies have been limited to the laminar case, whereas these disks are believed to be turbulent. Aims: We want to estimate the influence of gas turbulence on the dust-planetesimal collision rate and on the impact speeds. Methods: We used three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of a fixed sphere (planetesimal) facing a laminar and turbulent flow seeded with small inertial particles (dust) subject to a Stokes drag. A no-slip boundary condition on the planetesimal surface is modeled via a penalty method. Results: We find that turbulence can significantly increase the collision rate of dust particles with planetesimals. For a high turbulence case (when the amplitude of turbulent fluctuations is similar to the headwind velocity), we find that the collision probability remains equal to the geometrical rate or even higher for St ≳ 0.1, i.e., for dust sizes an order of magnitude smaller than in the laminar case. We derive expressions to calculate impact probabilities as a function of dust and planetesimal size and turbulent intensity.

  4. On the effect of dust particles on global cloud condensation nuclei and cloud droplet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  5. On the Effect of Dust Particles on Global Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Cloud Droplet Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  6. Wind tunnel study of twelve dust samples by large particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannak, B.; Corsmeier, U.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Al-azab, T.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the lack of data by large dust and sand particle, the fluid dynamics characteristics, hence the collection efficiencies of different twelve dust samplers have been experimentally investigated. Wind tunnel tests were carried out at wind velocities ranging from 1 up to 5.5 ms-1. As a large solid particle of 0.5 and 1 mm in diameter, Polystyrene pellets called STYRO Beads or polystyrene sphere were used instead of sand or dust. The results demonstrate that the collection efficiency is relatively acceptable only of eight tested sampler and lie between 60 and 80% depending on the wind velocity and particle size. These samplers are: the Cox Sand Catcher (CSC), the British Standard Directional Dust Gauge (BSD), the Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE), the Suspended Sediment Trap (SUSTRA), the Modified Wilson and Cooke (MWAC), the Wedge Dust Flux Gauge (WDFG), the Model Series Number 680 (SIERRA) and the Pollet Catcher (POLCA). Generally they can be slightly recommended as suitable dust samplers but with collecting error of 20 up to 40%. However the BSNE verify the best performance with a catching error of about 20% and can be with caution selected as a suitable dust sampler. Quite the contrary, the other four tested samplers which are the Marble Dust Collector (MDCO), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Inverted Frisbee Sampler (IFS) and the Inverted Frisbee Shaped Collecting Bowl (IFSCB) cannot be recommended due to their very low collection efficiency of 5 up to 40%. In total the efficiency of sampler may be below 0.5, depending on the frictional losses (caused by the sampler geometry) in the fluid and the particle's motion, and on the intensity of airflow acceleration near the sampler inlet. Therefore, the literature data of dust are defective and insufficient. To avoid false collecting data and hence inaccurate mass flux modeling, the geometry of the dust sampler should be considered and furthermore improved.

  7. Time of flight mass spectra of ions in plasmas produced by hypervelocity impacts of organic and mineralogical microparticles on a cosmic dust analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, B. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Armes, S. P.; Khan, M. A.; Lascelles, S. F.; Green, S. F.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Srama, R.; Bigger, S. W.

    2003-10-01

    The ionic plasma produced by a hypervelocity particle impact can be analysed to determine compositional information for the original particle by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such methods have been adopted on interplanetary dust detectors to perform in-situ analyses of encountered grains, for example, the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA). In order to more fully understand the data returned by such instruments, it is necessary to study their response to impacts in the laboratory. Accordingly, data are shown here for the mass spectra of ionic plasmas, produced through the acceleration of microparticles via a 2 MV van de Graaff accelerator and their impact on a dimensionally correct CDA model with a rhodium target. The microparticle dusts examined have three different chemical compositions: metal (iron), organic (polypyrrole and polystyrene latex) and mineral (aluminosilicate clay). These microparticles have mean diameters in the range 0.1 to 1.6 mu m and their velocities range from 1-50 km s-1. They thus cover a wide range of compositions, sizes and speeds expected for dust particles encountered by spacecraft in the Solar System. The advent of new low-density, microparticles with highly controllable attributes (composition, size) has enabled a number of new investigations in this area. The key is the use of a conducting polymer, either as the particle itself or as a thin overlayer on organic (or inorganic) core particles. This conductive coating permits efficient electrostatic charging and acceleration. Here, we examine how the projectile's chemical composition influences the ionic plasma produced after the hypervelocity impact. This study thus extends our understanding of impact plasma formation and detection. The ionization yield normalized to particle mass was found to depend on impact speed to the power (3.4 +/- 0.1) for iron and (2.9 +/- 0.1) for polypyrrole coated polystyrene and aluminosilicate clay. The ioization signal rise time was found to

  8. Dust particles from comets and asteroids collected at the Earth's orbit: Parent-daughter relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. A.; Zook, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The relative contributions of comets and asteroids to the reservoir of dust in the interplanetary medium is not well known. There are direct observations of dust released from comets and there is evidence to associate the IRAS dust bands with possible collisions of Asteroids in the main belt. It is believed that one may combine lab analysis of the physics and chemistry of captured particles with orbital data in order to identify comet and asteroid parent bodies. It is possible to use the collected orbits of the dust to connect with its source in two ways. One is to consider the long time orbit evolution of the dust under Poynting-Robertson drag. The other is to look at the prompt orbit change of dust from comets onto trajectories that intersect the earth's orbit. In order to characterize the orbits of dust particles evolved over a long period of time, a study of its orbital evolution was undertaken. Various parameters associated with these dust orbits as they cross the Earth's orbit were considered in order to see if one may discriminate between particles evolved from comets and asteroids. The method was to calculate by a numerical procedure the orbits of dust particles after they left their parent bodies. It appears that as the particles pass the Earth's orbit, asteroidal grains and cometary grains can be differentiated on the basis of their measured orbital eccentricities even after much planetary perturbation. Broad parent daughter associations can be made on this basis from measurement of their trajectories intercepted in earth orbit.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of neutral particle in the presence of topological defects in magnetic cosmic string background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanabadi, H.; Hosseinpour, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the covariant form of the non-relativistic Schrödinger-Pauli equation in the space-time generated by a cosmic string and discuss the solutions of this equation in the presence of interaction between the magnetic dipole momentum and electromagnetic field. We study the influence of the topology on this system. We obtain the solution of radial part as well as the energy levels. We consider all thermodynamic properties of a neutral particle in a magnetic cosmic string background by using an approach based on the partition function method.

  10. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  11. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  13. The All Particle Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel-Arias, Zigfried; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results of a measurement of the all-particle cosmic-ray energy spectrum above 10 TeV with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory. HAWC is a ground based air shower array deployed on the slopes of Volcán Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, México. It comprises 300 large light-tight water tanks covering an area of 20,000 square meters. Each tank is instrumented with four photomultipliers to detect particles from extensive air showers produced by gamma rays and cosmic rays upon entering the Earth's atmosphere. HAWC is optimized for the detection of gamma-ray induced air showers, yet the background flux of hadronic air showers is four orders of magnitude greater, allowing for a detailed study of the cosmic-ray flux in the TeV energy range. The primary cosmic-ray energy is determined with a maximum likelihood approach using the particle density as a function of distance to the shower core. Introducing quality cuts to isolate events with shower cores landing on the array, the reconstructed energy distribution is unfolded iteratively. We will report on the energy resolution of the technique and the results of the unfolding.

  14. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  15. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  16. Is astronomy possible with neutral ultrahigh energy cosmic ray particles existing in the standard model?

    SciTech Connect

    Tinyakov, P. G.; Tkachev, I. I.

    2008-03-15

    The recently observed correlation between HiRes stereo cosmic ray events with energies E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV and BL Lacertae objects occurs at an angle that strongly suggests that the primary particles are neutral. We analyze whether this correlation, if not a statistical fluctuation, can be explained within the Standard Model, i.e., assuming only known particles and interactions. We have not found a plausible process that can account for these correlations. The mechanism that comes closest-the conversion of protons into neutrons in the IR background of our Galaxy-still underproduces the required flux of neutral particles by about two orders of magnitude. The situation is different at E {approx} 10{sup 20} eV, where the flux of cosmic rays at the Earth may contain up to a few percent of neutrons, indicating their extragalactic sources.

  17. Dose equivalent on the Moon contributed from cosmic rays and their secondary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, K.; Hareyama, Makoto; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamashita, N.

    Estimation of radiation dose on and under the lunar surface is quite important for human activity on the Moon and in the future lunar bases. Radiation environment on the Moon is much different from that on the Earth. Galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles directly penetrate the lunar surface because of no atmosphere and no magnetic field around the Moon. Then, those generate many secondary particles such as gamma rays, neutrons and other charged particles by interaction with soils under the lunar surface. Therefore, the estimation of radiation dose from them on the surface and the underground of the Moon are essential for safety human activities. In this study the ambient dose equivalent in the ICRU sphere at the surface and various depths of the Moon is estimated based on the latest galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its generating secondary particles calculated by the Geant4 code. On the surface the most dominant contribution for the dose are not protons and heliums, but heavy components of galactic cosmic rays such as iron, while in the ground, secondary neutrons are the most dominant. In particular, the dose from neutrons becomes maximal at 50 - 100 g/cm2 of lunar soil depth, because fast neutrons with about 1.0 MeV are mostly produced at this depth and give a large dose. On the surface, the dose originated from GCR is quite sensitive for solar cycle activity, while that from secondary neutrons is not so sensitive. Inversely, under the surface, the dose from neutron is much sensitive for solar activity related to the flux of galactic cosmic rays. This difference should be considered to shield cosmic radiation for human activity on the Moon.

  18. Composition of Dust Particles Collected in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Kissel, Jochen; Langevin, Yves; Briois, Christelle; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Rynö, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA) is a dust particle composition analyzing instrument onboard the ROSETTA spacecraft orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. COSIMA is collecting cometary particles on metal targets in the inner coma, identifies the collected particle on microscopic images and analyses their composition by secondary ion mass spectrometry. We will report on the high resolution mass spectra containing positive or negative ions of elements, organic molecules and molecular fragments originating from the cometary particle surfaces.

  19. Contributions of particle absorption to mass extinction coefficients (0.55-14microm) of soil-derived atmospheric dusts: erratum.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1980-04-01

    Mass extinction coefficients of soil-derived atmospheric dusts often are determined largely by the absorption (rather than scattering) by individual particles, especially at longer IR wavelengths. Under many conditions, reasonable estimates of mass extinction coefficients of dusts can be made from absorption coefficients without the need for detailed knowledge of particle optical constants to perform, e.g., Mie calculations. This paper discusses absorption coefficients of dusts in the visible and IR wavelengths and the physical mechanisms of dust aerosol generation determining that portion of extinction attributable to absorption in a given dust cloud. Some soils, especially clays, can produce dust clouds that are almost pure. absorbers at longer IR wavelengths.

  20. Contributions of particle absorption to mass extinction coefficients (0.55-14 microm) of soil-derived atmospheric dusts.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1980-03-01

    Mass extinction coefficients of soil-derived atmospheric dusts often are determined largely by the absorption (rather than scattering) by individual particles, especially at longer IR wavelengths. Under many conditions, reasonable estimates of mass extinction coefficients of dusts can be made from absorption coefficients without the need for detailed knowledge of particle optical constants to perform, e.g., Mie calculations. This paper discusses absorption coefficients of dusts in the visible and IR wavelengths and the physical mechanisms of dust aerosol generation determining that portion of extinction attributable to absorption in a given dust cloud. Some soils, especially clays, can produce dust clouds that are almost pure absorbers at longer IR wavelengths.

  1. On the motion of a quantum particle in the spinning cosmic string space–time

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanabadi, H.; Afshardoost, A.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the energy spectrum and the wave function of a particle subjected to magnetic field in the spinning cosmic string space–time and investigate the influence of the spinning reference frame and topological defect on the system. To do this we solve Schrödinger equation in the spinning cosmic string background. In our work, instead of using an approximation in the calculations, we use the quasi-exact ansatz approach which gives the exact solutions for some primary levels. - Highlights: • Solving the Schrödinger equation in the spinning cosmic string space time. • Proposing a quasi-exact analytical solution to the general form of the corresponding equation. • Generalizing the previous works.

  2. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  3. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust.

  4. Investigation of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klemens, R.; Kapuscinski, M.; Wolinski, M.; Wolanski, P. . Instytut Techniki Cieplnej); Sichel, M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles are presented. Tests were carried out using a vertical detonation tube, and direct streak pictures showing the flame acceleration and pressure and temperature records were obtained. Flax dust, dispersed in an oxygen atmosphere, was used as the fuel, and two kinds of quartz sand were introduced as nonreacting particles. It was found that addition of inert particles caused a linear decrease of the detonation wave velocity but had no special influence on the transition distance. Calculations using the Gordon McBride Code showed that propagation of the detonation wave in a dust-oxygen mixture requires that the dust particles burnout at a level of about 70% but addition of inert particles increased the necessary burnout level to over 80% (with a significant decrease of the detonation wave velocity). The aim of this work was to investigate the processes of flame self acceleration and transition to detonation in mixtures of organic dust with oxygen and to investigate the influence of chemically neutral particles (used as a flame inhibiting agent) on these processes.

  5. Two dust populations of particle fragments in the striated tail of Comet Mrkos 1957 V

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Z.; Farrell, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    A total of 26 striae in the dust tail of Comet Mrkos 1957 V is investigated on five small-scale photographs taken 14--17 August 1957. The dynamical parameters of the striae are determined on the premise that these formations are products of the ejection of dust particles that subsequently break up in the tail. We establish the existence of two kinds of striae, consisting of submicron-sized particle fragments made of strongly absorbing and essentially dielectric materials. Although particles in the striae of both kinds are apparently restricted to sizes between 0.1 and 0.3 ..mu..m, inferred size distribution functions of the two dust populations are quite different. A calculated sequence of ejection times indicates that the striae originated in three isolated emission areas on the nucleus rotating with a 19.7-hr period. The discrete dust sources also account for an observed ''doublet'' structure of the striated pattern. We point out differences between the dust tails of Comets West 1976 VI and Mrkos and compare the particle-fragmentation model with a hypothesis that advocates a strong coupling between charged dust and comet plasma.

  6. Laboratory Experiments with the Concordia College High-Speed Dust Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    During the Apollo Era, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center built a 2MeV high-speed, dust particle accelerator. This facility was used to test and calibrate the LEAM instrument which was flown to the lunar surface by Apollo 17. As the Apollo project wound down, NASA no longer had need of the dust particle accelerator, and in 1975, it was move to Concordia College in Moorhead, MN. Through the years, it has been maintained and some modifications and improvements have been made to it. In the past decade, the facility has been revived and used by several collaborating institutions to study dust detector instrumentation as well as the effects of dust impacts on various materials. We have tested a prototype, space-flight dust particle detector. Also, piezoelectric pins which can be used as dust detectors were studied to learn the pin's response to single particle impacts of different energies and momenta, and then those measured responses were compared with theoretical models. The effects of high speed impacts on ultra-high temperature ceramics, aerogel, and several different thin films have also been studied at our facility. The results of these experiments will be presented.

  7. Interplanetary dust - Trace element analysis of individual particles by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although micrometeorites of cometary origin are thought to be the dominant component of interplanetary dust, it has never been possible to positively identify such micrometer-sized particles. Two such particles have been identified as definitely micrometeorites since their abundances of volatile and nonvolatile trace elements closely match those of primitive solar system material.

  8. A solid-phase mechanism of shock-wave formation of dust particles of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. E.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Khvorostin, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of formation of dust particles in solid as a result of shock-wave destruction of the initial crystalline material structure and subsequent coalescence of atomic clusters (nanoparticles), which leads to the aggregation of mesocrystalline particles (grains) in the shocked layer, is discussed.

  9. Direct Measurements of Interplanetary Dust Particles in the Vicinity of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCracken, C. W.; Alexander, W. M.; Dubin, M.

