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Sample records for counseling cultural ethical

  1. Group Counseling with International Students: Practical, Ethical, and Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakunina, Elena S.; Weigold, Ingrid K.; McCarthy, Alannah S.

    2011-01-01

    International students in higher education represent a diverse population with unique mental health needs. Foreign students commonly experience a host of adjustment issues, including acculturative stress, language difficulties, cultural misunderstandings, racial discrimination, and loss of social support. Despite their challenges, few…

  2. An Integral Approach to Counseling Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Durwin; Black, Timothy G.

    2007-01-01

    The authors offer an integral approach to counseling ethics using K. Wilber's (2000a, 2000b) integral metatheory. The article examines traditional counseling ethics through the lens of K. Wilber's (2000a, 2000b) "all-quadrants, all-levels" model, consisting of quadrants, levels, lines, states, and types. The authors begin with the 4 quadrants and…

  3. Marriage and Family Counseling: Ethics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen; Smith, Robert L.; Oliver, Marvarene

    2005-01-01

    Codes of ethics typically provide rules and guidelines for best practices in marriage and family counseling. An emerging model for ethical decision making emphasizes the ethics of virtues and aspirations. Exploring fundamental models of helping, as well as contemporary issues in community systems, affords context for examining the professional…

  4. Ethical Issues in Professional Counseling, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Frederic, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Volume of 4 and 5 contain lessons that provide expert information on a variety of ethical issues in professional counseling. The lessons included in these volumes may be applied toward continuing education credits. Lessons in volume 4 are: (1) "Ethics in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation" (Robert L. Hewes); (2) "Ethical Dilemmas in…

  5. 17 CFR 200.21a - The Ethics Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Ethics Counsel. 200.21a...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization § 200.21a The Ethics Counsel. (a) The Ethics Counsel within the Office of the General Counsel of...

  6. Counseling and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Juan; And Others

    This booklet, developed for school counselors, explores basic considerations for effective counseling of Lau students, defined as those from distinct language and cultural backgrounds, whose home language is other than English and who are not performing conceptually and linguistically at a level equal to district standards. Following a brief…

  7. 17 CFR 200.21a - The Ethics Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Ethics Counsel. 200.21a...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization § 200.21a The Ethics Counsel. (a) The Ethics Counsel is responsible for administering the...

  8. 17 CFR 200.21a - The Ethics Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Ethics Counsel. 200.21a...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization § 200.21a The Ethics Counsel. (a) The Ethics Counsel is responsible for administering the...

  9. 76 FR 71449 - Reporting Line for the Commission's Ethics Counsel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... 200 Reporting Line for the Commission's Ethics Counsel AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... rules to reflect that the Commission's Office of the Ethics Counsel is now a stand-alone Office of the Commission and that the head of the Office, the Ethics Counsel, reports directly to the Chairman of...

  10. Ethical Concerns in School Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Wayne C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses ethical dilemmas inherent in the school setting that result from conflicts in counselor responsibilities to pupils, parents, and school. An ethical dilemma involving a pregnant student who is considering an abortion is described, and some possible counselor responses are discussed. (Author)

  11. School Counseling Principles: Ethics and Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    This practical guide will sensitize the professional school counselor to legal and ethical issues involved in working with minors in school settings. Using a case study approach and more than 100 cases representing school counselors daily dilemmas, chapters help the reader connect the reality of school counseling to critical federal and state…

  12. Conversion Therapy: Ethical Considerations in Family Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steigerwald, Fran; Janson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the ethical and practical considerations of conversion therapy when counseling families and individuals within families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual concerns. Emphasis is placed on the need for counselors to assess personal biases in the area of working with sexual minorities. Presents a reflective exercise and case study…

  13. Counselling Ethics Casebook, 2000. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, William E.

    There are many issues that cannot be handled completely in any code of ethics, and casebooks have been developed to help provide some clarification. The general intent of casebooks is to help educate counselors, counselor educators, and counseling researchers. Some specific objectives of this second edition include promoting the discussion of…

  14. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  15. Virtue Ethics in School Counseling: A Framework for Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczenski, Felicia L.; Cook, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Virtue ethics focus on the motives that guide ethical decision making and action, and as such, are critical to the competent application of the counseling profession's ethical codes. Knowledge of virtue ethics deepens understanding of moral responsibilities and ethical reasoning in professional practice. This paper is an overview of virtue ethics…

  16. Cross-Cultural Counseling Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahia, Chikezie Emmanuel

    1984-01-01

    Examines problems and concerns of cross cultural counseling and psychotherapy. Raises specific questions concerning research designs and approaches, differences in cosmology, epistemology, differences in nosology, and problems of evaluation or testing. (JAC)

  17. Counseling Suicidal Adolescents within Family Systems: Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Rachelle; Hendricks, Bret; Bradley, Loretta

    2009-01-01

    Major ethical considerations must be taken into account when providing counseling services to suicidal adolescents and their families. This article explores these ethical issues and the American Counseling Association and International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors ethical codes relevant to these issues. Related liability and…

  18. Ethical Fairy Tales: Using Fairy Tales as Illustrative Ethical Dilemmas with Counseling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Kathryn L.; Malone, Stefanie L.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to navigate ethical dilemmas is important in counseling students' training. According to the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009 standards, counseling students must receive ethics education. A common goal for counselor educators is to assist students in translating ethical theory into…

  19. Ethics, evolution and culture.

    PubMed

    Mesoudi, Alex; Danielson, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Recent work in the fields of evolutionary ethics and moral psychology appears to be converging on a single empirically- and evolutionary-based science of morality or ethics. To date, however, these fields have failed to provide an adequate conceptualisation of how culture affects the content and distribution of moral norms. This is particularly important for a large class of moral norms relating to rapidly changing technological or social environments, such as norms regarding the acceptability of genetically modified organisms. Here we suggest that a science of morality/ethics can benefit from adopting a cultural evolution or gene-culture coevolution approach, which treats culture as a second, separate evolutionary system that acts in parallel to biological/genetic evolution. This cultural evolution approach brings with it a set of established theoretical concepts (e.g. different cultural transmission mechanisms) and empirical methods (e.g. evolutionary game theory) that can significantly improve our understanding of human morality.

  20. The Use of Bookmarks in Teaching Counseling Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane; Zavaschi, Guilherme; Covello, Christin; Zakaria, Noor Syamilah

    2012-01-01

    This article includes a description of the bookmark as a creative arts experiential strategy useful in teaching counseling ethics education. Three bookmark examples illustrate how counselors-in-training utilized bookmarks to conceptualize their counseling ethics understanding. Illustrations and written feedback from the counselors-in-training…

  1. Impact of human genome initiative-derived technology on genetic testing, screening and counseling: Cultural, ethical and legal issues

    SciTech Connect

    Trottier, R.W.; Hodgin, F.C.; Imara, M.; Phoenix, D.; Lybrook, S. . School of Medicine); Crandall, L.A.; Moseley, R.E.; Armotrading, D. . Coll. of Medicine)

    1993-01-01

    Genetic medical services provided by the Georgia Division of Public Health in two northern and two central districts are compared to services provided in a district in which a tertiary care facility is located. Genetics outreach public health nurses play key roles in Georgia's system of Children's Health Services Genetics Program, including significant roles as counselors and information sources on special needs social services and support organizations. Unique features of individual health districts, (e.g., the changing face of some rural communities in ethnocultural diversity and socioeconomic character), present new challenges to current and future genetics services delivery. Preparedness as to educational needs of both health professionals and the lay population is of foremost concern in light of the ever expanding knowledge and technology in medical genetics. Perspectives on genetics and an overview of services offered by a local private sector counselor are included for comparison to state supported services. The nature of the interactions which transpire between private and public genetic services resources in Georgia will be described. A special focus of this research includes issues associated with sickle cell disease newborn screening service delivery process in Georgia, with particular attention paid to patient follow-up and transition to primary care. Of particular interest to this focus is the problem of loss to follow-up in the current system. Critical factors in education and counseling of sickle cell patients and the expectations of expanding roles of primary care physicians are discussed. The Florida approach to the delivery of genetic services contrasts to the Georgia model by placing more emphasis on a consultant-specialist team approach.

  2. The ethics of cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Cultural competence curricula have proliferated throughout medical education. Awareness of the moral underpinnings of this movement can clarify the purpose of such curricula for educators and trainees and serve as a way to evaluate the relationship between the ethics of cultural competence and normative Western medical ethics. Though rarely stated explicitly, the essential principles of cultural competence are (1) acknowledgement of the importance of culture in people's lives, (2) respect for cultural differences, and (3) minimization of any negative consequences of cultural differences. Culturally competent clinicians promote these principles by learning about culture, embracing pluralism, and proactive accommodation. Generally, culturally competent care will advance patient autonomy and justice. In this sense, cultural competence and Western medical ethics are mutually supportive movements. However, Western bioethics and the personal ethical commitments of many medical trainees will place limits on the extent to which they will endorse pluralism and accommodation. Specifically, if the values of cultural competence are thought to embrace ethical relativity, inexorable conflicts will be created. The author presents his view of the ethics of cultural competence and places the concepts of cultural competence in the context of Western moral theory. Clarity about the ethics of cultural competence can help educators promote and evaluate trainees' integration of their own moral intuitions, Western medical ethics, and the ethics of cultural competence.

