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Sample records for cosmic dust particles

  1. Reanalysis of porous chondritic cosmic dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapisinsky, I.; Figusch, V.; Ivan, J.; Izdinsky, K.; Zemankova, M.

    2001-10-01

    The particles reanalysed in this study were obtained from the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Cosmic Dust Collection. The reanalysis of the particle L2008 P9 indicates typical assemblage of olivine - pyroxene. This sample can be classified as a chondritic porous IDP with the metallic phase grain containing essential amount of nickel and copper (the latter element is most probably due to instrumental artefact). The chemical composition of the particle L2011 S5 corresponds mostly to an assemblage of pyroxene phase - (Mg,Fe,Ni)SiO_3 roughly 75 wt.% and a sulphide phase - probably pyrrhotite (Fe,Ni)S about 25 wt.%.

  2. Cosmic dust or other similar outer-space particles location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aver, S.

    1973-01-01

    Cosmic dust may be serious radiation hazard to man and electronic equipment caught in its path. Dust detector uses two operational amplifiers and offers narrower areas for collection of cosmic dust. Detector provides excellent resolution as result of which recording of particle velocities as well as positions of their impact are more accurately determined.

  3. Automated classification of interplanetary dust particles: Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Stepinski, Tomasz; Bell, Samuel W.

    2010-05-01

    The ``Cosmic Dust Catalog,'' published by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), describes thousands of interplanetary dust particles subjected to preliminary analysis and with labels indicating their origin. However, only about 80% of the particles are assigned unambiguous labels, the labels of the remaining 20% being uncertain. In addition, the Stardust mission results opened up the possibility that some particles classified as terrestrial contaminants are instead of cosmic (cometary) origin. In this article, we present a methodology for automatic classification of particles on the basis of similarity of their X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry spectra. The method is applied to the 467 particles constituting Volume 15 of the catalog. A first part of the analysis is to digitize the spectra from their scanned images. The digitized spectra are subjected to agglomerative clustering, which reveals 16 distinct clusters or compositional types of particles. The Sammon's map is used to visualize the relationship between different clusters; 6 clusters corresponding to cosmic particles and 10 clusters corresponding to terrestrial contaminants are clearly separated on the map indicating overall differences between diverse spectra of cosmic and terrestrial particles. By reconciling labels with the clustering structures, we propose the relabeling of 155 particles including the relabeling of 31 terrestrial contaminants into cosmic particles. The proposed relabeling needs to be confirmed by in-depth study of these particles. The paucity of particles with firmly determined cometary or asteroidal origin makes it difficult to establish whether the spectra based autoclassification can be utilized to discriminate between cometary and asteroidal particles. The methodology presented here can be used to classify all particles published in the catalog, as well as different samples for which comparable spectra are available.

  4. Cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, Donald E.; Sandford, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    Dust is a ubiquitous component of our galaxy and the solar system. The collection and analysis of extraterrestrial dust particles is important to exobiology because it provides information about the sources of biogenically significant elements and compounds that accumulated in distant regions of the solar nebula and that were later accreted on the planets. The topics discussed include the following: general properties of interplanetary dust; the carbonaceous component of interplanetary dust particles; and the presence of an interstellar component.

  5. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-08-01

    The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s-1) particles.

  6. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo‐Sánchez, J. D.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s−1) particles. PMID:27478282

  7. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J D; Plane, J M C; Feng, W; Nesvorný, D; Janches, D

    2015-08-16

    The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s(-1)) particles.

  8. Laboratory Studies of Optical Characteristics and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.

    2000-01-01

    Information about the optical characteristics and physical processes involving cosmic dust particles is vital for interpretation of astronomical observations and an understanding of the formation and processing of dust in the evolutionary cycle of matter in the interstellar medium. Cosmic dust particles are formed in a variety of astrophysical environments such as in cool stellar outflows and circumstellar envelopes. Definitive knowledge of the nature, composition, and physical processes of cosmic dust grains, however, can only be inferred from astronomical observations through laboratory experiments on the analogs of hypothesized dust particles and with modeling calculations. Laboratory investigations of the nature, composition, and optical characteristics of cosmic dust particles are being, carried out at many institutions with a variety of experimental techniques. Despite a wealth of available data, however, many basic issues remain unresolved. An experimental facility based on suspension of dust particles in electrodynamic balance in a pressure/temperature controlled environment in a cavity has been operational at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and is currently being employed for studies of dust particle charging mechanisms using electron beams and with UV radiation. In this paper, we discuss two general classes of experiments under planning stages that may be simultaneously carried out on this facility for cosmic dust investigations (i) Infrared optical characteristics (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) of the analogs of hypothesized of cosmic dust particles, such as natural and synthetic amorphous silicates with varying compositions, amorphous carbon grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and icy core-mantle particles etc. The initial spectral range under consideration is 1-25 micrometers, to be extended to the far infrared region in the future (ii) Condensation of volatile gases on nucleus dust particles to be

  9. Laboratory Studies of Optical Characteristics and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.

    2000-01-01

    Information about the optical characteristics and physical processes involving cosmic dust particles is vital for interpretation of astronomical observations and an understanding of the formation and processing of dust in the evolutionary cycle of matter in the interstellar medium. Cosmic dust particles are formed in a variety of astrophysical environments such as in cool stellar outflows and circumstellar envelopes. Definitive knowledge of the nature, composition, and physical processes of cosmic dust grains, however, can only be inferred from astronomical observations through laboratory experiments on the analogs of hypothesized dust particles and with modeling calculations. Laboratory investigations of the nature, composition, and optical characteristics of cosmic dust particles are being, carried out at many institutions with a variety of experimental techniques. Despite a wealth of available data, however, many basic issues remain unresolved. An experimental facility based on suspension of dust particles in electrodynamic balance in a pressure/temperature controlled environment in a cavity has been operational at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and is currently being employed for studies of dust particle charging mechanisms using electron beams and with UV radiation. In this paper, we discuss two general classes of experiments under planning stages that may be simultaneously carried out on this facility for cosmic dust investigations (i) Infrared optical characteristics (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) of the analogs of hypothesized of cosmic dust particles, such as natural and synthetic amorphous silicates with varying compositions, amorphous carbon grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and icy core-mantle particles etc. The initial spectral range under consideration is 1-25 micrometers, to be extended to the far infrared region in the future (ii) Condensation of volatile gases on nucleus dust particles to be

  10. Do some of the sub-micrometer cosmic dust particles come from the sun.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, C. L.; Erkes, J. W.; Greenberg, J. M.; Hallgren, D. S.; Schmalberger, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of cosmic dust particles collected at altitudes of 80 to 120 km over White Sands, New Mexico, and at times of noctilucent clouds over Kiruna, Sweden, indicate that an anomalously high atomic weight contribution is present within those particles collected at Kiruna. The elements observed are inconsistent with an origin due to atomic bomb fallout, meteoroidal crumbling, lunar ejecta, or comets. Many of these heavy elements may be stable in particulate form at the relatively high temperatures found in the coolest regions of the solar atmosphere. Some implications of the sun as the source of a significant component of cosmic dust are discussed.

  11. Do some of the sub-micrometer cosmic dust particles come from the sun.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, C. L.; Erkes, J. W.; Greenberg, J. M.; Hallgren, D. S.; Schmalberger, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of cosmic dust particles collected at altitudes of 80 to 120 km over White Sands, New Mexico, and at times of noctilucent clouds over Kiruna, Sweden, indicate that an anomalously high atomic weight contribution is present within those particles collected at Kiruna. The elements observed are inconsistent with an origin due to atomic bomb fallout, meteoroidal crumbling, lunar ejecta, or comets. Many of these heavy elements may be stable in particulate form at the relatively high temperatures found in the coolest regions of the solar atmosphere. Some implications of the sun as the source of a significant component of cosmic dust are discussed.

  12. A Dust Particle Accelerator for Laboratory Simulations of Cosmic Dust Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, H. L. K.

    2001-11-01

    Dusty environments in the solar system such as around comets and interstellar dust are the focus of many current investigations. Instruments performing in-situ measurements of dust particles require laboratory testing and calibrating prior to their launch. This laboratory testing is most often done with a high-speed dust particle accelerator. In addition, studies of physical processing of planetary surfaces and spacecraft materials due to micro-dust particle impacts can also be performed with a dust particle accelerator. In 1975, Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota acquired a 2MeV dust particle accelerator from NASA/GSFC which is still fully functioning and currently being updated. Improvements to the electronic detection system have also been undertaken. We have designed a means to detect and record the charge and velocity of the dust particles with a computer system. Prior to these modifications, we had no means of correlating the particle's properties with the time the particles were detected. Other improvements to the vacuum system are slated. Besides improvements to the facilities, we have improved the performance characteristics of the accelerator. Our traditional dust material is 1-5 micron carbonyl iron. With this dust source, particles acquire velocities up to 14 km/sec. We have successfully used 70nm copper dust resulting in particles with speeds of 22km/sec and possibly higher.

  13. Trace Element Abundance Measurements on Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1996-01-01

    The X-Ray Microprobe on beamline X-26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to determine the abundances of elements from Cr through Sr in individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere and the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) on beamline X-1A at the NSLS was used to determine the carbon abundances and spatial distributions in IDPs. In addition, modeling was performed in an attempt to associate particular types of IDPs with specific types of parent bodies, and thus to infer the chemistry, mineralogy, and structural properties of those parent bodies.

  14. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  15. Electrodynamic Balance for Studies of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation and distribution of interstellar, interplanetary, and planetary dust grains, and their physical, chemical and optical characteristics provide valuable information about many issues dealing with the origin and formation of the solar system bodies, interplanetary and interstellar environments as well as various industrial processes. Understanding the microphysics of individual grains and their interaction with the surrounding, environment is key to properly model various conditions and interpret existing data. The theory and models of individual dust grains are well developed for environments that vary from dense planetary atmospheres to dusty plasmas to diffuse environments such as interplanetary space. However, experimental investigations of individual dust grains in equilibrium are less common, perhaps due to the difficulty of these experiments. Laboratory measurements of dust grains have primarily measured ensemble properties or transient properties of single grains. A technique developed in the 1950's for ion spectroscopy, generally referred to as a quadrupole trap has recently been employed as an electrodynamic balance to investigate single micron-sized dust grains and for atmospheric aerosol research. A description of the theoretical basis and the experimental setup of the electrodynamic balance being developed in our laboratory are given. This laboratory technique lends itself to many applications that relate to planetary atmospheres, heliospheric environments, pre-stellar and pre-planetary conditions, and industrial settings. We present results from some recent experiments carried out to investigate the equilibrium potential of dust grains exposed to far ultraviolet light or to an electron beam. Some future experiments using an electrodynamic balance to investigate the optical characteristics, and condensation process involving dust grains in various astrophysical environments are discussed.

  16. Electrodynamic Balance for Studies of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Abbas, M. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation and distribution of interstellar, interplanetary, and planetary dust grains, and their physical, chemical and optical characteristics provide valuable information about many issues dealing with the origin and formation of the solar system bodies, interplanetary and interstellar environments as well as various industrial processes. Understanding the microphysics of individual grains and their interaction with the surrounding, environment is key to properly model various conditions and interpret existing data. The theory and models of individual dust grains are well developed for environments that vary from dense planetary atmospheres to dusty plasmas to diffuse environments such as interplanetary space. However, experimental investigations of individual dust grains in equilibrium are less common, perhaps due to the difficulty of these experiments. Laboratory measurements of dust grains have primarily measured ensemble properties or transient properties of single grains. A technique developed in the 1950's for ion spectroscopy, generally referred to as a quadrupole trap has recently been employed as an electrodynamic balance to investigate single micron-sized dust grains and for atmospheric aerosol research. A description of the theoretical basis and the experimental setup of the electrodynamic balance being developed in our laboratory are given. This laboratory technique lends itself to many applications that relate to planetary atmospheres, heliospheric environments, pre-stellar and pre-planetary conditions, and industrial settings. We present results from some recent experiments carried out to investigate the equilibrium potential of dust grains exposed to far ultraviolet light or to an electron beam. Some future experiments using an electrodynamic balance to investigate the optical characteristics, and condensation process involving dust grains in various astrophysical environments are discussed.

  17. New low-Ni (igneous?) particles among the C and C? types of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Kloeck, W.

    1993-01-01

    Low-Ni particles with major element abundances, optical properties, and morphologies sufficiently similar to chondritic interplanetery dust particles (IDP's) to receive JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog classifications of C or C?-types were shown to have trace element contents and mineralogies similar to igneous material. Examination of the JSC Catalog EDX spectra by Cooke et al. has shown that 13 percent of the C-type and 38 percent of the C?-type particles are potentially low-Ni particles. Two new low-Ni particles were identified, and it was shown that an additional fragment from the L2002*C cluster has an igneous composition. A newly analyzed fragment of the W7066*A cluster has a chondritic composition. The W7066*A cluster is important because it has yielded a fragment of igneous composition and another fragment having high concentrations of He and Ne suggesting an extraterrestrial origin.

  18. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Craven, Paul D.; Spann, James F.; Tankosic, Dragana; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamics balance has been developing at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting a variety of experimental, of astrophysical interest. The objective of this research is to employ this innovative experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of cosmic grains of 0.2-10 micron size in a chamber with controlled pressure/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to investigate the microphysics of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. These measurements will provide the much-needed photoelectric emission data relating to individual particles as opposed to that for the bulk materials available so far. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles obtained by irradiating the particles with radiation from tunable infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. Specifically, the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1-25 micron spectral region will be determined. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The increase in the mass or m/q ratio due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data wild permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Preliminary results based on photoelectric emission experiments on 0.2-6.6 micron

  19. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Craven, Paul D.; Spann, James F.; Tankosic, Dragana; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamics balance has been developing at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting a variety of experimental, of astrophysical interest. The objective of this research is to employ this innovative experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of cosmic grains of 0.2-10 micron size in a chamber with controlled pressure/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to investigate the microphysics of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. These measurements will provide the much-needed photoelectric emission data relating to individual particles as opposed to that for the bulk materials available so far. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles obtained by irradiating the particles with radiation from tunable infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. Specifically, the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1-25 micron spectral region will be determined. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The increase in the mass or m/q ratio due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data wild permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Preliminary results based on photoelectric emission experiments on 0.2-6.6 micron

  20. Space science applications for conducting polymer particles: synthetic mimics for cosmic dust and micrometeorites.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee A; Hillier, Jon K; Burchell, Mark J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-11

    Over the last decade or so, a range of polypyrrole-based particles have been designed and evaluated for space science applications. This electrically conductive polymer enables such particles to efficiently acquire surface charge, which in turn allows their acceleration up to the hypervelocity regime (>1 km s(-1)) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. Either organic latex (e.g. polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)) or various inorganic materials (such as silica, olivine or pyrrhotite) can be coated with polypyrrole; these core-shell particles are useful mimics for understanding the hypervelocity impact ionisation behaviour of micro-meteorites (a.k.a. cosmic dust). Impacts on metal targets at relatively low hypervelocities (<10 km s(-1)) generate ionic plasma composed mainly of molecular fragments, whereas higher hypervelocities (>10 km s(-1)) generate predominately atomic species, since many more chemical bonds are cleaved if the particles impinge with higher kinetic energy. Such fundamental studies are relevant to the calibration of the cosmic dust analyser (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which was designed to determine the chemical composition of Saturn's dust rings. Inspired by volcanism observed for one of the Jupiter's moons (Io), polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latexes have also been designed to help space scientists understand ionisation spectra originating from sulfur-rich dust particles. Finally, relatively large (20 μm diameter) polypyrrole-coated polystyrene latexes have proven to be useful for understanding the extent of thermal ablation of organic projectiles when fired at ultralow density aerogel targets at up to 6.1 km s(-1) using a Light Gas Gun. In this case, the sacrificial polypyrrole overlayer simply provides a sensitive spectroscopic signature (rather than a conductive overlayer), and the scientific findings have important implications for the detection of organic dust grains during the Stardust space mission.

  1. Cosmic Dust VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Li, Aigen; Inoue, Akio K.; Jäger, Cornelia

    2014-10-01

    This special issue is primarily devoted to the 6th meeting on Cosmic Dust (COSMIC DUST VI), which was held at CPS (Center for Planetary Science) in Kobe, Japan, on August 5-9, 2013. This meeting was coordinated in an order where a friendly and welcoming atmosphere persuaded the participants of the meeting to develop human relations and interactions among themselves. This has been our interdisciplinary approach to answering the question of where dust comes from and where dust goes. We briefly review some of the exciting papers presented at the meeting and provide perspectives for the development of cosmic dust research.

  2. Physics of sub-micron cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory tests with simulated micrometeoroids to measure the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. Equations for ablation path length for electrically accelerated micrometeoroids entering a gas target are developed which yield guidelines for the laboratory measurement of the heat transfer coefficient. Test results are presented for lanthanum hexaboride (LaB sub 6) microparticles in air, argon, and oxygen targets. The tests indicate the heat transfer coefficient has a value of approximately 0.9 at 30 km/sec, and that it increases to approximately unity at 50 km/sec and above. Test results extend to over 100 km/sec. Results are also given for two types of small particle detectors. A solid state capacitor type detector was tested from 0.61 km/sec to 50 km/sec. An impact ionization type detector was tested from 1.0 to 150 km/sec using LaB sub 6 microparticles.

  3. The episodic influx of tin-rich cosmic dust particles during the last ice age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaViolette, Paul A.

    2015-12-01

    was found to contain tin-rich particles with a similar platy morphology and to have Sn and Pb weight abundances averaging 39% and 7.5% respectively, again approximating the interstellar Sn:Pb ratio. The relative absence of cosmic microspheres and the unmelted appearance of the tin-rich particles in both of these samples suggests that these particles entered the Earth's atmosphere at low velocity, implicating a gradual accumulation of dust from a dispersed state in the near Earth space environment. The unusual enhancement of Sn and Pb could be explained if these dust particles were originally present in the solar system's interstellar environment in a superconducting native metal state and were preferentially concentrated through Meissner effect forces by the passage of cosmic ray driven hydromagnetic shocks which may also have transported them into the solar system. The 49 kyrs BP event is estimated to have lasted over 6 years and to have deposited dust onto the Earth at a rate 104-105 times higher than present rates. This had a significant cooling effect on climate and resulted in a transient 33 fold increase in snow accumulation. Future discovery of these events in ice cores at other locations should void any lingering thoughts that this heavy metal enhancement may be due to sample contamination.

  4. The IAA cosmic dust laboratory: Experimental scattering matrices of clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results of measurements on solid particles performed at the Instituto de Astrofı´sica de Andalucı´a (IAA) cosmic dust laboratory located in Granada, Spain. The laboratory apparatus measures the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of aerosol particles. The measurements can be performed at a wavelength ( λ) of 483, 488, 520, 568, or 647 nm in the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. Results of special test experiments are presented which show that our experimental results for scattering matrices are not significantly contaminated by multiple scattering and that the sizes/shapes of the particles do not change during the measurements. Moreover, the measured scattering matrix for a sample of green clay particles is compared with measurements previously performed in the Amsterdam light scattering setup for the same sample. New measurements on a white clay sample at 488 and 647 nm are also presented. The apparatus is devoted to experimentally studying the angle dependence of scattering matrices of dust samples of astrophysical interest. Moreover, there is a great interest in similar studies of aerosols that can affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere of the Earth and other planets such as silicates, desert dust, volcanic ashes, and carbon soot particles.

  5. Cosmic Dust Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Watts, L.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Wentworth, S.; Dodson, A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1997-07-01

    Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially designed dust collectors are prepared for flight and processed after flight in an ultraclean (Class-100) laboratory constructed for this purpose at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Particles are individually retrieved from the collectors, examined and cataloged, and then made available to the scientific community for research. Cosmic dust thereby joins lunar samples and meteorites as an additional source of extraterrestrial materials for scientific study. This catalog summarizes preliminary observations on 468 particles retrieved from collection surfaces L2021 and L2036. These surfaces were flat plate Large Area Collectors (with a 300 cm2 surface area each) which was coated with silicone oil (dimethyl siloxane) and then flown aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft during a series of flights that were made during January and February of 1994 (L2021) and June 7 through July 5 of 1994 (L2036). Collector L2021 was flown across the entire southern margin of the US (California to Florida), and collector L2036 was flown from California to Wallops Island, VA and on to New England. These collectors were installed in a specially constructed wing pylon which ensured that the necessary level of cleanliness was maintained between periods of active sampling. During successive periods of high altitude (20 km) cruise, the collectors were exposed in the stratosphere by barometric controls and then retracted into sealed storage container-s prior to descent. In this manner, a total of 35.8 hours of stratospheric exposure was accumulated for collector L2021, and 26 hours for collector L2036.

  6. Cosmic Dust Catalog. Volume 15; Particles from Collectors L2036 and L2021

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, J.; Watts, L.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Wentworth , S.; Dodson , A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially designed dust collectors are prepared for flight and processed after flight in an ultraclean (Class-100) laboratory constructed for this purpose at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Particles are individually retrieved from the collectors, examined and cataloged, and then made available to the scientific community for research. Cosmic dust thereby joins lunar samples and meteorites as an additional source of extraterrestrial materials for scientific study. This catalog summarizes preliminary observations on 468 particles retrieved from collection surfaces L2021 and L2036. These surfaces were flat plate Large Area Collectors (with a 300 cm2 surface area each) which was coated with silicone oil (dimethyl siloxane) and then flown aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft during a series of flights that were made during January and February of 1994 (L2021) and June 7 through July 5 of 1994 (L2036). Collector L2021 was flown across the entire southern margin of the US (California to Florida), and collector L2036 was flown from California to Wallops Island, VA and on to New England. These collectors were installed in a specially constructed wing pylon which ensured that the necessary level of cleanliness was maintained between periods of active sampling. During successive periods of high altitude (20 km) cruise, the collectors were exposed in the stratosphere by barometric controls and then retracted into sealed storage container-s prior to descent. In this manner, a total of 35.8 hours of stratospheric exposure was accumulated for collector L2021, and 26 hours for collector L2036.

  7. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  8. Ablation and Chemical Alteration of Cosmic Dust Particles during Entry into the Earth’s Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudraswami, N. G.; Shyam Prasad, M.; Dey, S.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Fernandes, D.

    2016-12-01

    Most dust-sized cosmic particles undergo ablation and chemical alteration during atmospheric entry, which alters their original properties. A comprehensive understanding of this process is essential in order to decipher their pre-entry characteristics. The purpose of the study is to illustrate the process of vaporization of different elements for various entry parameters. The numerical results for particles of various sizes and various zenith angles are treated in order to understand the changes in chemical composition that the particles undergo as they enter the atmosphere. Particles with large sizes (> few hundred μm) and high entry velocities (>16 km s-1) experience less time at peak temperatures compared to those that have lower velocities. Model calculations suggest that particles can survive with an entry velocity of 11 km s-1 and zenith angles (ZA) of 30°-90°, which accounts for ˜66% of the region where particles retain their identities. Our results suggest that the changes in chemical composition of MgO, SiO2, and FeO are not significant for an entry velocity of 11 km s-1 and sizes <300 μm, but the changes in these compositions become significant beyond this size, where FeO is lost to a major extent. However, at 16 km s-1 the changes in MgO, SiO2, and FeO are very intense, which is also reflected in Mg/Si, Fe/Si, Ca/Si, and Al/Si ratios, even for particles with a size of 100 μm. Beyond 400 μm particle sizes at 16 km s-1, most of the major elements are vaporized, leaving the refractory elements, Al and Ca, suspended in the troposphere.

  9. Cosmic dust analyzer for Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, James G.; Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    1996-10-01

    The cosmic dust analyzer (CDA) is designed to characterize the dust environment in interplanetary space, in the Jovian and in the Saturnian systems. The instrument consists of two major components, the dust analyzer (DA) and the high rate detector (HRD). The DA has a large aperture to provide a large cross section for detection in low flux environments. The DA has the capability of determining dust particle mass, velocity, flight direction, charge, and chemical composition. The chemical composition is determined by the chemical analyzer system based on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The DA is capable of making full measurements up to one impact/second. The HRD contains two smaller PVDF detectors and electronics designed to characterize dust particle masses at impact rates up to 10(superscript 4) impacts/second. These high impact rates are expected during Saturn ring plane crossings.

  10. Study of cosmic dust particles on board LDEF: The FRECOPA experiments AO138-1 and AO138-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Borg, Janet

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments, within the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) and devoted to the detection of cosmic dust, were flown on the LDEF. A variety of sensors and collecting devices have made possible the study of impact processes on materials of technological interest. Preliminary examination of hypervelocity impact features gives valuable data on size distribution and nature of interplanetary dust particles in low earth orbit, within the 0.5 to 300 micrometer size range. Most of the events detected on the trailing face of LDEF are expected to be the result of impacts of meteoritic particles only. So far, chemical analysis of craters by EDS clearly shows evidence of elements (Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe) consistent with cosmic origin. Systematic occurrence of C and O in crater residues is an important result, to be compared with the existence of CHON particles detected in P-Halley comet nucleus. Crater size distribution is in good agreement with results from other dust experiments flown on LDEF. However, no crater smaller than 1.5 micron was observed, thus suggesting a cutoff in the near earth particle distribution. Possible origin and orbital evolution of micrometeoroids is discussed.

  11. Chemical thermodynamics of systemic self-organization towards life by nano-structured cosmic dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, F. R.; Kissel, J.

    2001-08-01

    Self-organization of chemicals to living systems demands for several necessary conditions as derived from far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. Autopoesis is not just self-replication of systems, but is orbital stability of growth, variability, and self-replication. Physically, this means a reaction-diffusion space-time boundary (in/out) problem. The solutions of such a system of related partial non-linear differential coupled equations exhibit orbital stability as needed only if some other conditions are at hand. Of course, template oriented synthesis is needed, however, onset of the cycle demands for high excess reaction energy. The type of non-linearity demands for chirality. The diffusion behaviour needs a nano-grained structure for onset of self-replication, together with critical spatial dimensions in the μm-regime. To meet all chemical and physical requirements the proticity and polarity of a mobile phase (such as liquid water), together with the right heterocatalytic backbone structure and organic precursors are prerequisites, too. To our knowledge only cosmic (esp. cometary or micrometeoritic) dust particles together with liquid water may cause that onset, as we calculated numerically for RNA and peptide life precursors as well. In order to test the dynamics of such a system model grains will be taylored which meet the requirements mentioned. Simple systems are to be prepared on the basis of nano-structured silica spheres. Loading of catalysts and precursors for autocatalytic (peptide or RNA) templates, and furtheron the onset of reaction by changing the liquid phase parameters, will be studied.

  12. Polarized polymer films as electronic pulse detectors of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new type of dust particle detector has been developed which consists of a polarized film of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) having conducting electrons on its surface and operating with no bias voltage. Here, the response characteristics of PVDF detectors with areas in the range 4-150 sq cm and thickness in the range 2-28 microns to iron particles accelerated to velocities in the range 1-12 km/s are reported. The discussion also covers the mechanism of detection, fast pulse response, noise characteristics, and the dependence of the detector signal amplitude on particle mass and velocity. The detectors exhibit long-term stability and can be operated for extended periods of time over the temperature range -50 to +50 C; their response to dust particle impacts is unaffected by high background fluxes of charged particles.

  13. The radiation-induced rotation of cosmic dust particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.; Ratcliff, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    A crossed beam, horizontal optical trap, used to achieve laser levitation of particles in an effort to determine how solar radiation produces high spin rate in interplanetary dust particles, is described. It is suggested that random variations in albedo and geometry give rise to a nonzero effective torque when the influence of a unidrectional source of radiaton (due to the Sun) over the surface of a interplanetary dust particle is averaged. This resultant nonzero torque is characterized by an asymmetry factor which is the ratio of the effective moment arm to the maximum linear dimension of the body and is estimated to be 5 X 10 to the minus four power. It is hoped that this symmetry factor, which stabilizes the nonstatistical response of the particle, can be measured in a future Spacelab experiment.

  14. Mining cosmic dust from the blue ice lakes of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurette, M.; Brownlee, D. E.; Fehrenback, L.; Hammer, C.; Jehano, C.; Thomsen, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material, most of which invisible settles to Earth's surface as dust particles smaller than a millimeter in size were investigated. Particles of 1/10 millimeter size fall at a rate of one/sq m/yr collection of extraterrestrial dust is important because the recovered cosmic dust particles can provide important information about comets. Comets are the most important source of dust in the solar system and they are probably the major source of extraterrestrial dust that is collectable at the Earth's surface. A new collection site for cosmic dust, in an environment where degradation by weathering is minimal is reported. It is found that the blue ice lakes on the Greenland ice cap provide an ideal location for collection of extraterrestrial dust particles larger than 0.1 mm in size. It is found that the lakes contain large amounts of cosmic dust which is much better preserved than similar particles recovered from the ocean floor.

  15. Nano-Particles in Cosmic Plasma Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Ingrid

    2008-09-07

    Astronomical observations and in-situ measurements point to the existence of cosmic nano-particles, but in most cases their material composition and structure are not known. Nano-dust interacts differently than larger dust with the cosmic radiation and plasma environment. Its dynamics and behavior upon collision is not well studied.

  16. Recent results of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer onboard Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, Ralf; Gruen, Eberhard; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Beckmann, Uwe; Postberg, Frank; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Burton, Marcia; Spahn, Frank; Economou, Thanasis

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini mission measures the properties of micron sized dust particles in the planetary system. Since 2004 CDA performs successfully measurements in the Saturnian system and made several exciting discoveries and measurements: Dust streams from the inner and outer ring system, dust grain potentials, dust grain composition of ring particles, dust size and density distributions in the outer ring system, the G ring detection, the Enceladus dust plumes and significant dust fluxes outside the known E ring. This paper provides an overview about the recent achievement of the CDA instrument and presents the results of the dust composition measurements of the Enceladus flyby on March 12, 2008.

  17. Cosmic dust in modern ferromanganese nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    This work is about the identification of modern cosmic dust that had survived heating during its high-velocity passage through the Earth's atmosphere from 3He isotope concentrations in marine (Gulf of Finland) ferromanganese nodules (FMNs). The measured bulk composition of helium includes components of various origins, enabling the determination of the age (1800 years) of the shallow-water Baltic FMNs and the average time of exposure (8 × 107 years) of cosmic dust particles during their existence in space. The concentration of cosmic dust per gram of FMN material is found to be 0.036 μg. The contribution of solar-wind helium to the Earth's atmospheric helium is found to be small. The experiments are conducted by the stepheating method in vacuo with the subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of the helium released from the samples.

  18. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) is designed to characterize the dust environment in interplanetary space, in the Jovian and in the Saturnian systems. The instrument consists of two major components, the Dust Analyzer (DA) and the High Rate Detector (HRD). The DA has a large aperture to provide a large cross section for detection in low flux environments. The DA has the capability of determining dust particle mass, velocity, flight direction, charge, and chemical composition. The chemical composition is determined by the Chemical Analyzer system based on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The DA is capable of making full measurements up to one impact/second. The HRD contains two smaller PVDF detectors and electronics designed to characterize dust particle masses at impact rates up to 10(exp 4) impacts/second. These high impact rates are expected during Saturn ring, plane crossings.

  19. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  20. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  1. NASA Now: Origins and Evolution of the Universe: Cosmic Dust

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This episode of NASA Now highlights recently discovered wonders of the universe as well as common cosmic dust. Discover how these microscopic particles floating in space could hold the key to the o...

  2. Experimental simulation of the atmospheric ablation of cosmic dust particles: implications for HPLA radar and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; James, Alexander; Janches, Diego; Plane, John

    2016-04-01

    The inner solar system is full of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating from cometary trails and collisions between asteroids. The entry and evaporation of IDPs in planetary atmospheres is related to a variety of phenomena including formation of mesospheric metal layers and clouds and stratospheric aerosol chemistry. The estimated mass flux into the Earth's Atmosphere from modelling of Zodiacal Cloud observations combined with results from our chemical ablation model (CABMOD) is consistent with the deposition rate of cosmic spherules on the ice caps. However, the fluxes derived from modelling HPLA radar observations, which also uses CABMOD, are significantly lower. In addition, all models underestimate the observed Na/Fe ratio in metal layers observed by LIDAR, and the radar-based model in particular does not predict differential ablation. In order to address these inconsistencies, we have built a laboratory meteor ablation simulator, which enables us to observe and characterise the ablation of metal atoms from meteoritic IDP analogues. CABMOD can be then benchmarked against the laboratory data. In this presentation, the implications of our experimental results for the interpretation of radar field observations, mass flux estimates and modelling of metal layers will be discussed.

  3. Atmospheric entry heating of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George J.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation of the atmospheric entry deceleration and heating for micrometeorites into a planetary atmosphere was developed. The results of this model were compared to an earlier model. The major difference between the extent of heating experienced in the two models results from an underestimation of the atmospheric density at altitudes above 130 km in the earlier model. Thus the earlier model systematically overestimates the peak temperature reached on atmospheric entry. The discrepancies are small for near vertical entry and/or high density particles, where little deceleration is experienced at high altitudes. For particles entering at grazing incidence and/or of low density the discrepancies are more pronounced. Gravitational enhancement, which is a function of geocentric velocity at the collection opportunity, was found to bias near Earth cosmic dust collections in favor of low velocity particles. The effect is to increase the proportion of low velocity dust, predominately from asteroids, in the stratospheric cosmic dust collections and on Earth orbiting spacecraft impact surfaces over its proportion in the interplanetary dust cloud.

  4. Frontiers in In-Situ Cosmic Dust Detection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Auer, Siegfried; Drake, Keith; Gruen, Eberhard; Horanyi, Mihaly; Le, Huy; Xie Jianfeng; Srama, Ralf

    2011-11-29

    In-situ cosmic dust instruments and measurements played a critical role in the emergence of the field of dusty plasmas. The major breakthroughs included the discovery of {beta}-meteoroids, interstellar dust particles within the solar system, Jovian stream particles, and the detection and analysis of Enceladus's plumes. The science goals of cosmic dust research require the measurements of the charge, the spatial, size and velocity distributions, and the chemical and isotopic compositions of individual dust particles. In-situ dust instrument technology has improved significantly in the last decade. Modern dust instruments with high sensitivity can detect submicron-sized particles even at low impact velocities. Innovative ion optics methods deliver high mass resolution, m/dm>100, for chemical and isotopic analysis. The accurate trajectory measurement of cosmic dust is made possible even for submicron-sized grains using the Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS). This article is a brief review of the current capabilities of modern dust instruments, future challenges and opportunities in cosmic dust research.

  5. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Plane, John M C

    2012-10-07

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O(3) chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  6. The Cosmic Odyssey of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We will present models for the evolution of dust in high redshift galaxies and in galaxies in the local universe. Galaxies at very high redshift, when the universe was less than one billion years old, contain massive quantities of dust that could only have fornedin the explosion of core-collapse supernovae. These same objects are also the main source of grain destruction during the later, remnant phase of their evolution. These galaxies offer therefore a unique opportunity for examining the effect of massive stars on the formation and destruction of interstellar dust, and the lecture will present a model for the evolution of dust in these very young galaxies. Spectral and photometric observations of nearby galaxies show a correlation between the strength of their mid-IR aromatic features, attributed to PAH molecules, and their metal abundance, leading to a deficiency of these features in low-metallicity galaxies. We show the observed correlation represents a trend of PAH abundance with galactic age, reflecting the delayed injection of carbon dust into the ISM by AGB stars in the final post-AGB phase of their evolution. We also show that larger dust particles giving rise to the far-IR emission follow a distinct evolutionary trend closely related to the injection of dust by massive stars into the ISM.

  7. An interactive service for cosmic dust catalogs at the IDIS Small Bodies and Dust Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, M.; Braga, V. F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; De Angelis, S.

    2012-09-01

    We present a web based interactive data service allowing an easy retrieval and analysis of cosmic dust repositories. Our tool allows to search dust particles using several criteria: shape, size interval, luster, transparency or curator classification. For each particle it is possible to show the SEM(Scanning Electron Microscopy) image, the EDS (X-ray Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry) spectra and other descriptive data. This service has been developed as a resource of the Europlanet Small Bodies and Dust Node and is available at this URL: http://www.iasfroma. inaf.it:8080/web/sbdn/cosmic-dust-catalog.

  8. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analyses of stratospheric cosmic dust: New results for chondritic and nickel-depleted particles

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Trace element abundance determinations were performed using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence on nine particles collected from the stratosphere and classified as ''cosmic''. Improvements to the Synchrotron Light Source allowed the detection of all elements between Cr and Mo, with the exceptions of Co and As, in our largest particle. The minor and trace element abundance patterns of three Ni-depleted particles were remarkably similar to those of extraterrestrial igneous rocks. Fe/Ni and Fe/Mn ratios suggest that one of these may be of lunar origin. All nine particles exhibited an enrichment in Br, ranging form 1.3 to 38 times the Cl concentration. Br concentrations were uncorrelated with particle size, as would be expected for a surface correlated component acquires from the stratosphere. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. COSMIC DUST AGGREGATION WITH STOCHASTIC CHARGING

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Shotorban, Babak

    2013-10-20

    The coagulation of cosmic dust grains is a fundamental process which takes place in astrophysical environments, such as presolar nebulae and circumstellar and protoplanetary disks. Cosmic dust grains can become charged through interaction with their plasma environment or other processes, and the resultant electrostatic force between dust grains can strongly affect their coagulation rate. Since ions and electrons are collected on the surface of the dust grain at random time intervals, the electrical charge of a dust grain experiences stochastic fluctuations. In this study, a set of stochastic differential equations is developed to model these fluctuations over the surface of an irregularly shaped aggregate. Then, employing the data produced, the influence of the charge fluctuations on the coagulation process and the physical characteristics of the aggregates formed is examined. It is shown that dust with small charges (due to the small size of the dust grains or a tenuous plasma environment) is affected most strongly.

  10. Sampling Interplanetary Dust Particles from Antarctic Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Lever, J. H.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Brownlee, D. E.; Messenger, S.; Littler, L. R.; Stroud, R. M.; Wozniakiewicz, P.; Clement, S.

    2016-08-01

    We are undertaking a NASA and NSF supported project to filter large volumes of clean Antarctic air to collect a broad range of cosmic dust, including CP-IDPs, rare ultra-carbonaceous particles and particles derived from specific meteor streams.

  11. Ion implantation effects in 'cosmic' dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Meunier, R.; Jouffrey, B.; Jouret, C.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic dust grains, whatever their origin may be, have probably suffered a complex sequence of events including exposure to high doses of low-energy nuclear particles and cycles of turbulent motions. High-voltage electron microscope observations of micron-sized grains either naturally exposed to space environmental parameters on the lunar surface or artificially subjected to space simulated conditions strongly suggest that such events could drastically modify the mineralogical composition of the grains and considerably ease their aggregation during collisions at low speeds. Furthermore, combined mass spectrometer and ionic analyzer studies show that small carbon compounds can be both synthesized during the implantation of a mixture of low-energy D, C, N ions in various solids and released in space by ion sputtering.

  12. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  13. The spin of cosmic dust: Rotational bursting of circumsolar dust in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misconi, Nebil Y.

    1993-11-01

    This paper will list, investigate, and evaluate the various spin mechanisms for cosmic dust particles that have been suggested in the literature. This evaluation will concentrate on the possibility of particle fragmentation (rotational bursting) of cosmic dust. The importance of partical fragmentation is manifested by the fact that dust particle size distribution will be changed. More importantly, repeated fragmentation of interplanetary dust particles will give rise to some of the observed 'beta meteoroids.' Some of these particles are driven out of the solar system and into interstellar space by solar radiation pressure. If this mass loss mechanism is taking place in stellar systems, then it becomes a source for interstellar dust. This paper also addresses the possibility that massive rotational bursting by circumsolar dust particles is taking place in the F corona region. This rotational bursting of F coronal dust could be taking place because of the classical 'Paddack effect,' along with a similar spin mechanism suggested by the author, and caused by coronal mass ejections.

  14. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  15. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  16. Cosmic Dust Collection Facility: Scientific objectives and programmatic relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Fred (Editor); Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Grounds, D.; Grun, E.; Rummel, Y.; Quaide, W. L.; Walker, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The science objectives are summarized for the Cosmic Dust Collection Facility (CDCF) on Space Station Freedom and these objectives are related to ongoing science programs and mission planning within NASA. The purpose is to illustrate the potential of the CDCF project within the broad context of early solar system sciences that emphasize the study of primitive objects in state-of-the-art analytical and experimental laboratories on Earth. Current knowledge about the sources of cosmic dust and their associated orbital dynamics is examined, and the results are reviewed of modern microanalytical investigations of extraterrestrial dust particles collected on Earth. Major areas of scientific inquiry and uncertainty are identified and it is shown how CDCF will contribute to their solution. General facility and instrument concepts that need to be pursued are introduced, and the major development tasks that are needed to attain the scientific objectives of the CDCF project are identified.

  17. The cosmic dust analyzer: Experimental evaluation of an impact ionization model. [considering thermal equilibrium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L.; Becker, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium plasma model is used to process data from an impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to convert the raw ion data to relative abundances of the elemental constituents of cosmic dust particles.