    1961-01-01

    The direct measurements made by the Explorer VIII satellite provide the first sound basis for analyzing all available direct measurements of the distribution of interplanetary dust particles. The model average distribution curve established by such an analysis departs significantly from that predicted by the (uncertain) extrapolation of results from meteor observations. A consequence of this difference is that the daily accretion of interplanetary particulate matter by the earth is now considered to be mainly dust particles of the direct measurements range of particle size. Almost all the available direct measurements obtained with microphone systems on rockets, satellites, and spacecraft fit directly on the distribution curve defined by Explorer VIII data. The lack of reliable datum points departing significantly from the model average distribution curve means that available direct measurements show no discernible evidence of an appreciable geocentric concentration of interplanetary dust particles.

  10. Ballistic motion of dust particles in the Lunar Roving Vehicle dust trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Horányi, Mihály

    2012-05-01

    We have selected video images from the Apollo 16 mission and analyzed the motion of dust clouds kicked up by the wheels of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). Applying the equations of ballistic motion, we estimate both the velocity of the dust and the gravitational field strength at the lunar surface. From measurements of the rotation of an LRV wheel, we estimate the speed of the LRV. Such exercises can be useful when discussing ballistic trajectories and angular motion in a high school or introductory level college physics class.

  11. LORD Space Experiment for Investigation of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic-ray Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Gusev, G. A.; Chechin, V. A.

    2013-02-01

    The problem of detecting cosmic rays and neutrinos of energies above the GZK cutoff is reviewed. Nowadays, it becomes clear that registration of nature's most energetic particles requires approaches based on new principles. First of all, we imply the detection of the coherent Cherenkov radio emission in cascades of ultrahigh-energy particles in radio-transparent natural dense media, i.e., ice shields of Antarctica, mineral salt, and lunar regolith. The Luna-Glob space mission planned for launching in the near future involves the Lunar Orbital Radio Detector (LORD) whose aperture for cosmic rays and neutrinos of energies E >= 1020 eV exceeds all existing ground-based arrays. The feasibility of LORD to detect radio signals from showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy particles interacting with the lunar regolith is examined. The design of the LORD space instrument and its scientific potentialities for registration of low-intense cosmic-ray particle fluxes above the GZK cut-off up to 1025 eV is discussed.

  12. Secondary-Particle Production in Organic Material by Cosmic Rays: Simulations and CRaTER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Spence, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that material between a radiation environment and a sensitive target, whether the target is an electronic device or living tissue, can enhance the dose received by the target instead of shielding it, depending on the characteristics of the material and of the radiation. The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is designed to measure this effect on the dose that would be received from the space radiation environment by an astronaut on or near the lunar surface. In between its silicon solid-state detectors are two pieces of Tissue-Equivalent Plastic (TEP) with a density and composition similar to muscle tissue, in which interacting primary cosmic-ray nuclei will produce secondary particles that increase dose in an underlying target beyond the base LET of the cosmic-ray particle itself. We will present results of Geant4 simulations of this effect given an incident cosmic-ray spectrum, and will compare those results with observations from CRaTER's first months in lunar orbit.

  13. The dependence of solar modulation on the sign of the cosmic ray particle charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.; Simpson, J. A.; Evenson, P.

    1986-01-01

    ISEE-3 spacecraft cosmic ray telescope data on the modulation of cosmic ray electrons are compared with IMP-8 spacecraft data on low energy He atoms to evaluate the effects of solar maxima on cosmic ray modulation. The investigation is constrained to the modulation of 70-95 MeV He-4 nuclei and 600-1000 MeV electrons over the period 1965-1984, an interval covering solar maxima in 1970 and 1981. It is shown that the occurrences of solar maxima are associated with magnetic field polarity reversals. When the interplanetary magnetic field reverses polarity, oppositely charged particles flow in different directions, thereby permitting studies of drift effects and modulation. Data on the recovery periods after the solar maxima show that the He-4 nuclei recovered before the electron population in 1970, while the situation was reversed in 1981. Actual flux ratio reversals were recorded in the years surrounding the maxima. Although the data support a connection between modulation of cosmic rays and the sign of charged particles, current models cannot account for the deviation of electron intensities from the nuclei intensities.

  14. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-01

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of 7Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6 MeV ≤mX(EX)≤20 MeV and few 100 s ≲τX≲104 s , and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or 7Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, nXσabsv ˜H , at the time of 7Be formation. We include X -initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of 7Li + 7Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X =a , we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of fd-1˜TeV-1 , which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments.

  15. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem.

    PubMed

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-27

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of ^{7}Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6  MeV≤m_{X}(E_{X})≤20  MeV and few100s≲τ_{X}≲10^{4}  s, and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or ^{7}Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, n_{X}σ_{abs}v∼H, at the time of ^{7}Be formation. We include X-initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of ^{7}Li+^{7}Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X=a, we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of f_{d}^{-1}∼TeV^{-1}, which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments. PMID:27284644

  16. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  17. Development of a Charged Particle Detector for Windborne Martian Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Mantovani, J. G.; Groop, E. E.; Buehler, M. G.; Buhler, C. R.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of an aerodynamic electrometer to measure the electrostatic properties of Martian atmospheric dust has been constructed. The instrument will enable a more thorough understanding of the potential for electrostatic discharge of different materials on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1986-01-01

    An understanding of carbonaceous matter in primitive extraterrestrial materials is an essential component of studies on dust evolution in the interstellar medium and the early history of the Solar System. Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) on carbonaceous material in two Chondritic Porous (CP) aggregrates is presented. The study suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may also be preserved in these materials.

  19. Physicochemical impacts of dust particles on alpine glacier meltwater at the Laohugou Glacier basin in western Qilian Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwen; Qin, Dahe; Chen, Jizu; Qin, Xiang; Ren, Jiawen; Cui, Xiaoqing; Du, Zhiheng; Kang, Shichang

    2014-09-15

    This work discusses the temporal variation of various physicochemical species in the meltwater runoff of Laohugou Glacier No. 12 (4260 ma.s.l.) in central Asia, and their correlation with dust particles, based on a two-year field observation in summer 2012 and 2013, mainly focusing on dust concentration and size distribution, meltwater chemistry, particles SEM-EDX analysis in the meltwater, and MODIS atmospheric optical depth fields around the Qilian Mountains in central Asia. We find that, the volume-size distribution of dust particles in the meltwater is mainly composed of three parts, which includes fine aerosol particles (with diameter of 0~3.0 μm, mainly PM 2.5), atmospheric dust (with diameter of 3.0~20 μm), and local dust particles (20~100 μm), respectively. Comparison of dust particles in the snowpack and meltwater runoff indicates that, large part of dust particles in the meltwater may have originated from atmospheric dust deposition to the snow and ice on the glacier, and transported into the meltwater runoff. Moreover, temporal variation of dust and major ions (especially crustal species) is very similar with each other, showing great influence of dust particles to the chemical constituents of the glacier meltwater. SPM and TDS implied significant influences of dust to the physical characteristics of the glacier meltwater. Results showed that, accelerated glacier melting may affect physicochemical characteristics of the meltwater at an alpine basin under global warming. MODIS atmospheric optical depth (AOD) fields derived using the Deep Blue algorithm, showed great influence of regional dust transportation over western Qilian Mountains in springtime. SEM-EDX analysis shows that dust particles in the glacier meltwater contain Si-, Al-, Ca-, K-, and Fe-rich materials, such as quartz, albite, aluminate, and fly ash, similar to that deposited in snowpack. These results showed great and even currently underestimated influences of atmospheric dust

  20. Dynamic Behavior of Nano-Size Dust Particles in a Magnetic Field Channel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Park, Haewoo; Jo, Youngmin

    2016-05-01

    Removal of very small dust from indoor public spaces, such as metro subway stations, is a challenge. A large proportion of subway dust, particularly that of submicron sizes, contains iron compounds. This study sought to understand the dynamic behavior of such fine iron dust in a magnetic field. The computer aided fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation revealed that the design and configuration of a rectangular flow channel with magnets determine the dynamic motion of particles. An attractive magnetic emitter arrangement produced higher magnetic flux density than a repulsive arrangement. Additional ferromagnetic wire mesh inserted into the duct channel could provide a more systematic magnetic field and collect more dust. The field gradient for 0.3 mm thick wire was more than twice that of 0.5 mm wire. The provision of a magnetic field could contribute a 20% increase in 100 nm particle collection and an increase of 5% in 10 nm. PMID:27483753

  1. Comparison of Morphologies of Apollo 17 Dust Particles with Lunar Simulant, JSC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Hill, Eddy; Kihm, Kenneth D.; Day, James D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar dust (< 20 microns) makes up approx.20 wt.% of the lunar soil. Because of the abrasive and adhering nature of lunar soil, a detailed knowledge of the morphology (size, shape and abundance) of lunar dust is important for dust mitigation on the Moon. This represents a critical step towards the establishment of long-term human presence on the Moon (Taylor et al. 2005). Machinery design for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on the Moon also requires detailed information on dust morphology and general physical/chemical characteristics. Here, we report a morphological study of Apollo 17 dust sample 70051 and compare it to lunar soil stimulant, JSC-1. W e have obtained SEM images of dust grains from sample 70051 soil (Fig. 1). The dust grains imaged are composed of fragments of minerals, rocks, agglutinates and glass. Most particles consist largely of agglutinitic impact glass with their typical vesicular textures (fine bubbles). All grains show sub-angular to angular shapes, commonly with sharp edges, common for crushed glass fragments. There are mainly four textures: (1) ropey-textured pieces (typical for agglutinates), (2) angular shards, (3) blocky bits, and (4) Swiss-cheese grains. This last type with its high concentration of submicron bubbles, occurs on all scales. Submicron cracks are also present in most grains. Dust-sized grains of lunar soil simulant, JSC-1, were also studied. JSC-1 is a basaltic tuff with relatively high glass content (approx.50%; McKay et al. 1994). It was initially chosen in the early 90s to approximate the geotechnical properties of the average lunar soil (Klosky et al. 1996). JSC-1 dust grains also show angular blocky and shard textures (Fig. 2), similar to those of lunar dust. However, the JSC-1 grains lack the Swiss-cheese textured particles, as well as submicron cracks and bubbles in most grains.

  2. Trajectory-capture cell instrumentation for measurement of dust particle mass, velocity and trajectory, and particle capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detector for space missions--such as the Halley Comet Missions where the impact velocity was very high as well as for missions where the impact velocity is low was extended to include: (1) the capability for impact position determination - i.e., x,y coordinate of impact; and (2) the capability for particle velocity determination using two thin PVDF sensors spaced a given distance apart - i.e., by time-of-flight. These developments have led to space flight instrumentation for recovery-type missions, which will measure the masses (sizes), fluxes and trajectories of incoming dust particles and will capture the dust material in a form suitable for later Earth-based laboratory measurements. These laboratory measurements would determine the elemental, isotopic and mineralogical properties of the captured dust and relate these to possible sources of the dust material (i.e., comets, asteroids), using the trajectory information. The instrumentation described here has the unique advantages of providing both orbital characteristics and physical and chemical properties--as well as possible origin--of incoming dust.

  3. COSIMA - Composition and morphology of dust particles from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Rita; Hilchenbach, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Since August 2014, the ROSETTA spacecraft has been escorting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko along its orbit around the Sun. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA) is the instrument onboard ROSETTA that determines the composition of comet dust. COSIMA is collecting the dust particles in the inner coma onto metal targets, identifies the individual particles on microscopic images and analyses their composition by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The particle collection commenced when the comet was at a pre-perihelion distance of about 3.6 AU and has continued ever since. Thousands of particles have been collected. Moreover, samples of dust particles are available that have been collected at different positions along the pre- and post-perihelion orbit. This permits to study the comet dust properties not just as a snapshot in time, but also in view to how the compositional and physical properties have evolved as the comet moved towards perihelion and now back into the outer solar system. An overview will be given on the results obtained so far by COSIMA in view to compositional and morphological dust analysis.

  4. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  5. On Meteoric Dust Particles in the Near-Earth Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Farahani, Majid Mazraeh Ei; Mohebalhojeh, Ali R.; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Over 40 metric tons of meteoric dust enters the earth's atmosphere every day. This dust settles and creates natural dust layers in the altitude ranges between 80 and 100 kilometers which spans the earth's upper mesosphere to lower thermosphere. The dust layers in the lower atmosphere have a great impact on climate, human health as well as communication and navigation signals. The main goal of this study is the role of meteoric smoke particles on the formation of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). Recent rocket experiments have detected the presence of these particles. Since these dust layers are immersed in the earth's upper atmosphere, they become charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth's ionospheric plasma. Noctilucent Clouds NLCs are a fascinating visual manifestation of these dust layers. So-called Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs are radar echoes that are a direct consequence of the sub-visible charged dust that exists at altitudes above NLC regions. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) are strong echoes that have been typically observed in the frequency range from 50MHz to 1.3GHz and in the altitude about 85km. Unlike PMSE, Polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are less known. PMWE appear at a lower altitude and is weaker in comparison with PMSE. The focus of this study is on meteoric smoke particles and how they affect PMWE source region. Parameters associated with smoke dust particles such as size distribution, charging characteristics, density and positive or negative charge will be considered. The second part of this presentation will be on the effect of gravity waves on PMC. Full coupling to a turbulent neutral field with a statistical analysis will be discussed. Impact of a neutral turbulence driving field on small amplitude plasma fluctuations in such a configuration and some of the important consequences will be also presented. This has important consequences for electric field and potential measurements on rocket probes as

  6. Dust survey following the final shutdown of TEXTOR: metal particles and fuel retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna-Zaleśna, E.; Weckmann, A.; Grzonka, J.; Rubel, M.; Esser, H. G.; Freisinger, M.; Kreter, A.; Sergienko, G.; Ström, P.

    2016-02-01

    The work presents results of a broad TEXTOR dust survey in terms of its composition, structure, distribution and fuel content. The dust particles were collected after final shutdown of TEXTOR in December 2013. Fuel retention, as determined by thermal desorption, varied significantly, even by two orders of magnitude, dependent on the dust location in the machine. Dust structure was examined by means of scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Several categories of dust have been identified. Carbon-based stratified and granular deposits were dominating, but the emphasis in studies was on metal dust. They were found in the form of small particles, small spheres, flakes and splashes which formed ‘comet’-like structures, clearly indicating directional effects in the impact on surfaces of plasma-facing components. Nickel-rich alloys from the Inconel liner and iron-based ones from various diagnostic holders were the main components of metal-containing dust, but also molybdenum and tungsten debris were detected. Their origin is discussed.

  7. Atmospheric aging of dust ice nucleating particles - a combined laboratory and field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boose, Yvonne; Rodríguez, Sergio; García, M. Isabel; Linke, Claudia; Schnaiter, Martin; Zipori, Assaf; Crawford, Ian; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Sierau, Berko

    2016-04-01

    We present INP data measured in-situ at two mostly free tropospheric locations: the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ) in the Swiss Alps, located at 3580 m above sea level (asl) and the Izaña observatory on Tenerife, off the West African shore (2373 m asl). INP concentrations were measured online with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, PINC, at the Jungfraujoch in the winters of 2012, 2013 and 2014 and at Izaña in the summers of 2013 and 2014. Each measurement period lasted between 2 to 6 weeks. During summer, Izaña is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to Saharan dust events. Saharan dust also reaches the Jungfraujoch mainly during spring. For offline ice nucleation analysis in the laboratory under similar thermodynamic conditions, airborne dust was collected a) at Izaña with a cyclone directly from the air and b) collected from the surface of the Aletsch glacier close to the JFJ after deposition. Supporting measurements of aerosol particle size distributions and fluorescence were conducted at both locations, as well as cloud water isotope analysis at the Jungfraujoch and aerosol chemistry at Izaña. For both locations the origin of the INPs was investigated with a focus on dust and biological particles using back trajectories and chemical signature. Results show that dust aerosol is the dominant INP type at both locations at a temperature of 241 K. In addition to Saharan dust, also more local, basaltic dust is found at the Jungfraujoch. Biological particles are not observed to play a role for ice nucleation in clouds during winter at Jungfraujoch but are enriched in INP compared to the total aerosol at Izaña also during dust events. The comparison of the laboratory and the field measurements at Izaña indicates a good reproducibility of the field data by the collected dust samples. Field and laboratory data of the dust samples from both locations show that the dust arriving at JFJ is less ice nucleation active

  8. The dynamics of submicron-sized dust particles lost from Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Tatrallyay, M.; Juhasz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of submicron-sized dielectric particles lost from the Martian moon Phobos are studied in connection with the possible detection of dust by the Phobos 2 spacecraft. The motion of these small dust grains is influenced not only by gravity but also by solar radiation pressure and electromagnetic forces. The plasma environment of Mars is described by applying a hybrid gasdynamic-cometary model. Some of the submicron-sized grains ejected at speeds on the order of a few tens meters per second can stay in orbit around Mars for several months forming a nonuniform and time-dependent dust halo.