  3. Distance Supervision in Rehabilitation Counseling: Ethical and Clinical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Emily M.; Schultz, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of technology-mediated distance supervision is a rapidly growing area in rehabilitation counseling and other fields. Distance supervision has both tremendous potential and notable challenges to address, including questions of ethics and evidence. Purpose: This article examines both the ethical and nonethical principles that…

  4. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 3: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 3 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "The Law and Ethical Practices in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Theodore P.…

  5. Cultural and Diversity Issues in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul B., Ed.; Locke, Don C., Ed.

    Counseling has been culturally diversified for a long time, but only in recent years have counselors become aware of their clients' cultural diversity. This collection of articles addresses a growing need for specific information on multicultural concerns in counseling. The emphasis here is on the importance of the client and client's special…

  6. Extending Counseling Cross-Culturally: Invisible Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauver, Philip J.

    In order to develop competence in cross-cultural counseling, awareness of one's own culture must be developed. To survive, cultures incorporate both obvious mechanisms, like a distinctive language, and less obvious mechanisms, like patterns of thought. Culture acts as an invisible veil which prevents us from being aware of the cultural filters…

  7. Cultural diversity in nanotechnology ethics.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Along with the rapid worldwide advance of nanotechnology, debates on associated ethical issues have spread from local to international levels. However unlike science and engineering issues, international perceptions of ethical issues are very diverse. This paper provides an analysis of how sociocultural factors such as language, cultural heritage, economics and politics can affect how people perceive ethical issues of nanotechnology. By attempting to clarify the significance of sociocultural issues in ethical considerations my aim is to support the ongoing international dialogue on nanotechnology. At the same time I pose the general question of ethical relativism in engineering ethics, that is to say whether or not different ethical views are irreconcilable on a fundamental level.

  8. 17 CFR 200.21a - The Ethics Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Office, and with state or local authorities on matters that, on occasion, the Ethics Counsel may refer to... review allegations of misconduct by a Commission employee. (2) Refer matters involving management questions to Division Directors, Office Heads, or Regional Directors, and matters involving alleged...

  9. Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, and Counseling Ethics: Not an Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urofsky, Robert I.; Engels, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, increased attention has been given to ethics in the preparation of counselors and psychologists. With that increase comes a number of voices calling for exposure to and integration of not only moral philosophy but other areas of philosophy to enhance understanding and provide a foundation for counseling practice. The…

  10. Law and Ethics for Practitioners in Counseling and Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Dean L.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses pertinent aspects of law and ethics as they relate to practitioners in counseling and guidance. Identifies major areas and cites cases that involve civil liability litigation. Also discusses the rights of minors in cases dealing with child abuse and abortion. (ML)

  11. Ethical issues in genetic counselling with special reference to haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling is provided in places where genetic tests are carried out. The process involves pre-test counselling as well as post-test counselling to enable the individuals to face the situation and take appropriate decisions with the right frame of mind. Major ethical principles which govern the attitudes and actions of counsellors include: respect for patient autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, or taking action to help benefit others and prevent harm, both physical and mental, and justice, which requires that services be distributed fairly to those in need. Other moral issues include veracity, the duty to disclose information or to be truthful, and respect for patient confidentiality. Nondirective counselling, a hallmark of this profession, is in accordance with the principle of individual autonomy. High prevalence of haemoglobinopathies with availability of good and sensitive carrier detection tests and prenatal diagnostic techniques makes these good candidates for population screening of carriers along with genetic counselling for primary prevention of the disease. Screening of the extended family members of the affected child, high risk communities and general population screening including antenatal women are the main target groups for planning a Haemoglobinopathy control programme. A critical mass of trained genetic counsellors who have understanding of the ethical issues and its appropriate handling with the required sensitivity is needed in India.

  12. Counseling Muslim Americans: Cultural and Spiritual Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.; Dykeman, Cass

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify the cultural and spiritual assessments needed to conduct counseling with Muslim Americans and Muslim immigrants to the United States. Assessment processes are outlined that include cultural identity (which subsumes several variables); worldview; spiritual assessment along with acculturation level and migration…

  13. Culturally Considerate School Counseling: Helping without Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kim L.

    2010-01-01

    The author brings her counseling expertise, personal experience, and compassionate perspective to this practical resource that cultivates "cultural competence"--essential for work with diverse populations. Expanding the definition of culture, this book addresses how biases have evolved in new and challenging ways, and provides strategies to help…

  14. Building an ethical organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William A; Taylor, Emily; Walsh, Thom

    2014-01-01

    The success of a health care institution-as defined by delivering high-quality, high-value care, positive patient outcomes, and financial solvency-is inextricably tied to the culture within that organization. The ability to achieve and sustain alignment between its mission, values, and everyday practices defines a positive organizational culture. An institution that has a diminished organizational culture, reflected in the failure to consistently align management and clinical decisions and practices with its mission and values, will struggle. The presence of misalignment or of ethics gaps affects the quality of care being delivered, the morale of the staff, and the organization's image in the community. Transforming an organizational culture will provide a foundation for success and a framework for daily ethics-grounded operations in any organization. However, building an ethics-grounded organization is a challenging process requiring strong organization leadership and planning. Using a case study, the authors provide a multiyear, continuous step-by-step strategy consisting of identifying ethics culture gaps, establishing an ethics taskforce, clarifying and prioritizing the problems, developing strategy for change, implementing the strategy, and evaluating outcomes. This process will assist organizations in aligning its actions with its mission and values, to find success on all fronts.

  15. The Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the practical aspects of online counseling, including ethics, training, supervision, technology, and competency issues. The authors discuss online counseling's strengths and limitations and present guidelines for what types of clients and counseling psychologists may be appropriate for online counseling. To illustrate the…

  16. Cross-Cultural Counselling with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barletta, John; Kobayashi, Yumi

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the issues for counsellors working with international students, particularly Asian international students. As globalisation has expanded people have tended to study overseas in great numbers, hence the increasing importance for professionals to examine counselling in this cultural speciality. In order to understand effective…

  17. Characteristics of Ethical Business Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexandre A.; Jondle, Douglas J.; Mitchell, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify general characteristics attributed to ethical business cultures by executives from a variety of industries. Our research identified five clusters of characteristics: (1) Mission- and Values-Driven; (2) Stakeholder Balance; (3) Leadership Effectiveness; (4) Process Integrity; and (5) Long-term Perspective.…

  18. Guidelines for a Cross-Cultural Counseling Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontress, Clemmont E.; Jackson, Morris L.

    This document presents guidelines for planning and teaching a cross-cultural counseling course. Problems encountered in defining the culturally different are discussed. Ten minimum course objectives are presented and three ways that a professor may focus on the impact of culture on the counseling process and address the counseling relationship,…

  19. Ethical Crises and Cultural Differences

    PubMed Central

    Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim; Jonsen, Albert R.

    1983-01-01

    Generalizations about patients without careful attention to their cultural background, their values and norms could lead to a number of ethical crises. The informed consent, disclosure of diagnosis and prognosis, and discussions of termination of treatment are reflections of Western cultural values. They represent respect for autonomy of clients and respect for openness in communications. For patients from other cultures such practices have different meanings that may violate their own values. The result of such conflict in practices and meanings can render the relationship between patients and health care personnel difficult at best and distrustful at worst. PMID:6613119

  20. Forging the Link between Multicultural Competence and Ethical Counseling Practice: A Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Zarus E. P.; Herlihy, Barbara Richter; Pierce, Latoya Anderson

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of multicultural competence as an essential component of ethical counseling practice is a growing trend. This article presents a historical perspective of salient events that have contributed to forging a link between multicultural competence and ethical behavior. Multicultural counseling is traced from its beginnings to its emergence…

  1. An Existential Approach to Cross-Cultural Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontress, Clemmont E.

    1988-01-01

    Defines existentialism, culture, and cross-cultural counseling and explains how various existential concepts can serve as guidelines for cross-cultural counseling. Advocates finding approach to help counselors and counselor trainees understand how their own cultural identities affect their ability to help culturally different clients. (NB)

  2. Impact of human genome initiative-derived technology on genetic testing, screening and counseling: Cultural, ethical and legal issues. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Trottier, R.W.; Hodgin, F.C.; Imara, M.; Phoenix, D.; Lybrook, S.; Crandall, L.A.; Moseley, R.E.; Armotrading, D.

    1993-03-01

    Genetic medical services provided by the Georgia Division of Public Health in two northern and two central districts are compared to services provided in a district in which a tertiary care facility is located. Genetics outreach public health nurses play key roles in Georgia`s system of Children`s Health Services Genetics Program, including significant roles as counselors and information sources on special needs social services and support organizations. Unique features of individual health districts, (e.g., the changing face of some rural communities in ethnocultural diversity and socioeconomic character), present new challenges to current and future genetics services delivery. Preparedness as to educational needs of both health professionals and the lay population is of foremost concern in light of the ever expanding knowledge and technology in medical genetics. Perspectives on genetics and an overview of services offered by a local private sector counselor are included for comparison to state supported services. The nature of the interactions which transpire between private and public genetic services resources in Georgia will be described. A special focus of this research includes issues associated with sickle cell disease newborn screening service delivery process in Georgia, with particular attention paid to patient follow-up and transition to primary care. Of particular interest to this focus is the problem of loss to follow-up in the current system. Critical factors in education and counseling of sickle cell patients and the expectations of expanding roles of primary care physicians are discussed. The Florida approach to the delivery of genetic services contrasts to the Georgia model by placing more emphasis on a consultant-specialist team approach.

  3. Cultural Values, Counseling Stigma, and Intentions to Seek Counseling among Asian American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miville, Marie L.; Constantine, Madonna G.