  18. Cosmic Dust and the Earth's Atmosphere (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s-1), and ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metallic vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke particles (MSPs)". MSPs are too small to sediment downwards and so are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 4 years to reach the surface. Smoke particles play a potentially important role as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere, where they also facilitate freezing of the clouds. There are also potential implications for climate, as the input of bio-available cosmic Fe in the Southern Ocean can increase biological productivity and stimulate CO2 drawdown from the atmosphere. However, current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust mass input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to over 200 tonnes per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there must be serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Furthermore, given this degree of uncertainty, the significance of these potential atmospheric impacts remains speculative. In this lecture I will describe the results of a large study designed to determine the size of the cosmic dust input rate using a self-consistent treatment of cosmic dust from the outer solar system to the Earth's surface. An astronomical model which tracks the evolution of dust from various sources into the inner solar system was combined with a

  19. In situ dust measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer in 2014 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 11 years in orbit around Saturn. Many discoveries like the Saturn nanodust streams or the large extended Ering were achieved. CDA provided unique results regarding Enceladus, his plume and the liquid water below the icy crust. In 2014 and 2015 CDA focuses on extended inclination and equatorial scans of the ring particle densities. Furthermore, scans are performed of the Pallene and Helene regions. Special attention is also given to the search of the dust cloud around Dione and to the Titan region. Long integration times are needed in order to characterize the flux and composition of exogenous dust (including interstellar dust) or possible retrograde dust particles. Finally, dedicated observation campaigns focus on the coupling of nanodust streams to Saturn's magnetosphere and the search of possible periodicities in the stream data. Saturn's rotation frequency was identified in the impact rate of nanodust particles at a Saturn distance of 40 Saturn radii. A special geometry in 2014-065 lead to an occultation of the dust stream by the moon Titan and its atmosphere when Titan crossed the line-of-sight between Saturn and Cassini. Here, CDA pointed towards Saturn for the measurement of stream particles. Around closest approach when Cassini was behind Titan, the flux of stream particles went down to zero (Fig. 1). This "dust occultation" is a new method to analyse the properties of the stream particles (speed, composition, mass) or the properties of Titans atmosphere (density). Furthermore, the particle trajectories can be constrained for a better analysis of their origin. In the final three years CDA performs exogenous and interstellar dust campaigns, studies of the composition and origin of Saturn's main rings by unique ring ejecta measurements, long-duration nano-dust stream observations, high-resolution maps of small moon orbit crossings, studies of the dust cloud around Dione and studies

  20. Effects of Martian dust storms on ionization profiles and surface dose rates from cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Global dust storms can engulf Mars and distribute dust throughout the atmosphere. The change in composition and density of the atmosphere due to dust storms affects the ionization rate due to cosmic rays impingent on Mars. To model the effect of dust storms on the Martian ionization profile, the Badhwar-O'Neill cosmic ray spectrum model has been adapted to Mars and used as an input in the NAIRAS model. NAIRAS is a cosmic ray irradiation model adapted for fast computations and has been applied to the Martian atmosphere. Full atmosphere ionization profiles for solar maximum and solar minimum conditions during both dust storms and quiet times are reported. The contribution of heavy ions and secondary particles to the ionization profile are also reported. Dose rates at the surface due to cosmic radiation are shown to not vary significantly due to the dust storms.

  1. The cosmic dust input to the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John

    2013-04-01

    This paper will address a fundamental problem - the size of the cosmic dust input to the earth's atmosphere. Zodiacal cloud observations and spaceborne dust detectors indicate a daily input of 100 - 300 tonnes, in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle and upper atmosphere - by radars, lidars, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is only 2 - 30 tonnes. There are two major reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust production and evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and in most cases completely ablate. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; nucleation of noctilucent clouds; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  2. Mathematical model of formation of Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sal'nikova, T. V.; Stepanov, S. Ya.

    2015-07-01

    The question of occurrence of cosmic dust clouds, which were found by Kordylewski in 1961 in the vicinity of libration point L 5 of the Earth-Moon system, still causes debates and concern. We explain theoretically the phenomenon of the apparent vanishing and appearance of the Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds in the vicinity of triangular libration points L 4 and L 5 of the Earth-Moon system. The possibility of occurrence of two such clouds rotating around libration points L 4 and two clouds rotating around point L 5 is shown and optimal times for their observation from the Earth are determined. The investigation is performed based on analysis of a stable periodic motion in a planar restricted circular problem of three bodies, Earth-Moon—Particle, allowing for perturbations from the Sun under the assumption that the orbits of the Earth and Moon are circular and lie in one plane.

  3. COSMIC DUST IN Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, Brice; Fukugita, Masataka

    2012-08-01

    Mg II absorbers induce reddening on background quasars. We measure this effect and infer the cosmic density of dust residing in these systems to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, in units of the critical density of the universe, which is comparable to the amount of dust found in galactic disks or about half the amount inferred to exist outside galaxies. We also estimate the neutral hydrogen abundance in Mg II clouds to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, which is approximately 5% of hydrogen in stars in galaxies. This implies a dust-to-gas mass ratio for Mg II clouds of about 1/100, which is similar to the value for normal galaxies. This would support the hypothesis of the outflow origin of Mg II clouds, which are intrinsically devoid of stars and hence have no sources of dust. Considerations of the dust abundance imply that the presence of Mg II absorbers around galaxies lasts effectively for a few Gyr. High-redshift absorbers allow us to measure the rest-frame extinction curve to 900 A, at which the absorption by the Lyman edge dominates over scattering by dust in the extinction opacity.

  4. Laser microprobe study of cosmic dust (IDPs) and potential source materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Sommer, M. S., II

    1986-01-01

    The study of cosmic dust or interplanetary dust particles (IDP) can provide vital information about primitive materials derived primarily from comets and asteroids along with a small unknown fraction from the nearby interstellar medium. The study of these particles can enhance our understanding of comets along with the decoding of the history of the early solar system. In addition the study of the cosmic dust for IDP particles can assist in the elucidation of the cosmic history of the organogenic elements which are vital to life processes. Studies to date on these particles have shown that they are complex, heterogeneous assemblages of both amorphous and crystalline components. In order to understand the nature of these particles, any analytical measurements must be able to distinguish between the possible sources of these particles. A study was undertaken using a laser microprobe interfaced to a quadrupole mass spectrometer for the analysis of the volatile components present in cosmic dust particles, terrestrial contaminants present in the upper atmosphere, and primitive carbonaceous chondrites. From the study of the volatiles released from the carbonaceous materials it is hoped that one could distinguish between components and sources in the IDP particles analyzed. The technique is briefly described and results for the CI, CM, and CV chondrites and cosmic dust particle W7027B8 are presented.

  5. Cosmic Rays and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.; Engel, Ralph; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. Cosmic rays; 2. Cosmic ray data; 3. Particle physics; 4. Hadronic interactions and accelerator data; 5. Cascade equations; 6. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos; 7. Neutrino masses and oscillations; 8. Muons and neutrinos underground; 9. Cosmic rays in the Galaxy; 10. Extragalactic propagation of cosmic rays; 11. Astrophysical - rays and neutrinos; 12. Acceleration; 13. Supernovae in the Milky Way; 14. Astrophysical accelerators and beam dumps; 15. Electromagnetic cascades; 16. Extensive air showers; 17. Very high energy cosmic rays; 18. Neutrino astronomy; A.1. Units, constants and definitions; A.2. References to flux measurements; A.3. Particle flux, density, and interaction cross section; A.4. Fundamentals of scattering theory; A.5. Regge amplitude; A.6. Glauber model of nuclear cross sections; A.7. Earth's atmosphere; A.8. Longitudinal development of air showers; A.9. Secondary positrons and electrons; A.10. Liouville's theorem and cosmic ray propagation; A.11. Cosmology and distances measures; A.12. The Hillas splitting algorithm; References; Index.

  6. Collection of cosmic dust in earth orbit for exobiological analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy; Huntington, Judith L.; Carle, Glenn C.

    1989-01-01

    Two proposed NASA exobiology flight experiments are described in terms of the approaches to cosmic dust collection and the issues addressed by the analysis of the samples. A passive collector is planned for use with the Cosmic Dust Collection Facility, and an active system is described for attachment to the Space Station Freedom payload. Exobiological study of cosmic dust could provide insights on organic chemistry in the grains and on the relative abundances of biogenic elements in interstellar, cometary, and meteoric samples.

  7. Role of Cosmic Dust Analogues in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, J. R.; Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Saladino, R.; di Mauro, E.

    Dust grains could have played an important role in driving the formation of complex molecular compounds relevant for the prebiotic chemistry occurred in the early Earth. Dust and molecular compounds present in space experienced very different environments, with temperatures ranging from few to thousands of Kelvins, and with very harsh conditions due to particle and UV irradiations. Astronomical observations of the interstellar medium, coupled with direct in-situ investigations of solar system bodies performed by space missions and laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial material have shown the presence of large amount of organic molecules. The detection of more than one hundred molecules demonstrates that chemical reactions can proceed successfully in space. However, due to low efficiency, formation of complex molecules in gas phase is not feasible, then an active chemistry has been suggested to take place at cryogenic temperatures (~10 K) on cosmic dust grains acting as catalysts. We will present laboratory results on catalytic effects of Cosmic Dust Analogues (CDAs) with olivine composition, in the synthesis of organic molecules under different physical conditions by using formamide (NH2COH). We will show the important role of CDAs in prebiotic chemistry experiments simulating processes occurring in astronomical environments relevant for the origin of life in the Solar System.

  8. The simulation of cosmic dust collection process with little damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danming; Li, Yali; Wu, Qingxiao; Dai, Peng

    2016-07-01

    To built a cosmic dust collector according to a predetermined concept, mateirals that can be used to buffer the poential high speed collision of the cosmic dust have been studied. In this study, aerogel was chosen as an ideal buffer material and analyzed with SPH modeling method which is embedded in ABAQUS FE code. This report presents the interactions of cosmic dust, varing composition, shape and velocity, with the buffer material. The results show that cosmic dust that moves at 6 Km/s or less can be captured with minor damage to the buffer material of certain length. The simulation provides favorable technical support for the structural design of the cosmic dust collector.

  9. Formation of Cosmic Carbon Dust Analogues in Plasma Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic carbon dust analogs are produced, processed and analyzed in the laboratory using NASA's COSmIC (COSmIC Simulation Chamber) Facility. These experiments can be used to derive information on the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars.

  10. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  11. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  12. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  13. Pristine Stratospheric Collections of Cosmic Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Clemett, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1981, NASA has routinely collected interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in the stratosphere by inertial impact onto silicone oil-coated flat plate collectors deployed on the wings of high-altitude aircraft [1]. The highly viscous oil traps and localizes the particles, which can fragment during collection. Particles are removed from the collectors with a micromanipulator and washed of the oil using organic solvents, typically hexane or xylene. While silicone oil is an efficient collection medium, its use is problematic. All IDPs are initially coated with this material (polydimethylsiloxane, n(CH3)2SiO) and traces of oil may remain after cleaning. The solvent rinse itself is also a concern as it likely removes indigenous organics from the particles. To avoid these issues, we used a polyurethane foam substrate for the oil-free stratospheric collection of IDPs.

  14. A possible mechanism for the capture of microparticles by the earth and other planets of the solar system. [planetary gravitation effects on cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, F.

    1973-01-01

    By application of Lyttleton's theory for the formation of comets, it is shown that a possible mechanism for the origin and formation of a concentration of cosmic particles around the earth and the other planets of the solar system exists. In the vicinity of the neutral point, where the velocity of colliding particles is not greater than 6 km/s, it is found that if the solid particles after collision must remain in a solid state, there can be no possibility of accretion for Mercury, Mars, and the Moon, where the maximum value of the distance of the center of the planet to the asymptotic trajectory is less than the radius of the planet. On the other hand, the capture radii of microparticles in solid form varies from a minimum of 2.95 planetary radii for Venus and 3.47 for the Earth, to about 986 for Jupiter.

  15. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  16. Superaromatics: The key to a unified cosmic dust theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, Lawrence R.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of Superaromatics, the key to a unified cosmic dust theory, was constructed by analyzing several thousand astronomical features covering every major aspect of astrophysics and astrochemistry relating to dust. To insure consistency between disciplines, the logical structure of the conclusions in each field was checked rather than accepting the current consensus. No substantial contradictory features are known to the author. The analysis falls into seven major parts: (1) kinetics of grain formation and destruction; (2) optical spectra of the interstellar medium (ISM); (3) meteorite interplanetary dust particle (IPD) chemistry; (4) structure and chemistry of the interstellar medium arising from surface catalysis; (6) dynamics of circumstellar and interstellar dust clouds, including galactic morphology; and (7) the chemistry and physics of previously unidentified compounds. Only tentative conclusions are presented here. The principle conclusion is that quantum mechanics as it is normally formulated is incomplete. The probable cause is that it is formulated with complex numbers rather than the more fundamental quaternion system. The manifestation in astrochemistry is that the most stable compounds are superaromatic and exotic enough to confound most classical analysis.

  17. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  18. Sources of zodiacal dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    The orbital evolution of dust particles produced by asteroids, comets, and trans- Neptunian objects was integrated [1-3]. Analysis of results of these integrations testify in favor of a considerable fraction of particles produced by comets among overall zodiacal dust particles, but it does not contradict to >30% of asteroidal dust needed for explanation of formation of dust bands. Fractions of asteroidal particles, particles originating beyond Jupiter's orbit (including trans-Neptunian particles), and cometary particles originating inside of Jupiter's orbit are estimated to be about 1/3 each, with a possible deviation from 1/3 up to 0.1-0.2. Comparison of the plots of the number density vs. the distance R from the Sun obtained for particles produced by different small bodies with the plots based on observations shows that asteroidal and trans- Neptunian particles alone can not explain the observed almost constant number density at R ∼3-18 AU and a lot of particles must be produced by comets at R ∼5-10 AU [2-3]. Comparison of the WHAM (Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper spectrometer) observations of spectra of zodiacal light with our models showed [4-5] that a significant fraction of particles produced by short-period comets is required to fit the observations of the width and velocity of the Mg I line. Comparison of the observations of the number density inside Jupiter's orbit with the number density of particles produced by different small bodies leads to the same conclusion about a considerable fraction of cometary particles. This comparison does not make limitations on cometary particles produced beyond Jupiter's orbit, but it shows that the fraction of particles produced by Encke-type comets (with eccentricities ∼0.8-0.9) does not exceed 0.15 of the overall population. The estimated fraction of particles produced by long-period and Halley-type comets among zodiacal dust also does not exceed 0.1-0.15. Though trans-Neptunian particles fit different observations of

  19. Detecting Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Humes, Donald H.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Wortman, Jim; Singer, S. Fred; Stanley, John

    1988-01-01

    Technique records times specific craters formed in targets exposed in space and permits determination of direction in which impacting particles traveled at times of impacts. MOS capacitor is short-circuited by impact of particle striking at high speed. After recovery of targets from space, compositions of impacting particles established through post-flight laboratory analyses of residual materials in craters. On earth technique has industrial and military uses in detection of fragments driven by explosions. Studies of orbital dynamics of particles produced by solid-propellant rocket-motor firings in space made using technique.

  20. Velocities of Zodiacal Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2005-09-01

    Ipatov et al. (2005, LPSC, 1266) compared the observational plots of the zodiacal light spectrum near the solar Mg Iλ 5184 absorption line (Reynolds, Madsen and Moseley, ApJ, 2004, 612, 1206-1213) with the spectrum obtained by analyzing computer simulation results of the distribution of dust particles which migrated from different sources (Ipatov et al., Annals of New York Academy of Sciences, 2004, v. 1017, 66-80). Now we compare the rotation curves, i.e., plots of velocities of Mg I line (at zero inclination) versus elongations ǎrepsilon (measured eastward from the Sun). The comparison of the observed rotation curves with the models for dust particles of different sizes (hence for different values of the ratio between the radiation pressure force and gravitational force β ) started from asteroids, comets (2P/Encke, 10P/Tempel 2, 39P/Oterma), and trans-Neptunian objects allowed to make some conclusions about sources of zodiacal dust particles. The rotation curves obtained for different scattering functions were similar for 30<ǎrepsilon<330 deg. For asteroidal dust particles and particles originating from comets 39P and 10P, rotation curves are relatively close to each other at β <0.2. For 2P particles the difference between the rotation curves obtained at different β was considerable in case of the particles produced at aphelion. For asteroidal dust particles modeled rotation curves differed from the observed ones, and for ǎrepsilon<240o modeled velocities were smaller by several km/s; for 10P and 39P particles they were smaller than those for observations at ǎrepsilon<160o and 60<ǎrepsilon<150o, respectively, but for 39P particles the difference was smaller than that for asteroidal and 10P particles. For trans-Neptunian particles the rotation curves were in agreement with the observations at ǎrepsilon<180o, but modeled velocities were smaller than observational velocities at 200<ǎrepsilon<250o. The rotation curves corresponding to particles originating

  1. A New Laboratory For Terahertz Characterization Of Cosmic Analog Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Thushara; Liu, Lunjun; Breyer, Fiona; Schonert, Ryan; O'Shea, Kyle; Roesner, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Most studies conducted with observatories such as ALMA, SOFIA, PLANCK, and Herschel will benefit from knowledge of (1) the predominant cosmic dust species in various environments and (2) the mm/sub-mm optical properties of cosmic dusts, including the temperature dependent-emissivity and spectral index. We have undertaken two efforts to enable the laboratory study of cosmic analogs dusts in the frequency range 60-2000 GHz. They are: (1) the construction of a novel compact Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) design coupled to a dry 4-K cryostat which houses a cooled sample exchanger (filter wheel) and a bolometer. (2) The production of Mg- and Fe-rich silicate dusts using sol-gel methods; various tests to determine their physical and chemical properties; embedding of samples in LDPE pellets for insertion into the novel FTS. This presentation will focus on the current status of the apparatus and data from its first few months of use.

  2. Recent Direct Measurements by Satellites of Cosmic Dust in the Vicinity of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGow, H. E.; Alexander, W. M.

    1960-01-01

    Direct measurements of the space density of cosmic dust particles in the vicinity of the earth have been made from rockets, satellites, and space probes. The largest data samples have been obtained from crystal transducer sensors that detect the impact-impulses occurring from the collision of dust particles on sensitive surfaces of space vehicles. Preliminary results from satellite 1959 Eta show: (1) over 1500 impacts and an area-time product greater than 10(exp 1O) sq cm-sec; and (2) a daily variation in the dust particle density near the earth. The dust particle instrumentation of 1959 Eta and sensor calibration techniques are discussed in this paper. The results of direct measurements from space vehicles prior to 1959 Eta are summarized with respect to 1959 Eta information.

  3. Interplanetary dust particles and impact erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klacka, J.; Saniga, M.

    1992-11-01

    Consideration is given to the motion of interplanetary dust particles under the effect of collisions with much smaller interplanetary dust particles. The equation of motion is derived. Perturbation equations of celestial mechanics are also discussed. The results are compared with the Poynting-Robertson effect and the effect of solar wind on the motion of the interplanetary dust particles.

  4. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  5. Alteration of Organic Compounds in Small Bodies and Cosmic Dusts by Cosmic Rays and Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Sarker, Palash K.; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Okabe, Takuto; Eto, Midori; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A wide variety of complex organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies like carbonaceous chondrites and comets, and their roles in the generation of terrestrial life are discussed. It was suggested that organics in small bodies were originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts in dense cloud. Irradiation of frozen mixture of possible interstellar molecules including CO (or CH _{3}OH), NH _{3} and H _{2}O with high-energy particles gave complex amino acid precursors with high molecular weights [1]. Such complex organic molecules were taken in planetesimals or comets in the early solar system. In prior to the generation of the terrestrial life, extraterrestrial organics were delivered to the primitive Earth by such small bodies as meteorites, comets and space dusts. These organics would have been altered by cosmic rays and solar radiation (UV, X-rays) before the delivery to the Earth. We examined possible alteration of amino acids, their precursors and nucleic acid bases in interplanetary space by irradiation with high energy photons and heavy ions. A mixture of CO, NH _{3} and H _{2}O was irradiated with high-energy protons from a van de Graaff accelerator (TIT, Japan). The resulting products (hereafter referred to as CAW) are complex precursors of amino acids. CAW, amino acids (dl-Isovaline, glycine), hydantoins (amino acid precursors) and nucleic acid bases were irradiated with continuous emission (soft X-rays to IR; hereafter referred to as soft X-rays irradiation) from BL-6 of NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility (Univ. Hyogo). They were also irradiated with heavy ions (eg., 290 MeV/u C ^{6+}) from HIMAC accelerator (NIRS, Japan). After soft X-rays irradiation, water insoluble materials were formed. After irradiation with soft X-rays or heavy ions, amino acid precursors (CAW and hydantoins) gave higher ratio of amino acids were recovered after hydrolysis than free amino acids. Nucleic acid bases showed higher stability than free

  6. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  7. Sources of cosmic dust in the Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J D; Nesvorný, D; Pokorný, P; Janches, D; Plane, J M C

    2016-12-16

    There are four known sources of dust in the inner solar system: Jupiter Family comets, asteroids, Halley Type comets, and Oort Cloud comets. Here we combine the mass, velocity, and radiant distributions of these cosmic dust populations from an astronomical model with a chemical ablation model to estimate the injection rates of Na and Fe into the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as the flux of cosmic spherules to the surface. Comparing these parameters to lidar observations of the vertical Na and Fe fluxes above 87.5 km, and the measured cosmic spherule accretion rate at South Pole, shows that Jupiter Family Comets contribute (80 ± 17)% of the total input mass (43 ± 14 t d(-1)), in good accord with Cosmic Background Explorer and Planck observations of the zodiacal cloud.

  8. Sources of cosmic dust in the Earth's atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo‐Sánchez, J. D.; Nesvorný, D.; Pokorný, P.; Janches, D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are four known sources of dust in the inner solar system: Jupiter Family comets, asteroids, Halley Type comets, and Oort Cloud comets. Here we combine the mass, velocity, and radiant distributions of these cosmic dust populations from an astronomical model with a chemical ablation model to estimate the injection rates of Na and Fe into the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as the flux of cosmic spherules to the surface. Comparing these parameters to lidar observations of the vertical Na and Fe fluxes above 87.5 km, and the measured cosmic spherule accretion rate at South Pole, shows that Jupiter Family Comets contribute (80 ± 17)% of the total input mass (43 ± 14 t d−1), in good accord with Cosmic Background Explorer and Planck observations of the zodiacal cloud. PMID:28275286

  9. Sources of cosmic dust in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Nesvorný, D.; Pokorný, P.; Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    There are four known sources of dust in the inner solar system: Jupiter Family comets, asteroids, Halley Type comets, and Oort Cloud comets. Here we combine the mass, velocity, and radiant distributions of these cosmic dust populations from an astronomical model with a chemical ablation model to estimate the injection rates of Na and Fe into the Earth's upper atmosphere, as well as the flux of cosmic spherules to the surface. Comparing these parameters to lidar observations of the vertical Na and Fe fluxes above 87.5 km, and the measured cosmic spherule accretion rate at South Pole, shows that Jupiter Family Comets contribute (80 ± 17)% of the total input mass (43 ± 14 t d-1), in good accord with Cosmic Background Explorer and Planck observations of the zodiacal cloud.

  10. Placers of cosmic dust in the blue ice lakes of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurette, M.; Hammer, C.; Reeh, N.; Brownlee, D. E.; Thomsen, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    A concentration process occurring in the melt zone of the Greenland ice cap has produced the richest known deposit of cosmic dust on the surface of the earth. Extraterrestrial particles collected from this region are well preserved and are collectable in large quantities. The collected particles are generally identical to cosmic spheres found on the ocean floor, but a pure glass type was discovered that has not been seen in deep-sea samples. Iron-rich spheres are conspicuously rare in the collected material.

  11. Composition of jovian dust stream particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, Frank; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Green, Simon F.; Hillier, Jon K.; McBride, Neil; Grün, Eberhard

    2006-07-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encountered Jupiter in late 2000. Within more than 1 AU of the gas giant the Cosmic Dust Analyser onboard the spacecraft recorded the first ever mass spectra of jovian stream particles. To determine the chemical composition of particles, a comprehensive statistical analysis of the dataset was performed. Our results imply that the vast majority (>95%) of the observed stream particles originate from the volcanic active jovian satellite Io from where they are sprinkled out far into the Solar System. Sodium chloride (NaCl) was identified as the major particle constituent, accompanied by sulphurous as well as potassium bearing components. This is in contrast to observations of gas in the ionian atmosphere, its co-rotating plasma torus, and the neutral cloud, where sulphur species are dominant while alkali and chlorine species are only minor components. Io has the largest active volcanoes of the Solar System with plumes reaching heights of more than 400 km above the moons surface. Our in situ measurements indicate that alkaline salt condensation of volcanic gases inside those plumes could be the dominant formation process for particles reaching the ionian exosphere.

  12. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  13. Vertical and horizontal transport of mesospheric Na: Implications for the mass influx of cosmic dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles as they enter the Earth's upper atmosphere. We show that the downward fluxes of these metal atoms, induced locally by waves and turbulence, are related in a straightforward way to the meteoric influxes of the metals, their chemical losses and their advective transport by the large-scale vertical and horizontal motions associated with the meridional circulation system. Above the peak of the metal layers where chemical losses and large-scale vertical motions are small, the wave-induced flux is insensitive to changes in local wave activity. If the downward transport velocity increases, because wave activity increases, then in response, the metal densities will decrease to maintain a constant vertical flux. By fitting the theoretical Na flux profile to the annual mean vertical flux profile measured during the night at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, we derive improved estimates for the global influxes of both Na and cosmic dust. The mean Na influx is 22,500±1050 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 389±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor. If the Na composition of the dust particles is identical to CI chondritic meteorites (4990 ppm by mass), then the global influx of cosmic dust is 176±38 t/d. If the composition is identical to ordinary chondrites (7680 ppm), the global dust influx is 107±22 t/d.

  14. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-11-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  15. Progress toward a cosmic dust collection facility on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R. (Editor); Carey, William C. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Scientific and programmatic progress toward the development of a cosmic dust collection facility (CDCF) for the proposed space station is documented. Topics addressed include: trajectory sensor concepts; trajectory accuracy and orbital evolution; CDCF pointing direction; development of capture devices; analytical techniques; programmatic progress; flight opportunities; and facility development.

  16. Modeling Cosmic Dust: How to Use Optical "Constants"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A.

    In order to determine the precise nature of cosmic dust, we use a combination of multi-wavelength ground- and space-based spectroscopy, imaging, laboratory data and modeling. Dust grains scatter, absorb and re-radiate light according to their optical properties, which are sensitive to e.g. the temperature, chemical composition, size, shape, and lattice structure of the dust grains. For example, graphite and diamond are both polymorphs of carbon, and will form under very similar conditions, but their interactions with light are very different. This work provides a primer on how to apply basic physics concepts to understanding how we measure and use the optical properties of candidate cosmic dust species. We discuss the way in which measurements are made, how simplifying assumptions commonly made in astronomy may cause problems and how measurable and calculable parameters from laboratory experiments can be directly or indirectly compared to parameters derived from astronomical observations. Finally, we examine the simplifying assumptions with the most commonly used “synthetic” optical properties for cosmic dust and highlight forthcoming laboratory data as a potential replacement.

  17. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  18. Cosmic dust detection by the Cluster spacecraft: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Kero, Johan; Mann, Ingrid; Norberg, Carol; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Pitkänen, Timo

    2016-04-01

    There are several different techniques that are used to measure cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical methods. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites with the Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver (WBD). We first describe the concept of dust impact ionization and of the impact detection. Based on these considerations the mass and the velocity of the impinging dust grains can be estimated from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses. In the case of the Cluster instrument an automatic gain control adjusts the dynamic range of the recorded signals. Depending on the gain level the impact signal can both be affected by saturation or be too weak for analysis. We describe how this influences the duty cycle of the impact measurements. We finally discuss the suitability of this method for monitoring dust fluxes near Earth and compare it with other methods.

  19. Carbon and silicate grains in the laboratory as analogues of cosmic dust.

    PubMed

    Mennella, V; Brucato, J R; Colangeli, L

    2001-03-15

    Carbon and silicate grains are the two main components of cosmic dust. There is increasing spectroscopic evidence that their composition varies according to the cosmic environment and the experienced processing. Irradiation from ultraviolet photons and cosmic rays, as well as chemical interactions with the interstellar gas play a crucial role for grain transformation. The study of 'laboratory analogues' represents a powerful tool to better understand the nature and evolution of cosmic materials. In particular, simulations of grain processing are fundamental to outline an evolutionary pathway for interstellar particles. In the present work, we discuss the ultraviolet and infrared spectral changes induced by thermal annealing, ultraviolet irradiation, ion irradiation and hydrogen atom bombardment in carbon and silicate analogue materials. The laboratory results give the opportunity to shed light on the long-standing problems of the attribution of ultraviolet and infrared interstellar spectral features.

  20. Particle Astrophysics with Cosmic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirandish, Ali

    IceCube's discovery of cosmic neutrinos offers a unique view of our universe and provides powerful insights into some of the most energetic and enigmatic objects in the cosmos. Cosmic neutrinos reveal an unobstructed view at wavelengths where the universe is opaque to photons. The existence of the cosmic-neutrino flux has challenged our understanding of the universe. It is somewhat counterintuitive that the most surprising property of the observed flux is its magnitude. An immediate inference from the large neutrino flux observed by IceCube, which is predominantly extragalactic in origin, is that the total energy density of neutrinos in the high-energy universe is similar to that of photons. The matching energy densities of the extragalactic gamma-ray flux detected by Fermi and the high-energy neutrino flux measured by IceCube suggest the possibility of a common origin. Therefore, rather than detecting some exotic sources, it looks more likely that IceCube observes the same universe as astronomers do. The finding implies that a large fraction of the energy in the non-thermal universe originates in hadronic processes, indicating a larger level than previously thought. The focus of this dissertation is on identifying the sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos observed in IceCube. Moreover, with the lack of confirmation to date of any source (type of sources) as the dominant contributor to the observed neutrino flux, we have studied prospects for observing different sources in IceCube by considering both transient and steady sources in the sky. Finally, we introduce new techniques to study the strength of neutrino dark matter interactions with the properties of high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  1. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  2. Particle atlas of World Trade Center dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, Heather; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has begun a reassessment of the presence of World Trade Center (WTC) dust in residences, public buildings, and office spaces in New York City, New York. Background dust samples collected from residences, public buildings, and office spaces will be analyzed by multiple laboratories for the presence of WTC dust. Other laboratories are currently studying WTC dust for other purposes, such as health effects studies. To assist in inter-laboratory consistency for identification of WTC dust components, this particle atlas of phases in WTC dust has been compiled.

  3. Dust particles interaction with plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Jepu, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Chiru, P.; Zaroschi, V.

    2009-11-10

    The flow of plasma and particularly the flow of ions play an important role in dusty plasmas. Here we present some instances in laboratory experiments where the ion flow is essential in establishing dust dynamics in strongly or weakly coupled dust particles. The formation of ion wake potential and its effect on the dynamics of dust crystals, or the ion drag force exerted on micron size dust grains are some of the phenomena observed in the presented experiments.

  4. Cosmic Ornament of Gas and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 4-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Silicon Gas Figure 2 Argon Figure 3 Dust Collection Figure 4

    This beautiful bulb might look like a Christmas ornament but it is the blown-out remains of a stellar explosion, or supernova. Called Cassiopeia A, this supernova remnant is located about 10,000 light-years away in our own Milky Way galaxy. The remains are shown here in an infrared composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Silicon gas is blue and argon gas is green, while red represents about 10,000 Earth masses worth of dust. Yellow shows areas where red and green overlap.

    The fact that these two features line up (as seen in yellow in the combined view) tells astronomers that the dust, together with the gas, was created in the explosion. This is the best evidence yet that supernovae are a significant source of dust in the early universe something that was postulated before, but not proven. Dust in our young universe is important because it eventually made its way into future stars, planets and even people.

    In figure 1, the upper left panel is a composite made up of three infrared views shown in the remaining panels. The bottom left view (figure 3) shows argon gas (green) that was synthesized as it was ejected from the star. The upper right panel (figure 2) shows silicon gas (blue) deep in the interior of the remnant. This cooler gas, called the unshocked ejecta, was also synthesized in the supernova blast. The bottom right view (figure 4) shows a collection of dust (red), including proto-silicates, silicate dioxide and iron oxide.

    The data for these images were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light apart to reveal the fingerprints of molecules and elements. In total, Spitzer collected separate 'spectra' at more than 1,700 positions across

  5. Cosmic Ornament of Gas and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 4-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Silicon Gas Figure 2 Argon Figure 3 Dust Collection Figure 4

    This beautiful bulb might look like a Christmas ornament but it is the blown-out remains of a stellar explosion, or supernova. Called Cassiopeia A, this supernova remnant is located about 10,000 light-years away in our own Milky Way galaxy. The remains are shown here in an infrared composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Silicon gas is blue and argon gas is green, while red represents about 10,000 Earth masses worth of dust. Yellow shows areas where red and green overlap.

    The fact that these two features line up (as seen in yellow in the combined view) tells astronomers that the dust, together with the gas, was created in the explosion. This is the best evidence yet that supernovae are a significant source of dust in the early universe something that was postulated before, but not proven. Dust in our young universe is important because it eventually made its way into future stars, planets and even people.

    In figure 1, the upper left panel is a composite made up of three infrared views shown in the remaining panels. The bottom left view (figure 3) shows argon gas (green) that was synthesized as it was ejected from the star. The upper right panel (figure 2) shows silicon gas (blue) deep in the interior of the remnant. This cooler gas, called the unshocked ejecta, was also synthesized in the supernova blast. The bottom right view (figure 4) shows a collection of dust (red), including proto-silicates, silicate dioxide and iron oxide.

    The data for these images were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light apart to reveal the fingerprints of molecules and elements. In total, Spitzer collected separate 'spectra' at more than 1,700 positions across

  6. Swift heavy ion irradiation of interstellar dust analogues. Small carbonaceous species released by cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Chabot, M.; Pino, T.; Béroff, K.; Godard, M.; Severin, D.; Bender, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Interstellar dust grain particles are immersed in vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and cosmic ray radiation environments influencing their physicochemical composition. Owing to the energetic ionizing interactions, carbonaceous dust particles release fragments that have direct impact on the gas phase chemistry. Aims: The exposure of carbonaceous dust analogues to cosmic rays is simulated in the laboratory by irradiating films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon interstellar analogues with energetic ions. New species formed and released into the gas phase are explored. Methods: Thin carbonaceous interstellar dust analogues were irradiated with gold (950 MeV), xenon (630 MeV), and carbon (43 MeV) ions at the GSI UNILAC accelerator. The evolution of the dust analogues is monitored in situ as a function of fluence at 40, 100, and 300 K. Effects on the solid phase are studied by means of infrared spectroscopy complemented by simultaneously recording mass spectrometry of species released into the gas phase. Results: Specific species produced and released under the ion beam are analyzed. Cross sections derived from ion-solid interaction processes are implemented in an astrophysical context.

  7. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  8. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  9. Ultrahigh-energy particles from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. . Astronomy and Astrophysics Center Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1991-02-01

    The idea of production of ultrahigh-energy particles in the present universe due to annihilation or collapse of topological defects is discussed. Topological defects, formed in symmetry-breaking phase transitions in the early universe, can survive till today owing to their topological stability. However, under certain circumstances, topological defects may be physically destroyed. When topological defects are destroyed, the energy contained in the defects can be released in the form of massive gauge- and Higgs bosons of the underlying spontaneously broken gauge theory. Subsequent decay of these massive particles can give rise to energetic particles ranging up to an energy on the order of the mass of the original particles released from the defects. This may give us a natural'' mechanism of production of extremely energetic cosmic ray particles in the universe today, without the need for any acceleration mechanism. To illustrate this idea, I describe in detail the calculation of the expected ultrahigh-energy proton spectrum due to a specific process which involves collapse or multiple self-intersections of a class of closed cosmic string loops formed in a phase transition at a grand unification energy scale. I discuss the possibility that some of the highest-energy cosmic ray particles are of this origin. By comparing with the observational results on the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, we derive an upper limit to the average fraction of the total energy in all primary'' cosmic string loops that may be released in the form of particles due to collapse or multiple self-intersections of these loops. No nuclei such as {alpha}'s or Fe's are in the spectrum. 43 refs., 3 figs.

  10. a New Laboratory for Terahertz Characterization of Cosmic Analog Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Thushara

    2016-06-01

    Two efforts have been underway to enable the laboratory study of cosmic analogs dusts in the frequency range 60--2000 GHz. They are: (1) the construction of a novel compact Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) design coupled to a dry 4-K cryostat which houses a cooled sample exchanger (filter wheel) and a bolometer. (2) The production of Mg- and Fe-rich silicate dusts using sol-gel methods; various tests to determine their physical and chemical properties; embedding of samples in LDPE pellets for insertion into the novel FTS. This presentation will focus on the current status of the apparatus and data from its first few months of use.

  11. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Witherow, W. K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for conducting a variety of experiments on single isolated dust particles of astrophysical interest levitated in an electrodynamics balance has been developed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The objective of the research is to employ this experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of individual cosmic dust grains of 0.1-100 micron size in controlled pressure/temperatures environments simulating astrophysical conditions. The physical and optical properties of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains of known composition and size distribution will be investigated by this facility. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to study the micro-physics of cosmic dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) in the 1-30 micron region using infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the condensation of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The condensation experiments will involve levitated nucleus dust grains of known composition and initial mass (or m/q ratio), cooled to a temperature and pressure (or scaled pressure) simulating the astrophysical conditions, and injection of a volatile gas at a higher temperature from a controlled port. The increase in the mass due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data will permit determination of the sticking coefficients of volatile gases and growth rates of dust particles of astrophysical interest. Some preliminary results based on

  12. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  13. DustPedia: A Definitive Study of Cosmic Dust in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Baes, M.; Bianchi, S.; Jones, A.; Madden, S.; Xilouris, M.; Bocchio, M.; Casasola, V.; Cassara, L.; Clark, C.; De Looze, I.; Evans, R.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Lianou, S.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Smith, M.; Verstocken, S.; Viaene, S.; Vika, M.; Wagle, G.; Ysard, N.

    2017-04-01

    The European Space Agency has invested heavily in two cornerstones missions: Herschel and Planck. The legacy data from these missions provides an unprecedented opportunity to study cosmic dust in galaxies so that we can, for example, answer fundamental questions about the origin of the chemical elements, physical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), its effect on stellar radiation, its relation to star formation and how this relates to the cosmic far-infrared background. In this paper we describe the DustPedia project, which enables us to develop tools and computer models that will help us relate observed cosmic dust emission to its physical properties (chemical composition, size distribution, and temperature), its origins (evolved stars, supernovae, and growth in the ISM), and the processes that destroy it (high-energy collisions and shock heated gas). To carry out this research, we combine the Herschel/Planck data with that from other sources of data, and provide observations at numerous wavelengths (≤slant 41) across the spectral energy distribution, thus creating the DustPedia database. To maximize our spatial resolution and sensitivity to cosmic dust, we limit our analysis to 4231 local galaxies (v< 3000 km s-1) selected via their near-infrared luminosity (stellar mass). To help us interpret this data, we developed a new physical model for dust (THEMIS), a new Bayesian method of fitting and interpreting spectral energy distributions (HerBIE) and a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo photon-tracing radiative transfer model (SKIRT). In this, the first of the DustPedia papers, we describe the project objectives, data sets used, and provide an insight into the new scientific methods we plan to implement.

  14. Influence of dust particles on glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, D. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Vasilyak, L. M.; Fortov, V. E.

    2010-11-01

    The gas discharge-dust particle interaction for a dc discharge in air with micron-sized particles is investigated. The plasma of the dc column is described in the frame of diffusion approximation combined with the orbital motion limited approximation for ion and electron flow on the dust component surface. The problem is solved for dust particles of 2 μm radius, embedded in a uniform glow discharge column with a diameter of 16 mm at air pressure 0.5 torr, discharge current 0.5-3 mA and particle concentration up to 105 cm-3. The current-voltage characteristics as an easy-to-observe measure of the nonlocal dust influence on the total amount of charge carriers in the discharge, as well as the radial distributions of plasma components in the dc discharge, are calculated for different dust concentrations and discharge currents. The results are compared with recently published experimental data. The presence of dust particles leads to an increase of the longitudinal electric field due to additional loss of ions and electrons. A decrease of the radial electric field within the dust cloud under the action of dust particles results in an essential change of the electron concentration profile, down to the appearance of the local minimum at the axis of the discharge.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Cosmic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Gaisser, T.K. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings includes papers presented at the Bartol ResearchInstitute, on topics concerning particle acceleration in stellar, space andgalactic environments. Two of the papers from this proceedings have beenabstracted for the database. (AIP)

  16. Properties of dust particles near Saturn inferred from voltage pulses induced by dust impacts on Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.-Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, H.-W.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2014-08-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust particles when voltage pulses induced by the dust impacts are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. For the first time, the dust impacts signals measured by dipole and monopole electric antennas are compared, from which the effective impact area of the spacecraft is estimated to be 4 m2. In the monopole mode, the polarity of the dust impact signal is determined by the spacecraft potential and the location of the impact (on the spacecraft body or the antenna), which can be used to statistically infer the charge state of the spacecraft. It is shown that the differential number density of the dust particles near Saturn can be characterized as a power law dn/dr ∝ rμ, where μ ~ - 4 and r is the particle size. No peak is observed in the size distribution, contrary to the narrow size distribution found by previous studies. The RPWS cumulative dust density is compared with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer High Rate Detector measurement. The differences between the two instruments are within the range of uncertainty estimated for RPWS measurement. The RPWS onboard dust recorder and counter data are used to map the dust density and spacecraft charging state within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  17. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  18. Observing air showers from cosmic superluminal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    1998-06-15

    The Poincare relativity principle has been tested at low energy with great accuracy, but its extrapolation to very high-energy phenomena is much less well established. Lorentz symmetry can be broken at Planck scale due to the renormalization of gravity or to some deeper structure of matter: we expect such a breaking to be a very high energy and very short distance phenomenon. If textbook special relativity is only an approximate property of the equations describing a sector of matter above some critical distance scale, an absolute local frame (the 'vacuum rest frame', VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related to new degrees of freedom not yet discovered experimentally. The new superluminal particles ('superbradyons', i.e. bradyons with superluminal critical speed) would have positive mass and energy, and behave kinematically like 'ordinary' particles (those with critical speed in vacuum equal to c, the speed of light) apart from the difference in critical speed (we expect c{sub i}>>c, where c{sub i} is the critical speed of a superluminal sector). They may be the ultimate building blocks of matter. At speed v>c, they are expected to release ''Cherenkov'' radiation ('ordinary' particles) in vacuum. Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss: a) the possible relevance of superluminal matter to the composition, sources and spectra of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signatures and experiments allowing to possibly explore such effects. Very large volume and unprecedented background rejection ability are crucial requirements for any detector devoted to the search for cosmic superbradyons. Future cosmic-ray experiments using air-shower detectors (especially from space) naturally fulfil both requirements.