  9. Erzion interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhutov, Yu. N.

    2001-08-01

    It is discussed the interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT" for the momentum range P > P0 = 30 GeV/c by Erzions, hypothetical heavy stable penetrating hadrons, proposed to explain the anomalous vertical muons energy spectrum at small depth underground. Here it is shown that negative charge of p articles observed in "SKAT" is the same as predicted by theoretical Erzion model. The excess particles flux ( J ˜ 10-5 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 ) corresponds to the Erzion intensity observed by scintillation telescope in our previous experiment. The threshold momentum ( P0 ) and the track length threshold ( L0 = 50 cm of liquid BrF3C) are in good accordance with Erzion stop path as for the single charged particle with mass M ≅ 200 GeV/c2 . But to don't contradict with all previous charge ratio results for cosmic ray muons in 30 - 100 GeV/c momentum range it is necessary to propose for such particles the Solar sporadic origin taking to account that both Erzion observations were in the active Sun years (April 23,1979 & July, 1999). INTRODUCTION. 20 years ago to explain anomalous energy spectrum of vertical cosmic ray muons, observed at sea level and small depth underground (<100 m.w.e.) [1,2], it was proposed hypothesis of existing in cosmic rays new heavy stable penetrating hadrons [3]. From that time our experiments to search such particles were started [4,5,6]. Later the theoretical model U(1)xSUl(2)xSU r(2)xSU(3) of such particles (Erzions) has been created in framework of "mirror" models [7,8], which without contradictions to elementary particles Standard Model has explained large kind of another anomalous results in cosmic rays and nuclear physics [9-19]. At last after almost 20 years Erzions search they have been observed due to small vertical original scintillation telescope "Doch-4" [20,21,22]. The observed Erz ions mass was ME = (175+/-25) GeV/c2 and intensity at sea level - JE = (1.8+/-0.4)ṡ10-6 cm-2 sr-1 s

  10. Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particle Observations In The 3-d Heliosphere Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    Observations from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope during Ulysses recent fast lat- itude scan have provided the first latitudinal survey of intensities of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles near solar maximum. During the previous fast latitude scan near solar minimum, no significant solar energetic particle events were observed, but the galactic and anomalous component cosmic ray intensities showed small positive latitudinal gradients organized around a southwardly displaced heliospheric current sheet. The small size of the gradients, together with observation near the poles of 26-day intensity variations impressed by near-equatorial CIR-structures, led to the conclusion that latitudinal transport across the mean Parker spiral magnetic fields was much easier than had been expected prior to Ulysses observations. During the recently completed fast latitude scan near solar maximum, galactic cosmic rays could be ob- served only occasionally in the quiet times between frequent solar energetic particle events. When cosmic ray intensities could be observed, no measurable latitude gradi- ents were found, implying that modulation became much more spherically symmetric near solar maximum. From observations of the solar energetic particle intensities, we found that almost all large gradual events produced intensity increases both at Ulysses and at IMP-8 near Earth, regardless of the latitude or longitude of the spacecrafts relative to the initiating event in the corona. Most often the intensities at Ulysses and IMP-8 became comparable a few days after the onset of the event and remained nearly equal for the rest of the decay, which in some cases lasted as much as a full solar rota- tion. Both the cosmic ray and the solar energetic particle observations imply efficient latitudinal and cross-field transport of energetic particles even in the complex inter- planetary magnetic fields of solar maximum. Recent observations suggest that the solar polar coronal holes have

  11. Retrieval of dust particle refractive index from scattering data using ellipsoid ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Merikallio, Sini; Räisänen, Petri

    2016-04-01

    Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties, such as dust particle refractive index, from remote sensing data is a key problem. Even when full scattering matrix data is available, the problem is challenging to solve due to the large number of possible particle property combinations, and the non-linear response of scattering data to changes in these properties. One approach is to perform a mathematical fit of a pre-defined shape class, such as ellipsoids, varying the free parameter, and evaluating the goodness of the fit for each free parameter value. It is known that a shape ensemble of ellipsoids can replicate dust particle scattering data with good accuracy, but it is less known if the good match guarantees that the microphysical properties used in the ensemble correspond to those of the real particle. Essentially, it is unclear if a small fit residue guarantees that the parameter is retrieved accurately. In this work, we test how accurate the refractive index retrieval with shape ensembles of ellipsoids is by using computational scattering data. Using the computational data allows us to know with certainty what is the true refractive index of the particle in question, and thus to quantify the retrieval accuracy. We test multiple realistic dust-like particle shapes that have been inverted from real dust particles by using electron microscopy stereogrammetry.

  12. Red-ox speciation and mixing state of iron in individual African dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboudt, Karine; Gloter, Alexandre; Mussi, Alexandre; Flament, Pascal

    2012-06-01

    The Fe distribution in African dust particles collected in Senegal (North-Western Africa) during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observation Period 0 (AMMA-"SOP 0," February 2006) was assessed using individual particle analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy respectively equipped with X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (TEM-EELS)). Senegal is not a dust source area; the chemical composition of collected dusts indicates that they originate primarily in the North-Western Sahara, which is consistent with previous studies of the area. Fe can be present inside dust particles as a substitution element in the crystalline lattice of aluminosilicate, but a high proportion (62%) of aluminosilicate Fe-containing particles are also found as an internal mixture of aluminosilicate with Fe oxide grains (including both oxide and hydroxide species). The 3D structure of such particles obtained by tomography reveals that these Fe-rich inclusions are often found at the surface of aluminosilicate particles but that some are also included inside particles. These Fe oxide grains can result from crustal earth or atmospheric processes during long-range transport. FeIII is dominant in both the aluminosilicate matrix and the Fe oxide grains (FeIII/Σ Fe ratio = 76.8% and 90.0%, respectively, on average), with notable heterogeneities of Fe valence inside grains at a nanometer scale.

  13. Neutral particle background in cosmic ray telescopes composed of silicon solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss-spectrum of secondary charged particles produced by the interaction of gamma-rays and energetic neutrons in silicon solid state detectors has been measured with a satellite-borne cosmic ray telescope. In the satellite measurements presented here two distinct neutral background effects are identified: secondary protons and alpha particles with energies of about 2 to 100 MeV produced by neutron interactions, and secondary electrons with energies of about 0.2 to 10 MeV produced by X-ray interactions. The implications of this neutral background for satellite measurements of low energy cosmic rays are discussed, and suggestions are given for applying these results to other detector systems in order to estimate background contamination and optimize detector system design.

  14. Thickness of the particle swarm in cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The average dispersion in arrival time of air shower particles detected with a scintillator at an impact parameter r is described with accuracy 5-10% by the empirical formula sigma = Sigma sub to (1+r/r sub t) sup b, where Sigma sub to = 2.6 ns, r sub t = 30m and b = (1.94 + or - .08) (0.39 + or - .06) sec Theta, for r 2 km, 10 to the 8th power E 10 to the 11th power GeV, and Theta 60 deg. (E is the primary energy and theta is the zenith angle). The amount of fluctuation in sigma sub t due to fluctuations in the level of origin and shower development is less than 20%. These results provide a basis for estimating the impact parameters of very larger showers with data from very small detector arrays (mini-arrays). The energy of such showers can then be estimated from the local particle density. The formula also provides a basis for estimating the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes.

  15. Cometary Evolution: Clues on Physical Properties from Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1989-01-01

    interplanetary dust particles (IDPS) as a guide to the likely constitution of mature comets traversing the inner Solar System. While there is, as yet, no direct proof that a specific sub-group or type of chondritic IDP is derived from a specific comet, it is clear that these particles are extraterrestrial in origin and that a certain portion of the interplanetary flux received by the Earth is cometary in origin. Two chondritic porous (CP) MPs, sample numbers W7010A2 and W7029Cl, from the Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection have been selected for this study of putative cometary physical parameters. This particular type of particle is considered a likely candidate for a cometary origin on the basis of mineralogy, bulk composition and morphology. While many IDPs have been subjected to intensive study over the past decade, we can develop a physical parameter model on only these two CP IDPs because few others have been studied in sufficient detail.

  16. Cometary Evolution: Clues on Physical Properties from Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1997-01-01

    chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPS) as a guide to the likely constitution of mature comets traversing the inner Solar System. While there is, as yet, no direct proof that a specific sub-group or type of chondritic IDP is derived from a specific comet, it is clear that these particles are extraterrestrial in origin and that a certain portion of the interplanetary flux received by the Earth is cometary in origin. Two chondritic porous (CP) IDPS, sample numbers W701OA2 and W7029CI, from the Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection have been selected for this study of putative cometary physical parameters. This particular type of particle is considered a likely candidate for a cometary origin on the basis of mineralogy, bulk composition and morphology. While many IDPs have been subjected to intensive study over the past decade, we can develop a physical parameter model on only these two CP IDPs because few others have been studied in sufficient detail.

  17. Exploring the wake of a dust particle by a continuously approaching test grain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hendrik Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Piel, Alexander; Carstensen, Jan

    2015-05-15

    The structure of the ion wake behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge is studied in a two-particle system. The wake formation leads to attractive forces between the negatively charged dust and can cause a reduction of the charge of a particle. By evaluating the dynamic response of the particle system to small external perturbations, these quantities can be measured. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve a continuous mass loss and hence an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. The results show a significant modification of the wake structure in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail.

  18. Soil-derived sulfate in atmospheric dust particles at Taklimakan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhang, Daizhou; Cao, Junji; Xu, Hongmei; An, Zhisheng

    2012-12-01

    Dust-associated sulfate is believed to be a key species which can alter the physical and chemical properties of dust particles in the atmosphere. Its occurrence in the particles has usually been considered to be the consequence of particles' aging in the air although it is present in some crustal minerals. Our observation at the north and south edge of Taklimakan desert, one of the largest dust sources in the Northern Hemisphere, during a dust episode in April 2008 revealed that sulfate in atmospheric dust samples most likely originated directly from surface soil. Its TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 content was proportional to samples' mass and comprised steadily about 4% in the differently sized samples, the ratio of elemental sulfur to iron was approximately constant 0.3, and no demonstrable influence of pollutants from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning was detected. These results suggest that sulfate could be substantially derived from surface soil at the desert area and the lack of awareness of this origin may impede accurate results in any investigation of atmospheric sulfur chemistry associated with Taklimakan dust and its subsequent local, regional and global effects on the atmosphere.

  19. Algebraic approach and coherent states for a relativistic quantum particle in cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Ramírez, M.; Ojeda-Guillén, D.; Mota, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    We study a relativistic quantum particle in cosmic string spacetime in the presence of a magnetic field and a Coulomb-type scalar potential. It is shown that the radial part of this problem possesses the su(1 , 1) symmetry. We obtain the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions of this problem by using two algebraic methods: the Schrödinger factorization and the tilting transformation. Finally, we give the explicit form of the relativistic coherent states for this problem.

  20. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  1. A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles. Progress report for Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-01

    Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. Task A consists of three experimental programs; a Double-Beta Decay study (currently at the Hoover Dam), a Reactor Neutrino program (until this year at Savannah River), and the IMB Proton Decay experiment in a Cleveland salt mine. Discussion of the research in each area is given.

  2. Distribution of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust as a function of particle size.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R G; Fortune, C R; Willis, R D; Camann, D E; Antley, J T

    1999-01-01

    House dust is a repository for environmental pollutants that may accumulate indoors from both internal and external sources over long periods of time. Dust and tracked-in soil accumulate most efficiently in carpets, and the pollutants associated with dust and soil may present an exposure risk to infants and toddlers, who spend significant portions of their time in contact with or in close proximity to the floor and who engage in frequent mouthing activities. The availability of carpet dust for exposure by transfer to the skin or by suspension into the air depends on particle size. In this study, a large sample of residential house dust was obtained from a commercial cleaning service whose clients were homeowners residing in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill (Research Triangle) area of North Carolina. The composite dust was separated into seven size fractions ranging from < 4 to 500 microm in diameter, and each fraction was analyzed for 28 pesticides and 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Over 20% of the fractionated dust sample consisted of particles < 25 microm in diameter. Fourteen pesticides and all 10 of the target PAHs were detected in one or more of the seven size-fractionated samples. Sample concentrations reported range from 0.02 to 22 microg/g; the synthetic pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin were the most abundant pesticide residue. The concentrations of nearly all of the target analytes increased gradually with decreasing particle size for the larger particles, then increased dramatically for the two smallest particle sizes (4-25 microm and < 4 microm). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10464072

  3. Gazification of coal dust particles in the blast furnace tuyere apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, V. S.; Yaroshenko, Yu G.; Spirin, N. A.; Lavrov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The mathematical statement of the problem on gasification of coal dust particles in the blast-furnace tuyere apparatus is given, which includes the motion equation of a variable mass particle, heat equation of a particle and the heat-balance equation of the blast flow. The results of calculations are obtained by using mathematical software packages (Mathcad, Maple). Relatively weak effect of the volatiles combustion process on the thermal state of the tuyere zone is shown.

  4. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  5. The immersion freezing behavior of mineral dust particles mixed with biological substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin-Bauditz, S.; Wex, H.; Denjean, C.; Hartmann, S.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Ebert, M.; Stratmann, F.

    2015-10-01

    Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INM). It has been suggested that these INM maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INM in e.g., soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INM. If particles from such soils which contain biological INM are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above -20 up to almost 0 °C. To explore this hypothesis, we performed a measurement campaign within the research unit INUIT, where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX) with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water) and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). To characterize the mixing state of the generated aerosol we used different methods which will also be discussed. We found that internally mixed particles, containing ice active biological material, follow the ice nucleation behavior observed for the purely biological particles, i.e. freezing occurs at temperatures at which mineral dusts themselves are not yet ice active. It can be concluded that INM located on a mineral dust particle determine the freezing behavior of that particle.

  6. Comet ejection and dynamics of nonspherical dust particles and meteoroids

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, B.A.S.

    1989-02-01

    This paper generalizes the formalism for calculating the ejection velocity of meteoroids and dust from comets and the forces to which such objects are subject in interplanetary space, including the dust tail of comets. It is found that spheres have the smallest cross section of any geometrical figures of the same valume averaged over random orientations, so for a fixed volume and mass, both the ejection velocity and beta reaches a minimum for bodies of spherical shapes. Flakes in random orientation are ejected near 70 percent of the highest ejection velocity for any orientation. Needles in random orientation escape a comet at nearly 90 percent of their maximum velocities. Randomly oriented cylinders of finite thickness escape at lower velocities that are slightly closer to their maximum velocities. The average beta acting on spin-aligned, perfectly absorbing needles is more than half that acting on a sphere of the same material and radius. 16 references.

