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Sample records for cosmogenic neutrino constraints

  1. Gamma-ray constraints on maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes and UHECR source evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Kalashev, Oleg; Semikoz, Dmitri V.

    2012-01-01

    The dip model assumes that the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 1018 eV consist exclusively of protons and is consistent with the spectrum and composition measure by HiRes. Here we present the range of cosmogenic neutrino fluxes in the dip-model which are compatible with a recent determination of the extragalactic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray diffuse background derived from 2.5 years of Fermi/LAT data. We show that the largest fluxes predicted in the dip model would be detectable by IceCube in about 10 years of observation and are within the reach of a few years of observation with the ARA project. In the incomplete UHECR model in which protons are assumed to dominate only above 1019 eV, the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes could be a factor of 2 or 3 larger. Any fraction of heavier nuclei in the UHECR at these energies would reduce the maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. We also consider here special evolution models in which the UHECR sources are assumed to have the same evolution of either the star formation rate (SFR), or the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate, or the active galactic nuclei (AGN) rate in the Universe and found that the last two are disfavored (and in the dip model rejected) by the new VHE gamma-ray background.

  2. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  3. Cosmogenic neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic ray models

    SciTech Connect

    Aloisio, R.; Petrera, S.; Boncioli, D.; Grillo, A.F.; Salamida, F. E-mail: denise.boncioli@lngs.infn.it E-mail: aurelio.grillo@lngs.infn.it E-mail: salamida@ipno.in2p3.fr

    2015-10-01

    We use an updated version of SimProp, a Monte Carlo simulation scheme for the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, to compute cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on Earth in various scenarios. These fluxes are compared with the newly detected IceCube events at PeV energies and with recent experimental limits at EeV energies of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This comparison allows us to draw some interesting conclusions about the source models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We will show how the available experimental observations are almost at the level of constraining such models, mainly in terms of the injected chemical composition and cosmological evolution of sources. The results presented here will also be important in the evaluation of the discovery capabilities of the future planned ultra-high energy cosmic ray and neutrino observatories.

  4. Cosmogenic neutrinos and signals of TeV gravity in air showers and neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Illana, J I; Masip, M; Meloni, D

    2004-10-08

    The existence of extra dimensions allows the possibility that the fundamental scale of gravity is at the TeV. If that is the case, gravity could dominate the interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. In particular, the production of microscopic black holes by cosmogenic neutrinos has been estimated in a number of papers. We consider here gravity-mediated interactions at larger distances, where they can be calculated in the eikonal approximation. We show that for the expected flux of cosmogenic neutrinos these elastic processes give a stronger signal than black hole production in neutrino telescopes. Taking the bounds on the higher-dimensional Planck mass M(D) (D=4 + n) from current air shower experiments, for n=2(6) elastic collisions could produce up to 118 (34) events per year at IceCube. On the other hand, the absence of any signal would imply a bound of M(D) > or approximately 5 TeV.

  5. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints to neutrino properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Schramm, David N.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutrino properties (masses, lifetimes, numbers of flavors, etc.) are reviewed. The freeze out of neutrinos in the early Universe are discussed and then the cosmological limits on masses for stable neutrinos are derived. The freeze out argument coupled with observational limits is then used to constrain decaying neutrinos as well. The limits to neutrino properties which follow from SN1987A are then reviewed. The constraint from the big bang nucleosynthesis on the number of neutrino flavors is also considered. Astrophysical constraints on neutrino-mixing as well as future observations of relevance to neutrino physics are briefly discussed.

  6. Neutrino production in electromagnetic cascades: An extra component of cosmogenic neutrino at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Li, Zhuo; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-03-01

    Muon pairs can be produced in the annihilation of ultrahigh energy (UHE, E ≳1 018 eV ) photons with low energy cosmic background radiation in the intergalactic space, giving birth to neutrinos. Although the branching ratio of muon pair production is low, products of other channels, which are mainly electron/positron pairs, will probably transfer most of their energies into the new generated UHE photon in the subsequent interaction with the cosmic background radiation via Compton scattering in deep Klein-Nishina regime. The regeneration of these new UHE photons then provides a second chance to produce the muon pairs, enhancing the neutrino flux. We investigate the neutrino production in the propagation of UHE photons in the intergalactic space at different redshifts, considering various competing processes such as pair production, double pair production for UHE photons, and triplet production and synchrotron radiation for UHE electrons. Following the analytic method raised by Gould and Rephaeli, we firstly study the electromagnetic cascade initiated by an UHE photon, with paying particular attention to the leading particle in the cascade process. Regarding the least energetic outgoing particles as energy loss, we obtain the effective penetration length of the leading particle, as well as energy loss rate including the neutrino emission rate in the cascade process. Finally, we find that an extra component of UHE neutrinos will arise from the propagation of UHE cosmic rays due to the generated UHE photons and electron/positrons. However, the flux of this component is quite small, with a flux of at most 10% of that of the conventional cosmogenic neutrino at a few EeV, in the absence of a strong intergalactic magnetic field and a strong cosmic radio background. The precise contribution of extra component depends on several factors, e.g., cosmic radio background, intergalactic magnetic field, and the spectrum of proton, which are discussed in this work.

  7. Restrictions on cosmogenic neutrinos and UHECR from Fermi 3 years data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Kalashev, Oleg; Semikoz, Dmitri V.

    2012-07-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic ray protons accelerated in astrophysical objects produce secondary electromagnetic cascades during propagation in the cosmic microwave and infrared backgrounds. Those cascades contribute to the GeV-TeV diffuse photon flux, measured by Fermi LAT experiment. Recent studies of 3 years of Fermi LAT data have shown that diffuse gamma-ray background at E > 10GeV is about factor of 2 smaller then original one year data. This affects both models of UHECR and secondary cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. We show the allowed range of cosmogenic neutrino fluxes scanning over unknown UHECR parameters such as injected proton maximum energy and power law index, evolution of sources, systematic shift of UHECR energy scale. We consider three evolution models in which the UHECR sources are assumed to have the same evolution of either the star formation rate (SFR), or the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate, or the active galactic nuclei (AGN) rate in the Universe and found that the last two are disfavored (and in the dip model rejected) by the new VHE gamma-ray background. We show that the largest fluxes predicted in the dip model would be detectable by IceCube in about 10 years of observation and are within the reach of a few years of observation with the ARA project. In the incomplete UHECR model in which protons are assumed to dominate only above 1019 eV, the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes could be a factor of 2 or 3 larger.

  8. A first search for cosmogenic neutrinos with the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, S. W.; Berg, E. C.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Binns, W. R.; Boersma, D. J.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Buitink, S.; Dookayka, K.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Duffin, T.; Euler, S.; Gerhardt, L.; Gustafsson, L.; Hallgren, A.; Hanson, J. C.; Israel, M. H.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Niederhausen, H.; Olevitch, M. A.; Persichelli, C.; Ratzlaff, K.; Rauch, B. F.; Reed, C.; Roumi, M.; Samanta, A.; Simburger, G. E.; Stezelberger, T.; Tatar, J.; Uggerhoj, U. I.; Walker, J.; Yodh, G.; Young, R.

    2015-10-01

    The ARIANNA experiment seeks to observe the diffuse flux of neutrinos in the 108-1010 GeV energy range using a grid of radio detectors at the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. The detector measures the coherent Cherenkov radiation produced at radio frequencies, from about 100 MHz-1 GHz, by charged particle showers generated by neutrino interactions in the ice. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA) is being constructed as a prototype for the full array. During the 2013-14 austral summer, three HRA stations collected radio data which was wirelessly transmitted off site in nearly real-time. The performance of these stations is described and a simple analysis to search for neutrino signals is presented. The analysis employs a set of three cuts that reject background triggers while preserving 90% of simulated cosmogenic neutrino triggers. No neutrino candidates are found in the data and a model-independent 90% confidence level Neyman upper limit is placed on the all flavor ν + ν bar flux in a sliding decade-wide energy bin. The limit reaches a minimum of 1.9 ×10-23GeV-1cm-2s-1sr-1 in the 108.5-109.5 GeV energy bin. Simulations of the performance of the full detector are also described. The sensitivity of the full ARIANNA experiment is presented and compared with current neutrino flux models.

  9. Constraints on Neutrino Mass from Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, A. J.; Niro, V.; Verde, L.

    2017-03-01

    Modern large-scale galaxy surveys, combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background, have managed to constrain the sum of neutrino masses to an order of magnitude below the limit placed by laboratory experiments. We discuss the signature of massive neutrinos in the distribution of galaxies and the current state of the art of neutrino mass constraints, focusing on parameter degeneracies that reveal how we can improve current constraints with next-generation galaxy surveys. We also comment on how the near future cosmology experiments are an opportunity for the first measurement of the value of the sum of neutrino masses, or alternatively, to find profound implications for neutrino physics extensions beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Constraints on secret neutrino interactions after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Forastieri, Francesco; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Natoli, Paolo E-mail: lattanzi@fe.infn.it

    2015-07-01

    Neutrino interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics may affect the cosmological evolution and can be constrained through observations. We consider the possibility that neutrinos possess secret scalar or pseudoscalar interactions mediated by the Nambu-Goldstone boson of a still unknown spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, as in, e.g., Majoron models. In such scenarios, neutrinos still decouple at T≅ 1 MeV, but become tightly coupled again (''recouple'') at later stages of the cosmological evolution. We use available observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, including Planck 2013 and the joint BICEP2/Planck 2015 data, to derive constraints on the quantity γ{sub νν}{sup 4}, parameterizing the neutrino collision rate due to scalar or pseudoscalar interactions. We consider both a minimal extension of the standard ΛCDM model, and more complicated scenarios with extra relativistic degrees of freedom or non-vanishing tensor amplitude. For a wide range of dataset and model combinations, we find a typical constraint γ{sub νν}{sup 4} ∼< 0.9× 10{sup −27} (95% C.L.), implying an upper limit on the redshift z{sub νrec} of neutrino recoupling 0∼< 850, leaving open the possibility that the latter occured well before hydrogen recombination. In the framework of Majoron models, the upper limit on γ{sub νν} roughly translates on a constraint g ∼< 8.2× 10{sup −7} on the Majoron-neutrino coupling constant g. In general, the data show a weak (∼ 1σ) but intriguing preference for non-zero values of γ{sub νν}{sup 4}, with best fits in the range γ{sub νν}{sup 4} = (0.15–0.35)× 10{sup −27}, depending on the particular dataset. This is more evident when either high-resolution CMB observations from the ACT and SPT experiments are included, or the possibility of non-vanishing tensor modes is considered. In particular, for the minimal model ΛCDM+γ{sub νν} and including the Planck 2013, ACT and

  11. Constraints and tests of the OPERA superluminal neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Yuan, Qiang

    2011-12-09

    The superluminal neutrinos detected by OPERA indicate Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) of the neutrino sector at the order of 10(-5). We study the implications of the result in this work. We find that such a large LIV implied by OPERA data will make the neutrino production process π → μ + ν(μ) kinematically forbidden for a neutrino energy greater than about 5 GeV. The OPERA detection of neutrinos at 40 GeV can constrain the LIV parameter to be smaller than 3×10(-7). Furthermore, the neutrino decay in the LIV framework will modify the neutrino spectrum greatly. The atmospheric neutrino spectrum measured by the IceCube Collaboration can constrain the LIV parameter to the level of 10(-12). The future detection of astrophysical neutrinos of galactic sources is expected to be able to give an even stronger constraint on the LIV parameter of neutrinos.

  12. Observational constraints on varying neutrino-mass cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: g9522545@oz.nthu.edu.tw E-mail: sami@iucaa.ernet.in

    2016-01-01

    We consider generic models of quintessence and we investigate the influence of massive neutrino matter with field-dependent masses on the matter power spectrum. In case of minimally coupled neutrino matter, we examine the effect in tracker models with inverse power-law and double exponential potentials. We present detailed investigations for the scaling field with a steep exponential potential, non-minimally coupled to massive neutrino matter, and we derive constraints on field-dependent neutrino masses from the observational data.

  13. A combined view of sterile-neutrino constraints from CMB and neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridle, Sarah; Elvin-Poole, Jack; Evans, Justin; Fernandez, Susana; Guzowski, Pawel; Söldner-Rembold, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of constraints on sterile neutrinos from the Planck experiment and from current and future neutrino oscillation experiments (MINOS, IceCube, SBN). For the first time, we express joint constraints on Neff and meffsterile from the CMB in the Δm2, sin2 ⁡ 2 θ parameter space used by oscillation experiments. We also show constraints from oscillation experiments in the Neff, meffsterile cosmology parameter space. In a model with a single sterile neutrino species and using standard assumptions, we find that the Planck 2015 data and the oscillation experiments measuring muon-neutrino (νμ) disappearance have similar sensitivity.

  14. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  15. Constraints on Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic-Ray Sources from a Search for Neutrinos above 10 PeV with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report constraints on the sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 1 09 GeV , based on an analysis of seven years of IceCube data. This analysis efficiently selects very high- energy neutrino-induced events which have deposited energies from 5 ×1 05 GeV to above 1 011 GeV . Two neutrino-induced events with an estimated deposited energy of (2.6 ±0.3 )×1 06 GeV , the highest neutrino energy observed so far, and (7.7 ±2.0 )×1 05 GeV were detected. The atmospheric background-only hypothesis of detecting these events is rejected at 3.6 σ . The hypothesis that the observed events are of cosmogenic origin is also rejected at >99 % CL because of the limited deposited energy and the nonobservation of events at higher energy, while their observation is consistent with an astrophysical origin. Our limits on cosmogenic neutrino fluxes disfavor the UHECR sources having a cosmological evolution stronger than the star formation rate, e.g., active galactic nuclei and γ -ray bursts, assuming proton-dominated UHECRs. Constraints on UHECR sources including mixed and heavy UHECR compositions are obtained for models of neutrino production within UHECR sources. Our limit disfavors a significant part of parameter space for active galactic nuclei and new-born pulsar models. These limits on the ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux models are the most stringent to date.

  16. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Spinelli, M.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release.

  17. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, M.

    2015-07-01

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release.

  18. Improved Constraints on the hep Solar Neutrino and Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background Fluxes with SNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastbaum, Andrew; SNO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has demonstrated that the apparent deficit in solar neutrinos observed on Earth is due to matter-enhanced flavor transitions and provided precise measurements of the relevant model parameters. The low backgrounds and large, spectral νe - d cross section that enabled this program also give SNO unique sensitivity to two yet-unobserved neutrino signals of interest: hep solar neutrinos and the νe component of the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB). We have developed a combined hep and DSNB search making use of the full SNO dataset. We perform both a cut-and-count analysis and a multidimensional spectral fit, improving upon previously reported constraints based on the initial phase of SNO running only.

  19. Neutrino oscillation constraints on neutrinoless double-beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.; Giunti, C.; Kim, C. W.; Monteno, M.

    1998-06-01

    We have studied the constraints imposed by the results of neutrino oscillation experiments on the effective Majorana mass \\|\\| that characterizes the contribution of Majorana neutrino masses to the matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay. We have shown that in a general scheme with three Majorana neutrinos and a hierarchy of neutrino masses (which corresponds to the standard seesaw mechanism) the results of neutrino oscillation experiments imply rather strong constraints on the parameter \\|\\|. From the results of the first reactor long-baseline experiment CHOOZ and the Bugey experiment it follows that \\|\\|<~3×10-2 eV if Δm2<~2 eV2 (Δm2 is the largest mass-squared difference). Hence, we conclude that the observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay with a probability that corresponds to \\|\\|>~10-1 eV would be a signal for a nonhierarchical neutrino mass spectrum and/or nonstandard mechanisms of lepton number violation.

  20. Tomographic Constraints on High-Energy Neutrinos of Hadronuclear Origin.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Tamborra, Irene; Zandanel, Fabio

    2015-11-27

    Mounting evidence suggests that the TeV-PeV neutrino flux detected by the IceCube telescope has mainly an extragalactic origin. If such neutrinos are primarily produced by a single class of astrophysical sources via hadronuclear (pp) interactions, a similar flux of gamma-ray photons is expected. For the first time, we employ tomographic constraints to pinpoint the origin of the IceCube neutrino events by analyzing recent measurements of the cross correlation between the distribution of GeV gamma rays, detected by the Fermi satellite, and several galaxy catalogs in different redshift ranges. We find that the corresponding bounds on the neutrino luminosity density are up to 1 order of magnitude tighter than those obtained by using only the spectrum of the gamma-ray background, especially for sources with mild redshift evolution. In particular, our method excludes any hadronuclear source with a spectrum softer than E^{-2.1} as a main component of the neutrino background, if its evolution is slower than (1+z)^{3}. Starburst galaxies, if able to accelerate and confine cosmic rays efficiently, satisfy both spectral and tomographic constraints.

  1. Tomographic Constraints on High-Energy Neutrinos of Hadronuclear Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Tamborra, Irene; Zandanel, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the TeV-PeV neutrino flux detected by the IceCube telescope has mainly an extragalactic origin. If such neutrinos are primarily produced by a single class of astrophysical sources via hadronuclear (p p ) interactions, a similar flux of gamma-ray photons is expected. For the first time, we employ tomographic constraints to pinpoint the origin of the IceCube neutrino events by analyzing recent measurements of the cross correlation between the distribution of GeV gamma rays, detected by the Fermi satellite, and several galaxy catalogs in different redshift ranges. We find that the corresponding bounds on the neutrino luminosity density are up to 1 order of magnitude tighter than those obtained by using only the spectrum of the gamma-ray background, especially for sources with mild redshift evolution. In particular, our method excludes any hadronuclear source with a spectrum softer than E-2.1 as a main component of the neutrino background, if its evolution is slower than (1 +z )3. Starburst galaxies, if able to accelerate and confine cosmic rays efficiently, satisfy both spectral and tomographic constraints.

  2. Natural Paleoseismometers: Cosmogenic Nuclide Dating of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) - Integral Constraints on Maximum Ground Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perg, L. A.; Ludwig, L. G.; Kendrick, K.; Brune, J.; Purvance, M.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Akciz, S.

    2007-12-01

    Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) act as natural seismometers constraining maximum ground acceleration over the surface exposure history of the PBR. These key paleoseismic indicators have the potential to validate ground motions on the timescale necessary to test earthquake rupture forecasts and Seismic Hazard Assessment estimates, and are an active topic of research to validate CyberShake results and constrain National Seismic Hazard Maps. This research focuses on examining the post-exhumation history of PBRs using in-situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs). TCNs provide a record of near-surface exposure history. The measured concentrations are a function of the residence time in the upper ~20 m of the subsurface (inherited concentration), the timing and rate of exhumation, and post-exhumation surface spalling and chemical erosion. Our goal in the project is to provide reasonable constraints on the post-exhumation history, specifically the age of the PBRs and evolution of precariousness: we should be able to constrain whether the rocks were of similar precariousness 2.5 ka, 5 ka, and 10 ka ago. These specific targets will provide important constraints on time since exceedance for the CyberShake models. We developed our sampling strategy to address subsurface inheritance, exhumation rate and timing, and post- exhumation spalling and chemical erosion. PBRs were selected to meet a variety of considerations. These rocks constrain ground motions from large earthquakes on the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults, in Southern California. Inherited concentrations lead to an age estimate that is too old; we are investigating inherited concentrations though sampling a rock quarry near Perris CA, with shielded samples at greater than 15 m depth. We also have partially shielded samples from the interior of rocks toppled to measure their stability, and through vandalism. To determine exhumation age and rate, our sampling strategy is to collect 5-6 samples per PBR: 1 on top, 3

  3. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G.L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Palazzo, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Silk, J.

    2004-12-01

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m{sub {beta}} by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on {sigma} from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the two degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-{alpha} forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a nonzero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m{sub {beta}},m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}},{sigma}) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and nonoscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  4. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian surface: Constraints for sample recovery and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects such as cosmic ray tracks can provide information on the surface history of Mars. A recent overview on developments in cosmogenic nuclide research for historical studies of predominantly extraterrestrial materials was published previously. The information content of cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects produced in the Martian surface is based on the different ways of interaction of the primary galactic and solar cosmic radiation (GCR, SCR) and the secondary particle cascade. Generally the kind and extent of interactions as seen in the products depend on the following factors: (1) composition, energy and intensity of the primary SCR and GCR; (2) composition, energy and intensity of the GCR-induced cascade of secondary particles; (3) the target geometry, i.e., the spatial parameters of Martian surface features with respect to the primary radiation source; (4) the target chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition of the Martian surface at the sampling location down to the minor element level or lower; and (5) duration of the exposure. These factors are not independent of each other and have a major influence on sample taking strategies and techniques.

  5. Constraints on Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic-Ray Sources from a Search for Neutrinos above 10 PeV with IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abraham, K; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Anton, G; Archinger, M; Argüelles, C; Auffenberg, J; Axani, S; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blot, S; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Burgman, A; Carver, T; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Cowen, D F; Cross, R; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Del Pino Rosendo, E; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dujmovic, H; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eller, P; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Flis, S; Fösig, C-C; Franckowiak, A; Friedman, E; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Giang, W; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Haack, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hansmann, T; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jones, B J P; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Katz, U; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kim, M; Kintscher, T; Kiryluk, J; Kittler, T; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Krüger, C; Kunnen, J; Kunwar, S; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lauber, F; Lennarz, D; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mancina, S; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meier, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Moulai, M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke Pollmann, A; Olivas, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relethford, B; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Rysewyk, D; Sabbatini, L; Sanchez Herrera, S E; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schimp, M; Schlunder, P; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Tenholt, F; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Rossem, M; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Weiss, M J; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wickmann, S; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wills, L; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woolsey, E; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M

    2016-12-09

    We report constraints on the sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 10^{9}  GeV, based on an analysis of seven years of IceCube data. This analysis efficiently selects very high- energy neutrino-induced events which have deposited energies from 5×10^{5}  GeV to above 10^{11}  GeV. Two neutrino-induced events with an estimated deposited energy of (2.6±0.3)×10^{6}  GeV, the highest neutrino energy observed so far, and (7.7±2.0)×10^{5}  GeV were detected. The atmospheric background-only hypothesis of detecting these events is rejected at 3.6σ. The hypothesis that the observed events are of cosmogenic origin is also rejected at >99% CL because of the limited deposited energy and the nonobservation of events at higher energy, while their observation is consistent with an astrophysical origin. Our limits on cosmogenic neutrino fluxes disfavor the UHECR sources having a cosmological evolution stronger than the star formation rate, e.g., active galactic nuclei and γ-ray bursts, assuming proton-dominated UHECRs. Constraints on UHECR sources including mixed and heavy UHECR compositions are obtained for models of neutrino production within UHECR sources. Our limit disfavors a significant part of parameter space for active galactic nuclei and new-born pulsar models. These limits on the ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux models are the most stringent to date.

  6. Constraints on neutrino-nucleon interactions at energies of 1 EeV with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Shigeru

    2010-11-15

    A search for extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos has been carried out with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The main signals in the search are neutrino-induced energetic charged leptons and their rate depends on the neutrino-nucleon cross section. The upper limit on the neutrino flux has implications for possible new physics beyond the standard model such as the extra space-time dimension scenarios which lead to a cross section much higher than the standard particle physics prediction. In this study we constrain the neutrino-nucleon cross section at energies beyond 10{sup 9} GeV with the IceCube observation. The constraints are obtained as a function of the extraterrestrial neutrino flux in the relevant energy range, which accounts for the astrophysical uncertainty of neutrino production models.

  7. 11B and constraints on neutrino oscillations and spectra from neutrino nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sam M; Heger, Alexander; Tur, Clarisse

    2011-04-15

    We study the sensitivity to variations in the triple-alpha and 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rates, of the yield of the neutrino-process isotopes 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La, and 180Ta in core-collapse supernovae. Compared to solar abundances, less than 15% of 7Li, about 25%-80% of 19F, and about half of 138La is produced in these stars. Over a range of ±2σ for each helium-burning rate, 11B is overproduced and the yield varies by an amount larger than the variation caused by the effects of neutrino oscillations. The total 11B yield, however, may eventually provide constraints on supernova neutrino spectra.

  8. Big bang nucleosynthesis constraints on massive, unstable neutrinos.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1995-01-01

    The tau-neutrino, if sufficiently massive, must be unstable. Big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) can provide constraints on the ντ mass and lifetime. The modification to the energy density of the early universe in the case of a massive τ-neutrino which decays via ντ→νμ+φ (where φ is a weakly coupled massless scalar) is described and the results of BBN production of the light elements is presented. Consistency with the primordial abundances of D, 3He, 7Li and, especially, 4He leads to constraints on the mass (mντ) and lifetime (τντ) of the tau-neutrino. Very massive ντ (mντ ≥ 5 - 10 MeV), up to the ARGUS bound of 31 MeV, are only allowed for short lifetimes (≤40 sec). Much lighter (mντ ≤ 0.01 MeV) ντ are permitted for lifetimes longer than ≡0.01 sec but, mντ(MeV) ≤ 10 τν(sec) for shorter lifetimes.

  9. Supernova constraints on massive (pseudo)scalar coupling to neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heurtier, Lucien; Zhang, Yongchao

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we derive constraints on the emission of a massive (pseudo)scalar S from annihilation of neutrinos in the core of supernovae through the dimension-4 coupling νν S, as well as the effective dimension-5 operator 1/Λ(νν)(SS). While most of earlier studies have focused on massless or ultralight scalars, our analysis involves scalar with masses of order eV–GeV which can be copiously produced during {the explosion of supernovae, whose core temperature is} generally of order T~ Script OO(10) MeV. From the luminosity and deleptonization arguments regarding the observation of SN1987A, we exclude a large range of couplings 10‑12 lesssim |gαβ|lesssim 10‑5 for the dimension-4 case, depending on the neutrino flavours involved and the scalar mass. In the case of dimension-5 operator, for a scalar mass from MeV to 100 MeV the coupling hαβ get constrained from 10‑6 to 10‑2, with the cutoff scale explicitly set Λ = 1 TeV. We finally show that if the neutrino burst of a nearby supernova explosion is detected by Super-Kamiokande and IceCube, the constraints will be largely reinforced.

  10. Miocene to recent ice elevation variations from the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet: Constraints from geologic observations, cosmogenic nuclides and ice sheet modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Ackert, Robert P.; Pope, Allen E.; Pollard, David; DeConto, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) behavior can be used to test and constrain dynamic ice sheet models. Long-term observational constraints are however, rare. Here we present the first constraints on long-term (Miocene-Holocene) WAIS elevation from the interior of the ice sheet near the WAIS divide. We use geologic observations and measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne and 10Be in bedrock surfaces to constrain WAIS elevation variations to <160 m above the present-day ice levels since 7 Ma, and <110 m above present-day ice levels since 5.4 Ma. The cosmogenic nuclide data indicate that bedrock surfaces 35 m above the present-day ice levels had near continuous exposure over the past 3.5 Ma, requiring average interior WAIS elevations to have been similar to, or lower than present, since the beginning of the Pliocene warm period. We use a continental ice sheet model to simulate the history of ice cover at our sampling sites and thereby compute the expected concentration of the cosmogenic nuclides. The ice sheet model indicates that during the past 5 Ma interior WAIS elevations of >65 m above present-day ice levels at the Ohio Range occur only rarely during brief ice sheet highstands, consistent with the observed cosmogenic nuclide data. Furthermore, the model's prediction that highstand elevations have increased on average since the Pliocene is in good agreement with the cosmogenic nuclide data that indicate the highest ice elevation over the past 5 Ma was reached during the highstand at 11 ka. Since the simulated cosmogenic nuclide concentrations derived from the model's ice elevation history are in good agreement with our measurements, we suggest that the model's prediction of more frequent collapsed-WAIS states and smaller WAIS volumes during the Pliocene are also correct.

  11. Observational constraints on cosmic neutrinos and dark energy revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Shan, HuanYuan; Tao, Charling; Gong, Yan; Chen, Xuelei; Huang, Y.F. E-mail: mlwx@mail.bnu.edu.cn E-mail: shanhuany@gmail.com E-mail: tao@cppm.in2p3.fr E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn

    2012-11-01

    Using several cosmological observations, i.e. the cosmic microwave background anisotropies (WMAP), the weak gravitational lensing (CFHTLS), the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations (SDSS+WiggleZ), the most recent observational Hubble parameter data, the Union2.1 compilation of type Ia supernovae, and the HST prior, we impose constraints on the sum of neutrino masses (m{sub ν}), the effective number of neutrino species (N{sub eff}) and dark energy equation of state (w), individually and collectively. We find that a tight upper limit on m{sub ν} can be extracted from the full data combination, if N{sub eff} and w are fixed. However this upper bound is severely weakened if N{sub eff} and w are allowed to vary. This result naturally raises questions on the robustness of previous strict upper bounds on m{sub ν}, ever reported in the literature. The best-fit values from our most generalized constraint read m{sub ν} = 0.556{sup +0.231}{sub −0.288} eV, N{sub eff} = 3.839±0.452, and w = −1.058±0.088 at 68% confidence level, which shows a firm lower limit on total neutrino mass, favors an extra light degree of freedom, and supports the cosmological constant model. The current weak lensing data are already helpful in constraining cosmological model parameters for fixed w. The dataset of Hubble parameter gains numerous advantages over supernovae when w = −1, particularly its illuminating power in constraining N{sub eff}. As long as w is included as a free parameter, it is still the standardizable candles of type Ia supernovae that play the most dominant role in the parameter constraints.

  12. Constraints to the decays of Dirac neutrinos from SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Frieman, Joshua A.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    The decay mode of a keV-mass Dirac neutrino is addressed with reference to the nineteen neutrino events associated with SN 1987A that were detected by the Kamiokande II and Irvine-Brookhaven-Michigan detectors. A complementary constraint is presented which is based upon a distinctive signal associated with the decay of wrong-helicity neutrinos that was not seen: high-energy (50 MeV and higher) neutrino events. The absence of such events excludes the decay of wrong-helicity neutrinos into proper-helicity neutrinos for a Dirac neutrino of mass between 1 and 300 keV. The constraint also rules out models of the 17-keV neutrino.

  13. Experimental constraints on the neutrino oscillations and a simple model of three-flavor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Raczka, P.A.; Szymacha, A. ); Tatur, S. )

    1994-02-01

    A simple model of neutrino mixing is considered which contains only one right-handed neutrino field coupled, via the mass term, to the three usual left-handed fields. This is the simplest model that allows for three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The existing experimental limits on the neutrino oscillations are used to obtain constraints on the two free-mixing parameters of the model. A specific sum rule relating the oscillation probabilities of different flavors is derived.

  14. Signatures of Glacial Erosion and Retreat in the Landscape: Cosmogenic and Numerical Modeling Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Briner, J. P.; Guido, Z. S.

    2006-12-01

    The response of glaciers to past climatic change is important for understanding 1) observations of modern glaciers under currently changing climate conditions, and 2) long-term effects on the landscape of repeated glacial occupation and retreat. The complex dynamics of these systems require that multiple lines of data constrain models of glacial behavior and erosion. Toward this end, we use cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) exposure ages to constrain numerical simulations of glacier advance and retreat histories in the Middle Boulder Creek drainage, Colorado Front Range, and the Animas River valley, San Juan Mountains, Colorado. We present ~12 new 10Be exposure ages from glacially polished bedrock sampled in the Middle Boulder Creek valley. All of these ages are younger than a ~17 ka 10Be terminal moraine age reported by Schildgen and Dethier (2002). Ages appear to decrease monotonically with distance upvalley from the moraine, and the youngest ages in the uppermost valley are uniformly ~10 ka. We include 5 10Be ages in a cross section across the mid-valley, which show a pattern of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ages (11-14 ka) within the glacial footprint, and older exposure ages (~40 ka) near the trim lines. A similar age trend is seen in the Animas River valley in southwestern Colorado, which was occupied by a lobe of the LGM ice sheet that capped the San Juan mountains. Deglaciation began here ca. 18.7 ka, based on a 10Be depth profile in a proglacial terrace. A longitudinal transect of exposure ages from glacially polished samples indicates that terminus retreat proceeded at 6-9 m/yr until complete deglaciation ca. 9.5 ka. Neither valley has obvious recessional deposits within the LGM glacial footprint. The first-order trend in each valley is a monotonic glacial retreat, but there are other possible retreat scenarios. For instance, we would like to test whether the same trend in 10Be concentrations could be generated by episodic retreat punctuated by periods of

  15. Signatures of Glacial Erosion and Retreat in the Landscape: Cosmogenic and Numerical Modeling Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Briner, J. P.; Guido, Z. S.

    2007-12-01

    We use cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) exposure ages to constrain numerical simulations of deglaciation histories in the Middle Boulder Creek drainage, Colorado Front Range, and the Animas River valley, San Juan Mountains, Colorado. We present 18 new 10Be exposure ages from glacially polished bedrock sampled in the Middle Boulder Creek valley. All of these ages are younger than the ~19-22 ka terminal moraine age based on 26Al and 36Cl measurements by Schildgen (2000) and Benson et al. (2005). Exposure ages decrease with distance upvalley from the moraine, and the youngest ages in the uppermost valley are uniformly ~13 ka. We include 4 10Be ages in a cross section across the mid-valley, which show a pattern of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ages (12-14 ka) within the glacial footprint, and older exposure ages (~40 ka) near the trim lines. A similar age trend is seen in the Animas River valley in southwestern Colorado, which was occupied by a lobe of the LGM ice sheet that capped the San Juan mountains. Deglaciation began here ca. 19.4 ka, based on a 10Be depth profile in a proglacial terrace. A longitudinal transect of exposure ages from glacially polished samples indicates that terminus retreat proceeded at ~15 m/yr until complete deglaciation ca. 12.3 ka. Neither valley has obvious recessional deposits within the LGM glacial footprint. The first-order trend in each valley is a monotonic glacial retreat, but there are other possible retreat scenarios. For instance, we would like to test whether the same trend in 10Be concentrations could be generated by episodic retreat punctuated by periods of readvance. To investigate these scenarios, we modified the GC2D numerical glacier simulation (see Kessler et al., 2006) to incorporate a CRN accumulation layer. This layer can contain any starting value of CRN concentration. Production over each timestep is scaled to DEM latitude and altitude. Production is taken to be zero in areas covered by more than 10 m of ice. The CRN

  16. Cosmogenic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisbeck, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclei, nuclides formed by nuclear interactions of galactic and solar cosmic rays with extraterrestrial or terrestrial matter are discussed. Long lived radioactive cosmogenic isotopes are focused upon. Their uses in dating, as tracers of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter, and in obtaining information on the variation of primary cosmic ray flux in the past are discussed.

  17. Supernova constraints on neutrino oscillation and EoS for proto-neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-02

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We here discuss how to determine the neutrino temperatures and propose a method to determine still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with isotopic ratios of the light elements discovered in presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show that our method suggests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  18. First Constraints on the Complete Neutrino Mixing Matrix with a Sterile Neutrino.

    PubMed

    Collin, G H; Argüelles, C A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H

    2016-11-25

    Neutrino oscillation models involving one extra mass eigenstate beyond the standard three (3+1) are fit to global short baseline experimental data and the recent IceCube ν_{μ}+ν[over ¯]_{μ} disappearance search result. We find a best fit of Δm_{41}^{2}=1.75  eV^{2} with Δχ_{null-min}^{2}/d.o.f. of 50.61/4. We find that the combined IceCube and short baseline data constrain θ_{34} to <80°(<6°) at 90% C.L. for Δm_{41}^{2}≈2(6)  eV^{2}, which is improved over present limits. Incorporating the IceCube information provides the first constraints on all entries of the 3+1 mixing matrix.

  19. Cosmic constraint on massive neutrinos in viable f( R) gravity with producing Λ CDM background expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianbo; Liu, Molin; Wu, Yabo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Tensions between several cosmic observations were found recently, such as the inconsistent values of H0 (or σ 8) were indicated by the different cosmic observations. Introducing the massive neutrinos in Λ CDM could potentially solve the tensions. Viable f( R) gravity producing Λ CDM background expansion with massive neutrinos is investigated in this paper. We fit the current observational data: Planck-2015 CMB, RSD, BAO, and SNIa to constrain the mass of neutrinos in viable f( R) theory. The constraint results at 95% confidence level are: Σ m_ν <0.202 eV for the active-neutrino case, m_{ν , sterile}^eff<0.757 eV with N_eff<3.22 for the sterile neutrino case. For the effects due to the mass of the neutrinos, the constraint results on model parameter at 95% confidence level become f_{R0}× 10^{-6}> -1.89 and f_{R0}× 10^{-6}> -2.02 for two cases, respectively. It is also shown that the fitting values of several parameters much depend on the neutrino properties, such as the cold dark matter density, the cosmological quantities at matter-radiation equality, the neutrino density and the fraction of baryonic mass in helium. Finally, the constraint result shows that the tension between direct and CMB measurements of H_0 gets slightly weaker in the viable f( R) model than that in the base Λ CDM model.

  20. Constraints on the relic neutrino abundance and implications for cosmological neutrino mass limits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    The authors examine a mechanism which can lead to flavor transformation of neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries in the early universe, a process which is unavoidable when the neutrino mixing angles are large. This sets the best limit on the lepton number of the universe, and hence on the relic neutrino abundance. They also consider the consequences for the relic neutrino abundance if extra neutrino interactions are allowed, e.g., the coupling of the neutrinos to a light (compared to m{sub {nu}}) boson. For a wide range of couplings not excluded by other considerations, the relic neutrinos would annihilate to bosons at late times, and thus make a negligible contribution to the matter density today. This mechanism evades the neutrino mass limits arising from large scale structure.