  19. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the volatiles found within interplanetary dust particles. These particles have been shown to represent primitive material from early in the solar system's formation and also may contain records of stellar processes. The organogenic elements (i.e., H, C, N, O, and S) are among the most abundant elements in our solar system, and their abundances, distributions, and isotopic compositions in early solar system materials permit workers to better understand the processes operating early in the evolutionary history of solar system materials. Interplanetary dust particles have a range of elemental compositions, but generally they have been shown to be similar to carbonaceous chondrites, the solar photosphere, Comet Halley's chondritic cores, and matrix materials of chondritic chondrites. Recovery and analysis of interplanetary dust particles have opened new opportunities for analysis of primitive materials, although interplanetary dust particles represent major challenges to the analyst because of their small size.

  20. Toward a complete inventory of stratospheric dust particles with implications and their classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.; Mckay, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    As the Earth travels about the Sun it continuously sweeps up material laying in its path. The material includes dust-sized fragments of the meteors, comets and asteroids that have passed by as well as much older particles from out between the stars. These grains first become caught in the mesosphere and then slowly pass down through the stratosphere and the troposphere, finally raining down upon the Earth's surface. In the stratosphere the cosmic dust particles encounter increasing amounts of contaminants from the Earth. At the highest reaches of Earth's atmosphere these contaminants consists mainly of dust from the most explosive volcanoes, rocket exhaust, and other manmade space debris. In the troposphere windborne particles and pollen become an increasingly larger fraction of the atmospheric dust load. An increased knowledge of the nature of cosmic particles is suggested.

  1. A Cosmic Dust Sensor Based on an Array of Grid Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Bugiel, S.; Strack, H.; Srama, R.

    2014-04-01

    We described a low mass and high sensitivity cosmic dust trajectory sensor using a array of grid segments[1]. the sensor determines the particle velocity vector and the particle mass. An impact target is used for the detection of the impact plasma of high speed particles like interplanetary dust grains or high speed ejecta. Slower particles are measured by three planes of grid electrodes using charge induction. In contrast to conventional Dust Trajectory Sensor based on wire electrodes, grid electrodes a robust and sensitive design with a trajectory resolution of a few degree. Coulomb simulation and laboratory tests were performed in order to verify the instrument design. The signal shapes are used to derive the particle plane intersection points and to derive the exact particle trajectory. The accuracy of the instrument for the incident angle depends on the particle charge, the position of the intersection point and the signal-to-noise of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). There are some advantages of this grid-electrodes based design with respect to conventional trajectory sensor using individual wire electrodes: the grid segment electrodes show higher amplitudes (close to 100%induced charge) and the overall number of measurement channels can be reduced. This allows a compact instrument with low power and mass requirements.

  2. Missing dust signature in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-09-01

    I examine a possible spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) due to its absorption by galactic and intergalactic dust. I show that even subtle intergalactic opacity of 1 × 10-7 mag h Gpc-1 at the CMB wavelengths in the local Universe causes non-negligible CMB absorption and decline of the CMB intensity because the opacity steeply increases with redshift. The CMB should be distorted even during the epoch of the Universe defined by redshifts z < 10. For this epoch, the maximum spectral distortion of the CMB is at least 20 × 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1 sr-1 at 300 GHz, which is well above the sensitivity of the COBE/FIRAS, WMAP or Planck flux measurements. If dust mass is considered to be redshift dependent with noticeable dust abundance at redshifts 2-4, the predicted CMB distortion would be even higher. The CMB would also be distorted in a perfectly transparent universe due to dust in galaxies, but this effect is lower by one order than that due to intergalactic opacity. The fact that the distortion of the CMB by dust is not observed is intriguing and questions either opacity and extinction law measurements or validity of the current model of the Universe.

  3. Dust Analyzer Instrument (DANTE) for the detection and elemental analysis of dust particles originating from the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; O'brien, L.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Malaspina, D.; Moebius, E.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2016-12-01

    Nano- to sub-micron-size dust particles generated by the collisional breakup of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in the inner solar system can be accelerated away from the Sun and are available for detection and analysis near 1 AU. Beta-meteoroids are sub-micron sized particles for which the radiation pressure dominates over gravity and have already been detected by dedicated dust instrument. Charged nano-sized dust particles are picked up by the expanding solar wind and arrive to 1 AU with high velocity. The recent observations by the WAVE instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft indicated that these particles may exist in large numbers. The Dust Analyzer Instrument (DANTE) is specifically developed to detect and analyze these two populations of dust particles arriving from a direction close to the Sun. DANTE is a linear time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer analyzing the ions generated by the dust impact on a target surface. DANTE is derived from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer instrument operating on Cassini. DANTE has a 300 cm2 target area and a mass resolution of approximately m/dm = 50. The instrument performance has been verified using the dust accelerator facility operating at the University of Colorado. A light trap system, consisting of optical baffles, is designed and optimized in terms of geometry and surface optical properties. A solar wind ion repeller system is included to prevent solar wind from entering the sensor. Both measures facilitate the detection with the instrument pointing close to the Sun's direction. The DANTE measurements will help to understand the sources, sinks and distribution of dust between the Sun and 1 AU, and, when combined with solar wind ion analyzer instrument, they will provide insight on the suspected link between dust particles and pickup ions, and how the massive particles affect the dynamics and energetics of the solar wind.

  4. Busting Dust: From Cosmic Grains to Terrestrial Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    Electrostatic charging can have important consequences for both the growth and disruption of microparticulates immersed in a plasma. In this topical review, my emphasis is on the latter process, while I extend the term microparticulates not only to include ordinary inanimate cosmic or terrestrial dust but also to include terrestrial microbes whose sizes range from tens of nanometers (viruses) to tens of micrometers (bacteria). Following a description of the basic mechanism of electrostatic disruption of a solid body, I will discuss the role of size, shape and surface irregularity on the process. I will also consider the mitigating role of electric field emission of electrons on the disruption process of a negatively charged grain as its size falls below a critical size. I will conclude by reviewing some early evidence for the electrostatic disruption of cosmic grains, and the very recent evidence for the electrostatic disruption of the bacterial cell membranes in terrestrial sterilization experiments.

  5. Collecting Comet Samples by ER-2 Aircraft: Cosmic Dust Collection During the Draconid Meteor Shower in October 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, Ron; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriquez, M.; Frank, D.; Gonzalez, C.; Robinson, G.-A.; Zolensky, M.; Brown, P.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Broce, S.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Many tons of dust grains, including samples of asteroids and comets, fall from space into the Earth's atmosphere each day. NASA periodically collects some of these particles from the Earth's stratosphere using sticky collectors mounted on NASA's high-flying aircraft. Sometimes, especially when the Earth experiences a known meteor shower, a special opportunity is presented to associate cosmic dust particles with a known source. NASA JSC's Cosmic Dust Collection Program has made special attempts to collect dust from particular meteor showers and asteroid families when flights can be planned well in advance. However, it has rarely been possible to make collections on very short notice. In 2012, the Draconid meteor shower presented that opportunity. The Draconid meteor shower, originating from Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, has produced both outbursts and storms several times during the last century, but the 2012 event was not predicted to be much of a show. Because of these predictions, the Cosmic Dust team had not targeted a stratospheric collection effort for the Draconids, despite the fact that they have one of the slowest atmospheric entry velocities (23 km/s) of any comet shower, and thus offer significant possibilities of successful dust capture. However, radar measurements obtained by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar during the 2012 Draconids shower indicated a meteor storm did occur October 8 with a peak at 16:38 (+/-5 min) UTC for a total duration of approximately 2 hours.

  6. Reliability of cosmic dust data from Pioneers 8 and 9.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Berg, O. E.; Dohnanyi, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the characteristics and capabilities of the Pioneer cosmic dust mission is presented to facilitate accurate astronomical adaptations of the data by independent researchers. The characteristics of the sensor and associated electronics as they relate to dynamic range, field of view, and penetration effects in the film are discussed, comparisons are made between flight and simulation data, and statistical analyses are made of the reliability of the flight data. It is shown that the measurements from the Pioneer experiment are highly reliable and provide a valuable contribution to man's knowledge of the meteoroid environment of the solar system.

  7. Reliability of cosmic dust data from Pioneers 8 and 9.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Berg, O. E.; Dohnanyi, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the characteristics and capabilities of the Pioneer cosmic dust mission is presented to facilitate accurate astronomical adaptations of the data by independent researchers. The characteristics of the sensor and associated electronics as they relate to dynamic range, field of view, and penetration effects in the film are discussed, comparisons are made between flight and simulation data, and statistical analyses are made of the reliability of the flight data. It is shown that the measurements from the Pioneer experiment are highly reliable and provide a valuable contribution to man's knowledge of the meteoroid environment of the solar system.

  8. Highlights and discoveries of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) during its 15 years of exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Postberg, F.; Albin, T.; Auer, S.; Altobelli, N.; Beckmann, U.; Bugiel, S.; Burton, M.; Economou, T.; Fliege, K.; Grande, M.; Gruen, E.; Guglielmino, M.; Hillier, J. K.; Schilling, A.; Schmidt, J.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F.; Sterken, V.; Trieloff, M.

    2014-04-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after seven years of cruise phase. Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 10 years in orbit around Saturn. During the cruise phase CDA measured the interstellar dust flux at one AU distance from the Sun, the charge and composition of interplanetary dust grains and the composition of the Jovian nanodust streams. The first discovery of CDA related to Saturn was the measurement of nanometer sized dust particles ejected by its magnetosphere to interplanetary space with speeds higher than 100 km/s. Their origin and composition was analysed and an their dynamical studies showed a strong link to the conditions of the solar wind plasma flow. A recent surprising result was, that stream particles stem from the interior of Enceladus. Since 2004 CDA measured millions of dust impacts characterizing the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument showed strong evidence for ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the salt-rich water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system lead to the discovery of liquid water below the icy crust connected to an ocean at depth feeding the icy jets. CDA was even capable to derive a spatially resolved compositional profile of the plume during close Enceladus flybys. A determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturn's E ring describing the observed properties. The measured dust density profiles in the dense E ring revealed geometric asymmetries. Cassini performed shadow crossings in the ring plane and dust grain charges were measured in shadow regions delivering important data for dust-plasma interaction studies. In the last years, dedicated measurement campaigns were executed by CDA to monitor the flux of interplanetary and interstellar dust particles reaching

  9. Uptake of acetylene on cosmic dust and production of benzene in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; James, Alexander D.; Sánchez, Juan Diego Carrillo; Mangan, Thomas P.; Willacy, Karen; Poppe, Andrew R.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A low-temperature flow tube and ultra-high vacuum apparatus were used to explore the uptake and heterogeneous chemistry of acetylene (C2H2) on cosmic dust analogues over the temperature range encountered in Titan's atmosphere below 600 km. The uptake coefficient, γ, was measured at 181 K to be (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-4 and (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-4 for the uptake of C2H2 on Mg2SiO4, MgFeSiO4 and Fe2SiO4, respectively, indicating that γ is independent of Mg or Fe active sites. The uptake of C2H2 was also measured on SiO2 and SiC as analogues for meteoric smoke particles in Titan's atmosphere, but was found to be below the detection limit (γ < 6 × 10-8 and < 4 × 10-7, respectively). The rate of cyclo-trimerization of C2H2 to C6H6 was found to be 2.6 × 10-5 exp(-741/T) s-1, with an uncertainty ranging from ± 27 % at 115 K to ± 49 % at 181 K. A chemical ablation model was used to show that the bulk of cosmic dust particles (radius 0.02-10 μm) entering Titan's atmosphere do not ablate (< 1% mass loss through sputtering), thereby providing a significant surface for heterogeneous chemistry. A 1D model of dust sedimentation shows that the production of C6H6via uptake of C2H2 on cosmic dust, followed by cyclo-trimerization and desorption, is probably competitive with gas-phase production of C6H6 between 80 and 120 km.

  10. Cosmic dust collection with a sub-satellite tethered to a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The number concentration and density of 1 micron and submicron sized grains in interplanetary space, as well as their relation to the larger zodical dust particles, and the importance of the Beta meteoroid phenomenon are currently being questioned. The best approach to collecting large numbers of intact micron and submicron sized cosmic dust particles in real time while avoiding terrestrial and man made contamination would be to employ a tethered subsatellite from a space station down into the Earth's atmosphere. Such a subsatellite tied to the space shuttle by a 100 km long tether is being developed. It is also possible that a permanent space station would allow the use of a tether even longer that 100 km. It should be noted that the same tethered collectors could also be employed to study the composition and flux of man made Earth orbiting debris in any direction within 100 km or so of the space station.

  11. Cosmic dust collection with a sub satellite tethered to a Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, George J.

    1987-01-01

    The number concentration and density of 1 micron and submicron sized grains in interplanetary space, as well as their relation to the larger zodical dust particles, and the importance of the beta meteoroid phenomenon are currently being questioned. The best approach to collecting large numbers of intact micron and submicron sized cosmic dust particles in real time while avoiding terrestrial and man made contamination would be to employ a tethered subsatellite from a space station down into the earth's atmosphere. Such a subsatellite tied to the space shuttle by a 100 km long tether is being developed. It is also possible that a permanent space station would allow the use of a tether even longer than 100 km. It should be noted that the same tethered collectors could also be employed to study the composition and flux of man made earth orbiting debris in any direction within 100 km or so of the space station.

  12. Flux and composition of interstellar dust at Saturn from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, N; Postberg, F; Fiege, K; Trieloff, M; Kimura, H; Sterken, V J; Hsu, H-W; Hillier, J; Khawaja, N; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Blum, J; Burton, M; Srama, R; Kempf, S; Gruen, E

    2016-04-15

    Interstellar dust (ISD) is the condensed phase of the interstellar medium. In situ data from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer on board the Cassini spacecraft reveal that the Saturnian system is passed by ISD grains from our immediate interstellar neighborhood, the local interstellar cloud. We determine the mass distribution of 36 interstellar grains, their elemental composition, and a lower limit for the ISD flux at Saturn. Mass spectra and grain dynamics suggest the presence of magnesium-rich grains of silicate and oxide composition, partly with iron inclusions. Major rock-forming elements (magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium) are present in cosmic abundances, with only small grain-to-grain variations, but sulfur and carbon are depleted. The ISD grains in the solar neighborhood appear to be homogenized, likely by repeated processing in the interstellar medium. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Cosmic dust analog simulation in a microgravity environment: The STARDUST program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dell'aversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1995-01-01

    We have undertaken a project called STARDUST which is a collaboration with Italian and American investigators. The goals of this program are to study the condensation and coagulation of refractory materials from the vapor and to study the properties of the resulting grains as analogs to cosmic dust particles. To reduce thermal convective currents and to develop valuable experience in designing an experiment for the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility aboard Space Station, Freedom we have built and flown a new chamber to study these processes under periods of microgravity available on NASA's KC-135 Research Aircraft. Preliminary results from flights with magnesium and zinc are discussed.

  14. Laboratory investigation of electric charging of dust particles by electrons, ions, and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Jiri; Pinter, S.; Gruen, E.

    1989-01-01

    In many cosmic environments electric charging of dust particles occurs by electrons, ions, and UV radiation. In case of interstellar dust particles the value of their electric charge can have, for instance, very important consequences for their destruction rate in supernova remnant's shock waves and can globally influence the overall life cycle of dust particles in galaxies. For experimental simulation of charging processes a vacuum chamber was used in which the particles fall through an electron or ion beam of energies up to 10 KeV. The aim of the experiments was to attain maximum charge of dust particles. Furthermore the influence of the rest gas was also determined because electrons and ions produced by collisional ionization of the rest gas can result in significant effects. For measurement particles from 1 to 100 microns from glass, carbon, Al, Fe, MgO, and very loosely bound conglomerates of Al2O3 were used.

  15. An overview of the cosmic dust analogue material production in reduced gravity: the STARDUST experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Mirra, C.

    1993-01-01

    The formation, properties and chemical dynamics of microparticles are important in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields including synthesis of semiconductor crystals from the vapour, heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere and the formation of cosmic dust surrounding the stars. Gravitational effects on particle formation from vapors include gas convection and buoyancy and particle sedimentation. These processes can be significantly reduced by studying condensation and agglomeration of particles in microgravity. In addition, to accurately simulate particle formation near stars, which takes place under low gravity conditions, studies in microgravity are desired. We report here the STARDUST experience, a recent collaborative effort that brings together a successful American program of microgravity experiments on particle formation aboard NASA KC-135 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft and several Italian research groups with expertise in microgravity research and astrophysical dust formation. The program goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science. To do so we are developing techniques that are generally applicable to study particle formation and properties, taking advantage of the microgravity environment to allow accurate control of system parameters.

  16. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  17. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  18. Formation of the Dust Cloud Caused by the Impact of Small Cosmic Body on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, V. A.; Artemiev, V. I.; Nemtchinov, I. V.; Shuvalov, V. V.; Medveduk, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    A hypothesis has been proposed in that the impacts of small cosmic bodies on the planet's; surface may trigger local sand storms due to the formation of a heated layer over the ground under thermal radiation. The interaction of the shock wave with the heated layer leads to initiation of large-scale vortex flow and high-speed jets moving along the surface. This flow may be responsible for the intense dust lifting even in the case when a small cosmic body does not directly hit the ground and creates an explosion above the surface. Several other factors of the impact can also facilitate a dust rising: outgassing of the porous surface layer under heating by the radiation impulse; intrusion of the shock-compressed atmospheric gas into the regolith and subsequent blow-off in the rarefaction wave; steep erosion by blast-generated high-velocity winds. The generation of large-scale vortex flows in interaction of the blast wave with the ballistic wave and the wake behind a falling body may also cause a lifting of dust particles to high altitude and its long-distant transport. All these effects are especially effective for the impact on Mars when the luminous performance and the fireball size highly exceed these for the impacts on the Earth or Venus. A thorough investigation of the possible impact origin of local sand storms on Mars becomes even more interesting if we keep in mind that now there is no well and widely recognized mechanism of dust rising. We have made studies on impact-generated dust lifting and transport in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments.

  19. Advanced In-Situ Detection and Chemical Analysis of Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Gemer, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Maute, K.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Williams, E.; O'brien, L.; Rocha, J. R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ulysses dust detector discovered that interstellar dust particles pass through the solar system. The Hyperdsut instrument is developed for the in-situ detection and analysis of these particles to determine the elemental, chemical and isotopic compositions. Hyperdust builds on the heritage of previous successful instruments, e.g. the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on Cassini. Hyperdust combines a highly sensitive Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) and the high mass resolution Chemical Analyzer (CA). The DTS will detect dust particles as small as 0.3 μm in radius, and the velocity vector information is used to confirm the interstellar origin and/or reveal the dynamics from the interactions within the solar system. The effective target area of the CA is > 600 cm2 achieves mass resolution in excess of 200, which is considerably higher than that of CDA, and is acheved by advanced ion optics design. The Hyperdust instrument is in the final phases of development to TRL 6.

  20. Force limited vibration testing of Cassini spacecraft cosmic dust analyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, Heiko; Ritzmann, Swen; Chang, Kurng; Scharton, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The testing of the cosmic dust analyzer for the Cassini mission using the force limited method in order to avoid overtesting and to verify the ability of the specimen design to withstand the loads during launch and cruise, is reported on. In order to implement the method, force gages, fixtures and a test controller are required and the test specimen is subjected to sine vibration, random vibration and half sine shock. The practical aspects of the use of the force limited method are described. Due to the high loads and the weak design of the structural element, a notching method is used which provides the possibility of limiting the excitation to flight expected levels.

  1. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is discussed as a cause of rotational bursting, and of eventual elimination of asymmetric dust particles from the solar system, by a windmill effect. The predicted life span with this process for metallic particles with radii of 0.00001 to 0.01 cm ranges from 10 to 10,000 years. The effects of magnetic spin damping were considered. This depletion mechanism works faster than the traditional Poynting-Robertson effect by approximately one order of magnitude for metallic particles and about two orders of magnitude for nonmetallic particles.

  2. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  3. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  4. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  5. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  6. Shielding of emitting dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca Delzanno, Gian; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2003-10-01

    In the present work we focus on the role of electron emission (either thermionic or photoelectric) in charging an object immersed in a plasma. In fact, it is well known that the higher mobility of the plasma electrons (that would lead to negatively charged objects) can be overcome by electron emission, thus reversing the object polarity. Moreover, recent work [1] has shown how electron emission can fundamentally affect the shielding potential around the dust. In particular, depending on the physical parameters of the system (that were chosen such to correspond to common experimental conditions), the shielding potential can develop an attractive potential well. The aim of the present work is two-fold. First, we will present a parametric study in order to enlight the conditions for the formation, as well as the stability of the well. Furthermore, simulations will be presented with physical parameters corresponding to the ionosphere, thus extending our study to the case of meteroids. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, "Attractive Potential among Thermionically Emitting Microparticles", submitted.

  7. Exposure to mineral sands dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Cunha, K.; Barros Leite, C. V.; Zays, Z.

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the airborne particles in a Brazilian region with high concentration of mineral sands (Buena village). In this study proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), plasma desorption mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry were used for analyses of airborne particles. The analyses of aerosol samples and lichen samples show that the inhabitants of the Buena village are exposed to airborne particles in the fine fraction of aerosols. The main anthropogenic sources of particles are the mineral sands processing plant and truck traffic, and natural sources as the sea, soil and the swamp. The results from the lichen samples show that at least during the last 15 years the inhabitants of the village have been exposed to monazite particles. The results from aerosols and lichens samples also suggested that the swamp is a source of 226Ra and 210Pb bearing particles besides the monazite dust.

  8. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces” and “granules,” fragments of...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2126 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means fragments of almond kernels or other material which will pass through a round...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces” and “granules,” fragments of...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2126 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means fragments of almond kernels or other material which will pass through a round...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces...

  14. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.2126 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means fragments of almond kernels or other material...

  15. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... § 51.2126 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means fragments of almond kernels or other material...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1443 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.1443 Section 51.1443... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1443 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means, for all size designations except “midget pieces” and “granules,” fragments of...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2126 - Particles and dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Particles and dust. 51.2126 Section 51.2126... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2126 Particles and dust. Particles and dust means fragments of almond kernels or other material which will pass through a round...

  18. Plasma-Based Detector of Outer-Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Brinza, David E.; Henry, Michael D.; Clay, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    A report presents a concept for an instrument to be flown in outer space, where it would detect dust particles - especially those associated with comets. The instrument would include a flat plate that would intercept the dust particles. The anticipated spacecraft/dust-particle relative speeds are so high that the impingement of a dust particle on the plate would generate a plasma cloud. Simple electric dipole sensors located equidistantly along the circumference of the plate would detect the dust particle indirectly by detecting the plasma cloud. The location of the dust hit could be estimated from the timing of the detection pulses of the different dipoles. The mass and composition of the dust particle could be estimated from the shapes and durations of the pulses from the dipoles. In comparison with other instruments for detecting hypervelocity dust particles, the proposed instrument offers advantages of robustness, large collection area, and simplicity.

  19. Kent in space: Cosmic dust to space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. A. M.

    1994-10-01

    The dusty heritage of the University of Kent's Space Group commenced at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire, U.K., the home of the largest steerable radio telescope. While Professor Bernard Lovell's 250 ft. diameter telescope was used to command the U.S. deep space Pioneer spacecraft, Professor Tony McDonnell, as a research student in 1960, was developing a space dust detector for the US-UK Ariel program. It was successful. With a Ph.D. safely under the belt, it seemed an inevitable step to go for the next higher degree, a B.T.A.] Two years with NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, provided excellent qualifications for such a graduation ('Been to America'). A spirited return to the University of Kent at Canterbury followed, to one of the green field UK University sites springing from the Robbins Report on Higher Education. Swimming against the current of the brain drain, and taking a very considerable reduction in salary, it was with some disappointment that he found that the UK Premier Harold Wilson's 'white-hot technological revolution' never quite seemed to materialize in terms of research funding] Research expertise, centered initially on cosmic dust, enlarged to encompass planetology during the Apollo program, and rightly acquired international acclaim, notching up a history of space missions over 25 years. The group now comprises 38 people supported by four sources: the government's Research Councils, the University, the Space Agencies and Industry. This paper describes the thrust of the group's Research Plan in Space Science and Planetology; not so much based on existing international space missions, but more helping to shape the direction and selection of space missions ahead.

  20. Early Solar Nebula Grains - Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    This chapter examines the compositions, mineralogy, sources, and geochemical significance of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Despite their micrometer-scale dimensions and nanogram masses, it is now possible, primarily as a result of advances in small particle handling techniques and analytical instrumentation, to examine IDPs at close to atomic-scale resolution. The most widely used instruments for IDP studies are presently the analytical electron microscope, synchrotron facilities, and the ion microprobe. These laboratory analytical techniques are providing fundamental insights about IDP origins, mechanisms of formation, and grain processing phenomena that were important in the early solar system and presolar environments. At the same time, laboratory data from IDPs are being compared with astronomical data from dust in comets, circumstellar disks, and the interstellar medium. The direct comparison of grains in the laboratory with grains in astronomical environments is known as "astromineralogy."

  1. Interplanetary dust particles and solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klacka, J.; Saniga, M.

    1993-01-01

    An effect of the solar wind on the motion of interplanetary dust particles is investigated. An equation of motion is derived. It is pointed out that the 'Pseudo-Poynting-Robertson effect' (and its special case - a 'corpuscular drag') and the 'corpuscular sputtering' represent in reality one and the same effect within the framework of special relativity. In this context perturbation equations of celestial mechanics are also discussed.

  2. Helium-3 from the mantle - Primordial signal or cosmic dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    Helium-3 in hotspot magmas has been used as unambiguous evidence for the existence of a primordial, undegassed reservoir deep in the Earth's mantle. However, a large amount of helium-3 is delivered to the Earth's surface by interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Recycling of deep-sea sediments containing these particles to the mantle, and eventual incorporation in magma, can explain the high helium-3/helium-4 ratios of hotspot magmas. Basalts with high helium-3/helium-4 ratios may represent degassing of helium introduced by ancient (probably 1.5 to 2.0 billion years old) pelagic sediments rather than degassing of primordial lower mantle material brought to the surface in plumes. Influx of IDPs can also explain the neon and siderophile compositions of mantle samples.

  3. Helium-3 from the mantle - Primordial signal or cosmic dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    Helium-3 in hotspot magmas has been used as unambiguous evidence for the existence of a primordial, undegassed reservoir deep in the Earth's mantle. However, a large amount of helium-3 is delivered to the Earth's surface by interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Recycling of deep-sea sediments containing these particles to the mantle, and eventual incorporation in magma, can explain the high helium-3/helium-4 ratios of hotspot magmas. Basalts with high helium-3/helium-4 ratios may represent degassing of helium introduced by ancient (probably 1.5 to 2.0 billion years old) pelagic sediments rather than degassing of primordial lower mantle material brought to the surface in plumes. Influx of IDPs can also explain the neon and siderophile compositions of mantle samples.

  4. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  5. Mineralogy of chondritic interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, I. D. R.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1987-08-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of current investigations on the mineralogy of chondritic micrometeorites obtained from the lower stratosphere using flat-plate collection surfaces attached to high-flying aircraft. A compilation of detailed mineralogical analyses for 30 documented chondritic interplanetary dust particles indicates a wide variety of minerals present in assemblages which, as yet, are poorly defined. Two possible assemblages are: (1) carbonaceous phases and layer silicates and (2) carbonaceous and chain silicates or nesosilicates. Particles with both types of silicate assemblages are also observed.

  6. Latest AMS Results on elementary particles in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of all elementary charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the elementary cosmic ray particles are presented. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of the AMS Collaboration.

  7. Nearedge Absorption Spectroscopy of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Bradley, J.; Graham, G.; Westphal, A.; Snead, C.; Dominguez, G.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-25

    Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are derived from primitive Solar System bodies like asteroids and comets. Studies of IDPs provide a window onto the origins of the solar system and presolar interstellar environments. We are using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) techniques developed for the measurement of the cleanliness of silicon wafer surfaces to analyze these particles with high detection sensitivity. In addition to elemental analysis of the particles, we have collected X-ray Absorption Near-Edge spectra in a grazing incidence geometry at the Fe and Ni absorption edges for particles placed on a silicon wafer substrate. We find that the iron is dominated by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  8. Diagenetically altered fossil micrometeorites suggest cosmic dust is common in the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Martin D.; Genge, Matthew J.

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery of fossil micrometeorites from Late Cretaceous chalk. Seventy-six cosmic spherules were recovered from Coniacian (87 ± 1 Ma) sediments of the White Chalk Supergroup. Particles vary from pristine silicate and iron-type spherules to pseudomorphic spherules consisting of either single-phase recrystallized magnetite or Fe-silicide. Pristine spherules are readily identified as micrometeorites on the basis of their characteristic mineralogies, textures and compositions. Both magnetite and silicide spherules contain dendritic crystals and spherical morphologies, testifying to rapid crystallisation of high temperature iron-rich metallic and oxide liquids. These particles also contain spherical cavities, representing weathering and removal of metal beads and irregular cavities, representing vesicles formed by trapped gas during crystallization; both features commonly found among modern Antarctic Iron-type (I-type) cosmic spherules. On the basis of textural analysis, the magnetite and Fe-silicide spherules are shown to be I-type cosmic spherules that have experienced complete secondary replacement during diagenesis (fossilization). Our results demonstrate that micrometeorites, preserved in sedimentary rocks, are affected by a suite of complex diagenetic processes, which can result in disparate replacement minerals, even within the same sequence of sedimentary beds. As a result, the identification of fossil micrometeorites requires careful observation of particle textures and comparisons with modern Antarctic collections. Replaced micrometeorites imply that geochemical signatures the extraterrestrial dust are subject to diagenetic remobilisation that limits their stratigraphic resolution. However, this study demonstrates that fossil, pseudomorphic micrometeorites can be recognised and are likely common within the geological record.

  9. Nitrogen Isotopic Anomalies in a Hydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. B.; Dai, Z. R.; Weber, P. K.; Graham, G. A.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Bajt, S.; Ishii, H.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are the fine-grained end member (5 - 50 microns in size) of the meteoritic material available for investigation in the laboratory. IDPs are derived from either cometary or asteroidal sources. Some IDPs contain cosmically primitive materials with isotopic signatures reflecting presolar origins. Recent detailed studies using the NanoSIMS have shown there is a wide variation of isotopic signatures within individual IDPs; grains with a presolar signature have been observed surrounded by material with a solar isotopic composition. The majority of IDPs studied have been anhydrous. We report here results from integrated NanoSIMS/FIB/TEM/Synchrotron IR studies of a hydrous IDP, focused on understanding the correlations between the isotopic, mineralogical and chemical compositions of IDPs.

  10. Cosmic rays, gas and dust in nearby anticentre clouds. I. CO-to-H2 conversion factors and dust opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Q.; Grenier, I. A.; Marshall, D. J.; Casandjian, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We aim to explore the capabilities of dust emission and γ rays for probing the properties of the interstellar medium in the nearby anti-centre region, using γ-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), and the thermal dust optical depth inferred from Planck and IRAS observations. We also aim to study massive star-forming clouds including the well known Taurus, Auriga, Perseus, and California molecular clouds, as well as a more diffuse structure which we refer to as Cetus. In particular, we aim at quantifying potential variations in cosmic-ray density and dust properties per gas nucleon across the different gas phases and different clouds, and at measuring the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, in different environments. Methods: We have separated six nearby anti-centre clouds that are coherent in velocities and distances, from the Galactic-disc background in H i 21-cm and 12CO 2.6-mm line emission. We have jointly modelled the γ-ray intensity recorded between 0.4 and 100 GeV, and the dust optical depth τ353 at 353 GHz as a combination of H i-bright, CO-bright, and ionised gas components. The complementary information from dust emission and γ rays was used to reveal the gas not seen, or poorly traced, by H i, free-free, and 12CO emissions, namely (i) the opaque H iand diffuse H2 present in the Dark Neutral Medium at the atomic-molecular transition, and (ii) the dense H2 to be added where 12CO lines saturate. Results: The measured interstellar γ-ray spectra support a uniform penetration of the cosmic rays with energies above a few GeV through the clouds, from the atomic envelopes to the 12CO-bright cores, and with a small ± 9% cloud-to-cloud dispersion in particle flux. We detect the ionised gas from the H iiregion NGC 1499 in the dust and γ-ray emissions and measure its mean electron density and temperature. We find a gradual increase in grain opacity as the gas (atomic or molecular) becomes more dense. The increase reaches a factor of

  11. Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment SAMUM 2006: Airborne observations of dust particle properties and vertical dust profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Fiebig, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Wirth, M.; Müller, D.; Wendisch, M.; Schuetz, L.; Kandler, K.; Kahn, R.; Wagner, F.; Pereira, S.; Virkkula, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is an initiative of several German institutes. Its goal is the characterisation of optical, physical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan dust at the source region. SAMUM data may serve as ground truth data to validate satellite products and atmospheric transport models, and to support the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) mission. The first SAMUM intensive field phase was carried out in May/June 2006 in Southern Morocco. Ground sites were Ouarzazate (30.93° N, 6.9° W), Zagora (30.15° N, 5.37°), and Evora (38.53°N, 7.90°E) in Portugal for long- range transport studies. Research aircraft were operating from Ouarzazate (Partenavia, local flights) and Casablanca (DLR Falcon) at the Moroccan west coast As part of SAMUM, airborne measurements of dust particle properties were conducted using the German research aircraft Falcon. The DLR Falcon was equipped with an extensive set of aerosol physico-chemical instruments for size, volatility, and absorption measurements, impactor sampling for chemical analyses and with a nadir-looking high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) for measuring aerosol extinction at 532 nm, and aerosol backscatter and depolarisation at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The field sites were equipped with aerosol sampling devices and instruments for particle size distribution measurements. During the SAMUM core phase, three large-scale dust events were probed which extended from southern Morocco to Portugal. Vertical (0 10 km) and horizontal (Saharan border to southern Portugal) dust plume structures, aerosol optical depth as well as particle microphysical and optical properties were studied for all cases. The upper boundary of the dust layers was found at altitudes between 4 and 6 km above sea level. The internal structure of the dust layers varied from well mixed to stratified. The influence of the Atlas Mountains on the lifting of the dust layers was monitored

  12. Temperature Measurement for Dust Particles in a GEC Reference Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary differences between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. Correlated motion cannot be qualified as random motion, and therefore should not be included in a measurement of the dust temperature. In this presentation, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motion of a dust particle confined in a glass box within a GEC radio frequency reference cell. Dust particle fluctuation data are obtained experimentally and analyzed using the mean square displacement and other techniques, and temperatures obtained by various methods are compared. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  13. Purity and cleanness of aerogel as a cosmic dust capture medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Fleming, R. H.; Lindley, P. M.; Craig, A. Y.; Blake, D.

    1994-01-01

    The capability for capturing micrometeoroids intact through laboratory simulations and in space in passive underdense silica aerogel offers a valuable tool for cosmic dust research. The integrity of the sample handling medium can substantially modify the integrity of the sample. Intact capture is a violent hypervelocity event: the integrity of the capturing medium can cause even greater modification of the sample. Doubts of the suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium were raised at the 20th LPSC, and questions were raised again at the recent workshop on Particle Capture, Recovery, and Velocity Trajectory Measurement Technologies. Assessment of aerogel's volatile components and carbon contents have been made. We report the results of laboratory measurements of the purity and cleanliness of silica aerogel used for several Sample Return Experiments flown on the Get Away Special program.

  14. STARDUST: A simulation experiment of cosmic dust analogues production in microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank; Lilleleht, Lembit U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dellaversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1992-01-01

    The aim, activity, and some preliminary results of the STARDUST program are presented. The condensation of solid materials from the vapor phase is important in several scientific fields such as chemical vapor deposition, air pollution, and the formation of refractory cosmic dust around stars. Conventional studies of refractory grain formation, using high temperature furnace and shock tube techniques, are restricted to short time scales and suffer from buoyancy induced convection that limit their accuracy. In order to simulate more accurately the condensation of refractory grains near stars and to investigate the advantages of performing condensation studies in microgravity conditions, an experimental investigation of vapor phase condensation in microgravity was undertaken. The experimental equipment currently used is reported. The results from the first flight series and particle aggregation modeling efforts are presented.

  15. STARDUST - A simulation experiment of cosmic dust analogues production in microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dell'aversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1993-01-01

    The condensation of solid materials from the vapor phase is important in several scientific fields such as chemical vapor deposition, air pollution and the formation of refractory cosmic dust around stars. Conventional studies of refractory grain formation, using high temperature furnace and shock tube techniques, are restricted to short time scales and suffer from buoyancy induced convection that limit their accuracy. In order to simulate more accurately the condensation of refractory grains near stars and to investigate the advantages of performing condensation studies in microgravity conditions, an experimental investigation was undertaken. This work reports the experimental equipment currently used. The results from the first flight series and particle aggregation modelling efforts are presented briefly.

  16. The effect of porosity of dust particles on polarization and color with special reference to comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.; Botet, R.; Vilaplana, R.; Choudhury, Naznin R.; Gupta, Ranjan

    2017-09-01

    Cosmic dust particles are mostly responsible for polarization of the light that we observe from astrophysical objects. They also lead to color-extinction, thermal re-emission and other scattering related phenomena. Micrometric dust particles are often made of smaller constituent (nanometric grains). They are characterized by their size (average radius), chemical composition and morphology (including porosity). In the present work, we address the question of the role of the dust particle porosity on light polarization and color, using Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) light scattering code. To this purpose, we develop an algorithm to generate dust particles of arbitrary values of porosity. In brief, starting from a compact spherical ensemble of dipoles,randomly the dipoles are removed one by one, such that the remaining dipoles remain connected within their neighbours. We stop the removal process when the desired porosity is obtained. Then we compute and study the optical properties of the porous dust particle.The main objective of this paper is to develop a tool to generate dust particles with an arbitrary value of porosity and to study the effect of porosity on their light scattering properties. As a possible application, we simulate cometary polarization and color values which grossly match with the observed ones for the comet 1P/Halley, leaving scope for future work.

  17. Investigating Cosmic Analog Dusts in the Lab at MM/Sub-MM Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lunjun; O'Shea, Kyle; Breyer, Fiona; Dorsey, Ronan; Chen, Hansheng; Perera, Thushara

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic dust is abundant in many interesting astronomical environments such as active galactic nuclei (AGN) and protosteller systems. It also plays a key role in star formation and galactic evolution. In an effort to understand the thermal emission of dust in various environments, a dedicated instrument for measuring the emissivity of various cosmic analog dusts in the millimeter/sub-millimeter has been assembled and tested. In particular, novel design have adopted for the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) and the cold sample holder of the apparatus. We report here on the performance of the sample holder, FTS, and other parts of the complete experimental setup as found with our initial tests. Our next step will be to obtain science data on realistic cosmic analog dust samples synthesized by us such as amorphous silicate grains containing Mg/Fe.

  18. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M. )

    1989-03-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust. 27 refs.

  19. Carbon in Comet Halley dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.

    Comets are small bodies of the solar system containing primarily a mixture of frozen gases and carbonaceous and mineral grains. They are likely to preserve volatile mineral from cold regions of the protosolar nebula and remnants of interstellar dust and gas. More than 2500 mass spectra of cometary grains with masses in the range 5 x 10 exp -17 to 5 x 10 exp -12 g were measured in situ by PUMA1 and PUMA2 mass spectrometers on board the VEGA spacecraft during flyby missions to Comet Halley. In this paper, we discuss different organic and inorganic C-containing components discovered so far in Comet Halley dust particles, the nature and abundance of which provide information about possible astrophysical sources of C and constrain models of interstellar grains.