    2007-01-01

    The authors explored the extent to which Asian American college women's perceived stigma about counseling mediated the relationship between their adherence to Asian cultural values and intentions to seek counseling, Participants, 201 Asian American college women (age range = 18-24 years), completed measures of Asian cultural values, perceived…

  4. The Use of Touch in Counseling: An Ethical Decision-Making Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calmes, Stephanie A.; Piazza, Nick J.; Laux, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Although some counselors have advocated for the limited use of touch in counseling, others have argued that touch has no place within the counseling relationship. Despite the controversy, the use of touch has been shown to have a number of therapeutic benefits; however, there are few ethical decision-making models that are appropriate for…

  5. Web-Based Resources for Legal and Ethical Issues in School Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillot-Miller, Lynne; Partin, Patricia W.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies major sources of legal and ethical information relevant to school counselors that is available on the World Wide Web. Summaries and Web addresses are provided for major Web sites that address legal and ethical issues in school counseling. (Contains 17 references.) (GCP)

  6. Current and Emerging Ethical Issues in Counseling: A Delphi Study of Expert Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Barbara; Dufrene, Roxane L.

    2011-01-01

    A Delphi study was conducted to ascertain the opinions of panel experts regarding the most important current and emerging ethical issues facing the counseling profession. Expert opinions on ethical issues in counselor preparation also were sought. Eighteen panelists responded to 3 rounds of data collection interspersed with feedback. Themes that…

  7. Ethical Issues Associated with Information and Communication Technology in Counseling and Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; Makela, Julia Panke

    2014-01-01

    For more than 50 years, literature on the use of information and communication technology in counseling and guidance has presented ethical issues related to the development and use of technologies in practice. This paper reviews the ethical issues raised, organizing them into three categories: Social equity, resources, and services. Career…

  8. Ethical Business Cultures: A Literature Review and Implications for HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Jondle, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This literature review identifies characteristics of ethical business cultures, describes factors, considered to be important in developing such cultures, describes current practices of developing ethical culture programs, and discusses the role of HRD in developing ethical business cultures. We argue that ethical thinking and behavior can be…

  9. Culturally-Competent School Counseling with Asian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.; Phoummarath, Marion J.

    2006-01-01

    Asian American adolescents are frequently overlooked as a population in need of counseling interventions. However, cultural issues such as refugee status or the pressure of high academic achievement can influence an Asian American student's mental health. As there is a dearth of school counseling literature written about what school counselors…

  10. A Culture of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufresne, Peter; McKenzie, Anne S.

    2009-01-01

    Becoming an ethical leader requires a personal journey toward integrity and a public commitment to a common good. This begins with claiming one's core values, finding a personal voice, developing a vision, and consciously aligning one's attitudes and beliefs with one's actions and behaviors. In the process, ethical leaders create spaces where…

  11. Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Caren C.; Gottleib, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the evolution of managed care and reviews basic biomedical ethics and ethical decision-making models. Examines specific ethical issues and offers suggestions for practice, research, and education and training. Concludes with a research agenda, a review of projected general trends in health care delivery, and a discussion of counseling…

  12. How Different Insights from a Variety of Theories Might Help Ethical Decision-Making in Educational Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tveit, Anne Dorthe; Sunde, Annikken Louise

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how different insights from a variety of theories might help ethical decision making in educational counselling and highlight the need for reflection. A framework for ethical decision making based on basic features of counselling, namely the interlocutors' practice or "acts", is proposed. There are…

  13. Ethical issues associated with genetic counseling in the context of adolescent psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Jane; Virani, Alice; Austin, Jehannine C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic counseling is a well-established healthcare discipline that provides individuals and families with health information about disorders that have a genetic component in a supportive counseling encounter. It has recently been applied in the context of psychiatric disorders (like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression and anxiety) that typically appear sometime during later childhood through to early adulthood. Psychiatric genetic counseling is emerging as an important service that fills a growing need to reframe understandings of the causes of mental health disorders. In this review, we will define psychiatric genetic counseling, and address important ethical concerns (we will particularly give attention to the principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice) that must be considered in the context of its application in adolescent psychiatry, whilst integrating evidence regarding patient outcomes from the literature. We discuss the developing capacity and autonomy of adolescents as an essential and dynamic component of genetic counseling provision in this population and discuss how traditional viewpoints regarding beneficence and non-maleficence should be considered in the unique situation of adolescents with, or at risk for, psychiatric conditions. We argue that thoughtful and tailored counseling in this setting can be done in a manner that addresses the important health needs of this population while respecting the core principles of biomedical ethics, including the ethic of care. PMID:26937355

  14. Discovering misattributed paternity in genetic counselling: different ethical perspectives in two countries.

    PubMed

    Tozzo, Pamela; Caenazzo, Luciana; Parker, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Misattributed paternity or 'false' paternity is when a man is wrongly thought, by himself and possibly by others, to be the biological father of a child. Nowadays, because of the progression of genetics and genomics the possibility of finding misattributed paternity during familial genetic testing has increased. In contrast to other medical information, which pertains primarily to individuals, information obtained by genetic testing and/or pedigree analysis necessarily has implications for other biologically related members in the family. Disclosing or not a misattributed paternity has a number of different biological and social consequences for the people involved. Such an issue presents important ethical and deontological challenges. The debate centres on whether or not to inform the family and, particularly, whom in the family, about the possibility that misattributed paternity might be discovered incidentally, and whether or not it is the duty of the healthcare professional (HCP) to disclose the results and to whom. In this paper, we consider the different perspectives and reported problems, and analyse their cultural, ethical and legal dimensions. We compare the position of HCPs from an Italian and British point of view, particularly their role in genetic counselling. We discuss whether the Oviedo Convention of the Council of Europe (1997) can be seen as a basis for enriching the debate.

  15. 17 CFR 200.21a - The Ethics Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... Counselor to the Commission and its staff with regard to ethical and conflicts of interest questions and... Management, the Office of the Inspector General and the Department of Justice. When appropriate and...

  16. Ethics and the Use of Technology in Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros-Bailey, Mary; Saunders, Jodi L.

    2010-01-01

    Standards for technology ethics were first introduced into the "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" in 2002. Since that time, the proliferation of technology has enhanced practice, changed the American vernacular, and become infused in the delivery of services to and teaching of individuals, families, and groups. The 2010…

  17. Ethical dilemmas related to counseling clients living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J G; Froehlich, R J; Cartwright, B; Letiecq, D; Forrester, L E; Mueller, R O

    1999-01-01

    This study tested an eight-factor model of client actions/decisions in terms of the extent to which professionals counseling persons with HIV/AIDS believed that those actions/decisions presented ethical dilemmas, and the frequency with which they encountered such actions. A confirmatory factor analysis lent initial support for the hypothetical eight-factor ethical-dilemma model for the ratings regarding the extent to which the participants believed those items constituted ethical dilemmas. Similar results were obtained for the frequency ratings, but in this case a second, competing model was equally plausible. Several significant predictors of participant ratings were found and are discussed.

  18. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 4: The School Counselor and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camblin, Lanthan D., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 4 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "School Counselors and the Reporting of Child Abuse: A Survey of State Laws and…

  19. Culturally Sensitive Health Care and Counseling Psychology: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Keith C.; Tucker, Carolyn M.; Ferdinand, Lisa A.; Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Hasan, Nadia T.; Beato, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the Major Contribution, which focuses on counseling psychologists' roles in addressing health disparities through culturally sensitive health care research and interventions. First, the authors provide a rationale for conducting research focused on culturally sensitive health care and then offer definitions of…

  20. Assessing and Promoting Cultural Relativism in Students of Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcauliffe, Garrett John; Grothaus, Tim; Jensen, Margaret; Michel, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Multicultural counseling is often promoted as a core element in counselor development. As such, educational efforts aim to increase counselors' cultural relativism, or their ability to recognize their own enculturation and to appreciate the value of other cultural norms. This mixed qualitative-quantitative study explored the relationship between…

  1. East and West: Transpersonal Psychology and Cross-Cultural Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benesch, Kevin F.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    1989-01-01

    Examines cross-cultural counseling (especially Western counselor-Eastern client) within a transpersonal psychological framework. Presents meta-model that allows counselors to adopt attitudes that transcend cultural differences. Notes that benefit of such a model to counselors would be superordinate framework in which various, specific counseling…

  2. Infusing Cultural Competence and Advocacy into Strength-Based Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grothaus, Tim; McAuliffe, Garett; Craigen, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Strength-based counseling represents a welcome shift from prevailing deficit perspectives. However, the literature often treats enhancing strengths as an acultural concept, minimizing or ignoring the essential role of culture in forming and defining strengths. Integrating cultural competence and advocacy into strength-based practice is examined as…

  3. Felix Adler and Education for Ethical Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared R.

    2015-01-01

    This article delves into the various religious influences on Dr. Felix Adler's spiritual development and the resulting theological and philosophical foundations for the Ethical Culture Society that he created in addition to the Society's schools. The discussion focuses on Dr. Adler's personal struggles with traditional Judaism in the face of…

  4. Legal and Ethical Implications of Refusing to Counsel Homosexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Mary A.; Herlihy, Barbara Richter

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, a federal appeals court upheld the job termination of a counselor who requested being excused from counseling a lesbian client on relationship issues because homosexuality conflicted with the counselor's religious beliefs ("Bruff v. North Mississippi Health Services, Inc.," 2001). This article provides the facts of the case and the legal…

  5. Is Ethical Sensitivity in Teaching Culturally Bound? Comparing Finnish and Iranian Teachers' Ethical Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gholami, Khalil; Kuusisto, Elina; Tirri, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the culture-invariant and culture-dependent nature of teachers' ethical sensitivity in two countries. Our case study involves teachers from Finland (n = 864) representing Western culture, and from Iran (n = 556) representing Eastern culture. Culturally bound elements of ethical sensitivity were studied with the…

  6. The Ethics of Counseling: A National Survey of Certified Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, William T.; Pope, Kenneth S.