  1. Neutrino beam constraints on flavor-diagonal Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschul, Brett

    2013-05-01

    Breaking of isotropy and Lorentz boost invariance in the dynamics of second-generation leptons would lead to direction-dependent changes in the lifetimes of charged pions. This would make the intensity of a neutrino beam produced via pion decay a function of the beam orientation. The experimental signature of this phenomenon—sidereal variations in the event rate at a downstream neutrino detector—has already been studied, in searches for Lorentz-violating neutrino oscillations. Existing analyses of MINOS near detector data can be used to constrain the flavor-diagonal Lorentz violation coefficients affecting muon neutrino speeds at roughly the 10-5 level.

  2. New constraints on the uplift history of the western Andes, north Chile, using cosmogenic He-3 in alluvial boulders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenstar, Laura; Stuart, Finlay; Hartley, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    To constrain mechanisms responsible for mountain belt growth independent methods for determining accurately the rate and timing of surface uplift are needed. Within the Central Andes paleoelevation proxies are afflicted by either large uncertainties or reliance on assumptions about past climate-elevation histories (Barnes and Ehmer. 2009). This leads to paleoelevation data being unable to distinguish between the two main uplift models of the Andes; gradual uplift of the Andes from the Late Eocene due to crustal shortening/thickening, and rapid uplift in the Late Miocene due to large-scale mantle delamination (Barnes and Ehmer. 2009). Here we present a new paleoelevation tool based on the varying production rate of in situ cosmogenic isotopes with elevation. It can constrain surface uplift histories independently of paleoclimatic fluctuations, making it potentially more accurate than previous methods. Within the Atacama Desert Northern Chile, a stable arid-hyperarid climate has persisted over the last 23 Ma (Dunai et al. 2005). This has lead to exceptionally low erosion rates and high cosmogenic nuclide concentrations within alluvial boulders overlying the Pacific Planation Surface (PPS). In the Aroma Quebrada region, the PPS can be constrained as forming post 13.4 Ma, using underlying volcanics (Evenstar 2007). Alluvial boulders that lie on this PPS have high concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 that suggest deposition soon after surface formation. Comparing concentrations of cosmogenic 3He in the boulders to those calculated for varying uplift histories the timing of the uplift of the western margin of the Andes can be constrained. The models require the Pacific Planation Surface to reach at least 2/3 of its current elevation by 13.4 Ma. These results are not consistent with rapid uplift of the Andes due to mantle delamination in the Late Miocene but support progressive shortening and thickening of continental crust initiating in the Early Miocene or earlier.

  3. Measurement of day and night neutrino energy spectra at SNO and constraints on neutrino mixing parameters.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Q R; Allen, R C; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Bühler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer Drees, R; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, M; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y I; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J-X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-07-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%+/-6.3%(+1.5%)(-1.4%) of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the nu(e) asymmetry is found to be 7.0%+/-4.9%(+1.3%)(-1.2%). A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution.

  4. Experimental limits for heavy neutrino admixture deduced from 177Lu β decay and constraints on the life time of a radiative neutrino decay mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönert, S.; Oberauer, L.; Hagner, C.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Schreckenbach, K.; Declais, Y.; Mayerhofer, U.

    1996-05-01

    From cosmological constraints, the requirement for stable neutrinos is to have masses less than 30 eV. In the case that neutrino masses exceed this bound, neutrinos must decay sufficiently fast in order to satisfy the presently observed energy density of the universe. The experiments presented in this contribution consist of the complementary search for heavy neutrino admixture in nuclear beta decay of 177Lu and of the search for a radiative neutrino decay mode at the nuclear power station in Bugey, France. The data obtained from the 177Lu beta decay restrict the mixing probability of a heavy neutrino to the electron | U eh| 2 < 0.2 - 0.3% (90% Cl) for neutrino masses between 10 and 95 keV. The radiative lifetime is constrained to exceed t/ m > 180 × | U eh| 2 sec/eV which is one order of magnitude more restrictive than previous laboratory limits.

  5. Neutrino mass constraint from CMB, BAO and SN

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide

    2007-11-20

    We show that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data of WMAP can give subelectronvolt limit on the neutrino mass. We investigate how much we can make it more stringent by using 'standard ruler' measurements such as baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) and type Ia supernovae (SN)

  6. Constraints on sterile neutrino oscillations using DUNE near detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya; Pramanik, Dipyaman

    2017-01-01

    DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) is a proposed long-baseline neutrino experiment in the US with a baseline of 1300 km from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) to Sanford Underground Research Facility, which will house a 40 kt Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) as the far detector. The experiment will also have a fine grained near detector for accurately measuring the initial fluxes. We show that the energy range of the fluxes and baseline of the DUNE near detector is conducive for observing νμ →νe oscillations of Δm2 ∼ eV2 scale sterile neutrinos, and hence can be effectively used for testing to very high accuracy the reported oscillation signal seen by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments. We study the sensitivity of the DUNE near detector to sterile neutrino oscillations by varying the baseline, detector fiducial mass and systematic uncertainties. We find that the detector mass and baseline of the currently proposed near detector at DUNE will be able to test the entire LSND parameter region with good precision. The dependence of sensitivity on baseline and detector mass is seen to give interesting results, while dependence on systematic uncertainties is seen to be small.

  7. Constraints on cosmic ray and PeV neutrino production in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B. Theodore; Li, Zhuo

    2017-03-01

    IceCube has detected a cumulative flux of PeV neutrinos, which origin is unknown. Blazars, active galactic nuclei with relativistic jets pointing to us, are long and widely expected to be one of the strong candidates of high energy neutrino sources. The neutrino production depends strongly on the cosmic ray power of blazar jets, which is largely unknown. The recent null results in stacking searches of neutrinos for several blazar samples by IceCube put upper limits on the neutrino fluxes from these blazars. Here we compute the cosmic ray power and PeV neutrino flux of Fermi-LAT blazars, and find that the upper limits for known blazar sources give stringent constraint on the cosmic ray loading factor of blazar jets (i.e., the ratio of the cosmic ray to bolometric radiation luminosity of blazar jets), ξcr lesssim (2–10)ζ‑1 (with ζ lesssim 1 the remained fraction of cosmic ray energy when propagate into the blazar broad line region) for flat cosmic ray spectrum, and that the cumulative PeV neutrino flux contributed by all-sky blazars is a fraction lesssim (10–50)% of the IceCube detected flux.

  8. Contribution of Paleomagnetic and Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Records to Solve the Question of Orbital Constraint on the Geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Ménabréaz, L.; Bourles, D. L.; Demory, F.; Guillou, V.; Arnold, M.; Magorb Team

    2013-05-01

    The contribution of axial precession to the geodynamo energy budget recently rebounded with the demonstrations through theoretical and experimental studies that its amount of energy had been underestimated, while on the contrary the energy required to disturb the geodynamo was overestimated (e.g. Vanyo, 2004, Roberts et Wu, 2005, Tilgner 2005). Paleomagnetic tests of such an hypothesis remain yet highly controversial because relative paleointensity reconstructions are suspected of paleoenvironmental biases. Many available indicators [i) depositional remanent magnetization of sediment (paleodirections and paleointensity), ii) magnetization of the deep sea floor basalts, iii) geochemical records of cosmogenic nuclides production rates] however converge to produce a robust series of geomagnetic dipole lows related to paleomagnetic excursions of the last Ma. These series evidence periodicities in the 30 kyr-120 kyr range and present phase relationships with obliquity variations and δ18O records. Yet, such paleomagnetic time series are presently not precise and complete enough to firmly validate such fundamental but still hypothetic relationship. To further contribute solving this issue, the MAG-ORB project, funded for a 4 years period by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche, aims at reconstructing the time series of the geomagnetic dipole lows over the last 2 Ma using paleomagnetism coupled with cosmogenic nuclide 10Be and lithogenic 9Be isotopes measurements on sedimentary cores from mid and low latitudes, i.e. where the geomagnetic modulation of the cosmic ray penetration is the most efficient. New results (Ménabréaz et al., 2011; 2012; Ménabréaz, 2012) confirm and complete former results (Carcaillet et al., 2003; 2004) to demonstrate that over the last 1.2 Ma the excursions and reversals, and their respective relative paleointensity lows, are accompanied by significant enhancements of the cosmogenic 10Be production rate, pointing out a global collapse of

  9. Observational constraints on the ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrino flux from the second flight of the ANITA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; DuVernois, M.; Hill, B.; Matsuno, S.; Miki, C.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Ruckman, L.; Varner, G. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Beatty, J. J.; Grashorn, E. W.; Mercurio, B. C.; Palladino, K.; Belov, K.; Hoover, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Besson, D. Z.; Detrixhe, M.

    2010-07-15

    The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) completed its second Long Duration Balloon flight in January 2009, with 31 days aloft (28.5 live days) over Antarctica. ANITA searches for impulsive coherent radio Cherenkov emission from 200 to 1200 MHz, arising from the Askaryan charge excess in ultrahigh energy neutrino-induced cascades within Antarctic ice. This flight included significant improvements over the first flight in payload sensitivity, efficiency, and flight trajectory. Analysis of in-flight calibration pulses from surface and subsurface locations verifies the expected sensitivity. In a blind analysis, we find 2 surviving events on a background, mostly anthropogenic, of 0.97{+-}0.42 events. We set the strongest limit to date for 10{sup 18}-10{sup 21} eV cosmic neutrinos, excluding several current cosmogenic neutrino models.

  10. Constraints on dark photon from neutrino-electron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilmiş, S.; Turan, I.; Aliev, T. M.; Deniz, M.; Singh, L.; Wong, H. T.

    2015-08-01

    A possible manifestation of an additional light gauge boson A', named a dark photon, associated with a group U (1 )B -L , is studied in neutrino-electron scattering experiments. The exclusion plot on the coupling constant gB -L and the dark photon mass MA' is obtained. It is shown that the contributions of interference terms between the dark photon and the Standard Model are important. The interference effects are studied and compared with data sets from TEXONO, GEMMA, BOREXINO, and LSND, as well as CHARM II experiments. Our results provide more stringent bounds to some regions of parameter space.

  11. Constraints on Non-flat Cosmologies with Massive Neutrinos after Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Ratra, Bharat; Biesiada, Marek; Li, Song; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-10-01

    We investigate two dark energy cosmological models (i.e., the ΛCDM and ϕCDM models) with massive neutrinos assuming two different neutrino mass hierarchies in both the spatially flat and non-flat scenarios, where in the ϕCDM model the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, V(ϕ) ∝ ϕ -α (α > 0). Cosmic microwave background data from Planck 2015, baryon acoustic oscillation data from 6dFGS, SDSS-MGS, BOSS-LOWZ and BOSS CMASS-DR11, the joint light-curve analysis compilation of SNe Ia apparent magnitude observations, and the Hubble Space Telescope H 0 prior, are jointly employed to constrain the model parameters. We first determine constraints assuming three species of degenerate massive neutrinos. In the spatially flat (non-flat) ΛCDM model, the sum of neutrino masses is bounded as Σm ν < 0.165(0.299) eV at 95% confidence level (CL). Correspondingly, in the flat (non-flat) ϕCDM model, we find Σm ν < 0.164(0.301) eV at 95% CL. The inclusion of spatial curvature as a free parameter results in a significant broadening of confidence regions for Σm ν and other parameters. In the scenario where the total neutrino mass is dominated by the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate, we obtain similar conclusions to those obtained in the degenerate neutrino mass scenario. In addition, the results show that the bounds on Σm ν based on two different neutrino mass hierarchies have insignificant differences in the spatially flat case for both the ΛCDM and ϕCDM models; however, the corresponding differences are larger in the non-flat case.

  12. Cosmological constraints on neutrino plus axion hot dark matter: update after WMAP-5

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, S; Mirizzi, A; Raffelt, G G; Wong, Y Y Y E-mail: amirizzi@mppmu.mpg.de E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-04-15

    We update our previous constraints on two-component hot dark matter (axions and neutrinos), including the recent WMAP five-year data release. Marginalizing over {Sigma}m{sub {nu}} provides m{sub a}<1.02 eV (95% C.L.) for the axion mass. In the absence of axions we find {Sigma}m{sub {nu}}<0.63 eV (95% C.L.)

  13. Galaxy clusters as reservoirs of heavy dark matter and high-energy cosmic rays: constraints from neutrino observations

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Beacom, John F. E-mail: beacom.7@osu.edu

    2013-02-01

    Galaxy Clusters (GCs) are the largest reservoirs of both dark matter and cosmic rays (CRs). Dark matter self-annihilation can lead to a high luminosity in gamma rays and neutrinos, enhanced by a strong degree of clustering in dark matter substructures. Hadronic CR interactions can also lead to a high luminosity in gamma rays and neutrinos, enhanced by the confinement of CRs from cluster accretion/merger shocks and active galactic nuclei. We show that IceCube/KM3Net observations of high-energy neutrinos can probe the nature of GCs and the separate dark matter and CR emission processes, taking into account how the results depend on the still-substantial uncertainties. Neutrino observations are relevant at high energies, especially at ∼>10 TeV. Our results should be useful for improving experimental searches for high-energy neutrino emission. Neutrino telescopes are sensitive to extended sources formed by dark matter substructures and CRs distributed over large scales. Recent observations by Fermi and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes have placed interesting constraints on the gamma-ray emission from GCs. We also provide calculations of the gamma-ray fluxes, taking into account electromagnetic cascades inside GCs, which can be important for injections at sufficiently high energies. This also allows us to extend previous gamma-ray constraints to very high dark matter masses and significant CR injections at very high energies. Using both neutrinos and gamma rays, which can lead to comparable constraints, will allow more complete understandings of GCs. Neutrinos are essential for dark matter annihilation channels like χχ→μ{sup +}μ{sup −}, where the neutrino signals are larger than the gamma-ray signals, and for hadronic instead of electronic CRs, because only the first leads to neutrinos. Our results suggest that the multi-messenger observations of GCs will be able to give useful constraints on specific models of dark matter and CRs.

  14. NEUTRINO CONSTRAINTS TO THE DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dobardžić, A.; Prodanović, T. E-mail: prodanvc@df.uns.ac.rs

    2015-06-20

    Accretion of gas during the large-scale structure formation has been thought to give rise to shocks that can accelerate cosmic rays. This process then results in an isotropic extragalactic gamma-ray emission contributing to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) observed by Fermi-LAT. Unfortunately, this emission has been difficult to constrain and thus presents an uncertain foreground to any attempts to extract a potential dark matter signal. Recently, IceCube has detected high-energy isotropic neutrino flux that could be of an extragalactic origin. In general, neutrinos can be linked to gamma rays since cosmic-ray interactions produce neutral and charged pions where neutral pions decay into gamma rays, while charged pions decay to give neutrinos. By assuming that isotropic high-energy IceCube neutrinos are entirely produced by cosmic rays accelerated in accretion shocks during the process of structure formation, we obtain the strongest constraint to the gamma-ray emission from large-scale structure formation (strong) shocks and find that they can make at best ∼20% of the EGRB, corresponding to neutrino flux with spectral index α{sub ν} = 2, or ∼10% for spectral index α{sub ν} = 2.46. Since typical objects where cosmic rays are accelerated in accretion shocks are galaxy clusters, observed high-energy neutrino fluxes can then be used to determine the gamma-ray emission of a dominant cluster type and constrain acceleration efficiency, and thus probe the process of large-scale structure formation.

  15. New constraints on muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino transitions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bernstein, R.H.; Betancourt, M.; Bhattarai, P.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; /Cambridge U. /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    This letter reports results from a search for {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 7 x 1020 protons-on-target exposure. Our observation of 54 candidate e events in the Far Detector with a background of 49.1 {+-} 7.0(stat.) {+-} 2.7(syst.) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector requires 2 sin2(2{theta}13) sin2{theta}23 < 0.12 (0.20) at the 90% C.L. for the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy at {delta}CP = 0. The experiment sets the tightest limits to date on the value of {theta}13 for nearly all values of {delta}CP for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy and maximal sin2(2{theta}23).

  16. IceCube constraints on fast-spinning pulsars as high-energy neutrino sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Murase, Kohta; Olinto, Angela V. E-mail: kotera@iap.fr E-mail: olinto@kicp.uchicago.edu

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic winds of fast-spinning pulsars have been proposed as a potential site for cosmic-ray acceleration from very high energies (VHE) to ultrahigh energies (UHE). We re-examine conditions for high-energy neutrino production, considering the interaction of accelerated particles with baryons of the expanding supernova ejecta and the radiation fields in the wind nebula. We make use of the current IceCube sensitivity in diffusive high-energy neutrino background, in order to constrain the parameter space of the most extreme neutron stars as sources of VHE and UHE cosmic rays. We demonstrate that the current non-observation of 10{sup 18} eV neutrinos put stringent constraints on the pulsar scenario. For a given model, birthrates, ejecta mass and acceleration efficiency of the magnetar sources can be constrained. When we assume a proton cosmic ray composition and spherical supernovae ejecta, we find that the IceCube limits almost exclude their significant contribution to the observed UHE cosmic-ray flux. Furthermore, we consider scenarios where a fraction of cosmic rays can escape from jet-like structures piercing the ejecta, without significant interactions. Such scenarios would enable the production of UHE cosmic rays and help remove the tension between their EeV neutrino production and the observational data.

  17. IceCube constraints on fast-spinning pulsars as high-energy neutrino sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Murase, Kohta; Olinto, Angela V.

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic winds of fast-spinning pulsars have been proposed as a potential site for cosmic-ray acceleration from very high energies (VHE) to ultrahigh energies (UHE). We re-examine conditions for high-energy neutrino production, considering the interaction of accelerated particles with baryons of the expanding supernova ejecta and the radiation fields in the wind nebula. We make use of the current IceCube sensitivity in diffusive high-energy neutrino background, in order to constrain the parameter space of the most extreme neutron stars as sources of VHE and UHE cosmic rays. We demonstrate that the current non-observation of 1018 eV neutrinos put stringent constraints on the pulsar scenario. For a given model, birthrates, ejecta mass and acceleration efficiency of the magnetar sources can be constrained. When we assume a proton cosmic ray composition and spherical supernovae ejecta, we find that the IceCube limits almost exclude their significant contribution to the observed UHE cosmic-ray flux. Furthermore, we consider scenarios where a fraction of cosmic rays can escape from jet-like structures piercing the ejecta, without significant interactions. Such scenarios would enable the production of UHE cosmic rays and help remove the tension between their EeV neutrino production and the observational data.

  18. Forecasts on neutrino mass constraints from the redshift-space two-point correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petracca, F.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Cimatti, A.; Carbone, C.; Angulo, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, fν, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high-density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of δfν ≈ 3.1 × 10-3 (which is equivalent to δ∑mν ≈ 0.039eV), using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the ΛCDM case.

  19. A Type 2 supernovae constraint on neutrino(sub e) - neutrino(sub s) mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.; Sigl, G.

    1993-01-01

    The role of a resonant nu(e) - nu(s) oscillation is discussed in the event of a supernova explosion. It is concluded that a significant nu(e) - nu(s) mixing may hinder the ability of the supernova to explode. It may also cool the proto-neutron star too quickly with respect to the observed cooling time of several seconds. The constraints on the nu(e) - nu(s) mixing parameters based on the above arguments are calculated.

  20. How Far Away Are the Sources of IceCube Neutrinos? Constraints from the Diffuse Teraelectronvolt Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Chuan; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    The nearly isotropic distribution of teraelectronvolt to petaelectronvolt neutrinos recently detected by the IceCube Collaboration suggests that they come from sources at a distance beyond our Galaxy, but how far away they are is largely unknown because of a lack of any associations with known sources. In this paper, we propose that the cumulative TeV gamma-ray emission accompanying the production of neutrinos can be used to constrain the distance of these neutrino sources, since the opacity of TeV gamma rays due to absorption by the extragalactic background light depends on the distance these TeV gamma rays have traveled. As the diffuse extragalactic TeV background measured by Fermi is much weaker than the expected cumulative flux associated with IceCube neutrinos, the majority of IceCube neutrinos, if their sources are transparent to TeV gamma rays, must come from distances larger than the horizon of TeV gamma rays. We find that above 80% of the IceCube neutrinos should come from sources at redshift z > 0.5. Thus, the chance of finding nearby sources correlated with IceCube neutrinos would be small. We also find that, to explain the flux of neutrinos under the TeV gamma-ray emission constraint, the redshift evolution of neutrino source density must be at least as fast as the cosmic star formation rate.

  1. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  2. Constraints on nucleon decay via invisible modes from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frati, W; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-03-12

    Data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory have been used to constrain the lifetime for nucleon decay to "invisible" modes, such as n-->3nu. The analysis was based on a search for gamma rays from the deexcitation of the residual nucleus that would result from the disappearance of either a proton or neutron from 16O. A limit of tau(inv)>2 x 10(29) yr is obtained at 90% confidence for either neutron- or proton-decay modes. This is about an order of magnitude more stringent than previous constraints on invisible proton-decay modes and 400 times more stringent than similar neutron modes.

  3. First constraints on the ultra-high energy neutrino flux from a prototype station of the Askaryan Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P.; Auffenberg, J.; Bard, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Bora, C.; Chen, C.-C.; Chen, P.; Connolly, A.; Davies, J. P.; DuVernois, M. A.; Fox, B.; Gorham, P. W.; Hanson, K.; Hill, B.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hong, E.; Hu, L.-C.; Ishihara, A.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Landsman, H.; Laundrie, A.; Li, C.-J.; Liu, T.; Lu, M.-Y.; Maunu, R.; Mase, K.; Meures, T.; Miki, C.; Nam, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Nir, G.; O'Murchadha, A.; Pfendner, C. G.; Ratzlaff, K.; Richman, M.; Rotter, B.; Sandstrom, P.; Seckel, D.; Shultz, A.; Stockham, J.; Stockham, M.; Sullivan, M.; Touart, J.; Tu, H.-Y.; Varner, G. S.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.

    2015-10-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) cosmic neutrino detector in phased construction near the south pole. ARA searches for radio Cherenkov emission from particle cascades induced by neutrino interactions in the ice using radio frequency antennas (∼ 150 - 800 MHz) deployed at a design depth of 200 m in the Antarctic ice. A prototype ARA Testbed station was deployed at ∼ 30 m depth in the 2010-2011 season and the first three full ARA stations were deployed in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 seasons. We present the first neutrino search with ARA using data taken in 2011 and 2012 with the ARA Testbed and the resulting constraints on the neutrino flux from 1017 -1021 eV.

  4. Constraints on very light sterile neutrinos from θ 13-sensitive reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Three dedicated reactor experiments, Double Chooz, RENO and Daya Bay, have recently performed a precision measurement of the third standard mixing angle θ 13 exploiting a multiple baseline comparison of ν e → ν e disappearance driven by the atmospheric mass-squared splitting. In this paper we show how the same technique can be used to put stringent limits on the oscillations of the electron neutrino into a fourth very light sterile species (VLS ν) characterized by a mass-squared difference lying in the range [10-3 - 10-1] eV2. We present accurate constraints on the admixture | U e4|2 obtained by a 4-flavor analysis of the publicly available reactor data. In addition, we show that the estimate of θ 13 obtained by the combination of the three reactor experiments is rather robust and substantially independent of the 4-flavor-induced perturbations provided that the new mass-squared splitting is not too low (≳ 6 × 10-3 eV2). We briefly comment on the possible impact of VLS ν's on the rest of the neutrino oscillation phenomenology and emphasize their potential role in the cosmological "dark radiation" anomaly.

  5. Observational constraints on multimessenger sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Bartos, Imre; Finley, Chad; Corsi, Alessandra; Márka, Szabolcs

    2011-12-16

    Many astronomical sources of intense bursts of photons are also predicted to be strong emitters of gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). Moreover some suspected classes, e.g., choked gamma-ray bursts, may only be identifiable via nonphoton messengers. Here we explore the reach of current and planned experiments to address this question. We derive constraints on the rate of GW and HEN bursts based on independent observations by the initial LIGO and Virgo GW detectors and the partially completed IceCube (40-string) HEN detector. We then estimate the reach of joint GW+HEN searches using advanced GW detectors and the completed km(3) IceCube detector to probe the joint parameter space. We show that searches undertaken by advanced detectors will be capable of detecting, constraining, or excluding, several existing models with 1 yr of observation.

  6. Constraints on neutrino masses from the study of the nearby large-scale structure and galaxy cluster counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-07-01

    The high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background by the Planck survey yielded tight constraints on cosmological parameters and the statistics of the density fluctuations at the time of recombination. This provides the means for a critical study of structure formation in the Universe by comparing the microwave background results with present epoch measurements of the cosmic large-scale structure. It can reveal subtle effects such as how different forms of Dark Matter may modify structure growth. Currently most interesting is the damping effect of structure growth by massive neutrinos. Different observations of low redshift matter density fluctuations provided evidence for a signature of massive neutrinos. Here we discuss the study of the cosmic large-scale structure with a complete sample of nearby, X-ray luminous clusters from our REFLEX cluster survey. From the observed X-ray luminosity function and its reproduction for different cosmological models, we obtain tight constraints on the cosmological parameters describing the matter density, Ωm, and the density fluctuation amplitude, σ8. A comparison of these constraints with the Planck results shows a discrepancy in the framework of a pure ΛCDM model, but the results can be reconciled, if we allow for a neutrino mass in the range of 0.17 eV to 0.7 eV. Also some others, but not all of the observations of the nearby large-scale structure provide evidence or trends for signatures of massive neutrinos. With further improvement in the systematics and future survey projects, these indications will develop into a definitive measurement of neutrino masses.

  7. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  8. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  9. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21 cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Kohri, Kazunori; Hazumi, Masashi E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Besides, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observation such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1 eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species σ (N{sub ν}) ∼ 0.06−0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  10. Constraints on the neutrino emission from the Galactic Ridge with the ANTARES telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2016-09-01

    A highly significant excess of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos has been reported by the IceCube Collaboration. Some features of the energy and declination distributions of IceCube events hint at a North/South asymmetry of the neutrino flux. This could be due to the presence of the bulk of our Galaxy in the Southern hemisphere. The ANTARES neutrino telescope, located in the Mediterranean Sea, has been taking data since 2007. It offers the best sensitivity to muon neutrinos produced by galactic cosmic ray interactions in this region of the sky. In this letter a search for an extended neutrino flux from the Galactic Ridge region is presented. Different models of neutrino production by cosmic ray propagation are tested. No excess of events is observed and upper limits for different neutrino flux spectral indices Γ are set. For Γ = 2.4 the 90% confidence level flux upper limit at 100 TeV for one neutrino flavour corresponds to Φ01 f (100 TeV) = 2.0 ṡ10-17 GeV-1cm-2s-1sr-1. Under this assumption, at most two events of the IceCube cosmic candidates can originate from the Galactic Ridge. A simple power-law extrapolation of the Fermi-LAT flux to account for IceCube High Energy Starting Events is excluded at 90% confidence level.

  11. Improving in Situ Cosmogenic Chronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Douglas H.; Bierman, Paul R.; Larsen, Patrick

    1995-11-01

    New radiocarbon ages for Sierra Nevada deglaciation, the first 10 Be measurements from the Laurentide terminal moraine, and calculations based on paleomagnetic field strength have the potential to substantially improve the accuracy of cosmogenic age estimates. Specifically, three new constraints apply to the interpretation of measured abundances of in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al: (1) A suite of minimum-limiting radiocarbon dates indicates that the Sierra Nevada was deglaciated at least several thousand years earlier than assumed when Nishiizumi et al. (1989) first calibrated 10Be and 26 Al production rates based on polished bedrock surfaces in the range, with retreat beginning by 18,000 cal yr B.P. and completed by 13,000 cal yr B.P. (2) Concentrations of 10Be in moraine boulders and glacier-polished bedrock in New Jersey show little variance (10%, 1σ) and can be used to calculate a preliminary 10Be production rate (integrated over the past 21,000-22,000 cal yr B.P. at 41°, 200-300 m altitude) that is about 20% lower than currently accepted. (3) Calculations of the effect of past geomagnetic field-strength variations on production rates suggest that the use of temporally averaged production rates may generate age errors of >20%; however, cosmogenic exposure ages can be corrected for this effect, although the corrections currently are imprecise. Many previously reported late-Pleistocene 10Be and 26Al exposure ages are probably too young and are less accurate and less precise than implied by reported uncertainties. The discrepancy between accepted production rates and those calculated from Laurentide exposures, when considered together with the Sierran deglacial chronology and the model results, suggest that correlations between cosmogenic and other numerical ages, especially for brief events like the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events, will not be robust until temporal variations and the altitude/latitude scaling of production rates are fully understood

  12. Updated constraints on the light-neutrino exchange mechanisms of the 0νββ-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay associated with light neutrino exchange mechanisms, which are due to both left-handed V-A and right-handed V+A leptonic and hadronic currents, is discussed by using the recent progress achieved by the GERDA, EXO and KamlandZen experiments. The upper limits for effective neutrino mass mββ and the parameters <λ> and <η> characterizing the right handed current mechanisms are deduced from the data on the 0νββ-decay of 76Ge and 136Xe using nuclear matrix elements calculated within the nuclear shell model and quasiparticle random phase approximation and phase-space factors calculated with exact Dirac wave functions with finite nuclear size and electron screening. The careful analysis of upper constraints on effective lepton number violating parameters assumes a competition of the above mechanisms and arbitrary values of involved CP violating phases.

  13. Mid-late Pleistocene glacial evolution in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica, constraints from cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of glacial erratic cobbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guocheng; Huang, Feixin; Yi, Chaolu; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Weijian; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-08-01

    Glacial histories from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) provide keys to understanding correlations between the EAIS and global climate. They are especially helpful in the assessment of global sea level change, and as a means of quantifying the magnitude of past glacial activity and the rate at which ice responded to climate change. Given the significance of EAIS glacial histories, it is imperative that more glacial chronologic data for this region be obtained, especially for the mid-to-late Pleistocene. We report cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating results from glacially transported cobbles embedded in blue-ice moraine material at Mount Harding, the Grove Mountains, EAIS. Forty exotic cobbles sampled along two profiles (A and B) on this blue-ice moraine present apparent exposure-ages ranging from 7.2 to 542.2 ka. We explore this scattered dataset by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify statistically significant trends in the data. We identify a correlation between exposure-age and distance of the cobbles from Mount Harding. In profile A, cobbles further from Mount Harding yield older exposure-ages than those that are relatively close. In profile B, cobbles closer to Mount Harding are found to have relatively older exposure-ages. In term of glacial history we suggest that the direction of ice flow changed during the period from ∼60 to 200 ka, and that multiple glacial fluctuations occurred in the mid-late Pleistocene.

  14. Quantum-gravity decoherence effects in neutrino oscillations: Expected constraints from CNGS and J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sarkar, Sarben; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2008-03-01

    Quantum decoherence, the evolution of pure states into mixed states, may be a feature of quantum-gravity models. In most cases, such models lead to fewer neutrinos of all active flavors being detected in a long-baseline experiment as compared to three-flavor standard neutrino oscillations. We discuss the potential of the CNGS and J-PARC beams in constraining models of quantum-gravity induced decoherence using neutrino oscillations as a probe. We use as much as possible model-independent parametrizations, even though they are motivated by specific microscopic models, for fits to the expected experimental data which yield bounds on quantum-gravity decoherence parameters.

  15. Quantitative constraints on the formation of post-glacial normal-fault scarps in Greece determined by chlore 36 cosmogenic dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, L.; King, G.; Finkel, R.; Papanastassiou, D.; Armijo, R.; Ryerson, F.; Farber, D.; Flerit, F.

    2003-04-01

    Recent activity of normal faults in Greece has produced steep limestone fault scarps at the base of the mountain fronts. For example, on the Sparta fault located in the Peloponnese, and responsible for the 464 B.C. M˜7 earthquake, a continuous fresh scarp cuts limestone bedrock and indurated conglomerates. The scarp is nearly continuous dipping at 65-68o with well-preserved slickensides. The maximum height of the scarp is 10-12 metres, progressively decreasing towards the ends. The few local variations are associated with active streams where hangingwall erosion causes the scarp to be locally higher. The regularity of the scarp is powerful evidence that the footwall and hangingwall surfaces were originally continuous and the scarp surface represents fault slip alone. It also suggests that there was no significant erosion or deposition on the hanging-wall (except near active gullies) since the scarp began to form. Such observations have led to the suggestion that numerous well-preserved limestone escarpments around the eastern Mediterranean, similar to those in Sparta, are post-glacial in age. Using 36Cl cosmogenic dating we tested the foregoing ideas. Limestones (largely calcite) contain an abundance of calcium, which is a major target element for cosmogenic 36Cl production. Samples were collected from the limestone scarp surface to recover the continuous exposure history of the scarp and also from the footwall and hanging wall surfaces as well as a depth profile in the hanging wall wedge. The concentration of 36Cl and of stable chlorine has been measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the LLNL-CAMS for each of the samples (about 150). The result confirm: 1- that the fault scarp was formed between about 2000 B.P. and 13 ka B.P. as the result of 5 earthquakes (including the known event in 464 B.C.) with similar slip amplitudes of about 2m and with time intervals ranging from 500yr to 4500yr (Benedetti et al., GRL, 2002), 2- that both hanging wall and

  16. Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C. (Editor); Englert, P. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclides are compiled. The major topic areas covered include: new techniques for measuring nuclides such as tandem accelerator and resonance mass spectrometry; solar modulation of cosmic rays; pre-irradiation histories of extraterrestrial materials; terrestrial studies; simulations and cross sections; nuclide production rate calculations; and meteoritic nuclides.

  17. Neutrinos in the holographic dark energy model: constraints from latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin E-mail: zhaomingmingsp@163.com E-mail: zhangxin@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    The model of holographic dark energy (HDE) with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation is investigated in detail. The background and perturbation evolutions in the HDE model are calculated. We employ the PPF approach to overcome the gravity instability difficulty (perturbation divergence of dark energy) led by the equation-of-state parameter w evolving across the phantom divide w=−1 in the HDE model with c<1. We thus derive the evolutions of density perturbations of various components and metric fluctuations in the HDE model. The impacts of massive neutrino and dark radiation on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum and the matter power spectrum in the HDE scenario are discussed. Furthermore, we constrain the models of HDE with massive neutrinos and/or dark radiation by using the latest measurements of expansion history and growth of structure, including the Planck CMB temperature data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the JLA supernova data, the Hubble constant direct measurement, the cosmic shear data of weak lensing, the Planck CMB lensing data, and the redshift space distortions data. We find that ∑ m{sub ν}<0.186 eV (95% CL) and N{sub eff}=3.75{sup +0.28}{sub −0.32} in the HDE model from the constraints of these data.

  18. Constraints on decaying neutrinos from the far-ultraviolet extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overduin, J. M.; Wesson, P. S.; Bowyer, S.

    1993-01-01

    We consider light neutrinos as dark matter candidates, concentrating on those proposed by Sciama, with rest energies near 30 eV and decay lifetimes of (2 +/- 1) x 10 exp 23 s. Using equations developed by Wesson et al. (1987) for the visible extragalactic background light, and assuming that the neutrinos are clustered in galactic halos similar to that around our own Galaxy, we show that their decay would be capable of significant contributions to the far-ultraviolet background. Observations in this region by Martin and Bowyer (1989) limit the possible mass of the neutrino halos to 2 x 10 exp 11 M(solar), which is less than the required galactic 'missing mass'. In order to form galactic halos of mass 5 x 10 exp 11 M(solar), such neutrinos would have to decay with lifetimes of at least 3 x 10 exp 23 s to be consistent with the observations. Sciama's proposal remains marginally viable, but more observational data will test it and similar neutrino models critically.

  19. Neutrino mass constraint from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey power spectrum of luminous red galaxies and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Shun; Takada, Masahiro; Taruya, Atsushi

    2011-02-15

    We compare the model power spectrum, computed based on perturbation theory, with the power spectrum of luminous red galaxies (LRG) measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, assuming a flat, cold dark matter-dominated cosmology. The model includes the effects of massive neutrinos, nonlinear matter clustering and nonlinear, scale-dependent galaxy bias in a self-consistent manner. We first test the accuracy of the perturbation theory model by comparing the model predictions with the halo power spectrum in real- and redshift-space, measured from 70 simulation realizations for a cold dark matter model without massive neutrinos. We show that the perturbation theory model with bias parameters being properly adjusted can fairly well reproduce the simulation results. As a result, the best-fit parameters obtained from the hypothetical parameter fitting recover, within statistical uncertainties, the input cosmological parameters in simulations, including an upper bound on neutrino mass, if the power spectrum information up to k{approx_equal}0.15 hMpc{sup -1} is used. However, for the redshift-space power spectrum, the best-fit cosmological parameters show a sizable bias from the input values if using the information up to k{approx_equal}0.2 hMpc{sup -1}, probably due to nonlinear redshift distortion effect. Given these tests, we decided, as a conservative choice, to use the LRG power spectrum up to k=0.1 hMpc{sup -1} in order to minimize possible unknown nonlinearity effects. In combination with the recent results from Wilkinson Microwave Background Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we derive a robust upper bound on the sum of neutrino masses, given as (95% C.L.), marginalized over other parameters including nonlinear bias parameters and dark energy equation of state parameter. The upper bound is only slightly improved to if including the LRG spectrum up to k=0.2 hMpc{sup -1}, due to severe parameter degeneracies, although the constraint may be biased as

  20. Constraint on the magnetic dipole moment of neutrinos by the tip-RGB luminosity in ω-Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arceo-Díaz, S.; Schröder, K.-P.; Zuber, K.; Jack, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we use models constructed with the Eggleton code for stellar evolution, along with the photometric data of the super-rich globular cluster ω-Centauri (Sollima et al., 2004), to put a constraint on the magnetic dipole moment of neutrinos. We begin with a review of the idea proposed by Raffelt and Dearborn (1988), in which, as a consequence of a non-zero magnetic dipole moment, the tip-RGB luminosity of low mass stars gets increased over its standard value. First, we measure the dependence of the He-core mass and bolometric luminosity, at the tip-RGB, on the existing fits to characterize plasmon decay into neutrinos, namely those from Itoh et al. (1992), Haft et al. (1994), and the more recent results from Kantor and Gushakov (2007). Then, stating our definition of the tip-RGB, we revise multiple theoretical aspects: the consequences of non-standard neutrino emission on the internal structure of stellar models, its impact on the calibration of the Reimers mass-loss rate and later evolutionary phases and the influence of initial Helium abundance, metallicity, convection theory and opacities. Finally, we consider the specific case of ω-Cen. Using our tip-RGB models, and the bolometric correction obtained by the PHOENIX code for stellar atmospheres, to estimate the luminosity for canonical and non-standard evolution, also measuring the impact of the reported chemical spread in ω-Cen on our results. We find that the upper limit μν ≤ 2.2 ×10-12μB is already well constrained by observations. This result compares with the one obtained by Viaux et al. (2013), μν ≤ 2.6 ×10-12μB , from photometric study of the globular cluster M5.