  20. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  1. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  2. Early developments: Particle physics aspects of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays is the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. In subsequent cloud chamber investigations Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Measurements with nuclear emulsions by Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. The cloud chamber continued to be a powerful instrument in cosmic ray studies. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be shortlived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Also Λ's, Σ's, and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays. But after that accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A. Cosmic ray neutrino results were best explained by the assumption of neutrino oscillations opening a view beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of accelerators.

  3. Vanadium concentrations in settled outdoor dust particles.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Mustafa S

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric dustfall is an important aspect of urban dust studies. Vanadium is considered as the marker element of air pollution emitted from residual oil and coal combustion. In this study, vanadium levels of outdoor dust particles are determined. The studied area covers the six sites located in Adapazarí (Turkey), which represents an earthquake-hit environment. The mass deposition rate was calculated for each sampling plate over the 30-days collection periods. The deposition rates for the six places in Adapazarí ranged from 20.5 to 84.9 microg/cm2/day. The arithmetic mean deposition rate for all places was 45.3 microg/cm2/day. Total dust deposition and vanadium loadings typically increased in magnitude according to the area order: Kampus > Serdivan > Cark C. > Ozanlar > Erenler > Yeşiltepe and Kampus > Serdivan > Cark C. > Ozanlar > Erenler > Yeşiltepe, respectively. The results suggested that vanadium may be useful for assessing the level of environmental pollution.

  4. Particle Distribution Of A Moon-Fed Dust Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrath, E.; Makuch, M.; Spahn, F.

    2008-09-01

    Enceladus' south-polar gey- sers support a huge gas-dust plume towering the south pole of the moon. It is considered to be the main source Saturns E-ring, the largest dust complex of the solar system. Contrary to the spherically sym- metric impactor ejecta dust cre- ation, the dust plume provides a directed particle outflow from the moon. Using a simple probabilistic model, we study the effects of this asymmetric dust ejection on Enceladus' dust torus. Dust con- figurations are described by par- ticle distribution functions and the dynamical properties of the system are adressed through a set of transformations. The re- sulting distribution function of orbital elements describes the unperturbed dust torus. We showcase the differences in the resulting particle distributions between impactor ejecta pro- cesses and dust production by Enceladus plume, modeled by a directed point-sized source. The obtained orbital element distri- bution is compared to the results of numerical simulations of the problem.

  5. Formation of Jet Propulsion Near Dust Particle in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vysykailo, F. I.; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.

    2011-11-29

    Processes of asymmetric ionization and cumulation of electric field and electron and ion flows can develop near the surface of charged dust particles in plasma. In the region of cumulation asymmetry on heating, the particle surface and ion momentum transfer arises; as a result, the dust particle moves in the plasma with high velocity.

  6. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  7. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; MacKinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  8. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Mark S; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  9. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  10. The concept of a facility for cosmic dust research on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Juergen; Cabane, Michel; Fonda, Mark; Giovane, Frank; Gustafson, Bo A. S.; Keller, Horst U.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.; Levasseur-Regourd, Any-Chantal; Worms, Jean-Claude; Nuth, Joseph A.; hide

    1996-01-01

    A proposal for the development of a permanently operating facility for the experimental investigation of cosmic dust-related phenomena onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is presented. Potential applications for this facility are the convection-free nucleation of dust grains, studies of coagulation and aggregation phenomena in a microgravity environment, investigations of heat transport through, and dust emissions from, high-porosity cometary analogs, and experiments on the interaction of very fluffy dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and with low pressure gas flows. Possible extensions of such a facility are towards aerosol science and colloidal plasma research.

  11. The concept of a facility for cosmic dust research on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Juergen; Cabane, Michel; Fonda, Mark; Giovane, Frank; Gustafson, Bo A. S.; Keller, Horst U.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.; Levasseur-Regourd, Any-Chantal; Worms, Jean-Claude; Nuth, Joseph A.; Rogers, Fred

    1996-01-01

    A proposal for the development of a permanently operating facility for the experimental investigation of cosmic dust-related phenomena onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is presented. Potential applications for this facility are the convection-free nucleation of dust grains, studies of coagulation and aggregation phenomena in a microgravity environment, investigations of heat transport through, and dust emissions from, high-porosity cometary analogs, and experiments on the interaction of very fluffy dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and with low pressure gas flows. Possible extensions of such a facility are towards aerosol science and colloidal plasma research.

  12. Amino Acid Formation on Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Barbier, B.; Brack, A.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the dense interstellar medium dust particles accrete ice layers of known molecular composition. In the diffuse interstellar medium these ice layers are subjected to energetic UV-irradiation. Here, photoreactions form complex organic molecules. The interstellar processes were recently successfully simulated in two laboratories. At NASA Ames Research Center three amino acids were detected in interstellar ice analogues [1], contemporaneously, our European team reported on the identification of 16 amino acids therein [2]. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. The identification of amino acids on the simulated icy surface of interstellar dust particles strongly supports the assumption that the precursor molecules of life were delivered from interstellar and interplanetary space via (micro-) meteorites and/or comets to the earyl Earth. The results shall be verified by the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission Rosetta [3]. [1] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403. [2] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [3] U. Meierhenrich, W.H.-P. Thiemann, H. Rosenbauer: itshape Chirality \\upshape 11 (1999), 575-582.

  13. Small-size dust particles near Halley's Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.; Evlanov, E. N.; Fomenkova, M. N.; Prilutskii, O. F.; Zubkov, B. V.

    Dust-impact PUMA mass-analyzers aboard the spacecrafts VEGA-1 and VEGA-2 allow to conduct the first direct measurements of mass-spectra of comet Halley's dust envelope particles with masses higher than 10 to the -17th g. The analysis of spectra measured by the PUMA instruments showed that unindentified peaks in this spectra could be associated with very small particles. Detection of small-size particles in the dust envelope of comet Halley agrees with the idea that the comet's nucleus is an interstellar dust aggregate which contains very small particles.

  14. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  15. Research in particles and fields. [cosmic rays, gamma rays, and cosmic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Buffington, A.; Davis, L., Jr.; Prince, T. A.; Vogt, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are reviewed. Energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons were used to carry out the investigations. Specific instruments mentioned are: the high energy isotope spectrometer telescope, the electron/isotope spectrometer, the heavy isotope spectrometer telescope, and magnetometers. Solar flares, planetary magnetospheres, element abundance, the isotopic composition of low energy cosmic rays, and heavy nuclei are among the topics receiving research attention.

  16. Effect of dust particle polarization on scattering processes in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kodanova, S. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.

    2015-06-15

    Screened interaction potentials in dusty plasmas taking into account the polarization of dust particles have been obtained. On the basis of screened potentials scattering processes for ion-dust particle and dust particle-dust particle pairs have been studied. In particular, the scattering cross section is considered. The scattering processes for which the dust grain polarization is unimportant have been found. The effect of zero angle dust particle-dust particle scattering is predicted.

  17. Cosmic dust flux on Earth inferred from the Concordia micrometeorite collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engrand, Cécile; Duprat, Jean; Dartois, Emmanuel; Godard, Marie; Delauche, Lucie

    2017-04-01

    The present extraterrestrial flux incoming to Earth is dominated by cosmic dust, i.e. micrometeorites in the 20-500 microns size range. Prior to atmospheric entry, the flux is estimated to ˜30 000 tons.yr-1 [1]. The proportion of this flux reaching the earth surface as dust particles is debated [e.g. 2]. Since 2000, we recover micrometeorites from ultraclean snow in the vicinity of the Dome C Concordia station in Antarctica. This region has a well-characterized and small precipitation rate (˜ 3.5 g of water per year) that allows collecting micrometeorites from large equivalent surfaces (> 100 m2.yrs) by sampling reasonable volumes of snow. The high efficiency and cleanliness of the collecting process at Dome C has enabled the recovery of several thousands of particles larger than ˜ 20 μm, constituting the Concordia micrometeorite collection [3]. The Concordia micrometeorites have a young terrestrial age of about 50 years. We characterized more than three thousand micrometeorites (both melted and unmelted particles) by secondary electron microscopy and classified them in the textural types defined in [4]. A preliminary flux value of 6,000 tons.yr-1 was given in [5] from the early Concordia collection examination. We now have better statistics to update this value. References: [1] Love S.G. and Brownlee D.E. (1993) Science 262, 550-553. [2] Peucker-Ehrenbrink B., et al. (2016) Elements 12, 191-196. [3] Duprat J., et al. (2007) Adv. Space Res. 39, 605-611. [4] Genge M.J., et al. (2008) Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 43, 497-515. [5] Duprat J., et al. (2006) Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 41 Suppl., A48 (#5239).

  18. Dust deposition fluxes and particle size of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean, from 2012 - 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Does, Michelle; Korte, Laura; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2017-04-01

    Every year, an estimated 140 million tons of Saharan dust are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, which can have several direct and indirect effects on global and regional climate. For example, dust can scatter and absorb incoming and reflected solar radiation, transport nutrients and pathogens, and act as mineral ballast particles in the ocean. This influences global radiation budgets and carbon export to the deep ocean, which in turn relate to the particle size of the dust. In order to constrain the relations between atmospheric dust and climate, subsurface sediment traps were moored at five stations along a transect across the Atlantic Ocean at 12˚N, at 1200m and 3500m water depth. These sampled from October 2012 to April 2016. For the first time, dust particle fluxes and particle size of two years of sampling (October 2012 - October 2014) will be presented here. The data show seasonal variations, with finer-grained dust particles during winter and spring, and coarser-grained dust during summer and fall, and seasonality of the dust flux. Also a fining trend of the grain sizes of the dust particles from source (Africa) to sink (Caribbean) is observed, in combination with a downwind decrease in dust deposition. In addition, we observed "giant" dust particles (>100 µm) at distances up to 4400 km from the African coast. This is much larger than previously assumed and applied in climate models. The dust deposition data is unique for validation of regional or global dust models. Some of the data that will be presented here has been recently published in van der Does et al. (2016); Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 16, doi: 10.5194/acp-16-13697-2016. See also: www.nioz.nl/dust

  19. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF DUST IN GALAXIES: METHODS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the redshift (z) evolution of dust mass and abundance, their dependences on initial conditions of galaxy formation, and physical correlations between dust, gas, and stellar contents at different z based on our original chemodynamical simulations of galaxy formation with dust growth and destruction. In this preliminary investigation, we first determine the reasonable ranges of the most important two parameters for dust evolution, i.e., the timescales of dust growth and destruction, by comparing the observed and simulated dust mass and abundances and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) content of the Galaxy. We then investigate the z-evolution of dust-to-gas ratios (D), H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}), and gas-phase chemical abundances (e.g., A {sub O} = 12 + log (O/H)) in the simulated disk and dwarf galaxies. The principal results are as follows. Both D and f{sub H{sub 2}} can rapidly increase during the early dissipative formation of galactic disks (z ∼ 2-3), and the z-evolution of these depends on initial mass densities, spin parameters, and masses of galaxies. The observed A {sub O}-D relation can be qualitatively reproduced, but the simulated dispersion of D at a given A {sub O} is smaller. The simulated galaxies with larger total dust masses show larger H{sub 2} and stellar masses and higher f{sub H{sub 2}}. Disk galaxies show negative radial gradients of D and the gradients are steeper for more massive galaxies. The observed evolution of dust masses and dust-to-stellar-mass ratios between z = 0 and 0.4 cannot be reproduced so well by the simulated disks. Very extended dusty gaseous halos can be formed during hierarchical buildup of disk galaxies. Dust-to-metal ratios (i.e., dust-depletion levels) are different within a single galaxy and between different galaxies at different z.

  20. The Astromineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J.

    Some chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are from comets. Because comets accreted at heliocentric distances beyond the giant planets, presolar grains or "astrominerals" both with solar and non-solar isotopic compositions are expected to be even more abundant in cometary IDPs than in primitive meteorites. Non-solar D/H and 15N/14N isotopic enrichments in chondritic IDPs are associated with a carbonaceous carrier. These H and N enrichments are attributed to extreme mass fractionation during chemical reactions in cold (10-100 K), dense interstellar molecular clouds. Nano-diamonds appear to be systematically depleted or even absent in some IDPs suggesting that some meteoritic nano-diamonds may not be (presolar) astrominerals. Enstatite (MgSiO3) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4) crystals in IDPs are physically and compositionally similar to enstatite and forsterite grains detected around young and old stars by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and large non-solar oxygen isotopic compositions recently measured in an IDP forsterite establish that they are presolar circumstellar silicates. The compositions, mineralogy, and optical properties of GEMS are consistent with those of interstellar amorphous silicates. Submicrometer FeNi sulfide astrominerals like those found in IDPs may be responsible for a broad char 126 23.5 mum feature observed around protostars and protoplanetary discs by ISO. The first returned samples of contemporary interstellar dust as well as dust from comet Wild-2 will be returned to Earth in 2006 by the STARDUST mission, providing a mother lode of astrominerals for future laboratory investigations.

  1. Reduction and analysis of data from cosmic dust experiments on Mariner 4, OGO 3, and Lunar Explorer 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The analysis of data from the cosmic dust experiment on three NASA missions is discussed. These missions were Mariner IV, OGO III, and Lunar Explorer 35. The analysis effort has included some work in the laboratory of the physics of microparticle hypervelocity impact. This laboratory effort was initially aimed at the calibration and measurements of the different sensors being used in the experiment. The latter effort was conducted in order to better understand the velocity and mass distributions of the picogram sized ejecta particles.

  2. Comparative Particle Surface Reactivity and Pulmonary Toxicity of Lunar and Terrestrial Dusts in Exposed Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Wallace, William; Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie; Hunter, Robert; Renne, Roger; McCluskey, Richard; Castranova, Vincent; Barger, Mark; hide

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. Whether or not the surface reactivity (SR) of a dust contributes substantially to oxidative stress (OS) leading to pulmonary toxicity remains unsettled. To investigate the impact of SR on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust, We ground two aliquots of an Apollo-14 lunar soil (aged) by two methods to restore or increase their SR, measured as the ability to generate hydroxyl radicals, and compared their toxicities with those of unground lunar dust, aged quartz and titanium dioxide. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all of these respirable dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and toxicity biomarkers assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Lunar dust (which mineralogically resembles an Arizona volcanic ash) was moderately toxic. These three respirable-size lunar dusts that had identical mineral properties but 14-fold difference in SR were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. Our results, show that the toxicity of mineral dusts is dependent on mineral properties and not on the SR of the particles, and support the contention that OS induced by particle exposure must come predominately from endogenous sources. We postulate that the dust-elicited neutrophils are the persistent source of OS; this assertion is the subject of further investigation and review in our companion paper (Lam et al. 2015).

  3. Dust particle radial confinement in a dc glow discharge.

    PubMed

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V; Antipov, S N; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E

    2013-01-01

    A self-consistent nonlocal model of the positive column of a dc glow discharge with dust particles is presented. Radial distributions of plasma parameters and the dust component in an axially homogeneous glow discharge are considered. The model is based on the solution of a nonlocal Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function, drift-diffusion equations for ions, and the Poisson equation for a self-consistent electric field. The radial distribution of dust particle density in a dust cloud was fixed as a given steplike function or was chosen according to an equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. The balance of electron and ion production in argon ionization by an electron impact and their losses on the dust particle surface and on the discharge tube walls is taken into account. The interrelation of discharge plasma and the dust cloud is studied in a self-consistent way, and the radial distributions of the discharge plasma and dust particle parameters are obtained. It is shown that the influence of the dust cloud on the discharge plasma has a nonlocal behavior, e.g., density and charge distributions in the dust cloud substantially depend on the plasma parameters outside the dust cloud. As a result of a self-consistent evolution of plasma parameters to equilibrium steady-state conditions, ionization and recombination rates become equal to each other, electron and ion radial fluxes become equal to zero, and the radial component of electric field is expelled from the dust cloud.

  4. Violation of cosmic censorship in the gravitational collapse of a dust cloud in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Ryosuke; Ohashi, Seij; Shiromizu, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the null geodesic equations in five-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime with collapsing inhomogeneous dust cloud. By using a new method, we prove the existence and non-existence of solutions to null geodesic equations emanating from the central singularity for smooth initial distribution of dust. Moreover, we also show that the null geodesics can extend to null infinity in a certain case, which implies violation of the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  5. On the observation of mesospheric dust particles by rocket probes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havnes, O.

    Some of the most outstanding questions to be answered when investigating the mesospheric PMSE layers is to find the charges and sizes of the dust particles which control the PMSE From various rocket dust probe observations it appears that the charges can be both positive and negative and that sometimes large amounts of dust particles of opposite charge signs can coexist This represents a serious challenge when attempting to model dust charging and coalescence of dust and it will also probably require that the dust particles contain a considerable amount of material other than water ice We will investigate in detail observations made by the first dust probe DUSTY on two flights We will analyze the observed currents to the probe and its two grids according to two models In the first model the observed currents are taken to be due only to the direct impact of charged dust particles so that positive currents corresponds to impact of positively charged dust In the second model we include the possible contribution of secondary effects to explain the cases when positive currents were observed Our results indicate that secondary effects where dust particles can rub off negative charge from the grids is the most likely candidate for explaining the cases where positive currents to the probe are observed

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  7. Stardust Abundance Variations among Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar grain abundances reflect the degree of processing primitive materials have experienced. This is evidenced by the wide range of silicate stardust abundances among primitive meteorites (10 to 300 ppm) [1], attributable to parent body hydrothermal processing. Stardust abundance variations are also pronounced in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs), that have not experienced parent body processing (300 to > 10,000 ppm) [2-4]. The large range in stardust abundances among CP IDPs thus reflect nebular processing. Here we present results of a systematic search for stardust among cluster CP IDPs. Our goals are to establish mineralogical trends among IDPs with different stardust abundances. This may shed light into the nature of isotopically normal presolar grains (GEMS grains?; 5) if their abundances vary similarly to that of isotopically exotic stardust grains.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  9. Dust Particle Growth in a Sputtering Discharge with Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Tawidian, H.; Mikikian, M.; Lecas, T.; Boufendi, L.

    2011-11-29

    Dust particles are grown in the PKE chamber by sputtering materials. The sputtering efficiency and the gas phase reactions can be affected by the gas type and particularly by the ion mass. Due to the presence of growing dust particles, the huge loss of electrons can trigger many instabilities in the plasma. These instabilities, the growth kinetics and the structure of the dust cloud, are compared by using two different gases: argon and krypton.

  10. The Cosmic Ray All-Particle Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongin

    1998-07-01

    The cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum in the energy range from 10 GeV to ~100 TeV is presented here. Data were obtained from the Thin Ionisation Calorimeter (TIC) experiment flown on balloon for 76 hours in August 1994 over northern Canada. TIC was calibrated with a 2.3 TeV gold beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1994 and with a 800 GeV proton beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 1997. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using GEANT/FLUKA to (1) evaluate the instrument performance including energy calibration and energy resolution, (2) calculate the energy deposited by interacting particles, and (3) reconstruct the cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum. The derived integral spectral index of the cosmic ray spectrum is γCR=1.68± 0.01 from the measured deposited energy spectrum.

  11. Atmospheric cosmic rays and solar energetic particles at aircraft altitudes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Friedberg, W; Sauer, H H; Smart, D F

    1996-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays, which are thought to be produced and accelerated by a variety of mechanisms in the Milky Way galaxy, interact with the solar wind, the earth's magnetic field, and its atmosphere to produce hadron, lepton, and photon fields at aircraft altitudes that are quite unlike anything produced in the laboratory. The energy spectra of these secondary particles extend from the lowest possible energy to energies over an EeV. In addition to cosmic rays, energetic particles, generated on the sun by solar flares or coronal mass ejections, bombard the earth from time to time. These particles, while less energetic than cosmic rays, also produce radiation fields at aircraft altitudes which have qualitatively the same properties as cosmic rays. The authors have calculated atmospheric cosmic-ray angular fluxes, spectra, scalar fluxes, and ionization, and compared them with experimental data. Agreement with these data is seen to be good. These data have been used to calculate equivalent doses in a simplified human phantom at aircraft altitudes and the estimated health risks to aircraft crews. The authors have also calculated the radiation doses from several large solar energetic particle events (known as GLEs, or Ground Level Events), which took place in 1989, including the very large event known as GLE 42, which took place on September 29th and 30th of that year. The spectra incident on the atmosphere were determined assuming diffusive shock theory. Unfortunately, there are essentially no experimental data with which to compare these calculations.

  12. Metamorphism of Cosmic Dust: Processing from Circumstellar Outflows to the Cometary Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    Nucleation is a non-equilibrium process: the products of this process are seldom the most thermodynamically stable condensates but are instead those which form fastest. It should therefore not be surprising that grains formed in a circumstellar outflow will undergo some degree of metamorphism if they are annealed or are exposed to a chemically active reagent. Metamorphism of refractory particles continues in the interstellar medium (ISM) where the driving forces are sputtering by cosmic ray particles, annealing by high energy photons and grain destruction in supernova generated shocks. Studies of the depletion of the elements from the gas phase of the interstellar medium tell us that if grain destruction occurs with high efficiency in the ISM, then there must be some mechanism by which grains can be formed in the ISM. Various workers have shown that refractory mantles could form on refractory cores by radiation processing of organic ices. A similar process may operate to produce refractory inorganic mantles on grain cores which survived the supernova shocks. Most grains in a cloud which collapses to form a star will be destroyed; many of the surviving grains will be severely processed. Grains in the outermost regions of the nebula may survive relatively unchanged by thermal processing or hydration. It is these grains which we hope to find in comets. However, only those grains encased in ice at low temperature can be considered pristine since a considerable degree of hydrous alteration might occur in a cometary regolith if the comet enters the inner solar system. Some discussion of the physical, chemical and isotopic properties of a refractory grain at each stage of its life cycle will be attempted based on the limited laboratory data available to date. Suggestions will be made concerning the types of experimental data which are needed in order to better understand the processing history of cosmic dust.

  13. Effects of dust enrichment on oxygen fugacity of cosmic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, Alexei V.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    The degree to which dust enrichment enhances the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a system otherwise solar in composition depends on the dust composition. Equilibrium calculations were performed at 10-3 bar in systems enriched by a factor of 104 in two fundamentally different types of dust to investigate the iron oxidation state in both cases. One type of dust, called SC for solar condensate, stopped equilibrating with solar gas at too high a temperature for FeO or condensed water to be stabilized in any form, and thus has the composition expected of a nebular condensate. The other has CI chondrite composition, appropriate for a parent body that accreted from SC dust and low-temperature ice. Upon total vaporization at 2300 K, both systems have high fO2, >IW. In the SC dust-enriched system, FeO of the bulk silicate reaches ~10 wt% at 1970 K but decreases to <1 wt% below 1500 K. The FeO undergoes reduction because consumption of gaseous oxygen by silicate recondensation causes a precipitous drop in fO2. Thus, enrichment in dust having the composition of likely nebular condensates cannot yield a sufficiently oxidizing environment to account for the FeO contents of chondrules. The fO2 of the system enriched in water-rich, CI dust, however, remains high throughout condensation, as gaseous water remains uncondensed until very low temperatures. This allows silicate condensates to achieve and maintain FeO contents of 27-35 wt%. Water-rich parent bodies are thus excellent candidate sources of chondrule precursors. Impacts on such bodies may have created the combination of high dust enrichment, total pressure, and fO2 necessary for chondrule formation.

  14. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  15. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  16. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  17. Skobeltsyn and the early years of cosmic particle physics in the Soviet Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevskaya, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    D.V. Skobeltsyn was the first physicist to put a Wilson cloud chamber in a magnetic field and to show that cosmic rays are high energy particles. Also he observed the multiple particle generation by a cosmic particle for the first time. He initiated the cosmic ray research in Leningrad and Moscow and he has brought up a pleiad of distinguished cosmic ray physicists. He is the acknowledged founder of the Soviet, and Russian cosmic ray investigations.

  18. Composition of comet Halley dust particles from Giotto observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissel, J.; Buechler, K.; Fechtig, H.; Gruen, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Brownlee, D. E.; Clark, B. C.; Hornung, K.; Igenbergs, E. B.; Sekanina, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Mass spectra of cometary dust particles measured by the PIA dust particle analyzer aboard the Giotto spacecraft show some unexpected and striking features. First, small particles below 10 to the -14th g are much more abundant than anticipated by models. Second, most of the particles are rich in light elements such as H, C, N, and O, suggesting the validity of models that describe the cometary dust as including organic material. Third, the light elements specifically seem to have a low ratio of mass to volume. Three examples of original mass spectra showing typical compositions are given; these have been measured, and are compared with a computer-simulated mass spectrum.

  19. Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Studies: Simulating Cosmic Dust Impacts on the Dustbuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, D. E.; Manning, H. L. K.; Bailey, C. L.; Farnsworth, J. T.; Ahrens, T. J.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Iron and copper microparticles accelerated to 2-20 km/s in a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator were used to test a recently-developed cosmic dust mass spectrometer, known as the Dustbuster. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Transport and Removal experiment of Dust (TReD) for the Dust Particle Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Soon-Gook; Chung, Kyu-Sun; Park, Eun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Joon; Hong, Suk-Ho

    2011-10-01

    The tokamak dust might be hazardous based on the radioactive from tritium or activated metals (e.g. tritium retention), toxic and/or explosive (or chemically reactive) in steam and air conditions. Therefore, controls of dust particle inventory can be treated a critical issue for safe operation of ITER and next step fusion devices. Although the dust removal experiments for fusion reactor had been tried in 1990s, it cannot directly applied to ITER and next step fusion reactors since scale issues does not solved. In this work, one developed the dedicated plasma device for the dust particle transport and removal tests to the level required in ITER or next step fusion reactors (~1 m dust particle transportation), which is called TReD (Transport and Removal experiments of Dust). The TReD also plan to test the dust particle detectors, such as electrostatic dust detector and capacitance diaphragm microbalance (CDM) used (or will be used) in fusion plasmas. The first experimental results of dust particle transport and removal will be explained along with the design concepts, assembly structure, also collaboration plans, etc.

  1. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  2. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  3. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  4. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  5. Experimental Phase Functions of Millimeter-sized Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Vargas-Martín, F.; Guirado, D.; Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Min, M.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2017-09-01

    We present the experimental phase functions of three types of millimeter-sized dust grains consisting of enstatite, quartz, and volcanic material from Mount Etna, respectively. The three grains present similar sizes but different absorbing properties. The measurements are performed at 527 nm covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 170°. The measured phase functions show two well-defined regions: (i) soft forward peaks and (ii) a continuous increase with the scattering angle at side- and back-scattering regions. This behavior at side- and back-scattering regions is in agreement with the observed phase functions of the Fomalhaut and HR 4796A dust rings. Further computations and measurements (including polarization) for millimeter-sized grains are needed to draw some conclusions about the fluffy or compact structure of the dust grains.

  6. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  7. Formation and alteration of complex amino acid precursors in cosmic dusts and their relevance to origins of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Takayama, Ken; Shibata, Hiromi

    A wide variety of organic compounds including many kinds of amino acids have been detected in carbonaceous chondrites. It has been known that comets also bring complex organic compounds. The relevance of extraterrestrial organics to the origin of life is extensively discussed. There have been many scenarios of the origin of amino acids found in meteorites or comets, including the Strecker synthesis in the parent bodies of meteorites, the Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the solar nebula and reactions in cosmic dusts. We examined possible formation of amino acids or their precursors in interstellar dust environments. When possible interstellar media (a mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water) was irradiated with high energy protons, complex organic compounds whose molecular weights are thousands were formed [1], which gave amino acids after acid hydrolysis: Hereafter we will refer them simulated interstellar organics. It was suggested that complex amino acid precursors could be formed in ice mantles of interstellar dust particles in prior to the formation of the solar system. We are planning to irradiate simulated interstellar ices with high-energy heavy ions from the Digital Accelerator (KEK) to confirm the scenario. The simulated interstellar oraganics were so hydrophilic that they were easy to dissolve in water. Complex organics found in meteorites are generally so hydrophobic and are insoluble to water. Organics found in cometary dusts sampled by the Stardust Mission contains organics with various hydrophobicity. We irradiated the simulated interstellar organics with UV and/or soft X-rays. Soft X-rays irradiation of the simulated interstellar organics resulted in the formation of more hydrophobic compounds as seen in some of cometary dusts. It was suggested that organics of interstellar origin on dusts were altered when the solar system was being formed with soft X-rays from the young Sun in prior to the incorporation to planetesimals or comets. Dusts have

  8. The elemental abundances in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Peter; Bohsung, Jörg; Maetz, Mischa; Jessberger, Elmar K.

    1996-11-01

    We compiled a table of all major, minor, and trace-element abundances in 89 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) that includes data obtained with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), synchroton x-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). For the first time, the reliability of the trace-element abundances in IDPs is tested by various crosschecks. We also report on the results of cluster analyses that we performed on IDP compositions. Because of the incompleteness of the data set, we included only the elements Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, normalized to Fe and CI chondrite abundances, that are determined in 73 IDPs. The data arrange themselves in four rather poorly defined groups that we discuss in relation to CI chondrites following the assumption that on the average CI abundances are most probable. The largest group (chondritic), with 44 members, has close to CI abundances for many refractory and moderately refractory elements (Na, Al, Si, P, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ge, Sr). It is slightly depleted in Fe and more in Ca and S, while the volatile elements (Cl, Cu, Zn, Ga, Se, Rb) are enriched by =1.7 × CI and Br by 21 × CI. The low-Zn group, with 12 members, is very similar to the chondritic group except for its Zn-depletion, stronger Ca-depletion and Fe-enrichment. The low-Ni group, with 11 members, has Ni/Fe = 0.03 × CI and almost CI-like Ca, but its extraterrestrial origin is not established. The last group (6 members) contains non-systematic particles of unknown origin. We found that Fe is inhomogeneously distributed on a micron scale. Furthermore, the abundances of elements that are measured near their limits of detection are easily overestimated. These biases involved, the incomplete data set and possible contaminating processes prevent us from obtaining information on the specific origin(s) of IDPs from elemental abundances.

  9. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at 90 km altitude and settle to the Earths surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earths surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend 104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.

  10. Raman observations on individual interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wopenka, B.

    1988-05-01

    A Raman study of 20 representative interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) belonging to different infrared spectral classes is discussed. Six different groups of Raman spectra were discerned among the IDPs studied. Groups 1-5 exhibit the Raman signature of poorly crystallized carbonaceous material, with the degree of disorder of this material increasing from group 1 (most ordered) to group 5 (least ordered). Group 1 contains IDPs that have infrared spectra characteristic of olivines, and are deuterium depleted, while those in groups 2, 3, and 4 contain less ordered carbonaceous material and are deuterium enriched, suggesting different carbonaceous carrier phases for deuterium depletions and enrichments. Groups 5 and 6 contain little or no carbonaceous material, with an abundance of deuterium. No obvious relationship was found between Raman groups and infrared classes based on the 10 micron absorption band due to silicates. Because silicates are known to be present, but are not seen, it is presumed that silicate grains are coated with and/or imbedded in carbonaceous material. Several IDPs show broad visible laser-induced photoluminescence, probably produced by a carbonaceous component.

  11. Cosmic reionization on computers. Ultraviolet continuum slopes and dust opacities in high redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaleva-Li, Zimu; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-03-30

    In this study, we compare the properties of stellar populations of model galaxies from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project with the exiting UV and IR data. Since CROC simulations do not follow cosmic dust directly, we adopt two variants of the dust-follows-metals ansatz to populate model galaxies with dust. Using the dust radiative transfer code Hyperion, we compute synthetic stellar spectra, UV continuum slopes, and IR fluxes for simulated galaxies. We find that the simulation results generally match observational measurements, but, perhaps, not in full detail. The differences seem to indicate that our adopted dust-follows-metals ansatzes are not fully sufficient. While the discrepancies with the exiting data are marginal, the future JWST data will be of much higher precision, rendering highly significant any tentative difference between theory and observations. It is, therefore, likely, that in order to fully utilize the precision of JWST observations, fully dynamical modeling of dust formation, evolution, and destruction may be required.

  12. Cosmic reionization on computers. Ultraviolet continuum slopes and dust opacities in high redshift galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Khakhaleva-Li, Zimu; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-03-30

    In this study, we compare the properties of stellar populations of model galaxies from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project with the exiting UV and IR data. Since CROC simulations do not follow cosmic dust directly, we adopt two variants of the dust-follows-metals ansatz to populate model galaxies with dust. Using the dust radiative transfer code Hyperion, we compute synthetic stellar spectra, UV continuum slopes, and IR fluxes for simulated galaxies. We find that the simulation results generally match observational measurements, but, perhaps, not in full detail. The differences seem to indicate that our adopted dust-follows-metals ansatzes are notmore » fully sufficient. While the discrepancies with the exiting data are marginal, the future JWST data will be of much higher precision, rendering highly significant any tentative difference between theory and observations. It is, therefore, likely, that in order to fully utilize the precision of JWST observations, fully dynamical modeling of dust formation, evolution, and destruction may be required.« less

  13. COSMIC REIONIZATION ON COMPUTERS. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM SLOPES AND DUST OPACITIES IN HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaleva-Li, Zimu; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2016-04-01

    We compare the properties of stellar populations of model galaxies from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project with the exiting ultraviolet (UV) and IR data. Since CROC simulations do not follow cosmic dust directly, we adopt two variants of the dust-follows-metals ansatz to populate model galaxies with dust. Using the dust radiative transfer code Hyperion, we compute synthetic stellar spectra, UV continuum slopes, and IR fluxes for simulated galaxies. We find that the simulation results generally match observational measurements, but, perhaps, not in full detail. The differences seem to indicate that our adopted dust-follows-metals ansatzes are not fully sufficient. While the discrepancies with the exiting data are marginal, the future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) data will be of much higher precision, rendering highly significant any tentative difference between theory and observations. It is, therefore, likely, that in order to fully utilize the precision of JWST observations, fully dynamical modeling of dust formation, evolution, and destruction may be required.

  14. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  15. Nanoflow Separation of Amino Acids for the Analysis of Cosmic Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids to the early Earth by interplanetary dust particles, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have been a significant source of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory. Amino acids are central to modern terrestrial biochemistry as major components of proteins and enzymes and were probably vital in the origin of life. A variety of amino acids have been detected in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison, many of which are exceptionally rare in the terrestrial biosphere including a-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline. AIB has also been detected in a small percentage of Antarctic micrometeorite grains believed to be related to the CM meteorites We report on progress in optimizing a nanoflow liquid chromatography separation system with dual detection via laser-induced-fluorescence time of flight mass spectrometry (nLC-LIF/ToF-MS) for the analysis of o-phthaldialdehydelN-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) labeled amino acids in cosmic dust grains. The very low flow rates (<3 micro-L/min) of nLC over analytical LC (>0.1 ml/min) combined with <2 micron column bead sizes has the potential to produce efficient analyte ionizations andchromatograms with very sharp peaks; both increase sensitivity. The combination of the selectivity (only primary amines are derivatized), sensitivity (>4 orders of magnitude lower than traditional GC-MS techniques), and specificity (compounds identities are determined by both retention time and exact mass) makes this a compelling technique. However, the development of an analytical method to achieve separation of compounds as structurally similar as amino acid monomers and produce the sharp peaks required for maximum sensitivity is challenging.

  16. Carbon dust particles in a beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, O. A.; Vizgalov, V.; Shalpegin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on dynamics of micro-sized carbon dust grains in beam-plasma discharge (BPD) plasmas. It was demonstrated that injected dust particles can be captured and transported along the discharge. Longitudinal average velocity of the particles in the central area of the plasma column was 17 m/sec, and 2 m/sec in the periphery. Dust injection caused a decrease of emission intensity of metastable nitrogen molecular ion. This effect is suggested for a spectroscopy method for particles’ potential measurements. Five-micron radius carbon dust grains obtained potential above 500 V in the experiments on PR-2 installation, proving the feasibility of BPDs for the charging of fine dust particles up to high potential values, unattainable in similar plasma conditions.

  17. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  18. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Nabiyev, Sh.

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index-orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  20. Cosmic ray particles behavior during last solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenbach, Marlos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Munakata, Kazuoki; Kato, Chihiro; Kuwabara, Takao; Bieber, John; Schuch, Nelson; Duldig, Marc; Humble, John; Jassar, Hala Al; Sharma, Madan; Sabbah, Ismail

    2013-04-01

    The work presents the Heliosphere characterization during the minimum solar activity. It is possible to identify phenomena caused by the Corrotating Interaction Regions - CIRs, during this solar activity phase. CIRs can be visualized in satellite data for each 27 days, approximately, and it is frequently accompanied by the Earth crossing through the Heliospheric Current Sheath - HCS. These crossing occur in a period of time lower than a day, and it is possible to study the behavior of cosmic rays particles in two different regions with opposite magnetic field polarities. The last solar minimum was special because their long duration and it was the first that the Global Muon Detector Network - GMDN operated in its full capacity. This cosmic ray detectors network is composed by muon scintillators installed in Nagoya - Japan, Hobart - Australia, São Martinho da Serra - Brazil and Kuwait City - Kuwait. Analyzing the GMDN data together with data from SOHO and/or ACE satellites it is possible to study the behavior of the cosmic ray particles and presents a Heliosphere characterization during the minimum solar activity, giving a better understanding of the cosmic ray particles modulation.

  1. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  2. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  3. Magnetic Reconnection: A Powerful Cosmic Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Astrophysical magnetic reconnection sites have long been expected to be sources of high-energy particles. Recent observations of high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula and hard X-ray emission from solar flares have motivated us to better understand magnetic reconnection and its associated particle acceleration in plasma conditions where the magnetic energy is dominant. We will present fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection in the highly magnetized regime (the magnetization parameter sigma >> 1 or plasma beta << 1). The magnetic energy is converted efficiently into kinetic energy of nonthermal relativistic particles in a power-law spectrum. For a sufficiently large system and strong magnetic field, the power-law index approaches ``-1''. The dominant acceleration mechanism is a first-order Fermi process accomplished through the curvature drift motion of particles in magnetic flux tubes along the electric field induced by fast plasma flows. We will show simulations in three dimensions and with open boundary conditions. We will present an analytical model for the formation of power-law distribution and show the nonthermal distribution may be a common feature of magnetically dominated reconnection. Collaborators: Hui Li, William Daughton, Yi-Hsin Liu, Xiaocan Li

  4. Charge distribution of particles in an irradiated dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Sodha, Mahendra; Dixit, Amrit; Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Bhasin, L.

    2010-01-01

    This communication is a discussion on the charge distribution of the dust particles in an illuminated dust cloud in near space when the photoelectric emission is the dominant mechanism for electron generation. An analytical model has been developed on the basis of charge neutrality condition and balance of number density and energy of electrons; the approach of statistical mechanics has been followed. Computations correspond to a metallic dust cloud in near space environment, where Lyman-α spectral line radiation is the dominant one for photoelectric emission. A comparison of results from the present statistical theory of charge distribution with the uniform charge theory has been presented. As an interesting conclusion, the theory predicts negative charging of a few dust particles for a certain range of parameters leading to the formation of bigger particles on account of electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged particles.

  5. Nano-Diamonds in Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Joswiak, D. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Hill, H. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ acid etching of ultramicrotomed thin sections has lead to the identification of nano-diamonds in interplanetary dust particles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Laboratory Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Microdsub-micron size cosmic dust grains play an important role in the physical and dynamical process in the galaxy, the interstellar medium, and the interplanetary and planetary environments. The dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged by a variety of mechanisms that include collisional process with electrons and ions, and photoelectric emissions with UV radiation. The photoelectric emission process is believed to be the dominant process in many astrophysical environments with nearby UV sources, such as the interstellar medium, diffuse clouds, the outer regions of the dense molecular clouds, interplanetary medium, dust in planetary environments and rings, cometary tails, etc. Also, the processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains are of great interest in view of the polarization of observed starlight as a probe for evaluation of the galactic magnetic field.

  7. Laboratory Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Microdsub-micron size cosmic dust grains play an important role in the physical and dynamical process in the galaxy, the interstellar medium, and the interplanetary and planetary environments. The dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged by a variety of mechanisms that include collisional process with electrons and ions, and photoelectric emissions with UV radiation. The photoelectric emission process is believed to be the dominant process in many astrophysical environments with nearby UV sources, such as the interstellar medium, diffuse clouds, the outer regions of the dense molecular clouds, interplanetary medium, dust in planetary environments and rings, cometary tails, etc. Also, the processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains are of great interest in view of the polarization of observed starlight as a probe for evaluation of the galactic magnetic field.

  8. Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular powerspectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above b = ±20°. We find that the dust temperature is T = (19.4 ± 1.3) K and the dust spectral index is β = 1.6 ± 0.1 averaged over the whole sky, while T = (19.4 ± 1.5) K and β = 1.6 ± 0.2 on 21% of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60% of the sky at Galactic latitudes |b| > 20°. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.

  9. Planck intermediate results: XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-12

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular powerspectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above b = ±20°. We find that the dust temperature is T = (19.4 ± 1.3) K and the dust spectral index is β = 1.6 ± 0.1 averaged over the whole sky, while T = (19.4 ± 1.5) K and β = 1.6 ± 0.2 on 21% of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60% of the sky at Galactic latitudes |b| > 20°. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.