    1993-01-01

    Collected national survey data from 579 counselors certified by National Board for Certified Counselors concerning their beliefs about whether each of 88 behaviors was ethical and how confident they were of their judgment. Systematic patterns in responding emerged in regard to age, sex, primary work setting, and degree. Participants indicated…

  7. Culturally Competent Counseling Psychology Students: Developmental Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Monique L.; Bronson, M. Kristine

    Four steps are critical in developing cultural competence in students: (1) a supportive training program; (2) a significant number or "critical mass" of culturally diverse students and allies; (3) opportunities to learn about diversity; and (4) development of racial identity. An appreciation of cultural diversity lies at the heart of any…

  8. Appraising Cultural Identity in Career-Development Assessment and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Leong, Frederick T. L.; Pope, Mark; Niles, Spencer G.; Farrow, Beverly

    1998-01-01

    Career-Development Assessment and Counseling (C-DAC) uses a comprehensive assessment battery to help clients explore their roles, developmental stages and tasks, career attitudes and knowledge, value, and interests within their unique life contexts. Recommends elaborating C-DAC model to formally appraise cultural identity and to coincide identity…

  9. Strategies for Counseling Chicanos: Effects of Racial and Cultural Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Frank, Jr.; Ybarra-Garcia, Melva

    This manual acquaints non-Chicano school counselors and educators with the difficulty of counseling Mexican American students due to the racist manifestations of cultural and racial stereotypes. Chapter 1, a general introduction, argues that counselors have often failed to effectively reach Chicano students because they have been insensitive to…

  10. Counseling Across Cultures. UMHE Monograph Series, Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Robert C.

    Counseling across cultures can present many problems for the White American counselor. It is important that the counselor understand the subculture in order to meet the needs of minority clients. In dealing with Black Americans, the counselor must consider issues of racism and religion. When working with Mexican-Americans, the counselor must often…

  11. Should Universalism Trump Cultural Relativism in Counseling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnier, Richard T.; Dixon, Andrea L.; Barratt, Tyler M.; Moyer, Erika L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain cultural customs and practices are viewed as abhorrent by many people, yet contemporary American counselors rarely criticize any specific culture. In this article, the authors explore why counselors abstain from such criticism. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that universalism, often regarded as a politically incorrect and an…

  12. A Cultural Perspective for Counseling Blacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Albert R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper attempts to view Blacks as minorities from a subcultural perspective. This perspective is brought to bear on the question of identity and the process of schooling. Discontinuities brought about by the meeting of different cultures are examined. (Author)

  13. Ethical implications in genetic counseling and family studies of the epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Godard, Béatrice; Cardinal, Geneviève

    2004-10-01

    Most of the inherited epilepsies do not follow a Mendelian inheritance pattern but rather are complex disorders. This leads us to reconsider the traditional ethical framework applying to genetics, which is still based largely on the understanding of Mendelian inheritance, to ethically use the genetic tests likely to be forthcoming for the prevention and surveillance of epilepsies. This article is a review of the ethical issues raised by family studies of the epilepsies, in both a clinical and a research context. These issues include the use of genetic tests, the scope of genetic counseling, the upholding of the risk-benefit ratio in pharmacogenetics, as well as those related to the availability of treatments, health professionals' changing responsibilities, and the communication within families. A reasonable approach calls for a case-by-case determination of whether the benefit and harm of genetic testing outweigh benefit and harm of protecting autonomy and nonmaleficence.

  14. Hispanic Culture, Gay Male Culture, and AIDS: Counseling Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carballo-Dieguez, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Discusses issue of the disproportionately high rate of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Hispanics. Claims high-risk sexual behavior conducive to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection seems to continue to take place among Hispanic homosexual men. Presents some necessary considerations when counseling this population. (Author/ABL)

  15. Canadian University Ethics Review: Cultural Complications Translating Principles into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Susan; Gormley, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Drawing from educational research conducted in Canada and Mexico, university researchers explore how culture complicates both the ethics review process and the translation of ethical research principles into practice. University researchers in Canadian contexts seek approval from university Research Ethics Boards to conduct research, following…

  16. Ethical questions arising from counselling in fetal complex congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Samuel

    2012-09-01

    Fetal ultrasounds are almost routinely carried out during pregnancies in Western society. It has led to the in-utero diagnosis of congenital malformations, and in skilled hands, complex congenital heart disease which carries a significant morbidity and definite mortality. That has allowed for counselling of the affected parents who may have the option of whether to continue with the pregnancy. Such counselling, however is not without its difficulties and ethical dilemmas. They range from attempting to inform at times very distressed parents, the nature and implications of their fetal abnormality, the outcome and risks involved in the interventions which may be required, while at the same time being asked to prognosticate the long-term outcomes. Such counselling at times is based on incomplete information obtained or refers to lesions that may evolve during the rest of the pregnancy. In addition, the information provided is unable to factor in possible advances that may occur in the future which may alter the quality of life and outcomes of the affected individuals. Other members of the concerned extended family may wish to have a say in the decision making process. The clinicians themselves may wish to take into account not only the burden to the family emotionally and in terms of the possible interventions - surgical or otherwise, hospitalisations, the risks of complications, and so on - but also the financial and other costs borne by the community. This article highlights the problems encountered and raises ethical questions to encourage discussion to guide the clinicians involved.

  17. Rehabilitation Counselors' Perceptions of Ethical Workplace Culture and the Influence on Ethical Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Frank J.; Shaw, Linda R.; Young, Mary Ellen; Bourgeois, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the environment in which a counselor works influences his or her ethical behavior, but there is little empirical examination of this idea within the rehabilitation counseling professional literature. A survey was conducted with a national sample of practicing certified rehabilitation counselors that elicited…

  18. Incorporating cultural issues in education for ethical practice.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, Susan; Klotz, Linda

    2007-07-01

    The population of most non-dominant ethnic groups in the USA is growing dramatically. Faculty members are challenged to develop curricula that adequately prepare our future nurses. An increased focus on clinical ethics has resulted from the use of sophisticated technology, changes in health care financing, an increasing elderly population and the shift of care from inpatient to outpatient settings. Nurses frequently face situations demanding resolution of ethical dilemmas involving cultural differences. Nursing curricula must include content on both ethics and cultural sensitivity. Active student participation is an important element providing a foundation for ethical practice. A proposed educational format was introduced with graduating baccalaureate students. In a pilot study, curricular content on cultural sensitivity and ethical practice was taught in separate modules. Students were then asked to identify and problem solve an ethical dilemma involving patients and professional caregivers from vastly different cultures. Course faculty members provided discussion questions to guide the students' thinking.

  19. Developing Cross Cultural Competence: Applying Development and Prevention Ideals to Counseling Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfgang, Jeff; Frazier, Kimberly; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Barrett, Joe

    2011-01-01

    As counselors turn their attention to child-based counseling, there is a need to apply the core tenets of the discipline of counseling to young children and incorporate cross-cultural issues into clinical competence. Using Multicultural Counseling Theory (MCT), the authors discuss conventional approaches to providing clinical interventions for…

  20. Counseling Psychology in Chinese Communities in Asia: Indigenous, Multicultural, and Cross-Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, S. Alvin; Chen, Ping-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the need to develop an indigenous counseling psychology in Chinese communities in Asia. The cross-cultural limitations and applications of counseling psychology are discussed, using the literature on multicultural counseling and competence as illustrations. The authors elaborate on the scope and nature of indigenous…

  1. Prenatal genetic counseling in cross-cultural medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bhogal, Ashvinder K.; Brunger, Fern

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To help family physicians practise effective genetic counseling and offer practical strategies for cross-cultural communication in the context of prenatal genetic counseling. SOURCES OF INFORMATION PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Most evidence was level II and some was level III. MAIN MESSAGE The values and beliefs of practitioners, no less than those of patients, are shaped by culture. In promoting a patient’s best interest, the assumptions of both the patient and the provider must be held up for examination and discussed in the attempt to arrive at a consensus. Through the explicit discussion and formation of trust, the health professionals, patients, and family members who are involved can develop a shared understanding of appropriate therapeutic goals and methods. CONCLUSION Reflecting on the cultural nature of biomedicine’s ideas about risk, disability, and normality helps us to realize that there are many valid interpretations of what is in a patient’s best interest. Self-reflection helps to ensure that respectful communication with the specific family and patient is the basis for health care decisions. Overall, this helps to improve the quality of care. PMID:20944039

  2. Cross-Cultural Counseling. A Guide for Nutrition and Health Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Brenda; And Others

    The United States is a land of people with diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. There will be a time when every counselor is called on to serve clients from a culture different from his or her own. This guide promotes awareness of cross-cultural counseling problems, and provides information for counseling clients with different beliefs,…

  3. International Immersion in Belize: Fostering Counseling Students' Cultural Self-Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Augustine, Shirlene; Dowden, Angel; Wiggins, Angel; Hall, LaCheata

    2014-01-01

    International cultural immersion provides an in vivo, authentic, cross-cultural experience that can enhance multicultural awareness, knowledge and skills. This article examines the impact of an international immersion on graduate counseling students' cultural self-awareness using a qualitative approach. Five graduate counseling students…

  4. CBRC and psychosocial counselling: assessing needs and developing an ethical framework for practice.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Eric; Thorn, Petra; Wischmann, Tewes

    2011-11-01

    Encountering infertility and involuntary childlessness and undergoing infertility treatment are acknowledged as stressful experiences that impact on individuals' psychological and emotional health – and for which access to psychosocial counselling by a skilled mental health professional may be beneficial. Evidence of patients', gamete donors' and surrogates' experiences indicates that utilization of infertility treatment in another country may not only exacerbate these psychosocial adversities, but may also pose additional risks to the psychological or physical health of participants, thus further emphasizing the need for competent psychosocial counselling services in cross-border reproductive care. However, this is a largely neglected topic in recent discussions of both CBRC itself and of infertility counselling practice. This paper extends the previous work undertaken by two of the authors to begin to map out practice issues within an ethical framework for counsellors when working with clients, donors, surrogates, individuals conceived following infertility treatment and existing children in clients', donor's and surrogates' families where cross-border reproductive treatment is considered or undertaken.