  1. Constraints from primordial nucleosynthesis on the mass of the tau neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.; Chakravorty, A.; Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that primordial nucleosynthesis excludes a tau-neutrino mass from 0.3 to 25 MeV (Dirac) and 0.5 to 25 MeV (Majorana) provided that its lifetime is not less than about 1 sec, and from 0.3 to 30 MeV (Dirac) and 0.5 to 32 MeV (Majorana) for a lifetime of not less than about 1000 sec. A modest improvement in the laboratory mass limit - from 35 to 25 MeV - would imply that the tau-neutrino mass must be less than 0.5 MeV (provided the lifetime is not less than about 1 sec).

  2. Updated constraints on the light-neutrino exchange mechanisms of the 0νββ-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay associated with light neutrino exchange mechanisms, which are due to both left-handed V-A and right-handed V+A leptonic and hadronic currents, is discussed by using the recent progress achieved by the GERDA, EXO and KamlandZen experiments. The upper limits for effective neutrino mass m{sub ββ} and the parameters 〈λ〉 and 〈η〉 characterizing the right handed current mechanisms are deduced from the data on the 0νββ-decay of {sup 76}Ge and {sup 136}Xe using nuclear matrix elements calculated within the nuclear shell model and quasiparticle random phase approximation and phase-space factors calculated with exact Dirac wave functions with finite nuclear size and electron screening. The careful analysis of upper constraints on effective lepton number violating parameters assumes a competition of the above mechanisms and arbitrary values of involved CP violating phases.

  3. Constraints to a Galactic component of the Ice Cube cosmic neutrino flux from ANTARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurio, M.

    2014-11-01

    The IceCube evidence for cosmic neutrinos in the high-energy starting events (HESE) sample has inspired a large number of hypotheses on their origin, mainly due to the poor precision on the measurement of the direction of showering events. The fact that most HESE are downward going suggests a possible Galactic component. This could be originated either by a single pointlike source or to a directional excess from an extended Galactic region. These hypotheses are reviewed and constrained, using the present available upper limits from the ANTARES neutrino telescope. ANTARES detects νμ from sources in the Southern sky with an effective area larger than that providing the IceCube HESE for Eν<60 TeV and a factor of about two smaller at 1 PeV. The use of the νμ signal enables an accurate measurement of the incoming neutrino direction. The Galactic signal allowed by the IceCube HESE and the corresponding ANTARES limits are studied in terms of a power law flux E-Γ, with spectral index Γ ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 to cover most astrophysical models.

  4. Constraints on the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitink, S.; Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R. G.; Yahyaoui, R. Al

    2010-10-01

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath the Moon's surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims: By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHE neutrino flux. Methods: The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a sampling frequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth's ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, the detection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results: With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit on the UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  5. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Beltrán, B.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Cremonesi, O.; García, E.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pavan, M.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  6. Particle-physics constraints from the globular cluster M5: neutrino dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaux, N.; Catelan, M.; Stetson, P. B.; Raffelt, G. G.; Redondo, J.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; Weiss, A.

    2013-10-01

    Stellar evolution is modified if energy is lost in a "dark channel" similar to neutrino emission. Comparing modified stellar evolution sequences with observations provides some of the most restrictive limits on axions and other hypothetical low-mass particles and on non-standard neutrino properties. In particular, a putative neutrino magnetic dipole moment μν enhances the plasmon decay process, postpones helium ignition in low-mass stars, and therefore extends the red giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters (GCs). The brightness of the tip of the RGB (TRGB) remains the most sensitive probe for μν and we revisit this argument from a modern perspective. Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic GC M5 (NGC 5904) and carefully determine its TRGB position. On the theoretical side, we add the extra plasmon decay rate brought about by μν to the Princeton-Goddard-PUC (PGPUC) stellar evolution code. Different sources of uncertainty are critically examined. The main source of systematic uncertainty is the bolometric correction and the main statistical uncertainty derives from the distance modulus based on main-sequence fitting. (Other measures of distance, e.g., the brightness of RR Lyrae stars, are influenced by the energy loss that we wish to constrain.) The statistical uncertainty of the TRGB position relative to the brightest RGB star is less important because the RGB is well populated. We infer an absolute I-band brightness of MI = -4.17 ± 0.13 mag for the TRGB compared with the theoretical prediction of - 3.99 ± 0.07 mag, in reasonable agreement with each other. A significant brightness increase caused by neutrino dipole moments is constrained such that μν < 2.6 × 10-12 μB (68% CL), where μB ≡ e/2me is the Bohr magneton, and μν < 4.5 × 10-12 μB (95% CL). In these results, statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature. The photometric catalog is only available at the CDS

  7. Constraints on texture zero and cofactor zero models for neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, K.; Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.

    2014-06-24

    Imposing a texture or cofactor zero on the neutrino mass matrix reduces the number of independent parameters from nine to seven. Since five parameters have been measured, only two independent parameters would remain in such models. We find the allowed regions for single texture zero and single cofactor zero models. We also find strong similarities between single texture zero models with one mass hierarchy and single cofactor zero models with the opposite mass hierarchy. We show that this correspondence can be generalized to texture-zero and cofactor-zero models with the same homogeneous costraints on the elements and cofactors.

  8. Neutrino Analysis of the September 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and Time-integrated Constraints on Neutrino Emission From the Crab Using IceCube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatikos, M.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguliar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J. L. Bazo; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. -H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, SW.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results for a search of high-energy muon neutrinos with the IceCube detector in coincidence with the Crab nebula flare reported on September 2010 by various experiments. Due to the unusual flaring state of the otherwise steady source we performed a prompt analysis of the 79-string configuration data to search for neutrinos that might be emitted along with the observed gamma-rays. We performed two different and complementary data selections of neutrino events in the time window of 10 days around the flare. One event selection is optimized for discovery of E(sub nu)(sup -2) neutrino spectrum typical of 1st order Fermi acceleration. A similar event selection has also been applied to the 40-string data to derive the time-integrated limits to the neutrino emission from the Crab [35]. The other event selection was optimized for discovery of neutrino spectra with softer spectral index and TeV energy cut-offs as observed for various galactic sources in gamma-rays. The 90% CL best upper limits on the Crab flux during the 10 day flare are 4.73 x 10(exp -11) per square centimeter per second TeV (sup -1) for an E(sub nu) (sup -2) neutrino spectrum and 2.50 x 10(exp -10) per square centimeter per second TeV(sup -1) for a softer neutrino spectra of E(sub nu)(sup -2.7), as indicated by Fermi measurements during the flare. IceCube has also set a time-integrated limit on the neutrino emission of the Crab using 375.5 days of livetime of the 40-string configuration data. This limit is compared to existing models of neutrino production from the Crab and its impact on astrophysical parameters is discussed. The most optimistic predictions of some models are already rejected by the IceCube neutrino telescope with more than 90% CL.

  9. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, O; Bacelar, J; Braun, R; de Bruyn, A G; Falcke, H; Singh, K; Stappers, B; Strom, R G; al Yahyaoui, R

    2010-04-02

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath the Moon's surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a sampling frequency of 40 MHz. The narrow band radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, the detection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit on the UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  10. Constraints on Neutrino Masses from the Lensing Dispersion of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Ryuichiro; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigate how accurately the total mass of neutrinos is constrained from the magnitude dispersion of SNe Ia due to the effects of gravitational lensing. For this purpose, we use the propagation equation of light bundles in a realistic inhomogeneous universe and propose a sample selection for supernovae to avoid difficulties associated with small-scale effects such as strong lensing or shear effects. With a fitting formula for the nonlinear matter power spectrum taking account of the effects of massive neutrinos, we find that in our model it is possible to obtain the upper limit {{Σ }}{m}ν ≃ 1.0[{{eV}}] for future optical imaging surveys with the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Furthermore, we discuss how far we need to observe SNe Ia and to what extent we have to reduce the magnitude error except for lensing in order to realize the current tightest limit {{Σ }}{m}ν \\lt 0.2[{{eV}}].

  11. Cosmogenic Induced Background Estimation for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brandon; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments probe for such rare events that the suppression and understanding of backgrounds are major experimental concerns. Cosmogenic induced isotopes have the potential to be a major background for such experiments. For the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment 76Ge isotope is used as both detector and source and pure electroformed copper is primarily used for detector housing. The isotopes 68Ge and 60Co are cosmogenically produced when the Germanium and Copper components are near Earth's surface. The decay of these isotopes can mimic events in the region of interest. The experiment is located at the 4850 foot level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota to suppress cosmogenic activation. In this talk I will present the calculations of cosmogenic backgrounds for the enriched 76Ge and electroformed Copper materials used in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The activation is determined by the surface exposure time of materials. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  12. First evidence of pep solar neutrinos by direct detection in Borexino.

    PubMed

    Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonetti, S; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Buizza Avanzini, M; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; Chepurnov, A; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, E; Hardy, S; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Koshio, Y; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Otis, K; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Quirk, J; Raghavan, R S; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schönert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Xu, J; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2012-02-03

    We observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range. We determined the rate of pep solar neutrino interactions in Borexino to be 3.1±0.6{stat}±0.3{syst}  counts/(day·100  ton). Assuming the pep neutrino flux predicted by the standard solar model, we obtained a constraint on the CNO solar neutrino interaction rate of <7.9  counts/(day·100  ton) (95% C.L.). The absence of the solar neutrino signal is disfavored at 99.97% C.L., while the absence of the pep signal is disfavored at 98% C.L. The necessary sensitivity was achieved by adopting data analysis techniques for the rejection of cosmogenic {11}C, the dominant background in the 1-2 MeV region. Assuming the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein large mixing angle solution to solar neutrino oscillations, these values correspond to solar neutrino fluxes of (1.6±0.3)×10{8}  cm{-2} s^{-1} and <7.7×10{8}  cm{-2} s{-1} (95% C.L.), respectively, in agreement with both the high and low metallicity standard solar models. These results represent the first direct evidence of the pep neutrino signal and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux to date.

  13. Joint short- and long-baseline constraints on light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Palazzo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that long-baseline (LBL) experiments are sensitive to the extra C P phases involved with light sterile neutrinos, whose existence is suggested by several anomalous short-baseline (SBL) results. We show that, within the 3 +1 scheme, the combination of the existing SBL data with the LBL results coming from the two currently running experiments, NO ν A and T2K, enables us to simultaneously constrain two active-sterile mixing angles, θ14 and θ24, and two C P phases, δ13≡δ and δ14, although the information on the second C P phase is still weak. The two mixing angles are basically determined by the SBL data, while the two C P phases are constrained by the LBL experiments, once the information coming from the SBL setups is taken into account. We also assess the robustness or fragility of the estimates of the standard 3-flavor parameters in the more general 3 +1 scheme. To this regard we find that (i) the indication of C P violation found in the 3-flavor analyses persists also in the 3 +1 scheme, with δ13≡δ having still its best-fit value around -π /2 , (ii) the 3-flavor weak hint in favor of the normal hierarchy becomes even less significant when sterile neutrinos come into play, (iii) the weak indication of nonmaximal θ23 (driven by NO ν A disappearance data) persists in the 3 +1 scheme, where maximal mixing is disfavored at almost the 90% C.L. in both normal and inverted mass hierarchy, and (iv) the preference in favor of one of the two octants of θ23 found in the 3-flavor framework (higher octant for inverted mass hierarchy) is completely washed out in the 3 +1 scheme.

  14. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  15. NEUTRINO ANALYSIS OF THE 2010 SEPTEMBER CRAB NEBULA FLARE AND TIME-INTEGRATED CONSTRAINTS ON NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM THE CRAB USING ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; and others

    2012-01-20

    We present the results of a search for high-energy muon neutrinos with the IceCube detector in coincidence with the Crab Nebula flare reported on 2010 September by various experiments. Due to the unusual flaring state of the otherwise steady source we performed a prompt analysis of the 79-string configuration data to search for neutrinos that might be emitted along with the observed {gamma}-rays. We performed two different and complementary data selections of neutrino events in the time window of 10 days around the flare. One event selection is optimized for discovery of E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum typical of first-order Fermi acceleration. A similar event selection has also been applied to the 40-string data to derive the time-integrated limits to the neutrino emission from the Crab. The other event selection was optimized for discovery of neutrino spectra with softer spectral index and TeV energy cutoffs as observed for various Galactic sources in {gamma}-rays. The 90% confidence level (CL) best upper limits on the Crab flux during the 10 day flare are 4.73 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for an E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum and 2.50 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for a softer neutrino spectra of E{sup -2.7}{sub {nu}}, as indicated by Fermi measurements during the flare. In this paper, we also illustrate the impact of the time-integrated limit on the Crab neutrino steady emission. The limit obtained using 375.5 days of the 40-string configuration is compared to existing models of neutrino production from the Crab and its impact on astrophysical parameters is discussed. The most optimistic predictions of some models are already rejected by the IceCube neutrino telescope with more than 90% CL.

  16. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  17. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, Martin; Zhao Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-15

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component--in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV--to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  19. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feix, Martin; Zhao, Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Pestaña, José Luis Garrido; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-01

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component—in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV—to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  20. Constraints on the extremely-high energy cosmic neutrino flux with the IceCube 2008-2009 data

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Gladstone, L.; Grullon, S.; Halzen, F.; Hill, G. C.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report on a search for extremely-high energy neutrinos with energies greater than 10{sup 6} GeV using the data taken with the IceCube detector at the South Pole. The data was collected between April 2008 and May 2009 with the half-completed IceCube array. The absence of signal candidate events in the sample of 333.5 days of live time significantly improves model-independent limits from previous searches and allows to place a limit on the diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos with an E{sup -2} spectrum in the energy range 2.0x10{sup 6}-6.3x10{sup 9} GeV to a level of E{sup 2{phi}{<=}}3.6x10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} sr{sup -1}.

  1. Tests of neutrino stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Petcov, S. V.; Toshev, S.; Valle, J. W. F.

    1986-12-01

    A possible solution of the solar neutrino problem is that electron neutrinos decay in transit from the sun. The phenomenological consequences of this hypothesis for solar neutrino experiments with detectors of 2H, 40Ar, 71Ga, 98Mo, and electron-neutrino scattering are discussed. The postulated fast decay can occur in models of majoron type without violating laboratory, cosmological, or astrophysical constraints. Address after January 1st, 1987: Department de Física Teòrica, Universitat de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia, Spain.

  2. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.; Whitney, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. In this short paper, we summarize the cosmogenic nuclide method and describe with examples some the utility of the technique in geologic site characterization. We report preliminary results from our ongoing work at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Sterile neutrinos in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Malaney, R.A. ); Fuller, G.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-11-14

    We discuss the role played by right-handed sterile neutrinos in the early universe. We show how well known {sup 4}He constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom at early times limits the equilibration of the right handed neutrino sea with the background plasma. We discuss how this allows interesting constraints to be placed on neutrino properties. In particular, a new limit on the Dirac mass of the neutrino is presented. 12 refs.

  4. The cosmogenic induced background estimation for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR enriched 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brandon; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments probe for such rare events that the suppression of backgrounds are major experimental concerns. Cosmogenic induced isotopes have the potential to be a major background for such experiments. For the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment 76Ge isotope is used as both detector and source. The isotope 68Ge is cosmogenically produced when the Ge is on the Earth's surface. The decay of this isotope can mimic events in the region of interest. The experiment is located at the 4850 foot level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota to suppress cosmogenic activation. In this talk I will present the calculations of cosmogenic background for the enriched 76Ge materials used in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR HPGe detectors. The activation is determined by the surface exposure from the time of production, storage, and delivery of the enriched Ge detectors to the underground experimental site. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Faci.

  5. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  6. Phased arrays: A strategy to lower the energy threshold for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissel, Stephanie; Avva, Jessica; Bechtol, Keith; Chesebro, Tyler; Cremonesi, Linda; Gupta, Anusha; Ludwig, Andrew; Messino, Wesley; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Oberla, Eric; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Saltzberg, David; Schlupf, Chandler; Shipp, Nora; Varner, Gary; Vieregg, Abigail

    2017-03-01

    In-ice radio arrays are optimized for detecting the highest energy, cosmogenic neutrinos expected to be produced though cosmic ray interactions with background photons. However, there are two expected populations of high energy neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed by IceCube ( 1 PeV) and the cosmogenic flux ( 1017 eV or 100 PeV). Typical radio arrays employ a noise-riding trigger, which limits their minimum energy threshold based on the background noise temperature of the ice. Phased radio arrays could lower the energy threshold by combining the signals from several channels before triggering, thereby improving the signal-to-noise at the trigger level. Reducing the energy threshold would allow radio experiments to more efficiently overlap with optical Cherenkov neutrino telescopes as well as for more efficient searches for cosmogenic neutrinos. We discuss the proposed technique and prototypical phased arrays deployed in an anechoic chamber and at Greenland's Summit Station.

  7. Cosmogenic Nuclides Study of Large Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, A.; Smith, T.; Rochette, P.; Bourles, D. L.; Leya, I.; Gattacceca, J.

    2014-09-01

    Six large iron meteorites were selected (Saint-Aubin, Mont-Dieu, Caille, Morasko, Agoudal, and Gebel Kamil). We measured stable and radiogenic cosmogenic nuclides, to study pre-atmospheric size, cosmic-ray exposure ages and terrestrial ages.

  8. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  9. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  10. High-energy neutrino astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaruli, Teresa

    2012-07-01

    Neutrino astronomy, conceptually conceived four decades ago, has entered an exciting phase for providing results on the quest for the sources of the observed highest energy particles. IceCube and ANTARES are now completed and are scanning in space and time possible signals of high energy neutrinos indicating the existence of such sources. DeepCore, inside IceCube, is a playground for vetoed neutrino measurement with better potential below 1 TeV. A larger and denser detector is now being discussed. ARA, now in test phase, will be composed by radio stations that could cover up to ~ 100 km2 and aims at the highest energy region of cosmogenic neutrinos. The non observation of cosmic events is on one side a source of disappointment, on the other it represents by itself an important result. If seen in the context of a multi-messenger science, the combination of photon and cosmic ray experiment results brings invaluable information. The experimental upper bounds of the cubic-kilometer telescope IceCube are now below the theoretical upper bounds for extragalactic fluxes of neutrinos from optically thin sources. These are responsible for accelerating the extragalactic cosmic rays. Such limits constrain the role of gamma-ray bursts, described by the fireball picture, as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Neutrino telescopes are exciting running multi-task experiments that produce astrophysics and particle physics results some of which have been illustrated at this conference and are summarized in this report.

  11. Cosmic Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2008-02-01

    I recall the place of neutrinos in the electroweak theory and summarize what we know about neutrino mass and flavor change. I next review the essential characteristics expected for relic neutrinos and survey what we can say about the neutrino contribution to the dark matter of the Universe. Then I discuss the standard-model interactions of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos, paying attention to the consequences of neutrino oscillations, and illustrate a few topics of interest to neutrino observatories. I conclude with short comments on the remote possibility of detecting relic neutrinos through annihilations of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos at the Z resonance.

  12. Challenges Confronting Superluminal Neutrino Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2012-12-01

    This talk opens the CosPA2011 session on OPERA's superluminal neutrino claim. I summarize relevant observations and constraints from OPERA, MINOS, ICARUS, KamLAND, IceCube and LEP as well as observations of SN1987A. I selectively review some models of neutrino superluminality which have been proposed since OPERA's announcement, focusing on a neutrino dark energy model. Powerful theoretical constraints on these models arise from Cohen-Glashow bremsstrahlung and from phase space requirements for the initial neutrino production. I discuss these constraints and how they might be evaded in models in which the maximum velocities of both neutrinos and charged leptons are equal but only superluminal inside of a dense medium.

  13. Review of direct neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragoun, O.

    2015-10-28

    Advantages and drawbacks of the kinematic methods of the neutrino mass determination are discussed. The meaning of the effective neutrino mass, resulting from measurements of the endpoint region of β-spectra is clarified. Current experimental constraints on the mass of active as well as sterile neutrinos are presented. Several new experiments are briefly outlined.

  14. Surficial Studies of Mars Using Cosmogenic Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides (CNs) are produced by cosmic-ray nuclear interactions with target nuclei in rocks, soils, ice, and the atmosphere. Cosmogenic nuclides have been widely used for investigation of solar system matter for several decades. Stable nuclides, such as He-3, Ne-21, and Ar-38, are built up over time as the surface is exposed to cosmic rays. The concentrations of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, and C-14 also build up with exposure time but reach saturation values after several half-lives. Especially since the development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), CNs in terrestrial samples have been routinely used for geomorphic studies such as glaciation, surface erosion, and tectonics, and studies of atmospheric and ocean circulation. Cosmogenic nuclides on Mars will be able to answer questions of exposure ages, erosion rates, tectonic events, and deposition rates of sediments and/or volatiles. The concentrations of cosmogenic stable nuclides give the integrated exposure time of the rock/mineral, and the activities of radionuclides give recent records for times back as long as a few half-lives.

  15. Neutrino Oscillations with Reactor Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Anatael

    2007-06-01

    Prospect measurements of neutrino oscillations with reactor neutrinos are reviewed in this document. The following items are described: neutrinos oscillations status, reactor neutrino experimental strategy, impact of uncertainties on the neutrino oscillation sensitivity and, finally, the experiments in the field. This is the synthesis of the talk delivered during the NOW2006 conference at Otranto (Italy) during September 2006.

  16. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Brenham pallasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Caffee, M. W.; Miura, Y. N.; Nagai, H.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic-ray-produced (cosmogenic) nuclides were studied in fragments of the Brenham pallasite, a large stony iron meteorite. The contents of light noble gases (He, Ne, and Ar) and long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, and 53Mn), produced by nuclear reactions with cosmic rays, were measured in the separated metal and olivine phases from numerous samples representing a wide range of shielding conditions in the meteoroid. The distribution of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in the metal follows patterns similar to that observed in large iron meteorites. Shielding effects were estimated from the relative proportions of low- and high-energy reaction products. The production rates varied, from surface to interior, by a factor of more than several hundred. The 36Cl-36Ar cosmic-ray exposure age of Brenham is 156 +/- 8 Myr. This determination is based on a multiple nuclide approach that utilizes cosmogenic nuclide pairs. This approach not only yields a "shielding independent" exposure age but also demonstrates that the production of cosmogenic nuclides occurred in a single stage. The depth profiles of 10Be in the stone phase and 53Mn in the metal phase are shown superimposed on corresponding profiles from the Apollo 15 long drill core. Surprisingly low abundances of lithophile elements, such as K, U, and Th, provided a unique opportunity to examine the production systematics of those nuclides whose inventories typically have significant contributions from non-cosmogenic sources, particularly radiogenic contributions. The U and Th contents of the olivine samples are extremely low, allowing detection of cosmogenic 4He production from oxygen, magnesium, silicon, and iron.

  17. The many aspects of neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    In mid-November, over seventy physicists gathered at Fermilab for an informal workshop on the Many Aspects of Neutrino Physics, which dovetailed with and also helped lay the groundwork for the succeeding more narrowly focused conference on Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations. The workshop indeed covered many of the interrelated aspects of neutrino physics: 17 keV neutrinos (experiments, theoretical models, and astrophysical constraints), neutrino properties (double beta decay experiments, neutrino magnetic moments), neutrinos from/as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in cosmology and astrophysics, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. In the following, I provide a brief and thoroughly biased account of only some of the many interesting developments discussed at the workshop.

  18. WMAPping out neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-10-28

    Recent data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND).We also note that the Heidelberg-Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  19. Neutrino Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.

    1963-01-09

    The prediction and verification of the neutrino are reviewed, together with the V A theory for its interactions (particularly the difficulties with the apparent existence of two neutrinos and the high energy cross section). The Brookhaven experiment confirming the existence of two neutrinos and the cross section increase with momentum is then described, and future neutrino experiments are considered. (D.C.W.)

  20. Measurement of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with minimal dependence on neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.-G.; Pickering, L.; Dolan, S.; Barr, G.; Coplowe, D.; Uchida, Y.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Yuan, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological study of nuclear effects in neutrino charged-current interactions, using transverse kinematic imbalances in exclusive measurements. Novel observables with minimal dependence on neutrino energy are proposed to study quasielastic scattering and especially resonance production. They should be able to provide direct constraints on nuclear effects in neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions.

  1. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  2. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial 7Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and 7Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like 7Li, 11B, 92Nb, 138La and 180Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ13 with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio 11B/7Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  3. Unparticle physics and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Bolanos, A.; Miranda, O. G.; Moura, C. A.; Rashba, T. I.

    2009-04-01

    We have constrained unparticle interactions with neutrinos and electrons using available data on neutrino-electron elastic scattering and the four CERN LEP experiments data on mono photon production. We have found that, for neutrino-electron elastic scattering, the MUNU experiment gives better constraints than previous reported limits in the region d>1.5. The results are compared with the current astrophysical limits, pointing out the cases where these limits may or may not apply. We also discuss the sensitivity of future experiments to unparticle physics. In particular, we show that the measurement of coherent reactor neutrino scattering off nuclei could provide a good sensitivity to the couplings of unparticle interaction with neutrinos and quarks. We also discuss the case of future neutrino-electron experiments as well as the International Linear Collider.

  4. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  5. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  6. Constraints on the ultra-high-energy neutrino flux from Gamma-Ray bursts from a prototype station of the Askaryan radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P.; Auffenberg, J.; Bard, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Bora, C.; Chen, C.-C.; Chen, P.; Connolly, A.; Davies, J. P.; DuVernois, M. A.; Fox, B.; Gorham, P. W.; Hanson, K.; Hill, B.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hong, E.; Hu, L.-C.; Ishihara, A.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Landsman, H.; Laundrie, A.; Li, C.-J.; Liu, T.; Lu, M.-Y.; Maunu, R.; Mase, K.; Meures, T.; Miki, C.; Nam, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Nir, G.; Ó Murchadha, A.; Pfendner, C. G.; Ratzlaff, K.; Rotter, B.; Sandstrom, P.; Seckel, D.; Shultz, A.; Song, M.; Stockham, J.; Stockham, M.; Sullivan, M.; Touart, J.; Tu, H.-Y.; Varner, G. S.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Bustamante, M.; Guetta, D.

    2017-02-01

    We report on a search for ultra-high-energy (UHE) neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the data set collected by the Testbed station of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) in 2011 and 2012. From 57 selected GRBs, we observed no events that survive our cuts, which is consistent with 0.12 expected background events. Using NeuCosmA as a numerical GRB reference emission model, we estimate upper limits on the prompt UHE GRB neutrino fluence and quasi-diffuse flux from 107 to 1010 GeV. This is the first limit on the prompt UHE GRB neutrino quasi-diffuse flux above 107 GeV.

  7. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  8. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently, a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9%more » to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  9. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  10. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  11. Neutrino phenomenology

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar

    2016-11-21

    Neutrino oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass and, by now, oscillation experiments have been able to determine most of the parameters in the leptonic mixing matrix with a very good accuracy. Nevertheless, there are still many open questions in the neutrino sector. As a result, I will briefly discuss some of these questions, pointing out possible experimental avenues to address them.

  12. Measurements of 14C in ancient ice from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica constrain in situ cosmogenic 14CH4 and 14CO production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Schaefer, Hinrich; Smith, Andrew M.; Kuhl, Tanner; Baggenstos, Daniel; Hua, Quan; Brook, Edward J.; Rose, Paul; Kulin, Robb; Bauska, Thomas; Harth, Christina; Buizert, Christo; Orsi, Anais; Emanuele, Guy; Lee, James E.; Brailsford, Gordon; Keeling, Ralph; Weiss, Ray F.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-14 (14C) is incorporated into glacial ice by trapping of atmospheric gases as well as direct near-surface in situ cosmogenic production. 14C of trapped methane (14CH4) is a powerful tracer for past CH4 emissions from ;old; carbon sources such as permafrost and marine CH4 clathrates. 14C in trapped carbon dioxide (14CO2) can be used for absolute dating of ice cores. In situ produced cosmogenic 14C in carbon monoxide (14CO) can potentially be used to reconstruct the past cosmic ray flux and past solar activity. Unfortunately, the trapped atmospheric and in situ cosmogenic components of 14C in glacial ice are difficult to disentangle and a thorough understanding of the in situ cosmogenic component is needed in order to extract useful information from ice core 14C. We analyzed very large (≈1000 kg) ice samples in the 2.26-19.53 m depth range from the ablation zone of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, to study in situ cosmogenic production of 14CH4 and 14CO. All sampled ice is >50 ka in age, allowing for the assumption that most of the measured 14C originates from recent in situ cosmogenic production as ancient ice is brought to the surface via ablation. Our results place the first constraints on cosmogenic 14CH4 production rates and improve on prior estimates of 14CO production rates in ice. We find a constant 14CH4/14CO production ratio (0.0076 ± 0.0003) for samples deeper than 3 m, which allows the use of 14CO for correcting the 14CH4 signals for the in situ cosmogenic component. Our results also provide the first unambiguous confirmation of 14C production by fast muons in a natural setting (ice or rock) and suggest that the 14C production rates in ice commonly used in the literature may be too high.

  13. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  14. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltoni, Michele; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ_{12} and Δ m 2 21 have been measured; θ_{13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3 ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos.

  15. Feasibility of determining diffuse ultra-high energy cosmic neutrino flavor ratio through ARA neutrino observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Hao; Chen, Pisin; Nam, Jiwoo; Huang, Melin

    2013-11-01

    The flavor composition of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos (UHECN) carries precious information about the physical properties of their sources, the nature of neutrino oscillations and possible exotic physics involved during the propagation. Since UHECN with different incoming directions would propagate through different amounts of matter in Earth and since different flavors of charged leptons produced in the neutrino-nucleon charged-current (CC) interaction would have different energy-loss behaviors in the medium, measurement of the angular distribution of incoming events by a neutrino observatory can in principle be employed to help determine the UHECN flavor ratio. In this paper we report on our investigation of the feasibility of such an attempt. Simulations were performed, where the detector configuration was based on the proposed Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) Observatory at the South Pole, to investigate the expected event-direction distribution for each flavor. Assuming νμ-ντ symmetry and invoking the standard oscillation and the neutrino decay scenarios, the probability distribution functions (PDF) of the event directions are utilized to extract the flavor ratio of cosmogenic neutrinos on Earth. The simulation results are summarized in terms of the probability of flavor ratio extraction and resolution as functions of the number of observed events and the angular resolution of neutrino directions. We show that it is feasible to constrain the UHECN flavor ratio using the proposed ARA Observatory.

  16. Probing neutrino nature at Borexino detector with chromium neutrino source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobków, W.; Błaut, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we indicate a possibility of utilizing the intense chromium source (˜ 370 PBq) in probing the neutrino nature in low energy neutrino experiments with the ultra-low threshold and background real-time Borexino detector located near the source (˜ 8 m). We analyse the elastic scattering of electron neutrinos (Dirac or Majorana, respectively) on the unpolarised electrons in the relativistic neutrino limit. We assume that the incoming neutrino beam is the superposition of left-right chiral states produced by the chromium source. Left chiral neutrinos may be detected by the standard V - A and non-standard scalar S_L, pseudoscalar P_L, tensor T_L interactions, while right chiral ones partake only in the exotic V + A and S_R, P_R, T_R interactions. Our model-independent study is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. We compute the expected event number for the standard V-A interaction of the left chiral neutrinos using the current experimental values of standard couplings and in the case of left-right chiral superposition. We show that the significant decrement in the event number due to the interference terms between the standard and exotic interactions for the Majorana neutrinos may appear. We also demonstrate how the presence of the exotic couplings affects the energy spectrum of outgoing electrons, both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. The 90~% C.L. sensitivity contours in the planes of corresponding exotic couplings are found. The presence of interferences in the Majorana case gives the stronger constraints than for the Dirac neutrinos, even if the neutrino source is placed outside the detector.

  17. Constraining neutrino decays with CMBR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannestad, Steen

    1998-07-01

    The decay of massive neutrinos to final states containing only invisible particles is poorly constrained experimentally. In this letter we describe the constraints that can be put on neutrino mass and lifetime using CMBR measurements. We find that very tight lifetime limits on neutrinos in the mass range 10 eV - 100 keV can be derived using CMBR data from upcoming satellite measurements.

  18. Recent results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Rey, Juan José

    2015-07-15

    The latest results from the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope are reported. Limits on a high energy neutrino diffuse flux have been set using for the first time both muon–track and showering events. The results for point sources obtained by ANTARES are also shown. These are the most stringent limits for the southern sky for neutrino energies below 100 TeV. Constraints on the nature of the cluster of neutrino events near the Galactic Centre observed by IceCube are also reported. In particular, ANTARES data excludes a single point–like neutrino source as the origin of this cluster. Looking for neutrinos coming from the Sun or the centre of the Galaxy, very competitive limits are set by the ANTARES data to the flux of neutrinos produced by self-annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles.

  19. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  20. Production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays, (GCR) can produce nuclides deep in any object exposed to them. These cosmic-ray-produced (cosmogenic) nuclides have been extensively studied during the last four decades, mainly in meteorites and lunar samples (e.g., 1,2). In extraterrestrial matter, several approaches have been used to determine the production systematics of these cosmogenic nuclides. Production rates of most cosmogenic nuclides in the Earth axe much lower, especially those nuclides made ``in situ`` in the Earth`s surface. Many of these @trial cosmogenic nuclides are only now being measured because of improved techniques, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). There have been very few determinations of the production rates of nuclides made in the Earth by cosmic rays. The work being done for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides is following the approaches used for, studying the production of extraterrestrial nuclides.

  1. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; ...

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  2. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  3. Natural Neutrino Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya

    2010-06-23

    1 construct a general description for neutrino dark energy models, that do not require exotic particles or strange couplings. With the help of the above, this class of models is reduced to a single function with several constraints. It is shown that these models lead to some concrete predictions that can be verified (or disproved) within the next decade, using results from PLANK, EUCLID and JDEM.

  4. Constraining astrophysical neutrino flavor composition from leptonic unitarity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xun-Jie; He, Hong-Jian; Rodejohann, Werner E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-12-01

    The recent IceCube observation of ultra-high-energy astrophysical neutrinos has begun the era of neutrino astronomy. In this work, using the unitarity of leptonic mixing matrix, we derive nontrivial unitarity constraints on the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos detected by IceCube. Applying leptonic unitarity triangles, we deduce these unitarity bounds from geometrical conditions, such as triangular inequalities. These new bounds generally hold for three flavor neutrinos, and are independent of any experimental input or the pattern of lepton mixing. We apply our unitarity bounds to derive general constraints on the flavor compositions for three types of astrophysical neutrino sources (and their general mixture), and compare them with the IceCube measurements. Furthermore, we prove that for any sources without ν{sub τ} neutrinos, a detected ν{sub μ} flux ratio < 1/4 will require the initial flavor composition with more ν{sub e} neutrinos than ν{sub μ} neutrinos.

  5. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daya Bay Collaboration; Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-12-15

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin^2(2*theta_13) to better than 0.01 at 90percent CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  6. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence, a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis.

  7. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  8. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed.

  9. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  10. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  11. Implications of the 17 keV neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J.

    1991-06-01

    Constraints on the theoretical interpretation of the 17 keV neutrino are reviewed. A simple understanding of the 17 keV neutrino is provided by flavon models, which involve the spontaneous breaking of Abelian lepton symmetries and have only the usual three light neutrino species. Signatures for this class of models include neutrino oscillations, tau decay to an electron and a flavon, and invisible decay modes of the Higgs boson to two flavons.

  12. The Potential of Spaced-based High-Energy Neutrino Measurements via the Airshower Cherenkov Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.; Mitchell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Future space-based experiments, such as (Orbiting Wide-angle Light Collectors (OWL) and JEM-EUSO, view large atmospheric and terrestrial neutrino targets. With energy thresholds slightly above 10(exp 19) eV for observing airshowers via air fluorescence, the potential for observing the cosmogenic neutrino flux associated with the GZK effect is limited. However, the forward Cherenkov signal associated with the airshower can be observed at much lower energies. A simulation was developed to determine the Cherenkov signal strength and spatial extent at low-Earth orbit for upward-moving airshowers. A model of tau neutrino interactions in the Earth was employed to determine the event rate of interactions that yielded a tau lepton which would induce an upward-moving airshower observable by a space-based instrument. The effect of neutrino attenuation by the Earth forces the viewing of the Earth's limb to observe the vT-induced Cherenkov airshower signal at above the OWL Cherenkov energy threshold of approximately 10(exp 16.5) eV for limb-viewed events. Furthermore, the neutrino attenuation limits the effective terrestrial neutrino target area to approximately 3 x 10(exp 5) square km at 10(exp 17) eV, for an orbit of 1000 km and an instrumental full Field-of-View of 45 deg. This translates into an observable cosmogenic neutrino event rate of approx. l/year based upon two different models of the cosmogenic neutrino flux, assuming neutrino oscillations and a 10% duty cycle for observation.