  7. Identification of ice nucleation active sites on feldspar dust particles.

    PubMed

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-03-19

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  8. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  9. The influence of Asian dust outflow on particle microphysical and optical properties at Mt. Tai in central east China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, T. T.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Fan, R. X.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2016-10-01

    An in-situ measurement of the particle number size distribution and optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients) of PM2.5 was conducted at Mt. Tai, a mountain top station in central east China in the spring of 2011. It was found that the particle size distribution, mass concentration, as well as the optical properties have been modified during the dust periods. The mean mass concentration of PM2.5 during the dust periods was nearly twice of that during the non-dust period. The number and volume size distribution showed a higher concentration in the size range of 0.5-2.5 μm during the dust period, which were identified as dust particles. The absorption coefficient increased by ∼40%, while the scattering coefficient did not show much difference. The single scattering albedo of 0.85 during dust period was also comparable with the value of 0.89 during non-dust period. The Mie model was applied to simulate the aerosol optical properties and validated through a closure study for an intensive dust event. This study quantitatively demonstrated that dust particles contributed to nearly 63% of the scattering coefficient, while the remainder was mainly due to anthropogenic particles on dust days. The dust particles took a lower portion to the absorption, about 40%, indicating the anthropogenic particles still played a more dominant role in absorbing. This study also indicated that although there were only a few tens of dust particles during dust period, they could influence in particle optical properties significantly.

  10. Space Weathering Products Found on the Surfaces of the Itokawa Dust Particles: A Summary of the Initial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noguchi, T.; Kimura, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Konno, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ogami, T.; Ishida, H.; Sagae, R.; Tsujimoto, S.; Tsuchiyama, A,; Zolensky, M. E.; Tanaka, M.; Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Mukai, T.; Ueno, M.; Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Okazaki, R.

    2012-01-01

    Surfaces of airless bodies exposed to interplanetary space gradually have their structures, optical properties, chemical compositions, and mineralogy changed by solar wind implantation and sputtering, irradiation by galactic and solar cosmic rays, and micrometeorite bombardment. These alteration processes and the resultant optical changes are known as space weathering [1, 2, 3]. Our knowledge of space weathering has depended almost entirely on studies of the surface materials returned from the Moon and regolith breccia meteorites [1, 4, 5, 6] until the surface material of the asteroid Itokawa was returned to the Earth by the Hayabusa spacecraft [7]. Lunar soil studies show that space weathering darkens the albedo of lunar soil and regolith, reddens the slopes of their reflectance spectra, and attenuates the characteristic absorption bands of their reflectance spectra [1, 2, 3]. These changes are caused by vapor deposition of small (<40 nm) metallic Fe nanoparticles within the grain rims of lunar soils and agglutinates [5, 6, 8]. The initial analysis of the Itokawa dust particles revealed that 5 out of 10 particles have nanoparticle-bearing rims, whose structure varies depending on mineral species. Sulfur-bearing Fe-rich nanoparticles (npFe) exist in a thin (5-15 nm) surface layer (zone I) on olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, and plagioclase, suggestive of vapor deposition. Sulfur-free npFe exist deeper inside (<60 nm) ferromagnesian silicates (zone II). Their texture suggests formation by amorphization and in-situ reduction of Fe2+ in ferromagnesian silicates [7]. On the other hand, nanophase metallic iron (npFe0) in the lunar samples is embedded in amorphous silicate [5, 6, 8]. These textural differences indicate that the major formation mechanisms of the npFe0 are different between the Itokawa and the lunar samples. Here we report a summary of the initial analysis of space weathering of the Itokawa dust particles.

  11. The ISPM dust experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Kissel, J.; Linkert, L. D.; Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Schwehm, G.; Zook, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The ISPM Dust Experiment observes particulate matter with masses between 10 to the minus 19th power and 10 to the minus 10th power kg in the solar system; investigates its physical and dynamical properties as a function of ecliptic latitude and heliocentric distance; and studies its interaction with solar radiation, the solar wind, and the interplanetary magnetic field. Measurement of the three dimensional spatial distribution of cosmic dust particles and their dynamics allows the relative significance of their probable sources (comets, asteroids and interstellar dust) to be determined. An instrument that measures the mass, speed, flight direction and electric charge of individual dust particles is used. It is a multicoincidence detector with a sensitivity 100,000 times higher than that of previous experiments. The instrument weighs 3.750 kg, consumes 2.0 W, and has a normal data transmission rate of 8 bit/sec in spacecraft tracking mode.

  12. Identification of solar nebula condensates in interplanetary dust particles and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloeck, W.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Orthopyroxene and olivine grains, low in FeO, but containing MnO contents up to 5 wt percent were found in interplanetary dust particles (IDP) collected in the stratosphere. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt percent MnO. Orthopyroxenes and olivines high in Mn and low in FeO have only been reported from a single coarse grained chondrule rim in the Allende meteorite and from a Tieschitz matrix augite grain. The bulk MnO contents of the extraterrestrial dust particles with high MnO olivines and pyroxenes are close to CI chondrite abundances. High MnO, low FeO olivines and orthopyroxenes were also found in the matrix of Semarkona, an unequilibrated ordinary chondrite. This may indicate a related origin for minerals in extraterrestrial dust particles and in the matrix of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  13. The Influence of Trapped Ions and Non-equilibrium EDF on Dust Particle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    Dust particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically with the help of model for trapped and free ions coupled with the self-consistent solution of Poisson equation for electric potential. Non-equilibrium (non-Maxwellian) character of electron energy distribution function depending on gas pressure and electric field was also taken into account on the basis of the solution of kinetic Boltzmann equation. The results were compared with the experimental measurements of dust particle charge depending on gas pressure. It was shown that the calculated effective charge, i.e. the difference of the dust particle charge and trapped ion charge, is in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: I. Project BIOCORE (M212), a biological cosmic ray experiment: procedures, summary, and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Haymaker, W; Look, B C; Winter, D L; Benton, E V; Cruty, M R

    1975-04-01

    The primary objective of the experiment was to determine whether a specific portion of the high Z-high energy (HZE)* galactic cosmic ray particle spectrum, especially particles with Z greater than or equal to 6, can produce microscopically visible injury of brain and eye tissues. Pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris), obtained from the California desert, were selected as the biological target. Five of these mice were flown on Apollo XVII. Not only the brain and eyes but also many other tissues of these animals were studied for evidence of cosmic ray particle damage. The lack of prior experimental evidence as to the character of the potential injury induced by HZE particles required reliance on the physical characteristics of particle radiation in ascertaining the probable nature of the injruy. These characteristics and the key aspects of the experiment are summarized in this paper. Subsequent articles in this special supplement give details of the biological, engineering, and dosimetric aspects of BIOCORE together with the results.

  15. Evaluating the applicability of a semi-continuous aerosol sampler to measure Asian dust particles.

    PubMed

    Son, Se-Chang; Park, Seung Shik

    2015-03-01

    A Korean prototype semi-continuous aerosol sampler was used to measure Asian dust particles. During two dust-storm periods, concentrations of crustal and trace elements were significantly enriched. Dust storms are one of the most significant natural sources of air pollution in East Asia. The present study aimed to evaluate use of a Korean semi-continuous aerosol sampler (K-SAS) in observation of mineral dust particles during dust storm events. Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 60 min intervals using the K-SAS, which was operated at a sampling flow rate of 16.7 L min(-1) through a PM10 cyclone inlet. The measurements were made during dust storm events at an urban site, Gwangju in Korea, between April 30 and May 5, 2011. The K-SAS uses particle growth technology as a means of collecting atmospheric aerosol particles. Concentrations of 16 elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Ca, K, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ti, V, Ni, Co, As, and Se) were determined off-line in the collected slurry samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The sampling periods were classified into two types, based on the source regions of the dust storms and the transport pathways of the air masses reaching the sampling site. The first period "A" was associated with dust particles with high Ca content, originating from the Gobi desert regions of northern China and southern Mongolia. The second period "B" was associated with dust particles with low Ca content, originating from northeastern Chinese sandy deserts. The results from the K-SAS indicated noticeable differences in concentrations of crustal and trace elements in the two sampling periods, as a result of differences in the source regions of the dust storms, the air mass transport pathways, and the impact of smoke from forest fires. The concentrations of the crustal (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) and anthropogenic trace elements (Vi, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, and Pb) were enriched significantly during the two dust storm periods. However, the

  16. Evaluating the applicability of a semi-continuous aerosol sampler to measure Asian dust particles.

    PubMed

    Son, Se-Chang; Park, Seung Shik

    2015-03-01

    A Korean prototype semi-continuous aerosol sampler was used to measure Asian dust particles. During two dust-storm periods, concentrations of crustal and trace elements were significantly enriched. Dust storms are one of the most significant natural sources of air pollution in East Asia. The present study aimed to evaluate use of a Korean semi-continuous aerosol sampler (K-SAS) in observation of mineral dust particles during dust storm events. Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 60 min intervals using the K-SAS, which was operated at a sampling flow rate of 16.7 L min(-1) through a PM10 cyclone inlet. The measurements were made during dust storm events at an urban site, Gwangju in Korea, between April 30 and May 5, 2011. The K-SAS uses particle growth technology as a means of collecting atmospheric aerosol particles. Concentrations of 16 elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Ca, K, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ti, V, Ni, Co, As, and Se) were determined off-line in the collected slurry samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The sampling periods were classified into two types, based on the source regions of the dust storms and the transport pathways of the air masses reaching the sampling site. The first period "A" was associated with dust particles with high Ca content, originating from the Gobi desert regions of northern China and southern Mongolia. The second period "B" was associated with dust particles with low Ca content, originating from northeastern Chinese sandy deserts. The results from the K-SAS indicated noticeable differences in concentrations of crustal and trace elements in the two sampling periods, as a result of differences in the source regions of the dust storms, the air mass transport pathways, and the impact of smoke from forest fires. The concentrations of the crustal (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) and anthropogenic trace elements (Vi, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, and Pb) were enriched significantly during the two dust storm periods. However, the

  17. The Intricate Role of Cold Gas and Dust in Galaxy Evolution at Early Cosmic Epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Capak, Peter L.; Carilli, Christopher L.

    Cold molecular and atomic gas plays a central role in our understanding of early galaxy formation and evolution. It represents the component of the interstellar medium (ISM) that stars form out of, and its mass, distribution, excitation, and dynamics provide crucial insight into the physical processes that support the ongoing star formation and stellar mass buildup. We here present results that demonstrate the capability of the Atacama Large (sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA) to detect the cold ISM and dust in ``normal'' galaxies at redshifts z=5-6. We also show detailed studies of the ISM in massive, dust-obscured starburst galaxies out to z>6 with ALMA, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI), and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). These observations place some of the most direct constraints on the dust-obscured fraction of the star formation history of the universe at z>5 to date, showing that ``typical'' galaxies at these epochs have low dust content, but also that highly-enriched, dusty starbursts already exist within the first billion years after the Big Bang.

  18. Particle-Wave Micro-Dynamics in Nonlinear Self-Excited Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Teng, L.-W.; Liao, C.-T.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    The large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited in a low-pressure dusty plasma. In the wave, the nonlinear wave-particle interaction determines particle motion, which in turn determines the waveform and wave propagation. In this work, the above behaviors are investigated by directly tracking particle motion through video-microscopy. A Lagrangian picture for the wave dynamics is constructed. The wave particle interaction associated with the transition from ordered to disordered particle oscillation, the wave crest trapping and wave heating are demonstrated and discussed.

  19. Detection of asteroidal dust particles from known families in near-Earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.; Liou, J.-C.

    1994-01-01

    The orbital evolution of dust particles with two different sizes (diameters equal to 4 and 9 microns) originating from the Eos, Koronis, and Themis asteroidal families was studied. All the planetary perturbations, radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson light drag, and corpuscular solar wind effects are included in the calculation. It is concluded that for particles having diameters ranging from 4 to 9 microns, Eos particles are quite different in orbital elements from Themis and Koronis particles. For Koronis and Themis particles, the best times to collect them are around April and October.

  20. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic anomalies in an anhydrous interplanetary dust particle.

    PubMed

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J; Bradley, John; Dai, Zu Rong; Bajt, Sasa; Graham, Giles

    2004-02-27

    Because hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles have been associated with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar anomalies in carbon has been a major conundrum. We report here the presence of a 13C depletion associated with a 15N enrichment in an anhydrous interplanetary dust particle. Our observations suggest that the anomalies are carried by heteroatomic organic compounds. Theoretical models indicate that low-temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds can produce carbon and nitrogen fractionations, but it remains to be seen whether the specific effects observed here can be reproduced.

  1. Behavior of dust particles in cylindrical discharges: Structure formation, mixture and void, effect of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo; Totsuji

    2014-12-01

    Theoretical and numerical works on dusty plasmas with cylindrical symmetry are presented. The main purpose has been to investigate behavior of dust particles in strongly coupled dusty plasmas which are expected to be realized in the planned experiments by PK-4 on the International Space Station and experiments by PK-4J, a similar apparatus constructed in Japan. The distribution of dust particles is analyzed on the basis of the drift-diffusion equations and, with the effect of discreteness taken into account, structure formations are numerically simulated.

  2. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  3. Determination of the levitation limits of dust particles within the sheath in complex plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, Angela; Land, Victor; Qiao Ke; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-01-15

    Experiments are performed in which dust particles are levitated at varying heights above the powered electrode in a radio frequency plasma discharge by changing the discharge power. The trajectories of particles dropped from the top of the discharge chamber are used to reconstruct the vertical electric force acting on the particles. The resulting data, together with the results from a self-consistent fluid model, are used to determine the lower levitation limit for dust particles in the discharge and the approximate height above the lower electrode where quasineutrality is attained, locating the sheath edge. These results are then compared with current sheath models. It is also shown that particles levitated within a few electron Debye lengths of the sheath edge are located outside the linearly increasing portion of the electric field.

  4. Schwarzschild black hole embedded in a dust field: scattering of particles and drag force effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    A ‘temporal analogue’ of the standard Poynting-Robertson effect is analyzed as induced by a dust of particles (instead of a gas of photons) surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole. Test particles inside this cloud undergo acceleration effects due to the presence of a friction force, so that the fate of their evolution can be completely different from the corresponding geodesic motion. Typical situations are discussed of hyperbolic motion of particles scattered by the black hole in the presence of a dust filling the whole spacetime region outside the horizon as well as particles which free fall radially crossing a corona located at a certain distance from the horizon. The existence of equilibrium orbits may prevent particles from either falling into the hole or escaping to infinity.

  5. Dust Production and Particle Acceleration in Supernova 1987A Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, R.; Matsuura, M.; Dwek, E.; Zanardo, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Baes, M.; Bouchet, P.; Burrows, D. N.; Chevalier, R.; Clayton, G. C.; Fransson, C.; Gaensler, B.; Kirshner, R.; Lakicevic, M.; Long, K. S.; Lundqvist, P.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Marcaide, J.; McCray, R.; Meixner, M.; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, S.; Sonneborn, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; vanLoon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions are crucial engines driving the evolution of galaxies by shock heating gas, increasing the metallicity, creating dust, and accelerating energetic particles. In 2012 we used the Atacama Large Millimeter/ Submillimeter Array to observe SN1987A, one of the best-observed supernovae since the invention of the telescope. We present spatially resolved images at 450 µm, 870 µm, 1.4 mm, and 2.8 mm, an important transition wavelength range. Longer wavelength emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated particles, shorter wavelengths by emission from the largest mass of dust measured in a supernova remnant (>0.2 Solar Mass). For the first time we show unambiguously that this dust has formed in the inner ejecta (the cold remnants of the exploded star's core). The dust emission is concentrated at the center of the remnant, so the dust has not yet been affected by the shocks. If a significant fraction survives, and if SN 1987A is typical, supernovae are important cosmological dust producers.

  6. DUST PRODUCTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERNOVA 1987A REVEALED WITH ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Indebetouw, R.; Chevalier, R.; Matsuura, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Dwek, E.; Zanardo, G.; Baes, M.; Bouchet, P.; Burrows, D. N.; Clayton, G. C.; Fransson, C.; Lundqvist, P.; Gaensler, B.; Kirshner, R.; Lakićević, M.; Long, K. S.; Meixner, M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Marcaide, J.; and others

    2014-02-10

    Supernova (SN) explosions are crucial engines driving the evolution of galaxies by shock heating gas, increasing the metallicity, creating dust, and accelerating energetic particles. In 2012 we used the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to observe SN 1987A, one of the best-observed supernovae since the invention of the telescope. We present spatially resolved images at 450 μm, 870 μm, 1.4 mm, and 2.8 mm, an important transition wavelength range. Longer wavelength emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated particles, shorter wavelengths by emission from the largest mass of dust measured in a supernova remnant (>0.2 M {sub ☉}). For the first time we show unambiguously that this dust has formed in the inner ejecta (the cold remnants of the exploded star's core). The dust emission is concentrated at the center of the remnant, so the dust has not yet been affected by the shocks. If a significant fraction survives, and if SN 1987A is typical, supernovae are important cosmological dust producers.