  10. Planck intermediate results: XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular powerspectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectralmore » index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above b = ±20°. We find that the dust temperature is T = (19.4 ± 1.3) K and the dust spectral index is β = 1.6 ± 0.1 averaged over the whole sky, while T = (19.4 ± 1.5) K and β = 1.6 ± 0.2 on 21% of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60% of the sky at Galactic latitudes |b| > 20°. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.« less

  11. Cosmic rays, supernova and the origin of ultrahigh energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1985-07-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10(15 to 20) eV, is still an unsolved problem in high-energy astrophysics. The now classical mechanism of stochastic acceleration of cosmic rays in a strong shock in the interstellar or intergalactic medium is limited in time and dimension for all likely acceleration sites, particularly for the highest energies. Acceleration of cosmic rays across a plasma shock of velocity, (BETA)/sub s/ ((BETA)/sub s/ = v/sub shock//c), requires 1/(BETA)/sub s/ number of crossings and therefore (1/(BETA)/sub s/) (2) number of scatterings for doubling the energy of a particle. This requires space of the order of 1/9BETA)/sub s/ x the scattering length, or a multiple of the Larmor radius and hence, the space requirements to cosmic ray acceleration are very many Larmor orbits in dimension, as well as times that are larger by (1/(BETA)/sub s/) (2) x t/sub Larmor/. The acceleration of cosmic rays by the shock in the envelope of a Type 1 supernova is reviewed, and the interaction of the accelerated matter with the nearby ISM is considered.

  12. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, Jochen Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  13. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  14. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  15. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  16. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  17. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Sriama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA's Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, "mud-like" dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars [1-4]. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet's surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (less than 1 micrometer to 50 micrometers) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time [5]. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  18. Polyvinylidene fluoride dust detector response to particle impacts.

    PubMed

    James, D; Hoxie, V; Horanyi, M

    2010-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors have flown on many space missions since their first use on the Vega 1 and 2 spacecraft. The fundamental operating principle of these detectors is the production of a charge upon impact by a hypervelocity dust particle. This measured signal, N, depends on the speed, v, and mass, m, of the particle. The relationship between N, v, and m was first empirically derived by Simpson and Tuzzolino. All of the PVDF dust instruments prior to the Student Dust Counter on the New Horizons mission use their formula for the calibration of the detectors. This paper provides additional dust impact calibration data, proposes a modification in the exponents for m and v, and investigates the relationship between detector temperature and detector signal.

  19. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Srirama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA s Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, mud-like dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet s surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (< 1 m to 50 m) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  20. Volatile Acquisition During Early Terrestrial Accretion — Constraints from Implanted Solar Neon in Cosmic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Gail, H.-P.; Hopp, J.; Ott, U.; Trieloff, M.

    2016-08-01

    Implanted Ne-B in particles with large surface/volume ratio has to be considered as source for terrestrial noble gases. Significant contributions of irradiated dust during Earth's accretion possibly explain the solar Ne signature of Earth's mantle.

  1. Jeans Collapse of a System of Electron Emitting Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Lapenta, G.

    2004-05-01

    The collapse of a molecular cloud to form a planetary system is a classic process in astrophysics. The length scale of the collapsed system and the rate of its formation is described in the simplest model by the Jeans instability. When the model is complicated by additional processes, the rate and scale of the Jeans instability is modified [1]. We focus on the processes involved with the charging of the dust in the initial cloud. The presence of charge of the same sign on the dust particles inhibits the process of collapse. Yet, the process of charging is expected to be operational. We propose a mechanism that can explain this apparent contradiction. In a recent work [2], we have shown that in presence of electron emission from the dust the interaction potential of a dust particle becomes similar to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. The important consequence of this discovery is that emitting dust particles with LJ like potential can actually attract each other even though they all share the same sign of charge. Here, we present a series of simulations conducted with a new code designed to study a large system of weakly coupled dust particles, interacting with a LJ like potential. [1] P. K. Shukla, Dust plasma interaction in space, Nova Science Publ., 2002. [2] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett., to appear.

  2. Temperature Spectra of Interstellar Dust Grains Heated by Cosmic Rays. I. Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-06-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating, f T , s-1, determines how often a certain temperature T CR, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with a comprehensive and updated data set on CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of f T and T CR spectra for bare olivine grains with radius a of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μm and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1a and 0.3a. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with A V = 2 mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the srim program. We report full T CR spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. We also provide frequencies for a range of minimum T CR values. The calculated data set can be simply and flexibly implemented in astrochemical models. The results show that, in the case of translucent clouds, the currently adopted rate for heating of whole grains to temperatures in excess of 70 K is underestimated by approximately two orders of magnitude in astrochemical numerical simulations. Additionally, grains are heated by CRs to modest temperatures (20-30 K) with intervals of a few years, which reduces the possibility of ice chemical explosions.

  3. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than - 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  4. Characterization of heavy metal particles embedded in tire dust.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kouji; Tainosho, Yoshiaki

    2004-10-01

    Tire dust is a significant pollutant, especially as a source of zinc in the urban environment. This study characterizes the morphology and chemical composition of heavy metal particles embedded in tire dust and traffic-related materials (brake dust, yellow paint, and tire tread) as measured by a field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FESEM/EDX). In 60 samples of tire dust, we detected 2288 heavy metal particles, which we classified into four groups using cluster analysis according to the following typical elements: cluster 1: Fe, cluster 2: Cr/Pb, cluster 3: multiple elements (Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Pb), cluster 4: ZnO. According to their morphologies and chemical compositions, the possible sources of each cluster were as follows: (1) brake dust (particles rich in Fe and with trace Cu, Sb, and Ba), (2) yellow paint (CrPbO(4) particles), (3) brake dust (particulate Ti, Fe, Cu, Sb, Zr, and Ba) and heavy minerals (Y, Zr, La, and Ce), (4) tire tread (zinc oxide). When the chemical composition of tire dust was compared to that of tire tread, the tire dust was found to have greater concentrations of heavy metal elements as well as mineral or asphalt pavement material characterized by Al, Si, and Ca. We conclude that tire dust consists not only of the debris from tire wear but also of assimilated heavy metal particles emitted from road traffic materials such as brake lining and road paint.

  5. Does the presence of cosmic dust influence the displacement of the Earth's Magnetopause?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I.; Hamrin, M.

    2012-04-01

    In a recent paper Treumann and Baumjohann propose that dust particles in interplanetary space occasionally cause large compressions of the magnetopause that, in the absence of coronal mass ejections, are difficult to explain by other mechanisms (R.A. Treumann and W. Baumjohann, Ann. Geophys. 30, 119-130, 2012). They suggest that enhanced dust number density raises the contribution of the dust component to the solar wind dynamical pressure and hence to the pressure balance that determines the extension of the magnetopause. They quantify the influence of the dust component in terms of a variation of the magnetopause stagnation point distance. As a possible event to trigger the compressions they propose the encounters with meteoroid dust streams along Earth's orbit. We investigate the conditions under which these compressions may occur. The estimate by Treumann and Baumjohann of the magnetopause variation presupposes that the dust particles have reached solar wind speed. Acceleration by electromagnetic forces is efficient in the solar wind for dust particles that have a sufficiently large ratio of surface charge to mass (Mann et al. Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion, Vol. 52, 124012, 2010). This applies to small dust particles that contribute little to the total dust mass in meteoroid streams. The major fraction of dust particles that reach high speed in the solar wind are nanometer-sized dust particles that form and are accelerated in the inner solar system (Czechowski and Mann, ApJ, Vol. 714, 89, 2010). Observations suggest that the flux of these nanodust particles near 1 AU is highly time-variable (Meyer-Vernet, et al. Solar Physics, Vol. 256, 463, 2009). We estimate a possible variation of the magnetopause stagnation point distance caused by these nanodust fluxes and by the dust associated to meteoroid streams. We conclude that the Earth's encounters with meteoroid dust streams are not likely to strongly influence the magnetopause according to the proposed effect. We

  6. Time-Correlated Particles Produced by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, George F.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Nakae, Les F.; Pawelczak, Iwona; Snyderman, Neal J.; Sheets, Steven A.; Wurtz, Ron E.

    2015-05-06

    This report describes the NA-22 supported cosmic ray experimental and analysis activities carried out at LLNL since the last report, dated October 1, 2013. In particular we report on an analysis of the origin of the plastic scintillator signals resembling the signals produced by minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). Our most notable result is that when measured in coincidence with a liquid scintillator neutron signal the MIP-like signals in the plastic scintillators are mainly due to high energy tertiary neutrons.

  7. Can decaying particle explain cosmic infrared background excess?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2017-09-01

    Recently the CIBER experiment measured the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) flux and claimed an excess compared with integrated emission from galaxies. We show that the CIB spectrum can be fitted by the additional photons produced by the decay of a new particle. However, it also contributes too much to the anisotropy of the CIB, which is in contradiction with the anisotropy measurements by the CIBER and Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  9. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  10. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-10-15

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} or higher, and low temperature {approx}1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  11. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  12. Capture of cosmic dusts and exposure of organics on the International Space Station: Objectives of the Tanpopo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei

    Finding of a wide variety of organic compounds contained in extraterrestrial bodies such as carbonaceous chondrites and comets suggested that they were important materials for the first life on the Earth. Cosmic dusts (interplanetary dust particles; IDPs) were believed to have been important carriers of extraterrestrial organics, since IDPs could deliver organics to the primitive Earth more safely than asteroids and comets. Since most IDPs have been collected in such terrestrial environments as ocean sediments, Antarctic ices, and air in stratosphere, it is difficult to judge whether biooranics found in IDPs were extraterrestrial origins or not. Thus it would be of importance to collect IDPs out of the terrestrial biosphere. We are planning the Tanpopo Mission by utilizing the Exposed Facility of Japan Experimental Module (JEM/EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Two types of experiments will be done in the Tanpopo Mission: Capture experiments and exposure experiments. In order to collect cosmic dusts (including IDPs) on the ISS, we are going to use extra-low density aerogel, since both cosmic dusts and ISS are moving at 8 km s-1 or over. We have developed novel aerogel whose density is 0.01 g cm-3. After the return of the aerogel blocks after 1 to a few years’ stay on JEM/EF, organic compounds in the captured dusts will be characterized by a wide variety of analytical techniques including FT-IR, XANES, and MS. Amino acid enantiomers will be determined after HF digestion and acid hydrolysis. A number of amino acids were detected in water extract of carbonaceous chondrites. It is controversial whether meteorites contain free amino acids or amino acid precursors. When dusts are formed from meteorites or comets in interplanetary space, they are exposed to high-energy particles and photons. In order to evaluate stability and possible alteration of amino acid-related compounds, we chose amino acids (glycine and isovaline) and hydantoins (precursors of amino

  13. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  14. Measuring the Dust Flux and Dust Particle Mass Distribution in the Saturn Rings with HRD Dust Instrument on the Cassini Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    In July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft will go into the Saturn orbit and start a 4 year intensive investigation of the planet itself, its multiple satellites and its rings with a multinational instrument payload. The High Rate Detectors (HRD) instrument provided by the Laboratory of Astrophysics and Space Research of the University of is part of the German Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and its main scientific objective is to provide quantitative measurements and mass distributions of dust particles in the rings of Saturn in the 10-11 to 10-4 grams mass range. The HRD instrument consists of two dust detectors -- a 20 and a 200 cm2 polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors -- and an electronic box that contains all the analog and digital electronics and in addition provides interface between the HRD and CDA instrument. The CDA stores all the HRD data in its memory and transmits the data to Earth. The HRD weighs 1.7 kg and consumes 1.8 W of power [1]. The HRD instrument was fully calibrated through the entire mass range using two dust particle accelerators at Heidelberg and Munich in Germany. The HRD electronics is very fast and it will provide spatial and time distributions of up to 0.1 second. It can handle rates up to 104 counts/sec expected to be encountered during the Saturn ring crossings without any dead time. The HRD instrument operated successfully during all of the time that it was under power and detected many interplanetary dust particles. Almost all of these particles were close to the lowest mass threshold. References 1 A.J. TUZZOLINO, T.E. ECONOMOU, R.B. MCKIBBEN, J.A. SIMPSON, J.A.M. MCDONNELL, M.J. BURCHELL, B.A.M. VAUGHAN, P. TSOU, M.S. HANNER, B.C. CLARK AND D.E. BROWNLEE. THE DUST FLUX MONITOR INSTRUMENT FOR THE STARDUST MISSION TO COMET WILD-2, J. GEOPHYS. RES., 108, DOI:10.1029/2003JE002091, 2003.

  15. Collective behaviour of a System of Emitting Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Luca Delzanno, Gian

    2004-11-01

    The collapse of a molecular cloud to form a planetary system is a classic process in astrophysics. The length scale of the collapsed system and the rate of its formation is described in the simplest model by the Jeans instability. When the model is complicated by additional processes, the rate and scale of the Jeans instability is modified. We focus on the processes involved with the charging of the dust in the initial cloud. The presence of charge of the same sign on the dust particles inhibits the process of collapse. Yet, the process of charging is expected to be operational. We propose a mechanism that can explain this apparent contradiction. In a recent work [1], we have shown that in presence of electron emission from the dust the interaction potential of a dust particle becomes similar to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. The important consequence of this discovery is that emitting dust particles with LJ like potential can actually attract each other even though they all share the same sign of charge. Here, we present a series of simulations conducted with a new code designed to study a large system of weakly coupled dust particles, interacting with a LJ like potential. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 035002 (2004).

  16. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays from decaying relic particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.; Kachelriess, M.; Vilenkin, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report on a recent proposal that particles produced by the decays of ultraheavy and quasistable X-particles constitute the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR). These X-particles are assumed to constitute a tiny fraction ξx of cold dark matter in the Universe, with ξx being the same in the halo of our Galaxy and in the intergalactic space. The UHECR fluxes produced at the decays of X-particles are dominated by photons and nucleons from the halo of our Galaxy. Thus they do not exihibit the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min cutoff and the cascade limit is relaxed. The authors discuss the spectrum of produced extensive air showers and a signal from the Virgo cluster as signatures of this model.

  17. Dust in Cometary Comae: Present Understanding of the Structure and Composition of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Zolensky, M.; Lasue, J.

    2007-01-01

    In situ probing of a very few cometary comae has shown that dust particles present a low albedo and a low density, and that they consist of both rocky material and refractory organics. Remote observations of solar light scattered by cometary dust provide information on the properties of dust particles in the coma of a larger set of comets. The observations of the linear polarization in the coma indicate that the dust particles are irregular, with a size greater (on the average) than about one micron. Besides, they suggest, through numerical and experimental simulations, that both compact grains and fluffy aggregates (with a power law of the size distribution in the -2.6 to -3 range), and both rather transparent silicates and absorbing organics are present in the coma. Recent analysis of the cometary dust samples collected by the Stardust mission provide a unique ground truth and confirm, for comet 81P/Wild 2, the results from remote sensing observations. Future space missions to comets should, in the next decade, lead to a more precise characterization of the structure and composition of cometary dust particles.

  18. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  19. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  20. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  1. Numerical and experimental analysis of particle dispersion in dust explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Mari G.; Berg, Ann Elin; Balakin, Boris V.; Kosinski, Pawel

    2017-07-01

    Dust explosions take place when small particles of flammable material such as grain, wood, plastic, coal and metal are dispersed in air and ignited. An important research tool that is used for describing dust explosion characteristics is the Hartmann apparatus, where dust is dispersed by a pressure wave. This makes it possible to find e.g. the minimum ignition energy. Nevertheless, there is a question whether the formed dust cloud is uniformly dispersed and how the solid particles behave as they flow. In addition to the scientific curiosity there is also a practical application, namely at what point in time the explosive mixture should be ignited in order to obtain the most representative results. The objective of this research was to run computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, using the commercial software Star CCM+, with the purpose to numerically investigate the dispersion of a single particle in a modified Hartmann tube. Numerical models affecting the particle-wall and the particle-gas interactions were analysed, and the motion of the particle resolved numerically was verified with experimental results obtained using the Positron Emmision Particle Tracking (PEPT) technique.

  2. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  3. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  4. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  5. Lifting particles in martian dust devils by pressure excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Marc; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-10-01

    The passage of a dust devil vortex goes along with a pressure reduction above ground. This leads to a sub-soil overpressure. It has been suggested that this enhances the lift on particles and facilitates dust entrainment by dust devils. We quantify the necessary pressure difference to lift fine sand from sand beds with thickness of 50, 150, and 250 mm in laboratory experiments with basalt samples consisting of 63-125 μm grains. The absolute pressure was varied between 1,300 and 3,600 Pa. In general, a pressure differences of about 30 Pa per mm depth is needed to lift sand grains. With slight systematic variations this is in agreement to simply accounting for the weight of a lifted particle layer. On Mars observed absolute pressure difference are several Pa. This limits particle lift to a layer smaller than 100 μm . However, it clearly allows Δp lifting if the top layer has a decreased permeability. This might be the case for dust layers sitting on top of a coarse grained sand bed. These measurements support the idea of enhanced dust entrainment due to the Δp -effect in Martian dust devils under certain conditions.

  6. Detection of cosmic superstrings by geodesic test particle motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Betti; Sirimachan, Parinya; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2011-02-15

    (p,q)-strings are bound states of p F-strings and q D-strings and are predicted to form at the end of brane inflation. As such, these cosmic superstrings should be detectable in the Universe. In this paper we argue that they can be detected by the way that massive and massless test particles move in the space-time of these cosmic superstrings. In particular, we study solutions to the geodesic equation in the space-time of field theoretical (p,q)-strings. The geodesics can be classified according to the test particles' energy, angular momentum and momentum in the direction of the string axis. We discuss how the change of the magnetic fluxes, the ratio between the symmetry-breaking scale and the Planck mass, the Higgs-to-gauge-boson mass ratios and the binding between the F- and D-strings, respectively, influence the motion of the test particles. While massless test particles can move only on escape orbits, a new feature as compared to the infinitely thin string limit is the existence of bound orbits for massive test particles. In particular, we observe that--in contrast to the space-time of a single Abelian-Higgs string--bound orbits for massive test particles in (p,q)-string space-times are possible if the Higgs boson mass is larger than the gauge boson mass. We also compute the effect of the binding between the p- and the q-string on observables such as the light deflection and the perihelion shift. While light deflection can also be caused by other matter distributions, the possibility of a negative perihelion shift seems to be a feature of finite width cosmic strings that could lead to the unmistakable identification of such objects. In Melvin space-times, which are asymptotically nonconical, massive test particles have to move on bound orbits, while massless test particles can escape to infinity only if their angular momentum vanishes.

  7. Fluctuation of charge on dust particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Srivastava, Sweta

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the evaluation of the fluctuation of the charge on the dust particles in a complex plasma. In contrast to earlier analyses, which ignored the effect of dust particles on density and temperature of electrons and ions, the present model takes into account the number and energy balance of electrons and ions. Three cases, viz., (i) no emission, (ii) thermionic emission, and (iii) photoelectric emission of electrons from the dust particles, have been considered. The results have been graphically illustrated for typical parameters. It is seen that the plasma parameters, and hence the fluctuations, are considerably affected by the consideration of number and energy balance of electrons and ions. A comparison of the results of the present analysis with those of earlier works has also been made.

  8. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  9. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Norman, G E; Timofeev, A V

    2011-11-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dust particles system is performed. A mechanism of dust particle average kinetic energy increase is suggested on the basis of theoretical analysis of the simulation results. It is shown that heating of dust particles' vertical motion is initiated by forced oscillations caused by the dust particles' charge fluctuations. The process of energy transfer from vertical to horizontal motion is based on the phenomenon of the parametric resonance. The combination of parametric and forced resonances explains the abnormally high values of the dust particles' kinetic energy. Estimates of frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the experimental values.

  10. Distribution of pesticides in dust particles in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jaben; Reif, Ruben; Luo, Yuzhuo; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    In regions with a mild climate, pesticides are often used around homes for pest control. Recent monitoring studies have linked pesticide use in residential areas to aquatic toxicity in urban surface water ecosystems, and suggested dust particles on paved surfaces as an important source of pesticides. To test the hypothesis that dust on hard surfaces is a significant source of pesticides, we evaluated spatial and temporal patterns of current-use insecticides in Southern California, and further explored their distribution as a function of particle sizes. Pyrethroid insecticides were detected in dust from the driveway, curb gutter and street at 53.5-94.8%, with median concentrations of 1-46 ng g(-1). Pyrethroid residues were uniformly distributed in areas adjacent to a house, suggesting significant redistribution. The total levels of pyrethroids in dust significantly (p < 0.01) decreased from October to February, suggesting rainfalls as a major mechanism to move pesticide residues offsite. Fipronil as well as its degradation products, were detected at 50.6-75.5%, and spatial and temporal patterns of fipronil residues suggested rapid transformations of fipronil to its biologically active intermediates. Moreover, pyrethroids were found to be enriched in fine particles that have a higher mobility in runoff than coarse particles. Results from this study highlight the widespread occurrence of pesticides in outdoor dust around homes and the potential contribution to downstream surface water contamination via rain-induced runoff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the zodiacal cloud is used to evaluate the effects of rotational bursting on interplanetary dust particles caused by the interaction of solar radiation pressure with the irregular surface geometry of the particles. The effectiveness of this mechanism is evaluated using several values for the effective moment arm and tensile strength of the particles. Due to repeated bursting, it is shown that particles spiraling in from the asteroid belt by the Poynting-Robertson effect do not penetrate inside 1.2 AU. Spin rate stabilization under the effect of magnetic damping is found to depend critically on the initial heliocentric distance of the particle and on its radius.

  12. Dust particles investigation for future Russian lunar missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnikov, Gennady; Horanyi, Mihaly; Esposito, Francesca; Zakharov, Alexander; Popel, Sergey; Afonin, Valeri; Borisov, Nikolay; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Vorobyova, Elena; Petrov, Oleg; Lisin, Evgeny

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On light side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution dust particle by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind, solar

  13. The Dust Particle Facility, a Facility for the ISS: Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burfeindt, J.; Castegini, R.; Seurig, R.; Stuffler, T.; Blum, J.

    Since early July 2001, an ESA-funded accommodation study on the Dust Particle Facility is conducted by Kayser-Threde, Munich. With the Dust Particle Facility, simulation experiments on the formation and evolution of pre-planetesimal bodies will be conducted. Specifically, runaway-growth processes, collisional interactions, and aerodynamic influences on the evolution of macroscopic preplanetary dust aggregates will be investigated. The tasks of the accomodation study are: (1) Identification of scientific requirements out of the ICAPS community (Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems), (2) transferring these requirements into technical requirements for a research facility to be accommodated on the International Space Station, (3) harmonization of these requirements, development of first technical concepts, (4) optimizing technical concepts, designing technical details, (5) analyzing commonality with IMPF (International Microgravity Plasma Facility) design, (6) recommending further developments, and (7) planning and cost estimates for the next development phases. The study is carried out in close cooperation with the ICAPS scientific community, especially with the coordinating board of ICAPS. The fist period of this study will be focussed on the collection and discussion of scientific requirements including inspection of already available hardware. The study is intended to last 6 + 1 months (the seventh month is reserved for final study documentation upgrade). This paper will give a status about the actual study work and an outlook about intended activities.

  14. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Somik; Le Bihan, Olivier; Fischer, Marc; Morgeneyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  15. Dynamics of Cometary Dust Particles in Electromagnetic Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranen, Joonas; Markkanen, Johannes; Penttilä, Antti; Muinonen, Karri

    2016-10-01

    The formation of cometary dust tails and comae is based on solar radiation pressure. The pressure effects of electromagnetic radiation were originally conceptualized in Kepler's observations of the tails of comets and formulated mathematically by Maxwell in 1873. Today, the dynamics of cometary dust are known to be governed by gravity, electromagnetic forces, drag, solar wind, and solar radiation pressure.Solar radiation pressure has its roots in absorption, emission, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation. Due to modern advances in so-called integral equation methods in electromagnetics, a new approach of studying the effect of radiation pressure on cometary dust dynamics can be constructed. We solve the forces and torques due to radiation pressure for an arbitrarily shaped dust particle using volume integral equation methods.We then present a framework for solving the equations of motion of cometary dust particles due to radiative interactions. The solution is studied in a simplified cometary environment, where the radiative effects are studied at different orbits. The rotational and translational equations of motion are solved directly using a quaternion-based integrator. The rotational and translational equations of motion affect dust particle alignment and concentration. This is seen in the polarization of the coma. Thus, our direct dynamical approach can be used in modelling the observed imaging photo-polarimetry of the coma.In future studies, the integrator can be further extended to an exemplary comet environment, taking into account the drag, and the electric and magnetic fields. This enables us to study the dynamics of a single cometary dust particle based on fundamental physics.Acknowledgments. Research supported, in part, bythe European Research Council (ERC, grant Nr. 320773).

  16. AN APPARENT REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM: IMPLICATION FOR COSMIC DUST EXTINCTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., α{sub ν12} (1000 ∼ 2000 Å) and α{sub ν24} (2000 ∼ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher α{sub ν}) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both α{sub ν12} and α{sub ν24} show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed α{sub ν} − z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσ{sub v} ∼ 10{sup −5}h Mpc{sup −1} at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  17. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansyngel, F.; Boulanger, F.; Ghosh, T.; Wandelt, B.; Aumont, J.; Bracco, A.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a necessary step toward the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere that is similar to the approach used for CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a Gaussian random (turbulent) component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent αM. The integration along the line of sight carried out to compute Stokes maps is approximated by a sum over a small number of emitting layers with different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB, and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for αM = -2.5, an exponent close to that measured for total dust intensity but larger than the Kolmogorov exponent - 11/3. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multifrequency simulations, including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize

  18. Heavy particles at the LHC and in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukhin, A. A.; Bogdanov, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    Direct production of heavy particles and their indirect signatures, detected at the LHC as anomalous events, are considered. Analogous anomalous events at comparable c.m.s. energies were detected in cosmic-ray experiments several decades ago. All these exotic phenomena and processes can be interpreted from a common viewpoint by assuming the production of quark-gluon blobs with large orbital momenta which hinder the emission of light rather than heavy quarks including the top quarks. The prospects for testing this model in the LHC experiments are discussed.

  19. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Shao, L. Y.

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite). CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3). Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  20. A reconsideration of nucleation phenomena in light of recent findings concerning the properties of small clusters, and a brief review of some other particle growth processes. [for cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines mechanisms of nucleation and growth by condensation and coagulation in the light of recent research on properties of small clusters. Homogeneous, hetero-molecular, and heterogeneous nucleation is analyzed, and expressions for the rate of formation of a stable condensed phase and evaluation of the free energy of formation of charged droplets are given. Application of high-pressure mass spectrometry which makes possible a direct determination of intensity spectra for cluster distributions, measurement of the thermodynamic properties of individual ion clusters and determination of cluster entropy and bond energy is discussed. Finally, coagulation of the condensed phase is considered, noting that concentration and mean particle size vary during coagulation, but the shape distribution is time independent, leading to the concept of a self-preserving aerosol size distribution.

  1. Probing the interstellar dust in galaxies over >10 Gyr of cosmic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Aller, Monique C.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2016-11-01

    Dust has a profound effect on the physics and chemistry of the interstellar gas in galaxies and on the appearance of galaxies. Understanding the cosmic evolution of dust with time is therefore crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. Despite the importance of interstellar dust, very little is known about its nature and composition in distant galaxies. We summarize the results of our ongoing programs using observations of distant quasars to obtain better constraints on dust grains in foreground galaxies that happen to lie along the quasar sightlines. These observations consist of a combination of mid-infrared data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope and optical/UV data obtained with ground-based telescopes and/or the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid-IR data target the 10 μm and 18 μm silicate absorption features, while the optical/UV data allow determinations of element depletions, extinction curves, 2175 Å bumps, etc. Measurements of such properties in absorption-selected galaxies with redshifts ranging from z 0 to z > 2 provide constraints on the evolution of interstellar dust over the past > 10 Gyr . The optical depth of the 10 μm silicate absorption feature (τ10) in these galaxies is correlated with the amount of reddening along the sightline. But there are indications (e.g., based on the τ10 / E(B - V) ratio and possible grain crystallinity) that the dust in these distant galaxies differs in structure and composition from the dust in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of galaxies and their star formation history.

  2. Cosmic ray particle dosimetry and trajectory tracing. [cosmic ray track analysis for Apollo 17 BIOCORE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruty, M. R.; Benton, E. V.; Turnbill, C. E.; Philpott, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Five pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were flown on Apollo XVII, each with a solid-state (plastic) nuclear track detector implanted beneath its scalp. The subscalp detectors were sensitive to HZE cosmic ray particles with a LET greater than or approximately equal to 0.15 million electron volts per micrometer (MeV/micron). A critical aspect of the dosimetry of the experiment involved tracing individual particle trajectories through each mouse head from particle tracks registered in the individual subscalp detectors, thereby establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a trajectory location in the tissue and the presence or absence of a lesion. The other major aspect was the identification of each registered particle. An average of 16 particles with Z greater than or equal to 6 and 2.2 particles with Z greater than or equal to 20 were found per detector. The track density, 29 tracks/sq cm, when adjusted for detection volume, was in agreement with the photographic emulsion data from an area dosimeter located next to the flight package.

  3. Dust Particle Dynamics in The Presence of Highly Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Brian; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    Complex plasmas are four component plasmas that contain, in addition to the usual electrons, ions, and neutral atoms, macroscopic electrically charged (nanometer to micrometer) sized ``dust'' particles. These macroscopic particles typically obtain a net negative charge due to the higher mobility of electrons compared to that of ions. Because the electrons, ions, and dust particles are charged, their dynamics may be significantly modified by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Possible consequences of this modification may be the charging rate and the equilibrium charge. For example, in the presence of a strong horizontal magnetic field (B >1 Tesla), it may be possible to observe dust particle gx B deflection and, from that deflection, determine the dust grain charge. In this poster, we present recent data from performing multiple particle dropping experiments to characterize the g x B deflection in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX). This work is supported by funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Grant Number DE - SC0010485 and the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, JPL-1543114.

  4. Martian Dust Devils: Laboratory Simulations of Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Balme, Matthew R.; Iverson, James D.; Metzger, Stephen; Mickelson, Robert; Phoreman, Jim; White, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus has been fabricated to simulate terrestrial and Martian dust devils. Comparisons of surface pressure profiles through the vortex core generated in the apparatus with both those in natural dust devils on Earth and those inferred for Mars are similar and are consistent with theoretical Rankine vortex models. Experiments to determine particle threshold under Earth ambient atmospheric pressures show that sand (particles > 60 micron in diameter) threshold is analogous to normal boundary-layer shear, in which the rotating winds of the vortex generate surface shear and hence lift. Lower-pressure experiments down to approx. 65 mbar follow this trend for sand-sized particles. However, smaller particles (i.e., dust) and all particles at very low pressures (w 10-60 mbar) appear to be subjected to an additional lift function interpreted to result from the strong decrease in atmospheric pressure centered beneath the vortex core. Initial results suggest that the wind speeds required for the entrainment of grains approx. 2 microns in diameter (i.e., Martian dust sizes) are about half those required for entrainment by boundary layer winds on both Earth and Mars.

  5. Martian dust devils: Laboratory simulations of particle threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Balme, Matthew R.; Iversen, James D.; Metzger, Stephen; Mickelson, Robert; Phoreman, Jim; White, Bruce

    2003-05-01

    An apparatus has been fabricated to simulate terrestrial and Martian dust devils. Comparisons of surface pressure profiles through the vortex core generated in the apparatus with both those in natural dust devils on Earth and those inferred for Mars are similar and are consistent with theoretical Rankine vortex models. Experiments to determine particle threshold under Earth ambient atmospheric pressures show that sand (particles > 60 μm in diameter) threshold is analogous to normal boundary-layer shear, in which the rotating winds of the vortex generate surface shear and hence lift. Lower-pressure experiments down to ~65 mbar follow this trend for sand-sized particles. However, smaller particles (i.e., dust) and all particles at very low pressures (~10-60 mbar) appear to be subjected to an additional lift function interpreted to result from the strong decrease in atmospheric pressure centered beneath the vortex core. Initial results suggest that the wind speeds required for the entrainment of grains ~2 μm in diameter (i.e., Martian dust sizes) are about half those required for entrainment by boundary layer winds on both Earth and Mars.

  6. Primary cosmic ray particles with z 35 (VVH particles). [very heavy particle detection by high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E., Jr.; Friedlander, M. W.; Hoppe, M.; Klarmann, J.; Walker, R. M.; Wefel, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Large areas of nuclear emulsions and plastic detectors were exposed to the primary cosmic radiation during high altitude balloon flights. From the analysis of 141 particle tracks recorded during a total exposure of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th power sq m ster.sec., a charge spectrum of the VVH particles has been derived.

  7. Large dust particles around main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, R.; Kruegel, E.; Kreysa, E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on observations of spectra of five nearby main-sequence stars (Vega, Tau-1 Eri, Epsilon Eri, Alpha PsA, and Sirius), carried out from summer 1987 to spring 1989 on the IRAM 30-m telescope on Pico Veleta. It was found that all of these stars, with the possible exception of Sirius, possess an excess at 100 microns, which is interpreted as emission from dust grains, confirming the suggestion of Aumann et al. (1984) that Vega is enshrouded by a shell of large grains. The observations were used to derive precise values for the grain sizes, their temperatures, total mass, and density distribution.

  8. Dust particles in high-speed flows: calculations of small-particle re-entry hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, M.T. II

    1984-02-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic calculations are used to model the dispersion of dust injected into a supersonic flow by the explosive disruption of a re-entry vehicle. The particles constitute an initial dustball that expands into the existing velocity field after the detonation. Dust grains subsequently form a plume along the vehicle path. The importance of aerodynamic and radiative heating of the dust is considered but not included in the calculations. Particles in the bow shock heat to the vaporization temperature because of drag and radiative heating, but particles in the dustball are shielded and consequently suffer only a small amount of vaporization. About 20% of the initial dust mass will be vaporized. Application of the results to dust grains entrained in the air blast of a near-surface nuclear explosion is briefly considered. 4 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  9. Carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kathie L.; Blanford, George E.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Kloeck, Wolfgang; Mckay, David S.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied nineteen anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) using analytical electron microscopy. We have determined a method for quantitative light element EDX analysis of small particles and have applied these techniques to a group of IDPs. Our results show that some IDPs have significantly higher bulk carbon abundances than do carbonaceous chondrites. We have also identified a relationship between carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy in our set of anhydrous IDPs. In general, these particles are dominated by pyroxene, olivine, or a subequal mixture of olivine and pyroxene. The pyroxene-dominated IDPs have a higher carbon abundance than those dominated by olivines. Members of the mixed mineralogy IDPs can be grouped with either the pyroxene- or olivine-dominated particles based on their carbon abundance. The high carbon, pyroxene-dominated particles have primitive mineralogies and bulk compositions which show strong similarities to cometary dust particles. We believe that the lower carbon, olivine-dominated IDPs are probably derived from asteroids. Based on carbon abundances, the mixed-mineralogy group represents particles derived from either comets or asteroids. We believe that the high carbon, pyroxene-rich anhydrous IDPs are the best candidates for cometary dust.

  10. Anomalies in cosmic rays: New particles versus charm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balayan, G. L.; Khodjamirian, A. Y.; Oganessian, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    For a long time two anomalies are observed in cosmic rays at energies E approx. = 100 TeV: (1) the generation of long-flying cascades in the hadron calorimeter (the so-called Tien-Shan effect) and; (2) the enhancement of direct muon yield as compared with the accelerator energy region. The aim is to discuss the possibility that both anomalies have common origins arising from production and decays of the same particles. the main conclusions are the following: (1) direct muons cannot be generated by any new particles with mass exceeding 10+20 GeV; and (2) if both effects are originated from the charmed hadrons, then the needed charm hadroproduction cross section is unexpectedly large as compared with the quark-gluon model predictions.

  11. Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation and solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2007-01-01

    Several investigations of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes have been undertaken during solar cycle 23 which occurred in the period 1993-2003. The radiation field is produced by the passage of galactic cosmic rays and their nuclear reaction products as well as solar energetic particles through the Earth's atmosphere. Galactic cosmic rays reach a maximum intensity when the sun is least active and are at minimum intensity during solar maximum period. During solar maximum an increased number of coronal mass ejections and solar flares produce high energy solar particles which can also penetrate down to aircraft altitudes. It is found that the very complicated field resulting from these processes varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. By employing several active and passive detectors, the whole range of radiation types and energies were encompassed. In-flight data was obtained with the co-operation of many airlines and NASA. The EURADOS Aircraft Crew in-flight data base was used for comparison with the predictions of various computer codes. A brief outline of some recent studies of exposure to radiation in Earth orbit will conclude this contribution.

  12. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C.K. Iowa Univ., Iowa City )

    1990-09-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns. 9 refs.

  13. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  14. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  15. Transmission electron microscope study of carbon soot grains to infer on cosmic dust condensation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F.; Heymann, D.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.

    The laboratory analyses of cosmic dust analogues have a critical role in the understanding of cosmic dust condensation processes. The morphological, structural and chemical characterisation of these analogues are critical for comparisons with astronomical observations data and models. Carbon-rich dust samples are prepared by arc discharge in Ar and H2 atmosphere at pre-selected proportions. To identify their internal textures we used High Resolution Electron Microscopy and chemical analyses was done by HPLC and mass spectrometer. Carbon soot grains, crystallographically amorphous, consist of individual Single-Wall Spheres (SWS - diameters: 0.7 nm to 10nm) forming close-packed arrangements. These spheres are also observed in short and straight, or long and curved, liner arrangement called proto-fringes with a thickness corresponding to the diameters of the SWS. SWS resemble structures in synthetic C60 crystals, including C50, possibly C32, and larger elongated fullerenes. The fringe spacing is consistent with increasing diameters of nested fullerenes. HPLC and mass spectroscopy confirmed that the SWS, 0.7nm diameter, are C60 fullerene. The HRTEM data of SWS with a diameter >0.7nm define a linear correlation that could correspond to an increasing number of carbon atoms in larger SWS. When C60 is a metastable carbon, its fusion into larger SWS might be spontaneous growth process that lead to giant fullerenes. C60 once 'isolated' inside agglomerated soot grains it might survive in condensed circumstellar carbon dust that did not suffer post-condensation thermal annealing.

  16. Iron Solubility Depending on the Mineralogical Composition of Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Chevaillier, S.; Caquineau, S.

    2008-12-01

    Dust deposition in open ocean is recognised as an important supply of iron for phytoplankton community. Various previous studies have shown an extremely variable solubility (0,01-80%) and numerous factors influencing this solubility, as suspended particules concentration, chemical and photochemical atmospheric process, aerosol sources (Maholwald et al., 2005). Despite these numerous studies, any factor of influence seems to be dominant enough to enable a comprehensive parameterization of iron solubility. Recently, dissolution experiment have been conducted on pure mineral that composed dust, like illite, feldpars, smectite and iron (hydr-)oxide. This study has shown that iron solubility is extremely dependent on the mineral that is considered. Iron coming from aluminosilicates is much more soluble that iron derived from iron (hyd-)oxides (Journet et al., 2008). According to these results, dissolution experiments have been led on dust particles collected in different source areas, in West Africa, and after transport, in tropical Atlantic Ocean. These experiments show that iron solubility is very low, always under 0,6%, in agreement with others observations in these regions (e.g. Baker et al., 2006). Furthermore, from bulk mineralogical analysis of the dust samples, iron solubility in source areas seems exclusively dependent on the mineralogical composition of dust particle. The greater iron solubilities (0,3%) corresponds to dust originated from central Sahara (Algeria, Lybia, Tunisia) where smectite are abundant in comparison to the others studied area (Sahel and Western Sahara) where iron mainly comes from iron (hydr-)oxide and illite. In this case, iron solubility does not exceed 0,13%. From comparison between these results and the lab data issued from Journet et al. (2008), a parameterization to estimate iron solubility from mineralogical composition of dust has been established and validated. Far from the source, iron solubility is usually greater than dust

  17. Phototelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and the equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much higher than the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approximately 0.09 to 8 microns radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with W radiation at 120 to 160 nm wavelengths. The measured values and the size dependence of the yields are found to be substantially different from the bulk values given in the literature.

  18. Phototelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; hide

    2005-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and the equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much higher than the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approximately 0.09 to 8 microns radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with W radiation at 120 to 160 nm wavelengths. The measured values and the size dependence of the yields are found to be substantially different from the bulk values given in the literature.

  19. Cosmic Dust in ~50 KG Blocks of Blue Ice from Cap-Prudhomme and Queen Alexandra Range, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurette, M.; Cragin, J.; Taylor, S.