  13. Probing Unparticle Physics in Reactor Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Bolanos, A.

    2008-11-13

    Unparticle physics is studied by using reactor neutrino data. We obtain limits to the scalar unparticle couplings depending on different values for the parameter d. We found that, as has been already noticed, reactor neutrino data is a good tool to put constraints on unparticle physics. Thanks to a detailed analysis of the experimental characteristics of reactor data we find better constraints than the previously reported.

  14. Sterile Neutrino Experiments I: Accelerator-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model is the theory that describes the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. Despite its great success, there still exists evidence for a wide range of phenomena, which lie outside the framework of the Standard Model. Among these, neutrino flavor oscillations hold great promise to bring insight to the field towards a theory that transcends the Standard Model. The discovery of light, sterile neutrinos that mix with the three active neutrino flavors and modify the standard three-neutrino oscillation probabilities in vacuum and matter would be a major breakthrough for the field and contribute to our overall understanding of neutrino mass and mixing. Current indications for light sterile neutrinos come from a variety of experiments reporting anomalies. The accelerator-based LSND and MiniBooNE experiments, for example, reported an excess of electron-type neutrinos over short baselines, which if interpreted as due to νμ ->νe (or νμ ->νe) oscillations, would imply the existence of a fourth light neutrino mass state. On the other hand, null results from other accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments searching for sterile neutrinos have put constraints on the possible existence of these particles. This talk will review the accelerator-based searches for light, sterile neutrinos as well as the prospects for confirming or refuting their existence in the coming years.

  15. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Bustamante, Mauricio; Carvalho, Washington; Charrier, Didier; De Jong, Sijbrand; de Vries, Krijn D.; Fang, Ke; Feng, Zhaoyang; Finley, Chad; Gou, Quanbu; Gu, Junhua; Hu, Hongbo; Kotera, Kumiko; Le Coz, Sandra; Medina, Clementina; Murase, Kohta; Niess, Valentin; Oikonomou, Foteini; Timmermans, Charles; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangping; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of 2·105 radio antennas deployed over 200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus produced by the interaction of cosmic neutrinos under the Earth surface. GRAND aims at reaching a neutrino sensitivity of 5 · 10-11 E-2 GeV-1 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 above 3 · 1016 eV. This ensures the detection of cosmogenic neutrinos in the most pessimistic source models, and 50 events per year are expected for the standard models. The instrument will also detect UHECRs and possibly FRBs. Here we show how our preliminary design should enable us to reach our sensitivity goals, and discuss the steps to be taken to achieve GRAND, while the compelling science case for GRAND is discussed in more details in [1].

  16. Probing neutrino flavor transition mechanism with ultrahigh energy astrophysical neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che

    2014-02-01

    Observation of ultrahigh energy astrophysical neutrinos and identification of their flavors have been proposed for future neutrino telescopes. The flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos observed on the Earth depends on both the initial flavor ratio at the source and flavor transitions taking place during propagations of these neutrinos. The flavor transition mechanisms are well classified with our model-independent parametrization. We find that a new parameter R ≡ϕe/(ϕμ+ϕτ) can probe directly the flavor transition in the framework of our model-independent parametrization, without the assumption of the νμ-ντ symmetry. A few flavor-transition models are employed to test our parametrization with this new observable. The observational constraints on flavor transition mechanisms by the new observable are discussed through our model-independent parametrization.

  17. Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos with JEM-EUSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos are carriers of very important astrophysical information. They may be produced at the sites of cosmic ray acceleration or during the propagation of the cosmic rays in the intergalactic medium. In contrast to charged cosmic rays, photon and neutrino arrival directions point to the production site because they are not deflected by the magnetic fields of the Galaxy or the intergalactic medium. In this work we study the characteristics of the longitudinal development of showers initiated by photons and neutrinos at the highest energies. These studies are relevant for development of techniques for neutrino and photon identification by the JEM-EUSO telescope. In particular, we study the possibility of observing the multi-peak structure of very deep horizontal neutrino showers with JEM-EUSO. We also discuss the possibility to determine the flavor content of the incident neutrino flux by taking advantage of the different characteristics of the longitudinal profiles generated by different type of neutrinos. This is of grate importance for the study of the fundamental properties of neutrinos at the highest energies. Regarding photons, we discuss the detectability of the cosmogenic component by JEM-EUSO and also estimate the expected upper limits on the photon fraction which can be obtained from the future JEM-EUSO data for the case in which there are no photons in the samples.

  18. Search for sterile neutrino oscillations in muon neutrino disappearance at MINOS/MINOS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Jacob; Minos+ Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A wide variety of neutrino oscillation phenomena are well-described by the standard three-flavour neutrino model, but some anomalies exist. The LSND and MiniBooNE experiments have measured electron antineutrino appearance in excess of standard oscillation predictions, which points to the possibility of a sterile neutrino with higher mass than the presently known states. MINOS, a two-detector, long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, was optimized for the measurement of muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI neutrino beam. A sterile neutrino responsible for the LSND and MiniBooNE excesses would cause distortions in the charged current and neutral current MINOS spectra, which permits the search for sterile neutrinos at MINOS. In close collaboration with the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment, MINOS has placed strong constraints on the sterile neutrino parameter space for a model with one additional sterile neutrino. Further, the extension of data collection with MINOS+, which samples the NuMI beam in a medium energy configuration, markedly increases the sensitivity of the combined MINOS and MINOS+ sample to a 3+1-flavour sterile neutrino model.

  19. Neutrino magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2016-01-15

    A new neutrino magnetohydrodynamics (NMHD) model is formulated, where the effects of the charged weak current on the electron-ion magnetohydrodynamic fluid are taken into account. The model incorporates in a systematic way the role of the Fermi neutrino weak force in magnetized plasmas. A fast neutrino-driven short wavelengths instability associated with the magnetosonic wave is derived. Such an instability should play a central role in strongly magnetized plasma as occurs in supernovae, where dense neutrino beams also exist. In addition, in the case of nonlinear or high frequency waves, the neutrino coupling is shown to be responsible for breaking the frozen-in magnetic field lines condition even in infinite conductivity plasmas. Simplified and ideal NMHD assumptions were adopted and analyzed in detail.

  20. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  1. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2012-03-01

    Recent discovery of two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures (Fermi Bubbles) at the Galactic center opens up a possibility to detect high-energy neutrinos from them as well, if the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin. This new predicted Galactic neutrino flux is hard, following gamma-ray data, compared to the atmospheric neutrino flux and can be detected with a kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, above 20-50 TeV. IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South pole can also provide interesting constraints on the flux model. A detection or exclusion of this neutrino flux can discriminate between a leptonic or hadronic origin of the gamma-rays, as well as bring unique information on the activities at the Galactic center.

  2. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  3. Neutrino '88. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneps, J.; Kafka, T.; Mann, W. A.; Nath, P.

    Contents: 1. Neutrino mass. 2. Neutrino oscillations. 3. Double beta decay. 4. Solar neutrinos. 5. Neutrinos from supernovae. 6. Neutrino interactions at accelerators. 7. New detectors for neutrino processes. 8. Neutrino interactions at accelerators II. 9. W, Z, and the standard model. 10. "Fred Reines at 70" Fest. 11. Nucleon decay, the standard model, and beyond. 12. Neutrinos: Earth, atmosphere, Sun, and galaxies. 13. Dark matter and cosmology. 14. Theoretical topics. 15. Future prospects.

  4. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Testing keV sterile neutrino dark matter in future direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Miguel D.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-11-01

    We determine constraints on sterile neutrino warm dark matter through direct detection experiments, taking XENON100, XENON1T, and DARWIN as examples. If keV-scale sterile neutrinos scatter inelastically with bound electrons of the target material, an electron recoil signal is generated. This can be used to set limits on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active sector. While not competitive with astrophysical constraints from x-ray data, the constraints are the first direct laboratory bounds on sterile neutrino warm dark matter and will be in some parts of parameter space the strongest limits on keV-scale neutrinos.

  6. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  7. Sterile neutrinos as the origin of dark and baryonic matter.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-02-08

    We demonstrate for the first time that three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, evading thus the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. We identify the range of sterile neutrino properties that is consistent with all known constraints. We find a domain of parameters where the new particles can be found with present day experimental techniques, using upgrades to existing experimental facilities.

  8. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.; Howard, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma. Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the inclusion

  9. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  10. Gamma-ray limits on neutrino lines

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-05-23

    Monochromatic neutrinos from dark matter annihilations (χχ→νν-bar) are always produced in association with a gamma-ray spectrum generated by electroweak bremsstrahlung. Consequently, these neutrino lines can be searched for not only with neutrino detectors but also indirectly with gamma-ray telescopes. Here, we derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section into neutrinos based on recent Fermi-LAT and HESS data. We find that, for dark matter masses above 200 GeV, gamma-ray data actually set the most stringent constraints on neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and, therefore, an upper bound on the dark matter total annihilation cross section. In addition, we point out that gamma-ray telescopes, unlike neutrino detectors, have the potential to distinguish the flavor of the final state neutrino. Our results indicate that we have already entered into a new era where gamma-ray telescopes are more sensitive than neutrino detectors to neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation.

  11. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ{sub 13} can be determined from abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 11}B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on {sup 40}Ar and {sup 208}Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 40}Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 208}Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  12. Constraining Dark Matter-Neutrino Interactions with High-Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguelles, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    IceCube has continued to observe cosmic neutrinos since their discovery. The origin of these cosmic neutrinos is still unknown. Moreover, their arrival direction is compatible with an isotropic distribution. The this observation, together with dedicated studies looking for galactic plane correlations, suggest that the observed astrophysical neutrinos are of extragalactic origin. If there is a dark matter-neutrino interaction, then the observed neutrino flux and its spatial distribution would be distorted. We perform a likelihood analysis using four years of IceCube's high energy starting events to constrain the strength dark matter neutrino interactions in the context of simplified models. Finally, we compare our results with cosmology and highlight the complementary between the two constraints.

  13. Upper bound on neutrino mass based on T2K neutrino timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment consists of a muon neutrino beam, produced at the J-PARC accelerator, a near detector complex and a large 295-km-distant far detector. The present work utilizes the T2K event timing measurements at the near and far detectors to study neutrino time of flight as a function of derived neutrino energy. Under the assumption of a relativistic relation between energy and time of flight, constraints on the neutrino rest mass can be derived. The sub-GeV neutrino beam in conjunction with timing precision of order tens of ns provide sensitivity to neutrino mass in the few MeV /c2 range. We study the distribution of relative arrival times of muon and electron neutrino candidate events at the T2K far detector as a function of neutrino energy. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the mixture of neutrino mass eigenstates represented in the data sample is found to be mν2<5.6 MeV2/c4 .

  14. Dirac neutrino in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-12-01

    We implement Dirac neutrinos in the minimal custodial Randall-Sundrum setting via the Krauss-Wilczek mechanism. We demonstrate by giving explicit lepton mass matrices that with neutrinos in the normal hierarchy, lepton mass and mixing patterns can be naturally reproduced at the scale set by the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, and at the same time without violating bounds set by lepton flavor violations. Our scenario generically predicts a nonzero neutrino mixing angle θ13, as well as the existence of sub-TeV right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos, which partner the right-handed standard model charged leptons. These relatively light KK neutrinos may be searched for at the LHC.

  15. Light sterile neutrinos in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2014-06-24

    Cosmological and terrestrial data suggests the number of light neutrinos may be greater than 3, motivating a careful reexamination of cosmological bounds on extra light species. Big bang nucleosynthesis constrains the number of relativistic neutrino species present during nucleosynthesis, N{sub eff}{sup BBN}, while measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum constrain the effective energy density in relativistic neutrinos at the time of matter-radiation equality, N{sub eff}{sup CMB}. We review a scenario with two sterile neutrinos and explore whether partial thermalization of the sterile states can ease the tension between cosmological constraints on N{sub eff}{sup BBN} and terrestrial data. We conclude that, still, two additional light sterile neutrinos species cannot fit all the data at the 95% confidence level.

  16. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  17. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The DM profile in clusters of galaxies was studied and simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations. Neutrino DM densities, with this amplitude normalization cluster, are comparable to observed cluster DM values. It was concluded that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be al least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidson et al., who argued that the failure to detect uv photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis, could be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  18. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1994-01-01

    Davidsen et al. (1991) have argued that the failure to detect UV photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis. Sciama et al. (1993) argued that because of high central concentration the DM in that cluster must be baryonic. We study the DM profile in clusters of galaxies simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations (Melott 1984b; Anninos et al. 1991) and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations (Smoot et al. 1992). We find that with this amplitude normalization cluster neutrino DM densities are comparable to observed cluster DM values. We conclude that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be at least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidsen et al. can be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  19. Low-energy sterile neutrinos: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Several experimental anomalies seem to point towards the existence of light sterile neutrinos. We focus on the low-energy anomalous results (the so-called gallium and reactor anomalies), which indicate a non-zero admixture U of the electron neutrino with a fourth (mostly) sterile mass eigenstate ν4. We point out that solar sector data, in combination with the precision measurement of θ13, provide the constraint |<0.041 (90% C.L.), independent of the reactor flux determinations.

  20. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  1. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Beacom, John

    2009-11-14

    Supernovae in our Galaxy probably occur about 3 times per century, though 90% of them are invisible optically because of obscuration by dust. However, present solar neutrino detectors are sensitive to core-collapse supernovae anywhere in our Galaxy, and would detect of order 10,000 events from a supernova at a distance of 10 kpc (roughly the distance to the Galactic center). I will describe how this data can be used to understand the supernova itself, as well as to test the properties of neutrinos.

  2. Are cosmological neutrinos free-streaming?

    SciTech Connect

    Basboell, Anders; Bjaelde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-02-15

    Precision data from cosmology suggest neutrinos stream freely and hence interact very weakly around the epoch of recombination. We study this issue in a simple framework where neutrinos recouple instantaneously and stop streaming freely at a redshift z{sub i}. The latest cosmological data imply z{sub i} < or approx. 1500, the exact constraint depending somewhat on the assumed prior on z{sub i}. This bound can be translated into a bound on the coupling strength between neutrinos and majoronlike particles.

  3. Revisiting the texture zero neutrino mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Madan; Ahuja, Gulsheen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2016-12-01

    In the light of refined and large measurements of the reactor mixing angle θ, we have revisited the texture three- and two-zero neutrino mass matrices in the flavor basis. For Majorana neutrinos, it has been explicitly shown that all the texture three-zero mass matrices remain ruled out. Further, for both normal and inverted mass ordering, for the texture two-zero neutrino mass matrices one finds interesting constraints on the Dirac-like CP-violating phase δ and Majorana phases ρ and σ.

  4. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses. II

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Marrone, A.; Rotunno, A. M.; Lisi, E.; Melchiorri, A.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2008-08-01

    In this followup to Phys. Rev. D 75, 053001 (2007) , we report updated constraints on neutrino mass-mixing parameters, in light of recent neutrino oscillation data (KamLAND, SNO, and MINOS) and cosmological observations (WMAP 5-year and other data). We discuss their interplay with the final 0{nu}2{beta} decay results in {sup 76}Ge claimed by part of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration, using recent evaluations of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements, and their uncertainties. We also comment on the 0{nu}2{beta} limits in {sup 130}Te recently set by Cuoricino and on prospective limits or signals from the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment.

  5. Cratering and cosmogenic nuclides. [as function of depth in regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, M. L.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    A simple probabilistic model was constructed for the average value of a cosmogenic nuclide as a function of depth in a regolith. An arbitrary function was chosen for the size distribution of craters. The resulting integro-differential equation was found to reduce in limiting cases to the marching equation with a characteristic residence time and to the diffusion equation. The regolith diffusion constant is shown to be a simple integral of the cratering rate weighted by geometrical terms. This formal treatment provides a direct and general connection between cosmogenic nuclides and cratering rates and crater population in a simple analytical form. The validity of this model remains to be tested.

  6. The solar neutrino problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renxin; Luo, Xianhan

    1995-12-01

    The solar neutrino problem (SNP) is reviewed on the bases of neutrino physics, solar neutrino detection and standard solar model. It is interesting that the detected neutrino flux values of different solar neutrino detectors are lower than the values calculated by SMM in different degree. The studies on SNP in particle physics and in astrophysics are also discussed respectively.

  7. Survey on Cosmogenic 26Al in Lewis Cliff Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Alderliesten, C.; Lindner, L.

    1992-07-01

    levels of 56 +- 7 and 60 +- 7 for H and L chondrites, respectively [3], range up to 800 ka with an average of about 290 ka. Altogether this may indicate that the Lewis Cliff blue-ice region is a relatively old meteorite stranding area. This is supported by preliminary conclusions based on ^36Cl, measured in 8 Lewis Cliff meteorites [4]. However, it is likely that some of our terrestrial ages have been overestimated due to (i) lower ^26Al saturation values for meteorites with preatmospheric radii less than 20 cm [3] and (ii) low exposure ages, resulting in initial ^26Al levels below 90-95% of the saturation level. These effects make individual terrestrial age determinations solely based on ^26Al content speculative as long as additional cosmogenic nuclide data are lacking. Dramatic changes in the overall picture are not expected, because (i) we have measured relatively large samples with an average recovered weight of about 500 g (one 11-kg sample excluded) and (ii) anomalously low exposure ages occur in about only 5% of the cases [5,6]. Possible correlations between terrestrial age and place of find will be discussed. UNUSUAL EXPOSURE HISTORIES: We excluded samples with extremely low NTL (<1 krad) from the above discussion, because these may have been exposed to high SCR-fluxes due to smallperihelia orbits (<0.7 A.U.) [7]. This hypothesis is supported by LEW 87169 and 87143, which have extremely low NTL-values in combination with high ^26Al contents. PAIRING CRITERIA: In order to impose additional constraints on pairing possibilities we critically used--besides classification, location of find and TL-properties--the cosmogenic ^26Al and also the natural ^40K content of ordinary chondrites. As an example we will show that the 15 measured Lewis Cliff L6 chondrites are representing at least 10 separate falls. Acknowledgements. This work was performed with financial support from the "Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek" (NWO). References: 1. Komura K. et

  8. Neutrino masses and solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1992-11-01

    It has been pointed out by Bahcall and Bethe and others that all solar neutrino data can be explained by MSW oscillations with m({nu}{sub {mu}}) {approximately} 10{sup {minus}3} eV consistent with ideas grand unified theories (GUTS). There is a second possibility consistent with GUTS ideas with m({nu}{sub {tau}}) {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} eV and m({nu} {sub {mu}}) {approximately} 10 {sup {minus}4} eV. The two cases can be distinguished by a measurement of the solar neutrinos from {sup {tau}}Be.

  9. Supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John Beacom

    2003-01-23

    We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum, which solves a long-standing problem of how to separately measure the total energy release and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  10. Production and suppression of {sup 11}C in the solar neutrino experiment Borexino

    SciTech Connect

    Meindl, Quirin; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Avanzini, M. Buizza; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Kerret, H. de; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.

    2011-04-27

    Cosmogenic {sup 11}C is produced in-situ by atmospheric muons and forms the main background for the measurement of solar pep- and CNO-neutrinos. However, FLUKA simulations show that the majority of {sup 11}C is accompanied by a free neutron in the final state, thus allowing for an efficient tagging method, the so-called Three-Fold Coincidence technique. The technique and its first applications on Borexino data are presented.

  11. Cosmology based on f(R) gravity admits 1 eV sterile neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2013-03-22

    It is shown that the tension between recent neutrino oscillation experiments, favoring sterile neutrinos with masses of the order of 1 eV, and cosmological data which impose stringent constraints on neutrino masses from the free streaming suppression of density fluctuations, can be resolved in models of the present accelerated expansion of the Universe based on f(R) gravity.

  12. Cosmogenic photons strongly constrain UHECR source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Arjen

    2017-03-01

    With the newest version of our Monte Carlo code for ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) propagation, CRPropa 3, the flux of neutrinos and photons due to interactions of UHECRs with extragalactic background light can be predicted. Together with the recently updated data for the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB) by Fermi LAT, it is now possible to severely constrain UHECR source models. The evolution of the UHECR sources especially plays an important role in the determination of the expected secondary photon spectrum. Pure proton UHECR models are already strongly constrained, primarily by the highest energy bins of Fermi LAT's IGRB, as long as their number density is not strongly peaked at recent times.

  13. Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamyshkov, Yuri; Handler, Thomas

    2016-10-24

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ13 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton "FAR" neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton "NEAR" detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  14. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    SciTech Connect

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W. E-mail: gfuller@ucsd.edu E-mail: mparis@lanl.gov

    2015-05-01

    We show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, and scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.

  15. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy with cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Kitching, Thomas D.; Heavens, Alan; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-12-15

    The combination of current large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background anisotropies data can place strong constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses. Here we show that future cosmic shear experiments, in combination with cosmic microwave background constraints, can provide the statistical accuracy required to answer questions about differences in the mass of individual neutrino species. Allowing for the possibility that masses are nondegenerate we combine Fisher matrix forecasts for a weak lensing survey like Euclid with those for the forthcoming Planck experiment. Under the assumption that neutrino mass splitting is described by a normal hierarchy we find that the combination Planck and Euclid will possibly reach enough sensitivity to put a constraint on the mass of a single species. Using a Bayesian evidence calculation we find that such future experiments could provide strong evidence for either a normal or an inverted neutrino hierarchy. Finally we show that if a particular neutrino hierarchy is assumed then this could bias cosmological parameter constraints, for example, the dark energy equation of state parameter, by > or approx. 1{sigma}, and the sum of masses by 2.3{sigma}. We finally discuss the impact of uncertainties on the theoretical modeling of nonlinearities. The results presented in this analysis are obtained under an approximation to the nonlinear power spectrum. This significant source of uncertainty needs to be addressed in future work.

  16. Searching for radiative neutrino mass generation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-04-01

    In this talk (talk given at the International Conference on Massive Neutrinos, Singapore, 9-13 February 2015), I describe the general characteristics of radiative neutrino mass models that can be probed at the LHC. I then cover the specific constraints on a new, explicit model of this type.

  17. Neutrino magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL ); Senjanovic, G. . Dept. of Theoretical Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We review attempts to achieve a large neutrino magnetic moment ({mu}{sub {nu}} {le} 10{sup {minus}11}{mu}{sub B}), while keeping neutrino light or massless. The application to the solar neutrino puzzle is discussed. 24 refs.

  18. Recent results from the ARIANNA neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelles, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The ARIANNA experiment is currently taking data in its pilot-phase on the Ross ice-shelf. Fully autonomous stations measure radio signals in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 1 GHz. The seven station hexagonal radio-array (HRA) was completed in December 2014, and augmented by two special purpose stations with unique configurations. In its full extent ARIANNA is targeted at detecting interactions of cosmogenic neutrinos (> 1016eV) in the ice-shelf. Downward-pointing antennas installed at the surface will record the radio emission created by neutrino-induced showers in the ice and exploit the fact that the ice-water surface acts as a mirror for radio emission. ARIANNA stations are independent, low-powered, easy to install and equipped with real-time communication via satellite modems. We report on the current status of the HRA, as well as air shower detections that have been made over the past year. Furthermore, we will discuss the search for neutrino emission, future plans of the experiment.

  19. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in the Campo Del Cielo Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liberman, R. G.; FernandezNiello, J. O.; Reedy, R. C.; Fifield, L. K.; diTada, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, Ca-41, and Ni-59 were measured in the Campo del Cielo iron meteorite. Our results led us to conclude that the pre-atmospheric radius might have been approximately 2 m. Comparisons with other big bodies are also presented. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  1. Proceedings of a Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J. (Editor); Reedy, Robert C. (Editor); Michel, Rolf (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Abstracts of reports from the proceedings are presented. The presentations were divided into discussion topics. The following general topic areas were used: (1) measured cosmogenic noble gas and radionuclide production rates in meteorite and planetary surface samples; (2) cross-section measurements and simulation experiments; and (3) interpretation of sample studies and simulation experiments.

  2. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  3. Sensitivity of a proposed space-based Cherenkov astrophysical-neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, Andrii; Semikoz, Dmitri V.; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Adams, James H.; Olinto, Angela V.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinos with energies in the PeV to EeV range produce upgoing extensive air showers when they interact underground close enough to the surface of the Earth. We study the possibility for detection of such showers with a system of very wide field-of-view imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, named CHANT (Cherenkov from astrophysical neutrinos telescope), pointing down to a strip below the Earth's horizon from space. We find that CHANT provides sufficient sensitivity for the study of the astrophysical neutrino flux in a wide energy range, from 10 PeV to 10 EeV. A space-based CHANT system can discover and study in detail the cosmogenic neutrino flux originating from interactions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays in the intergalactic medium.

  4. Acoustic neutrino detection investigations within ANTARES and prospects for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at energies exceeding 1 EeV. It suggests itself to investigate this technique in the context of underwater Cherenkov neutrino telescopes, in particular KM3NeT, because acoustic sensors are present by design to allow for the calibration of the positions of the optical sensors. For the future, the KM3NeT detector in the Mediterranean Sea will provide an ideal infrastructure for a dedicated array of acoustic sensors. In this presentation results from the acoustic array AMADEUS of the ANTARES detector will be discussed with respect to the potential and implications for acoustic neutrino detection with KM3NeT and beyond.

  5. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2011-06-04

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  6. Deployment Preparation for the Neutral Current Detectors in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, M. C.; Elliott, S. R.; Harper, T. G.; Heeger, K. M.; Myers, A.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Vanwechel, T.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Hime, A.

    1997-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a heavy water neutrino detector currently under construction in Sudbury, Canada. SNO's unique sensitivity to neutral current (NC) neutrino interactions in the heavy water allows for a comprehensive study into several possible solutions for the Solar Neutrino Problem. One method developed to measure the NC signal is the deployment of an array of discrete Neutral Current Detectors (NCDs). Due to strict radioactive requirements on the NCD construction materials, a six-month underground storage period is planned to allow for both the decay of cosmogenically induced activity, as well as characterization of the detector array prior to deployment. This "cooldown" phase of the NCD project is discussed, along with a description of the electronics to be used during detector and array characterization.

  7. Reconstructing the cosmogenic 21Ne inventory of Neogene sedimentary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay; Sinclair, Hugh; McCann, Louise

    2016-04-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclides, in particular 10Be, have found use in modern sediments as a way of determining the erosion rate of river catchments. Cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz is easier and faster to measure than 10Be and has the potential to record erosion rates back 10s million years. However the routine use of cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz sand is hampered by ubiquitous nucleogenic 21Ne. When the eroding lithology can be identified it is possible to measure the nucleogenic in samples that are shielded from cosmic rays and correct for it in exposed bedrock [1]. However, identifying the lithologies that contributes quartz sand in large river catchments, and determining precise nucleogenic contributions is more problematic. The North and South Platte rivers drain early Prototerozoic lithologies of the Laramie and Front Ranges in the high Rockies of Wyoming. They have deposited several km of coarse clastic fluvial deposits on the Great Plains of Nebraska and Colorado up to 200 km from the mountain front. Quartz from shielded samples of granite and gneiss - the dominant quartz-bearing rocks - has high concentrations of nucleogenic 21Ne (60-140 e6 atoms/g). The 21Ne concentration in modern sand from the river (n=10) overlaps that measured in the shielded granite and gneiss. The sand data rarely lie on the air-spallation mixing line in the Ne three isotope plot indicating that it is dominantly derived from the granite and gneiss and has no resolvable cosmogenic 21Ne. Building on previous studies of cosmogenic 21Ne in pebbles [2] we have started a programme of analysis of pebbles derived from the Medicine Bow quartzite that are abundant throughout the Cenozoic alluvial sequence. Nucleogenic 21Ne in shielded quartzite is lower than granites (3-7 e6 atoms/g, n=4) and the data tend to lie on the air-spallation mixing line. All pebbles (n=14) from modern sediments analysed so far contain 2-80 times more excess 21Ne than the highest shielded quartzite suggesting that cosmogenic 21

  8. Weighing Neutrinos with Cosmic Neutral Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Bull, Philip; Viel, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, ΩH i(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, Mν ≡ Σ mν. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(Mν) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(Mν) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL).

  9. WEIGHING NEUTRINOS WITH COSMIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Bull, Philip E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, Ω{sub H} {sub i}(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, M{sub ν} ≡ Σ m{sub ν}. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL)

  10. Testing light sterile neutrino species with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Several pieces of data seem to point towards new light sterile neutrino species. Here we show that the solar sector is able to provide stringent constraints on the most general schemes endowed with such new particles.

  11. Neutrinos estériles en nucleosíntesis primordial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, M. M.; Mosquera, M. E.; Civitarese, O.

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the effect of the inclusion of massive sterile neutrinos upon primordial abundances of the elements produced during the stage of primordial nucleosynthesis (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis). We calculate the new active neutrino number densities by taking into account the interactions between active neutrinos (effective potential), the active neutrino oscillations, the active-sterile neutrino oscillations and a damping factor for active neutrinos. We computed the primordial abundances as functions of the active-sterile mixing parameters. Finally, we compared the abundances calculated theoretically with the observations to set constraints for the free parameters.

  12. Possible implications of the atmospheric, the Bugey, and the Los Alamos neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu

    1995-12-01

    A combined analysis of the terrestrial neutrino experiments and the Kamiokande observation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly is performed under the assumption of the existence of dark-matter-mass neutrinos, as suggested by the recent Los Alamos experiment. In the three-flavor mixing scheme of neutrinos it is shown that the constraints from these experiments are so strong that the patterns of mass hierarchy and flavor mixing of neutrinos are determined almost uniquely depending upon the interpretation of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly.

  13. Testing for new physics: neutrinos and the primordial power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canac, Nicolas; Aslanyan, Grigor; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C.

    2016-09-01

    We test the sensitivity of neutrino parameter constraints from combinations of CMB and LSS data sets to the assumed form of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) using Bayesian model selection. Significantly, none of the tested combinations, including recent high-precision local measurements of H0 and cluster abundances, indicate a signal for massive neutrinos or extra relativistic degrees of freedom. For PPS models with a large, but fixed number of degrees of freedom, neutrino parameter constraints do not change significantly if the location of any features in the PPS are allowed to vary, although neutrino constraints are more sensitive to PPS features if they are known a priori to exist at fixed intervals in log k. Although there is no support for a non-standard neutrino sector from constraints on both neutrino mass and relativistic energy density, we see surprisingly strong evidence for features in the PPS when it is constrained with data from Planck 2015, SZ cluster counts, and recent high-precision local measurements of H0. Conversely combining Planck with matter power spectrum and BAO measurements yields a much weaker constraint. Given that this result is sensitive to the choice of data this tension between SZ cluster counts, Planck and H0 measurements is likely an indication of unmodeled systematic bias that mimics PPS features, rather than new physics in the PPS or neutrino sector.

  14. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  15. NEUTRINO FACTORIES - PHYSICS POTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-02-16

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric and solar neutrino observations opens a new era in neutrino physics and has sparked a considerable interest in the physics possibilities with a Neutrino Factory based on the muon storage ring. We present physics opportunities at a Neutrino Factory, and prospects of Neutrino oscillation experiments. Using the precisely known flavor composition of the beam, one could envision an extensive program to measure the neutrino oscillation mixing matrix, including possible CP violating effects. These and Neutrino Interaction Rates for examples of a Neutrino Factory at BNL (and FNAL) with detectors at Gran Sasso, SLAC and Sudan are also presented.

  16. Solar neutrinos.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, O.

    1993-12-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to review the progress made in the field of solar-neutrino physics with the results of the last-generation experiments together with the new perspectives suggested by the future projects. An elementary introduction to energy production mechanisms and stellar models is given. Neutrino properties and oscillations are discussed with particular interest in matter effects. Present experiments and future projects are reviewed. Particular attention is devoted to the compelling background and low-statistics problems. Finally, presently available results from running experiments are discussed, in the framework of the SNP. Some conclusions on the possibilities of the new proposed projects to actually slove the problem are also given.

  17. Glacial Erosion Rates from Bayesian Inversion of Cosmogenic Nuclide Concentrations in a Bedrock Core, Streaked Mtn., ME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploskey, Z. T.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial erosion is an important source of sediment and could be an important coupling to glacier and ice sheet models that track sediment. However, glacial erosion is difficult to quantify, and models of glacial erosion can benefit from independent erosion rate estimates. Here we present the results of a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion of a cosmogenic nuclide (CN) geomorphic model for glacial erosion rates on a bedrock landform formerly eroded beneath the Laurentide ice sheet. The CN 10Be was measured in quartz to 8 m depth in a bedrock core from the summit of Streaked Mountain, ME. The accumulation of 10Be was modeled over multiple glacial cycles of alternating exposure and glacial erosion. This model was invertedfor glacial erosion rates and burial history using MCMC algorithms implemented in PyMC (Patil et al., 2010). This Bayesian approach allows us to incorporate prior constraints on ice cover history, including oxygen isotope records and radiometric dates, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate from erosion in rapidly eroding areas. We compare these results to depth profile and surface CN measurements elsewhere in Maine (Ploskey and Stone, 2013).The forward model of CN production used in the inversion is part of Cosmogenic (github.com/cosmolab/cosmogenic), an open-source Python-based software library we developed for modeling the growth and decay of in-situ CN inventories in rock during geomorphic evolution. It includes calibrated production rates for 10Be and 26Al in quartz and 36Cl in K-feldspar by both neutrons and muons, with more isotopic production pathways and material targets to be added in the future. Production rates are scaled to the site altitude and latitude using modular scaling schemes. Cosmogenic includes a variety of functions representing common geomorphic histories, and can be used to model any arbitrary exposure, erosion and burial history that can be defined as Python function.ReferencesPatil, A., D. Huard and C

  18. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity at the nuSTORM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, D.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J. J.; Barker, G.; Baussan, E.; Bayes, R.; Bhadra, S.; Blackmore, V.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S. A.; Booth, C.; Boyd, S. B.; Bramsiepe, S. G.; Bravar, A.; Brice, S. J.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Cease, H.; Cervera, A.; Cobb, J.; Colling, D.; Coloma, P.; Coney, L.; Dobbs, A.; Dobson, J.; Donini, A.; Dornan, P.; Dracos, M.; Dufour, F.; Edgecock, R.; Geelhoed, M.; Uchida, M. A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; de Gouvêa, A.; Haesler, A.; Hanson, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartz, M.; Hernández, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Hodgson, P.; Huber, P.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kopp, J.; Kormos, L.; Korzenev, A.; Kuno, Y.; Kurup, A.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J. B.; Laing, A.; Liu, A.; Link, J. M.; Long, K.; Mahn, K.; Mariani, C.; Martin, C.; Martin, J.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, K. T.; Mena, O.; Mishra, S. R.; Mokhov, N.; Morfín, J.; Mori, Y.; Murray, W.; Neuffer, D.; Nichol, R.; Noah, E.; Palmer, M. A.; Parke, S.; Pascoli, S.; Pasternak, J.; Plunkett, R.; Popovic, M.; Ratoff, P.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Rubinov, P.; Santos, E.; Sato, A.; Sen, T.; Scantamburlo, E.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Smith, D. R.; Smith, P. J.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Søby, L.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sorel, M.; Snopok, P.; Stamoulis, P.; Stanco, L.; Striganov, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Taylor, I. J.; Touramanis, C.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, Y.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wilking, M. J.; Wildner, E.; Winter, W.; Nustorm Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    A facility that can deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam has the potential to unambiguously resolve the issue of the evidence for light sterile neutrinos that arises in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and from estimates of the effective number of neutrino flavors from fits to cosmological data. In this paper, we show that the nuSTORM facility, with stored muons of 3.8 GeV/c ± 10%, will be able to carry out a conclusive muon neutrino appearance search for sterile neutrinos and test the LSND and MiniBooNE experimental signals with 10σ sensitivity, even assuming conservative estimates for the systematic uncertainties. This experiment would add greatly to our knowledge of the contribution of light sterile neutrinos to the number of effective neutrino flavors from the abundance of primordial helium production and from constraints on neutrino energy density from the cosmic microwave background. The appearance search is complemented by a simultaneous muon neutrino disappearance analysis that will facilitate tests of various sterile neutrino models.

  19. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  20. Neutrino decay and solar neutrino seasonal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoreti, R.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the ν2 neutrino lifetime at τ2 /m2 ≥ 7.2 ×10-4s .eV-1 at 99% C.L. Also, we show how seasonal variations in the solar neutrino data can give interesting additional information about neutrino lifetime.

  1. Solar neutrino experiments and neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    This report gives the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment that is based upon the neutrino capture reaction, /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar. The experiment was built in 1967 to test the theory of solar energy production, and it is well known that the neutrino capture rate in the detector is lower than that expected from theoretical models of the sun. The results will be compared to the current solar model calculations. One possible explanation of the low solar neutrino capture rate is that the neutrinos oscillate between two or more neutrino states, a topic of particular interest to this conference. This question is discussed in relation to the /sup 37/Cl experiment, and to other solar neutrino detectors that are capable of observing the lower energy neutrinos from the sun. A radiochemical solar neutrino detector located deep underground has a very low background and is capable of detecting the monoenergetic neutrinos from megacurie sources of radioisotopes that decay by electron capture. Experiments of this nature are described that are capable of testing for neutrino oscillations with a omicronm/sup 2/ as low as 0.2 eV/sup 2/ if there is maximum mixing between two neutrino states.

  2. Is cosmology compatible with sterile neutrinos?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Slosar, Anze; /Ljubljana U.