  5. [Expansion of HIV counseling and testing strategies: technical challenges and ethical-political tensions].

    PubMed

    Mora Cárdenas, Claudia Mercedes; Monteiro, Simone; Moreira, Carlos Otávio Fiúza

    2014-08-01

    Incentives to provide universal access to antiretroviral therapy in order to control the HIV/AIDS epidemic also encouraged the diversification of HIV testing strategies, as demonstrated by the simultaneous existence of Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) and Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling (PITC). This paper analyzes the concepts, principles and implementation of the VCT and PITC models regarding counseling, confidentiality and informed consent in Brazil and other countries, based on a literature review of works in the Lilacs, Medline, Sociological Abstracts and Cochrane databases published between 2000 and 2013. According to the literature, PITC increases rates of testing in comparison with VCT, but reduces sexual and reproductive rights and the autonomy of users. These findings suggest technical challenges and ethical tensions between the paradigm of exceptionalism and the normalization of HIV testing. The necessity to reconcile increased access to HIV tests with the local capacity to offer comprehensive care for people living with HIV/AIDS is highlighted. It is recommended that interdisciplinary studies about the social effects of VCT and PITC be amplified.

  6. Ethical Issues in Cross-Cultural Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honan, Eileen; Hamid, M. Obaidul; Alhamdan, Bandar; Phommalangsy, Phouvanh; Lingard, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The gap between theoretical expectations of research ethics as outlined in the bureaucratic processes associated with University Ethics Committees and the situated realities of students undertaking studies within their own sociocultural contexts is explored in this paper. In particular, the authors investigate differences in ethical norms and…

  7. Respect for cultural diversity in bioethics is an ethical imperative

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata; De Vries, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The field of bioethics continues to struggle with the problem of cultural diversity: can universal principles guide ethical decision making, regardless of the culture in which those decisions take place? Or should bioethical principles be derived from the moral traditions of local cultures? Ten Have and Gordijn (2011) and Bracanovic (2011) defend the universalist position, arguing that respect for cultural diversity in matters ethical will lead to a dangerous cultural relativity where vulnerable patients and research subjects will be harmed. We challenge the premises of moral universalism, showing how this approach imports and imposes moral notions of Western society and leads to harm in non-western cultures. PMID:22955969

  8. Genetic counselling and ethical issues with chromosome microarray analysis in prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, George; Rosenfeld, Jill A; McKinlay Gardner, R J; Gillam, Lynn H

    2012-04-01

    Molecular karyotyping using chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) detects more pathogenic chromosomal anomalies than classical karyotyping, making CMA likely to become a first tier test for prenatal diagnosis. Detecting copy number variants of uncertain clinical significance raises ethical considerations. We consider the risk of harm to a woman or her fetus following the detection of a copy number variant of uncertain significance, whether it is ethically justifiable to withhold any test result information from a woman, what constitutes an 'informed choice' when women are offered CMA in pregnancy and whether clinicians are morally responsible for 'unnecessary' termination of pregnancy. Although we are cognisant of the distress associated with uncertain prenatal results, we argue in favour of the autonomy of women and their right to information from genome-wide CMA in order to make informed choices about their pregnancies. We propose that information material to a woman's decision-making process, including uncertain information, should not be withheld, and that it would be paternalistic for clinicians to try to take responsibility for women's decisions to terminate pregnancies. Non-directive pre-test and post-test genetic counselling is central to the delivery of these ethical objectives.

  9. Cultural context in medical ethics: lessons from Japan.

    PubMed

    Powell, Tia

    2006-04-03

    This paper examines two topics in Japanese medical ethics: non-disclosure of medical information by Japanese physicians, and the history of human rights abuses by Japanese physicians during World War II. These contrasting issues show how culture shapes our view of ethically appropriate behavior in medicine. An understanding of cultural context reveals that certain practices, such as withholding diagnostic information from patients, may represent ethical behavior in that context. In contrast, nonconsensual human experimentation designed to harm the patient is inherently unethical irrespective of cultural context. Attempts to define moral consensus in bioethics, and to distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable variation across different cultural contexts, remain central challenges in articulating international, culturally sensitive norms in medical ethics.

  10. The cultural and philosophical foundations of normative medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Hill, T P

    1994-11-01

    Thirty years ago, the idea that culture and philosophy could provide a foundation for normative medical ethics was more easily entertained than it is today when the very notion of a norm, whether culturally, philosophically or ethically derived, is in itself a problem. In large measure this comes from our contemporary embrace of cultural and philosophical pluralism and an increasing tendency to exchange the difficult belief in abstract and universally applicable norms for the more accessible notion that ethical values are cultural and relative derivatives. Despite this, in the face of the unprecedented ethical dilemmas presented by modern medicine, we have attempted to apply traditional ethical norms and analysis to modern medicine to establish a consensus for its right practice. Unfortunately, the attempt has not been successful, so that wherever we turn we find that ethical problems in medicine remain intractable and unresolved. That, in turn, has prompted a certain scepticism about the efficacy of ethics in medicine. In order to understand why we have reached this impasse, it is essential to realize that we have seriously underestimated the way science and technology have informed and, as a consequence, transformed the practice of medicine. Contributing to this, our tendency to think of technology simply as a way of doing things has blinded us to the fact that it is more fundamentally a way of thinking, knowing and valuing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Genetic counseling practice in next generation sequencing research: implications for the ethical oversight of the informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Egalite, Nathalie; Groisman, Iris Jaitovich; Godard, Beatrice

    2014-08-01

    The potential for next generation sequencing research (NGS) to generate individual genetic results could have implications for the informed consent process and the provision of genetic counseling. We undertook a content analysis of informed consent templates and guidelines produced by Canadian institutional review boards, purposively sampling documents used by researchers to obtain consent from participants in genetics studies. Our goal was to examine the extent to which the informed consent documents addressed genetic counseling and the return of individual genetic results. Our analysis reveals that the majority of informed consent documents did not mention genetic counseling while several did not mention the return of results. We found differences in the ways in which documents addressed availability of counseling, eligibility criteria for referral to a genetic counselor, genetic counselor involvement, provision of services to family members of participants and incidental findings. From an ethical standpoint, consent documents should provide appropriate information so that participants may make an informed decision about their participation in research. The need to ensure adequate counseling for study populations in an NGS research context will necessarily involve adapting values that underlie care in genetic counseling practice. If the interests of research participants are to be truly promoted, the drafting and review of informed consent documents should give proper due to genetic counseling.

  12. Religion, Ethnicity, Culture, Way of Life: Jews, Muslims, and Multicultural Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Lewis Z.; Ali, Saba Rasheed; Ackerman, Sandra R.; Dewey, J. Jane H.

    2009-01-01

    Jews and Muslims represent 2 unique cultural groups that have been relatively under-examined by multicultural counseling scholars. In this article, the authors review the recent literature on Jews and Muslims, synthesize and discuss the commonalities across these 2 groups, provide some recommendations for counseling members of these populations,…

  13. Strategies for Counseling Hispanics: Effects of Racial and Cultural Stereotypes. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Frank, Jr.; Ybarra-Garcia, Melva

    This manual, written for counselors and educators at all levels of education, focuses on multicultural awareness and educational equity. It is intended to acquaint the reader with the difficulty of counseling Hispanics due to manifestations of cultural and racial stereotypes. It stresses the need to change the counseling techniques that have…

  14. A Counselling Model for Young Women in the United Arab Emirates: Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Although all modalities of therapy work equally well, some models are better suited to work with specific populations. This article outlines a rationale for a counselling model used for female college students in the United Arab Emirates where the concept of counselling is not well known, and where the social and cultural organizations demand a…

  15. The Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Social Class in Counseling: Examining Selves in Cultural Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Madonna G.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of counselors considering the intersection of multiple cultural identities in working with clients. The article serves as an introduction to the special issue, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Social Class in Counseling, of the "Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development." (Contains 28 references.) (GCP)

  16. Cultural Competence in Counseling the Muslim Patient: Implications for Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rassool, G Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Given the rapidly growing population of Muslims in Western societies, it is imperative to develop a better understanding of the mental health needs and concerns of this community. Muslim religious beliefs have an impact on the mental health of individuals, families and communities. The lack of understanding of the interplay between religious influences on health or sickness behaviors can have a significant effect upon the delivery of nursing practice. The Muslim community is experiencing social exclusion (social exclusion correlates with mental health problems) related to their cultural and religious identity. In addition, the emergence of radical extremism and the resulting media coverage have magnified this problem. Misunderstanding the worldview of the patient can lead to ethical dilemmas, practice problems, and problems in communication. Often, Muslim individuals are stigmatized and families are rejected and isolated for their association with mental health problems, addiction and suicide. There are indicators that Muslims experience mental ill health, but that they either are unidentified by mainstream mental health services or present late to the services. The aims of the paper are to examine the religious and cultural influences on mental health beliefs of Muslims, and provide an understanding of mental health problems, and its implications in counseling and spiritual interventions.