  7. A Novel System to Generate WTC Dust Particles for Inhalation Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Soukup, Joleen M.; Zelikoff, Judith; Ghio, Andrew; Peltier, Richard E.; Asgharian, Bahman; Chen, Lung-Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D.

    2014-01-01

    First Responders (FR) present at Ground Zero within the first 72-hr after the WTC (World Trade Center) collapse have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injury. The majority (>96%) of WTC dusts were >10 μm and no studies have examined potential health effects of this size fraction. This study sought to develop a system to generate and deliver supercoarse (10–53 μm) WTC particles to a rat model in a manner that mimicked FR exposure scenarios. A modified Fishing Line generator was integrated onto an intratracheal inhalation (ITIH) system that allowed for a bypassing of the nasal passages so as to mimic FR exposures. Dust concentrations were measured gravimetrically; particle size distribution was measured via elutriation. Results indicate that the system could produce dusts with 23 μm MMAD at levels up to ≥ 1200 mg/m3. To validate system utility, F344 rats were exposed for 2-hr to ≈100 mg WTC dust/m3. Exposed rats had significantly increased lung weight and levels of select tracer metals 1-hr post-exposure. Using this system, it is now possible to conduct relevant inhalation exposures to determine adverse WTC dusts impacts on the respiratory system. Furthermore, this novel integrated Fishing Line-ITIH system could potentially be used in the analyses of a wide spectrum of other dusts/pollutants of sizes previously untested or delivered to the lungs in ways that did not reflect realistic exposure scenarios. PMID:24220216

  8. Pallene dust torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiss, M.; Srama, R.; Kempf, S.; Sun, K. L.; Seiler, M.; Sachse, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Spahn, F.

    2014-12-01

    The tiny moon Pallene (diameter < 5 km, semi-major axis 212,000 km) orbits between Saturn's moons Mimas and Enceladus. The ISS cameras on board the Cassini spacecraft have detected a faint dust torus along its inclined orbit (Hedman, 2009). The source of the torus is believed to be the moon itself, where dust particles are ejected from the surface by micrometeoroid bombardment. Here we present in-situ dust measurements of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on-board the spacecraft Cassini which confirm a dust torus of micrometer-sized particles along the orbit of Pallene. The cross-section of the torus has been modeled with a double-Gaussian distribution, resulting in a radial and vertical full width at half maximum of 2300 km and 270 km and a maximum particle density of n = 2.7 10-3 m-3. Additionally, the data show an enhancement of larger particle in the torus in comparison to the background E-ring size distribution. The radial mean position of the torus is radially shifted outwards by around 1200 km in all flybys. This could point to a systematic larger semi-major axes of the dust particles (in comparison to Pallene) or a possible heliotropic appearance of the torus (all flybys in anti-solar direction).

  9. Sensitivity of the shortwave radiative effect of dust on particle shape: Comparison of spheres and spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanala, PäIvi; RäIsäNen, Petri; Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo

    2012-04-01

    The sensitivity of direct shortwave radiative effects of dust (DRE) to assumed particle shape is investigated. Radiative transfer simulations are conducted using optical properties of either spheres, mass-equivalent spheroids (mass-conserving case), or (mass-equivalent) spheroids whose number concentration is modified so that they have the same midvisible optical thickness (τ(545 nm)) as spheres (τ-conserving case). The impact of particle shape on DRE is investigated for different dust particle effective radii, optical thickness of the dust cloud, solar zenith angle, and spectral surface albedo (ocean, grass, and desert). It is found that the influence of particle shape on the DRE is strongest over ocean. It also depends very strongly on the shape distribution of spheroids used, to a degree that the results for two distributions of spheroids may deviate more from each other than from those for spheres. Finally, the effects of nonsphericity largely depend on whether the mass- orτ-conserving case is considered. For example, when using a shape distribution of spheroids recommended in a recent study for approximating the single-scattering properties of dust, the DRE at the surface differs at most 5% from that from spherical particles in the mass-conserving case. This stems from compensating nonsphericity effects on optical thickness, asymmetry parameter, and single-scattering albedo. However, in theτ-conserving case, the negative DRE at the surface can be up to 15% weaker for spheroids than spheres.

  10. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  11. Primary cosmic ray spectra observed by RUNJOB --- spectra for heavy and all particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RUNJOB Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    The absolute fluxes of heavy cosmic ray primaries, CNO, Ne Mg Si groups and Fe comp onents are reported from RUssian Nipp on JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) experiment. Total exposure of RUNJOB turns out to b e 342.4 m2 hour at the average altitude of around 30 km in three campaigns in 1995, 1996 and 1997. Using the angular distribution of the fragments nuclei and secondary particles, and the darkness on X-ray films, the energy of the primary particle is estimated. The flux of Fe comp onent extends up to 5*1012 eV/nucleon. And summing up the observed sp ectra, we got the all particle sp ectrum up to 1015 eV/particle. Combining with OG.1.2.14 of this conference, this paer will be the full explanation of RUNJOB experiment.

  12. Chemical processing does not always impair heterogeneous ice nucleation of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Demott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Minambres, L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Moehler, O.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust particles are the most abundant heterogeneous ice nuclei in the atmosphere. They also frequently become mixed with secondary material during atmospheric transport. The effect that such atmospheric processing has on the ice nucleation properties of dust particles remains under investigation. We have studied changes in the ice nucleation ability of various mineral dust sources after exposure to nitric acid in an aerosol flow tube, and after heterogeneous nucleation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the AIDA cloud expansion chamber. Both chemical treatments altered and homogenized the dust particles’ heterogeneous ice nucleation properties below water-saturation, but had no apparent impact on the immersion-freezing fraction well above water saturation. The fraction of particles capable of nucleating ice at fixed mixed-phase cloud temperatures between -35 and -15 °C was determined using a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) as the relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) was scanned from 75% to 110% RHw. Exposure to both nitric acid and SOA impaired essentially all ice nucleation in the deposition-regime below water saturation, while causing the onset of condensation-freezing to occur in a step-wise manner over a small range of RHw just below water saturation. We interpret this as the result of an increase in particle hygroscopicity following chemical treatment. This allows the mineral particles to absorb enough water to overcome solute freezing point depression effects and nucleate ice via condensation-freezing at a slightly smaller and narrower range of RHw than the less hygroscopic untreated dust can. Immersion-freezing above water saturation was not affected by either treatment. This is in stark contrast to earlier experiments where dust was exposed to sulfuric acid from a heated vapor source; ice nucleation was notably impaired in both the deposition and immersion-freezing regimes following sulfuric acid treatment.

  13. Characteristics of tyre dust in polluted air: Studies by single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C. S.; Gietl, Johanna K.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi A.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    There is a paucity of quantitative knowledge on the contributions of non-exhaust (abrasion and re-suspension) sources to traffic emissions. Abrasive emissions can be broadly categorised as tyre wear, brake wear and road dust/road surface wear. Current research often considers road dust and tyre dust as externally mixed particles, the former mainly composed of mineral matter and the latter solely composed of mainly organic matter and some trace elements. The aim of this work was to characterise tyre wear from both laboratory and field studies by using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). Real-time single particle chemical composition was obtained from a set of rubber tyres rotating on a metal surface. Bimodal particle number size distributions peaking at 35 nm and 85 nm were obtained from SMPS/APS measurements over the range 6-20,000 nm. ATOFMS mass spectra of tyre wear in the particle size range 200-3000 nm diameter show peaks due to exo-sulphur compounds, nitrate, Zn and ions of high molecular weight (m/z > 100) attributed to organic polymers. Two large ATOFMS datasets collected from a number of outdoor studies were examined. The former was constituted of 48 road dust samples collected on the roads of London. The latter consisted of ATOFMS ambient air field studies from Europe, overall composed of more than 2,000,000 single particle mass spectra. The majority (95%) of tyre wear particles present in the road dust samples and atmospheric samples are internally mixed with metals (Li, Na, Ca, Fe, Ti), as well as phosphate. It is concluded that the interaction of tyres with the road surface creates particles internally mixed from two sources: tyre rubber and road surface materials. Measurements of the tyre rubber component alone may underestimate the contribution of tyre wear to concentrations of airborne particulate matter. The results presented are especially relevant for urban aerosol source apportionment and PM2.5 exposure assessment.

  14. Two-fluid dust and gas mixtures in smoothed particle hydrodynamics: a semi-implicit approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Bate, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    A method to avoid the explicit time integration of small dust grains in the two-fluid gas/dust smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach is proposed. By assuming a very simple exponential decay model for the relative velocity between the gas and dust components, all the effective characteristics of the drag force can be reproduced. A series of tests has been performed to compare the accuracy of the method with analytical and explicit integration results. We find that the method performs well on a wide range of tests, and can provide large speed-ups over explicit integration when the dust stopping time is small. We have also found that the method is much less dissipative than conventional explicit or implicit two-fluid SPH approaches when modelling dusty shocks.

  15. Effect of particle size of Martian dust on the degradation of photovoltaic cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1991-01-01

    Glass coverglass and SiO2 covered and uncovered silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells were subjected to conditions simulating a Mars dust storm, using the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, to assess the effect of particle size on the performance of PV cells in the Martian environment. The dust used was an artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil, which was sorted into four different size ranges. Samples were tested both initially clean and initially dusted. The samples were exposed to clear and dust laden winds, wind velocities varying from 23 to 116 m/s, and attack angles from 0 to 90 deg. It was found that transmittance through the coverglass approximates the power produced by a dusty PV cell. Occultation by the dust was found to dominate the performance degradation for wind velocities below 50 m/s, whereas abrasion dominates the degradation at wind velocities above 85 m/s. Occultation is most severe at 0 deg (parallel to the wind), is less pronounced from 22.5 to 67.5 deg, and is somewhat larger at 90 deg (perpendicular to the wind). Abrasion is negligible at 0 deg, and increases to a maximum at 90 deg. Occultation is more of a problem with small particles, whereas large particles (unless they are agglomerates) cause more abrasion.

  16. Technical Note: Optical properties of desert dust with non-spherical particles: data incorporated to OPAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, P.; Gasteiger, J.; Hess, M.

    2015-02-01

    Mineral desert dust particles in general are no spheres and assuming spherical particles, instead of more realistic shapes, has significant effects on modeled optical dust properties and so on the belonging remote sensing procedures for desert dust and the derived radiative forcing. Thus in a new version of the data base OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds; Hess et al., 1998), the optical properties of the mineral particles are modeled describing the particles as spheroids with size dependent aspect ratio distributions, but with the size distributions and the spectral refractive indices not changed against the previous version of OPAC. The spheroid assumption strongly improves the scattering functions, but pays regard to the limited knowledge on particle shapes in an actual case. The relative deviations of the phase functions of non-spherical mineral particles from those of spherical particles are up to +60% at scattering angles of about 130° and up to -60% in the backscatter region, but the deviations are generally small for optical properties that are independent of the scattering angle. The improved version of OPAC (4.0) is freely available under http://www.rascin.net/

  17. Dust particles precipitation in AC/DC electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworek, A.; Marchewicz, A.; Krupa, A.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Czech, T.; Antes, T.; Śliwiński, Ł.; Kurz, M.; Szudyga, M.; Rożnowski, W.

    2015-10-01

    Submicron and nanoparticles removal from flue or exhaust gases remain still a challenge for engineers. The most effective device used for gas cleaning in power plants or industry is electrostatic precipitator, but its collection efficiency steeply decreases for particles smaller than 1 micron. In this paper, fractional collection efficiency of two-stage electrostatic precipitator comprising of alternating electric field charger and DC supplied parallel-plate collection stage has been investigated. The total number collection efficiency for PM2.5 particles was higher than 95% and mass collection efficiency >99%. Fractional collection efficiency for particles between 300 nm and 1 μm was >95%.

  18. Interplanetary charged particle models (1974). [and the effects of cosmic exposure upon spacecraft and spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1975-01-01

    The design of space vehicles for operation in interplanetary space is given, based on descriptions of solar wind, solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays. A state-of-the-art review is presented and design criteria are developed from experiment findings aboard interplanetary and high-altitude earth-orbiting spacecraft. Solar cells were found to be particularly sensitive. Solar protons may also impact the reliability of electric propulsion systems and spacecraft surfaces, as well as causing interference, detector saturation, and spurious signals. Galactic cosmic-ray impact can lead to similar electronic failure and interference and may register in photographic films and other emulsions. It was concluded that solar wind electron measurements might result from differential charging when shadowed portions of the spacecraft acquired a negative charge from electron impact.

  19. Evidence for fragmentation of strongly nonspherical dust particles in the tail of Comet West 1976 VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Farrell, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Motion of 16 striae through the dust tail of Comet West 1976 VI are observed over a time interval of more than three days. Initiation times for most of the 16 striae are found to coincide with the times of discrete violent bursts of dust, determined from the motions of streamers. It is also found that fragments are subjected to repulsive accelerations between 0.6 and 2.7 the solar attraction, indicating submicron-size absorbing particles, while repulsive accelerations imparted to parent articles are slightly lower than the average acceleration of fragments. The sizes of the fragments are estimated to be between one tenth and a few tenths of a micron. No effect of the Lorentz force on striae motion is detected. It is concluded that the theoretical assumption that striae are products of fragmentation of friable dust particles ejected from the nucleus agrees with observations.

  20. The dynamics of submicron-sized dust particles lost from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M. ); Tatrallyay, M.; Juhasz, A. ); Luhmann, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The dynamics of submicron-sized dielectric particles lost from the Martian moon Phobos are studied in connection with the possible detection of dust by the Phobos 2 spacecraft. The motion of these small dust grains is influenced not only by gravity but also by solar radiation pressure and electromagnetic forces. The plasma environment of Mars is described by applying a hybrid gasdynamic-cometary model. Some of the submicron-sized grains ejected at speeds on the order of a few tens meters per second can stay in orbit around Mars for several months forming a nonuniform and time-dependent dust halo. The lifetime of the particles depends on their size, on the actual interplanetary parameters (constant or varying with a periodicity of 28 days) and also on the orbital position of Mars at the time of ejection since there is a 24 {degree} obliquity between the orbit of Phobos and that of Mars.

  1. Dust Telescopes and Active Dust Collectors: Linking Dust to Their Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, K. J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.; Postberg, F.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmic dust particles from remote sites and times are treasures of information. By determining the dust particles' source and their elemental properties, we can learn about the environments, where they were formed and processed. Born as stardust in the cool atmospheres of giant stars or in novae and supernovae explosions, the particles are subsequently modified in the interstellar medium. Interplanetary dust that originates from comets and asteroids represents even more processed material at different stages of Solar System evolution. Interstellar and interplanetary dust particles from various sources can be detected and analyzed in the near-Earth space environment. The newly developed instruments Dust Telescope and Active Dust Collector are able to determine the origin of dust particles and provide their elemental composition. A Dust Telescope is a combination of a Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) [1] together with an analyzer for the chemical composition of dust particles in space. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of induced electric signals when a charged grain flies through a position sensitive electrode system. A modern DTS can measure dust particles as small as 0.2 µm in radius and dust speeds up to 100 km/s. Large area chemical analyzers of 0.1 m2 sensitive area have been tested at a dust accelerator and it was demonstrated that they have sufficient mass resolution to resolve ions with atomic mass number up to >100 [2]. The advanced Dust Telescope is capable of identifying interstellar and interplanetary grains, and measuring their mass, velocity vector, charge, elemental and isotopic compositions. An Active Dust Collector combines a DTS with an aerogel or other dust collector materials, e.g. like the ones used on the Stardust mission. The combination of a DTS with a dust collector provides not only individual trajectories of the collected particles but also their impact time and position on the collector which proves essential to

  2. Numerical study of particle deposition and scaling in dust exhaust of cyclone separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. W.; Li, Q.; Zhao, Y. L.; Wang, J. J.; Jin, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    The solid particles accumulation in the dust exhaust cone area of the cyclone separator can cause the wall wear. This undoubtedly prevents the flue gas turbine from long period and safe operation. So it is important to study the mechanism how the particles deposited and scale on dust exhaust cone area of the cyclone separator. Numerical simulations of gas-solid flow field have been carried out in a single tube in the third cyclone separator. The three-dimensionally coupled computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology and the modified Discrete Phase Model (DPM) are adopted to model the gas-solid two-phase flow. The results show that with the increase of the operating temperature and processing capacity, the particle sticking possibility near the cone area will rise. The sticking rates will decrease when the particle diameter becomes bigger.