    2005-11-01

    By combining data from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments (including the recent BOOMERANG-2K2 results), large scale structure (LSS) and Lyman-{alpha} forest observations, we constrain the hypothesis of a fourth, sterile, massive neutrino. For the 3 massless + 1 massive neutrino case we bound the mass of the sterile neutrino to m{sub s} < 0.55eV at 95% c.l.. These results exclude at high significance the sterile neutrino hypothesis as an explanation of the LSND anomaly. We then generalize the analysis to account for active neutrino masses (which tightens the limit to m{sub s} < 0.51eV) and the possibility that the sterile abundance is not thermal. In the latter case, the constraints in the (mass, density) plane are non-trivial. For a mass of > 1eV or < 0.05eV the cosmological energy density in sterile neutrinos is always constrained to be {omega}{sub {nu}} < 0.005 at 95% c.l.. However, for a sterile neutrino mass of {approx} 0.25 eV, {omega}{sub {nu}} can be as large as 0.015.

  3. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  4. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  5. Dissipation and θ 13 in neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. L. N.; Guzzo, M. M.

    2013-05-01

    We obtain a complete survival and transition probability involving three neutrino flavors when dissipation effects in vacuum are taken into consideration. In an approach that presents decoherence and relaxation effects, we study the behavior of the probabilities obtained from complete positivity constraints. Making the von Neumann entropy increase in time, many cases can be obtained and studied with the Lindblad master equation with addition of only one or two parameters related to dissipation. New possibilities are obtained when we take into account two decoherence parameters with different magnitudes which are given by reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments. We also present a model with only one parameter that has an important symmetry property, which can be used when the effective matter potential is important. Furthermore, the dissipation effects can contribute to the appearance of neutrinos that can hide or imitate the θ 13 effects and we study these possibilities showing that dissipative effects have an important role in three-neutrino oscillations.

  6. Constraining the HEP solar neutrino and diffuse supernova neutrino background fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastbaum, Andrew T.

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has demonstrated that the apparent deficit in solar neutrinos observed on Earth is due to matter-enhanced flavor transitions, and provided precision measurements of the relevant oscillation parameters. The low backgrounds and large, spectral charged-current nue-d cross section that enabled these measurements also give SNO unique sensitivity to two yet-unobserved neutrino signals of great interest: the hep solar neutrino flux and the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB). This work presents a joint analysis of all three running configurations of the SNO experiment in order to improve constraints on the hep and DSNB nue fluxes. The crucial uncertainties in the energy response and atmospheric neutrino background, as well as the event selection criteria, are reevaluated. Two analysis approaches are taken, a single-bin counting analysis (hep and DSNB) and multidimensional signal extraction fit (hep), using a random sample representing 1/3 of the total SNO data. These searches are the most sensitive to date for these important signals, and will improve further when the full dataset is analyzed. The SNO+ liquid scintillator experiment is a successor to SNO primarily concerned with a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0nubetabeta) in 130Te. The modifications to the SNO detector in preparation for SNO+ and an analysis of the 0nubetabeta sensitivity of this upcoming experiment will also be presented in this work. SNO+ will be the first experiment to load Te into liquid scintillator, and is expected to achieve world-class sensitivity in an initial phase commencing in 2017, with significantly improved sensitivity in an upgraded configuration to follow using much higher Te target mass.

  7. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  8. Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    There is compelling evidence for neutrino flavor change as neutrinos propagate. The evidence for this phenomenon has been provided by several experiments observing neutrinos that traverse distances of several hundred kilometers between production and detection. This review outlines the evidence for neutrino flavor change from such experiments and describes recent results in the field.

  9. Underground neutrino astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1983-02-01

    A review is made of possible astronomical neutrino sources detectable with underground facilities. Comments are made about solar neutrinos and gravitational-collapse neutrinos, and particular emphasis is placed on ultra-high-energy astronomical neutrino sources. An appendix mentions the exotic possibility of monopolonium.

  10. Search for sterile neutrinos in muon neutrino disappearance mode at FNAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhina, A.; Bagulya, A.; Benettoni, M.; Bernardini, P.; Brugnera, R.; Calabrese, M.; Cecchetti, A.; Cecchini, S.; Chernyavskiy, M.; Dal Corso, F.; Dalkarov, O.; Del Prete, A.; De Robertis, G.; De Serio, M.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Klicek, B.; Kose, U.; Jakovcic, K.; Laurenti, G.; Lippi, I.; Loddo, F.; Longhin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Marsella, G.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Mingazheva, R.; Morgunova, O.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Nessi, M.; Orecchini, D.; Paoloni, A.; Papadia, G.; Paparella, L.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rosa, G.; Sahnoun, Z.; Shchedrina, T.; Simone, S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spurio, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Surdo, A.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2017-01-01

    The NESSiE Collaboration has been setup to undertake a conclusive experiment to clarify the muon-neutrino disappearance measurements at short baselines in order to put severe constraints to models with more than the three-standard neutrinos. To this aim the current FNAL-Booster neutrino beam for a Short-Baseline experiment was carefully evaluated by considering the use of magnetic spectrometers at two sites, near and far ones. The detector locations were studied, together with the achievable performances of two OPERA-like spectrometers. The study was constrained by the availability of existing hardware and a time-schedule compatible with the undergoing project of multi-site Liquid-Argon detectors at FNAL. The settled physics case and the kind of proposed experiment on the Booster neutrino beam would definitively clarify the existing tension between the ν _{μ } disappearance and the ν e appearance/disappearance at the eV mass scale. In the context of neutrino oscillations the measurement of ν _{μ } disappearance is a robust and fast approach to either reject or discover new neutrino states at the eV mass scale. We discuss an experimental program able to extend by more than one order of magnitude (for neutrino disappearance) and by almost one order of magnitude (for antineutrino disappearance) the present range of sensitivity for the mixing angle between standard and sterile neutrinos. These extensions are larger than those achieved in any other proposal presented so far.

  11. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  12. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  13. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  14. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, Daniela

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and ν oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant ν oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through ν oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with ν_e leftrightarrow ν_s oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile ν mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global ν data.

  15. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  16. Applications of Cosmogenic He-3 and Ne-21 Dating to Glacial Moraines in Antarctica and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, S.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.

    2015-12-01

    The depositional age of moraines can be determined through cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. These ages are useful in establishing a glacial history of an area and ascribing age constraints to transport processes. Be-10 is the most common nuclide used for exposure dating today, but this method is both expensive and time consuming because it requires analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). He-3 and Ne-21 can be analyzed using noble gas mass spectrometry, which is more cost efficient than AMS and requires less chemical preparation. We collected samples from areas in Moraine Canyon, Antarctica (86.10° S, 157.75° W), which is a dry valley in the Transantarctic Mountains. Dolerite boulders along a transect of recessional moraines were sampled in the typical fashion of using a large piece of the boulder for analysis. Pyroxene minerals have been separated from these samples following the method of Bromley et al. (2014) using hydrofluoric acid. Exposure ages will be calculated from the He-3 concentrations in them. In the Mono Lake area of California, moraines were sampled from Bloody Canyon and McGee Creek sites. Instead of collecting a sample from an individual boulder, we collected approximately 25 granitic pebbles (1-3 cm) from 4-6 sites along the crest of the moraines following the method of Briner (2009). Each suite of pebbles was crushed together, and quartz minerals were separated from the agglomeration of pebbles. Cosmogenic Ne-21 will be measured from these samples to determine their exposure age. From these two field sites, we will use He-3 and Ne-21 to better understand the timing and extent of glaciation in these areas.

  17. Helium synthesis, neutrino flavors, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of the production of helium in big bang cosmology is re-examined in the light of several recent astrophysical observations. These data, and theoretical particle physics considerations, lead to some important inconsistencies in the standard big bang model and suggest that a more complicated picture is needed. Thus, recent constraints on the number of neutrino flavors, as well as constraints on the mean density (openness) of the universe, need not be valid.

  18. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Tuniz, C.; Fink, D.

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  19. ULTRAHIGH ENERGY NEUTRINOS, SMALL X AND UNITARITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HALL RENO, M.; SARCEVIC,IN.; STERMAN,G.; STRATMANN,M.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2001-06-30

    The ultrahigh energy cross section for neutrino interactions with nucleons is reviewed, and unitarity constraints are discussed. We argue that existing QCD extrapolations are self-consistent, and do not imply a breakdown of the perturbative expansion in the weak coupling.

  20. Cosmogenic radionuclides on LDEF: An unexpected Be-10 result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Albrecht, A.; Herzog, G.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Harmon, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    Following the discovery of the atmospheric derived cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), a search began for other known nuclides produced by similar mechanisms. None of the others have the narrow gamma-ray line emission of Be-7 decay which enabled its rapid detection and quantification. A search for Be-10 atoms on LDEF clamp plates using accelerator mass spectrometry is described. An unexpected result was obtained.

  1. Predicting the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The production rates of nuclides made by the galactic and solar cosmic rays are important in the interpretations of measurements made with lunar samples, meteorites, and cosmic spherules. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides have been predicted by a variety of methods that are reviewed in this paper, ranging from systematic studies of one or a group of meteorites to purely theoretical calculations. Production rates can vary with the chemical composition and the preatmospheric depth of the sample and with the size and shape of the object. While the production systematics for cosmogenic nuclides are fairly well known, our ability to predict their production rates can be improved, with a corresponding increase in the scientific return. Additional detailed studies of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial objects are needed, especially for fairly small and very large objects. Nuclides made in simulation experiments and cross sections for many major nuclear reactions should be measured. Such studies are especially needed for the long-lived radionuclides that have only recently become readily measurable by accelerator mass spectrometry. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  2. CPT Tests: Kaon vs neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-07-09

    CPT violation has an impressive limit in the neutral kaon system |m(K{sup 0})-m({bar K}{sup 0})| < 10{sup -18} m{sub K} = 0.50 x 10{sup -18} GeV. However, if viewed as a constraint on the mass-squared, the bound appears weak, |m{sup 2}(K{sup 0})-m{sup 2}({bar K}{sup 0})| < 0.25 eV{sup 2}. the authors point out that neutrino oscillation offers better limits on CPT violation in this case. The comparison of solar and rector neutrino results puts the best limit on CPT violation by far, |{Delta}m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-{Delta}m{sub {rho}}{sup 2}| < 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} (90% CL).

  3. Reionization in sterile neutrino cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sownak; Frenk, Carlos S.; Hou, Jun; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lovell, Mark R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the process of reionization in a model in which the dark matter is a warm elementary particle such as a sterile neutrino. We focus on models that are consistent with the dark matter decay interpretation of the recently detected line at 3.5 keV in the X-ray spectra of galaxies and clusters. In warm dark matter models, the primordial spectrum of density perturbations has a cut-off on the scale of dwarf galaxies. Structure formation therefore begins later than in the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model and very few objects form below the cut-off mass scale. To calculate the number of ionizing photons, we use the Durham semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, GALFORM. We find that even the most extreme 7 keV sterile neutrino we consider is able to reionize the Universe early enough to be compatible with the bounds on the epoch of reionization from Planck. This, perhaps surprising, result arises from the rapid build-up of high redshift galaxies in the sterile neutrino models which is also reflected in a faster evolution of their far-UV luminosity function between 10 > z > 7 than in CDM. The dominant sources of ionizing photons are systematically more massive in the sterile neutrino models than in CDM. As a consistency check on the models, we calculate the present-day luminosity function of satellites of Milky Way-like galaxies. When the satellites recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey are taken into account, strong constraints are placed on viable sterile neutrino models.

  4. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  5. Neutrino mass, a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1993-08-01

    Experimental approaches to neutrino mass include kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at rectors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing.

  6. Sterile neutrinos and indirect dark matter searches in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: jkopp@fnal.gov

    2012-07-01

    If light sterile neutrinos exist and mix with the active neutrino flavors, this mixing will affect the propagation of high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. In particular, new Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances can occur, leading to almost complete conversion of some active neutrino flavors into sterile states. We demonstrate how this can weaken IceCube limits on neutrino capture and annihilation in the Sun and how potential future conflicts between IceCube constraints and direct detection or collider data might be resolved by invoking sterile neutrinos. We also point out that, if the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and the allowed annihilation channels are precisely measured in direct detection and collider experiments in the future, IceCube can be used to constrain sterile neutrino models using neutrinos from the dark matter annihilation.

  7. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2016-07-12

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  8. Neutrinos and Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bradley S.

    2008-05-12

    Core-collapse supernovae are one of the few astrophysical environments in which neutrinos play a dominant role. Neutrinos emission is the means by which a newly-born neutron star formed in a core-collapse event cools. Neutrinos may play a significant role in causing the supernova explosion. Finally neutrinos may significantly affect the nucleosynthesis occurring in the layers of the exploding star that are eventually ejected into interstellar space. This paper reviews some interesting neutrino-nucleus processes that may occur in the cores of exploding massive stars and then discusses some effects neutrinos may have on explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae.

  9. Sterile neutrinos with secret interactions—lasting friendship with cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: bdasgupta@theory.tifr.res.in

    2015-10-01

    Sterile neutrinos with mass ≅ 1 eV and order 10% mixing with active neutrinos have been proposed as a solution to anomalies in neutrino oscillation data, but are tightly constrained by cosmological limits. It was recently shown that these constraints are avoided if sterile neutrinos couple to a new MeV-scale gauge boson A'. However, even this scenario is restricted by structure formation constraints when A'-mediated collisional processes lead to efficient active-to-sterile neutrino conversion after neutrinos have decoupled. In view of this, we reevaluate in this paper the viability of sterile neutrinos with such ''secret'' interactions. We carefully dissect their evolution in the early Universe, including the various production channels and the expected modifications to large scale structure formation. We argue that there are two regions in parameter space—one at very small A' coupling, one at relatively large A' coupling—where all constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large scale structure (LSS) data are satisfied. Interestingly, the large A' coupling region is precisely the region that was previously shown to have potentially important consequences for the small scale structure of dark matter halos if the A' boson couples also to the dark matter in the Universe.

  10. Sterile neutrinos with secret interactions — lasting friendship with cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim

    2015-10-06

    Sterile neutrinos with mass ≃1 eV and order 10% mixing with active neutrinos have been proposed as a solution to anomalies in neutrino oscillation data, but are tightly constrained by cosmological limits. It was recently shown that these constraints are avoided if sterile neutrinos couple to a new MeV-scale gauge boson A{sup ′}. However, even this scenario is restricted by structure formation constraints when A{sup ′}-mediated collisional processes lead to efficient active-to-sterile neutrino conversion after neutrinos have decoupled. In view of this, we reevaluate in this paper the viability of sterile neutrinos with such “secret” interactions. We carefully dissect their evolution in the early Universe, including the various production channels and the expected modifications to large scale structure formation. We argue that there are two regions in parameter space — one at very small A{sup ′} coupling, one at relatively large A{sup ′} coupling — where all constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large scale structure (LSS) data are satisfied. Interestingly, the large A{sup ′} coupling region is precisely the region that was previously shown to have potentially important consequences for the small scale structure of dark matter halos if the A{sup ′} boson couples also to the dark matter in the Universe.

  11. Probing neutrinos from Planck and forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Kadota, Kenji E-mail: kadota.kenji@f.nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how much the constraints on the neutrino properties can be improved by combining the CMB, the photometric and spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys which include the CMB lensing, galaxy lensing tomography, galaxy clustering and redshift space distortion observables. We pay a particular attention to the constraint on the neutrino mass in view of the forthcoming redshift surveys such as the Euclid satellite and the LSST survey along with the Planck CMB lensing measurements. Combining the transverse mode information from the angular power spectrum and the longitudinal mode information from the spectroscopic survey with the redshift space distortion measurements can determine the total neutrino mass with the projected error of O(0.02) eV. Our analysis fixes the mass splittings among the neutrino species to be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, and we accordingly study the sensitivity of our parameter estimations on the minimal neutrino mass. The cosmological measurement of the total neutrino mass can distinguish between the normal and inverted mass hierarchy scenarios if the minimal neutrino mass ∼<0.005 eV with the predicted 1–σ uncertainties taken into account.

  12. Primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christel Johanna

    We study primordial nucleosynthesis abundance yields for assumed ranges of cosmological lepton numbers, sterile neutrino mass-squared differences and active-sterile vacuum mixing angles. We fix the baryon-to-photon ratio at the value derived from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and then calculate the deviation of the 2 H, 4 He, and 7 Li abundance yields from those expected in the zero lepton number(s), no-new-neutrino-physics case. We conclude that high precision (< 5% error) measurements of the primordial 2 H abundance from, e.g., QSO absorption line observations coupled with high precision (< 1% error) baryon density measurements from the CMB could have the power to either: (1) reveal or rule out the existence of a light sterile neutrino if the sign of the cosmological lepton number is known; or (2) place strong constraints on lepton numbers, sterile neutrino mixing properties and resonance sweep physics. Similar conclusions would hold if the primordial 4 He abundance could be determined to better than 10%. We have performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations which employ arbitrarily-specified, time-dependent neutrino and antineutrino distribution functions for each of up to four neutrino flavors. We self-consistently couple these distributions to the thermodynamics, the expansion rate and scale factor-time/temperature relationship, as well as to all relevant weak, electromagnetic, and strong nuclear reaction processes in the early universe. With this approach, we can treat any scenario in which neutrino or antineutrino spectral distortion might arise. These scenarios might include, for example, decaying particles, active-sterile neutrino oscillations, and active-active neutrino oscillations in the presence of significant lepton numbers. Our calculations allow lepton numbers and sterile neutrinos to be constrained with observationally-determined primordial helium and deuterium abundances. We have modified a standard BBN code to perform these

  13. Background Studies for Acoustic Neutrino Detection at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method. to measure the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS). deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed, Lacking an in situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10-50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger. sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to test the localization of acoustic events. An upper limit on the neutrino flux at energies E(sub v) > 10(exp 11) GeV is derived from acoustic data taken over eight months.

  14. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  15. SEARCH FOR PROMPT NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; BenZvi, S.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K.-H.; and others

    2015-05-20

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino, compatible with the atmospheric neutrino background, was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than ∼1% of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  16. Late Time Neutrino Masses, the LSND Experiment and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Hall, Lawrence J.; Oliver, Steven J.; Perelstein, Maxim

    2004-05-07

    Models with low-scale breaking of global symmetries in the neutrino sector provide an alternative to the seesaw mechanism for understanding why neutrinos are light. Such models can easily incorporate light sterile neutrinos required by the LSND experiment. Furthermore, the constraints on the sterile neutrino properties from nucleosynthesis and large scale structure can be removed due to the non-conventional cosmological evolution of neutrino masses and densities. We present explicit, fully realistic supersymmetric models, and discuss the characteristic signatures predicted in the angular distributions of the cosmic microwave background.

  17. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Finally, stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  18. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; de Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.; Minos Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab's Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1 020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  19. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; De Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-12-16

    Here, we report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. This analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 × 1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Furthermore, we obtained stronger limits for nonvanishing masses.

  20. Constraints on Large Extra Dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  1. Solar Neutrino Problem

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C.; Cleveland, B. T.

    1978-04-28

    A summary of the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment is given and discussed in relation to solar model calculations. A review is given of the merits of various new solar neutrino detectors that were proposed.

  2. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  3. Very-high-energy astrophysical neutrinos with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    IceCube is a ≳TeV neutrino observatory operating at the South Pole. Ice-Cube has observed a flux of neutrinos of astrophysical origin, with energies beyond 2 PeV. However the sources of these neutrinos have not yet been identified. A summary of various IceCube observations is presented. The results discussed were obtained through several different analysis methods, which have varying sensitivity to the different neutrino flavors. A discussion of the spectral fit obtained for the various event selections is included, as well as the constraints on the astrophysical neutrino flavor flux ratio. Several attempts by IceCube to identify the sources of these neutrinos are described. These include studies correlating neutrino events with catalogs of sources as well as selfcorrelations among IceCube's neutrinos. The observations of astrophysical neutrinos are limited by statistics. So an upgrade of IceCube, including a larger detector and a surface veto is planned. This upgrade is briefly discussed.

  4. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to ~3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the world

  5. Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2015-02-01

    The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast start of data taking allowed to identify and quantify isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days. Initial activities underground have been measured and then production rates at sea level have been estimated following the history of detectors; values of about a few tens of nuclei per kg and day for Te isotopes and 22Na and of a few hundreds for I isotopes have been found. These are the first direct estimates of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in NaI crystals. A comparison of the so deduced rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a carefully selected description of excitation functions will be also presented together with an estimate of the corresponding contribution to the background at low and high energies, which can be relevant for experiments aiming at rare events searches.

  6. Effects of Bedrock Landsliding on Cosmogenically Determined Erosion Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemi, Nathan; Oskin, Mike; Burbank, Douglas; Heimsath, Arjun

    2005-01-01

    The successful quantification of long-term erosion rates underpins our understanding of landscape. formation, the topographic evolution of mountain ranges, and the mass balance within active orogens. The measurement of in situ-produced cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs) in fluvial and alluvial sediments is perhaps the method with the greatest ability to provide such long-term erosion rates. In active orogens, however, deep-seated bedrock landsliding is an important erosional process, the effect of which on CRN-derived erosion rates is largely unquantified. We present a numerical simulation of cosmogenic nuclide production and distribution in landslide-dominated catchments to address the effect of bedrock landsliding on cosmogenic erosion rates in actively eroding landscapes. Results of the simulation indicate that the temporal stability of erosion rates determined from CRN concentrations in sediment decreases with increased ratios of landsliding to sediment detachment rates within a given catchment area, and that larger catchment areas must be sampled with increased frequency of landsliding in order to accurately evaluate long-term erosion rates. In addition, results of this simulation suggest that sediment sampling for CRNs is the appropriate method for determining long-term erosion rates in regions dominated by mass-wasting processes, while bedrock surface sampling for CRNs is generally an ineffective means of determining long-term erosion rates. Response times of CRN concentrations to changes in erosion rate indicate that climatically driven cycles of erosion may be detected relatively quickly after such changes occur, but that complete equilibration of CRN concentrations to new erosional conditions may take tens of thousands of years. Simulation results of CRN erosion rates are compared with a new, rich dataset of CRN concentrations from the Nepalese Himalaya, supporting conclusions drawn from the simulation.

  7. Leptogenesis with many neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Eisele, Marc-Thomas

    2008-02-15

    We consider leptogenesis in scenarios with many neutrino singlets. We find that the lower bound for the reheating temperature can be significantly relaxed with respect to the hierarchical three neutrino case. We further argue that the upper bound for the neutrino mass scale from leptogenesis gets significantly lifted in these scenarios. As a specific realization, we then discuss an extradimensional model, where the large number of neutrinos is provided by Kaluza-Klein excitations.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  9. Neutrino masses and mixings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1991-12-31

    Theoretical prejudices, cosmology, and neutrino oscillation experiments all suggest neutrino mass are far below present direct experimental limits. Four interesting scenarios and their implications are discussed: (1) a 17 keV {nu}{sub {tau}}, (2) a 30 ev {nu}{sub {tau}} making up the dark matter, (3) a 10{sup {minus}3} ev {nu}{sub {mu}} to solve the solar neutrino problem, and (4) a three-neutrino MSW solution.

  10. Solar Neutrino Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilitzsch, F. v.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering experiment of R. Davis et al., which started neutrino astronomy by measuring the solar neutrinos via the inverse beta decay reaction on 37Cl, all solar neutrino experiments find a considerably lower flux than expected by standard solar models. This finding is generally called the solar neutrino problem. Many attempts have been made to explain this result by altering the solar models, or assuming different nuclear cross sections for fusion processes assumed to be the energy sources in the sun. There have been performed numerous experiments recently to investigate the different possibilities to explain the solar neutrino problem. These experiments covered solar physics with helioseismology, nuclear cross section measurements, and solar neutrino experiments. Up to now no convincing explanation based on "standard" physics was suggested. However, assuming nonstandard neutrino properties, i.e. neutrino masses and mixing as expected in most extensions of the standard theory of elementary particle physics, natural solutions for the solar neutrino problem can be found. It appears that with this newly invented neutrino astronomy fundamental information on astrophysics as well as elementary particle physics are tested uniquely. In this contribution an attempt is made to review the situation of the neutrino astronomy for solar neutrino spectroscopy and discuss the future prospects in this field.

  11. Axion-Assisted Production of Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan

    2016-10-12

    Sterile neutrinos can be generated in the early universe through oscillations with active neutrinos and represent a popular and well-studied candidate for our universe's dark matter. Stringent constraints from X-ray and gamma-ray line searches, however, have excluded the simplest of such models. In this letter, we propose a novel alternative to the standard scenario in which the mixing angle between the sterile and active neutrinos is a dynamical quantity, induced through interactions with a light axion-like field. As the energy density of the axion-like particles is diluted by Hubble expansion, the degree of mixing is reduced at late times, suppressing the decay rate and easily alleviating any tension with X-ray or gamma-ray constraints. We present a simple model which illustrates the phenomenology of this scenario, and also describe a framework in which the QCD axion is responsible for the production of sterile neutrinos in the early universe.

  12. Sterile neutrinos and right-handed currents in KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, James; Heeck, Julian; Rodejohann, Werner

    2014-07-01

    Kurie-plot experiments allow for neutrino-mass measurements based on kinematics in an almost model-independent manner. A future tritium-based KATRIN-like experiment can be sensitive to light sterile neutrinos with masses below 18 keV, which are among the prime candidates for warm dark matter. Here we consider such keV neutrinos in left-right symmetric extensions, i.e. coupled to right-handed currents, which allow for an enhanced contribution to beta decay even for small active-sterile mixing, without violating astrophysical X-ray constraints. The modified spectral shape is in principle distinguishable from the standard contribution — especially for sterile neutrino masses below 9 keV, which can lead to a distinct peak. We compare the sensitivity to constraints from the LHC and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  13. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton,J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler,M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky,M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac,M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter,T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin,C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener,M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.; et al.

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  14. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  15. Neutrino Masses from a Pseudo-Dirac Bino.

    PubMed

    Coloma, Pilar; Ipek, Seyda

    2016-09-09

    We show that, in U(1)_{R}-symmetric supersymmetric models, the bino and its Dirac partner (the singlino) can play the role of right-handed neutrinos and generate the neutrino masses and mixing, without the need for traditional bilinear or trilinear R-parity violating operators. The two particles form a pseudo-Dirac pair, the "biνo." An inverse seesaw texture is generated for the neutrino-biνo sector, and the lightest neutrino is predicted to be massless. Unlike in most models with heavy right-handed neutrinos, the biνo can be sizably produced at the LHC through its interactions with colored particles, while respecting low energy constraints from neutrinoless double-beta decay and charged lepton flavor violation.

  16. Neutrino masses from a pseudo-Dirac bino

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar; Ipek, Seyda

    2016-09-09

    We show that, in U(1)R-symmetric supersymmetric models, the bino and its Dirac partner (the singlino) can play the role of right-handed neutrinos and generate the neutrino masses and mixing, without the need for traditional bilinear or trilinear R-parity violating operators. The two particles form a pseudo-Dirac pair, the “bi νo.” An inverse seesaw texture is generated for the neutrino-biνo sector, and the lightest neutrino is predicted to be massless. Lastly, unlike in most models with heavy right-handed neutrinos, the bi νo can be sizably produced at the LHC through its interactions with colored particles, while respecting low energy constraints frommore » neutrinoless double-beta decay and charged lepton flavor violation.« less

  17. Neutrino masses from a pseudo-Dirac bino

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Ipek, Seyda

    2016-09-09

    We show that, in U(1)R-symmetric supersymmetric models, the bino and its Dirac partner (the singlino) can play the role of right-handed neutrinos and generate the neutrino masses and mixing, without the need for traditional bilinear or trilinear R-parity violating operators. The two particles form a pseudo-Dirac pair, the “bi νo.” An inverse seesaw texture is generated for the neutrino-biνo sector, and the lightest neutrino is predicted to be massless. Lastly, unlike in most models with heavy right-handed neutrinos, the bi νo can be sizably produced at the LHC through its interactions with colored particles, while respecting low energy constraints from neutrinoless double-beta decay and charged lepton flavor violation.

  18. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Harnik, Roni; Kaplan, Jared; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  19. Nucleosynthesis and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    2011-05-06

    Neutrinos play the critical roles in nucleosynthesis of light-to-heavy mass nuclei in core-collapse supernovae. We study the nucleosynthesis induced by neutrino interactions and find suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta. These isotopes are predominantly synthesized by the supernova {nu}-process. We also study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances and propose a method to determine the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, i.e. {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy.

  20. DEEP UNDERGROUND NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2016-03-03

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration will perform an experiment centered on accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino studies along with nucleon decay and topics in neutrino astrophysics. It will consist of a modular 40-kt (fiducial) mass liquid argon TPC detector located deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and a high-resolution near detector at Fermilab in Illinois. This conguration provides a 1300-km baseline in a megawatt-scale neutrino beam provided by the Fermilab- hosted international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility.

  1. Mass determination of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1988-01-01

    A time-energy correlation method has been developed to determine the signature of a nonzero neutrino mass in a small sample of neutrinos detected from a distant source. The method is applied to the Kamiokande II (Hirata et al., 1987) and IMB (Bionta et al., 1987) observations of neutrino bursts from SN 1987A. Using the Kamiokande II data, the neutrino rest mass is estimated at 2.8 + 2.0, - 1.4 eV and the initial neutrino pulse is found to be less than 0.3 sec full width, followed by an emission tail lasting at least 10 sec.

  2. Neutrinos from AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The great penetrating power of neutrinos makes them ideal probe of astrophysical sites and conditions inaccessible to other forms of radiation. These are the centers of stars (collapsing or not) and the centers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). It has been suggested that AGN presented a very promising source of high energy neutrinos, possibly detectable by underwater neutrino detectors. This paper reviews the evolution of ideas concerning the emission of neutrinos from AGN in view of the more recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy and their implications for the neutrino emission from these class of objects.

  3. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say {bar {nu}}{sub e}). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations.

  4. Right-handed neutrinos as the source of density perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo

    2006-05-15

    We study the possibility that cosmological density perturbations are generated by the inhomogeneous decay of right-handed neutrinos. This will occur if a scalar field whose fluctuations are created during inflation is coupled to the neutrino sector. Robust predictions of the model are a detectable level of non-Gaussianity and, if standard leptogenesis is the source of the baryon asymmetry, a baryon isocurvature perturbations at the level of the present experimental constraints.

  5. Cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production ratio in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Caffee, Marc W.; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    The assumed value for the cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production rate ratio in quartz is an important parameter for studies investigating the burial or subaerial erosion of long-lived surfaces and sediments. Recent models and data suggest that the production ratio is spatially variable and may be greater than originally thought. Here we present measured 26Al/10Be ratios for 24 continuously exposed bedrock and boulder surfaces spanning 61-77°N in Greenland. Empirical measurements, such as ours, include nuclides produced predominately by neutron-induced spallation with percent-level contributions by muon interactions. The slope of a York regression line fit to our data is 7.3 ± 0.3 (1σ), suggesting that the 26Al/10Be surface production ratio exceeds the commonly used value of 6.75, at least in the Arctic. A higher 26Al/10Be production ratio has implications for multinuclide cosmogenic isotope studies because it results in greater modeled burial durations and erosion rates.

  6. Forbush decreases geomagnetic and atmospheric effects cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An overview and synthesis is given of recent developments that have occurred in the areas of Forbush decreases, geomagnetic and atmospheric effects, and cosmogenic nuclides. Experimental evidence has been found for substantial differences in the effects of the various types of interplanetary perturbations on cosmic rays, and for a dependence of these effects on the three-dimensional configuration of the interplanetary medium. In order to fully understand and to be able to simulate the solar cosmic ray particle access to the polar regions of the earth we need accurate models of the magnetospheric magnetic field. These models must include all major magnetospheric current systems (in particular the field aligned currents), and they should represent magnetically quiet time periods as well as different levels of geomagnetic activity. In the evolution of magnetospheric magnetic field models, cosmic ray and magnetospheric physicists should work closely together since cosmic ray measurements are a powerful additional tool in the study of the perturbed magnetosphere. In the field of cosmogenic nuclides, finally, exciting new results and developments follow in rapid succession. Thanks to new techniques and new isotopes the analysis of cosmic ray history has entered into a new dimension.

  7. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad.

    PubMed

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-03-04

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16 degrees 00'N, 18 degrees 53'E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16 degrees 15'N, 17 degrees 29'E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3-3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene ( approximately 7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric (10)Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 +/- 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 (10)Be/(9)Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock.

  8. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad

    PubMed Central

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L.; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16°00′N, 18°53′E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16°15′N, 17°29′E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3–3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene (≈7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric 10Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic 10Be/9Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 ± 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 10Be/9Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock. PMID:18305174

  9. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  10. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  11. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  12. Neutrino Heat Conduction and Inhomogeneities in the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, A.; Hogan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Constraints on parameters of inhomogeneous nucteosynthesis, namely, the overdensity and size of baryon lumps, are found by calculatig the blackbody neutrino heat conduction into the lumps, which tends to inflate them away. The scale size for efficient heat conduction is determined by the mean free path lambda of the neutrino, and so we compute lambda in our case of a high-temperature plasma with low chemical potential, and find a general result that many-body effects are unimportant, simplifying the calculation. We find that in the region of interest for nucleosynthesis, neutrino inflation is important for overdensities greater than 10(exp 4).

  13. Cosmological bounds on dark-matter-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the cosmological effects of a neutrino interaction with cold dark-matter. We postulate a neutrino that interacts with a ''neutrino-interacting dark-matter'' (NIDM) particle with an elastic-scattering cross section that either decreases with temperature as T{sup 2} or remains constant with temperature. The neutrino-dark-matter interaction results in a neutrino-dark-matter fluid with pressure, and this pressure results in diffusion-damped oscillations in the matter power spectrum, analogous to the acoustic oscillations in the baryon-photon fluid. We discuss the bounds from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey on the NIDM opacity (ratio of cross section to NIDM-particle mass) and compare with the constraint from observation of neutrinos from supernova 1987A. If only a fraction of the dark matter interacts with neutrinos, then NIDM oscillations may affect current cosmological constraints from measurements of galaxy clustering. We discuss how detection of NIDM oscillations would suggest a particle-antiparticle asymmetry in the dark-matter sector.

  14. Disentangling neutrino-nucleon cross section and high energy neutrino flux with a km^3 neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Cuoco, A.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pastor, S.; Pisanti, O.; Serpico, P.D.

    2007-11-01

    The energy-zenith angular event distribution in a neutrino telescope provides a unique tool to determine at the same time the neutrino-nucleon cross section at extreme kinematical regions, and the high energy neutrino flux. By using a simple parameterization for fluxes and cross sections, we present a sensitivity analysis for the case of a km{sup 3} neutrino telescope. In particular, we consider the specific case of an under-water Mediterranean telescope placed at the NEMO site, although most of our results also apply to an under-ice detector such as IceCube. We determine the sensitivity to departures from standard values of the cross sections above 1 PeV which can be probed independently from an a-priori knowledge of the normalization and energy dependence of the flux. We also stress that the capability to tag downgoing neutrino showers in the PeV range against the cosmic ray induced background of penetrating muons appears to be a crucial requirement to derive meaningful constraints on the cross section.

  15. A technique for detection of PeV neutrinos using a phased radio array

    SciTech Connect

    Vieregg, A.G.; Bechtol, K.; Romero-Wolf, A. E-mail: bechtol@kicp.uchicago.edu

    2016-02-01

    The detection of high energy neutrinos (10{sup 15}–10{sup 20} eV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies (∼1 PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies (∼10{sup 18} eV) . Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  16. A technique for detection of PeV neutrinos using a phased radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, A. G.; Bechtol, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of high energy neutrinos (1015-1020 eV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies (~1 PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies (~1018 eV) . Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  17. A New Neutrino Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Starting in the late 1960s, neutrino detectors began to see signs that neutrinos, now known to come in the flavors electron ({nu}{sub e}), muon ({nu}{sub {mu}}), and tau ({nu}{sub {tau}}), could transform from one flavor to another. The findings implied that neutrinos must have mass, since massless particles travel at the speed of light and their clocks, so to speak, don't tick, thus they cannot change. What has since been discovered is that neutrinos oscillate at two distinct scales, 500 km/GeV and 15,000 km/GeV, which are defined by the baseline (L) of the experiment (the distance the neutrino travels) divided by the neutrino energy (E). Neutrinos of one flavor can oscillate into neutrinos of another flavor at both L/E scales, but the amplitude of these oscillations is different for the two scales and depends on the initial and final flavor of the neutrinos. The neutrino states that propogate unchanged in time, the mass eigenstates {nu}1, {nu}2, {nu}3, are quantum mechanical mixtures of the electron, muon, and tau neutrino flavors, and the fraction of each flavor in a given mass eigenstate is controlled by three mixing angles and a complex phase. Two of these mixing angles are known with reasonable precision. An upper bound exists for the third angle, called {theta}{sub 13}, which controls the size of the muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at an L/E of 500 km/GeV. The phase is completely unknown. The existence of this phase has important implications for the asymmetry between matter and antimatter we observe in the universe today. Experiments around the world have steadily assembled this picture of neutrino oscillation, but evidence of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at 500 km/GeV has remained elusive. Now, a paper from the T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment in Japan, reports the first possible observation of muon neutrinos oscillating into electron neutrinos at 500 km/GeV. They see 6 candidate signal events, above an expected background

  18. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  19. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  20. Cosmic neutrino cascades from secret neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Beacom, John F.

    2014-09-01

    The first detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube provides new opportunities for tests of neutrino properties. The long baseline through the cosmic neutrino background (CνB) is particularly useful for directly testing secret neutrino interactions (νSI) that would cause neutrino-neutrino elastic scattering at a larger rate than the usual weak interactions. We show that IceCube can provide competitive sensitivity to νSI compared to other astrophysical and cosmological probes, which are complementary to laboratory tests. We study the spectral distortions caused by νSI with a large s-channel contribution, which can lead to a dip, bump, or cutoff on an initially smooth spectrum. Consequently, νSI may be an exotic solution for features seen in the IceCube energy spectrum. More conservatively, IceCube neutrino data could be used to set model-independent limits on νSI. Our phenomenological estimates provide guidance for more detailed calculations, comparisons to data, and model building.