  17. The Vocational Significance of Black Identity: Cultural Formulation Approach to Career Assessment and Career Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Byars-Winston, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Scholarship is emerging on intervention models that purposefully attend to cultural variables throughout the career assessment and career counseling process (Swanson & Fouad, in press). One heuristic model that offers promise to advance culturally-relevant vocational practice with African Americans is the Outline for Cultural Formulation (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). This article explicates the Outline for Cultural Formulation in career assessment and career counseling with African Americans integrating the concept of cultural identity into the entire model. The article concludes with an illustration of the Outline for Cultural Formulation model with an African American career client. PMID:20495668

  18. Respect for cultural diversity in bioethics is an ethical imperative.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata; De Vries, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    The field of bioethics continues to struggle with the problem of cultural diversity: can universal principles guide ethical decision making, regardless of the culture in which those decisions take place? Or should bioethical principles be derived from the moral traditions of local cultures? Ten Have and Gordijn (Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14:1-3, 2011) and Bracanovic (Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14:229-236, 2011) defend the universalist position, arguing that respect for cultural diversity in matters ethical will lead to a dangerous cultural relativity where vulnerable patients and research subjects will be harmed. We challenge the premises of moral universalism, showing how this approach imports and imposes moral notions of Western society and leads to harm in non-western cultures.

  19. Chinese Confucian culture and the medical ethical tradition.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Z

    1995-01-01

    The Confucian culture, rich in its contents and great in its significance, exerted on the thinking, culture and political life of ancient China immense influences, unparalleled by any other school of thought or culture. Confucian theories on morality and ethics, with 'goodness' as the core and 'rites' as the norm, served as the 'key notes' of the traditional medical ethics of China. The viewpoints of Confucianism on benevolence and material interests, on good and evil, on kindheartedness, and on character cultivation were all inherited by the medical workers and thus became prominent in Chinese traditional medical ethics. Hence, it is clear that the medical profession and Confucianism have long shared common goals in terms of ethics. Influenced by the excellent Confucian thinking and culture, a rather highly-developed system of Chinese traditional medical ethics emerged with a well-defined basic content, and the system has been followed and amended by medical professionals of all generations throughout Chinese history. This system, just to mention briefly, contains concepts such as the need: to attach great importance to the value of life; to do one's best to rescue the dying and to heal the wounded; to show concern to those who suffer from diseases; to practise medicine with honesty; to study medical skills painstakingly; to oppose a careless style of work; to comfort oneself in a dignified manner; to respect local customs and to be polite; to treat patients, noble or humble, equally, and to respect the academic achievements of others, etc. Of course, at the same time, Confucian culture has its own historical and class limitations, which exerted negative influences on traditional medical ethics. Now, if we are to keep up with the development of modern medicine, a serious topic must be addressed. That is how to retain the essence of our traditional medical ethics so as to maintain historic continuity and yet, at the same time, add on the new contents of medical

  20. Comparison of cross culture engineering ethics training using the simulator for engineering ethics education.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the use and analysis of the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (SEEE) to perform cross culture engineering ethics training and analysis. Details describing the first generation and second generation development of the SEEE are published in Chung and Alfred, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 15, 2009 and Alfred and Chung, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 18, 2012. In this effort, a group of far eastern educated students operated the simulator in the instructional, training, scenario, and evaluation modes. The pre and post treatment performance of these students were compared to U.S. Educated students. Analysis of the performance indicated that the far eastern educated student increased their level of knowledge 23.7 percent while U.S. educated students increased their level of knowledge by 39.3 percent.

  1. An Organizational Framework for Understanding the Role of Culture in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Benesch, Kevin F.

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a direction for cross-cultural training and research different from the traditional ones which emphasize differences between groups and the need to develop culture-specific techniques. Delineates a conceptual model which provides an integrative framework for understanding the role of culture in counseling. Draws on work in transpersonal…

  2. The Vocational Significance of Black Identity: Cultural Formulation Approach to Career Assessment and Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byars-Winston, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Scholarship is emerging on intervention models that purposefully attend to cultural variables throughout the career assessment and career counseling process. One heuristic model that offers promise to advance culturally relevant vocational practice with African Americans is the Outline for Cultural Formulation (CF). This article explicates the…

  3. AAPI college students' willingness to seek counseling: the role of culture, stigma, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na-Yeun; Miller, Matthew J

    2014-07-01

    This study tested 4 theoretically and empirically derived structural equation models of Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islanders' willingness to seek counseling with a sample of 278 college students. The models represented competing hypotheses regarding the manner in which Asian cultural values, European American cultural values, public stigma, stigma by close others, self-stigma, and attitudes toward seeking professional help related to willingness to seek counseling. We found that Asian and European American cultural values differentially related to willingness to seek counseling indirectly through specific indirect pathways (public stigma, stigma by close others, self-stigma, and attitudes toward seeking professional help). Our results also showed that the magnitude of model-implied relationships did not vary as a function of generational status. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for counseling are discussed.

  4. Ethics Education and Its Influences on Rehabilitation Counseling Master's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The importance of ethics in helping professions and ethics education in counselor preparation programs have been stressed and discussed greatly. In order to foster helping professionals' ethical behaviors to ensure clients' rights and welfare, professional organizations have developed codes of ethics to serve as guidelines for helping…

  5. Cultural Effects on Business Students' Ethical Decisions: A Chinese versus American Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Sherry F.; Persons, Obeua S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used a corporate code of ethics to create 18 scenarios for examining cultural effects on ethical decisions of Chinese versus American business students. Four cultural differences were hypothesized to contribute to overall less ethical decisions of Chinese students. The results support the hypothesis and indicate strong cultural effects…

  6. Ethical concerns: comparison of values from two cultures.

    PubMed

    Wros, Peggy L; Doutrich, Dawn; Izumi, Shigeko

    2004-06-01

    The present study was a secondary analysis of data from two phenomenological studies of nurses in the USA and Japan. The study incorporated hermeneutics and feminist methodologies to answer the following questions. Are there common values and ethical concerns and values within the nursing cultures of Japan and the USA? What are some commonalities and differences between Japanese nurses' ethical concerns and those of American nurses? Findings indicated that nurses from the USA and Japan share common values and ethical concerns as professional nurses, including competence, respect for the patient as a person, responsibility, relationship and connection, importance of the family, caring, good death, comfort, truth-telling, understanding the patient/situation, and anticipatory care. Although ethical concerns are similar, related background meanings and actions often look different between cultures; truth-telling is described as an example. Nurses in each country also hold unique values not found in the nursing practice of the other country. Understanding these commonalities and differences is critical for the development of global nursing ethics.

  7. A Cultural Formulation Approach to Career Assessment and Career Counseling with Asian American Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Hardin, Erin E.; Gupta, Arpana

    2010-01-01

    Using the cultural formulations approach to career assessment and career counseling, the current article applies it specifically to Asian American clients. The approach is illustrated by using the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" fourth edition ("DSM-IV") Outline for Cultural Formulations that consists of the following five…

  8. Broaching the Subjects of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture during the Counseling Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day-Vines, Norma L.; Wood, Susannah M.; Grothaus, Tim; Craigen, Laurie; Holman, Angela; Dotson-Blake, Kylie; Douglass, Marcy J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors define "broaching" as the counselor's ability to consider how sociopolitical factors such as race influence the client's counseling concerns. The counselor must learn to recognize the cultural meaning clients attach to phenomena and to subsequently translate that cultural knowledge into meaningful practice that facilitates client…

  9. Applying the Cultural Formulation Approach to Career Counseling with Latinas/os

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Ramos, Karina; Kanagui, Marlen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors present two hypothetical cases, one of a Mexican American female college student and one of a Mexican immigrant adult male, and apply a culturally sensitive approach to career assessment and career counseling with each of these clients. Drawing from Leong, Hardin, and Gupta's cultural formulation approach (CFA) to…

  10. Immigrant Asian youth and cultural-identity challenges: implications for pastoral counseling practice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyen D

    2006-01-01

    Immigrant Asian youth's five cultural-identity stages and their challenges are examined. Theological significance in working with immigrant Asian youth is also the focus of this article. The essay concludes with implications for pastoral counseling practice, with respect to culturally sensitive effective therapeutic treatment of immigrant Asian youth and their families.

  11. A cross-cultural comparison of nurses' ethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Wadensten, Barbro; Wenneberg, Stig; Silén, Marit; Ping Fen Tang; Ahlström, Gerd

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare Swedish and Chinese nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas and workplace distress in order to deepen understanding of the challenges neuroscience nurses encounter in different cultures. Qualitative interviews from two previously performed empirical studies in Sweden and China were the basis of this comparative study. Four common content areas were identified in both studies: ethical dilemmas, workplace distress, quality of nursing and managing distress. The themes formulated within each content area were compared and synthesized into novel constellations by means of aggregated concept analysis. Despite wide differences in the two health care systems, the nurse participants had similar experiences with regard to work stress and a demanding work situation. They were struggling with similar ethical dilemmas, which concerned seriously ill patients and the possibilities of providing good care. This indicates the importance of providing nurses with the tools to influence their own work situation and thereby reducing their work-related stress.

  12. "Phronesis" on tour: cultural adaptability of Aristotelian ethical notions.