    1992-07-01

    Favorable Antarctic blue ice fields have produced a large number of meteorite finds because of the ice ablation concentration process (Cassidy et al., 1982). Such ice fields should also concentrate cosmic dust grains including both spherules and unmelted micrometeorites. Here we present preliminary results of concentrations of cosmic dust grains in ice from two very different Antarctic blue ice fields. The first sample (~60 kg) was collected in January 1987 from the surface of the blue ice field at Cap-Prudhomme (CP), near the French station of Dumont d'Urville, by a team from the "Laboratoire de Glaciologie du CNRS" (A. Barnola). The second sample (~50 kg), was retrieved from a meteorite stranding surface near the Queen Alexandra range (QUE) by a team (M. Burger, W. Cassidy, and R.Walker) of the ANSMET 1990 field expedition in Antarctica. Both samples were transported frozen to the laboratory where they were subdivided and processed. The CP sample was cut with a stainless steel saw into 4 pieces while the QUE sample, which had the top surface identified, was cut into three equal (~15 cm) horizontal layers to provide constituent variability with depth. All subsequent work on both samples was performed in a class 100 clean room using procedures developed by M. de Angelis and M. Maurette aimed at minimizing the loss of extraterrestrial particles. Pieces of both samples were cleaned by rinsing thoroughly with ultrapure water (Milli-O) and then melted in polyethylene containers in a microwave oven. Aliquots were decanted for chemical analysis and the remaining meltwater was filtered through stainless steel sieves for collection of large (>30 micrometers) particles. Using a 30X binocular microscope particles were hand picked for subsequent SEM/EDX analyses. Our initial objective was to compare the cosmic dust concentration in ice from the two locations. But this comparison was only partial because in the CP-ice, only magnetic spherules of >50 micrometers were studied

  20. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: VII. Cosmic ray particle dosimetry and trajectory tracing.

    PubMed

    Cruty, M R; Benton, E V; Turnbill, C E; Philpott, D E

    1975-04-01

    Five pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were flown on Apollo XVII, each with a solid-state (plastic) nuclear track detector implanted beneath its scalp. The subscalp detectors were sensitive to HZE cosmic ray particles with a LET larger than or equal to 0.15 million electron volts per micrometer (MeV/mjm). A critical aspect of the dosimetry of the experiment involved tracing individual particle trajectories through each mouse head from particle tracks registered in the individual subscalp detectors, thereby establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a trajectory location in the tissue and the presence or absence of a lesion. The other major aspect was the identification of each registered particle. An average of 16 particles with Z larger than or equal to 6 and 2.2 particles with Z larger than or equal to 20 were found per detector. The track density, 29 tracks/cm2, when adjusted for detection volume, was in agreement with the photographic emulsion data from an area dosimeter located next to the flight package.

  1. Pulsed Holography of Rapidly Moving Dust Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    orthodontal and dental work as a small "sand blatst" unit. Nitrogen gas at high pressure is passed through a regulator to reduce the pressure to the range 20...34projectile" is a 55 x 135 pmi particle emerging from the nozzle under 30 psi pressure, indicating a velocity of 20 to 60 rn/s. Resolution is

  2. Trace element content of chondritic cosmic dust: Volatile enrichments, thermal alterations, and the possibility of contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element abundances in 51 chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDP's) were measured by Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence (SXRF). The data allow us to determine an average composition of chondritic IDP's and to examine the questions of volatile loss during the heating pulse experienced on atmospheric entry and possible element addition due to contamination during atmospheric entry, stratospheric residence, and curation.

  3. Trace element content of chondritic cosmic dust: Volatile enrichments, thermal alterations, and the possibility of contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element abundances in 51 chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDP's) were measured by Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence (SXRF). The data allow us to determine an average composition of chondritic IDP's and to examine the questions of volatile loss during the heating pulse experienced on atmospheric entry and possible element addition due to contamination during atmospheric entry, stratospheric residence, and curation.

  4. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  5. Abundance and Community Structure of Bacteria on Asian Dust Particles Collected in Beijing, China, during the Asian Dust Season.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Baba, Takashi; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Himezawa, Yuka; Enoki, Kanami; Saraya, Makoto; Li, Pin-Fang; Nasu, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 180 t/km(2) of Asian dust particles are estimated to fall annually on Beijing, China, and there is significant concern about the influence of microbes transported by Asian dust events on human health and downwind ecosystems. In this study, we collected Asian dust particles in Beijing, and analyzed the bacterial communities on these particles by culture-independent methods. Bacterial cells on Asian dust particles were visualized first by laser scanning microscopy, which demonstrated that Asian dust particles carry bacterial cells to Beijing. Bacterial abundance, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was 10(8) to 10(9) cells/g, a value about 10 times higher than that in Asian dust source soils. Inter-seasonal variability of bacterial community structures among Asian dust samples, as compared by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), was low during the Asian dust season. Several viable bacteria, including intestinal bacteria, were found in Asian dust samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Clone library analysis targeting 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences demonstrated that bacterial phylogenetic diversity was high in the dust samples, and most of these were environmental bacteria distributed in soil and air. The dominant species in the clone library was Segetibacter aerophilus (Bacteroidetes), which was first isolated from an Asian dust sample collected in Korea. Our results also indicate the possibility of a change in the bacterial community structure during transportation and increases in desiccation-tolerant bacteria such as Firmicutes.

  6. Characterization of biogenic elements in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    Those particles that were designated cometary are aggregates of amorphous materials including carbon, iron-magnesium silicates, sulfides, metal and trace amounts of unusual phases. Most aggregates are carbon-rich with major and minor element abundances similar to a fine grained matrix of carbonaceous chondrites. Several particles were analyzed by a laser microprobe. The negative ionic species identified to date include carbon clusters, protonated carbon clusters, CN-, HCN-, CNO-, PO2-, PO3-, S-, S2- asnd OH-. These species are similar to those observed in cometary spectra and they support the assumption that organic materials are present. The occurance of phosphate ions suggests the presence of apatite or whitlockite. Cometary particle characteristics may indicate that the component grains represent primitive unaltered dust whose overall properties are extremely similar to altered primitive dust in carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-05-27

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  8. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L. E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

  9. Dust Particle Velocity Measurement in Shock Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-08

    00. . .. 0 . 37 21 Photography of Electronic System for CERF 6’ Shock Tubeo..o..... 38 22 Record of a Typical Doppler Burst...2.1 PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION. Direct measurement of the particle velocity was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) [Ref. 2 and 3]. The...and transforms it into an electri- cal signal, known as Doppler burst. The period of the burst (T) is a function of the fringe spacing and the

  10. Artificial meteor ablation studies. [for identification of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals, composed predominately of magnetite and hematite, using an arc heated plasma stream of air. Analysis of the ablated debris indicated most was composed of two or more minerals. The more volatile elements were depleted and the relative abundance of Fe increased as a result of both volatile depletion and a reduction in its oxidation state. Hematite was converted to magnetite in the ablation zone, and quartz and apatite minerals were converted to an Fe-rich glass consisting of varying amounts of Si, P, Cl, and Ca, depending upon the accessory minerals available at the time of melting. Artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibited unique properties depending on the composition of the original material and the environmental conditions of formation. In addition to the accepted elemental criteria, these properties were morphologic characteristics, textural parameters, and the existence of metastable minerals.

  11. Bibliography. [of asteroids, comets, meteorites, cosmic dust and other particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopal, Z.; Moutsoulas, M.; Waranius, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    Articles entered into the data base and Lunar and Planetary Institute Library in the period from May to October, 1983 are listed in annotated bibliography. The topics of the articles include asteroids, comets, and meteorites.

  12. Frozen Hydrocarbon Particles as Component of Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, Irakli

    2012-07-01

    New theoretical model of frozen hydrocarbon particles in the form of diamond core with PAHs ice mantle is presented. Formation process of such particles in the circumstellar environment is described. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence of circumstellar FHPs in fields of electromagnetic and corpuscular radiations of central star are considered. Luminescence emissions of nebula CED 201 are studied. Three emissions are identified as photoluminescence of frozen hydrocarbons and several features are ascribed to extended red emission. It is proposed that the dust component of CED 201 be regarded as a complex of frozen hydrocarbon particles.

  13. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  14. The charging processes of dust particles and the effects of Lorentz scattering in the circum-solar dust band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. S.; Isobe, Syuzo

    1992-03-01

    An analysis is presented of the charging processes for the dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii, as well as the effects of the interactions between these charged particles and the magnetized ambient solar wind plasma on the evolution of their orbits. It is concluded that due to the higher values of the potential on the dust particle and the ambient solar wind magnetic field, the Lorentz force affects a much wider size range of particles in the near-solar regions. Since the magnitude of the Lorentz force is much higher and its characteristic time to affect the particle's orbit is much lower than those for the Poynting-Robertson drag force, the Lorentz force is a major perturbing force for dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii.

  15. Space dust in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-02-01

    Next time you take a stroll in Paris, Oslo or Berlin, you might be breathing in big particles of cosmic dust after a study led by earth scientist Matthew Genge from Imperial College London found tiny specks of space dust on the rooftops of the three European capitals.

  16. Search for Cosmic Particles with the Moon and LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchen, T.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; ter Veen, S.

    2017-03-01

    The low flux of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) at the highest energies provides a challenge to answer the long standing question about their origin and nature. A significant increase in the number of detected UHECR is expected to be achieved by employing Earth''s moon as detector, and search for short radio pulses that are emitted when a particle interacts in the lunar rock. Observation of these short pulses with current and future radio telescopes also allows to search for the even lower fluxes of neutrinos with energies above 1022 eV, that are predicted in certain Grand-Unifying-Theories (GUTs), and e.g. models for super-heavy dark matter (SHDM). In this contribution we present the initial design for such a search with the LOFAR radio telescope.

  17. Effective magnetization of the dust particles in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kählert, Hanno

    2012-10-01

    The large mass and size of the dust particles in a complex plasma has several advantages, including low characteristic frequencies on the order of a few Hz and the ability to record their motion with video cameras. However, these properties pose major difficulties for achieving strong magnetization. While the light electrons and ions can be magnetized by (superconducting) magnets, magnetizing the heavy dust component is extremely challenging. Instead of further increasing the magnetic field strengths or decreasing the particle size, we use the analogy between the Lorentz force and the Coriolis force experienced by particles in a rotating reference frame to create ``effective magnetic fields'' which is a well-established technique in the field of trapped quantum gases [1]. To induce rotation in a complex plasma, we take advantage of the neutral drag force, which allows to transmit the motion of a rotating neutral gas to the dust particles [2]. The equations of motion in the rotating frame agree with those in a stationary gas except for the additional centrifugal and Coriolis forces [3]. Due to the slow rotation frequencies (˜ Hz) and contrary to the situation in a strong magnetic field, only the properties of the heavy dust particles are notably affected. Experiments with a rotating electrode realize the desired velocity profile for the neutral gas and allow us to verify the efficiency of the concept [3].[4pt] This work was performed in collaboration with J. Carstensen, M. Bonitz, H. L"owen, F. Greiner, and A. Piel.[4pt] [1] A. L. Fetter, Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 647 (2009)[0pt] [2] J. Carstensen, F. Greiner, L.-J. Hou, H. Maurer, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 16, 013702 (2009)[0pt] [3] H. K"ahlert, J. Carstensen, M. Bonitz, H. L"owen, F. Greiner, and A. Piel, submitted for publication, arXiv:1206.5073

  18. Dust Particle Growth and Application in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-01

    Dust particle nucleation and growth has been widely studied these last fifteen years in different chemistries and experimental conditions. This phenomenon is correlated with various electrical changes at electrodes, including self-bias voltage and amplitudes of the various harmonics of current and voltage [1]. Some of these changes, such as the appearance of more resistive plasma impedance, are correctly attributed to loss of electrons in the bulk plasma to form negative molecular ions (e.g. SiH3-) and more precisely charged nanoparticles. These changes were studied and correlated to the different phases on the dust particle formation. It is well known now that, in silane argon gas mixture discharges, in the first step of this particle formation we have formation of nanometer sized crystallites. These small entities accumulate and when their number density reaches a critical value, about 1011 to 1012 cm-1, they start to aggregate to form bigger particles. The different phases are well defined and determined thanks to the time evolution of the different electrical parameter changes. The purpose of this contribution is to compare different chemistries to highlight similarities and/or differences in order to establish possible universal dust particle growth mechanisms. The chemistries we studied concern SiH4-Ar, CH4, CH4-N2 and Sn(CH3)4 [2]. We also refer to works performed in other laboratories in different discharge configurations [3]. Different applications have already developed or are foreseen for these nanoparticles. The first application concerns the inclusion of nanosized dust crystallites in an amorphous matrix in order to modify the optoelectronic and mechanical properties [4-5]. At the present time a very active research programs are devoted towards single electron devises where nanometer sized crystallites play a role of quantum dots. These nanoparticles can be produced in low pressure cold plasmas.

  19. A Novel Dust Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.; Srama, R.; Krüger, H.; Kempf, S.; Harris, D.; Conlon, T.; Auer, S.

    2001-11-01

    Dust particles in space, like photons, are born at remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and the particles' bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a dust observatory in space. A dust telescope is a combination of a dust trajectory sensor together with a chemical composition analyzer for dust particles. A novel dust telescope is described. It consists of a highly sensitive dust trajectory sensor, and a large area chemical dust analyzer. It can provide valuable information about the particles' birthplace which may not be accessible by other techniques. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of the electric signals that are induced when a charged grain flies through an appropriately configured electrode systems. After the successful identification of a few charged micron-sized dust grains in space by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer, this dust telescope has a ten fold increased sensitivity of charge detection (10-16 Coulombs) and will be able to obtain trajectories for sub-micron sized dust grains. State-of-the art dust chemical analyzers have sufficient mass resolution to resolve ions with atomic mass numbers above 100. However, since their impact areas are small they can analyze statistically meaningful numbers of grains only in the dust-rich environments of comets or ringed planets. Therefore, this dust telescope includes a large area (0.1 m2) chemical dust analyzer of mass resolution > 100 that will allow us to obtain statistically significant measurements of interplanetary and interstellar dust grains in space.

  20. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND CONSTRAINTS OF DECAYING DARK MATTER PARTICLE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, S.; Chan, M. H.; Chu, M.-C.

    2012-08-20

    If a component of cosmological dark matter is made up of massive particles-such as sterile neutrinos-that decay with cosmological lifetime to emit photons, the reionization history of the universe would be affected, and cosmic microwave background anisotropies can be used to constrain such a decaying particle model of dark matter. The optical depth depends rather sensitively on the decaying dark matter particle mass m{sub dm}, lifetime {tau}{sub dm}, and the mass fraction of cold dark matter f that they account for in this model. Assuming that there are no other sources of reionization and using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year data, we find that 250 eV {approx}< m{sub dm} {approx}< 1 MeV, whereas 2.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr {approx}< {tau}{sub dm}/f {approx}< 1.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} yr. The best-fit values for m{sub dm} and {tau}{sub dm}/f are 17.3 keV and 2.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} yr, respectively.

  1. New Manganese Silicide Mineral Phase in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.; Kloeck, W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup was identified as a source of an Earth-crossing dust stream with low Earth-encounter velocities, with peak anticipated fluxes during April in 2003 and 2004 [1]. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections using high altitude aircraft to target potential interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream in April 2003. Several IDPs from this collection have shown unusually low noble gas abundances [2] consistent with the predicted short space exposure ages of Grigg-Skjellerup dust particles [1]. High abundances of large D enrichments [3] and presolar grains [4] in IDPs from this collection are also consistent with an origin from the comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Here we report a new mineral from one of the cluster IDPs of the "Grigg-Skjellerup" collection, L2055. Our report focuses on an unusual manganese-iron-chromium silicide phase that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature. This unique phase may also shed light on the genesis of the enigmatic low-Fe,Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine that has been previously reported in IDPs and meteorites [5].

  2. Ion microprobe isotopic measurements of individual interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeegan, K. D.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first extended ion probe study of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are reported. The analytic procedures and the current limits on the precision and accurary of isotopic measurements of light elements are discussed in considerable detail. It is shown that isotopic measurements of several elements can be made on different individual fragments of a single IDP of 10-15 microns in size. The deuterium enrichments observed in several of the particles are shown to be intrinsic, providing independent proof that the particles are extraterrestrial. Carbon isotopic measurements on fragments of three IDPs give ratios similar to terrestrial values and show a largely uniform isotopic composition for a given particle. Small, but significant, differences in delta C-13 of about 40 percent between particles are seen.

  3. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration Nd on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of Nd leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 102-108cm-3 , discharge current density 10-1-101mA/cm2 , and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5μm . The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  4. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N{sub d} on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N{sub d} leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, discharge current density 10{sup -1}-10{sup 1} mA/cm{sup 2}, and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 mum. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  5. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N(d) on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N(d) leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), discharge current density 10(-1)-10(1) mA/cm(2), and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 microm. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  6. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  7. The impact of dust particle morphological details on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Jeong, Gi Young

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the impact of dust particle surface roughness and internal structure on light scattering. Starting from digital representation of realistically shaped dust particles, we vary the particle morphology, and perform light scattering simulations to both the original and the modified particles. By mapping the changes in morphology to the changes in scattering, we will get information of how strongly and in which way a particular change affects scattering. All investigations have been done with complex, irregular particle shapes. For surface roughness studies we have kept the particle total volume virtually constant during the roughening process, and the roughness element size small enough to keep the overall shape relatively unchanged. For internal structure studies, the size and the external shape are kept constant. These safety measures help ensure that the effects seen are in fact due to the feature studied. The work is notable for model development, because some models can not include surface roughness, for example. In that case, the people who use such models have to adjust for the fact that the results are inaccurate, and by knowing how surface roughness typically changes the scattering results, the adjustment can be made. As a corollary, if it is shown that a particular feature does not change scattering results in any noticeable way, the model developers can confidently ignore or simplify it.

  8. Electrostatic Characteristics of Materials Exposed to Martian Simulant Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, C. I.; Kim, H. S.; Young, S.; Jackson, D.; Lombardi, A. J.

    1998-11-01

    The Pathfinder mission to Mars identified Andesitic rock as the primary type of rock at the landing site. Several experiments were designed at NASA/Kennedy Space Center to determine the charging characteristics of common space materials exposed to small particles derived from those rocks. MARS-1, a Martian soil simulant prepared from Andesitic rocks by NASA/JSC was used in this work. Characterization of this simulant was made using scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy coupled with a carbon-sulfur detector. These results were compared to the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer analysis on Pathfinder. The simulant was found to be a suitable substitute for Martian soil for our purposes. Two experimental designs and methods to simulate the exposure of different materials to wind-blown dust were made. These designs permit dust particle delivery to samples at different speeds. Initial experiments made with these designs to determine their viability were promising.

  9. Electrostatic dust transport on airless planetary bodies: Laboratory measurements of the charge of lofted dust particles and their subsequent dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H. W.; Deca, J.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Our recent laboratory studies have fundamentally advanced our understanding of electrostatic dust transport on airless planetary bodies, which has been related to a variety of planetary phenomena observed in the Solar System, such as the lunar horizon glow, the dust ponds on asteroid Eros and comet 67P and the spokes in Saturn's rings. A new "patched charge model" explains that the mobilization and lofting of dust particles are attributed to strong repulsive forces between largely negatively charged dust particles due to the collection of photoelectron and/or secondary electron emitted from their neighboring particles. Here we present direct measurements of the charges of dust particles on a dusty surface that is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or plasma. Large negative charges were measured from the lofted dust particles that register in a Faraday cup by UV illumination while no positively charged particles were registered, contrary to generally expected positive charge due to photoemission. The charge results confirmed the prediction of our "patched charge model". Dust lofting and subsequent dynamics were recorded and analyzed using a high-speed camera. The sheath electric field was found to modify the dynamics of lofted dust particles. The initial dust lofting conditions, including both the dust charge and launch speed, measured from our laboratory experiments will provide the essential parameters for studies of dust dynamics/redistribution that reshapes airless planetary bodies. We will also discuss the implications of the proposed dust-lofting mechanism on upcoming observations, such as by the OSIRIS-Rex and Cassini grand finale missions.

  10. Noble gases in stratospheric dust particles: confirmation of extraterrestrial origin.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B; Flynn, G J; Fraundorf, P; Hohenberg, C M; Shirck, J

    1981-01-23

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic ratios were measured in a group of 13 "chondritic" stratospheric dust particles. Neon and argon are present in "solar" proportions; xenon appears to be dominated by contributions from "planetary" sources. The apparent xenon concentration is higher than that measured in any bulk meteorite, approaching the concentration found in the noble gas-rich, acid-insoluble residues from carbonaceous chondrites.

  11. Stochastic Circumplanetary Dynamics of Rotating Non-Spherical Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Martin; Brilliantov, N. V.; Sremcevic, M.; Spahn, F.; Krivov, A. V.

    2006-12-01

    Influence of stochastically fluctuating radiation pressure on the dynamics of dust grains on circumplanetary orbits was studied. Stochasticity stems from the permanent change of the particle cross-section due to rotation of nonspherical grains, exposed to the solar radiation. We found that stochasticity depends on the characteristic angular velocity of particles which, according to our estimates, spins very fast on the time scale of the orbital motion. According to this we modelled the stochastic part of the radiation pressure by a Gaussian white noise. Gauss perturbation equations with the radiation pressure being a sum of the deterministic and stochastic component have been used. We observed monotonous increasing standard deviation of the orbital elements, that is, the diffusive-like behaviour of the ensemble, which results in a spatial spreading of initially confined set of particles. By linear approximation we obtained expression for the effective diffusion coefficients and estimate their dependence on the geometrical characteristics of particles and their spin. Teoretical results were compared with numerical simulations performed for the putative dust tori of Mars. Our theory agrees fairly well with simulations for the initial period of the system evolution. The agreement however deteriorates with increasing time where impact of the non-linear terms of the perturbation equations becomes important. Analysis shows that the theoretical results may estimate the low boundary of the time-dependent standard deviation of the orbital elements. In the case of dust ejected from Martian moon Deimos we observed a change of orbital elements up to 10% of their initial values during the first 1000 years of orbital evolution. Our results indicate that the stochastic modulation of the radiation pressure can play an important role in the circumplanetary dynamics of dust and may, together with further noise sources (shadow, planetary bowshock, charge fluctuations, etc

  12. Migration of Dust Particles and Their Collisions with the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    Our review of previously published papers on dust migration can be found in [1], where we also present different distributions of migrating dust particles. We considered a different set of initial orbits for the dust particles than those in the previous papers. Below we pay the main attention to the collisional probabilities of migrating dust particles with the planets based on a set of orbital elements during their evolution. Such probabilities were not calculated earlier.

  13. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  14. Stochastic circumplanetary Dynamics of rotating non-spherical Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, M.; Brilliantov, N. V.; Sremcevic, M.; Spahn, F.; Krivov, A. V.

    We investigate the influence of stochastically fluctuating radiation pressure on the dynamics of dust grains on circumplanetary orbits. The stochasticity stems from the permanent change of the particle cross-section exposed to the solar radiation due to rotation of nonspherical grains. Therefore, the stochastic properties of the radiation pressure are related to the ensemble-averaged characteristics of rotating particles, such as orientational time-correlation function of an individual grain. We evaluate this function and observe that it depends on the characteristic angular velocity of particles, which according to our estimates, spin very fast on the time scale of the orbital motion. This allows to model the stochastic part of the radiation pressure by a Gaussian white noise. The parameters of the noise are expressed in terms of the particle's geometric properties and their characteristic spin. In our analytical approach we use the Gauss perturbation equations with the radiation pressure being a sum of the deterministic and stochastic component and analyse the dynamics of a grains ensemble. We observe a steadily increasing standard deviation of the orbital elements, that is, the diffusive-like behaviour of the ensemble, which results in a spatial spreading of initially confined set of particles. In the linear approximation we obtain analytical expression for the effective diffusion coefficients and estimate their dependence on the geometrical characteristics of particles and their spin. The results of our analytical theory were compared with extensive numerical simulations performed for a specific dust complex, the putative dust tori of Mars. We found that our theory agrees fairly well with simulations for the initial period of the system evolution. The agreement however deteriorates at later time when the impact of the non-linear terms of the perturbation equations, neglected in our theory, becomes important. Nevertheless, the analysis shows that the theoretical

  15. Effects of plasma particle trapping on dust-acoustic solitary waves in an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Mushtaq, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-03-15

    Dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma containing dust of opposite polarity (adiabatic positive and negative dust), non-isothermal electrons and ions (following vortex like distribution) are theoretically investigated by employing pseudo-potential approach, which is valid for arbitrary amplitude structures. The propagation of small but finite amplitude solitary structures is also examined by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic properties of large (small) amplitude solitary structures are investigated by analyzing the energy integral (modified Korteweg-de Vries equation). It is shown that the effects of dust polarity, trapping of plasma particles (electrons and ions), and temperatures of dust fluids significantly modify the basic features of the dust-acoustic solitary structures that are found to exist in such an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium. The relevance of the work in opposite polarity dust-plasma, which may occur in cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, is briefly discussed.

  16. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  17. Dust Particles Alignments and Transitions in a Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, J. D. E.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The alignments and transitions of two dust particles in a plasma sheath have been investigated. It is shown that the Hamiltonian description of a non-Hamiltonian system can be used to predict qualitative features of possible equilibria in a variety of confinement potentials and can provide useful plasma diagnostics. The results compare favorably with simulation and are used to create new experimental hypotheses. In particular, the symmetry breaking transition of the particles as they leave the horizontal plane admits a Hamiltonian description which is used to elucidate the wake parameter.

  18. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Bunch, T. E.; Mardinly, A. J.; Echer, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Properties of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), Ames-Dec86-11, were investigated using TEM and analytical electron microscopy. The particle was found to have mineralogy and chondritic composition indicating an absence of direct kinship with known carbonaceous chondrites. The available data on the Ames-Dec86-11 suggest that at least one aqueous alteration event took place in this hydrated IDP, during which fine-grained material, possibly glass, was transformed to smectite. This event appears to be unique to hydrated IDPs.

  19. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Bunch, T. E.; Mardinly, A. J.; Echer, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Properties of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), Ames-Dec86-11, were investigated using TEM and analytical electron microscopy. The particle was found to have mineralogy and chondritic composition indicating an absence of direct kinship with known carbonaceous chondrites. The available data on the Ames-Dec86-11 suggest that at least one aqueous alteration event took place in this hydrated IDP, during which fine-grained material, possibly glass, was transformed to smectite. This event appears to be unique to hydrated IDPs.

  20. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Mardinly, A. J.; Echer, C. J.; Bunch, T. E.

    Properties of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), Ames-Dec86-11, were investigated using TEM and analytical electron microscopy. The particle was found to have mineralogy and chondritic composition indicating an absence of direct kinship with known carbonaceous chondrites. The available data on the Ames-Dec86-11 suggest that at least one aqueous alteration event took place in this hydrated IDP, during which fine-grained material, possibly glass, was transformed to smectite. This event appears to be unique to hydrated IDPs.

  1. Erosion of circumstellar particle disks by interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    1989-01-01

    Circumstellar particle disks appear to be a common phenomenon; however, their properties vary greatly. Models of the evolution of such systems focus on internal mechanisms such as interparticle collisions and Poynting-Robertson drag. Herein it is shown that 'sandblasting' by interstellar dust can be an important and even dominant contributor to the evolution of circumstellar particle disks. Stars spend up to about 3 percent of their main-sequence lifetimes within atomic clouds. Among an IRAS sample of 21 nearby main-sequence A stars, beta Pictoris has the brightest disk; it also possesses the smallest random velocity and therefore the slowest predicted erosion rate.

  2. Shape effects and size distributions of astrophysical dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rakesh K.; Botet, Robert

    2017-05-01

    In the infrared and visible wavelength ranges, the extinction cross-sections of small irregular particles are essentially proportional to the corresponding cross-sections for spheres of the same volume, which confirms a previous statement by Mathis. The situation differs for large disordered particles because of the contribution of large surface areas. The differences between irregular particles and homogeneous spheres of the same mass might depend on the material. For example, graphite particles are less sensitive to surface shapes than silicate particles. As a consequence, the successful fit of the average galactic extinction curve by an ensemble of graphite + silicate spherical particles, can also be replaced by a fit using an ensemble of irregular particles, including a smaller amount of silicate. Because the interstellar dust particles are expected to be generally of irregular shapes, the former fit with spherical particles could have overestimated the relative amount of silicate in the interstellar medium (ISM). In the same spirit, we discuss various interpretations of the remarkable stability of the 217.5-nm peak in the ISM extinction.

  3. Quantification of Spore-forming Bacteria Carried by Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Cholakian, Tanya; Gao, Wenming; Osman, Shariff; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish a biological contamination transport model for predicting the cross contamination risk during spacecraft assembly and upon landing on Mars, it is important to understand the relationship between spore-forming bacteria and their carrier particles. We conducted air and surface sampling in indoor, outdoor, and cleanroom environments to determine the ratio of spore forming bacteria to their dust particle carriers of different sizes. The number of spore forming bacteria was determined from various size groups of particles in a given environment. Our data also confirms the existence of multiple spores on a single particle and spore clumps. This study will help in developing a better bio-contamination transport model, which in turn will help in determining forward contamination risks for future missions.

  4. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  5. Quantification of Spore-forming Bacteria Carried by Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Cholakian, Tanya; Gao, Wenming; Osman, Shariff; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish a biological contamination transport model for predicting the cross contamination risk during spacecraft assembly and upon landing on Mars, it is important to understand the relationship between spore-forming bacteria and their carrier particles. We conducted air and surface sampling in indoor, outdoor, and cleanroom environments to determine the ratio of spore forming bacteria to their dust particle carriers of different sizes. The number of spore forming bacteria was determined from various size groups of particles in a given environment. Our data also confirms the existence of multiple spores on a single particle and spore clumps. This study will help in developing a better bio-contamination transport model, which in turn will help in determining forward contamination risks for future missions.

  6. Cryogenic Synthesis of Molecules of Astrobiological Interest: Catalytic Role of Cosmic Dust Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, J. R.; Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Rotundi, A.; Colangeli, L.

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the effects of the substrate, namely amorphous olivine (MgFeSiO4) cosmic dust analogues (CDAs), in synthesis of molecules obtained after 200 keV proton irradiation of formamide (NH2COH). Formamide has been deposited on the olivine substrate at 20 K. The abundances of new molecular species formed after an irradiation dose of 12 eV/16 amu in formamide pure (i.e. deposited on an inert silicon substrate) and deposited on CDAs have been compared. Specifically, MgFeSiO4 amorphous olivine is a selective catalyst preventing formation of NH3 and CN- molecules and changing the relative abundances of {text{NH}}^{ + }4 {text{OCN}}^{ - } , CO2, HNCO, CO. We have shown that the role of CDAs has to be taken into account in experiments simulating processes occurring in astronomical environments.

  7. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 4: Cosmic Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Beatty, J. J.; Buckley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; Cushman, P.; Dodelson, S.; Galbiati, C.; Honscheid, K.; Hooper, D.; Kaplinghat, M.; Kusenko, A.; Matchev, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A. E.; Olinto, A.; Profumo, S.; Robertson, H.; Rosenberg, L.; Sinnis, G.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 4, on the Cosmic Frontier, discusses the program of research relevant to cosmology and the early universe. This area includes the study of dark matter and the search for its particle nature, the study of dark energy and inflation, and cosmic probes of fundamental symmetries.

  8. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  9. Nonviscous motion of a slow particle in a dust crystal under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Fortov, V E; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Naumkin, V N; Thomas, H M; Ivlev, A V; Schwabe, M; Morfill, G E

    2012-07-01

    Subsonic motion of a large particle moving through the bulk of a dust crystal formed by negatively charged small particles is investigated using the PK-3 Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station. Tracing the particle trajectories shows that the large particle moves almost freely through the bulk of the plasma crystal, while dust particles move along characteristic α-shaped pathways near the large particle. In the hydrodynamic approximation, we develop a theory of nonviscous dust particle motion about a large particle and calculate particle trajectories. Good agreement with experiment validates our approach.

  10. High Precision Oxygen Three Isotope Analysis of Wild-2 Particles and Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Matrajt, G.; Kita, N. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries from comet Wild-2 samples was observation of crystalline silicate particles that resemble chondrules and CAIs in carbonaceous chondrites. Previous oxygen isotope analyses of crystalline silicate terminal particles showed heterogeneous oxygen isotope ratios with delta(sup 18)O to approx. delta(sup 17)O down to -50% in the CAI-like particle Inti, a relict olivine grain in Gozen-sama, and an olivine particle. However, many Wild-2 particles as well as ferromagnesian silicates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) showed Delta(sup 17)O values that cluster around -2%. In carbonaceous chondrites, chondrules seem to show two major isotope reservoirs with Delta(sup 17)O values at -5% and -2%. It was suggested that the Delta(sup 17)O = -2% is the common oxygen isotope reservoir for carbonaceous chondrite chondrules and cometary dust, from the outer asteroid belt to the Kuiper belt region. However, a larger dataset with high precision isotope analyses (+/-1-2%) is still needed to resolve the similarities or distinctions among Wild-2 particles, IDPs and chondrules in meteorites. We have made signifi-cant efforts to establish routine analyses of small particles (< or =10micronsm) at 1-2% precision using IMS-1280 at WiscSIMS laboratory. Here we report new results of high precision oxygen isotope analyses of Wild-2 particles and anhydrous chondritic IDPs, and discuss the relationship between the cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrite chondrules.

  11. Astronomers Use Moon in Effort to Corral Elusive Cosmic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    Seeking to detect mysterious, ultra-high-energy neutrinos from distant regions of space, a team of astronomers used the Moon as part of an innovative telescope system for the search. Their work gave new insight on the possible origin of the elusive subatomic particles and points the way to opening a new view of the Universe in the future. The team used special-purpose electronic equipment brought to the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, and took advantage of new, more-sensitive radio receivers installed as part of the Expanded VLA (EVLA) project. Prior to their observations, they tested their system by flying a small, specialized transmitter over the VLA in a helium balloon. In 200 hours of observations, Ted Jaeger of the University of Iowa and the Naval Research Laboratory, and Robert Mutel and Kenneth Gayley of the University of Iowa did not detect any of the ultra-high-energy neutrinos they sought. This lack of detection placed a new limit on the amount of such particles arriving from space, and cast doubt on some theoretical models for how those neutrinos are produced. Neutrinos are fast-moving subatomic particles with no electrical charge that readily pass unimpeded through ordinary matter. Though plentiful in the Universe, they are notoriously difficult to detect. Experiments to detect neutrinos from the Sun and supernova explosions have used large volumes of material such as water or chlorine to capture the rare interactions of the particles with ordinary matter. The ultra-high-energy neutrinos the astronomers sought are postulated to be produced by the energetic, black-hole-powered cores of distant galaxies; massive stellar explosions; annihilation of dark matter; cosmic-ray particles interacting with photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background; tears in the fabric of space-time; and collisions of the ultra-high-energy neutrinos with lower-energy neutrinos left over from the Big Bang. Radio telescopes can't detect

  12. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-09-07

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r{sup 2}) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F{sub es} (c/r{sup 3})) and shadowing (F{sub shadow} = -(d/r{sup 2})) forces.

  13. Mixture state and size of Asian dust particles collected at southwestern Japan in spring 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daizhou; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Shi, Guangyu; Zang, Jiaye; Matsuki, Atsushi; Trochkine, Dmitri

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric particles were collected at Kumamoto (32°48'N, 130°45'E), a coastal city in southwestern Japan, during three dust storm events in spring 2000. The elemental composition and size of individual dust particles and their mixture state with sea salt, sulfate, and nitrate were analyzed using electron microscopes and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. About 60 ˜ 85% of dust particles were internally mixed with sea salt. Weather records indicated these particles were most probably formed by the collisions and coagulations of dust particles and sea-salt particles. The relative weight ratios of mineral components to sea salt in individual particles showed that the mixtures of particles were dominated by mineral, by sea salt, or by both. Size distributions of the particles segregated by the mixture levels of mineral and sea salt in the three dust storm events were similar and all distributions showed a diameter range of 1 ˜ 8 μm with maximum mode around 3 μm. Out of 1 ˜ 8 μm, dust particles were rarely detected. The combination of dust particles with sea salt caused an increase in size of the dust particles. Therefore the decrease of particle concentrations in the range of diameter >3 μm suggests the critical diameter for dust particle dispersion was possibly around 3 μm and a dust particle might be removed rapidly if it became larger than this scale in the marine atmosphere. Detection of sulfate and nitrate revealed that 91% or more dust particles contained sulfate and 27% or less contained nitrate. The comparisons of the relative weight ratios of sodium, sulfur, and chlorine in mixture particles and in sea-salt particles confirmed previous results that mineral materials could enhance particulate sulfate and nitrate formation and restrain chlorine depletion from the sea-salt components in mixture particles.

  14. Collective behaviour of a System of Emitting Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Lapenta, G.

    2004-12-01

    In the present work we focus on the role of electron emission (either thermionic, secondary or photoelectric) in charging an object immersed in a plasma. Recent work [1] has shown how electron emission can fundamentally affect the shielding potential around the dust. In particular, depending on the physical parameters of the system, the shielding potential can develop an attractive potential well. The aim of the present work is two-fold. First, we will present a theory of the existence and properties of the attractive potential well to explain the conditions for the formation, as well as providing a description of the well in terms of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials. Second, we focus on the consequences of attraction among eqully charged dust particle and on the peculiar collective behaviour under the circumstances. Here, we present a series of simulations conducted with a new code designed to study a large system of weakly coupled dust particles, interacting with a LJ like potential. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 035002 (2004).

  15. The atmospheric cosmic- and solar energetic particle radiation environment at aircraft altitudes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Friedberg, W; Smart, D F; Sauer, H H

    1998-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays interact with the solar wind, the earth's magnetic field and hadron, lepton and photon fields at aircraft altitudes. In addition to cosmic rays, energetic particles generated by solar activity bombard the earth from time to time. These particles, while less energetic than cosmic rays, also produce radiation fields at aircraft altitudes which have qualitatively the same properties as atmospheric cosmic rays. We have used a code based on transport theory to calculate atmospheric cosmic-ray quantities and compared them with experimental data. Agreement with these data is seen to be good. We have then used this code to calculate equivalent doses to aircraft crews. We have also used the code to calculate radiation doses from several large solar energetic particle events which took place in 1989, including the very large event that occurred on September 29th and 30th of that year. The spectra incident on the atmosphere were determined assuming diffusive shock theory.

  16. Enrichment of Mineral Dust Storm Particles with Sea Salt Elements - Using bulk and Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Y.; Perrino, C.; Yossef, O.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral aerosol emitted from African and Asian deserts plays an important role in the atmosphere. During their long-range transport, the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust particles change due to heterogeneous reactions with trace gases, coagulation with other particles, and in-cloud processing. These processes affect the optical and hygroscopic properties of dust particles, and in general influencing the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Four African and Arabian dust storm episodes affecting the East Mediterranean Coast in the spring of 2006 have been characterized, to determine if atmospheric natural dust particles are enriched with sea salt and anthropogenic pollution. Particle samplers included PM10 and manual dichotomous sampler that collected fine and coarse particles. Three sets of filters were used: Teflon filters for gravimetric, elemental and ionic analyses; Pre-fired Quartz-fiber filters for elemental and organic carbon; and Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (Philips XL 30 ESEM) was used to analyze single particle, for morphology, size and chemistry of selected filter samples. A detailed chemical and microscopical characterization has been performed for the particles collected during dust event days and during clear days. The Saharan and Arabian air masses increased significantly the daily mass concentrations of the coarse and the fine particle fractions. Carbonates, mostly as soil calcites mixed with dolomites, and silicates are the major components of the coarse fraction, followed by sea salt particles. In addition, the levels of anthropogenic heavy metals and sea salt elements registered during the dust episode were considerably higher than levels recorded during clear days. Sea salt elements contain Na and Cl, and smaller amounts of Mg, K, S and Br. Cl ranges from 300 to 5500 ng/m3 and Na from 100 to almost 2400 ng/m3. The Cl to Na ratio on dusty days in

  17. Cosmic meteor dust: potentially the dominant source of bio-available iron in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Marsh, D. R.; Del Castillo, C. E.; Fentzke, J.; Lopez-Rosado, R.; Behrenfeld, M.

    2012-12-01

    Johnson, 2001 [Johnson, Kenneth. S. (2001), Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean: Is extraterrestrial dust a significant source of bioavailable iron?, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 15(1), 61-63, doi:10.1029/2000GB001295], first suggested that meteoric particulate flux could be a significant source of bio-available iron, particularly in regions with little or no eolean sources, such as the Southern Ocean. While these calculations raised intriguing questions, there were many large unknowns in the input calculations between meteor flux and bio-available ocean molecular densities. There has been significant research in the intervening decade on related topics, such as the magnitude (~200 ktons per year) and composition of the meteoric flux, its atmospheric evaporation, transport, mesospheric formation of potentially soluble meteoric smoke, and extraterrestrial iron isotope identification. Paramount of these findings are recent NCAR WACCM atmosphere model results demonstrating that the majority of meteoric constituents are transported towards the winter poles and the polar vortex. This may lead to a focusing of meteoritic iron deposition towards the Southern Ocean. We present a proposed research plan involving Southern Ocean sample collection and analysis and atmospheric and biological modeling to determine both the current relevance of meteoric iron, and examine the past and future consequences of cosmic dust under a changing climate.