  1. Radiatively broken symmetries of nonhierarchical neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, Amol; Goswami, Srubabati; Roy, Probir

    2007-11-01

    Symmetry-based ideas, such as the quark-lepton complementarity principle and the tribimaximal mixing scheme, have been proposed to explain the observed mixing pattern of neutrinos. We argue that such symmetry relations need to be imposed at a high scale Λ˜1012GeV characterizing the large masses of right-handed neutrinos required to implement the seesaw mechanism. For nonhierarchical neutrinos, renormalization group evolution down to a laboratory energy scale λ˜103GeV tends to radiatively break these symmetries at a significant level and spoil the mixing pattern predicted by them. However, for Majorana neutrinos, suitable constraints on the extra phases α2,3 enable the retention of those high scale mixing patterns at laboratory energies. We examine this issue within the minimal supersymmetric standard model and demonstrate the fact posited above for two versions of quark-lepton complementarity and two versions of tribimaximal mixing. The appropriate constraints are worked out for all these four cases. Specifically, a preference for α2≈π (i.e., m1≈-m2) emerges in each case. We also show how a future accurate measurement of θ13 may enable some discrimination among these four cases in spite of renormalization group evolution.

  2. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity at the nuSTORM facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, D.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J. J.; Barker, G.; Baussan, E.; Bayes, R.; Bhadra, S.; Blackmore, V.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S. A.; Booth, C.; Boyd, S. B.; Bramsiepe, S. G.; Bravar, A.; Brice, S. J.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Cease, H.; Cervera, A.; Cobb, J.; Colling, D.; Coloma, P.; Coney, L.; Dobbs, A.; Dobson, J.; Donini, A.; Dornan, P.; Dracos, M.; Dufour, F.; Edgecock, R.; Geelhoed, M.; Uchida, M. A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; de Gouvêa, A.; Haesler, A.; Hanson, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartz, M.; Hernández, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Hodgson, P.; Huber, P.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kopp, J.; Kormos, L.; Korzenev, A.; Kuno, Y.; Kurup, A.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J. B.; Laing, A.; Liu, A.; Link, J. M.; Long, K.; Mahn, K.; Mariani, C.; Martin, C.; Martin, J.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, K. T.; Mena, O.; Mishra, S. R.; Mokhov, N.; Morfín, J.; Mori, Y.; Murray, W.; Neuffer, D.; Nichol, R.; Noah, E.; Palmer, M. A.; Parke, S.; Pascoli, S.; Pasternak, J.; Plunkett, R.; Popovic, M.; Ratoff, P.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Rubinov, P.; Santos, E.; Sato, A.; Sen, T.; Scantamburlo, E.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Smith, D. R.; Smith, P. J.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Søby, L.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sorel, M.; Snopok, P.; Stamoulis, P.; Stanco, L.; Striganov, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Taylor, I. J.; Touramanis, C.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, Y.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wilking, M. J.; Wildner, E.; Winter, W.

    2014-04-01

    A facility that can deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam has the potential to unambiguously resolve the issue of the evidence for light sterile neutrinos that arises in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and from estimates of the effective number of neutrino flavors from fits to cosmological data. In this paper, we show that the nuSTORM facility, with stored muons of 3.8GeV/c±10%, will be able to carry out a conclusive muon neutrino appearance search for sterile neutrinos and test the LSND and MiniBooNE experimental signals with 10σ sensitivity, even assuming conservative estimates for the systematic uncertainties. This experiment would add greatly to our knowledge of the contribution of light sterile neutrinos to the number of effective neutrino flavors from the abundance of primordial helium production and from constraints on neutrino energy density from the cosmic microwave background. The appearance search is complemented by a simultaneous muon neutrino disappearance analysis that will facilitate tests of various sterile neutrino models.

  3. Discriminating Majorana neutrino textures in light of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Manikanta; Borah, Debasish; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2015-06-01

    We study all possible texture zeros in the Majorana neutrino mass matrix which are allowed from neutrino oscillation as well as cosmology data when the charged lepton mass matrix is assumed to take the diagonal form. In the case of one-zero texture, we write down the Majorana phases which are assumed to be equal and the lightest neutrino mass as a function of the Dirac C P phase. In the case of two-zero texture, we numerically evaluate all the three C P phases and lightest neutrino mass by solving four real constraint equations. We then constrain texture zero mass matrices from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry through the mechanism of leptogenesis by assuming the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be diagonal. Adopting a type I seesaw framework, we consider the C P -violating out of equilibrium decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino as the source of lepton asymmetry. Apart from discriminating between the texture zero mass matrices and light neutrino mass hierarchy, we also constrain the Dirac and Majorana C P phases so that the observed baryon asymmetry can be produced. In two-zero texture, we further constrain the diagonal form of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry.

  4. Higgs production from sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In scenarios with sterile (right-handed) neutrinos that are subject to an approximate "lepton-number-like" symmetry, the heavy neutrinos (i.e. the mass eigenstates) can have masses around the electroweak scale and couple to the Higgs boson with, in principle, unsuppressed Yukawa couplings while accounting for the smallness of the light neutrinos' masses. In these scenarios, the on-shell production of heavy neutrinos and their subsequent decays into a light neutrino and a Higgs boson constitutes a hitherto unstudied resonant contribution to the Higgs production mechanism. We investigate the relevance of this resonant mono-Higgs production mechanism in leptonic collisions, including thepresent experimental constraints on the neutrino Yukawa couplings, and we determine the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to the heavy neutrinos. With Monte Carlo event sampling and a simulation of the detector response we find that, at future lepton colliders, neutrino Yukawa couplings below the percent level can lead to observable deviations from the SM and, furthermore, the sensitivity improves with higher center-of-mass energies (for identical integrated luminosities).

  5. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  6. Lightest sterile neutrino abundance within the νMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takehiko; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Laine, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    We determine the abundance of the lightest (dark matter) sterile neutrinos created in the Early Universe due to active-sterile neutrino transitions from the thermal plasma. Our starting point is the field-theoretic formula for the sterile neutrino production rate, derived in our previous work [JHEP 06(2006)053], which allows to systematically incorporate all relevant effects, and also to analyse various hadronic uncertainties. Our numerical results differ moderately from previous computations in the literature, and lead to an absolute upper bound on the mixing angles of the dark matter sterile neutrino. Comparing this bound with existing astrophysical X-ray constraints, we find that the Dodelson-Widrow scenario, which proposes sterile neutrinos generated by active-sterile neutrino transitions to be the sole source of dark matter, is only possible for sterile neutrino masses lighter than 3.5 keV (6 keV if all hadronic uncertainties are pushed in one direction and the most stringent X-ray bounds are relaxed by a factor of two). This upper bound may conflict with a lower bound from structure formation, but a definitive conclusion necessitates numerical simulations with the non-equilibrium momentum distribution function that we derive. If other production mechanisms are also operative, no upper bound on the sterile neutrino mass can be established.

  7. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  8. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  9. Neutrino masses and scalar singlet dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Jana, Sudip; Nandi, S.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a simple extension of the Standard Model (SM) which has a viable dark matter (DM) candidate and can explain the generation of tiny neutrino masses. The DM is an electroweak (EW) singlet scalar S , odd under an imposed exact Z2 symmetry, that interacts with the SM through the "Higgs portal" coupling, while all other particles are even under Z2. The model also has an EW isospin 3 /2 scalar Δ and a pair of EW isospin vectors Σ and Σ ¯, which are responsible for generating tiny neutrino mass via the effective dimension-seven operator. Thanks to the additional interactions with Δ , the scalar singlet DM S survives a large region of parameter space by relic density constraints from WMAP/Planck and direct search bounds from updated LUX data. Constraints on the model from the LHC are also discussed.

  10. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  11. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of glaciofluvial deposits: insights from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasily; Claude, Anne; Reber, Regina; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Schlunegger, Fritz; Rahn, Meinert; Dehnert, Andreas; Schlüchter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al can be employed to reconstruct the chronology of sediment layers. Accumulation of these can be used to exposure date the sediment layer as the variation of cosmogenic nuclide concentration with depth can be modeled. Decay of 10Be and 26Al in the samples from a well-defined single bed in a deposit enables the modeling of the post-burial component and the determination of the 26Al/10Be at the time of burial. The isochron-burial age can then be calculated from the initial and the measured ratios. In this study, we focus on the depth-profile and isochron-burial dating of the oldest Quaternary deposits of the Alpine Foreland. These are called Swiss Deckenschotter (cover gravels) as they build mesa-type hill tops on the Mesozoic or Cenozoic bedrock of the Swiss Alpine forelands. Deckenschotter consists of glaciofluvial gravel layers intercalated with glacial and/or overbank deposits. Although previously morphostratigraphically correlated with Günz and Mindel glaciations of Penck and Brückner, the Swiss Deckenschotter is likely much older, and their chronostratigraphy is not well constrained. In order to reconstruct the chronology of these deposits, we studied two Deckenschotter outcrops in abandoned gravel pits in Mandach (507 m a.s.l.) and Siglistorf (530 m a.s.l.) in canton Zurich. We collected four samples from Mandach for 10Be analysis and more than 30 clasts of different lithology, shape and size from a single stratigraphic horizon in Siglistorf among which we processed 19 clasts for 10Be and 26Al analysis. 10Be concentrations of the Mandach samples vary between 10000 and 30000 at/g. Based on these, we calculated a modal depth-profile age of around 1.0 Ma. Among Siglistorf samples, four did not yield successful 26Al measurements and two were unsuccessful for 10Be. Most of the samples have low nuclide concentrations, i.e. <20000 10Be at/g and <150000 26Al at/g. The 26Al/10Be ratio of eight samples was above the surface ratio of 6

  12. Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance in a Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; /Kyoto U.

    2010-04-25

    We report a search for muon neutrino disappearance in the {Delta}m{sup 2} region of 0.5--40 eV{sup 2} using data from both Sci-BooNE and MiniBooNE experiments. SciBooNE data provides a constraint on the neutrino flux, so that the sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with both detectors is better than with just MiniBooNE alone. The preliminary sensitivity for a joint {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance search is presented.

  13. Updated results from the RICE experiment and future prospects for ultra-high energy neutrino detection at the south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, I.; Hussain, S.; Seckel, D.; Besson, D.; Fensholt, E.; Ralston, J.; Taylor, J.; Ratzlaff, K.; Young, R.

    2012-03-01

    The RICE experiment seeks observation of ultra-high energy (UHE; Eν>1017eV) neutrinos interacting in Antarctic ice, by measurement of the radio frequency (RF) Cherenkov radiation resulting from the collision of a neutrino with an ice molecule. RICE was initiated in 1999 as a first-generation prototype for an eventual, large-scale in-ice UHE neutrino detector. Herein, we present updated limits on the diffuse UHE neutrino flux, based on 12 years of data taken between 1999 and 2010. We find no convincing neutrino candidates, resulting in 95% confidence-level model-dependent limits on the flux Eν2dϕ/dEν<0.5×10-6GeV/(cm2s-sr) in the energy range 1017cosmogenic neutrino flux. As detailed herein, RICE studies of Antarctic ice demonstrate that both birefringence and internal layer RF scattering result in no significant loss of ARA neutrino sensitivity, and, for the first time, verify in situ the decrease in attenuation length with depth into the Antarctic ice sheet.

  14. PeV Neutrinos Observed by IceCube from Cores of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2013-01-01

    I show that the high energy neutrino flux predicted to arise from active galactic nuclei cores can explain the PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube without conflicting with the constraints from the observed extragalactic cosmic-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds.

  15. An all-sky, three-flavor search for neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts with the icecube neutrino observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellauer, Robert Eugene, III

    place the strongest constraints thus far on models of neutrino and UHECR production in GRB fireballs.

  16. Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2010-08-01

    We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

  17. Measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in lunar rock 64455

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Kohl, C. P.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.; Southon, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Eleven samples were ground from the glass coated surface of lunar rock 64455,82 with an average depth resolution of 50 microns and were measured for Be-10, Al-26, and Cl-36 using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry). Results show no evidence of SCR (solar cosmic ray) effects. The flat cosmogenic nuclide profiles and activity levels are consistent with a 2 My exposure history for the rock and a sample location on the bottom of the rock. These AMS measurements are some of the most precise ever obtained for these three nuclides. This precision and the demonstrated fine depth resolution will enable us to conduct a number of detailed studies of depth effects in lunar and meteoritic samples, including investigating SCR effects in the surface exposed top of the glass coating of 64455 and possibly in the underlying rock.

  18. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Lazareth, O.W.; Spergel, M.S.; Ward, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn production due to spallation induced by cosmogenic protons in model meteorite composition similar to L Chondrite has yielded predictions which are consistent with the observed decay rates in L Chondrite stony meteorites. The calculated /sup 26/Al production rate (54 dpm/kg) in a 1 m diameter meteorite is within 1/2 S.D. of the mean (49 +- 11 dpm/kg) taken from 100 bulk determinations in L Chondrite samples compiled in Nishiizumi (1987). Similarly calculated average value for /sup 53/Mn (223 dpm/kg) is consistent with one S.D. off the mean in the widely scattered /sup 53/Mn data (362 +- 113 dpm/kg) compiled by Nishiizumi (1987). 9 refs.

  19. Bridging the timescales between thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of Earth's landscape is a key to understand its future evolution and to identify the driving forces that shape Earth's surface. Cosmogenic nuclide and thermochronological methods are routinely used to quantify Earth surface processes over 102-104 yr and 106-107 yr, respectively (e.g. Lal 1991; Reiners and Ehlers 2005; von Blanckenburg 2006). A comparison of the rates of surface processes derived from these methods is, however, hampered by the large difference in their timescales. For instance, a constant erosion rate of 0.1 mm/yr yield an apatite (U-Th)/He age of ~24 Ma and a 10Be age of ~6 ka, respectively. Analytical methods that bridge this time gap are on the way, but are not yet fully established (e.g. Herman et al. 2010). A ready to use alternative are river profiles, which record the regional uplift history over 102-107 yr (e.g. Pritchard et al. 2009). Changes in uplift are retained in knickzones that propagate with a distinct velocity upstream, and therefore the time of an uplift event can be estimated. Here I present an integrative inverse modelling approach to simultaneously reconstruct river profiles, model thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data and to derive robust information about landscape evolution over thousands to millions of years. An efficient inversion routine is used to solve the forward problem and find the best uplift history and erosional parameters that reproduce the observed data. I test the performance of the algorithm by inverting a synthetic dataset and a dataset from the Sila massif (Italy). Results show that even complicated uplift histories can be reliably retrieved by the combined interpretation of river profiles, thermochronological and cosmogenic nuclide data. References Gallagher, K., Brown, R. & Johnson, C. (1998): Fission track analysis and its applications to geological problems. - Annu. Rev. Earth Planet., 26: 519-572. Herman, F., Rhodes, E.J., Braun, J. & Heiniger, L. (2010): Uniform

  20. Noble gases and cosmogenic radionuclides in the Eltanin Pacific meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, D D; Garrison, D H; Caffee, M W; Kyte, F; Nishiizumi, K

    2000-01-14

    A 1.5 cm long, 1.2 g specimen of the Eltanin meteorite was found at 10.97 m depth in Polarstern piston core PS2704-1. The early studies indicated that the small fragments of the Eltanin meteorite was debris from a km-sized asteroid which impacted into the deep-ocean basin. In this study, the authors measured {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar age, noble gases, and cosmogenic radionuclides in splits of specimen as a part of consortium studies of Eltanin meteorite. They concluded that the specimen was about 3 m deep from the asteroid surface. The exposure age of the Eltanin asteroid was about 20 Myr.

  1. Solar neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-04-30

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  2. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  3. Understanding Antarctic sulfur cycle chemistry using cosmogenic 35S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Falkenthal, J.; Priyadarshi, A.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have been recognized to possess strong light scattering abilities and act as cloud condensation nuclei, thus having an impact on Earth's climate and radiation budget. Improved understanding of the sulfate aerosol transport is needed for assessing its influences on climate. Cosmogenically produced 35S (half-life~87 days)(2) exists both in the gas and solid phases, thus making it ideal to trace the atmospheric processes of sulfate oxidation. Here, we present a yearlong sampling of sulfate aerosol in Antarctica with 35S measurements illustrating its boundary layer chemistry and stratospheric- tropospheric mixing. Samples were collected from Dome C station once a week from Jan 2010-Jan 2011. 35S activity in sulfate aerosols shows maximums in summer months between December and February and minimums in winter from June to August. Higher oxidative capacity of the atmosphere coupled with long range transport of mid-latitude air increases 35SO4 activity in the summer, whereas a lack of air mass mixing coupled with low oxidant concentration significantly decreases 35SO4 activity(1). Stratospheric/tropospheric exchange processes like tropopause folding could help explain a random spike in activity that deviates from the normal background activity. In the future, a box model calculation will be done to determine the contribution of stratospheric air mass transported downward during the exchange. The oxygen isotopes will also be measured to see the effect of stratospheric intrusion. References (1)Priyadarshi, A., G. Dominguez, J. Savarino, and M. Thiemens (2011), Cosmogenic 35S: A unique tracer to Antarctic atmospheric chemistry and the polar vortex, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L13808, doi:10.1029/2011/GL047469. (2)Lal, D., and B. Peters (1967), Cosmic ray produced radioactivity in the earth, Handb. Phys., 46, 551-612.

  4. Novel Ideas for Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Ken

    2007-04-23

    Recent developments in neutrino physics, primarily the demonstration of neutrino oscillations in both atmospheric neutrinos and solar neutrinos, provide the first conclusive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The simplest phenomenology of neutrino oscillations, for three generations of neutrino, requires six parameters - two squared mass differences, 3 mixing angles and a complex phase that could, if not 0 or {pi}, contribute to the otherwise unexplained baryon asymmetry observed in the universe. Exploring the neutrino sector will require very intense beams of neutrinos, and will need novel solutions.

  5. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  6. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  7. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  8. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2008-01-24

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrinos on cosmology, focussing in particular on the role played by neutrinos in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of galaxies can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future.

  9. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  10. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  11. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-06-18

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  12. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  13. Infrared constraints on ultraviolet theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-01-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM-SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  14. Cosmogenic 10Be constraints on Little Ice Age glacial advances in the eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon; Liu, Gengnian; Yi, Chaolu; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-04-01

    Presumed Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances, represented by a set of fresh, sharp-crested, boulder covered and compact moraines a few hundred meters downstream from modern glaciers, have been widely recognized in the Central Asian highlands. However, few studies have constrained the formation ages of these moraines. We report 31 10Be exposure ages from presumed LIA moraines in six glacial valleys in the Urumqi River headwater area and the Haxilegen Pass area of the eastern Tian Shan, China. Our results reveal that the maximum LIA glacial extent occurred mainly around 430 ± 100 yr, a cold and wet period as indicated by proxy data from ice cores, tree rings, and lake sediments in Central Asia. We also dated a later glacial advance to 270 ± 55 yr. However, 10Be exposure ages on several presumed LIA moraines in front of small, thin glaciers are widely scattered and much older than the globally recognized timing of the LIA. Historical topographic maps indicate that most glaciers were more extensive in the early 1960s, and two of our 10Be sample sites were located close to the ice front at that time. Boulders transported by these small and thin glaciers may be reworked from deposits originally formed prior to the LIA glacial advances, producing apparently old and widely scattered exposure ages due to varied nuclide inheritance. Other published ages indicated an earlier LIA advance around 790 ± 300 yr in the easternmost Tian Shan, but in our study area the more extensive advance around 430 ± 100 yr likely reworked or covered deposits from this earlier event.

  15. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  16. Muons and neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  17. Solar atmosphere neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G.L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P.D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    The Sun is a source of high energy neutrinos (E > 10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations on the solar atmosphere neutrino fluxes observable at Earth. We find that peculiar matter oscillation effects in the Sun do exist, but are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged ''vacuum'' oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23}).

  18. Production Rates of Cosmogenic Nuclides in the Knyahinya L-Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The production rates of spallogenic radionuclides and stable isotopes in the L-chondrite Knyahinya were investigated using the MCNPX code. Numerous cosmogenic nuclides had been measured in many Knyahinya samples. The pre-atmospheric size and sample locations of Knyahinya are well known, thus Knyahinya is a good test case for cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calculations. Our calculated profiles were compared to the measurements to determine effective proton fluxes.

  19. Measurements of Cosmogenic Nuclides in and their Significance for Samples Returned from Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with matter produce cosmogenic nuclides (CNs). Ever since they were first measured nearly 50 years ago, cosmogenic nuclides have been used to infer the irradiation histories of terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. Here we call for an extension of such measurements to samples returned from an asteroidal surface. The information gained in this way will be important for elucidating the evolution of the asteroidal surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-04-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction of 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ∼106-108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. We present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints. For Apollo 15 samples 15016, 15556, and 15596 we find apparent 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages between 3.21 and 3.28 Ga and evidence for diffusive loss of radiogenic 40Ar primarily from K-bearing glass. From 38Ar/37Ar spectra normalized to the apparent Ca/K ratios, we also find evidence of diffusive loss of cosmogenic 38Ar that requires elevated temperatures either during or after surface exposure. Using 39Ar and 37Ar, we construct multiple-phase-multiple diffusion domain (MP-MDD) models to quantify the diffusion kinetics of Ar from a range of macroscopic grain sizes of each phase. While diffusive loss of 40Ar can be explained by brief reheating conditions after crystallization (e.g., during an impact event), we find that

  1. A search for Secluded Dark Matter in the Sun with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Collaboration: The ANTARES collaboration; and others

    2016-05-05

    A search for Secluded Dark Matter annihilation in the Sun using 2007–2012 data of the ANTARES neutrino telescope is presented. Three different cases are considered: a) detection of dimuons that result from the decay of the mediator, or neutrino detection from: b) mediator that decays into a dimuon and, in turn, into neutrinos, and c) mediator that decays directly into neutrinos. As no significant excess over background is observed, constraints are derived on the dark matter mass and the lifetime of the mediator.

  2. Neutrinos from collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyro, F. L.; Romero, G. E.; Peres, O. L. G.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with the gravitational collapse of very massive stars. The central engine of a GRB can collimate relativistic jets that propagate inside the stellar envelope. The shock waves produced when the jet disrupts the stellar surface are capable of accelerating particles up to very high energies. Aims: If the jet has hadronic content, neutrinos will be produced via charged pion decays. The main goal of this work is to estimate the neutrino emission produced in the region close to the surface of the star, taking pion and muon cooling into account, along with subtle effects arising from neutrino production in a highly magnetized medium. Methods: We estimate the maximum energies of the different kinds of particles and solve the coupled transport equations for each species. Once the particle distributions are known, we calculate the intensity of neutrinos. We study the different effects on the neutrinos that can change the relative weight of different flavors. In particular, we consider the effects of neutrino oscillations, and of neutrino spin precession caused by strong magnetic fields. Results: The expected neutrino signals from the shocks in the uncorking regions of Population III events is very weak, but the neutrino signal produced by Wolf-Rayet GRBs with z < 0.5 is not far from the level of the atmospheric background. Conclusions: The IceCube experiment does not have the sensitivity to detect neutrinos from the implosion of the earliest stars, but a number of high-energy neutrinos may be detected from nearby long GRBs. The cumulative signal should be detectable over several years (~10 yr) of integration with the full 86-string configuration.

  3. Using cosmogenic nuclides from amalgamated talus cobbles to assess alpine erosion in the Teton Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranel, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring spatial patterns and rates of erosion in alpine landscapes is challenging because locations are steep and remote, and hillslope processes including rockfalls, avalanches and landslides are stochastic. This study evaluates how variability between quantitative erosion rates and surface ages and qualitative weathering features on talus deposits may influence interpretations of the spatial distribution of hillslope erosion in the Teton Range. I use cosmogenic nuclide concentrations to estimate erosion rates and surface ages of bedrock and talus deposits. I then compare these cosmogenic nuclide results to talus volumetric estimates of erosion rates. I also compare the quantitative estimates of surface ages and erosion to qualitative weathering observations on talus cobbles. The resulting erosion rates from cosmogenic nuclides are slower than rates estimated from talus volumes, however, both methods produced the same pattern of erosion. The fastest and slowest cosmogenic nuclide and volumetric erosion rates were associated with the same fans. Exposure ages of talus surfaces decrease as elevation of the fans increase. Qualitative observations of weathering on cobble surfaces were not reliable to predict the relative rates of erosion on the talus fans. Using amalgamated samples from hillslope deposits adjacent to steep sided canyons for cosmogenic nuclide analysis has high uncertainty when finding accurate erosion rates or exposure ages due to complicated shielding on steeply sloping walls. The similar patterns of rapid or slow erosion rates, however, suggest that cosmogenic nuclides or volume estimates are both reasonable methods to understand relative timing of hillslope events, even if the absolute age or erosion rate cannot be determined.

  4. In-Situ Measurements of Cosmogenic Radionuclides on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides are produced by cosmic-ray nuclear interactions with target nuclei in rocks, soils, ice, and the atmosphere. Cosmogenic nuclides have been widely used for investigation of solar system matter for several decades. Stable nuclides, such as He-1, Ne-21, and Ar-38, are built up over time as the surface is exposed to cosmic rays. The concentrations of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as Be-10 (halflife = 1.5 Myr), Al-26 (0.705 Myr), and C-14 (5,730 yr) also build up with exposure time but reach saturation values after several half-lives. Especially after development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), cosmogenic nuclides in terrestrial samples are routinely used for geomorphic studies such as glaciation, surface erosion, and tectonics, and studies of atmospheric and ocean circulation. Cosmogenic nuclides on Mars will be able to answer questions of exposure ages, erosion rates, tectonic events, and deposition rates of sediments and/or volatiles. The concentrations of cosmogenic stable nuclides gives the integrated exposure time of the rock/mineral, and the activities of radionuclides give recent records for times back as long as a few half-lives.

  5. Cosmic-ray interactions and dating of meteorite stranding surfaces with cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A wide variety of products from cosmic-ray interactions have been measured in terrestrial or extraterrestrial samples. These ''cosmogenic'' products include radiation damage tracks and rare nuclides that are made by nuclear reactions. They often have been used to determine the fluxes and composition of cosmic-ray particles in the past, but they are usually used to study the history of the ''target'' (such as the time period that it was exposed to cosmic-ray particles). Products made by both the high-energy galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles emitted irregularly from the Sun have been extensively studied. Some of these cosmogenic products, especially nuclides, have been or can be applied to studies of Antarctic meteorite stranding surfaces, the ice surfaces in Antarctica where meteorites have been found. Cosmogenic nuclides studied in samples from Antarctica and reported by others elsewhere in this volume include those in meteorites, especially radionuclides used to determine terrestrial ages, and those made in situ in terrestrial rocks. Cosmogenic nuclides made in the Earth's atmosphere or brought in with cosmic dust have also been studied in polar ice, and it should also be possible to measure nuclides made in situ in ice. As an introduction to cosmogenic nuclides and their applications, cosmic rays and their interactions will be presented below and production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in these various media will be discussed later. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Improvement of cosmological neutrino mass bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusarma, Elena; Gerbino, Martina; Mena, Olga; Vagnozzi, Sunny; Ho, Shirley; Freese, Katherine

    2016-10-01

    The most recent measurements of the temperature and low-multipole polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background from the Planck satellite, when combined with galaxy clustering data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey in the form of the full shape of the power spectrum, and with baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, provide a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper bound on the sum of the three active neutrinos ∑mν<0.183 eV , among the tightest neutrino mass bounds in the literature, to date, when the same data sets are taken into account. This very same data combination is able to set, at ˜70 % C.L., an upper limit on ∑mν of 0.0968 eV, a value that approximately corresponds to the minimal mass expected in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy scenario. If high-multipole polarization data from Planck is also considered, the 95% C.L. upper bound is tightened to ∑mν<0.176 eV . Further improvements are obtained by considering recent measurements of the Hubble parameter. These limits are obtained assuming a specific nondegenerate neutrino mass spectrum; they slightly worsen when considering other degenerate neutrino mass schemes. Low-redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant or the reionization optical depth, play a very important role when setting the neutrino mass constraints. We also comment on the eventual shifts in the cosmological bounds on ∑mν when possible variations in the former two quantities are addressed.

  7. High Energy Neutrinos with a Mediterranean Neutrino Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Cuoco, A.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pastor, Sergio; Pisanti, O.; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The high energy neutrino detection by a km{sup 3} Neutrino Telescope placed in the Mediterranean sea provides a unique tool to both determine the diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux and the neutrino nucleon cross section in the extreme kinematical region, which could unveil the presence of new physics. Here is performed a brief analysis of possible NEMO site performances.

  8. Extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos and relic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2006-03-01

    I review the essentials of ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions, show how neutral-current detection and flavor tagging can enhance the scientific potential of neutrino telescopes, and sketch new studies on neutrino encounters with dark matter relics and on gravitational lensing of neutrinos.

  9. Dark Coulomb binding of heavy neutrinos of fourth family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Esipova, E. A.; Khlopov, M. Yu.; Laletin, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Direct dark matter searches put severe constraints on the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These constraints cause serious troubles for the model of stable neutrino of fourth generation with mass around 50GeV. Though the calculations of primordial abundance of these particles make them in the charge symmetric case a sparse subdominant component of the modern dark matter, their presence in the universe would exceed the current upper limits by several orders of the magnitude. However, if quarks and leptons of fourth generation possess their own Coulomb-like y-interaction, recombination of pairs of heavy neutrinos and antineutrinos and their annihilation in the “neutrinium” atoms can play important role in their cosmological evolution, reducing their modern abundance far below the experimental upper limits. The model of stable fourth generation assumes that the dominant part of dark matter is explained by excessive Ū antiquarks, forming (ŪŪŪ)-- charged clusters, bound with primordial helium in nuclear-interacting O-helium (OHe) dark atoms. The y charge conservation implies generation of the same excess of fourth generation neutrinos, potentially dangerous WIMP component of this scenario. We show that due to y-interaction recombination of fourth neutrinos with OHe hides these WIMPs from direct WIMP searches, leaving the negligible fraction of free neutrinos, what makes their existence compatible with the experimental constraints.

  10. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2007-04-27

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  11. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  12. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  13. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  14. Supernova nucleosynthesis and the physics of neutrino oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    2012-11-20

    We studied the explosive nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae and found that several isotopes of rare elements like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La, {sup 180}Ta and others are predominantly produced by the neutrino interactions with several abundant nuclei. These isotopes are strongly affected by the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect. We here first study how to know the suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances, and propose a new novel method to determine the neutrino oscillation parameters, {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that some SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced neutrino-process {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on {theta}{sub 13}, we show that although the uncertainties are still large, our method hints at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy for the first time.

  15. Discovering asymmetric dark matter with anti-neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, Brian; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam E-mail: fitzpatr@physics.bu.edu

    2010-09-01

    We discuss possible signatures of Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) through dark matter decays to neutrinos. We specifically focus on scenarios in which the Standard Model (SM) baryon asymmetry is transferred to the dark sector (DS) through higher dimensional operators in chemical equilibrium. In such cases, the dark matter (DM) carries lepton and/or baryon number, and we point out that for a wide range of quantum number assignments, by far the strongest constraints on dark matter decays come from decays to neutrinos through the ''neutrino portal'' operator HL. Together with the facts that ADM favors lighter DM masses ∼ a few GeV and that the decays would lead only to anti-neutrinos and no neutrinos (or vice versa), the detection of such decays at neutrino telescopes would provide compelling evidence for ADM. We discuss current and future bounds on models where the DM decays to neutrinos through operators of dimension ≤ 6. For dimension 6 operators, the scale suppressing the decay is bounded to be ∼>10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} GeV.

  16. Constraining bilinear R-parity violation from neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, Marek; Kamiński, Wiesław A.

    2008-10-01

    We confront the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model with the neutrino oscillation data. Investigating the 1-loop particle-sparticle diagrams with additional bilinear insertions on the external neutrino lines we construct the relevant contributions to the neutrino mass matrix. A comparison of the so-obtained matrices with the experimental ones assuming normal or inverted hierarchy and taking into account possible CP-violating phases allows to set constraints on the values of the bilinear coupling constants. A similar calculation is presented with the input from the Heidelberg-Moscow neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. We base our analysis on the renormalization group evolution of the minimal supersymmetric standard model parameters which are unified at the grand unified theory scale. Using the obtained bounds we calculate the contributions to the Majorana neutrino transition magnetic moments.

  17. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, Lucas Andrew; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; ...

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1–3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν- or ν¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examinemore » our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Lastly, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.« less

  18. Interpretation of MINOS data in terms of nonstandard neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Parke, Stephen J.

    2010-12-01

    The MINOS experiment at Fermilab has recently reported a tension between the oscillation results for neutrinos and antineutrinos. We show that this tension, if it persists, can be understood in the framework of nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI). While neutral current NSI (nonstandard matter effects) are disfavored by atmospheric neutrinos, a new charged current coupling between tau neutrinos and nucleons can fit the MINOS data without violating other constraints. In particular, we show that loop-level contributions to flavor-violating τ decays are sufficiently suppressed. However, conflicts with existing bounds could arise once the effective theory considered here is embedded into a complete renormalizable model. We predict the future sensitivity of the T2K and NOνA experiments to the NSI parameter region favored by the MINOS fit, and show that both experiments are excellent tools to test the NSI interpretation of the MINOS data.

  19. Renormalization of a two-loop neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, K. S.; Julio, J.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the renormalization group structure of a radiative neutrino mass model consisting of a singly charged and a doubly charged scalar fields. Small Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the exchange of these scalars via two-loop diagrams. We derive boundedness conditions for the Higgs potential and show how they can be satisfied to energies up to the Planck scale. Combining boundedness and perturbativity constraints with neutrino oscillation phenomenology, new limits on the masses and couplings of the charged scalars are derived. These in turn lead to lower limits on the branching ratios for certain lepton flavor violating (LFV) processes such as μ→eγ, μ→3e and μ – e conversion in nuclei. Improved LFV measurements could test the model, especially in the case of inverted neutrino mass hierarchy where these are more prominent.

  20. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Lucas Andrew; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1–3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν- or ν¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examine our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Lastly, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.

  1. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Lucas; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1-3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν - or ν ¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examine our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Finally, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.

  2. Search for flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions using νe appearance in MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; de Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.; Minos Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report new constraints on flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions from the MINOS long-baseline experiment using νe and ν¯e appearance candidate events from predominantly νμ and ν¯μ beams. We used a statistical selection algorithm to separate νe candidates from background events, enabling an analysis of the combined MINOS neutrino and antineutrino data. We observe no deviations from standard neutrino mixing, and thus place constraints on the nonstandard interaction matter effect, |ɛe τ|, and phase, (δC P+δe τ) , using a 30-bin likelihood fit.

  3. Supernova heavy element nucleosynthesis: Can it tell us about neutrino masses?

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, George M.

    1997-05-20

    Here we describe a new probe of neutrino properties based on heavy element nucleosynthesis. This technique is in many ways akin to the familiar light element Primordial Nucleosynthesis probe of conditions in the early universe. Our new probe is based on the fact that neutrino masses and vacuum mixings can engender matter-enhanced neutrino flavor transformation in the post core bounce supernova environment. Transformations of the type {nu}{sub {mu}}{sub (r)}<-->{nu}{sub e} in this site will have significant effects on the synthesis of the rapid neutron capture (r-Process) elements and the light p-nuclei. We suggest that an understanding of the origin of these nuclides, combined with the measured abundances of these species, may provide a ''Rosetta Stone'' for neutrino properties. Heavy element nucleosynthesis abundance considerations give either constraints/evidence for neutrino masses and flavor mixings, or strong constraints on the site of origin of r-Process nucleosynthesis. The putative limits on neutrino characteristics are complimentary to those derived from laboratory neutrino oscillation studies and solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. Preliminary studies show that the existence of r-Process nuclei in the abundances observed in the Galaxy cannot be understood unless neutrinos have small masses (possibly in the cosmologically significant range)

  4. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  5. Solar Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, E.-I.; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; McGirt, F.; Miller, G.G.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.

    1999-07-15

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) offers the unique opportunity to measure both the 8B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and, independently, the flux of all active neutrino species reaching the Earth. A model-independent test of the hypothesis that neutrino oscillations are responsible for the observed solar neutrino deficit can be made by comparing the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) rates. This LDRD proposal supported the research and development necessary for an assessment of backgrounds and performance of the SNO detector and the ability to extract the NC/CC-Ratio. Particular emphasis is put upon the criteria for deployment and signal extraction from a discrete NC detector array based upon ultra-low background 3He proportional counters.

  6. On neutrino flavor states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chiu Man

    2012-12-01

    We review the issues associated with the construction of neutrino flavor states. We then provide a consistent proof that the flavor states are approximately well-defined only if neutrinos are ultra-relativistic or the mass differences are negligible compared to energy. However, we show that weak interactions can be consistently described by only neutrino mass eigenstates. Meanwhile, the second quantization of neutrino flavor fields generally has no physical relevance as their masses are indefinite. Therefore, the flavor states are not physical quantum states and they should simply be interpreted as definitions to denote specific linear combinations of mass eigenstates involved in weak interactions. We also briefly discuss the implication of this work for the mixing between active and heavy sterile neutrinos.

  7. Summary: Neutrinos and nonaccelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper contains brief synopsis of the following major topics discussed in the neutrino and nonaccelerator parallel sessions: dark matter; neutrino oscillations at accelerators and reactors; gamma-ray astronomy; double beta decay; solar neutrinos; and the possible existence of a 17-KeV neutrino. (LSP)

  8. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M. V.; Galymov, V.; Qian, X.; Rubbia, A.