    PubMed

    Polansky, R

    2000-12-01

    How might bioethics take account of cultural diversity? Can practical wisdom of an Aristotelian sort be applied across cultures? After showing that practical wisdom involves both intellectual cleverness and moral virtue, it is argued that both these components have universality. Hence practical wisdom must be universal as well. Hellenic ethical thought neither depended on outdated theoretical notions nor limited itself to the Greek world, but was in fact developed with constant awareness of cultural differences, so it arguably works as well in other times and places when formulated. Even the eudaemonistic setting for practical wisdom is unproblematic.

  13. Legal and ethical issues in genetic testing and counseling for susceptibility to breast, ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, B M; Pei, N; Taylor, K M

    1996-01-01

    The prediction of susceptibility to heritable breast, ovarian and colon cancer raises important legal and ethical concerns. Health care professionals have a duty to disclose sufficient information to enable patients to make informed decisions. They must also safeguard the confidentiality of patient data. These duties may come into conflict if a positive finding in one patient implies that family members are also at risk. A legal distinction is made between a breach of confidentiality and the legitimate sharing of information in a patient's interest or to prevent harm to a third party. Physicians also have a fiduciary duty to warn. Other issues concern the legal liability assumed by genetic counsellors, whose disclosures may influence decisions about childbearing, for example, and the risk of socioeconomic discrimination faced by people with a known genetic susceptibility. Traditional ethical orientations and principals may be applied to these and other questions, but feminist ethics will likely have particular importance in the development of an ethical stance toward testing and counseling for heritable breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:8634959

  14. An Investigation of Multicultural Counseling Competence and Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy for Counselors-in-Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Sejal M.; Greene, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Counseling necessitates clinicians to be culturally competent and self-efficacious in order to ethically and effectively work with diverse client populations. This study investigated the relationship between counselor education students' (N?=?118) levels of self-reported multicultural counseling competence (MCC), multicultural counseling…

  15. Ethics and patient education: health literacy and cultural dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Marks, Ray

    2009-07-01

    This article discusses health literacy and cultural factors that have implications for the ethical practice of health education. It specifically focuses on recent data that speaks to the challenges in carrying out patient education from the perspective of comprehension and equitable distribution of health-related information across diverse cultures and communities. It discusses strategies for reducing the negative impact of low health literacy among diverse groups and the importance of acknowledging this pervasive problem in the context of ensuring equity in the optimal delivery of health promotion messages.

  16. Teaching ethics: when respect for autonomy and cultural sensitivity collide.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Howard

    2014-04-01

    Respect for autonomy is a key ethical principle. However, in some cultures other moral domains such as community (emphasizing the importance of family roles) and sanctity (emphasizing the sacred and the spiritual side of human nature) hold equal value. Thus, an American physician may sometimes perceive a conflict between the desire to practice ethically and the wish to be sensitive to the mores of other cultures. For example, a woman may appear to be making what the physician thinks is a bad clinical choice because her spouse is speaking on her behalf. That physician may find it difficult to reconcile the sense that the patient had not exercised freely her autonomy with the desire to be culturally sensitive. In this article, the means by which a physician can reconcile respect for other cultures with respect for autonomy is explored. The question of whether physicians must always defer to patients' requests solely because they are couched in the language of cultural sensitivity is also addressed.

  17. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  18. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  19. Synthesizing Family, Career, and Culture: A Model for Counseling in the Twenty-First Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Kathy M., Ed.; Rotter, Joseph C., Ed.; Gold, Joshua M., Ed.

    Career and work constitute a major portion of most people's lives; families have an impact on people's careers; and their culture determines a great deal about how they approach family and work. The family counseling, career, and multicultural literature has given little attention to these dynamics. This text provides a multifaceted framework for…

  20. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants' Cultural Values, and Counseling Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists' multicultural competence and by examining clients' cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to…

  1. Greek American Ethnic Identity, Cultural Experience and the "Embodied Language" of Dance: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issari, Philia

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study aims to contribute to better counseling services for the Greek American population in the U.S. by providing cultural knowledge and insight into one of the smaller ethnic groups that has been overlooked in the literature. More specifically, it explores the role of the "embodied language" of dance in the formation…

  2. Cultural Influences on Nonverbal Behavior: An Annotated Bibliography for Counseling Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogelaar, Laura

    This bibliography for counseling psychologists focuses on differences in nonverbal behavior as an aspect of cross cultural psychotherapy. The introductory section discusses the purpose, scope and limitations of the report. Different theories of emotion (dimensional versus typological) are also discussed and classifications of nonverbal behavior…

  3. From Awareness to Practice: An Online Workshop on Bringing Culture into the Counselling Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapacki, Tomasz Michal; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to enhance the counselling services offered to diverse clients by supplying counsellors-in-training with a professional development resource that combines the best available outcome evidence and applied clinical wisdom, with the most current cultural adaptation frameworks. A comprehensive literature review was…

  4. Multicultural education and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Weil, J

    2001-03-01

    The responsibility to provide accessible, useful genetic counseling to individuals from many cultures and ethnicities arises from the increasing ethnocultural diversity of the populations served, coupled with the ethical goal of providing equal access and quality of services for all individuals. The multicultural education, training, and practice of genetic counseling involves three major components: knowledge of relevant ethnocultural groups, ethnocultural self-awareness, and an understanding of institutional and social barriers to services. Despite the diversity of ethnocultural groups served and the critical role of direct experience and training for the genetic counselor, some general guidelines for multicultural genetic counseling can be identified. These include the importance of establishing and maintaining trust, the essential need to respect the counselee's healthcare beliefs and practices, and the necessity of understanding the impact of culture on the process of decision making and on counselee responses to nondirective counseling.

  5. Comparison of Ethical Dilemmas across Public and Private Sectors in Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Scott; Garcia, Jorge; Siblo, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the nature of ethical dilemmas most frequently reported by rehabilitation counselors in the private and public sectors and determine if significant differences exist in how practitioners experience ethical dilemmas in these two settings. Method: A mixed-methods internet-based survey design was utilized and included descriptive,…

  6. Pastoral care and counseling with the "un-homeless homeless": understanding cultures of homelessness.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Jill

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a subset of findings from a larger study exploring the lived experiences of 16 former residents of a 90-day emergency family shelter program in Los Angeles County. Interpretative phenomenological analysis serves as a qualitative method for understanding the cultural uniqueness of the "un-homeless homeless." The findings offer implications for culturally competent pastoral care and counseling in the context of family homelessness and attend to both the process and content of caregiving.

  7. Perceptions of Intercultural Social Challenges: Towards Culturally Competent Counselling Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Anita S.; Shaw, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing ethnic and cultural diversity worldwide and especially in Australia requires that psychologists and counsellors cultivate the know-how to interact and work effectively with clients and stakeholders in cross-cultural contexts. This study aimed to identify and compare themes regarding challenging intercultural social scenarios experienced…

  8. Making Career Theories More Culturally Sensitive: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard A.; Marshall, Sheila K.; Valach, Ladislav

    2007-01-01

    The primary question addressed in this article is whether and how career theories can be more culturally sensitive without losing value as conceptual explanations or their usefulness for counselors. Contextual action theory is identified as a means to develop culturally sensitive explanations. Six steps are proposed and illustrated, including…

  9. A Comparative Study of Ethical Values of Business Students: American vs. Middle Eastern Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurden, Michael; Shurden, Susan; Cagwin, Douglass

    2008-01-01

    Business schools must prepare students to face the world and yet maintain strong ethical convictions. The question of ethics in the business environment is not exclusive to the United States. Ethical business behavior is a multinational issue, and all business schools world-wide must deal with this issue. However, cultural differences often define…

  10. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants' Cultural Values, and Counseling Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S K

    2010-10-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists' multicultural competence and by examining clients' cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to examine these possibilities. The result from a t test showed that the session containing therapist multicultural competencies received higher ratings than the session without therapist multicultural competence. In addition, correlational analyses showed that participant values acculturation was positively associated with participant ratings of counseling process, while the value of emotional self-control was negatively correlated. The results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis did not support any interaction effects among the independent variables on counseling process. All of these findings could contribute to the field of multicultural competence research and have implications for therapist practices and training.

  11. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection.

  12. “Prefacing the Script” as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laws governing abortion provision are proliferating throughout the United States, yet little is known about how these laws affect providers. We investigated the experiences of abortion providers in North Carolina practicing under the 2011 Women’s Right to Know Act, which mandates that women receive counseling with specific, state-prescribed information at least 24 hours prior to an abortion. We focus here on a subset of the data to examine one strategy by which providers worked to minimize moral conflicts generated by the counseling procedure. Drawing on Erving Goffman’s work on language and social interaction, we highlight how providers communicated moral objections and layered meanings through a practice that we call prefacing the script. METHODS We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and clinic managers who provide abortion care in North Carolina. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive, iterative analytic approach, which included reading for context, interpretive memo-writing, and focused coding. RESULTS Roughly half of the participants (14/31) reported that they or the clinicians who performed the counseling in their institution routinely prefaced the counseling script with qualifiers, disclaimers, and apologies that clarified their relationship to the state-mandated content. We identified three performative functions of this practice: 1) enacting a frame shift from a medical to a legal interaction, 2) distancing the speaker from the authorial voice of the counseling script, and 3) creating emotional alignment. CONCLUSIONS Prefacing state-mandated abortion counseling scripts constitutes a practical strategy providers use to balance the obligation to comply with state law with personal and professional responsibilities to provide tailored care, emotional support, and serve the patient’s best interests. Our findings suggest that language constitutes a

  13. Teaching Group Counseling in Botswana: Two U.S.-Trained Counselors Discuss Experiences and Share Cultural Considerations for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Angela D.; Majuta, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research in the area of teaching group counseling within an African context. In this article we describe and reflect on our experiences teaching group counseling at an institution of higher learning in the country of Botswana. We discuss cultural traditions and strengths that support an environment of group work in Botswana,…