  3. Ion acoustic and dust acoustic waves at finite size of plasma particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2015-03-15

    We consider the influence of the finite size of ions on the properties of classic plasmas. We focus our attention at the ion acoustic waves for electron-ion plasmas. We also consider the dusty plasmas where we account the finite size of ions and particles of dust and consider the dispersion of dust acoustic waves. The finite size of particles is a classical effect as well as the Coulomb interaction. The finite size of particles considerably contributes to the properties of the dense plasmas in the small wavelength limit. Low temperature dense plasmas, revealing the quantum effects, are also affected by the finite size of plasma particles. Consequently, it is important to consider the finite size of ions in the quantum plasmas as well.

  4. Effect of particle shape on dust shortwave direct radiative forcing calculations based on MODIS observations for a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Cui, Songxue; Zhao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Assuming spheroidal and spherical particle shapes for mineral dust aerosols, the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals, and subsequently on instantaneous shortwave direct radiative forcing (SWDRF) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), is assessed based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for a case study. Specifically, a simplified aerosol retrieval algorithm based on the principle of the Deep Blue aerosol retrieval method is employed to retrieve dust aerosol optical depths, and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model is used to derive the instantaneous SWDRF of dust at the TOA for cloud-free conditions. Without considering the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals, the effect of particle shape on the scattering properties of dust aerosols (e.g., extinction efficiency, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor) is negligible, which can lead to a relative difference of at most 5% for the SWDRF at the TOA. However, the effect of particle shape on the SWDRF cannot be neglected provided that the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals is also taken into account for SWDRF calculations. The corresponding results in an instantaneous case study show that the relative differences of the SWDRF at the TOA between spheroids and spheres depend critically on the scattering angles at which dust aerosol optical depths are retrieved, and can be up to 40% for low dust-loading conditions.

  5. Asian Dust at Mauna Loa Observatory: Analysis and Modeling of Individual Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Willis, R. D.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Springtime Asian dust storms events, typically originating in the Gobi Desert or Taklamakan Desert, produce particles that can be carried aloft eastward for thousands of miles. As a result, the radiative properties of these particles can significantly affect global climate. Here, we determine the optical properties of particles identified as Asian dust at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, (MLO) based on the composition and actual shapes of individual particles. Samples of particulate material <10 μm in size were collected at MLO, between March 15 and April 26, 2011. Air mass back trajectories and satellite imagery showed that a subset of the aerosol sampled during this period likely originated from the Asian mainland while most of the aerosol probably did not. Samples were first analyzed by automated scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, whereby particles were sorted into compositionally-distinct particle types. Two particle types, identified as dolomite and calcite were determined to have originated from Asia. A third type, anhydrite, also aloft in the free troposphere, was not associated with Asian dust. Individual particles were analyzed compositionally and their shapes modeled spatially using focused ion-beam (FIB) SEM and FIB tomography. Particle 3-D representations were then input to the discrete dipole approximation method to determine their optical properties for 589 nm light. Calculations revealed that the single scattering albedo (SSA) for the Asian dust particles (0.79 to 0.94) straddled the critical SSA for cooling vs. warming (0.86), with the lowest SSA (0.79) attributed to a small amount of soot (1.7 % by volume) attached to a dolomite particle. SSA for the free troposphere anhydrite particles (0.90 to 0.93) was well above the critical SSA. For the three particle types, SSA for the actual-shaped particles was higher than equivalently-sized spheres, cubes, or tetrahedra. For the fraction of backscattered light from

  6. Asian dust event observed in Seoul, Korea, during 29-31 May 2008: analysis of transport and vertical distribution of dust particles from lidar and surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Jung-Yoon; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the transport of dust particles, its vertical distribution, and the associated meteorological conditions during an Asian dust event that was observed in Seoul, Korea on May 29-31, 2008. This study analyzes data from ground-based and space-borne 2-wavelength polarization lidars, particulate mass concentrations, and synoptic weather data. Surface meteorological station observations of dust phenomena, dust transport model, and weather maps consistently show that the dust particles were transported from the source regions (Inner Mongolia, Man-Ju, and Ordos areas) to Korea via the northeastern part of China. Network observations of the PM(10) concentrations in Korea revealed that a majority of the heavy dust particles traveled across South Korea from the northwest to the southeast direction with a horizontal scale of 250-300km and a traveling speed of approximately 40kmh(-1). This extraordinary dust event, in terms of its intensity and timing during the year, occurred due to the blockage of an unusually intensified low-pressure system in the northeastern part of China as well as high-pressure system centered over the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril Islands. The low values of the particle depolarization ratio (delta(532)) (dust period indicate the presence of spherical, non-dust, and relatively small particles. The mean delta(532) value was approximately 0.123+/-0.069 between altitudes of ground approximately 2.8km, and 0.161+/-0.049 for near-surface dust layer (ground approximately 1.2km). This value is quite similar to that obtained during the 3-year SNU-Lidar measurements in Seoul (delta(532) approximately 0.136+/-0.027). The value of delta(532) during the 2nd multilayered dust episode ranged between 0.081 and 0.120 for near-surface dust layers, and between 0.076 and 0.114 for elevated dust layers. The CALIPSO measurements of beta(532), delta(532), and CR also revealed the presence of dense dust

  7. Nano-Diamonds in Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs), Micrometeorites, and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Genge, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-diamonds have been identified in IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles), micrometeorites, and meteorites. They appear to be depleted in non-cluster IDPs suggesting that some nano-diamonds are not presolar. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Pattern recognition of respirable dust particles by a back-propagation artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Wippel, R; Pichler-Semmelrock, F P; Köck, M; Kosmus, W

    2001-05-01

    A back-propagation neural network was used as a pattern recognition tool for LAMMA mass spectral data. Standard EPA source profiles were used as training and test data of the net. The elemental patterns (10 elements) of the sum of 100 mass spectra of fine dust particles were presented to the trained nets and satisfactory recognition (> 50%) was obtained.

  9. Volatiles in fourteen interplanetary dust particles: A comparison with CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to classify the nature of volatiles within interplanetary dust particles (IDP's), 14 IDP's using a laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LM/MS) technique were studied. Volatile abundances and distributions found for the IDP's are compared with those measured for carbonaceous chondrites in order to determine if the IDP's are related to the parent bodies of these primitive meteorites.

  10. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  11. Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.; Akhoundi, A.

    2012-10-01

    A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

  12. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    M. Balden; N. Endstrasser; P. W. Humrickhouse; V. Rohde; M. Rasinski; U. von Toussaint; S. Elgeti; R. Neu

    2014-04-01

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ~50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

  13. Application of randomly oriented spheroids for retrieval of dust particle parameters from multiwavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Dubovik, O.; Kolgotin, A.; Lapyonok, T.; di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Whiteman, D. N.; Mishchenko, M.; Tanré, D.

    2010-11-01

    Multiwavelength (MW) Raman lidars have demonstrated their potential to profile particle parameters; however, until now, the physical models used in retrieval algorithms for processing MW lidar data have been predominantly based on the Mie theory. This approach is applicable to the modeling of light scattering by spherically symmetric particles only and does not adequately reproduce the scattering by generally nonspherical desert dust particles. Here we present an algorithm based on a model of randomly oriented spheroids for the inversion of multiwavelength lidar data. The aerosols are modeled as a mixture of two aerosol components: one composed only of spherical and the second composed of nonspherical particles. The nonspherical component is an ensemble of randomly oriented spheroids with size-independent shape distribution. This approach has been integrated into an algorithm retrieving aerosol properties from the observations with a Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser. Such a lidar provides three backscattering coefficients, two extinction coefficients, and the particle depolarization ratio at a single or multiple wavelengths. Simulations were performed for a bimodal particle size distribution typical of desert dust particles. The uncertainty of the retrieved particle surface, volume concentration, and effective radius for 10% measurement errors is estimated to be below 30%. We show that if the effect of particle nonsphericity is not accounted for, the errors in the retrieved aerosol parameters increase notably. The algorithm was tested with experimental data from a Saharan dust outbreak episode, measured with the BASIL multiwavelength Raman lidar in August 2007. The vertical profiles of particle parameters as well as the particle size distributions at different heights were retrieved. It was shown that the algorithm developed provided substantially reasonable results consistent with the available independent information about the observed aerosol event.

  14. Studies of the Energy Spectra of Incident Cosmic Radiation by the Networks of Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot A.; Hovsyapayan, Gagik G.

    2007-08-01

    There are numerous indications that particle acceleration took place in supernovae remnants, by pulsars, super-massive black holes, in the galaxy clusters and by stars. As a universal mechanism operated on different scales the stochastic and shock acceleration is pointed. It is very important to use our nearest star - the sun, as laboratory in studying particle acceleration phenomena. The surface particle detectors, along with space-born spectrometers are capable of detecting solar particles in the energy range from KeVs till several Tens of GeV. The large surface arrays are detecting particle in energy range from ~100 TeV till EeV. This richness of information on particle fluxes on different scales can be used in studying physical processes responsible for particle acceleration in Universe. Surface detectors measuring Extensive Air Showers (EAS) initiated by Primary Cosmic Rays (PCR) incident on terrestrial atmosphere have been in operation since the last 50 years with main goal to explore the major enigma of Cosmic Ray (CR) origin and acceleration. Recent achievements of the Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes and X-ray space laboratories, establishing the supernova remnants (SNRs) as source of hadronic cosmic rays pose stringent conditions on the quality of the EAS evidence. After establishing the existence of the “knee” in all particle spectrum the most pronounced result from EAS studies is the rigidity dependent shift of the knee position to the highest energies. This feature first observed by the exploiting the separation of the primary beam in different groups of mass in MAKET-ANI, EAS-TOP and KASCADE experiments also pointed to the SNR blast shocks as CR source. The MAKET ANI detector is placed on mountain Aragats (Armenia) on 3200m at sea level (40.50N, 44.20E). More than 1.3 x 10^6 showers with size greater than 10^5 were registered in 1997-2004. The detector has effectively collected the cores of EAS, initiated by primaries with energies of 5 × 10

  15. A novel in situ method for sampling urban soil dust: particle size distribution, trace metal concentrations, and stable lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liang, Siyuan; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a novel in situ sampling method was utilized to investigate the concentrations of trace metals and Pb isotope compositions among different particle size fractions in soil dust, bulk surface soil, and corresponding road dust samples collected within an urban environment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of using soil dust samples to determine trace metal contamination and potential risks in urban areas in comparison with related bulk surface soil and road dust. The results of total metal loadings and Pb isotope ratios revealed that soil dust is more sensitive than bulk surface soil to anthropogenic contamination in urban areas. The new in situ method is effective at collecting different particle size fractions of soil dust from the surface of urban soils, and that soil dust is a critical indicator of anthropogenic contamination and potential human exposure in urban settings.

  16. Real-time mass measurement of dust particles deposited on vessel wall in a divertor simulator using quartz crystal microbalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Mizuki; Koga, Kazunori; Katayama, Ryu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a dust monitoring method using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) equipped with a dust eliminating filter. Here we report a dust eliminating ratio of the filter and first measurement results of the QCMs in a divertor simulator. The volume of spherical dust in unit area on the filter and QCM under the filter were 2.09 × 10-9 and 1.22 × 10-10 m3 m-2, respectively. Thus, the dust eliminating ratio of the filter is 94.2%. The QCM without the filter gives deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles, whereas the QCM with the filter gives deposition rate predominantly due to radicals. From the results, we deduce information of mass fraction of dust particles in deposits.

  17. Charge Balance in the Mesosphere with Meteoric Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S. H.; Asmus, H.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol particle charging model developed initially for noctilucent cloud particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) returned by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from the Andøya rocket Range, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes as a consequence of recombination of electrons on the MSPs at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and nighttime data place constraints on the photodetachment rate. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction by atomic oxygen helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. MSP particle densities from the CARMA/CHEM2D model are in better agreement with rocket data for assumed values of the meteor input flux that are at the low end of the generally accepted range.

  18. Solar radiative effects of a Saharan dust plume observed during SAMUM assuming spheroidal model particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Sebastian; Bierwirth, Eike; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Kandler, Konrad; Esselborn, Michael; Tesche, Matthias; Schladitz, Alexander; Wendisch, Manfred; Trautmann, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT The solar optical properties of Saharan mineral dust observed during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) were explored based on measured size-number distributions and chemical composition. The size-resolved complex refractive index of the dust was derived with real parts of 1.51-1.55 and imaginary parts of 0.0008-0.006 at 550nm wavelength. At this spectral range a single scattering albedo ωo and an asymmetry parameter g of about 0.8 were derived. These values were largely determined by the presence of coarse particles. Backscatter coefficients and lidar ratios calculated with Mie theory (spherical particles) were not found to be in agreement with independently measured lidar data. Obviously the measured Saharan mineral dust particles were of non-spherical shape. With the help of these lidar and sun photometer measurements the particle shape as well as the spherical equivalence were estimated. It turned out that volume equivalent oblate spheroids with an effective axis ratio of 1:1.6 matched these data best. This aspect ratio was also confirmed by independent single particle analyses using a scanning electron microscope. In order to perform the non-spherical computations, a database of single particle optical properties was assembled for oblate and prolate spheroidal particles. These data were also the basis for simulating the non-sphericity effects on the dust optical properties: ωo is influenced by up to a magnitude of only 1% and g is diminished by up to 4% assuming volume equivalent oblate spheroids with an axis ratio of 1:1.6 instead of spheres. Changes in the extinction optical depth are within 3.5%. Non-spherical particles affect the downwelling radiative transfer close to the bottom of the atmosphere, however, they significantly enhance the backscattering towards the top of the atmosphere: Compared to Mie theory the particle non-sphericity leads to forced cooling of the Earth-atmosphere system in the solar spectral range for both dust over

  19. Striated dust tail of Comet West 1976 VI as a particle fragmentation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Z.; Farrell, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    The motions of 16 striae in the dust tail of Comet West between 4 and 7 March 1976 have been successfully fitted on four small-scale photographs. Our model assumes that the striae are the result of the ejection of dust particles that subsequently fragment in the tail. The particles responsible for the formation of a discrete stria must be emitted simultaneously, be subjected to the same repulsive acceleration in the tail, and break up simultaneously. The results of the analysis indicate a strong correlation between the ejection times and the times of known explosive events. The repulsive accelerations of the fragments are found to be between 0.6 and 2.7 times the solar attraction, indicating submicron-sized absorbing particles. We also find that the repulsive accelerations of parent particles are only slightly smaller than those of their fragments, suggesting comparable area-to-mass ratios between parents and fragments, and therefore highly nonspherical shapes of parents. Complex, tenuously bonded, chain-like aggregates of submicron-sized grains would satisfy these conditions. The mass of dust in an average stria is estimated to be about 10/sup 9/ g. There was no measurable effect from the Lorentz force, indicating an upper limit of a few volts for the electric charge of the fragments. We consider rotational bursting caused by a ''windmill'' effect of radiation pressure to be a possible fragmentation mechanism. Application of a simple chain-particle model suggests the existence of discrete particle types.