  18. MOS sensors for detection of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Durin, Ch.

    2003-04-01

    Most of recent data on the size distribution of micrometeoroids and small space debris come from passive detectors exposed on low earth orbits. The active instrument presented here is able to study the environment on any kind of orbits. The detectors will use a technology pioneered by J.J. Wortman and used previously on LDEF and Clementine satellites. Thin dielectric capacitor sensors are made from 2 inches diameter silicon wafers. The device is operated with an electrical potential (bias) applied across the capacitor plates : a charge is normally stored in the capacitor. When a high velocity particle impacts the exposed plate with enough energy, it can cause the dielectric to breakdown and results in a discharge of the capacitor. The event is measured by monitoring the charge required to recharge the capacitor. After impact the sensor reaches again its nominal voltage within a short time. Evaporation of the electrode around the impact site usually prevent the occurrence of a permanent short. Comprehensive testing upon impact has been made with an electrostatic dust accelerator in Heidelberg and and a plasma drag accelerator in Munich. The detection threshold for a dielectric 1.4 μm thick is reached with a dust particle of 1 μm in diameter, at a velocity of 3 km/s. This type of detector can be used to monitor the small particulate environment. It is best suited to the detection of micron sized particles on a routine basis. Its foreseen use on satellites and on the ISS could increase our knowledge on the distribution of man-made orbital debris and natural dust particles

  19. Mixed Calcium Dust and Carbonaceous Particles from Asia Contributing to Precipitation Changes in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L.; Cornwell, G.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), with enhanced CCN activity observed when the dust is mixed with additional soluble species. Long range atmospheric transport can change the composition of dust particles through aging, cloud processing and mixing with other particles. The CalWater2 campaign measured single particles and cloud dynamics to investigate the influence aerosols have on the hydrological cycle in California. An Aircraft Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to characterize and identify single particles within clouds potentially acting as ice and cloud nuclei. Two matching flights over California's mountains in March 2015 detected significantly different particle types that resulted in different precipitation totals. Calcium dust dominated the particle composition during the first flight which had an observed decrease in orographic precipitation. Particle composition and air mass back trajectories indicate an Asian desert origin. The calcium dust particles contained secondary acids, in particular oxalic acid, acquired during transport from Asia to California. This chemical processing likely increased the solubility of the dust, enabling the particles to act as more effective CCN. The chemical composition also showed oligomeric carbonaceous species were mixed with the calcium dust particles, potentially further increasing the solubility the particles. A single particle soot photometer (SP2) measured black carbon concurrently and returned intense incandescence when calcium dust was present, confirming the calcium dust particles were internally mixed with a carbonaceous species. Dust particles were greatly reduced during the second flight with local biomass burning particles the dominant type. Observed precipitation in California were within forecast levels during the second flight. These single particle measurements from CalWater2 show that dust particles from Asia can affect cloud process and thus

  20. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  1. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S. Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J.; Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  2. Multielement analysis of interplanetary dust particles using TOF-SIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, T.; Kloeck, W.; Jessberger, E. K.; Rulle, H.; Zehnpfenning, J.

    1993-01-01

    Sections of three stratospheric particles (U2015G1, W7029*A27, and L2005P9) were analyzed with TOF-SIMS (Time Of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) continuing our efforts to investigate the element distribution in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with high lateral resolution (approximately 0.2 micron), to examine possible atmospheric contamination effects, and to further explore the abilities of this technique for element analysis of small samples. The samples, previously investigated with SXRF (synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis), are highly enriched in Br (Br/Fe: 59 x CI, 9.2 x CI, and 116 x CI, respectively). U2015G1 is the IDP with the by far highest Zn/Fe-ratio (81 x CI) ever reported in chondritic particles.

  3. MicroMED: a dust particle counter for the characterization of airborne dust close to the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, Fabio; Esposito, Francesca; Molfese, Cesare; Cortecchia, Fausto; Saggin, Bortolino; D'amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of airborne dust is very important in planetary climatology. Indeed, dust absorbs and scatter solar and thermal radiation, severely affecting atmospheric thermal structure, balance and dynamics (in terms of circulations). Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. Dust is permanently present in the atmosphere of Mars and its amount varies with seasons. During regional or global dust storms, more than 80% of the incoming sunlight is absorbed by dust causing an intense atmospheric heating. Airborne dust is therefore a crucial climate component on Mars which impacts atmospheric circulations at all scales. Main dust parameters influencing the atmosphere heating are size distribution, abundance, albedo, single scattering phase function, imaginary part of the index of refraction. Moreover, major improvements of Mars climate models require, in addition to the standard meteorological parameters, quantitative information about dust lifting, transport and removal mechanisms. In this context, two major quantities need to be measured for the dust source to be understood: surface flux and granulometry. While many observations have constrained the size distribution of the dust haze seen from the orbit, it is still not known what the primary airborne dust (e.g. the recently lifted dust) is made of, size-wise. MicroMED has been designed to fill this gap. It will measure the abundance and size distribution of dust, not in the atmospheric column, but close to the surface, where dust is lifted, so to be able to monitor dust injection into the atmosphere. This has never been performed in Mars and other planets exploration. MicroMED is an Optical Particle Counter, analyzing light scattered from single dust particles to measure their size and abundance. A proper fluid-dynamic system, including a pump and a

  4. Separating Continental Mineral Dust from Cosmic Dust using Platinum Group Element Concentrations and Osmium Isotopes in Ancient Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. H.; Jackson, B.; Osterberg, E. C.; Sharma, M.

    2015-12-01

    The platinum group element (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, and Ru) accumulation in ancient polar archives have been argued to trace cosmic dust and "smoke" from larger meteors but the PGE concentration data lack specificity. For example, the extent to which the terrestrial volcanism/dust has contributed to the PGE inventory of polar ice cannot be readily evaluated. Since the Os isotope compositions (187Os/188Os ratio) of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources are distinctly different from each other, the PGE concentrations when combined with Os isotope composition have the potential to untangle contributions from these sources. Platinum group element concentration determinations in polar ice cores are highly challenging due to their extremely low concentrations (down to 10-15 g/g or fg/g). Here, a new procedure is presented that allows PGEs and Os isotope compositions to be determined from a ~50 g sample of polar ice. Decontaminated ice-melt is spiked with 101Ru, 106Pd, 190Os, 191Ir, and 198Pt and frozen at -20 °C in quartz-glass ampoules. A mixture of purified HNO3 and H2O2 is then added and the sample is heated to 300 °C at 128bar using a High Pressure Asher. This allows all spikes to be equilibrated with the sample PGEs and all Os species are oxidized to OsO4. The resulting OsO4 is extracted using distillation, purified, and measured using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. PGEs are then separated and purified using two stage column chromatography and their concentrations determined by isotope dilution using a triple quadruople inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer coupled to an Apex de-solvation nebulizer. The developed method was applied to modern Greenland firn and snow. The PGE concentrations of the firn are 4.0 fg/g for Ir, 20 fg/g for Ru, 590 fg/g for Pt, 38 fg/g for Pd, and 1.3 fg/g for Os, while those of the snow are 3.0 fg/g for Ir, 53 fg/g for Ru, 360 fg/g for Pt, 32 fg/g for Pd, and 0.4 fg/g for Os, respectively. A comparison

  5. Extraction and microanalysis of cosmic dust captured during sample return missions: laboratory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Butterworth, A. L.; Bland, P. A.; Burchell, M. J.; McPhail, D. S.; Chater, R.; Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.

    2004-01-01

    Particles of cometary and asteroidal origin collected at source using dedicated capture cell technologies will be returned to Earth within the next 8 years. Furthermore, coincidental capture of interplanetary dust particles will occur on the exposed surfaces of the Genesis spacecraft. Laboratory simulations using both light-gas-gun and Van de Graaff accelerators have impacted dust analogues at velocities ranging from 5 km s -1 to ca. 72 km s -1 into comparable silicon and aerogel targets. Analysis of the impacts on silicon has shown complete spallation of impact residues for silicate projectiles of 38-53 μm in diameter, however craters formed by 1 μm iron projectiles show that near-intact residues can be preserved. An olivine grain embedded in aerogel has been characterized in situ using Raman micro-spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments have shown that analytical scanning electron microscopy can also be used to characterize embedded grains. Development of a novel particle extraction methodology using a 266 nm UV laser micro-dissection system has resulted in the recovery of an olivine grain. The extracted particle was then "cleaned up" using focused ion beam (FIB) milling to remove excess aerogel that was fused on the grain surface.

  6. Stochastic circumplanetary dynamics of rotating non-spherical dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Martin; Brilliantov, Nikolai V.; Sremčević, Miodrag; Spahn, Frank; Krivov, Alexander V.

    2006-08-01

    We develop a model of stochastic radiation pressure for rotating non-spherical particles and apply the model to circumplanetary dynamics of dust grains. The stochastic properties of the radiation pressure are related to the ensemble-averaged characteristics of the rotating particles, which are given in terms of the rotational time-correlation function of a grain. We investigate the model analytically and show that an ensemble of particle trajectories demonstrates a diffusion-like behaviour. The analytical results are compared with numerical simulations, performed for the motion of the dusty ejecta from Deimos in orbit around Mars. We find that the theoretical predictions are in a good agreement with the simulation results. The agreement however deteriorates at later time, when the impact of non-linear terms, neglected in the analytic approach, becomes significant. Our results indicate that the stochastic modulation of the radiation pressure can play an important role in the circumplanetary dynamics of dust and may in case of some dusty systems noticeably alter an optical depth.

  7. Energetic-Particle Populations and Cosmic-Ray Entry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-17

    H., E. Fl~ickiger. H. von Mandach , and M. Arens, Determina- tion of the ring current radii from cosmic ray neutron monitor data for the 17 December... Mandach , and M. Arens, Determination of the ring current radii from cosmic ray neutron monitor data for the 17 December 1971 magnetic storm, Planet. Space

  8. Portable cosmic particle detectors for subsurface density mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, László; Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Hamar, Gergö; Surányi, Gergely; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    Muography deduces the density length in the interior of the investigated geological object, such as a mountain or volcano by the measurement of the cosmic muon absorption along different paths through the object. If path lengths (average densities) are measured, the average density (path length) can be deduced along the muon paths. A portable, low power consumption cosmic particle tracking detector based on Close Cathode multi-wire proportional chambers [1,2] has been developed for muography based on our earlier developments and experiences at the Wigner RCP of the HAS in Budapest [3,4,5]. The newly developed tracking system consists of six layers with the sensitive area of 0.25 m2 [6]. The spatial resolution of 2 mm provides an angular resolution of 15 mrad. This instrument has been optimized for underground and outdoor measurements: it has a Raspberry pi controlled data acquisition system which includes a custom designed board with a coincidence unit and allows high level remote control, data management and analysis. The individual trigger signals, number of missed triggers, analogue signals from chambers and the temperature are recorded. The duration of data readout (dead time) is 100 microsec. The DAQ software runs on the Raspberry Pi. For standard operation, a graphical user interface has been developed, running on any remote computer with Internet connection (both of wired and wireless) to the Raspberry Pi. A temperature-controlled high-voltage power supply provides a stable and reasonable (> 95 %) tracking performance for the measurements. With total power consumption of 5W, a portable tracking detector can operate for 5 days with a standard 50 Ah battery and with gas (non flammable Ar-CO2 mixture) consumption of 0.5 liter per hour, a 10 l bottle at pressure of 150 bar is enough for four month. The portability (total weight of less than 30 kg) allowed that our tracking detectors have been applied in underground caverns for subsurface density mapping. The

  9. Evaluating the effect of soil dust particles from semi-arid areas on clouds and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjansson, J. E.; Hummel, M.; Lewinschal, A.; Grini, A.

    2016-12-01

    Primary ice production in mixed-phase clouds predominantly takes place by heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust particles. Therefore, mineral dust has a large impact on cloud properties. Organic matter attached to mineral dust particles can expand their already good freezing ability further to warmer subzero temperatures. These dust particles are called "soil dust". Dusts emitted from deserts contribute most to the total dust concentration in the atmosphere and they can be transported over long distances. Soil dust is emitted from semi-arid regions, e.g. agricultural areas. Besides wind erosion, human activities like tillage or harvest might be a large source for soil dust release into the atmosphere. In this study, we analyze the influence of soil dust particles on clouds with the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM; Bentsen et al., 2013: GMD). The parameterization of immersion freezing on soil dust is based on findings from the AIDA cloud chamber (Steinke et al., in prep.). Contact angle and activation energy for soil dust are estimated in order to be used in the dust immersion freezing scheme of the model, which is based on classical nucleation theory. Our first results highlight the importance of soil dust for ice nucleation on a global scale. Its influence is expected to be highest in the northern hemisphere due to its higher area for soil dust emission. The immersion freezing rates due to additional soil dust can on average increase by a factor of 1.2 compared to a mineral dust-only simulation. Using a budget tool for NorESM, influences of soil dust ice nuclei on single tendencies of the cloud microphysics can be identified. For example, accretion to snow is sensitive to adding soil dust ice nuclei. This can result in changes e.g. in the ice water path and cloud radiative properties.

  10. Migration of Dust Particles from Comet 2P Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets (except for Pluto), radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag for Beta equal to 0.002, 0.004, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of Beta correspond to diameters equal to about 200, 100, 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively. We used the Bulirsh-Stoer method of integration, and the relative error per integration step was taken to be less than lo-'. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbit of Comet 2P Encke. We considered initial particles near perihelion (runs denoted as Delta tsub o, = 0), near aphelion (Delta tsub o, = 0.5), and also studied their initial positions when the comet moved for Pa/4 after perihelion passage (such runs are denoted as Delta tsub o, =i 0.25), where Pa is the period of the comet. Variations in time T when perihelion was passed was varied with a step 0.1 day for series 'S' and with a step 1 day for series 'L'. For each Beta we considered N = 101 particles for "S" runs and 150 particles for "L" runs.

  11. Mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles from the 'olivine' infrared class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy observations establish that olivine is abundant and the predominant silicate phase in three interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from the 'olivine' infrared spectra category. Two of the particles have microstructures resembling those of most nonhydrous chondritic IDPs, consisting of micron to submicron grains together with a matrix composed of amorphous carbonaceous material and sub-500 A grains. In addition to olivine these particles respectively contain enstatite and magnetite, and pentlandite plus Ca-rich clinopyroxene. The third IDP consists mostly of olivine and pyrrhotite with little or no matrix material. Olivine grains in this particle contain prominent solar-flare ion tracks with densities corresponding to a space-exposure age between 1000 to 100,000 years. Although the three particles have olivine-rich mineralogies in common, other aspects of their mineralogies and microstructures suggest that they experienced different formation histories. The differences between the particles indicate that the olivine infrared spectral category is a diverse collection of IDPs that probably incorporates several genetic groups.

  12. Parameters of Dust Particles in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Zh. M.; Morozhenko, A. V.

    2001-11-01

    A critical analysis of the methods and results of estimating the optical thickness of the dust component in the Martian atmosphere τ_0, the particle size r_0, and the imaginary part of the refractive index n_ihas shown the following. (1) Observational data on the brightness distribution over the Martian disk as well as the phase dependences of diffusely reflected light and the azimuthal dependences of diffusely transmitted light are most appropriate to use only for verifying the reliability of the aerosol parameters determined by other methods. (2) If the morning and evening fogs in the atmosphere are disregarded, the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer method used to analyze the solar-brightness attenuation measured on the planetary surface yields overestimated extraatmospheric solar intensity I_0and atmospheric optical depth τ_0. At the Viking 1landing site, I_0and τ_0could be overestimated by a factor of 1.7 and by 0.35, respectively. (3) The aerosol size determined by analyzing measurements of the azimuthal dependences for the Martian sky brightness at low elevations of the Sun most likely corresponds to the fog particles. (4) If overestimated values of I_0were used to standardize the observations of the solar radiation transmitted by the Martian atmosphere, then n_iwere also overestimated; using overestimated τ_0also affected the reliability of the latter. (5) The problem of reliability of the available τ_0and r_0estimates for periods of high atmospheric transparency is yet to be solved. For the highest activity of the dust storm in 1971, it was found that 4.5 <= r_0<= 7.5 μm for the lognormal particle size distribution with σ^2= 0.2 and the optical thickness of a dust cloud τ_0>= 15. (6) The spectral values of the apparent albedo of Mars measured in October 1971 at a phase angle of 42° in the spectral range 0.250 <= λ <= 0.717 allowed the imaginary part of the refractive index to be estimated in terms of a model of a dust cloud composed of spherical particles with

  13. Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Leibovitz, B.; Donathan, R.; Fisher, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The ciliated protozoan Paramecium was used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nickel particles. The biological response of these eukaryotic cells to pure nickel powder and iron-nickel powder was assayed and compared to the effect of the inorganic carcinogen nickel subsulfide. Cytotoxicity was determined by the percent survival of treated cells. Genotoxicity was indicated by significant increases in the fraction of nonviable offspring (presumed index of lethal mutations) found after self-fertilization (autogamy) in parents from the nickel-treated versus neutral control groups. The cells were exposed to the dusts and the biological effects determined. Only the nickel subsulfide consistently showed a significant increase in offspring lethality.

  14. Variations in the composition of house dust by particle size.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2017-07-03

    In this study, the distribution of heavy metals and other components in the various size fractions of house dust is investigated. A house dust sample collected from a vacuum cleaner was separated into size fractions by sieving and air classification. The analysis of the size fractions showed that the heavy metals and other components are not uniformly distributed in the various size fractions. The highest total carbon concentrations were found in the size fractions with a mass median diameter of 18-95 µm, while in the coarser size fractions and in the finest size fraction, the total carbon concentration was lower. In contrast, for many heavy metals and other metals (Al, Fe, Ca, S, Mn, Ti, Ba, Sr, As, Co, and V), the maximum concentrations were found in the finest size fraction. With increasing size of the dust fractions, the concentrations decreased. For several of these components, the dependence of the concentration on the particle size can be approximately assessed well using a power function. The distribution of Zn, Cu, Mg and Na was different. While the concentration of Na and Mg was higher in the coarser size fractions, no distinct trend was found for the concentrations of Cu and Zn.

  15. Temperature measurement of a dust particle in a RF plasma GEC reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary difference between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from the unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. This last contribution does not include random motion and is therefore separable from the random motion in a `normal' temperature measurement. In this paper, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motions of a dust particle confined in a glass box in a Gaseous Electronic Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) reference cell employing experimentally determined dust particle fluctuation data analysed using the mean square displacement technique.

  16. Measurements of the vertical fluxes of atomic Fe and Na at the mesopause: Implications for the velocity of cosmic dust entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wentao; Chu, Xinzhao; Gardner, Chester S.; Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan D.; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.; Nesvorný, David

    2015-01-01

    downward fluxes of Fe and Na, measured near the mesopause with the University of Colorado lidars near Boulder, and a chemical ablation model developed at the University of Leeds, are used to constrain the velocity/mass distribution of the meteoroids entering the atmosphere and to derive an improved estimate for the global influx of cosmic dust. We find that the particles responsible for injecting a large fraction of the ablated material into the Earth's upper atmosphere enter at relatively slow speeds and originate primarily from the Jupiter Family of Comets. The global mean Na influx is 17,200 ± 2800 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 298 ± 47 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor and 150 ± 38 t/d for the global influx of cosmic dust. The global mean Fe influx is 102,000 ± 18,000 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 4.29 ± 0.75 t/d for the global input of Fe vapor.

  17. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-04-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  18. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  19. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  20. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  1. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; McKay, David S.

    1987-05-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  2. LAD-C: A Large Area Cosmic Dust and Orbital Debris Collector on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F.; Corsaro, R.; Stansbery, E.

    2007-01-01

    A 10 m^2 aerogel and acoustic sensor system has been under development by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with main collaboration from the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center. This Large Area Debris Collector (LAD-C) is tentatively scheduled to be deployed by the U.S. Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2007. The system will be retrieved, after one to two years of data and sample collection, for post-flight analysis. In addition to cosmic dust and orbital debris sample return, the acoustic sensors will record impact characteristics for potential orbit determination of some of the collected samples. Source identification based on their dynamical signatures may be possible. The LAD-C science return will benefit orbital debris, cosmic dust, and satellite safety communities. This paper presents an overview of the mission objectives, basic configuration, deployment consideration, and science return of the experiment.

  3. Nonstationary stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shotorban, B.

    2011-06-15

    Stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle that are due to discreteness of electrons and ions in plasmas can be described by a one-step process master equation [T. Matsoukas and M. Russell, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 4285 (1995)] with no exact solution. In the present work, using the system size expansion method of Van Kampen along with the linear noise approximation, a Fokker-Planck equation with an exact Gaussian solution is developed by expanding the master equation. The Gaussian solution has time-dependent mean and variance governed by two ordinary differential equations modeling the nonstationary process of dust particle charging. The model is tested via the comparison of its results to the results obtained by solving the master equation numerically. The electron and ion currents are calculated through the orbital motion limited theory. At various times of the nonstationary process of charging, the model results are in a very good agreement with the master equation results. The deviation is more significant when the standard deviation of the charge is comparable to the mean charge in magnitude.

  4. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  5. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  6. Layer-like Structure of Radio-Frequency Discharge with Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. Y.; Vakulenko, A. V.; Lisitchenko, T. Y.; Levada, G. I.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper we are carried out the computer simulation of the dust particles dynamics in the radio frequency discharges at the microgravity conditions using PIC/MCC method for electrons and ions and hydrodynamics model for dust particles. The moving of dust particles is governed by the electrostatic force, ion and neutral drag forces, which are averaged over period of RF discharge. The obtained results show that dust particles form layers with sharp boundaries in the discharge chamber that is response on the instability of the radio-frequency discharge.

  7. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Huang, F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results.

  8. Heterogeneous Photo-oxidation of SO2 in the Presence of Two Different Mineral Dust Particles: Gobi and Arizona Dust.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyeon; Jang, Myoseon; Yu, Zechen

    2017-09-05

    The impact of authentic mineral dust particles sourced from the Gobi Desert (GDD) on the kinetic uptake coefficient of SO2 was studied under varying environments (humidity, O3, and NOx) using both an indoor chamber and an outdoor chamber. There was a significant increase in the kinetic uptake coefficient of SO2 (γSO4(2-),light) for GDD particles under UV light compared to the value (γSO4(2-),dark) under dark conditions at various relative humidities (RH) ranging from 20% to 80%. In both the presence and the absence of O3 and NOx, γSO4(2-),light and γSO4(2-),dark greatly increased with increasing RH. The resulting γSO4(2-),light of GDD particles was also compared to that of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The γSO4(2-),light values of GDD were 2 to 2.5 times greater than those of ATD for all RH levels. To understand the photocatalytic act of dust particles, both GDD and ATD were characterized for the metal element composition of fresh particles, the aerosol acidity of aged particles, and the hygroscopic properties of both fresh and aged particles. We conclude that the difference in the formation of sulfate between GDD and ATD particles is regulated mainly by the quantity of the semiconductive metals in dust particles and partially by hygroscopic properties.

  9. Optical Investigations of Dust Particles Distribution in RF and DC Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V.

    2008-09-07

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to study dust particles movement and conditions of a formation of ordered plasma-dust structures in a capacitively coupled RF discharge. 3D binocular diagnostics of plasma-dust structures in dc discharge was made.

  10. Investigation of the dynamics of nanometer-size dust particles in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'brien, L.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and size distribution of submicron-sized interplanetary dust particles at 1 AU is highly variable due to the nature of its production and transport through the solar system. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009]. Simulations of nano-dust dynamics are performed to gain an understanding of their transport in the inner heliosphere and distribution near 1 AU where they can potentially be detected. Simulations show that the temporal variation in nano-dust detection, as suggested by the STEREO observations, can be described by the dust's interaction with the complex structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) [Juhasz and Horanyi, 2013]. The dust trajectories and their distribution near Earth's orbit is a function of the initial conditions of both nano-dust particles and the IMF. Le Chat et al. (2015) reported on the correlation between high nano-dust fluxes observed by STEREO and the observed Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). We present the results from simulating nano-dust interaction with ICMEs that are modeled as magnetic clouds, and report that the dust trajectories and, thus, their distribution and velocities at 1 AU are significantly altered.

  11. Influence of Air Humidity and Water Particles on Dust Control Using Ultrasonic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Shindo, Dai; Kawamura, Youhei

    2012-07-01

    The influence of air humidity and water particles on dust control was examined using ultrasonic atomization at 2.4 MHz, an acrylic box (61 L), and four types of ore dust samples: green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica. It was clearly demonstrated that ultrasonic atomization was effective in raising humidity rapidly. However, at high relative air humidity, the water particles remained stable in the box without changing to water vapor. Ultrasonic atomization was applied to suppress dust dispersion and 40-95% dust reduction was achieved at 83% relative air humidity. Dust dispersion was more effective with ultrasonic atomization than without.

  12. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  13. [Migration and transformation of heavy metals in street dusts with different particle sizes during urban runoff].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Hong-Tao; Li, Xu-Yong; Lian, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2012-03-01

    The heavy metal pollution in runoff caused by street dust washoff has been an increasingly prominent problem in the context of rapid urbanization in China. Based on measurement of heavy metal contents in street dusts with different particle sizes and an experiment of street dust washoff using simulated rainfall, we analyzed the role of particle size of street dust in heavy metal pollution, and the variation in geometrical forms of heavy metals during street dust washoff. Our results showed that the heavy metal concentration decreased from "static" street dust to "dynamic" runoff particulate in the same diameter particles. Heavy metals in street dust were dissolved and extracted during washoff. The average loss proportion of the five metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were 24.3%, 56.8%, 34.3%, 22.8%, 27.3%, respectively. The loss proportion increased with the decrease of the particle size of street dust. Proportion of extracted form dust was higher in street than that in washoff samples, which suggested some dissolved loss in water. In washoff samples, dissolved metals of waterphase did not have significant changes; however, heavy metals with particle state in waterphase reduced rapidly during runoff. Meanwhile, heavy metals of solid-phase particle reduced during runoff. Street dust with small particle size had higher loss rate during runoff. The variation rate of street dust loss among different particle sizes varied from 4.6% to 62.1%. Street dust with smaller particle size had higher migration ability in runoff, which was more risky to urban water pollution.

  14. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  15. Wave-particle dynamics of wave breaking in the self-excited dust acoustic wave.

    PubMed

    Teng, Lee-Wen; Chang, Mei-Chu; Tseng, Yu-Ping; I, Lin

    2009-12-11

    The wave-particle microdynamics in the breaking of the self-excited dust acoustic wave growing in a dusty plasma liquid is investigated through directly tracking dust micromotion. It is found that the nonlinear wave growth and steepening stop as the mean oscillating amplitude of dust displacement reaches about 1/k (k is the wave number), where the vertical neighboring dust trajectories start to crossover and the resonant wave heating with uncertain crest trapping onsets. The dephased dust oscillations cause the abrupt dropping and broadening of the wave crest after breaking, accompanied by the transition from the liquid phase with coherent dust oscillation to the gas phase with chaotic dust oscillation. Corkscrew-shaped phase-space distributions measured at the fixed phases of the wave oscillation cycle clearly indicate how dusts move in and constitute the evolving waveform through dust-wave interaction.

  16. Martian global dust storms - Zonally symmetric numerical simulations including size-dependent particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1993-02-01

    A zonally symmetric primitive-equation grid-point model of the Martian atmosphere is coupled with an aerosol transport/microphysical model in order to numerically investigate the size-dependent transport of dust particles in the Martian atmosphere. The coupled model accounts for diabatic heating due to a radiatively active evolving dust field, but neglects feedbacks between atmosphere-surface interactions and surface dust lifting. The differing suspension lifetimes of dust particles of various sizes (radius = 1-80 microns), in conjunction with spatially varying atmospheric dynamics, result in latitudinal differences in several measurements of the column integrated particle concentration. This work indicates the importance of considering the full range of particle sizes (and shapes) of the suspended dust during Martian global dust storms and their impact upon the spatial extent and wavelength-dependent radiative influence of such storms.

  17. Dust Particle Density and Charges in Radio-Frequency Mixture Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Peng-Yun; Sun, Ji-Zhong; Yao, Lie-Ming; Duan, Xu-Ru

    2011-09-01

    We develop a method for measuring the density and charges of dust particles in a capacitive coupled cylinder discharge chamber in mixtures of gases SiH4/C2H4/Ar. Dust particles are created in situ using these reactive mixtures in rf discharge. A Langmuir probe is employed for the measurement of important plasma parameters, such as electron density, electron temperature and ion density. The density and charges of dust particles is then calculated based on the data of the measurement of these parameters and a known dust plasma sheath model. The curves of dust particle density versus rf power and gas pressure are presented, respectively, under various experimental conditions. The dust charges versus different experimental conditions are also evaluated and presented.

  18. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  19. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of < or = 5 microm, with virtually identical size distribution) birch or oak dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  20. Exploring results of the possibility on detecting cosmic ray particles by acoustic way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Li, Y.; Chen, D.; Zheng, R.; Song, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that high energy particles produce detectable sounds in water. However, no one has been able to detect an acoustic signal generated by a high energy cosmic ray particle in water. Results show that transient ultrasonic signals in a large lake or reservoir are fairly complex and that the transient signals under water may arise mainly from sound radiation from microbubbles. This field is not explored in detail. Perhaps, the sounds created by cosmic ray particles hide in these ultrasonic signals. In order to develop the technique of acoustic detection, it is most important to make a thorough investigation of these ultrasonic signals in water.

  1. Diffusion of strongly magnetized cosmic ray particles in a turbulent medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) propagation in a turbulent medium is usually considered in the diffusion approximation. Here, the diffusion equation is obtained for strongly magnetized particles in the general form. The influence of a large-scale random magnetic field on CR propagation in interstellar medium is discussed. Cosmic rays are assumed to propagate in a medium with a regular field H and an ensemble of random MHD waves. The energy density of waves on scales smaller than the free path 1 of CR particles is small. The collision integral of the general form which describes interaction between relativistic particles and waves in the quasilinear approximation is used.

  2. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of mineral dust particles exposed to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Zamin A.; Welti, André; Chou, Cédric; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2013-05-01

    Deposition and immersion mode ice nucleation studies of kaolinite (Ka) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles exposed to ozone at 430 ppbv, 1.4 and 4.3 ppmv for approximately 2 hours in a stainless steel aerosol tank are presented. The polydisperse particles used have a mode mobility diameter of 800 nm for Ka and 400 nm for ATD. The portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC) and immersion chamber (IMCA-ZINC) were used to study deposition and immersion mode ice nucleation respectively. Both instruments sampled through a particle impactor with a diameter cut-off size of 1 μm. Preliminary results indicate that ice nucleation can be enhanced or inhibited depending on ozone concentration used for the ageing process with higher concentrations suppressing ice nucleation in both immersion and deposition modes. Additionally, Ka and ATD respond differently to the ageing process and to the different modes of ice nucleation. Ozone surface coverage and initial uptake coefficients are presented for the low exposure studies to explain the ice nucleation behavior observed. Ice Active Surface Site Densities (IASSD) are presented as a means of comparison and parameterization of the data to predict potential atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) concentrations.

  4. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Maechling, C. R.; Zare, R. N.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the first definitive measurements of specific organic molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's)) in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). An improved version of the microbeam-two-step laser mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two IDP's gave similar mass spectra showing an abundance of PAH's. Control samples, including particles of probable terrestrial origin from the same stratospheric collector, gave either null results or quite different spectra. We conclude that the PAH's are probably indigenous to the IDP's and are not terrestrial contaminants. The instrument used to study the particles is a two-step laser mass spectrometer. Constituent neutral molecules of the sample are first desorbed with a pulsed infrared laser beam focussed to 40 micrometers. In the second step, PAH's in the desorbed plume are preferentially ionized by a pulsed UV laser beam. Resulting ions produced by resonant absorption are extracted into a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This instrument has high spatial resolution, high ion transmission, unlimited mass range, and multichannel detection of all ion masses from a single laser shot.

  5. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Maechling, C. R.; Zare, R. N.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the first definitive measurements of specific organic molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's)) in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). An improved version of the microbeam-two-step laser mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two IDP's gave similar mass spectra showing an abundance of PAH's. Control samples, including particles of probable terrestrial origin from the same stratospheric collector, gave either null results or quite different spectra. We conclude that the PAH's are probably indigenous to the IDP's and are not terrestrial contaminants. The instrument used to study the particles is a two-step laser mass spectrometer. Constituent neutral molecules of the sample are first desorbed with a pulsed infrared laser beam focussed to 40 micrometers. In the second step, PAH's in the desorbed plume are preferentially ionized by a pulsed UV laser beam. Resulting ions produced by resonant absorption are extracted into a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This instrument has high spatial resolution, high ion transmission, unlimited mass range, and multichannel detection of all ion masses from a single laser shot.

  6. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T. E.; Reilly, T. W.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The resolution of available low-voltage SEM (LVSEM) models used in the characterization of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is limited by a number of factors including energy spread in the electron source, beam brightness, scanning electron detector geometry, and various lens aberrations. This paper describes an improved model of LVSEM which offers an increased resolution at low voltage. The improvements include a cold cathode FE source which has an extremely low inherent energy spread and high brightness, a second condenser lens to converge the beam and maintain an optimum aperture half-angle, and a detector optimized for low-voltage scanning-electron collection. To reduce lens aberrations, the specimen is immersed in the objective lens field. The features of several IDP samples observed using the images obtained with this LVSEM model are described.

  7. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Fujita, D.

    2008-09-07

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  8. Origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Lee, Wei

    1994-01-01

    Using experiments as a basis, we have developed a scenario for the origin of the hydrocarbon material of carbonaceous chondrites. This scenario can also serve as an explanation for the origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the atmospheres of C stars undergoing a late stage of stellar evolution is indicated by the observed unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. Those molecules are then transported through interstellar space where they become enriched with D through ion molecule reactions when passing through cold, dark clouds. Many of those PAH molecules are subsequently hydrogenated and cracked in a H-dominated plasma such as would have occurred in the solar nebula. The resulting mixture of alkanes and residual D-rich PAH molecules was then incorporated into the mineral fraction of the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites and IDP's.

  9. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T. E.; Reilly, T. W.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The resolution of available low-voltage SEM (LVSEM) models used in the characterization of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is limited by a number of factors including energy spread in the electron source, beam brightness, scanning electron detector geometry, and various lens aberrations. This paper describes an improved model of LVSEM which offers an increased resolution at low voltage. The improvements include a cold cathode FE source which has an extremely low inherent energy spread and high brightness, a second condenser lens to converge the beam and maintain an optimum aperture half-angle, and a detector optimized for low-voltage scanning-electron collection. To reduce lens aberrations, the specimen is immersed in the objective lens field. The features of several IDP samples observed using the images obtained with this LVSEM model are described.

  10. Aqueous alteration in five chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1991-02-01

    Results are presented on AEM observations carried out on chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which include data on alkali-rich layer silicates and new observations of nonstoichiometric plagioclase and alkali feldspars in individual CP IDPs. The compositional similarities found between the feldspar minerals and the layer silicates suggest that the latter have formed from these feldspars during low-temperature aqueous alterations at a stage of diagenesis in the CP IDP parent bodies. Small, but persistent, amounts of layer silicates, carbonates, and barite found in several nominally anhydrous CP IDPs support the suggestion of incipient aqueous alterations in their parent bodies, which may include short-period comet nuclei and outer-belt asteroids.

  11. Unequilibrated, equilibrated, and reduced aggregates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    Track-rich anhydrous IDP's are probably the most primitive IDP's because they have escaped significant post-accretional alteration; they exhibit evidence of (nebular) gas phase reactions; their mineralogy is similar to comet Halley's dust; and some of them exhibit comet-like IR spectral characteristics. However, basic questions about the mineralogy and petrography of anhydrous IDP's remain unanswered, because they contain aggregated components that can be heterogeneous on a scale of nanometers. In some IDP's, aggregates account for greater than 75 percent of the volume of the particle. The aggregates have been systematically examined using an analytical electron microscope (AEM), which provides probe-forming optics and (x-ray and electron) spectrometers necessary to analyze individual nanometer-sized grains. The AEM results reveal at least three mineralogically distinct classes of aggregates in an hydrous IDP's, with mineralogies reflecting significantly different formation/aggregation environments.

  12. ASTROPHYSICS AND COSMOLOGY RELATED TO PARTICLES AND NUCLEI: Ultra-high energy cosmic rays threshold in Randers-Finsler space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Kinematics in Finsler space is used to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles through the cosmic microwave background radiation. We find that the GZK threshold is lifted dramatically in Randers-Finsler space. A tiny deformation of spacetime from Minkowskian to Finslerian allows more ultra-high energy cosmic rays particles to arrive at the earth. It is suggested that the lower bound of particle mass is related with the negative second invariant speed in Randers-Finsler space.

  13. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  14. Halley comet dust particle classification according to the data obtained by mass spectrometer Puma-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikov, Yu. P.; Evlanov, E. N.; Fomenkova, M. N.; Mukhin, L. M.; Nazarov, M. A.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Zubkov, B. V.

    Nonzero mode spectra of the dust component of Comet Halley obtained by the dust particle impact mass-spectrometer, Puma-1, on Vega, are used to examine the origin of the mineral phase. The element compositions of 511 cometary particles are studied, using data on ions of Na, Ca, C, H, N, S, Si, Mg, Fe, Cr, and Al. The results are used to determine the mineral composition of the dust of Comet Halley.

  15. Charging of a dust particle in a plasma with a non extensive electron distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2011-10-15

    We present a theoretical model for the electrostatic charging of a spherical dust particle in an electron-ion plasma with streaming ions and a nonextensive electron distribution function following a non-Maxwell-Boltzmann law. The non-extensive electron distribution function drastically affects the electron current to dust grain surface and, therefore, the electron charge on a dust particle is significantly reduced in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma.

  16. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    W.U. Boeglin, A.L. Roquemore, and R. Maqueda

    2009-03-06

    Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed. 2008 American Institute of Physics. __________________________________________________

  17. STARDUST and Interplanetary Dust Particles - Big Science from Small Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Flynn, G. J.

    2002-01-01

    Comets are primitive bodies that are widely believed to be a reservoir of preserved interstellar and circumstellar grains, and molecular cloud materials (organics). Direct samples of cometary dust along with interstellar grains will be returned by the STARDUST Mission in 2006. Analyses of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and analogue materials in the laboratory provide constraints and serve as "ground truth" for evaluating various hypotheses on the nature of comets and interstellar grains. Anhydrous IDPs are the most primitive remnants of the primordial Solar System, and are our only known samples of comets. These cometary lDPs are rich in preserved interstellar organic compounds II]. In addition, abundant interstellar silicates have recently been discovered in cluster lDPs [2]. In some of these IDPs, the presolar silicate abundance reaches 1 wt %, exceeding the total presolar grain abundance in meteorites by three orders of magnitude, where presolar silicates are still notably absent. The results to date support the idea that comets are rich in presolar materials, but are at odds with the common perception that they are 'pristine aggregates of interstellar grains'. These results underscore the scientific importance of sample return missions to comets. The technology for the analysis of micrometer-sized samples is well advanced. The newest generation of ion probe instruments allow for isotopic analyses at the submicrometer level. The nature of the organic matter is analyzed using Infrared and soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques on synchrotron-based instruments, also at the micrometer-scale and smaller. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy provide details on the mineralogy and chemistry of constituent grains in !DPs at nearly the atomic scale. Novel sample preparation techniques have been developed such that all of these measurements can now be made on the same 10 micrometer diameter particle. Returned comet samples captured in aerogel will pose new challenges in

  18. Sungrazing dust particles against the sporadic meteor background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubaev, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    From the results of the statistical study, the genetic relation between some meteors (from -5 m to +5 m ) of the sporadic background and the comets of the Kreutz, Marsden, and Kracht families has been revealed. The radiants of sporadic meteors are concentrated at the geocentric ecliptic latitudes 7°-10° northward and southward of the ecliptic. The radiants of the sungrazing meteoroids, that were detected on their heliocentric orbits "before" and "after" the perihelion passage, are concentrated in the elongation intervals of approximately 120°-165° and 20°-60° from the Sun, respectively. Each of the specified radiant regions, in its turn, breaks up into two groups. The group of radiants with elongations of about 30° and 155° from the Sun belongs to the Marsden and Kracht cometary families, while the group with 50° and 135°, to the Kreutz cometary family. In the distribution by perihelion distance, a sharp decrease of the number of observed dust particles with q < 0.08 AU was found. This corresponds to the heliocentric distances (20-30 R ⊙), where the production of microscopic dust due to sublimation of cometary nuclei, while approaching the Sun, terminates. The number of sporadic sungrazing meteoroids detected after their passage in the vicinity of the Sun is approximately 20 times smaller than the number of similar particles in the preperihelion part of the trajectory. This result is of special importance for studying the thermodesorption effect of meteoroids (i.e., the change in the content of chemical elements in meteoroids as a function of the perihelion distance).

  19. Observation of the Effects of Dust Particles on Plasma Fluctuation Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ratynskaia, S.; De Angeli, M.; Lontano, M.; Lazzaro, E.; Gervasini, G.; De Angelis, U.; Marmolino, C.; Capobianco, G.; Morfill, G. E.

    2007-08-17

    Charged dust particles are theoretically expected to modify the amplitude and spectrum of plasma fluctuations, and this can eventually provide novel diagnostic tools. Direct experimental evidence of the effects of dust particles on the fluctuations of a low collisionality plasma is reported, in agreement with the expectations of kinetic theory.

  20. Exposure to dust and its particle size distribution in shoe manufacture and repair workplaces measured with GRIMM laser dust monitor.