    2016-10-19

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We will summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology with our focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We will proceed from the rst evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research

  9. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  10. Cosmogenic Helium In Alluvial Diamonds From Namaqualand, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, R.; Harris, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The interpretation of He in diamonds is not straightforward, potential sources include trapped mantle-derived He, radiogenic 4He, and 3He produced in situ by cosmic-ray spallation. The presence of cosmogenic 3He is manifested by high 3He/4He values and ratios of >200 Ra have been measured. 3He contents can be used to distinguish pipe from alluvial diamonds and the time interval that they have been involved in the sedimentary cycle, i.e. their surface exposure history. This is important information for locating the source of alluvial diamonds, understanding their transport histories and may provide a useful tool for diamond exploration. In this study we are analysing the He composition of ten alluvial diamonds from the Koignass-Namaqualand area along the south-west coast of South Africa and Namibia. Diamonds are currently mined at a depth of 100m below the surface from deposits of gravel beaches and river channels. Helium is extracted from the diamonds using a newly developed high temperature filament furnace having a blank approximately 200x lower than conventional resistance furnaces. The low blank of this system means it is possible to extract He by stepwise heating of diamonds weighing 0.05 g. Helium isotopes were analysed using a mass spectrometer with a 3He detection limit of 2,000,000 atoms equivalent to about 20 ka of surface exposure. Results from one diamond from Namaqualand illustrate the range of data obtained so far. This diamond was analysed using eight temperature steps and shows an overall increase in 3He/4He value with temperature from 8.8 x 10-6 to 2.6 x 10-2, the latter being only 10x lower than the pure spallogenic ratio. The cosmogenic 3He content is estimated at 73.5 x 10-12 cm3/g which is at the upper end of the range determined previously in alluvial diamonds from west African sources. Assuming a sea level 3He production rate at 30°S, then the 3He content of this diamond is equivalent to 16 Ma of surface exposure. Most of this exposure is

  11. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the "solar neutrino problem". Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. (Communicated by Toshimitsu Yamazaki, M.J.A.).

  12. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. PMID:21558758

  13. Sterile neutrinos as subdominant warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzo, A.; Cumberbatch, D.; Slosar, A.; Silk, J.

    2007-11-15

    In light of recent findings which seem to disfavor a scenario with (warm) dark matter entirely constituted of sterile neutrinos produced via the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we investigate the constraints attainable for this mechanism by relaxing the usual hypothesis that the relic neutrino abundance must necessarily account for all of the dark matter. We first study how to reinterpret the limits attainable from x-ray nondetection and Lyman-{alpha} forest measurements in the case that sterile neutrinos constitute only a fraction f{sub s} of the total amount of dark matter. Then, assuming that sterile neutrinos are generated in the early universe solely through the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we show how the x-ray and Lyman-{alpha} results jointly constrain the mass-mixing parameters governing their production. Furthermore, we show how the same data allow us to set a robust upper limit f{sub s} < or approx. 0.7 at the 2{sigma} level, rejecting the case of dominant dark matter (f{sub s}=1) at the {approx}3{sigma} level.

  14. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts in the IceCube and ARA Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guetta, Dafne

    2016-07-01

    In this review I discuss the ultra-high energy neutrinos (UHEN) originated from Cosmic-Rays propogation (GZK neutrinos) and from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), and discuss their detectability in kilometers scale detectors like ARA and IceCube. While GZK neutrinos are expected from cosmic ray interactions on the CMB, the GRB neutrinos depend on the physics inside the sources. GRBs are predicted to emit UHEN in the prompt and in the later "after-glow" phase. I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino fux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

  15. Neutrinos from gamma ray bursts in the IceCube and ARA era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guetta, Dafne

    2015-09-01

    In this review I discuss the ultra-high energy neutrinos (UHEN) originated from cosmic-ray propagation (GZK neutrinos) and from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), and discuss their detectability in kilometers scale detectors like ARA and IceCube. While GZK neutrinos are expected from cosmic ray interactions on the CMB, the GRB neutrinos depend on the physics inside the sources. GRBs are predicted to emit UHEN in the prompt and in the later 'after-glow' phase. I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

  16. Radiative neutrino model with S U (2 )L triplet fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-12-01

    We propose a loop-induced neutrino mass model, in which we introduce several exotic fermions and bosons with an S U (2 )L multiplet, and discuss various phenomenologies such as lepton flavor violations, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, nonstandard interacting neutrinoless double beta decay, the relic density of dark matter, and the possibility of the spin-independent direct detection searches, imposing the constraints of oblique parameters. And we show a benchmark point to satisfy all the constraints and discuss our predictions.

  17. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    DOE PAGES

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; ...

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, andmore » scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.« less

  18. Probing neutrino physics with a self-consistent treatment of the weak decoupling, nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs

    SciTech Connect

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we show that a self-consistent and coupled treatment of the weak decoupling, big bang nucleosynthesis, and photon decoupling epochs can be used to provide new insights and constraints on neutrino sector physics from high-precision measurements of light element abundances and Cosmic Microwave Background observables. Implications of beyond-standard-model physics in cosmology, especially within the neutrino sector, are assessed by comparing predictions against five observables: the baryon energy density, helium abundance, deuterium abundance, effective number of neutrinos, and sum of the light neutrino mass eigenstates. We give examples for constraints on dark radiation, neutrino rest mass, lepton numbers, and scenarios for light and heavy sterile neutrinos.

  19. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    DOE PAGES

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-02-10

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction ofmore » 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ~106–108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. Furthermore, we present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints.« less

  20. Neutrino-neutrino interactions in a supernova and their effect on neutrino flavor conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Dighe, Amol

    2011-11-23

    The neutrino-neutrino interactions inside a supernova core give rise to nonlinear collective effects that significantly influence the neutrino flavor conversions inside the star. I shall describe these interactions, the new oscillation phenomena they generate, and their effect on the neutrino fluxes arriving at the earth.

  1. Increasing the Effective Number of Neutrinos with Decaying Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Senami, Masato; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2007-11-20

    We present a model of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, As an example, we consider saxion decay into two axions.

  2. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic 35S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high 35S concentrations (7,390 atoms m−3; ∼16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced 35S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that 35S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level. PMID:27655890

  3. Cosmogenic Samarium-150 and Calcium-41 in Norton County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Albrecht, A.; Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.; Garrison, D. H.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Rugel, G.; Faestermann, T.; Korschinek, G.

    2010-01-01

    Though brecciated, the Norton County (NC) aubrite contains little or no trapped noble gas and has been widely assumed to have a simple if unusually long cosmic ray exposure (CRE), 115 Ma. One goal of this ongoing study of NC has been to search for signs of pre-irradiation as proposed. One may test for multiple stages of CRE by comparing thermal neutron fluences inferred from Ca-41 (t(sub 1/2)=0.1 Ma) activities, which reflect irradiation conditions over the last approximately 0.3 Ma, with those inferred from (stable) Sm isotope abundances, which integrate over the entire CRE history. In the case of a one-stage exposure the fluences should agree. We focus on these particular comparisons because the properties of NC - its long CRE exposure, relatively large size, and low iron concentration - all promised high production rates and ease of measurement. Previously, we reported on several cosmogenic nuclides in NC. Here we present new Ca-41 data, Sm isotope measurements, and comparisons with model calculations of cosmic ray production.

  4. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  5. Analytical method for measuring cosmogenic 35S in natural waters

    DOE PAGES

    Uriostegui, Stephanie H.; Bibby, Richard K.; Esser, Bradley K.; ...

    2015-05-18

    Here, cosmogenic sulfur-35 in water as dissolved sulfate (35SO4) has successfully been used as an intrinsic hydrologic tracer in low-SO4, high-elevation basins. Its application in environmental waters containing high SO4 concentrations has been limited because only small amounts of SO4 can be analyzed using current liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques. We present a new analytical method for analyzing large amounts of BaSO4 for 35S. We quantify efficiency gains when suspending BaSO4 precipitate in Inta-Gel Plus cocktail, purify BaSO4 precipitate to remove dissolved organic matter, mitigate interference of radium-226 and its daughter products by selection of high purity barium chloride, andmore » optimize LSC counting parameters for 35S determination in larger masses of BaSO4. Using this improved procedure, we achieved counting efficiencies that are comparable to published LSC techniques despite a 10-fold increase in the SO4 sample load. 35SO4 was successfully measured in high SO4 surface waters and groundwaters containing low ratios of 35S activity to SO4 mass demonstrating that this new analytical method expands the analytical range of 35SO4 and broadens the utility of 35SO4 as an intrinsic tracer in hydrologic settings.« less

  6. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Parnell, T. A.; Herzog, G.; Klein, J.; Jull, A. J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has opened new opportunities to study several unexplored regions of space science. The experiments have shown that the Be-7 found was concentrated in a thin surface layer of spacecraft material. The only reasonable source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. It is expected that the uptake of Be in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (Teflon). It is noted however, that (1) organic surfaces are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km/s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. Be-7 is formed by disintegration of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry.

  7. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C H; Thiemens, Mark H

    2016-10-04

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic (35)S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high (35)S concentrations (7,390 atoms m(-3); ∼16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced (35)S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that (35)S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  8. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2016-10-01

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic 35S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high 35S concentrations (7,390 atoms m-3; ˜16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced 35S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that 35S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  9. One-loop correction effects on supernova neutrino fluxes: a new possible probe for Beyond Standard Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.

    2010-05-01

    We present the consequences of a large radiative correction term coming from Supersymmetry (SUSY) upon the electron neutrino fluxes streaming off a core-collapse supernova using a 3-flavour neutrino-neutrino interaction code. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of the resonance associated with the μ−τ neutrino index of refraction. We find that sizeable effects may be visible in the flux on Earth and, consequently, on the number of events upon the energy signal of electron neutrinos in a liquid argon detector. Such effects could lead to a probe for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics and, ideally, to constraints in the SUSY parameter space.

  10. Dynamics of neutrino lumps in growing neutrino quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Santiago; Pettorino, Valeria; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and dissipation of large-scale neutrino structures in cosmologies where the time evolution of dynamical dark energy is stopped by a growing neutrino mass. In models where the coupling between neutrinos and dark energy grows with the value of the scalar cosmon field, the evolution of neutrino lumps depends on the neutrino mass. For small masses the lumps form and dissolve periodically, leaving only a small backreaction of the neutrino structures on the cosmic evolution. This process heats the neutrinos to temperatures far above the photon temperature, such that neutrinos acquire again an almost relativistic equation of state. The present equation of state of the combined cosmon-neutrino fluid is very close to -1 . By contrast, for larger neutrino masses, the lumps become stable. The highly concentrated neutrino structures entail a large backreaction similar to the case of a constant neutrino-cosmon coupling. A present average neutrino mass of around 0.5 eV seems to be compatible with observations so far. For masses lower than this value, neutrino-induced gravitational potentials remain small, making the lumps difficult to detect.

  11. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  12. Submarine neutrino communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the possibility to use a high energy neutrino beam from a muon storage ring to provide one way communication with a submerged submarine. Neutrino interactions produce muons which can be detected either, directly when they pass through the submarine or by their emission of Cerenkov light in sea water, which, in turn, can be exploited with sensitive photo detectors. Due to the very high neutrino flux from a muon storage ring, it is sufficient to mount either detection system directly onto the hull of the submersible. The achievable data transfer rates compare favorable with existing technologies and do allow for a communication at the usual speed and depth of submarines.

  13. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-07-11

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  14. Unifying leptogenesis, dark matter and high-energy neutrinos with right-handed neutrino mixing via Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; Ludl, Patrick Otto; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-11-21

    We revisit a model in which neutrino masses and mixing are described by a two right-handed (RH) neutrino seesaw scenario, implying a strictly hierarchical light neutrino spectrum. A third decoupled RH neutrino, N{sub DM} with mass M{sub DM}, plays the role of cold dark matter (DM) and is produced by the mixing with a source RH neutrino, N{sub S} with mass M{sub S}, induced by Higgs portal interactions. The same interactions are also responsible for N{sub DM} decays. We discuss in detail the constraints coming from DM abundance and stability conditions showing that in the hierarchical case, for M{sub DM}≫M{sub S}, there is an allowed window on M{sub DM} values necessarily implying a contribution, from DM decays, to the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by IceCube. We also show how the model can explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis in the quasi-degenerate limit. In this case, the DM mass should be within the range 300 GeV ≲M{sub S}neutrino flux and show the predicted event spectrum for two exemplary cases. Although DM decays, with a relatively hard spectrum, cannot account for all the IceCube high-energy data, we illustrate how this extra source of high-energy neutrinos could reasonably explain some potential features in the observed spectrum. In this way, this represents a unified scenario for leptogenesis and DM that could be tested during the next years with more high-energy neutrino events.

  15. Unifying leptogenesis, dark matter and high-energy neutrinos with right-handed neutrino mixing via Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Pasquale; Ludl, Patrick Otto; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    We revisit a model in which neutrino masses and mixing are described by a two right-handed (RH) neutrino seesaw scenario, implying a strictly hierarchical light neutrino spectrum. A third decoupled RH neutrino, NDM with mass MDM, plays the role of cold dark matter (DM) and is produced by the mixing with a source RH neutrino, NS with mass MS, induced by Higgs portal interactions. The same interactions are also responsible for NDM decays. We discuss in detail the constraints coming from DM abundance and stability conditions showing that in the hierarchical case, for MDM gg MS, there is an allowed window on MDM values necessarily implying a contribution, from DM decays, to the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by IceCube. We also show how the model can explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis in the quasi-degenerate limit. In this case, the DM mass should be within the range 300 GeV lesssim MS < MDM lesssim 10 PeV. We discuss the specific properties of this high-energy neutrino flux and show the predicted event spectrum for two exemplary cases. Although DM decays, with a relatively hard spectrum, cannot account for all the IceCube high-energy data, we illustrate how this extra source of high-energy neutrinos could reasonably explain some potential features in the observed spectrum. In this way, this represents a unified scenario for leptogenesis and DM that could be tested during the next years with more high-energy neutrino events.

  16. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  17. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations and tau neutrinos in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-06-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core Array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show here that cascade measurements in the Ice Cube Deep Core Array can provide strong evidence for tau neutrino appearance in atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Controlling systematic uncertainties will be the limiting factor in the analysis. A careful study of these tau neutrinos is crucial, since they constitute an irreducible background for astrophysical neutrino detection.

  18. Berry phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; McKellar, Bruce H.J.; Zhang Yue

    2005-09-01

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation. If the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges, these conditions imply that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a nonzero Berry phase with just two generations.

  19. Erratic boulder trains and cosmogenic exposure dating of former glacial limits: A case-study from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher; Stokes, Chris; Bentley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Erratic Boulder Trains (EBTs) are a spectacular yet poorly-understood glacial geomorphological feature. These linear clusters of glacial erratic boulders help to illustrate the flow-lines of former glaciers by pin-pointing the parent rock from which they have originated and are often used as targets for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Consequently, there is a need to understand their geomorphological significance to improve ice-sheet reconstructions and provide important contextual information for dating studies. The EBTs in Tierra del Fuego are some of the finest examples of this feature in the world, and this paper presents the first comprehensive mapping and physical assessment of four boulder trains. Unlike most other examples, they were deposited laterally rather than medially and are tightly clustered, presenting linear features only a few kilometres long that contain hundreds to thousands of huge boulders (often >8 m in diameter). The size and angularity of the boulders strongly supports the hypothesis that they were deposited as a supraglacial rock avalanche. The boulders have been the subject of previous cosmogenic dating, which have yielded anomalously young ages from deposits thought to be hundreds of thousands of years old. Analysis of weathering proxies shows little difference between boulder trains thought to be of radically different ages, with important implications for the timing of glaciations and potentially contradicting previous age constraints on glacial limits in the region.

  20. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments. >>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  1. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  2. Detecting the Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arns, Robert G.

    In 1930 Wolfgang Pauli suggested that a new particle might be required to make sense of the radioactive-disintegration mode known as beta decay. This conjecture initially seemed impossible to verify since the new particle, which became known as the neutrino, was uncharged, had zero or small mass, and interacted only insignificantly with other matter. In 1951 Frederick Reines and Clyde L. Cowan, Jr., of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory undertook the difficult task of detecting the free neutrino by observing its inverse beta-decay interaction with matter. They succeeded in 1956. The neutrino was accepted rapidly as a fundamental particle despite discrepancies in reported details of the experiments and despite the absence of independent verification of the result. This paper describes the experiments, examines the nature of the discrepancies, and discusses the circumstances of the acceptance of the neutrino's detection by the physics community.

  3. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewan, G. T.

    1992-04-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector is a 1000 ton heavy water (D2O) Cherenkov detector designed to study neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical sources. The use of heavy water allows both electron neutrinos and all other types of neutrinos to be observed by three complementary reactions. The detector will be sensitive to the electron neutrino flux and energy spectrum shape and to the total neutrino flux irrespective of neutrino type. These measurements will provide information on both vacuum neutrino oscillations and matter-enhanced oscillations, the MSW effect. In the event of a supernova it will be very sensitive to muon and tau neutrinos as well as the electron neutrinos emitted in the initial burst, enabling sensitive mass measurements as well as providing details of the physics of stellar collapse. On behalf of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration : H.C . Evans, G.T . Ewan, H.W. Lee, J .R . Leslie, J .D. MacArthur, H .-B . Mak, A.B . McDonald, W. McLatchie, B.C . Robertson, B. Sur, P. Skensved (Queen's University) ; C.K . Hargrove, H. Mes, W.F. Davidson, D. Sinclair, 1 . Blevis, M. Shatkay (Centre for Research in Particle Physics) ; E.D. Earle, G.M. Milton, E. Bonvin, (Chalk River Laboratories); J .J . Simpson, P. Jagam, J . Law, J .-X . Wang (University of Guelph); E.D . Hallman, R.U. Haq (Laurentian University); A.L. Carter, D. Kessler, B.R . Hollebone (Carleton University); R. Schubank . C.E . Waltha m (University of British Columbia); R.T. Kouzes, M.M. Lowry, R.M. Key (Princeton University); E.W. Beier, W. Frati, M. Newcomer, R. Van Berg (University of Penn-sylvania), T.J . Bowles, P.J . Doe, S.R . Elliott, M.M. Fowler, R.G.H. Robertson, D.J . Vieira, J .B . Wilhelmy, J .F. Wilker-son, J .M. Wouters (Los Alamos National Laboratory) ; E. Norman, K. Lesko, A. Smith, R. Fulton, R. Stokstad (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), N.W. Tanner, N. JCIILY, P. Trent, J . Barton, D.L . Wark (University of Oxford).

  4. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p+p→d+e++νe, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE - the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6±3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3-3.5+3.9 SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux of ϕpp♁=(3.41-0.77+0.76)×1010/(cm-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of ϕpp♁=(3.30-0.14+0.13)×1010/(cm-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88±0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  5. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  6. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  7. Neutrino Experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  8. Neutrinos beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, J.W.F.

    1989-08-01

    I review some basic aspects of neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model such as neutrino mixing and neutrino non-orthogonality, universality and CP violation in the lepton sector, total lepton number and lepton flavor violation, etc.. These may lead to neutrino decays and oscillations, exotic weak decay processes, neutrinoless double /beta/ decay, etc.. Particle physics models are discussed where some of these processes can be sizable even in the absence of measurable neutrino masses. These may also substantially affect the propagation properties of solar and astrophysical neutrinos. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Testing the Equivalence Principle and Lorentz Invariance with PeV Neutrinos from Blazar Flares.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-04-15

    It was recently proposed that a giant flare of the blazar PKS B1424-418 at redshift z=1.522 is in association with a PeV-energy neutrino event detected by IceCube. Based on this association we here suggest that the flight time difference between the PeV neutrino and gamma-ray photons from blazar flares can be used to constrain the violations of equivalence principle and the Lorentz invariance for neutrinos. From the calculated Shapiro delay due to clusters or superclusters in the nearby universe, we find that violation of the equivalence principle for neutrinos and photons is constrained to an accuracy of at least 10^{-5}, which is 2 orders of magnitude tighter than the constraint placed by MeV neutrinos from supernova 1987A. Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) arises in various quantum-gravity theories, which predicts an energy-dependent velocity of propagation in vacuum for particles. We find that the association of the PeV neutrino with the gamma-ray outburst set limits on the energy scale of possible LIV to >0.01E_{pl} for linear LIV models and >6×10^{-8}E_{pl} for quadratic order LIV models, where E_{pl} is the Planck energy scale. These are the most stringent constraints on neutrino LIV for subluminal neutrinos.

  10. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Parnell, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft has opened opportunities to investigate new phenomena in several disciplines of space science. The experiments performed for this work show that the Be-7 results only if the source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. We should expect that the uptake of beryllium in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does, in fact, differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (teflon). It is noted, however, that: (1) organic surfaces, even PTFE, are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km(exp -1)s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. The Be-7 is formed by spallation of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. The principal source region is at altitudes of 12-15 km. While very small quantities are produced above 300 km, the amount measured on the LDEF was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than expected from production at orbital altitude. The most reasonable explanation is that Be-7 is rapidly transported from low altitudes by some unknown mechanism. The process must take place on a time scale similar to the half-life of the isotope (53 days). Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry. A program was initiated to search for these isotopes and it is hoped that such studies will provide new methods for studying mixing in the upper atmosphere.

  11. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Parnell, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface (and the front surface only) of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft has opened opportunities to investigate new phenomena in several disciplines of space science. The experiments performed for this work show that the Be-7 results only if the source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. We should expect that the uptake of beryllium in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does, in fact, differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (teflon). It is noted, however, that: (1) organic surfaces, even PTFE, are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km(exp -1)s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. The Be-7 is formed by spallation of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. The principal source region is at altitudes of 12-15 km. While very small quantities are produced above 300 km, the amount measured on the LDEF was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than expected from production at orbital attitude. The most reasonable explanation is that Be-7 is rapidly transported from low altitudes by some unknown mechanism. The process must take place on a time scale similar to the half-life of the isotope (53 days). Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry. A program was initiated to search for these isotopes and it is hoped that such studies will provide new methods for studying mixing in the upper atmosphere.

  12. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  13. Simulation of the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides on the Moon based on Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Dong, Wudong; Ren, Zhongzhou; Dong, Tiekuang; Xu, Aoao

    2017-02-01

    A numerical simulation model is built to simulate the production of cosmogenic nuclides based on Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking). Some modifications have been made for cross sections in Geant4 using the experimental data or the other proper model and the contributions of all secondary particles caused by cosmic rays are included in our simulation model. Our simulation results suggest a substantial contribution of the secondary charged pions to the production rates of 10Be and 14C, as high as 21.04% for 10Be and 21.36% for 14C, respectively. Within one set of self-consistent parameters, the simulation results of the production rates of the cosmogenic nuclides, 53Mn, 36Cl, 41Ca, 26Al, 10Be, and 14C, agree well with the measured data from Apollo 15 drill core. This model provides users a validated approach to study the production of cosmogenic nuclides on the planet surface and in the meteorites.

  14. Constraints on light dark matter from core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Fayet, Pierre; Hooper, Dan; Sigl, Günter

    2006-06-02

    We show that light (approximately or = 1-30 MeV) dark matter particles can play a significant role in core-collapse supernovae, if they have relatively large annihilation and scattering cross sections, as compared to neutrinos. We find that if such particles are lighter than approximately or = 10 MeV and reproduce the observed dark matter relic density, supernovae would cool on a much longer time scale and would emit neutrinos with significantly smaller energies than in the standard scenario, in disagreement with observations. This constraint may be avoided, however, in certain situations for which the neutrino-dark-matter scattering cross sections remain comparatively small.

  15. Core-collapse supernova neutrinos and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.; Volpe, C.

    2008-08-29

    Core-collapse supernovae are powerful neutrino sources. The observation of a future (extra-)galactic supernova explosion or of the relic supernova neutrinos might provide important information on the supernova dynamics, on the supernova formation rate and on neutrino properties. One might learn more about unknown neutrino properties either from indirect effects in the supernova (e.g. on the explosion or on in the r-process) or from modifications of the neutrino time or energy distributions in a detector on Earth. Here we will discuss in particular possible effects of CP violation in the lepton sector. We will also mention the interest of future neutrino-nucleus interaction measurements for the precise knowledge of supernova neutrino detector response to electron neutrinos.

  16. Prospect for Relic Neutrino Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2006-03-01

    Neutrinos from the Big Bang are theoretically expected to be the most abundant particles in the Universe after the photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Unlike the relic photons, relic neutrinos have not so far been observed. The Cosmic Neutrino Background (CνB) is the oldest relic from the Big Bang, produced a few seconds after the Bang itself. Due to their impact in cosmology, relic neutrinos may be revealed indirectly in the near future through cosmological observations. In this talk we concentrate on other proposals, made in the last 30 years, to try to detect the CνB directly, either in laboratory searches (through tiny accelerations they produce on macroscopic targets) or through astrophysical observations (looking for absorption dips in the flux of Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrinos, due to the annihilation of these neutrinos with relic neutrinos at the Z-resonance). We concentrate mainly on the first possibility. We show that, given present bounds on neutrino masses, lepton number in the Universe and gravitational clustering of neutrinos, all expected laboratory effects of relic neutrinos are far from observability, awaiting future technological advances to reach the necessary sensitivity. The problem for astrophysical searches is that sources of UHE neutrinos at the extreme energies required may not exist. If they do exist, we could reveal the existence, and possibly the mass spectrum, of relic neutrinos, with detectors of UHE neutrinos (such as ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE and SalSA).

  17. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-06

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  18. No-neutrino double beta decay: more than one neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Interference effects between light and heavy Majorana neutrinos in the amplitude for no-neutrino double beta decay are discussed. The effects include an upper bound on the heavy neutrino mass, and an A dependence for the effective mass extracted from double beta decay. Thus the search for the no-neutrino decay mode should be pursued in several nuclei, and particularly in Ca/sup 48/, where the effective mass may be quite large.

  19. Pinning down neutrino oscillation parameters in the 2-3 sector with a magnetised atmospheric neutrino detector: a new study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Lakshmi S.; Indumathi, D.

    2017-01-01

    We determine the sensitivity to neutrino oscillation parameters from a study of atmospheric neutrinos in a magnetised detector such as the ICAL at the proposed India-based Neutrino Observatory. In such a detector, which can separately count ν _μ and overline{ν }_μ -induced events, the relatively smaller (about 5%) uncertainties on the neutrino-antineutrino flux ratios translate to a constraint in the χ ^2 analysis that results in a significant improvement in the precision with which neutrino oscillation parameters such as sin ^2θ _{23} can be determined. Such an effect is unique to all magnetisable detectors and constitutes a great advantage in determining neutrino oscillation parameters using such detectors. Such a study has been performed for the first time here. Along with an increase in the kinematic range compared to earlier analyses, this results in sensitivities to oscillation parameters in the 2-3 sector that are comparable to or better than those from accelerator experiments where the fluxes are significantly higher. For example, the 1σ precisions on sin ^2θ _{23} and |Δ {m^2_{32(31)}}| achievable for 500 kton year exposure of ICAL are {˜ }9 and {˜ }2.5%, respectively, for both normal and inverted hierarchies. The mass hierarchy sensitivity achievable with this combination when the true hierarchy is normal (inverted) for the same exposure is Δ χ ^2≈ 8.5 (Δ χ ^2≈ 9.5).

  20. Cosmogenic and primordial radioisotopes in copper bricks shortly exposed to cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coarasa, I.; Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuestá, C.; García, E.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortíz de Solórzano, A.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmogenic activation is the most common source of radioactivity in copper, being 60 Co the most significant because of its long half-life (5.27 y) and saturation activity at sea level of 1 mBq/kg. Copper bricks, which had been exposed to cosmic rays for 41 days after their casting, were used to replace the internal 10 cm of the lead shielding of a HPGe detector placed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. We describe the outcome of the new shielding and the cosmogenic and primordial radioisotopes observed.

  1. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  2. Neutrino mass and the origin of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, K. ); Semikoz, V. IZMIRAN, Academy of Sciences, Troitsk 142092 ); Shukurov, A. Computing Center, Moscow University, Moscow 119899 ); Sokoloff, D. Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0EH )

    1993-11-15

    We compare two constraints on the strength of the cosmological primordial magnetic field: the one following from the restrictions on the Dirac neutrino spin flip in the early Universe, and another one based on the galactic dynamo theory for the Milky Way (presuming that the seed magnetic field has a relic origin). Since the magnetic field facilitates transitions between left- and right-handed neutrino states, thereby affecting [sup 4]He production at primordial nucleosynthesis, we can obtain a guaranteed [ital upper] limit on the strength of the relic magnetic field in the protogalaxy, [ital B][sub [ital c

  3. Atmospheric neutrinos in ice and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show that the very high statistics atmospheric neutrino data can be used to obtain precise measurements of the main oscillation parameters.

  4. Dark radiation sterile neutrino candidates after Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Mena, Olga

    2013-11-01

    Recent Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) results from the Planck satellite, combined with previous CMB data and Hubble constant measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, provide a constraint on the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom 3.62+0.50-0.48 at 95% CL. New Planck data provide a unique opportunity to place limits on models containing relativistic species at the decoupling epoch. We present here the bounds on sterile neutrino models combining Planck data with galaxy clustering information. Assuming Neff active plus sterile massive neutrino species, in the case of a Planck+WP+HighL+HST analysis we find mν, sterileeff < 0.36 eV and 3.14 < Neff < 4.15 at 95% CL, while using Planck+WP+HighL data in combination with the full shape of the galaxy power spectrum from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey BOSS Data Relase 9 measurements, we find that 3.30 < Neff < 4.43 and mν, sterileeff < 0.33 eV both at 95% CL with the three active neutrinos having the minimum mass allowed in the normal hierarchy scheme, i.e. ∑mν ~ 0.06 eV. These values compromise the viability of the (3+2) massive sterile neutrino models for the parameter region indicated by global fits of neutrino oscillation data. Within the (3+1) massive sterile neutrino scenario, we find mν, sterileeff < 0.34 eV at 95% CL. While the existence of one extra sterile massive neutrino state is compatible with current oscillation data, the values for the sterile neutrino mass preferred by oscillation analyses are significantly higher than the current cosmological bound. We review as well the bounds on extended dark sectors with additional light species based on the latest Planck CMB observations.

  5. Simulating nonlinear neutrino flavor evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, H.; Fuller, G. M.; Carlson, J.

    2008-10-01

    We discuss a new kind of astrophysical transport problem: the coherent evolution of neutrino flavor in core collapse supernovae. Solution of this problem requires a numerical approach which can simulate accurately the quantum mechanical coupling of intersecting neutrino trajectories and the associated nonlinearity which characterizes neutrino flavor conversion. We describe here the two codes developed to attack this problem. We also describe the surprising phenomena revealed by these numerical calculations. Chief among these is that the nonlinearities in the problem can engineer neutrino flavor transformation which is dramatically different to that in standard Mikheyev Smirnov Wolfenstein treatments. This happens even though the neutrino mass-squared differences are measured to be small, and even when neutrino self-coupling is sub-dominant. Our numerical work has revealed potential signatures which, if detected in the neutrino burst from a Galactic core collapse event, could reveal heretofore unmeasurable properties of the neutrinos, such as the mass hierarchy and vacuum mixing angle θ13.

  6. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  7. IceCube Gen2: The Next Generation of Neutrino Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaufuss, Erik; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The observations of an astrophysical flux of neutrinos by the IceCube neutrino observatory signaled the start of the era of neutrino astronomy. While the source of these astrophysical neutrinos remains unclear, many strong constraints have already been made. Unfortunately, the limits of the current detector are becoming clear and the design of the next generation of Antarctic neutrino observatory is well underway. The IceCube-Gen2 high-energy array will instrument a 10km3 volume of clear glacial ice at the South Pole to deliver substantially larger astrophysical samples of all neutrino flavors. This contribution will highlight the science case and detector sensitivity studies performed in the design process. Additionally, astrophysical neutrino sensitivity can be increased by the addition of an extensive surface detector to identify and reject atmospheric backgrounds originating from the southern hemisphere. This large detector, in combination with the existing IceCube neutrino observatory and the rest of the IceCube-Gen2 facility, will be the flagship experiment of the new field of neutrino astronomy.

  8. Future sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to dark matter annihilations from the cosmic diffuse neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Moliné, Ángeles; Ibarra, Alejandro; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio E-mail: ibarra@tum.de

    2015-06-01

    Cosmological observations and cold dark matter N-body simulations indicate that our Universe is populated by numerous halos, where dark matter particles annihilate, potentially producing Standard Model particles. In this paper we calculate the contribution to the diffuse neutrino background from dark matter annihilations in halos at all redshifts and we estimate the future sensitivity to the annihilation cross section of neutrino telescopes such as IceCube or ANTARES. We consider various parametrizations to describe the internal halo properties and for the halo mass function in order to bracket the theoretical uncertainty in the limits from the modeling of the cosmological annihilation flux. We find that observations of the cosmic diffuse neutrino flux at large angular distances from the galactic center lead to constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section which are complementary to (and for some extrapolations of the astrophysical parameters, better than) those stemming from observations of the Milky Way halo, especially for neutrino telescopes not pointing directly to the Milky Way center, as is the case of IceCube.

  9. Neutrino trident production: a powerful probe of new physics with neutrino beams.

    PubMed

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Gori, Stefania; Pospelov, Maxim; Yavin, Itay

    2014-08-29

    The production of a μ+ μ- pair from the scattering of a muon neutrino off the Coulomb field of a nucleus, known as neutrino trident production, is a subweak process that has been observed in only a couple of experiments. As such, we show that it constitutes an exquisitely sensitive probe in the search for new neutral currents among leptons, putting the strongest constraints on well-motivated and well-hidden extensions of the standard model gauge group, including the one coupled to the difference of the lepton number between the muon and tau flavor, Lμ-Lτ. The new gauge boson Z', increases the rate of neutrino trident production by inducing additional (μγαμ)(νγ(α)ν) interactions, which interfere constructively with the standard model contribution. Existing experimental results put significant restrictions on the parameter space of any model coupled to muon number Lμ, and disfavor a putative resolution to the muon g-2 discrepancy via the loop of Z' for any mass mZ'≳400  MeV. The reach to the models' parameter space can be widened with future searches of the trident production at high-intensity neutrino facilities such as the LBNE.

  10. Sterile neutrinos at a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2010-03-30

    We study the potential of a Neutrino Factory (NF) to constrain the parameters of the (3+1)-scheme with a O(1)eV{sup 2} largest mass square difference, considering two set-ups: a NF with 50 GeV (20 GeV) stored muons, with two detectors of the Hybrid-MIND type located at L = 3000(4000), 7500 km. We show that the best sensitivity to sterile neutrinos can be achieved through the nu{sub m}u->nu{sub m}u and the nu{sub m}u->nu{sub t}au channels which can constrain theta{sub 34}<=12 deg. (14 deg.) and theta{sub 24}<=7.5 deg. (8 deg.) with the 50 GeV (20 GeV) NF. We also study the CP-violation in this new context showing that the CP-asymmetries in the nu{sub m}u->nu{sub t}au channel can give us the chance to see a clear new CP-violation signal associated with the sterile neutrinos.

  11. Neutrino sea scope takes shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2016-03-01

    A consortium of European physicists building a vast neutrino detector on the floor of the Mediterranean Sea has unveiled the science it will carry out. The Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope (KM3NeT) will use strings of radiation detectors arranged in a 3D network to measure the light emitted when neutrinos very occasionally interact with the surrounding sea water.

  12. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  13. Preliminary Cosmogenic Surface Exposure Ages on Laurentide Ice-sheet Retreat and Opening of the Eastern Lake Agassiz Outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leydet, D.; Carlson, A. E.; Sinclair, G.; Teller, J. T.; Breckenridge, A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Barth, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology for the eastern outlets of glacial Lake Agassiz holds important consequences for the cause of Younger Dryas cold event during the last deglaciation. Eastward routing of Lake Agassiz runoff was originally hypothesized to have triggered the Younger Dryas. However, currently the chronology of the eastern outlets is only constrained by minimum-limiting radiocarbon ages that could suggest the eastern outlets were still ice covered at the start of the Younger Dryas at ~12.9 ka BP, requiring a different forcing of this abrupt climate event. Nevertheless, the oldest radiocarbon ages are still consistent with an ice-free eastern outlet at the start of the Younger Dryas. Here we will present preliminary 10-Be cosmogenic surface exposure ages from the North Lake, Flat Rock Lake, glacial Lake Kaministiquia, and Lake Nipigon outlets located near Thunder Bay, Ontario. These ages will date the timing of the deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet in the eastern outlet region of glacial Lake Agassiz. This will provide an important constraint for the hypothesized freshwater forcing of the cause of Younger Dryas cold event.

  14. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  15. Cosmogenic Chlorine-36 Production in Calcite by Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. O. H.; Evans, J. M.; Fifield, L. K.; Allan, G. L.; Cresswell, R. G.