  20. Dust Library of Plasmonically Enhanced Infrared Spectra of Individual Respirable Particles.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Antriksh; Ravi, Aruna; Li, Sirui; Nystrom, Steven V; Thompson, Zechariah; Coe, James V

    2016-09-01

    This work characterizes collections of infrared spectra of individual dust particles of ∼4 µm size that were obtained from three very different environments: our lab air, a home air filter, and the 11 September 2001 World Trade Center event. Particle collection was done either directly from the air or by placing dust powder from various samples directly on the plasmonic mesh with 5 µm square holes as air is pumped through the mesh. This arrangement enables the recording of "scatter-free" infrared absorption spectra of individual particles of size comparable to the probing wavelengths whose vibrational signatures are otherwise dominated by scattering and dispersive line shape distortions. The spectra are sensitive to the amounts of various infrared active components and analysis using a Mie-Bruggeman model for mixed composition particles provides volume fractions of the components. Inhalation of dust particles of ∼4 µm size has significant health consequences as these are among the largest inhaled into people's lungs. The chemical composition of ∼4 µm respirable particles is of great interest from health, atmospheric, and environmental perspectives as different environments may pose different hazards and spectroscopic challenges. PMID:27440136

  1. Dust Library of Plasmonically Enhanced Infrared Spectra of Individual Respirable Particles.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Antriksh; Ravi, Aruna; Li, Sirui; Nystrom, Steven V; Thompson, Zechariah; Coe, James V

    2016-09-01

    This work characterizes collections of infrared spectra of individual dust particles of ∼4 µm size that were obtained from three very different environments: our lab air, a home air filter, and the 11 September 2001 World Trade Center event. Particle collection was done either directly from the air or by placing dust powder from various samples directly on the plasmonic mesh with 5 µm square holes as air is pumped through the mesh. This arrangement enables the recording of "scatter-free" infrared absorption spectra of individual particles of size comparable to the probing wavelengths whose vibrational signatures are otherwise dominated by scattering and dispersive line shape distortions. The spectra are sensitive to the amounts of various infrared active components and analysis using a Mie-Bruggeman model for mixed composition particles provides volume fractions of the components. Inhalation of dust particles of ∼4 µm size has significant health consequences as these are among the largest inhaled into people's lungs. The chemical composition of ∼4 µm respirable particles is of great interest from health, atmospheric, and environmental perspectives as different environments may pose different hazards and spectroscopic challenges.

  2. Dust acoustic solitary structures in a multi-fluid dusty plasma in the presence of kappa distributed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika; Kaur, Nimardeep

    2016-07-01

    Dusty plasma is a fully or partially ionized gas which contain micron or sub-micron sized dust particles. These dust particles can be positively or negatively charged, depending upon the mechanism of charging . Dusty plasma is often observed in most of the space and astrophysical plasma environments. Presence of these dust particles can modify the dispersion properties of waves in the plasma and can introduce several new wave modes, e.g., dust acoustic (DA) waves, dust-ion acoustic (DIA) waves, dust-acoustic shock waves etc. In this investigation we have studied the small amplitude dust acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma comprising of electrons, positively charged ions, negatively charged hot as well as cold dust. Electrons and ions are described by superthermal distribution which is more appropriate for modeling space and astrophysical plasmas. Kadomtsev- Petviashvili (KP) equation has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. Positive as well as negative potential structures are observed, depending upon some critical values of parameters. Amplitude and width of dust acoustic solitary waves are modified by varying these parameters such as superthermality of electrons and ions, direction of propagation of the wave, relative concentration of hot and cold dust particles etc. This study may be helpful in understanding the formation and dynamics of nonlinear structures in various space and astrophysical plasma environments such Saturn's F-rings.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of steady state shock structure including cosmic ray mediation and particle escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, D. C.; Jones, F. C.; Eichler, D.

    1983-01-01

    Both hydrodynamic calculations (Drury and Volk, 1981, and Axford et al., 1982) and kinetic simulations imply the existence of thermal subshocks in high-Mach-number cosmic-ray-mediated shocks. The injection efficiency of particles from the thermal background into the diffusive shock-acceleration process is determined in part by the sharpness and compression ratio of these subshocks. Results are reported for a Monte Carlo simulation that includes both the back reaction of accelerated particles on the inflowing plasma, producing a smoothing of the shock transition, and the free escape of particles allowing arbitrarily large overall compression ratios in high-Mach-number steady-state shocks. Energy spectra and estimates of the proportion of thermal ions accelerated to high energy are obtained.

  4. Final Reports of the Stardust ISPE: Seven Probable Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Gruen, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, (Bruce); Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.

    2014-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft carried the first spaceborne collector specifically designed to capture and return a sample of contemporary interstellar dust to terrestrial laboratories for analysis [1]. The collector was exposed to the interstellar dust stream in two periods in 2000 and 2002 with a total exposure of approximately 1.8 10(exp 6) square meters sec. Approximately 85% of the collector consisted of aerogel, and the remainder consisted of Al foils. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) was a consortiumbased effort to characterize the collection in sufficient detail to enable future investigators to make informed sample requests. Among the questions to be answered were these: How many impacts are consistent in their characteristics with interstellar dust, with interplanetary dust, and with secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft? Are the materials amorphous or crystalline? Are organics detectable? An additional goal of the ISPE was to develop or refine the techniques for preparation, analysis, and curation of these tiny samples, expected to be approximately 1 picogram or smaller, roughly three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than the samples in other small particle collections in NASA's collections - the cometary samples returned by Stardust, and the collection of Interplanetary Dust Particles collected in the stratosphere.

  5. Investigating the Structure of the Wake of a Dust Particle in the Plasma Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Due to the deflection of the ambient streaming ions, a negatively charged dust particle in the plasma sheath forms a wake with a net positive space charge in downstream direction. The wake is characterized by attractive, non-reciprocal forces between negatively charged particles and a charge reduction of a particle in the wake of another particle. In this contribution a two-particle system is used to investigate the ion wake structure behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge. For this purpose, we have used the phase-resolved resonance method that evaluates the dynamic response of the particle system to small external, sinusoidal perturbations, which allows to measure the wake induces characteristics. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. In good agreement with theoretical predictions, a significant modification in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail is observed. The presented method is used to investigate the influence of a strong magnetic field on the formation and spatial structure of the wake. Funded by DFG under contract SFB TR-24/A2.

  6. Dust particle size measurement by the multi-channel laser light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Seon, C. R.; Chai, K. B.; Park, H. Y.; Shin, Y. H.; Chung, K. H.

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of the spatial distribution of dust particle size was performed by the multi-channel laser light scattering method. To self-consistently determine the time evolution of the particle size, in-situ polarization-sensitive laser light scattering was used using a 30 mW He-Ne laser. Polarization light intensities (incident and scattered light intensities with the same polarization) were measured at 71 . Before applying the method to the dusty plasmas, the measurement accuracy was confirmed using a distilled water solution of the size-known particles. In addition, the size-known particles were injected into the argon plasma, and the particles trapped inside the plasma were used for the accurate measurement of the light scattering angle. The measured size of the dust particles in an argon diluted silane capacitively-coupled plasma at 160 mTorr, 150 W, (11.4-11.8) s after the plasma on was (80-110) nm. In comparison, the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fallout particles showed (90-100) nm spherical particles under the similar experimental condition. The time evolution of the spatially distributed particle size at various plasma conditions was studied by using a 2-dimensional 16 channel photomultiplier tube as a detector of scattered laser light.

  7. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  8. Rotating dust particles in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulle, M.; Ivanovski, S. L.; Bertini, I.; Gutierrez, P.; Lara, L.; Sierks, H.; Zakharov, V.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bodewits, D.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Groussin, O.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Michalik, H.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Sabau, L.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Context. During September and October 2014, the OSIRIS cameras onboard the ESA Rosetta mission detected millions of single particles. Many of these dust particlesappear as long tracks (due to both the dust proper motion and the spacecraft motion during the exposure time) with a clear brightness periodicity. Aims: We interpret the observed periodic features as a rotational and translational motion of aspherical dust grains. Methods: By counting the peaks of each track, we obtained statistics of a rotation frequency. We compared these results with the rotational frequency predicted by a model of aspherical dust grain dynamics in a model gas flow. By testing many possible sets of physical conditions and grain characteristics, we constrained the rotational properties of dust grains. Results: We analyzed on the motion of rotating aspherical dust grains with different cross sections in flow conditions corresponding to the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the OSIRIS observations, we constrain the possible physical parameters of the grains.

  9. Using NASA EOS in the Arabian and Saharan Deserts to Examine Dust Particle Size and Spectral Signature of Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenton, J. C.; Keeton, T.; Barrick, B.; Cowart, K.; Cooksey, K.; Florence, V.; Herdy, C.; Luvall, J. C.; Vasquez, S.

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of airborne particulate matter can have adverse effects on the human respiratory system. Ground-based studies conducted in Iraq have revealed the presence of potential human pathogens in airborne dust. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), airborne particulate matter below 2.5μm (PM2.5) can cause long-term damage to the human respiratory system. Given the relatively high incidence of new-onset respiratory disorders experienced by US service members deployed to Iraq, this research offers a new glimpse into how satellite remote sensing can be applied to questions related to human health. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) can be used to determine spectral characteristics of dust particles, the depth of dust plumes, as well as dust particle sizes. Comparing dust particle size from the Sahara and Arabian Deserts gives insight into the composition and atmospheric transport characteristics of dust from each desert. With the use of NASA SeaWiFS DeepBlue Aerosol, dust particle sizes were estimated using Angström exponent. Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) equation was used to determine the distribution of particle sizes, the area of the dust storm, and whether silicate minerals were present in the dust. The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra satellite was utilized in calculating BTD. Minimal research has been conducted on the spectral characteristics of airborne dust in the Arabian and Sahara Deserts. Mineral composition of a dust storm that occurred 17 April 2008 near Baghdad was determined using imaging spectrometer data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spectral Library and EO-1 Hyperion data. Mineralogy of this dust storm was subsequently compared to that of a dust storm that occurred over the Bodélé Depression in the Sahara Desert on 7 June 2003.

  10. Diffusive Acceleration of Cosmic-Ray Particles in Quasi-Parallel Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    1994-05-01

    The diffusion-convection equation has been solved numerically in order to study the injection and acceleration of cosmic-ray particles at quasi-parallel shocks. Our previous numerical code has been improved to include realistic momentum-dependent diffusion coefficient. The particle distribution function is solved in the grid whose size is chosen in a momentum-dependent way, so that a fixed number of zones are contained in a diffusion length. Injection of the suprathermal particles is approximated through the diffusive scattering process itself, that is, the diffusion and acceleration of the thermal particles near the Maxwellian tail across the shock front. We show how the acceleration process is dependent on the details of the injection, the momentum-dependent diffusion, and the escaping high energy particles. The simulated particle spectrum from our calculation will be compared with that of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the particle acceleration at earth's bow shock by Ellison, Mobius and Paschmann (1990). Support for this work at the University of Minnesota is provided through the NSF, NASA and the University of Minnesota Supercomputer Institute. HK is supported in part by the Korea Research Foundation through the Brain Pool Program. { References: Ellison, D. C., Mobius, E., & Paschmann, G. 1990, Ap. J., 352, 376. }

  11. Dust Particle Release from the Lunar Surface: Influence of Adhesion and Meteoroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Sergey; Golub', Anatoliy; Izvekova, Yulia; Lisin, Evgeniy; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Dolnikov, Gennadiy; Zakharov, Aleksandr; Zelenyi, Lev

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that for consideration of dust particle release from the lunar surface one has to take into account (among other effects) both adhesion and meteoroid impacts. The effect of surface roughness on the adhesion intensity on the Moon is discussed. The rate of meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface per unit area is determined. The strength of the regolith due to the adhesion effect is estimated. The processes occurring when a high-speed meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface are described. In particular, the characteristic parameters of zones of evaporation of the substance, its melting, destruction of particles constituting lunar regolith, their irreversible deformations, and elastic deformation of the regolith substance are found. A possibility of the rise of micrometer-sized dust particles above the lunar surface is shown. It is demonstrated that most of the particles rising over lunar surface due to the meteoroid impact originates from the elastic deformation zone. The number of dust particles raised over the lunar surface as result of a meteoroid impact is estimated. The size-distribution function of particles released from the lunar surface due to meteoroid impacts is determined. It is noted that micrometeoroid impacts can result in rise of dust particles of the size of a few μm up to an altitude of about 30 cm that explains the effect of "horizon glow" observed by Surveyor lunar lander. This work was carried out as part of the Russian Academy of Sciences Presidium program no. 7 and was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects nos. 15-02-05627, 15-32-21159) and the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2), as well as NCN grant Rezonans 2012/07/B/ST9/04414.

  12. Meteoroid impacts and dust particles over the surface of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Sergey; Zelenyi, Lev; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zakharov, Alexander; Izvekova, Yulia; Dolnikov, Gennady; Lisin, Evgeny; Golub', Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that for consideration of dust particle release from the lunar surface one has to take into account (among other effects) both adhesion and meteoroid impacts. The effect of surface roughness on the adhesion intensity on the Moon is discussed. The rate of meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface per unit area is determined. The strength of the regolith due to the adhesion effect is estimated. The processes occurring when a high-speed meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface are described. In particular, the characteristic parameters of zones of evaporation of the substance, its melting, destruction of particles constituting lunar regolith, their irreversible deformations, and elastic deformation of the regolith substance are found. A possibility of the rise of micrometer-sized dust particles above the lunar surface is shown. It is demonstrated that most of the particles rising over lunar surface due to the meteoroid impact originates from the elastic deformation zone. The number of dust particles raised over the lunar surface as result of meteoroid impacts is calculated. The size-distribution function of particles released from the lunar surface due to meteoroid impacts is determined. It is noted that micrometeoroid impacts can result in rise of dust particles of the size of a few micrometers up to an altitude of about 30 cm that explains the effect of ``horizon glow" observed by Surveyor lunar lander. This work was supported in part by the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences (under Fundamental Research Program No. 7, ``Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Solar System Objects and Stellar Planet Systems. Transient Explosion Processes in Astrophysics" and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project No. 15-02-05627-a). Y.N. Izvekova is supported also within the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  13. Lifetime of Cosmic-Ray Muons and the Standard Model of Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Sahansha; Shevde, Yash; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Muon is one of the twelve fundamental particles of matter, having the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W+/W-. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, reaching the sea level. By detecting time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our single scintillation detector (donated by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA), we measured muon's lifetime at rest. It compares well with the value predicted by the Standard Model of Particles. From the lifetime we were able to calculate the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (an analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Using further Standard Model relations and an experimental value for MW, we calculated the weak coupling constant, the electric charge of the muon, and the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. We determined the sea-level flux of cosmic muons.

  14. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  15. Charge balance for the mesosphere with meteoric dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, H.; Robertson, S.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L.

    2015-05-01

    An aerosol particle charging model initially developed for noctilucent cloud ice particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain the data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) obtained by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from Andøya, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes (those with ionization rates above 20 cm-3 s-1) as a consequence of recombination on the MSPs being dominant at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and the nighttime rocket data suggest a photodetachment rate between 0.1 and 0.01 s-1. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. The MSP number densities that are the inputs to the charging model are taken from the CARMA/CHEM2D model. The CHAMPS data are more consistent with number densities generated with an assumed input flux from ablation of 4 t d-1 than with 44 t d-1 assumed previously.

  16. Peculiar high energy cosmic ray stratospheric event reveals a heavy primary origin particle above the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopenkin, V.; Fujimoto, Y.

    2005-01-15

    We wish to put forward an explanation for a peculiar cosmic ray event with energy {sigma}E{sub {gamma}}{>=}2x10{sup 15} eV detected in 1975 by the balloon borne emulsion chamber experiment performed in the stratosphere, at the altitude {>=}30 km above sea level. For almost 30 years the event has been described as unusual, invoking new exotic mechanisms or models. In our opinion there is no need for an extraordinary explanation. Contrary to the widespread belief, the event gives us an example of 'unrecognized standard physics'. At the same time this event revealed a variety of features which are of considerable interest for cosmic rays, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. Here we show that the observed family is most likely to be a result of a heavy nucleus interaction with an air nucleus. In this case a primary particle would originally have been in the energy region above 'the knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  17. The Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics cosmic ray veto system

    SciTech Connect

    Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Ramberg, E.; Kiper, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    A photomultiplier (PMT) readout system has been designed for use by the cosmic ray veto systems of two warm liquid bubble chambers built at Fermilab by the Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics (COUPP) collaboration. The systems are designed to minimize the infrastructure necessary for installation. Up to five PMTs can be daisy-chained on a single data link using standard Category 5 network cable. The cables is also serve distribute to low voltage power. High voltage is generated locally on each PMT base. Analog and digital signal processing is also performed locally. The PMT base and system controller design and performance measurements are presented.