    PubMed

    Stroszejn-Mrowca, Grazyna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2003-01-01

    Owing to a diversified technological process and a great variety of products and materials used in shoe manufacture, workers may be exposed to dusts that contain different chemicals and particles of various shapes and sizes. The aim of this study was to assess the dust exposure, taking account of concentration of particular size fractions according to the European Standard Norm, and to analyze particle size distribution in inhalable dust at selected workplaces in a modern shoe manufacture plant and in a small shoe repair workshop in comparison with other industrial branches. In these two workplaces, the concentrations of dust, representing the inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions, were measured with the GRIMM 1.105 laser dust monitor. The particle size distribution in inhaled dust in the most characteristic workposts was analyzed. In the shoe manufacture plant, the concentrations ranged from 124 microg/m3 (leather cutting out) to 724 microg/m3 (scouring and milling of soles); concentrations of the thoracic and respirable fractions in the same workposts ranged from 74 microg/m3 to 412 microg/m3 and from 24 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3, respectively. In the shoe repair workshop, the recorded concentrations were higher: the values ranged from 521 microg/m3 (gluing of shoes and soles, zipper exchange and heel abrasion) to 916 microg/m3 (uppers sewing and heel scouring) for the inhaled fraction; from 335 microg/m3 to 499 microg/m3 for the thoracic fraction; and from 88 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3 for the respirable fraction. The mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhalable dust particles fell within the limits of 6.2-25.0 mm. Dust with the smallest particles (MMAD = 6.2 mm) was observed in shoe brushing and polishing, and with the largest particles (MMAD = 25.0 mm) in uppers sewing. The modern process of shoe manufacture is characterized by very low concentrations of inhalable dust and its fractions, they are considerably lower than occupational exposure limits

  1. Particle-in-cell simulation of astrophysical plasmas: Probing the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, Thomas Alan

    Cosmic rays, the product of natural extraterrestrial particle accelerators far more powerful than the LHC, were first detected a century ago. A "standard model" of cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants has begun to emerge, but a number of questions still require satisfactory answers. The maximum particle energy attainable via the most favored mechanism, diffusive shock acceleration, is limited by the amplitude of magnetic-field turbulence in the unshocked interstellar or circumstellar medium, but cosmic rays are observed at high enough energies that some magnetic-field amplification is required. By what mechanisms might this amplification occur, and can it operate to a great enough extent to account for those cosmic rays thought to be of Galactic origin? A number of proposed solutions involve instabilities arising from interactions between cosmic rays and the upstream plasma, whose evolution becomes highly nonlinear. A related question explored is whether the presence of accelerated particles in the shock vicinity has any microscopic effect on the instabilities governing the shock itself. Particle-in-cell kinetic simulations allow us to investigate the growth and saturation of these instabilities at the (astrophysically) microscopic scale, providing valuable insights and important considerations for self-consistent macroscopic models of particle acceleration.

  2. MCNP6 Cosmic & Terrestrial Background Particle Fluxes -- Release 4

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.; Wilcox, Trevor

    2015-01-23

    Essentially a set of slides, the presentation begins with the MCNP6 cosmic-source option, then continues with the MCNP6 transport model (atmospheric, terrestrial) and elevation scaling. It concludes with a few slides on results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  3. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: IX Results of examination of the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kraft, L M; Vogel, F S; Lloyd, B; Benton, E V; Cruty, M R; Haymaker, W; Leon, A; Billingham, J; Turnbill, C E; Teas, V; Look, B C; Suri, K; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Samorajski, T; Bailey, O T; Zeman, W

    1975-04-01

    The olfactory epithelium, but not the nasal respiratory epithelium, of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived their flight on Apollo XVII showed both diffuse alterations and numerous disseminated focal lesions. The olfactory mucosa of the mouse that died during flight was also affected, but to a minor degree insofar as could be determined. All this was in contrast to the normal appearance of the olfactory mucosa of the numerous control animals. A number of possible causes were considered: systemic or regional infection; inhaled particulate material (seed dust); by-products from the KO2 bed in aerosol or particulate form; gas contaminants originating in the flight package; volatile substances from the dead mouse; weightlessness; and cosmic ray particle radiation. Where feasible, studies were conducted in an effort to rule in or rule out some of these potentially causative factors. No definitive conclusions were reached as to the cause of the lesions in the flight mice.

  4. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  5. Interplanetary dust particles, not wind blown dust, control high altitude ice clouds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, Owen B.

    2016-10-01

    Water ice clouds on Mars are commonly observed at high altitudes. However, current generation Mars three-dimensional general circulation models (GCM) struggle to reproduce clouds above approximately 20-30 km. On Mars, as on Earth, ice cloud formation likely initiates by heterogeneous nucleation, which requires a population of suspended ice nuclei contiguous with supersaturated atmospheric water vapor. Although supersaturation is observed at high altitudes and has been reproduced in models, models predict very few ice nuclei. The small number of ice nuclei in the upper atmosphere is due to the assumption in Mars GCMs that the only source of ice nuclei is dust from the Martian surface. However, terrestrial mesospheric noctilucent clouds have been shown to form by ice nucleation on particles originating from ablated micrometeroids. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that a population of micrometeoric ablation biproducts on Mars exists and can act as a site for cloud nucleation at high altitudes. We present simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model for Mars (MarsCAM) based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model for Earth,coupled with a physically based, state-of-the-art cloud and dust physics model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to show that ablating micrometeoroids can yield abundant ice nuclei throughout the upper atmosphere of Mars. We find that simulations including a constant annual micrometeoroid flux allows us to reproduce the observed properties of high altitude water ice clouds including vertical distribution and particle size. In general, effective radius decreases with increasing altitude. We have additionally explored the impact of variable ablation rates. Preliminary results suggest that relatively high ablation rates, near or greater than 50%, are required to reproduce observed cloud features.

  6. The impact of mineral dust particles on radiation and cloud formation during a Saharan dust event over Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Nenes, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Barahona, D.; Kumar, P.; Blahak, U.; Seifert, A.

    2010-12-01

    Dust, through their action as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), has long been hypothesized to impact clouds and the hydrological cycle. This effect is particularly strong during dust outbreaks. Europe, being adjacent to the Sahara, is susceptible to the effects of dust storms; a quantitative assessment remains elusive and is the subject of this study. This talk focuses on one major dust event that occurred in May 2008. Its origin was in the Sahara and from there mineral dust particles were transported over the western Mediterranean, covering large areas of Western Europe. During the episode, high aerosol concentrations were observed throughout Europe; ice nuclei concentrations significantly increased (compared to pre-event levels) at Kleiner Feldberg, Germany (Bingemer et al. 2009). During this time, traditional weather forecast models (which currently neglect aerosol impacts on atmospheric processes) exhibited poor prediction skill. The impacts of dust on atmospheric state is studied with the regional scale online coupled model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009) that accounts for feedbacks between chemistry, aerosols, radiation, and clouds. A two-moment cloud microphysics scheme (Seifert & Beheng 2001) is coupled together with comprehensive parameterisations for aerosol activation (Kumar et al. 2009; Barahona et al. 2010) and ice nucleation (Barahona and Nenes 2009) to simulate the impact of the various aerosol particles on the cloud microphysics and therefore on cloud properties and precipitation. The sensitivity of predicted atmospheric state to the dust amount, properties (hygroscopicity) and parameterization is thoroughly studied.

  7. Enhancing the Spectral Hardening of Cosmic TeV Photons by Mixing with Axionlike Particles in the Magnetized Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanino, Daniele; Vazza, Franco; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Viel, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale extragalactic magnetic fields may induce conversions between very-high-energy photons and axionlike particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. However, in simplified "cell" models, used so far to represent extragalactic magnetic fields, this mechanism would be strongly suppressed by current astrophysical bounds. Here we consider a recent model of extragalactic magnetic fields obtained from large-scale cosmological simulations. Such simulated magnetic fields would have large enhancement in the filaments of matter. As a result, photon-ALP conversions would produce a significant spectral hardening for cosmic TeV photons. This effect would be probed with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array detector. This possible detection would give a unique chance to perform a tomography of the magnetized cosmic web with ALPs.

  8. Enhancing the Spectral Hardening of Cosmic TeV Photons by Mixing with Axionlike Particles in the Magnetized Cosmic Web.

    PubMed

    Montanino, Daniele; Vazza, Franco; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Viel, Matteo

    2017-09-08

    Large-scale extragalactic magnetic fields may induce conversions between very-high-energy photons and axionlike particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. However, in simplified "cell" models, used so far to represent extragalactic magnetic fields, this mechanism would be strongly suppressed by current astrophysical bounds. Here we consider a recent model of extragalactic magnetic fields obtained from large-scale cosmological simulations. Such simulated magnetic fields would have large enhancement in the filaments of matter. As a result, photon-ALP conversions would produce a significant spectral hardening for cosmic TeV photons. This effect would be probed with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array detector. This possible detection would give a unique chance to perform a tomography of the magnetized cosmic web with ALPs.

  9. Comparison Between Dust Particle Generation In CH4 or CH4/N2 Mixing RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2005-10-31

    Dust particles have been spontaneously generated either in pure CH4 or in CH4/N2 r.f. plasmas. The dust particle formation results from homogeneous nucleation in the plasma and is detected by laser light scattering (Ar+, {lambda} = 514.5 nm). The temporal and spatial behaviour of dust particles is studied. In pure methane gas, particles are trapped in well defined clouds at the plasma sheath boundaries. In a CH4/N2 mixture, the nitrogen addition leads to an expansion of the clouds. For nitrogen contents higher than 50%, the space between the electrodes is nearly completely filled with dust particles leading to plasma instabilities and a void appears in the center of the discharge. The particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.8-2 {mu}m. For nitrogen-rich plasmas, the particles growth is improved and leads to a rough shape with an orange-peel-type surface texture.

  10. Laboratory far-infrared spectroscopy of terrestrial sulphides to support analysis of cosmic dust spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusentsova, T.; Peale, R. E.; Maukonen, D.; Figueiredo, P.; Harlow, G. E.; Ebel, D. S.; Nissinboim, A.; Sherman, K.; Lisse, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    As an aid in interpreting data from space far-infrared (far-IR) missions, such as the Herschel Space Observatory with its Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, this paper presents spectroscopic studies of selected naturally occurring terrestrial sulphide minerals in the wavelength range 15-250 μm. The data can also be used to support the return from other, both past and planned, IR space missions, such as the Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer, SOFIA, SPiCA and Millimetron. In this study, we present far-IR spectra for 11 natural sulphide minerals in the form of dispersed powders of micron particle dimensions. Samples of various sulphides from the American Museum of Natural History mineral collection were selected based on criteria of diversity and potential astrophysical relevancy, based on their identification in Stardust, in stratospheric interplanetary dust particle samples, or in meteorites. Mineral species include digenite, galena, alabandite, sphalerite, wurtzite, covellite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, chalcopyrite and stibnite. Most of the sulphides examined possess prominent and characteristic features in the far-IR range. Spectra obtained are compared to those available from previous studies. Far-IR peak frequencies and mass absorption coefficient values are tabulated. Effects of particle size distribution, low temperature, and provenance on IR spectra are demonstrated for selected samples.

  11. Mineralogical properties and internal structures of individual fine particles of Saharan dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Park, Mi Yeon; Kandler, Konrad; Nousiainen, Timo; Kemppinen, Osku

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing radiation, gases, other aerosols, and clouds. The assessment of its optical and chemical impacts requires knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of bulk dust and single particles. Despite the existence of a large body of data from field measurements and laboratory analyses, the internal properties of single dust particles have not been defined precisely. Here, we report on the mineralogical organization and internal structures of individual fine ( < 5 µm) Saharan dust particles sampled at Tenerife, Canary Islands. The bulk of Tenerife dust was composed of clay minerals (81 %), followed by quartz (10 %), plagioclase (3 %), and K-feldspar (2 %). Cross-sectional slices of Saharan dust particles prepared by the focused ion beam technique were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to probe the particle interiors. TEM analysis showed that the most common particle type was clay-rich agglomerate, dominated by illite-smectite series clay minerals with subordinate kaolinite. Submicron grains of iron (hydr)oxides (goethite and hematite) were commonly dispersed through the clay-rich particles. The median total volume of the iron (hydr)oxide grains included in the dust particles was estimated to be about 1.5 % vol. The average iron content of clay minerals, assuming 14 wt % H2O, was determined to be 5.0 wt %. Coarse mineral cores, several micrometers in size, were coated with thin layers of clay-rich agglomerate. Overall, the dust particles were roughly ellipsoidal, with an average axial ratio of 1.4 : 1.0 : 0.5. The mineralogical and structural properties of single Saharan dust particles provide a basis for the modeling of dust radiative properties. Major iron-bearing minerals, such as illite-smectite series clay minerals and iron (hydr)oxides, were commonly submicron- to nano-sized, possibly enhancing their biogeochemical availability to remote marine ecosystems lacking micronutrients.

  12. Metamorphism of cosmic dust: Processing from circumstellar outflows to the cometary regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1989-01-01

    Metamorphism of refractory particles continues in the interstellar medium (ISM) where the driving forces are sputtering by cosmic ray particles, annealing by high energy photons, and grain destruction in supernova generated shocks. Studies of the depletion of the elements from the gas phase of the interstellar medium tell us that if grain destruction occurs with high efficiency in the ISM, then there must be some mechanism by which grains can be formed in the ISM. Most grains in a cloud which collapses to form a star will be destroyed; many of the surviving grains will be severely processed. Grains in the outermost regions of the nebula may survive relatively unchanged by thermal processing or hydration. It is these grains which one hopes to find in comets. However, only those grains encased in ice at low temperature can be considered pristine since a considerable degree of hydrous alteration might occur in a cometary regolith if the comet enters the inner solar system. The physical, chemical and isotopic properties of a refractory grain at each stage of its life cycle will be discussed.

  13. Generation rate and particle size distribution of wood dust by handheld sanding operation.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2016-11-29

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and Japan Society for Occupational Health (JSOH) classified wood dust as a human carcinogen. Former studies have suggested that sanding with a portable sander is one of the processes that are liable to cause highest exposure to wood dust. However, the wood dust by sanding operation has not been investigated sufficiently. In this study, the generation rate and the particle size distribution of the wood dust produced by handheld sanding operation were observed by laboratory experiments. Beech and cypress were taken as typical hard and soft wood specimen respectively, and sanded with a portable sander. Three grades of sand paper (coarse, medium, fine) were attached to the sander in turn to be tested. The quantity of the wood dust produced by the sander was measured by weighing the specimen before and after the sanding and then the generation rate of the dust was calculated. Soft wood generated more dust than hard wood due to the difference in abrasion durability. A coarse sand paper produced more dust than a fine sand paper. The particles of less than 1 μm diameter were scarcely observed in the wood dust. When the specimens were sanded with a fine sand paper, the mass median aerodynamic diameters of beech dust and cypress dust were 9.0 μm and 9.8 μm, respectively. Respirable wood dust is able to be controlled by general ventilation with more than 0.7-4.2 m(3)/min ventilation rate.

  14. Shielding of a Moving Charged Dust Particle in the Nonequilibrium Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Momot, A. I.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2008-09-07

    Study of shielding of a moving charged dust particle in the nonequilibrium plasma was performed. It is known that in the collisionless so-called Vlasov plasma the electric field of a slowly moving charged particle at high distances corresponds to quadrupole [1, 2, 3]. It was found that in the collisional plasma the electric field of a moving dust particle had the dipole component and the long distance behavior of the electric fields was defined by this component. Therefore the interaction of dust particles in plasma flow became dependent on the relative orientation of the interpaticle radius-vector and the flow velocity vector.

  15. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  16. Interplanetary Dust Particles as Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Brunetto, R.; Demeo, F. E.; Djouadi, Z.; Dumas, C.; Merouane, S.; Mousis, O.; Zanda, B.

    2015-06-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  17. Interplanetary Dust Particles As Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, Pierre; Marsset, Michael; Beck, Pierre; Binzel, Richard; Birlan, Mirel; Brunetto, Rosario; DeMeo, Francesca; Djouadi, Zahia; Dumas, Christophe; Merouane, Sihane; Mousis, Olivier; Zanda, Brigitte

    2015-11-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  18. A parallel direct numerical simulation of dust particles in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. V.; Yokota, R.; Stenchikov, G.; Kocurek, G.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their effects on radiation transport, aerosols play an important role in the global climate. Mineral dust aerosol is a predominant natural aerosol in the desert and semi-desert regions of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The Arabian Peninsula is one of the three predominant source regions on the planet "exporting" dust to almost the entire world. Mineral dust aerosols make up about 50% of the tropospheric aerosol mass and therefore produces a significant impact on the Earth's climate and the atmospheric environment, especially in the MENA region that is characterized by frequent dust storms and large aerosol generation. Understanding the mechanisms of dust emission, transport and deposition is therefore essential for correctly representing dust in numerical climate prediction. In this study we present results of numerical simulations of dust particles in a turbulent flow to study the interaction between dust and the atmosphere. Homogenous and passive dust particles in the boundary layers are entrained and advected under the influence of a turbulent flow. Currently no interactions between particles are included. Turbulence is resolved through direct numerical simulation using a parallel incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver. Model output provides information on particle trajectories, turbulent transport of dust and effects of gravity on dust motion, which will be used to compare with the wind tunnel experiments at University of Texas at Austin. Results of testing of parallel efficiency and scalability is provided. Future versions of the model will include air-particle momentum exchanges, varying particle sizes and saltation effect. The results will be used for interpreting wind tunnel and field experiments and for improvement of dust generation parameterizations in meteorological models.

  19. Sulfate and nitrate in Asian dust particles observed in desert, coastal and marine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Wu, F.; Junji, C.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfate and nitrate in dust particles are believed to be two key species which can largely alter the physical and chemical properties of the particles in the atmosphere, in particular under humid conditions. Their occurrence in the particles has usually been considered to be the consequence of particles' aging during their long-distance travel in the air although they are present in some crustal minerals. Our observations at two deserts in China during dust episodes revealed that there were soil-derived sulfate and background-like nitrate in atmospheric dust samples. Sulfate in dust samples was proportional to samples' mass and comprised at steady mass percentages in differently sized samples. In contrast, nitrate concentration was approximately stable and independent from dust loading. Our observations at inland and coastal areas of China during dust episodes revealed that sulfate and nitrate were hardly produced on the surface of dust particles that were originated from the deserts areas in northwestern China. This is because the dust particles were in the postfrontal air, where the temperature was low and the relative humidity was small due to the adiabatic properties of the air mass. There are a number studies reporting that sulfate and nitrate had been efficiently produced on mineral particles in inland areas of China. However, those mineral particles were more likely from the local areas rather than from the desert areas. Our observations in the coastal areas of Japan, which is located in the downstream areas of the Asian continent and surrounded by sea areas revealed that dust particles appearing there frequently contained sulfate and nitrate, indicating sulfate and nitrate had been efficiently produced on the surface of the particles when the particles traveled in the marine air between China and Japan.

  20. The development and the tests of the electrostatic probe for dust particle collection in thermonuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Voityuk, A. N.; Zakharov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Formation of dust particles in thermonuclear reactors can greatly affect the plasma parameters and lead to accumulation of tritium. The rates of formation and deposition of dust need to be measured, and the parameters of formation of dust particles and clusters need to be studied. A model of a device for collection of fine conductive particles capable of removing them from the reactor chamber for future research is proposed in this paper. The dust collector's operation is based on a principle of applied electrostatic field. The model was tested in different operating conditions: in vacuum, at the atmospheric pressure in the atmosphere of air and dry nitrogen. The experiments were conducted with a stationary system and with the dust collector in motion relative to the dusty surface. It is shown that, during the probe moving relative to the surface, it can remove up to 95% of fine tungsten particles with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 μm.

  1. Dosimeter design, construction, and implantation. [for recording HZE cosmic particle tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, D. L.; Suri, K.; Durso, J. A.; Cota, F. L.; Ashley, W. W.; Binnard, R. M.; Haymaker, W.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Zeman, W.

    1975-01-01

    To detect the passage of cosmic ray particles through the heads of the pocket mice during the Apollo XVII flight, a 'monitor' (dosimeter) composed of plastics was prepared and implanted under the scalp. The monitor was mounted on a platform, the undersurface of which fitted the contour of the skull. Numerous tests were run to assure that the presence of the monitor assembly beneath the scalp would be compatible with the well-being of the mice and that the capacity of the monitor to detect the traversal of cosmic ray particles would be preserved over the several weeks during which it would remain under the scalp.

  2. ISEE-C HKH high energy cosmic rays. [multidetector particle telescope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, D. E.; Bieser, F. S.; Heckman, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the ISEE-C multidetector cosmic ray telescope experiment. The HKH particle identifier sensor array is designed to identify the charge and mass of incident cosmic ray nuclei from H-1 to Ni-64 over the energy range of approximately 20 to 500 MeV/nucleon. Particle identification is based on the multiple energy loss technique. The scientific aspects of the experiment are briefly reviewed and consideration is given to the flight hardware, including sensors, event encoding, buffer memory, redundancy and commandability, and packaging.

  3. ISEE-C HKH high energy cosmic rays. [multidetector particle telescope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, D. E.; Bieser, F. S.; Heckman, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the ISEE-C multidetector cosmic ray telescope experiment. The HKH particle identifier sensor array is designed to identify the charge and mass of incident cosmic ray nuclei from H-1 to Ni-64 over the energy range of approximately 20 to 500 MeV/nucleon. Particle identification is based on the multiple energy loss technique. The scientific aspects of the experiment are briefly reviewed and consideration is given to the flight hardware, including sensors, event encoding, buffer memory, redundancy and commandability, and packaging.

  4. Limits on deeply penetrating particles in the 10(17) eV cosmic ray flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, J. W.; Loh, P. R.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    Deeply penetrating particles in the 10 to the 17th power eV cosmic ray flux were investigated. No such events were found in 8.2 x 10 to the 6th power sec of running time. Limits were set on the following: quark-matter in the primary cosmic ray flux; long-lived, weakly interacting particles produced in p-air collisions; the astrophysical neutrino flux. In particular, the neutrino flux limit at 10 to the 17th power eV implies that z, the red shift of maximum activity is 10 in the model of Hill and Schramm.

  5. Automated SIMS Isotopic Analysis Of Small Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gyngard, F.; Morgand, A.; Zinner, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of sub-μm to μm sized dust grains are of increasing interest in cosmochemistry, nuclear forensics and terrestrial aerosol research. Because of its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the tool of choice for measuring isotopes in such small samples. Indeed, SIMS has enabled an entirely new sub-field of astronomy: presolar grains in meteorites. In recent years, the development of the Cameca NanoSIMS ion probe has extended the reach of isotopic measurements to particles as small as 100 nm in diameter, a regime where isotopic precision is strongly limited by the total number of atoms in the sample. Many applications require obtaining isotopic data on large numbers of particles, necessitating the development of automated techniques. One such method is isotopic imaging, wherein images of multiple isotopes are acquired, each containing multiple dispersed particles, and image processing is used to determine isotopic ratios for individual particles. This method is powerful, but relatively inefficient for raster-based imaging on the NanoSIMS. Modern computerized control of instrumentation has allowed for another approach, analogous to commercial automated SEM-EDS particle analysis systems, in which images are used solely to locate particles followed by fully automated grain-by-grain analysis. The first such system was developed on the Carnegie Institution’s Cameca ims-6f, and was used to generate large databases of presolar grains. We have recently developed a similar system for the NanoSIMS, whose high sensitivity allows for smaller grains to be analyzed with less sample consumption than is possible with the 6f system. The 6f and NanoSIMS systems are functionally identical: an image of dispersed grains is obtained with sufficient statistical precision for an algorithm to identify the positions of individual particles, the primary ion beam is deflected to each particle in turn and rastered in a small

  6. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  7. A note on the stochastic nature of particle cohesive force and implications to threshold friction velocity for aerodynamic dust entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yaping; Klose, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable interest to determine the threshold for aeolian dust emission on Earth and Mars. Existing schemes for threshold friction velocity are all deterministic in nature, but observations show that in the dust particle size range the threshold friction velocity scatters strongly due to stochastic inter-particle cohesion. In the real world, there always exists a certain amount of free dust which can be easily lifted from the surface by weak winds or even turbulence, as exemplified by dust devils. It has been proposed in the dust-devil research community, that the pressure drop at dust-devil center may be a major mechanism for dust-devil dust emission, known as the Δp effect. It is questioned here whether the Δp effect is substantial or whether the elevated dust concentration in dust devils is due to free dust emission. A simple analysis indicates that the Δp effect appears to be small and the dust in dust devils is probably due to free dust emission and dust convergence. To estimate free dust emission, it is useful to define a lower limit of dust-particle threshold friction velocity. A simple expression for this velocity is proposed by making assumptions to the median and variance of inter-particle cohesive force. The simple expression is fitted to the data of the Arizona State University Vortex Generator. While considerable uncertainty remains in the scheme, this note highlights the need for additional research on the stochastic nature of dust emission.

  8. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  9. Mass-particle size distributions of atmospheric dust and the dry deposition of dust to the remote ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Ray, B. J.; Lewis, N. F.; Tomza, U.; Duce, R. A.

    1997-07-01

    Size-separated mineral aerosol samples were collected and analyzed to investigate the relationships between the mass-particle size distributions (MSDs) of dust particles and the dust loadings in the atmosphere. The data also were used to assess the changes in the MSDs of dust in relation to transport processes and especially the associated effects on dry deposition. Atmospheric dust concentrations, as indicated by aluminum or scandium, in samples collected from three sites in the remote North Atlantic were higher than those in samples collected during a cruise in the North Pacific on board the R/V Moana Wave. However, the mass median diameters (MMDs) for the North Pacific samples were both larger on average (˜3 μm versus ˜2 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter) and more variable than those from the North Atlantic; this difference was attributed to wet conditions and particle aggregation over the North Pacific. In addition, for the ensemble of all samples the geometric standard deviations of the mass-particle size distributions, which are analogous to the sorting values used to characterize sedimentary materials, tended to vary inversely and nonlinearly with the mass median diameters. Model-derived dry deposition velocities for the samples were at most weakly related to either the dust concentrations or the MMDs. However, the dry deposition velocities for two subsets of samples were correlated with the geometric standard deviations of the distributions; this is further evidence that the mass flux of dust via dry deposition can be controlled by a relatively small fraction of aerodynamically large particles.

  10. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  11. Cosmic dust in the atmosphere and in the interplanetary space at 1 AU today and in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.

    1973-01-01

    A description of techniques used in recent experiments to detect and analyze cosmic dust and micrometeorites is given and the results both from the study of lunar crater statistics and from in situ measurements are reviewed. The results from lunar crater statistics show an agreement with the results obtained from in situ measurements in interplanetary space and derived from zodiacal light measurements. The near earth results show an enhancement in the flux numbers. This can be caused either by secondary lunar debris or by disintegration of low density fireballs in the outer atmosphere.

  12. Understanding The Baryonic Cycle: Confronting Galaxy Physics With The Mass; Metallicity Relation And Dust Content Of Galaxies Over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; Somerville, Rachel; Galametz, Maud

    2016-09-01

    The mass-metallicity relation combines the star formation, metal enrichment, feedback, and baryon accretion history of galaxies and acts as a superb probe of the cycle of baryons through galaxies. Reproducing its cosmic evolution is a stringent constraint on models of galaxy formation. I will present new cosmological models of galaxy formation that include various ejective and preventive feedback schemes and detailed chemical evolution and dust chemistry models. I will present the impact of the different feedback schemes on the evolution of the mass;metallicity relation, compare my predictions with observations, and discuss how this comparison helps us constrain the galaxy physics acting on the baryonic cycle. I will further show that proper accounting for dust emphasizes a serious caveat in our understanding of galaxy formation. Galaxies are too metal enriched at early times.

  13. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 μm, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0-2.5 μm. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters.

  14. First detection of charged dust particles in the Earth's mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havnes, O.; Trøim, J.; Blix, T.; Mortensen, W.; Næsheim, L. I.; Thrane, E.; Tønnesen, T.

    1996-05-01

    Some theories for the observed anomalous radar backscatter during the summer (polar mesospheric summer echoes, or PMSE) and electron bite outs measured by rockets require the presence of charged dust. To investigate this, two dust probes have been launched in 1994 from Andyøa Rocket Range and we here report the results from the dust and an electron probe on the two payloads. The dust probes were designed to block out the electron and ion components at the mesopause but to detect primary currents due to impacts of charged dust and also to detect secondary plasma production during dust impacts. The results indicate that both during PMSE and noctilucent cloud (NLC) conditions, large amounts of dust, with average sizes apparently of about 0.1 μm and less, were present. The number densities Nd can be up to many thousand per cubic centimeter, and the charge density NdZd likewise. Large local gradients in density and charge density of dust are detected. Dust carrying both positive and negative charges can apparently be present on different occasions. In some parts of the NLC/PMSE layers we find that the negative charge density locked in grains is so large that the number of free electrons is significantly reduced there because the dust acts like sinks for electrons, and an electron bite out results. We also find that in one case the presence of positive dust leads to an increase in the local electron density by photoionization. The main uncertainties in the data analysis are the structure of the dust and the secondary plasma production at the comparatively low dust impact velocities (1 kms-1) in the experiment.

  15. Spectra of all primary cosmic ray particles: TIC experiment data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, G.; Lee, G.; Zatsepin, V. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Sokolskaya, N. V.

    The authors present experimental data on the energy release spectrum in a thin ionization calorimeter irradiated in summer 1994 in a balloon over Northern Canada at the atmospheric depth of 4 g·cm-2. The instrument operated stably during the whole flight of 75 h. A total of about two million events were recorded with the energy release from 10 GeV to 20 TeV. The experimental data seem to show two fluxes of primary cosmic rays with different spectral exponents.

  16. THE EFFECT OF HEAVY COSMIC-RAY IONS ON SILICATE GRAINS IN THE INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Szenes, G.; Kovacs, V. K.; Pecz, B.; Skuratov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Electronmicroscopic samples of crystalline Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} forsterite were irradiated by energetic Ar, Fe, Kr, and Xe ions at room temperature. Tracks with a mean radius R{sub e} = 1.36 nm were observed after irradiation by 56 MeV Fe ions, while no tracks were induced by a 48 MeV Ar beam. Amorphization of forsterite grains by cosmic-ray (CR) Fe ions are discussed, including the effects of low temperature, ion velocity, and ion-induced crystallization. CR Fe ions induce amorphous tracks in crystalline forsterite only in the range 40-140 MeV, and the period of time for complete amorphization is tau{sub cr} approx 13,400 Myr. Our estimate is tau{sub cr} approx 1300 Myr for enstatite. Thus, heavy CR particles do not reduce the crystallinity of silicate grains within a reasonable time, as supposed previously. However, energetic ions can induce crystallization in amorphous solids, and this may be partially or fully responsible for the estimated 0.2% crystallinity of silicates in the interstellar medium.

  17. Dissipation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves on Energetic Particles: Impact on Interstellar Turbulence and Cosmic Ray Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, V.S.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Jones, F.C.; Strong, A.W.; Zirakashvili, V.N.; /Troitsk, IZMIRAN /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-01-17

    The physical processes involved in diffusion of Galactic cosmic rays in the interstellar medium are addressed. We study the possibility that the nonlinear MHD cascade sets the power-law spectrum of turbulence which scatters charged energetic particles. We find that the dissipation of waves due to the resonant interaction with cosmic ray particles may terminate the Kraichnan-type cascade below wavelengths 10{sup 13} cm. The effect of this wave dissipation has been incorporated in the GALPROP numerical propagation code in order to asses the impact on measurable astrophysical data. The energy-dependence of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient found in the resulting self-consistent model may explain the peaks in the secondary to primary nuclei ratios observed at about 1 GeV/nucleon.

  18. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikov, M. I.; D'yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M.; Fortov, V. E.; Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number ( 104) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100-400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  19. Salts in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Grain-by-grain analytical electron microscope analyses of two micrometeorites, or interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of the chondritic porous subtype show the presence of rare barite (BaSO4) and magnesium carbonate, probably magnesite. Salt minerals in chondritic porous (CP) IDPs give evidence for in situ aqueous alteration in their parent bodies. The uniquely high barium content of CP IDP W7029(asterisk)C1 is consistent with barite precipitation from a mildly acidic (pH above 5) aqueous fluid at temperatures below 417 K and low oxygen fugacity. The presence of magnesite in olivine-rich, anhydrous CP IDP W7010(asterisk)A2 is evidence that carbonate minerals occur in both the chondritic porous and chondritic smooth subtypes of chondritic IDPs. Citing Schramm et al. (1989) for putative asteroidal-type aqueous alteration in IDPs and probable sources of chondritic IDPs, salt minerals in CP IDPs could support low-temperature aqueous activity in nuclei of active short-period comets.

  20. Dust Devils on Mars: Effects of Surface Roughness on Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neakrase, Lynn D.; Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.; Balme, Matthew L.; Foley, Daniel J.; Eddlemon, Eric E.

    2005-01-01

    Dust devils have been proposed as effective mechanisms for lofting large quantities of dust into the martian atmosphere. Previous work showed that vortices lift dust more easily than simple boundary layer winds. The aim of this study is to determine experimentally the effects of non-erodable roughness elements on vortex particle threshold through laboratory simulations of natural surfaces. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Numerical investigation of the coagulation mixing between dust and hygroscopic aerosol particles and its impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Chung-Kuang Chou, Charles; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2015-05-01

    A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization was incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to study the coagulation mixing process focusing on a dust storm event that occurred over East Asia. Simulation results show that the coagulation mixing process tends to decrease aerosol mass, surface area, and number concentrations over the dust source areas. Over the downwind oceanic areas, aerosol concentrations generally increased due to enhanced sedimentation as particles became larger upon coagulation. The mixture process can reduce the overall single-scattering albedo by up to 10% as a result of enhanced core with shell absorption by dust and reduction in the number of scattering particles. The enhanced dry deposition speed also altered the vertical distribution. In addition, the ability of aerosol particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased from around 107 m-3 to above 109 m-3 over downwind areas because a large amount of mineral dust particles became effective CCN with solute coating, except over the highly polluted areas where multiple collections of hygroscopic particles by dust in effect reduced CCN number. This CCN effect is much stronger for coagulation mixing than by the uptake of sulfuric acid gas on dust, although the nitric acid gas uptake was not investigated. The ability of dust particles to serve as ice nuclei may decrease or increase at low or high subzero temperatures, respectively, due to the switching from deposition nucleation to immersion freezing or haze freezing.

  2. Time resolved collection and characterization of dust particles moving in the TEXTOR scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Ratynskaia, S.; Litnovsky, A.; Petersson, P.; Possnert, G.

    2013-07-01

    Moving dust has been collected in the SOL of TEXTOR in a time-resolved way with silica aerogel collectors [1-3]. The collectors were exposed to the toroidal particle flux in NBI heated discharges during the start-up and flat top phase. Intrinsic dust was collected in several discharges. Other discharges were accompanied with injection of known amounts of pre-characterized dust (W, C flakes and C microspheres) from a position toroidally 120° away from the collector. Particle flux, composition and dust size distribution have been determined with SEM and EDX. Calibration allowed particle velocity estimates to be made. Upper limits for the deuterium content of individual dust grains have been determined by NRA.

  3. Kinetics of dust particles around the scrape off layer in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-05-01

    A kinetic model based on the balance of charge and energy over the dust particle surface around the scrape off layer (SOL) region in fusion devices has been developed; for describing the dust mass diminution, its temperature evolution and phase change process have been taken into account. The formulation has been utilized to determine the lifetime of cylindrical and spherical dust particles. A realistic situation in fusion devices, when the plasma exhibits meso-thermal flow, has been taken into account; for this purpose a rigorous approach, pioneered by Mott-Smith and Langmuir (1926 Phys. Rev. 28 727), has been adopted to derive the general expressions for the electron (ion) current on cylindrical dust surfaces and the corresponding mean energy of accreting electrons/ions in a flowing plasma. On the basis of analytical modelling the numerical results for the dust electric potential energy and the lifetime of the dust particles corresponding to a typical plasma environment near the SOL region of Mega Ampere Spherical tokamak (MAST)/Joint European Torus (JET) fusion devices have been evaluated for graphite and tungsten dust particles. The results are graphically illustrated as functions of particle size, electron/ion temperature and plasma ionization. It is seen that a large dust particle immersed in low temperature plasma can survive for long time; as an important outcome it is also noticed that the cylindrical particles of tungsten last longer than spherical particles. The findings are of relevance in characterizing and simulating the effects of a variety of dusts for experimental campaigns in large scale (ITER/Demo-like) fusion devices.

  4. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  5. A detailed petrological analysis of hydrated, low-nickel, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    A detailed petrological analysis of three low-Ni, K-bearing, nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles is performed, and these particles are compared to products of high-energy, explosive (Plinian-type) volcanic events. The analytical electron microscope (AEM) analyses show pervasive layer silicates, carbonate and goethite, and chemical fractionation in the matrix of these particles similar to hydrothermal alteration in volcanic ejecta. Along with low Ni content and the presence of potassium, the texture and mineralogy of particles L2001-18, L2001-20, and L2002 C2 are similar to at least two nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles of the igneous subgroup for which an extraterrestrial origin has been suggested based on their minor- and trace-element abundances. The petrological characteristics of some low-Ni, K-bearing nonchondritic stratospheric dust particles supports a probable terrestrial volcanic origin, but the AEM data alone cannot exclude an extraterrestrial origin for these particles.

  6. (A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D)

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-06

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper.

  7. [A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-06

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper.

  8. Particle size and metals concentrations of dust from a paint manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siew Lai; Yin, Chun-Yang; Yap, Siaw Yang

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the particle size distribution and concentration of metallic elements of solvent- and water-based paint dust from bulk dust collected from dust-collecting hoppers were determined. The mean particle size diameter over a 12-week sampling period was determined using a particle size analyzer. The metals composition and concentration of the dust were determined via acid digestion technique followed by concentration analysis using inductively coupled plasma. The volume weighted mean particle diameters were found to be 0.941+/-0.016 and 8.185+/-0.201 microm for solvent- and water-based paint dust, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in solvent-based paint dust were found to be 100+/-20.00 microg/g (arsenic), 1550+/-550.00 microg/g (copper), 15,680+/-11,780.00 microg/g (lead) and 30,460+/-10,580.00 microg/g (zinc) while the mean concentrations of metals in water-based paint dust were found to be 20.65+/-6.11 microg/g (arsenic), 9.14+/-14.65 microg/g (copper), 57.46+/-22.42 microg/g (lead) and 1660+/-1260 microg/g (zinc). Both paint dust types could be considered as hazardous since almost all of the dust particles were smaller than 10 microm. Particular emphasis on containment of solvent-based paint dust particles should be given since it was shown that they were very fine in size (<1 microm) and had high lead and zinc concentrations.

  9. On The Origins Of Cosmic Dust And The Evolution Of Nearby Galaxies With The Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Christopher Jonathan Redfern

    2015-04-01

    Using multiwavelength observations, centred around the unique far-infrared and submillimetre window provided by the Herschel Space Observatory, this thesis investigates the origins and evolution of cosmic dust in the local Universe – by examining individual sources of dust in our own galaxy, and by studying dust in nearby galaxies. I search Herschel observations of the remnants of Kepler’s (SN1604) and Tycho’s (SN1572) supernovæ, both Type-Ia explosions, for evidence of dust creation by these events. Being the only Type-Ia supernovæ known to have occurred in our Galaxy within the past 1,000 years, these remnants are the only ones both close enough to resolve, and young enough that they are dominated by their ejecta dynamics. There is no indication of any recently manufactured dust associated with either supernova remnant. It therefore appears that Type-Ia supernovæ do not contribute significantly to the dust budgets of galaxies. The Crab Nebula, the result of a Type-II supernova (SN1054), is also investigated using Herschel and multiwavelength data. After accounting for other sources of emission, a temperature of Td = 63.1 K and mass of Md = 0.21 M⊙ is derived for the Crab Nebula’s dust component. I create a map of the distribution of dust in the Crab Nebula, the first of its kind, by means of a resolved component separation, revealing that the dust is located in the dense filamentary ejecta. We can be confident that this dust will survive in the long term, and be injected into the galactic dust budget. This is the first detection of manufactured supernova dust for which this can be said. Next I use the Herschel-ATLAS to assemble HAPLESS: the Herschel- ATLAS Phase-1 Limited Extent Spatial Sample – a blind, volume-limited, dust- selected sample of nearby galaxies. The majority of this sample is made up of curious very blue galaxies. Often irregular and/or flocculent in morphology, with extremely blue UV-NIR colours, these galaxies appear to be

  10. Alpha particles in solar cosmic rays over the last 80,000 years.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Present-day (1967 to 1969) fluxes of alpha particles from solar cosmic rays, determined from satellite measurements, were used to calculate the production rates of cobalt-57, cobalt-58, and nickel-59 in lunar surface samples. Comparisons with the activities of nickel-59 (half-life, 80,000 years) measured in lunar samples indicate that the long-term and present-day fluxes of solar alpha particles are comparable within a factor of approximately 4.

  11. Effects of Spray Surfactant and Particle Charge on Respirable Coal Dust Capture.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Mei W; Raynor, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Surfactant-containing water sprays are commonly used in coal mines to collect dust. This study investigates the dust collection performance of different surfactant types for a range of coal dust particle sizes and charges. Bituminous coal dust aerosol was generated in a wind tunnel. The charge of the aerosol was either left unaltered, charge-neutralized with a neutralizer, or positively- or negatively-charged using a diffusion charger after the particles were neutralized. An anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant spray or a plain water spray was used to remove the particles from the air flow. Some particles were captured while passing through spray section, whereas remaining particles<