    1998-02-01

    At depths below a few metres, 36Cl production in calcite is initiated almost entirely by cosmic ray muons. The principal reactions are (1) direct negative muon capture by Ca; 40Ca(μ -,α) 36Cl, and (2) capture by 35Cl of secondary neutrons produced in muon capture and muon-induced photodisintegration reactions. We have determined rates for 36Cl and neutron production due to muon capture in calcite from a 20 m (5360 g cm -2) depth profile in limestone. The 36Cl yield from muon capture by Ca in pure calcite is 0.012 ± 0.002 atom per stopped negative muon. The surface production rate of 36Cl by muon capture on Ca in calcite is, therefore, 2.1 ± 0.4 atom g -1a -1 at sea level and high latitude, approximately 11% of the production rate by Ca spallation. If it is assumed that 34% of the negative muons are captured by the Ca atom in calcite, the α-yield from 40Ca following muon capture is 0.043 ± 0.008, somewhat lower than the result of a recent muon irradiation experiment (0.062 ± 0.020), but well within the extremes of existing theoretical predictions (0.0033-0.15). The average neutron yield following muon capture in pure calcite is 0.44 ± 0.15 secondary neutrons per stopped negative muon, in good agreement with existing theoretical predictions. Cosmogenic isotope production by muons must be taken into account when dating young geomorphic surfaces, especially those created by excavation of only a few metres of overlying rock. Attention to isotope production by muons is also crucial to determining surface erosion rates accurately. Due to the deep penetration of muons compared to cosmic ray hadrons, the accumulation of muon-produced 36Cl is less sensitive to erosion than that of spallogenic 36Cl. Although production by muons at the surface is only a small fraction of production by spallation, the fraction of muon-produced 36Cl in rapidly eroding limestone surfaces can approach 50%. In such cases, erosion rates estimated using conventional models which attribute

  16. Cosmogenic beryllium cycling in a natural forest setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conyers, Grace

    10Bemet, or cosmogenic beryllium, has a long half-life of 1.4 million years and quick adsorption on soil particles, which may make it ideal for dating soil erosion in historical context. However, there are questions on about the fundamental assumptions of the retentivity of 10Bemet. This manuscript explores these assumptions and the context of nutrient cycling in a natural forest setting. To see if 10Bemet was being cycled through the trees, and at what rate, we looked at the[10Bemet ] in the soil, 4 species of trees, and their leaves. The isotopic ratio 10Be/9Be in all four tree species was comparable to the soil on which they grow, ranging from 6-8 x 10 -9. However, there was one exception with hickory (Carya spp.) which strongly bioaccumulate beryllium with an average of 0.38 ppm dry weight in the wood. Abscised hickory leaves have a higher [Be] of 2.0 ppm, over 10 times higher than in the soil. Using standard allometric equations relating tree biomass to trunk diameter, and assuming that belowground biomass has the same [Be] as aboveground, we calculate that hickory trees at our site contain approximately 1% of the total 10Bemet under their canopy and that ~10% of this Be is cycled annually by leaf abscission. It is not clear at this point what fraction of litterfall Be is recycled into the plant, returned to the soil, or carried to groundwater as organic chelates. Hickory trees occupy an average of ~10% of the oak-hickory forest area. Assuming that trees are randomly distributed, that litterfall Be is returned to the soil, and maintaining a constant 10Bemet budget over time for simplicity, then more than half of all 10Be met in the forest soil will have passed through a hickory tree over the past 10 ky. Fully 90% of all 10Bemet will pass through a hickory tree over a period of ~25 ky. It is clear that hickory trees can transport a sizable fraction of the total 10Bemet in their nutrient cycle, and that they may be responsible for landscape-scale Be mobility.

  17. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero, D. V.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2014-11-01

    Here, we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results that have appeared since the Neutrino 2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor antineutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle θ23 is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with an emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the C P phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data. In the Appendix, we present the updated results obtained after the inclusion of new reactor data presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference. We discuss their impact on the global neutrino analysis.

  18. Neutrinos from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, A. S.

    First, the author presents a short history of supernova neutrino theory. Then, the theory of core collapse supernovae is reviewed. Because of the profound opacity to light of the dense core that experiences collapse, we "see" this core directly only through its neutrino signature. Every bump and wiggle echoes the internal convulsions of the event and can provide clues about both the supernova mechanism and the neutron star that remains. The author discusses the only neutrino observations of a supernova so far, SN 1987A. While the agreement with calculations has been gratifying, there remain, of course, plenty of outstanding issues in supernova theory to be tested. These are high-lighted throughout the text. Since neutrinos give us the only real access to the physics inside the collapse, it is important that observation of these particles continue. In an appendix the author describes some of the available or contemplated neutrino detectors capable of good time resolution and therefore of shedding light on supernova mechanisms.

  19. Active faulting, mountain growth, and erosion at the margins of the Tibetan Plateau constrained by in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone is a key area for understanding continental plateau formation and mountain building. Two fundamental questions in this context are how the northeastward motion of India is partitioned between strike-slip and thrust faults and how mountain building is counteracted by erosion. Cosmogenic nuclides allow us to address these questions, because they provide age constraints on tectonically offset landforms and constraints on erosion rates. After considerable debate on whether or not major strike-slip faults move at high rates of up to 20-30 mm/yr and absorb most of the continental deformation, it now appears that the three largest faults (Altyn Tagh, Haiyuan, Kunlun) have millennial slip rates of no more than 8-13 mm/yr, consistent with rates of elastic strain accumulation determined by geodetic methods. Furthermore, a significant portion of the lateral slip on these faults is transferred to thrust faults within the collision zone. Both observations indicate that the eastward tectonic escape of material along these faults is less important than often assumed. With respect to mountain building and erosion, cosmogenic nuclide studies show that thrust faults at the northeastern and eastern margins of Tibet (Qilian Shan, Longmen Shan) have vertical slip rates of ~ 0.3 to ~ 2 mm/yr while catchment-wide erosion rates vary from ~ 0.02 to ~ 1.0 mm/yr, with high-relief areas eroding significantly faster than the plateau interior and growing mountains in the foreland. The deeply incised regions have apparently reached an erosional steady-state, in which rock uplift is balanced by erosion. River terraces at active mountain fronts document repeated changes between sediment deposition and fluvial incision. During the Quaternary, incision and terrace formation occurred predominantly at glacial-interglacial transitions but also during interglacial periods. Hence, flights of terraces at the fault-bounded mountain fronts record the interplay between sustained

  20. Neutrino fluctuat nec mercitur: are fossil neutrinos detectable

    SciTech Connect

    De Rujula, A

    1980-04-01

    A brief report is presented on the question whether light (few eV to approx. 100 eV) neutrinos left over from the big bang are detectable. The answer is perhaps. If the weak current of leptons, like those of quarks, are not diagonal in mass eigenstates, a neutrino will decay into a lighter neutrino and a monochromatic photon. The corresponding photon line may be detectable provided: neutrinos are heavy enough to participate in galaxy clustering and neutrino lifetimes are, as in some weak interaction models, short enough.

  1. Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and new neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Rodejohann, Werner; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the potential to probe new neutrino physics with future experiments measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. Experiments with high statistics should become feasible soon and allow to constrain parameters with unprecedented precision. Using a benchmark setup for a future experiment probing reactor neutrinos, we study the sensitivity on neutrino non-standard interactions and new exotic neutral currents (scalar, tensor, etc). Compared to Fermi interaction, percent and permille level strengths of the new interactions can be probed, superseding for some observables the limits from future neutrino oscillation experiments by up to two orders of magnitude.

  2. Rapidly Melting Ice Caps of Northern Baffin Island: Insights From Cosmogenic and Conventional Radiocarbon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. K.; Miller, G. H.; Briner, J. P.; Lifton, N.; Devogel, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    The interior plateau of northern Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic is home to several small (< 50 km2) ice caps whose melt has been well recorded since 1949. Modern equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is well above all existing ice and a continuation of current climatic conditions will lead to the disappearance of all ice on the plateau in the future. Between 2000 and 2005, approximately 1 km2 of ice was lost per year, equivalent to ~1.3% of the total ice cover on the plateau. To put this current melt into a larger picture of ice-cap history on the plateau since deglaciation 6 ka, several techniques have been used in concert. The recent extent of the ice caps during the Little Ice Age can be estimated from the preservation of lichen trimlines across much of the plateau. These trimlines represent previous multi-year snow or ice cover and their aerial extent can be measured via satellite imagery. Based on these measurements, modern ice caps represent only ~3% of ice-cap extent during the Little Ice Age. Radiocarbon dating of moss, preserved beneath the ice caps due to their cold-based nature, suggests a sudden expansion of ice cover around 520 calendar years before present (cal BP), indicated by a mode of 7 dates of approximately this age. This coincides with a pulse of global volcanic activity; predicted cooling from increased aerosol loading may have triggered rapid ice-cap growth. However, dead moss emerging at three sites is more than 1000 years old, with a maximum age of 1326±15 cal BP, indicating that portions of the remaining ice caps have remained intact from more than 1000 years Further constraints on ice cap size are provided by 14C cosmogenic exposure dating. 14C concentrations in rocks at the modern ice margin are too low to be the result of continuous exposure since deglaciation followed by shielding for 500-1000 years by ice cover. Exposure history modeling indicates at least one additional prior period of ice cover of approximately 1000 years

  3. Late Cenozoic Himalayan Erosion Rates Revealed by Cosmogenic Isotopes in Foreland Sediments, Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Barnes, J. B.; Insel, N.; Densmore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Most surface processes that transport sediment are influenced by climate. For example, more rainfall enhances runoff and stream capacity, and colder temperatures expand glaciers at the expense of rivers. Late Cenozoic cooling and glacial cycles during the Quaternary should thus have affected erosion of the Earth's surface. But whether these changes were also associated with an overall increase of erosion rates is not clear. Here, we assess the erosional response of the fluvial-dominated Yamuna catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India, to late Cenozoic cooling and Quaternary climatic oscillations. Our approach is to measure cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) concentrations in fluvial sediments (n = 14) eroded from uplifting foreland deposits and compare them with modelled concentrations for different paleo-erosion rate scenarios. This approach differs from previous ones that determine paleo-erosion rates from 10Be concentrations in distinct samples from stratigraphic sections, and avoids misinterpreting short-term fluctuations in 10Be concentrations that are unrelated to erosion rates. We tested this approach in the Mohand Range in northwest India, where Miocene to Quaternary deposits of the paleo-Yamuna River are actively uplifting, and where a robust kinematic model and published stratigraphic age constraints exist. Our model free parameters are the shortening rate across the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) and the onset of shortening, within a known amount of total MFT slip (4-5 km). Preliminary results show that we can reproduce the measured 10Be concentrations best when Himalayan erosion rates were lower in the past than they are now, or have been increasing towards the present. Within uncertainties, the best-fit parameter combinations give shortening rates between 10 and 20 mm/yr, which is consistent with independent estimates from a nearby dated strath terrace and expected uplift rates based on channel steepness indices. Scenarios in which erosion rates are

  4. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    Cosmology and neutrino physics have converged into a recent discovery era. The success of the standard model of cosmology in explaining the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure data allows for the possibility of measuring the absolute neutrino mass and providing exquisite constraints on the number of light degrees of freedom, including neutrinos. This sensitivity to neutrino physics requires the validity of some of the assumptions, including general relativity, inflationary cosmology, and standard thermal history, many of which can be tested with cosmological data. This sensitivity is also predicated on the robust handling of systematic uncertainties associated with different cosmological observables. We review several past, current, and future measurements of the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure that allow us to do fundamental neutrino physics with cosmology.

  5. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    SciTech Connect

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Basa, S.; Biagi, S.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; and others

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  6. Quantum dissipation in a neutrino system propagating in vacuum and in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Marcelo M.; de Holanda, Pedro C.; Oliveira, Roberto L. N.

    2016-07-01

    Considering the neutrino state like an open quantum system, we analyze its propagation in vacuum or in matter. After defining what can be called decoherence and relaxation effects, we show that in general the probabilities in vacuum and in constant matter can be written in a similar way, which is not an obvious result for such system. From this result, we analyze the situation where neutrino evolution satisfies the adiabatic limit and use this formalism to study solar neutrinos. We show that the decoherence effect may not be bounded by the solar neutrino data and review some results in the literature, in particular the current results where solar neutrinos were used to put bounds on decoherence effects through a model-dependent approach. We conclude explaining how and why these models are not general and we reinterpret these constraints.

  7. The neutrino signal at HALO: learning about the primary supernova neutrino fluxes and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect

    Väänänen, Daavid; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: volpe@ipno.in2p3.fr

    2011-10-01

    Core-collapse supernova neutrinos undergo a variety of phenomena when they travel from the high neutrino density region and large matter densities to the Earth. We perform analytical calculations of the supernova neutrino fluxes including collective effects due to the neutrino-neutrino interactions, the Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect due to the neutrino interactions with the background matter and decoherence of the wave packets as they propagate in space. We predict the numbers of one- and two-neutron charged and neutral-current electron-neutrino scattering on lead events. We show that, due to the energy thresholds, the ratios of one- to two-neutron events are sensitive to the pinching parameters of neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, almost independently of the presently unknown neutrino properties. Besides, such events have an interesting sensitivity to the spectral split features that depend upon the presence/absence of energy equipartition among neutrino flavors. Our calculations show that a lead-based observatory like the Helium And Lead Observatory (HALO) has the potential to pin down important characteristics of the neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, and provide us with information on the neutrino transport in the supernova core.

  8. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  9. The Neutrino Telescope ANTARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Juan José

    Neutrinos can reveal a brand new Universe at high energies. The ANTARES collaboration [1] , formed in 1996, works towards the building and deployment of a neutrino telescope. This detector could observe and study high energy astrophysical sources such as X-ray binary systems, young supernova remnants or Active Galactic Nuclei and help to discover or set exclusion limits on some of the elementary particles and objects that have been put forward as candidates to fill the Universe (WIMPS, neutralinos, topological deffects, Q-balls, etc). A neutrino telescope will certainly open a new observational window and can shed light on the most energetic phenomena of the Universe. A review of the progress made by the ANTARES collaboration to achieve this goal is presented

  10. Thermalisation of light sterile neutrinos in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Tram, Thomas; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    Recent cosmological data favour additional relativistic degrees of freedom beyond the three active neutrinos and photons, often referred to as ''dark'' radiation. Light sterile neutrinos is one of the prime candidates for such additional radiation. However, constraints on sterile neutrinos based on the current cosmological data have been derived using simplified assumptions about thermalisation of ν{sub s} at the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) epoch. These assumptions are not necessarily justified and here we solve the full quantum kinetic equations in the (1 active + 1 sterile) scenario and derive the number of thermalised species just before BBN begins (T ≅ 1 MeV) for null (L = 0) and large (L = 10{sup −2}) initial lepton asymmetry and for a range of possible mass-mixing parameters. We find that the full thermalisation assumption during the BBN epoch is justified for initial small lepton asymmetry only. Partial or null thermalisation occurs when the initial lepton asymmetry is large.

  11. The solar neutrino deficit -- Principle and interest (a modern problem)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Sufficient data now exist that tests, independent of any solar model, can be made of whether solar neutrino experiment are consistent with the minimal Standard Model (stable, massless neutrinos). If the experimental uncertainties are correctly estimated and the sun is generating energy by light-element fusion in quasi-static equilibrium, the probability of a standard-physics solution is less than 1.2%. Even when the luminosity constraint is abandoned, the probability is not more than 5%. The sensitivity of the conclusions to input parameters is explored. New experiments nearing completion (SNO and SuperKamiokande) are expected to provide decisive evidence of neutrino oscillations, if they are indeed the explanation.

  12. Are neutrinos their own antiparticles?

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    We explain the relationship between Majorana neutrinos, which are their own antiparticles, and Majorana neutrino masses. We point out that Majorana masses would make the neutrinos very distinctive particles, and explain why many theorists strongly suspect that neutrinos do have Majorana masses. The promising approach to confirming this suspicion is to seek neutrinoless double beta decay. We introduce a toy model that illustrates why this decay requires nonzero neutrino masses, even when there are both right-handed and left-handed weak currents.

  13. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  14. Accounting for the Unresolved X-ray Background with Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberbatch, D.T.; Silk, Joseph

    2007-11-20

    We consider a scenario where keV sterile neutrinos constitute all of the currently inferred dark matter abundance, whose radiative decays could potentially account for the flux contributions to the X-ray background (XRB) by unresolved sources. Here we apply integrated flux methods to results from the observations of the North/South Chandra deep fields (CDF-N/S) in order to deduce constraints on the sterile neutrino mass-mixing parameters.

  15. Solar Neutrinos. II. Experimental

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A method is described for observing solar neutrinos from the reaction Cl{sup 37}(nu,e{sup -})Ar{sup 37} in C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}. Two 5 00-gal tanks of C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} were placed in a limestone mine (1800 m.w.e.) and the resulting Ar{sup 37} activity induced by cosmic mesons( mu ) was measured to determine the necessary conditions for solar neutrino observations. (R.E.U.)

  16. Neutrino Detection Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    particle accelerators. They arise as decay products of pions, K- mesons , and other unstable particles produced in the primary collisions of high energy...34 \\ = GF • (1-9) Here h is Planck’s constant, c the velocity of light , G the weak 1-11 interaction constant, and F the flux of neutrinos to be detected...momentum of a body (a ferromagnet, 4-1 say), F the neutrino flux, h the reduced Planck constant, c the speed of light , one has for the torque on the

  17. The ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, Carla

    The ANTARES collaboration has completed in 2008 the construction of an underwater high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, located 40 km off the French coast at a depth of 2500 m. The detector consists of 885 optical modules, which are distributed in 12 detector lines, various calibration systems and devices for environmental measurements. With an instrumented volume of about 0.05 km3, ANTARES is the largest Cherenkov neutrino detector currently operating in the Northern hemisphere. A general overview on the ANTARES telescope is given. The preliminary results from the various physics analyses on the collected data will be presented.

  18. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Alena V.

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  19. Experimental data on solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-04-01

    Neutrino physics continues to be a very active research field, full of opened fundamental questions reaching even beyond the Standard Model of elementary particles and towards a possible new physics. Solar neutrinos have played a fundamental historical role in the discovery of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations and thus non-zero neutrino mass. Even today, the study of solar neutrinos provides an important insight both into the neutrino as well as into the stellar and solar physics. In this section we give an overview of the most important solar-neutrino measurements from the historical ones up to the most recent ones. We cover the results from the experiments using radio-chemic (Homestake, SAGE, GNO, GALLEX), water Cherenkov (Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO), and the liquid-scintillator (Borexino, KamLAND) detection techniques.

  20. Sensitivity of low energy neutrino experiments to physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Miranda, O. G.; Rashba, T. I.

    2007-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of future low energy neutrino experiments to extra neutral gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and R-parity breaking interactions. We focus on future proposals to measure coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering and neutrino-electron elastic scattering. We introduce a new comparative analysis between these experiments and show that in different types of new physics it is possible to obtain competitive bounds to those of present and future collider experiments. For the cases of leptoquarks and R-parity breaking interactions we found that the expected sensitivity for most of the future low energy experimental setups is better than the current constraints.

  1. A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Jocelyn Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for vμ → ve oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a vμ beam with an average energy of ~ 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic ve content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH2, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE vμ charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with ~ 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the vμ and ve fluxes are derived using the vμ CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined vμ disappearance and ve appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the vμ → ve oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a ve appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5σ, depending on the value of Δm2.

  2. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26Al, 36Cl, 3He, and 21Ne)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavićević, M. K.; Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb-As-Tl-Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long-term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ˜165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L-8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L-4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo-depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250-290 and 750-790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo-depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo-depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp-neutrino and fast cosmic-ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment.

  3. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides ((26)Al, (36)Cl, (3)He, and (21)Ne).

    PubMed

    Pavićević, M K; Cvetković, V; Niedermann, S; Pejović, V; Amthauer, G; Boev, B; Bosch, F; Aničin, I; Henning, W F

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb-As-Tl-Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long-term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive ((26)Al and (36)Cl) and stable ((3)He and (21)Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (21)Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L-8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L-4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo-depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250-290 and 750-790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo-depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo-depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of (205)Pb derived from pp-neutrino and fast cosmic-ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment.

  4. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26 Al, 36 Cl, 3 He, and 21 Ne)

    PubMed Central

    Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb‐As‐Tl‐Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long‐term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L‐8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L‐4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo‐depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250–290 and 750–790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo‐depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo‐depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp‐neutrino and fast cosmic‐ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment. PMID:27587984

  5. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  6. Anti-neutrino imprint in solar neutrino flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2006-10-01

    A future neutrino detector at megaton mass might enlarge the neutrino telescope thresholds revealing cosmic supernova background and largest solar flares (SFs) neutrinos. Indeed the solar energetic (Ep>100 MeV) flare particles (protons, α), while scattering among themselves on solar corona atmosphere must produce prompt charged pions, whose chain decays are source of a solar (electron muon) neutrino 'flare' (at tens or hundreds MeV energy). These brief (minutes) neutrino 'bursts' at largest flare peak may overcome by three to five orders of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, possibly leading to their detection above detection thresholds (in a full mixed three flavour state). Moreover the birth of anti-neutrinos at a few tens of MeV very clearly flares above a null thermal 'hep' anti-neutrino solar background and also above a tiny supernova relic and atmospheric noise. The largest prompt solar anti-neutrino 'burst' may be well detected in future Super Kamikande (gadolinium implemented) anti-neutrino \\bar\

  7. Cosmological limits on neutrino unknowns versus low redshift priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropy measurements from the Planck mission have significantly improved previous constraints on the neutrino masses as well as the bounds on extended models with massless or massive sterile neutrino states. However, due to parameter degeneracies, additional low redshift priors are mandatory in order to sharpen the CMB neutrino bounds. We explore here the role of different priors on low redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant, the cluster mass bias, and the reionization optical depth τ . Concerning current priors on the Hubble constant and the cluster mass bias, the bounds on the neutrino parameters may differ appreciably depending on the choices adopted in the analyses. With regard to future improvements in the priors on the reionization optical depth, a value of τ =0.05 ±0.01 , motivated by astrophysical estimates of the reionization redshift, would lead to ∑mν<0.0926 eV at 90% C.L., when combining the full Planck measurements, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Planck clusters data, thereby opening the window to unravel the neutrino mass hierarchy with existing cosmological probes.

  8. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined in the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.

  9. Detecting asymmetric dark matter in the Sun with neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter (DM) may have a relic density that is in part determined by a particle/antiparticle asymmetry, much like baryons. If this is the case, it can accumulate in stars like the Sun to sizable number densities and annihilate to Standard Model particles including neutrinos. We show that the combination of neutrino telescope and direct detection data can be used in conjunction to determine or constrain the DM asymmetry from data. Depending on the DM mass, the current neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande and IceCube give powerful constraints on asymmetric DM unless its fractional asymmetry is ≲10-2 . Future neutrino telescopes and detectors like Hyper-K and KM3NeT can search for the resulting signal of high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Sun. The observation of such a flux yields information on both the DM-nucleus cross section and also on the relative abundances of DM and anti-DM.

  10. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-01

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2=0.46 (22 ) fm2 , with a much larger uncertainty than determined in the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ (νμn →μ-p )|Eν=1GeV=10.1 (0.9 )×10-39 cm2 . The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. These techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.

  11. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard; Meyer, Aaron; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2) , which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0 . 46(22) fm2 , with a much larger uncertainty than determined in the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμ n ->μ- p) |Eν = 1GeV = 10 . 1(0 . 9) ×10-39cm2 . The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. These techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.

  12. Neutrino Flux Prediction for the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga Soplin, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the neutrino flux in any conventional neutrino beam presents a challenge for the current and future short and long baseline neutrino experiments. The uncertainties associated with the production and attenuation of the hadrons in the beamline materials along with those associated with the beam optics have a big effect in the flux spectrum knowledge. For experiments like MINERvA, understanding the flux is crucial since it enters directly into every neutrino-nucleus cross-sections measurements. The foundation of this work is predicting the neutrino flux at MINERvA using dedicated measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus collisions and incorporating in-situ MINERvA data that can provide additional constraints. This work also includes the prospect for predicting the flux at other detectors like the NOvA Near detector. The procedure and conclusions of this thesis will have a big impact on future hadron production experiments and on determining the fl ux for the upcoming DUNE experiment.

  13. Neutrino Flux Prediction for the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Soplin, Leonidas Aliaga

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the neutrino flux in any conventional neutrino beam presents a challenge for the current and future short and long baseline neutrino experiments. The uncertainties associated with the production and attenuation of the hadrons in the beamline materials along with those associated with the beam optics have a big effect in the flux spectrum knowledge. For experiments like MINERvA, understanding the flux is crucial since it enters directly into every neutrino-nucleus cross-sections measurements. The foundation of this work is predicting the neutrino flux at MINERvA using dedicated measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus collisions and incorporating in-situ MINERvA data that can provide additional constraints. This work also includes the prospect for predicting the flux at other detectors like the NOvA Near detector. The procedure and conclusions of this thesis will have a big impact on future hadron production experiments and on determining the flux for the upcoming DUNE experiment.

  14. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; ...

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  15. Decaying sterile neutrino dark matter in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozek, Brandon; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Abazajian, Kevork; Bullock, James

    2017-01-01

    The detection of a 3.55 keV X-ray line in clusters of galaxies and the Andromeda and Milky Way galaxies, while contentious, can be explained by the decay of resonantly-produced 7.1 keV sterile neutrinos. If the X-ray line is confirmed to be the result of dark matter decay, then it is the first non-gravitational signal of dark matter and groundbreaking evidence of physics beyond the standard model. We use simulations that accurately model the dark matter distribution of the Local Group in realistic sterile neutrino cosmologies to study the dark matter interpretation of the X-ray flux. We present the sterile neutrino dark matter models that are consistent with the observed M31 flux profile and discuss the predictions of these models for X-ray observations of classical Milky Way dwarf galaxies. We discuss how these results relate to Lyman-alpha forest constraints of sterile neutrino models and predictions for satellite galaxy counts in future surveys, which may be able to rule out 7.1 keV sterile neutrinos as a dark matter candidate.

  16. Neutrino Flux Prediction for the NuMI Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliaga Soplin, Leonidas

    The determination of the neutrino flux in any conventional neutrino beam presents a challenge for the current and future short and long baseline neutrino experiments. The uncertainties associated with the production and attenuation of the hadrons in the beamline materials along with those associated with the beam optics have a big effect in the flux spectrum knowledge. For experiments like MINERvA, understanding the flux is crucial since it enters directly into every neutrino-nucleus cross-section measurements. The foundation of this work is predicting the neutrino flux at MINERvA using dedicated measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus collisions and incorporating in-situ MINERvA data that can provide additional constraints. This work also includes the prospect for predicting the flux at other detectors like the NOvA Near. The procedure and conclusions of this thesis will have a big impact on future hadron production experiments and on determining the flux for the upcoming DUNE experiment.

  17. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  18. Supernovae and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Beacom

    2002-09-19

    A long-standing problem in supernova physics is how to measure the total energy and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. While of the highest importance, this is very difficult because these flavors only have neutral-current detector interactions. We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos in scintillator detectors. It should be emphasized immediately that the dominant signal is on free protons. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  19. Stochastic neutrino mixing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2013-05-01

    We propose a mechanism which provides an explanation of the Gallium and antineutrino reactor anomalies. Differently from original Pontecorvo’s hypothesis, this mechanism is based on the phenomenological assumption in which the admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates in the moments of neutrino creation and detection can assume different configurations around the admixture parametrized by the usual values of the mixing angles θ12, θ23, and θ13. For simplicity, we assume a Gaussian distribution for the mixing angles in such a way that the average value of this distribution is given by the usual values of the mixing angles, and the width of the Gaussian is denoted by α. We show that the proposed mechanism provides a possible explanation for very short-baseline neutrino disappearance, necessary to accommodate Gallium and antineutrino reactor anomalies, which is not allowed in usual neutrino oscillations based on Pontecorvo’s original hypotheses. We also can describe high-energy oscillation experiments, like LSND, Fermi, and NuTeV, assuming a weakly energy dependent width parameter, α(E), that nicely fits all experimental results.

  20. A maximum-likelihood search for neutrino point sources with the AMANDA-II detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, James R.

    Neutrino astronomy offers a new window to study the high energy universe. The AMANDA-II detector records neutrino-induced muon events in the ice sheet beneath the geographic South Pole, and has accumulated 3.8 years of livetime from 2000 - 2006. After reconstructing muon tracks and applying selection criteria, we arrive at a sample of 6595 events originating from the Northern Sky, predominantly atmospheric neutrinos with primary energy 100 GeV to 8 TeV. We search these events for evidence of astrophysical neutrino point sources using a maximum-likelihood method. No excess above the atmospheric neutrino background is found, and we set upper limits on neutrino fluxes. Finally, a well-known potential dark matter signature is emission of high energy neutrinos from annihilation of WIMPs gravitationally bound to the Sun. We search for high energy neutrinos from the Sun and find no excess. Our limits on WIMP-nucleon cross section set new constraints on MSSM parameter space.

  1. Three twin neutrinos: Evidence from LSND and MiniBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Lu, Ran; Lu, Sida; Salvado, Jordi; Stefanek, Ben A.

    2016-04-01

    We construct a neutrino model of three twin neutrinos in light of the neutrino appearance excesses at LSND and MiniBooNE. The model, which includes a twin parity, naturally predicts identical lepton Yukawa structures in the Standard Model and the twin sectors. As a result, a universal mixing angle controls all three twin neutrino couplings to the Standard Model charged leptons. This mixing angle is predicted to be the ratio of the electroweak scale over the composite scale of the Higgs boson and has the right order of magnitude to fit the data. The heavy twin neutrinos decay within the experimental lengths into active neutrinos plus a long-lived Majoron and can provide a good fit, at around the 4 σ confidence level, to the LSND and MiniBooNE appearance data while simultaneously satisfying the disappearance constraints. For the Majorana neutrino case, the fact that neutrinos have a larger scattering cross section than antineutrinos provides a natural explanation to MiniBooNE's observation of a larger antineutrino appearance excess.

  2. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratiosmore » of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Finally, stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.« less

  3. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Here, we report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. This analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 × 1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations.more » The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Furthermore, we obtained stronger limits for nonvanishing masses.« less

  4. Precision Solar Neutrino Measurements with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, Noah

    2007-10-26

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is the first experiment to measure the total flux of active, high-energy neutrinos from the sun. Results from SNO have solved the long-standing 'Solar Neutrino Problem' by demonstrating that neutrinos change flavor. SNO measured the total neutrino flux with the neutral-current interaction of solar neutrinos with 1000 tonnes of D{sub 2}O. In the first two phases of the experiment we detected the neutron from that interaction by capture on deuterium and capture on chlorine, respectively. In the third phase an array of {sup 3}He proportional counters was deployed in the detector. This allows a measurement of the neutral-current neutrons that is independent of the Cherenkov light detected by the PMT array. We are currently developing a unique, detailed simulation of the current pulses from the proportional-counter array that will be used to help distinguish signal and background pulses.

  5. Toroidal magnetized iron neutrino detector for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Burguet-Castell, J.

    2013-08-01

    A neutrino factory has unparalleled physics reach for the discovery and measurement of CP violation in the neutrino sector. A far detector for a neutrino factory must have good charge identification with excellent background rejection and a large mass. An elegant solution is to construct a magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) along the lines of MINOS, where iron plates provide a toroidal magnetic field and scintillator planes provide 3D space points. In this report, the current status of a simulation of a toroidal MIND for a neutrino factory is discussed in light of the recent measurements of large $\\theta_{13}$. The response and performance using the 10 GeV neutrino factory configuration are presented. It is shown that this setup has equivalent $\\delta_{CP}$ reach to a MIND with a dipole field and is sensitive to the discovery of CP violation over 85% of the values of $\\delta_{CP}$.

  6. Pseudo-dirac neutrinos: a challenge for neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Beacom, John F; Bell, Nicole F; Hooper, Dan; Learned, John G; Pakvasa, Sandip; Weiler, Thomas J

    2004-01-09

    Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are deltam(2) less, similar 10(-12) eV(2); in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of L/E, mass-squared differences down to deltam(2) approximately 10(-18) eV(2) can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos.

  7. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The data taken with the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2010, a total live time of 863 days, are used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos. Muon tracks are reconstructed with energies as low as 20 GeV. Neutrino oscillations will cause a suppression of vertical upgoing muon neutrinos of such energies crossing the Earth. The parameters determining the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos are extracted by fitting the event rate as a function of the ratio of the estimated neutrino energy and reconstructed flight path through the Earth. Measurement contours of the oscillation parameters in a two-flavour approximation are derived. Assuming maximal mixing, a mass difference of Δ m322 = (3.1 ± 0.9) ṡ10-3eV2 is obtained, in good agreement with the world average value.

  8. Brief introduction of the neutrino event generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hayato, Yoshinari

    2015-05-15

    The neutrino interaction simulation programs (event generators) play an important role in the neutrino experiments. This article briefly explains what is the neutrino event generator and how it works.

  9. On the Detection of the Free Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Reines, F.; Cowan, C. L., Jr.

    1953-08-06

    The experiment previously proposed [to Detect the Free Neutrino] has been initiated, with a Hanford pile as a neutrino source. It appears probable that neutrino detection has been accomplished, and confirmatory work is in progress. (K.S.)

  10. Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics with the Antares Neutrino Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurio, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ANTARES detector is currently the largest operating neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. Its scientific target is the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos through measurement of Cherenkov radiation from neutrino-induced charged leptons. Here, an overview of the results of various analyses will be given, in particular for the searches of point-like sources and the opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy.

  11. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-06-29

    This final report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is focussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using intense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment, currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design effort for a future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US. She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that effort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinosμ) and the appearance of electron neutrinose), using a beam of muon neutrino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K first reported indications of νe appearance, a previously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νe appearance, and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the universe. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This effort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  12. Partial Quark-Lepton Universality and Neutrino CP Violation

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-01-01

    We smore » tudy a model with partial quark-lepton universality that can naturally arise in grand unified theories. We find that constraints on the model can be reduced to a single condition on the Dirac CP phase δ in the neutrino sector. Using our current knowledge of the CKM and PMNS mixing matrices, we predict - 32 . 4 ° ≤ δ ≤ 32 . 0 ° at 2 σ .« less

  13. Dating buried glacier ice using cosmogenic 3He in surface clasts: Theory and application to Mullins Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Sean L.; Marchant, David R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a modeling framework to describe the accumulation of terrestrial cosmogenic 3He in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers. The framework helps quantify the expected range in cosmogenic-nuclide inventories for measured clasts at the surface of supraglacial debris. We first delineate the physical factors that impact clast movement within, and on top of, debris-covered glaciers, including the effects of (1) ice ablation, (2) erosion at the debris surface, and (3) stochastic geomorphic processes that impact clast movement within and on top of supraglacial debris; we then explicitly calculate the impact of each process in altering the total inventory of cosmogenic nuclides in surface clasts. Assuming basic elements of ice-dynamics and debris entrainment are known, the model results provide an estimate for the total accumulation of cosmogenic nuclides, as well as the expected range in nuclide inventories, for any clast at the surface of debris-covered glaciers. Because the values are quantified, the approach can be applied to help evaluate the robustness of existing and future cosmogenic datasets applied to these systems. As a test, we applied our model framework towards Mullins Glacier, a cold-based debris-covered alpine glacier in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Our simulated values for cosmogenic-nuclide inventories compare well with those previously measured from fifteen surface cobbles along Mullins Glacier (3He), both in terms of expected ranges and absolute values, and suggest that our model framework adequately incorporates most of the complicating factors that impact cosmogenic datasets for cold-based, debris-covered glaciers. Relating these cosmogenic-nuclide inventories to ice ages, the results show that ice within Mullins Glacier increases non-linearly, ranging from 12 ka to ∼220 ka in areas of active flow, to ≫1.6 Ma in areas of slow-moving-to-stagnant ice.

  14. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  15. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP 3-year and first MINOS results

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2007-03-01

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and nonoscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2{sigma}) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses {sigma} ranging from {approx}2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to {approx}0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2{sigma}, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter {sigma}{sub 8}. We show how the partial degeneracy between {sigma} and {sigma}{sub 8} in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of {sigma}{sub 8} pushes the upper bound of {sigma} in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  16. Higgs production through sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    In scenarios with sterile (right-handed) neutrinos with an approximate “lepton-number-like” symmetry, the heavy neutrinos (the mass eigenstates) can have masses around the electroweak scale and couple to the Higgs boson with, in principle, unsuppressed Yukawa couplings, while the smallness of the light neutrinos’ masses is guaranteed by the approximate symmetry. The on-shell production of the heavy neutrinos at lepton colliders, together with their subsequent decays into a light neutrino and a Higgs boson, constitutes a resonant contribution to the Higgs production mechanism. This resonant mono-Higgs production mechanism can contribute significantly to the mono-Higgs observables at future lepton colliders. A dedicated search for the heavy neutrinos in this channel exhibits sensitivities for the electron neutrino Yukawa coupling as small as ˜ 5 × 10-3. Furthermore, the sensitivity is enhanced for higher center-of-mass energies, when identical integrated luminosities are considered.

  17. Solar neutrino experiments: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    The situation in solar neutrino physics has changed drastically in the past few years, so that now there are four neutrino experiments in operation, using different methods to look at different regions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. These experiments are the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl Homestake detector, the realtime Kamiokande detector, and the different forms of radiochemical {sup 71}Ga detectors used in the GALLEX and SAGE projects. It is noteworthy that all of these experiments report a deficit of observed neutrinos relative to the predictions of standard solar models (although in the case of the gallium detectors, the statistical errors are still relatively large). This paper reviews the basic principles of operation of these neutrino detectors, reports their latest results and discusses some theoretical interpretations. The progress of three realtime neutrino detectors that are currently under construction, SuperKamiok, SNO and Borexino, is also discussed.

  18. Neutrino Non-standard Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardelli, David; Guzzo, Marcelo

    The quantum neutrino oscillation phenomenon is not perfectly described by the actual standard physics models. Experimental results of different neutrino sources like reactors, accelerators and supernovae, indicate a non-negligible flux error if compared to the predicted theoretical models. This work aims to propose different non-standard neutrino in- teractions and predict LBNE potential in analyze it. That approach could give a better understanding of the quantum neutrino oscillation phenomenon. As an example, we can use the weak leptonic number violation that generate new interactions that is not possible using the Standard Model. This violation is directly related with a change in the Flavor neutrino Hamiltonian and consequently connected with the quantum neutrino oscillation.

  19. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  20. Advancements in Solar Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino; Antonelli, Vito

    2013-03-01

    We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.