  18. Particle sizes and composition of Mars atmospheric dust based upon Viking and Mariner 9 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Mars atmospheric dust can play an important role in the thermal structure of the Mars atmosphere during periods of high dust loading. However, the radiative properties of Mars atmospheric dust remain uncertain due to uncertain definitions of the dust composition and size distribution. The analysis by Toon et al., of Mariner 9 IRIS spectra during the 1971-1972 global dust storm indicated a reasonable match between the modeled 9-micron absorption of montmorillinite and the observed 9-micron absorption. Toon et al. also determined that an effective (cross-section weighted) mean radius of 2.5 microns (R(sub mode) = 0.4 microns) provided a consistent fit of montmorillinite to the IRIS dust spectra at 9 microns. Pollack et al. analyzed Viking lander observations of atmospheric extinction and scattering at visible-near IR wavelengths (0.5-1.0 microns), and obtained consistency with the Toon et al. dust size distribution when the effects of nonspherical particle shapes were included. An additional, minor (1 percent) component of visible-ultraviolet absorbing material was required to model the derived visible (0.86) and ultraviolet (0.4-0.6) single-scattering albedos of the dust, since montmorillinite does not absorb sufficiently in this wavelength region. A combined analysis of the Viking IRTM and Mariner 9 observations was conducted to reassess the model of Mars atmospheric ultraviolet-to-infrared measurements of dust absorption and scattering. The optical constants for palagonite are incorporated in a doubling-adding radiative transfer model of the Mars atmosphere to simulate Mariner 9 IRIS spectra as well as the Viking IRTM IR band observations. Visible and ultraviolet single-scattering albedos based on the Hansen and Travis Mie scattering code were also derived. A tentative conclusion is that smaller dust particles (R(sub mode) = 0.15 microns, cross-section weighted mean R = 1.2 microns) composed of palagonite provide a much improved fit to the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra

  19. Polarimetric Studies of Solar Light Scattered by Interplanetary Dust Particles and the Eye-Sat Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2014-12-01

    Studying intensity and linear polarization of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust is of interest for various reasons. This so-called zodiacal light constitutes a faint polarized glow that constitutes a changing foreground for observations of faint extended astronomical sources. Besides, analysis of its polarization provides information on properties of the dust particles, such as spatial density, morphology and complex refractive index. Previous observations, mostly from the Earth and with a resolution in the 10° range, have been used to infer that the local polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance. Numerical simulations suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of a mixture of absorbing and less absorbing materials, and that radial changes originate in a decrease of organic materials with decreasing solar distance under alteration or evaporation processes. To improve the quality of data on zodiacal light polarimetry, Eye-Sat nanosat is being developed in the context of the JANUS CNES cubesats program for students. The project is now in phase C-D, for a piggy-back launch in 2016. Eye-Sat triple cubesat is anticipated to demonstrate the feasibility of a series of new on-board technologies. Moreover, during its one-year mission, zodiacal light intensity and polarization are to be measured, for the first time with a spatial resolution of about 1° over a wide portion of the sky and in four different wavelengths (visible to near-IR), leading to a better assessment of interplanetary dust properties. Finally, a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is estimated to come from comets, the most pristine objects to be found in the inner solar system. While similarities have indeed been noticed between polarimetric properties of interplanetary and cometary dust particles, the latter being currently extensively documented by the Rosetta mission to comet 67P

  20. A carbonate-rich, hydrated, interplanetary dust particle: possible residue from protostellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Tomeoka, K; Buseck, P R

    1986-03-28

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) indicates that it contains abundant magnesium-iron carbonates, primarily breunnerite and magnesian siderite. This IDP displays a strong absorption band at 6.8 micrometers in its infrared spectrum, similar to that in certain protostellar spectra. The carbonates probably account for the 6.8-micrometer band in the IDP spectrum, suggesting that carbonate also may occur in interstellar dust and be the source of the controversial 6.8-micrometer feature from the protostellar spectra.

  1. Itokawa dust particles: a direct link between S-type asteroids and ordinary chondrites.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tanaka, Masahiko; Zolensky, Michael E; Kimura, Makoto; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakato, Aiko; Ogami, Toshihiro; Ishida, Hatsumi; Uesugi, Masayuki; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Okazaki, Ryuji; Sandford, Scott A; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-26

    The Hayabusa spacecraft successfully recovered dust particles from the surface of near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa. Synchrotron-radiation x-ray diffraction and transmission and scanning electron microscope analyses indicate that the mineralogy and mineral chemistry of the Itokawa dust particles are identical to those of thermally metamorphosed LL chondrites, consistent with spectroscopic observations made from Earth and by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Our results directly demonstrate that ordinary chondrites, the most abundant meteorites found on Earth, come from S-type asteroids. Mineral chemistry indicates that the majority of regolith surface particles suffered long-term thermal annealing and subsequent impact shock, suggesting that Itokawa is an asteroid made of reassembled pieces of the interior portions of a once larger asteroid.

  2. Attenuation of an electromagnetic wave by charged dust particles in a sandstorm.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Li, Xingcai; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2010-12-10

    We calculate the light scattering properties of the partially charged dust particles with the Mie theory for electromagnetic waves with different frequencies, and the attenuation coefficients of an electromagnetic wave propagating in a sandstorm are also calculated. The results show that the electric charges distributed on the sand surface have a significant effect on the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave, especially for a frequency lower than 40 GHz, and attenuation coefficients increase with the magnitude of charges carried by the dust particles (expressed by the charge-to-mass ratio in this paper). For the higher frequency electromagnetic wave, such as visible light, the effect of charges carried by sand particles on its attenuation is very little, which can be ignored. PMID:21151232

  3. Measurement of dust particle size and density by a laser light scattering and extinction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Changrae; Chai, Kilbyoung; Park, Hoyong; Shin, Yonghyun; Chung, Kwanghwa; Choe, Wonho

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of dust particle density was performed using the laser light extinction method. Using two spherical mirrors, a multi-pass setup was used for lowering the measurement limit of the system. In parallel, the particle size was measured using the laser light scattering method. To self-consistently determine the time evolution of the particle size, in-situ polarization-sensitive laser light scattering was used. Polarization light intensities (incident and scattered light intensities with the same polarization) were measured at 71 . Before applying the method to the dusty plasmas, the measurement accuracy was confirmed using a distilled water solution of the size-known particles. In addition, the size-known particles were injected into the argon plasma, and the particles trapped inside the plasma were used for the accurate measurement of the light scattering angle. The measured size of the dust particles in a Ar+SiH4 (5%) 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled plasma (160 mTorr, 150 W, 10 s after plasma on) was about 118 nm, which was also confirmed by scanning electron microscope photographs. The time evolution of the particle size and its number density was studied by both methods.

  4. Dust Growth in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Tsytovich, V. N.

    2002-12-01

    Dust formation in space is important in diverse environments such as dust molecular clouds, proto-planetary nebulae, stellar outbursts, and supernova explosions. The formation of dust proceeds the formation of stellar objects and planets. In all these environments the dust particles interact with both neutral and plasma particles as well as with (ultraviolet) radiation and cosmic rays. The conventional view of grain growth is one based on accretion by the Van der Waals and chemical forces [Watson and Salpeter [14] considered in detail both theoretically and numerically (Kempf at all [6],Meaking [7]( and confirmed recently by micro-gravity experiments Blum et all [2]). The usual point of view is that the dust grow is occurring in dust molecular clouds at very low temperatures ~ (10 - 30)° K and is a slow process - dust grows to a size of about 0.1 μm in 106 - 109 years. This contradicts recent observations of dust growing in winds of C-stars in about 10 years and behind the supernova SN1987A shock in about 500 days. Also recent observation of star formation at the edge of irradiated dust clouds suggests that new plasma mechanism operates in star formation. Dusty plasma mechanisms of agglomeration are analyzed as an explanation of the new astrophysical observation. New micro-gravity experiments are proposed for observing the plasma mechanisms of dust agglomeration at gas pressures substantially higher than used in ([2]. Calculations for the growth rates of dust agglomeration due to plasma mechanisms are presented. It is shown that at large neutral gas densities the dust plasma attraction provides an explanation of dust grow in about 10 days observed in H-star winds. Ionization by cosmic rays and by radioactive dust can provide the dust attraction necessary for forming dust clumping observed in molecular clouds and the fractal plasma clumping can enhance the time to reach the gravitational contraction phase operating at the final stage of star formation. A new

  5. Radiation induced rotation of interplanetary dust particles - A feasibility study for a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, K. F.; Misconi, N. Y.; Paddack, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    Irregular interplanetary dust particles may acquire a considerable spin rate due to two non-statistical dynamical mechanisms induced by solar radiation. These arise from variations in surface albedo discussed by Radzievskii (1954) and from irregularities in surface geometry discussed by Paddack (1969). An experiment is reported which will lead to an evaluation in space of the effectiveness of these two spin mechanisms. The technique of optical levitation in an argon laser beam provides a stable trap for particles 10-60 microns in diameter. The objective is to design an optical trap for dielectric particles in vacuum to study these rotation mechanisms in the gravity-free environment of a Spacelab experiment.

  6. Investigating the Present Day Cosmic Dust Flux at the Earth's Surface: Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Russell, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite indicate a present day micrometeoroid flux of approx. 30,000 tonnes [1 after 2]. But what portion of this material arrives at the Earth's surface as micrometeorites? Studies of available micrometeorite collections from deep sea sediments [e.g. 3], Greenland blue ice [e.g. 4] and the South Pole water well [e.g. 1] may be complicated by terrestrial weathering and, in some cases, collection bias (magnetic separation for deep sea sediments) and poorly constrained ages. We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. By collecting in this way, the terrestrial age of the particles is known, the weathering they experience is minimal, and we are able to constrain particle arrival times. Collecting at this location also exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background [5]. Method: High volume air samplers were installed on top of the two-story airport building on Kwajalein. These were fitted with polycarbonate membrane filters with 5µm diameter perforations. The flow rates were set to 0.5m3/min, and filters were changed once a week. After collection, filters were washed to remove salt and concentrate particles [see 5] in preparation for analysis by SEM. Results and Discussion: A selection of filters have been prepared and surveyed. Due to their ease of identification our initial investigations have focused on particles resembling cosmic spherules. The spheres can be divided into three main groups: 1. Silicate spherules rich in Al, Ca, K and Na (to varying degrees), 2. Silicate spherules rich in Mg and Fe and 3. Fe-rich spherules. Group 1 spherules are often vesiculated and can occur as aggregates. They are similar in appearance and composition to volcanic microspheres [e.g. 6] and are thus likely terrestrial in

  7. Dust particles in the anomalous tail of Comet Kohoutek (1973 XII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Richter, K.; Schmidt, H. U.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Intermediate results from theoretical models of the anomalous spikelike dust distribution observed in the tail of Comet Kohoutek using the Skylab white-light coronograph on December 28.996, 1973, are reported. The time evolution is studied using the model of Finson and Probstein (1968) and assuming power-law variation of the dust-production rate and the particle-size distribution. Brightness profiles are calculated and presented graphically for comparison with those derived from the observation photograph: the model predicts a longer duration of the spike phenomenon than was observed. It is shown qualitatively that this discrepancy can be removed by introducing a finite dust-emission velocity (e.g., 1 m/s) into the model.

  8. A novel system to generate WTC dust particles for inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany J; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Soukup, Joleen M; Zelikoff, Judith T; Ghio, Andrew; Peltier, Richard E; Asgharian, Bahman; Chen, Lung-Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D

    2014-01-01

    First responders (FRs) present at Ground Zero within the critical first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injury. The majority (>96%) of WTC dusts were >10 μm and no studies have examined potential health effects of this size fraction. This study sought to develop a system to generate and deliver supercoarse (10-53 μm) WTC particles to a rat model in a manner that mimicked FR exposure scenarios. A modified Fishing Line generator was integrated onto an intratracheal inhalation (ITIH) system that allowed for a bypassing of the nasal passages so as to mimic FR exposures. Dust concentrations were measured gravimetrically; particle size distribution was measured via elutriation. Results indicate that the system could produce dusts with 23 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) at levels up to ≥1200 mg/m(3). To validate system utility, F344 rats were exposed for 2 h to ≈100 mg WTC dust/m(3). Exposed rats had significantly increased lung weight and levels of select tracer metals 1 h after exposure. Using this system, it is now possible to conduct relevant inhalation exposures to determine adverse WTC dusts impacts on the respiratory system. Furthermore, this novel integrated Fishing Line-ITIH system could potentially be used in the analyses of a wide spectrum of other dusts/pollutants of sizes previously untested or delivered to the lungs in ways that did not reflect realistic exposure scenarios. PMID:24220216

  9. Voyager 1 and 2 Observations of Anomalous Cosmic Rays and Other Energetic Particle in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew; Roelof, Edmond; Krimigis, Stamatios; Hamilton, Doug C.; Decker, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Conditions are changing in the heliosheath at the positions of Voyager 1 (V1) and Voyager 2 (V2) and are doing so in unexpected ways that so far defy a single consistent interpretation. Some characteristic intensity variations cut across a surprisingly broad range of energies and species, from termination shock particles (TSPs), to energetic electrons, to light and heavy anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs), and to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The changes must be a mix of spatial structure and temporal changes produced by the rise in activity of Solar Cycle 24 beginning in January 2010. Yet there are drastic differences between some of the same species at V1 compared with V2. The puzzling observations include the decline of V1 ACR intensities from 2010.7 to 2011.7, and increase thereafter, while at V2 ACRs were exponentially increasing, finally reaching levels comparable to or even exceeding those at V1. A distinct pattern of increases and decreases is seen at V2 in TSPs, electrons, light ACRs, and GCRs, but not in ACR heavy ions. However some things are happening similarly at V1 and V2, like a recent increase in GCR protons. We will present an overview of these observations with an emphasis on the ACR observations from the V1 and V2 Low Energy Charged Particle instruments, which also provide spectral properties, anisotropies, and (indirectly) solar wind speed.

  10. Comet Dust: The Story of Planet Formation as Told by the Tiniest of Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    Our planetary system formed out of a gas-rich disk-shaped nebula with the early Sun at its center. Many small icy bodies were consumed by the formation of the giant planets. However, many km-size icy bodies were tossed out of the giant-planet region to the cold, distant reaches of our solar system. Comets remained in their places of cold storage until perturbed into orbits that carry them into the inner solar system where they pass relatively close to the Sun. Comets are warmed by the Sun and shed material from their outer layers. The ices and gases shed by comets reveal simple and complex organic molecules were present at the time and in the region of the formation of the giant planets. Where the Earth was forming was too hot and had too intense sunlight for many of these ices and molecules to survive. The dust shed by comets tells us that some stardust survived unaltered but much of the dust was heated and crystallized before becoming part of the comet. Therefore, comet dust grains tell of large radial migrations from the cold outer reaches near Neptune into the hot regions near the forming Sun, and then back out to the cold regions where icy comets were accreting and forming. On 2005 July 4, the NASA Deep Impact Mission hit a comet and ejected primitive materials fiom its interior. These materials were not released into the comet s coma during normal activity. Despite the many passages of this comet close to the Sun, these primitive volatile gases and dust grains survived in its interior. Comet dust grains show that cold and hot materials were mixed into the same tiny particle very early in the formation of the solar system, and these aggregate dust grains never saw high temperatures again. The survival of primitive materials in comet nuclei suggests comets could have delivered organic molecules and primitive dust grains to early Earth.

  11. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a