  14. Emerging Profiles for Cultured Meat; Ethics through and as Design

    PubMed Central

    van der Weele, Cor; Driessen, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary The idea of cultured meat is to grow meat from animal cells with tissue engineering techniques. Cultured meat is an idea under investigation that will not be ready for the market for several years. It is also still open what it could or should be like. We argue that this openness offers the opportunity to explore different directions in which this idea could be developed. Feelings, critical thinking and the imagination all have important roles to play in this exploration. Abstract The development of cultured meat has gained urgency through the increasing problems associated with meat, but what it might become is still open in many respects. In existing debates, two main moral profiles can be distinguished. Vegetarians and vegans who embrace cultured meat emphasize how it could contribute to the diminishment of animal suffering and exploitation, while in a more mainstream profile cultured meat helps to keep meat eating sustainable and affordable. In this paper we argue that these profiles do not exhaust the options and that (gut) feelings as well as imagination are needed to explore possible future options. On the basis of workshops, we present a third moral profile, “the pig in the backyard”. Here cultured meat is imagined as an element of a hybrid community of humans and animals that would allow for both the consumption of animal protein and meaningful relations with domestic (farm) animals. Experience in the workshops and elsewhere also illustrates that thinking about cultured meat inspires new thoughts on “normal” meat. In short, the idea of cultured meat opens up new search space in various ways. We suggest that ethics can take an active part in these searches, by fostering a process that integrates (gut) feelings, imagination and rational thought and that expands the range of our moral identities. PMID:26479525

  15. Culturally Competent Counseling for Religious and Spiritual African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.

    2008-01-01

    Religion and spirituality are deeply rooted in traditional African American culture. Data suggest that African American adolescents maintain higher baseline rates of religious activities and beliefs than their peers (Bachman, Johnston, & O'Malley, 2005; Smith, Faris, Denton, & Regnerus, 2003). Recognizing these data, this article examines…

  16. Third Culture Kids: Implications for Professional School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limberg, Dodie; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2011-01-01

    The increase of international business, military placements, and immigration has led to an increase in students attending schools in a country other than where they were born: third culture kids (TCKs). TCKs have unique educational needs, necessitating the support of their school counselors. This article (a) defines and introduces the needs and…

  17. Universality and Cultural Diversity in Professional Ethical Development: From Kohlberg to Dynamic Systems Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minkang

    2012-01-01

    Upholding ethical standards is part of what it means to be a professional and therefore part of professional education, but to what extent is the development of ethical reasoning universal across cultures, or is it highly dependent on culture? If universal, how can we explain the unique patterns of moral reasoning and behaviour in Asia, which…

  18. Cross-Cultural Considerations in U.S. Research Ethics Education

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Demand among graduate and postdoctoral trainees for international research experience brings together students and investigators from increasingly diverse cultural backgrounds around the world. Educators in research ethics and scientific integrity need to address the cultural aspects of both science and ethics to help all trainees learn ethical practices for effective collaboration with a diverse array of partners. NIH and NSF’s mandates for instruction in the responsible conduct of research do not specifically address the needs of international trainees or U.S. trainees who undertake research projects abroad. Nonetheless, research ethics educators’ typical focus on policy and professional standards can offer trainees and faculty investigators helpful insights into differing ethical values and priorities in research. Examination of linguistic differences can also reveal important conceptual frameworks that shape ethical practice. New resources for teaching research integrity in cross-cultural settings can be a valuable addition to the development of shared understanding of the goals of scientific research. PMID:25574262

  19. Examining Work Ethic across Populations: A Comparison of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile across Three Diverse Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehr, David J.; Arciniega, Luis M.; Lim, Doo H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the measurement equivalence of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) across the diverse cultures of Korea, Mexico, and the United States. Korean- and Spanish-language versions of the MWEP were developed and evaluated relative to the original English version of the measure. Confirmatory factor analytic results…

  20. Framing Cross-Cultural Ethical Practice in Adapt[ive] Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donna; Howe, P. David

    2016-01-01

    Academics and practitioners are often at a loss when it comes to understanding the ethical socio-political and cultural contexts that invade the world of adapted physical activity. Ethical practice is situated in the local and the specific. In this article we highlight the reality that both academics and practitioners need to be ever mindful that…

  1. Archaeology, Ethics, and Character: Using Our Cultural Heritage to Teach Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Jeanne M.; Coleman, Carolee; Fink, Kristie; Krejs, Kirsti

    2002-01-01

    Archaeology is a highly interdisciplinary field. Its main goal is to construct culture histories, but it uses many scientific methods in the process. Ethical dilemmas inherent in archaeology make it a good vehicle for teaching ethics and character in the classroom (Moe 2000). The interdisciplinary nature of the field makes it possible to weave…

  2. Evaluation of culturally appropriate health counselling to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and its modification for practical use as the new ABC model of culturally appropriate counselling for Japanese public health nurses.

    PubMed

    Marutani, Miki; Tamura, Sugako; Miyazaki, Misako; Amamiya, Yuko

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluates culturally appropriate health counselling to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and suggests modifications of the method for practical use. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 public health nurses (PHNs) in seven cities with different cultural backgrounds. Data were analysed qualitatively with the following research questions: Do we need to add other cultural factors to the previous six categories or to improve their expression for practical use? Are the methods for using cultural factors valid and expressed in appropriate language for practical use? The original factors were re-categorized into three classifications-Values, Styles and Relationships-using colloquial expressions. The original methods of using cultural factors were re-categorized and modified into five phases: Assessment, Acceptance, Awareness, Balance and Connection. The names of the methods were also modified. Modified culturally appropriate health counselling is easily understandable by any PHN and highlights the unique Japanese culture and style of public health nurses.

  3. Ethics and Accreditation in Addictions Counselor Training: Possible Field Placement Issues for CACREP-Accredited Addictions Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors have long been practicing in alcohol and drug treatment settings. However, only recently has the counseling field offered formal recognition of addictions counseling as a specialization through the implementation of accreditation standards for addiction counseling training programs. With the passage of the 2009 standards,…

  4. Current products and practice section: religious, cultural, and ethical dilemmas in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Mattick, C R

    2003-03-01

    There are potential religious, cultural and ethical dilemmas facing patients who are undergoing orthodontic treatment. Opinions were collected from religious and cultural leaders, as well as from non-religious groups who take an ethical standpoint on certain medical or dental treatment. Factors relating to ingredients in orthodontic products, timing of orthodontic appointments, and the effects of religious fasting are all discussed. It is important to recognize all patients' opinions and beliefs when planning and undertaking orthodontic treatment.

  5. Developing Cultural Competence and Overcoming Ethical Challenges in the Informed Consent Process: An Experience from Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Messih, Ibrahim Adib; El-Setouhy, Maged; Crouch, Michael M.; Earhart, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Research is conducted in a variety of cultural settings. Ethical standards developed in Europe and the Americas are increasingly applied in these settings, many of which are culturally different from the countries in which these standards originated. To overcome these cultural differences, investigators may be tempted to deviate from ethical…

  6. Ethical Ideology and Cultural Orientation: Understanding the Individualized Ethical Inclinations of Marketing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brent

    2009-01-01

    As today's marketing graduates formally enter the business profession, they are expected to demonstrate the fruits of their ethics-intensive education. Hence, their professors and future bosses may call upon these graduates to discern and deal with ethical situations that affect various aspects of company and consumer relations. However, students…

  7. Waiver Culture: The Unintended Consequence of Ethics Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genova, Gina L.

    2008-01-01

    The passage of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act (2002) spawned a series of compliance and ethics programs --the revised Principles of Federal Prosecution of Business Organizations known as the Thompson Memo (Thompson, 2003), the revised Federal Sentencing Guidelines that included the Effective Compliance and Ethics Program and the corporate…

  8. Cultural, ethical, and spiritual implications of natural disasters from the survivors' perspective.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shainy B

    2010-12-01

    Cultural, ethical, and spiritual implications of disaster depend on various factors. The impact of a disaster on a particular culture depends on the people in that culture and the strength and resilience of the culture. Disasters may slow cultural development; however, typically the customs, beliefs, and value systems remain the same even if the outward expressions of culture change. Critical to survivors is the implication of aid that is culturally sensitive. Ethical questions and dilemmas associated with disasters and their management are profound. Adhering to ethical principles does not solve all of the issues related to disaster management, but awareness of their utility is important. People affected by a disaster may not be capable of responding to human rights violations, so it is the first responders who must be cognizant of their responsibility to protect the victims’ dignity and rights. Ethical treatment of survivors entails a crucial blend of knowledge about ethnic culture, religious beliefs, and human rights. A strong awareness of ethical principles is merely a beginning step to well-informed decision making in disaster situations. The literature also suggests that during a crisis, spirituality helps victims to cope. Important to any catastrophic event is the understanding that every disaster creates unique circumstances that require relief responses tailored to the specific situation.

  9. Ethics in technological culture: a programmatic proposal for a pragmatist approach.

    PubMed

    Keulartz, Jozef; Schermer, Maartje; Korthals, Michiel; Swierstra, Tsjalling

    2004-01-01

    Neither traditional philosophy nor current applied ethics seem able to cope adequately with the highly dynamic character of our modern technological culture. This is because they have insufficient insight into the moral significance of technological artifacts and systems. Here, much can be learned from recent science and technology studies (STS). They have opened up the black box of technological developments and have revealed the intimate intertwinement of technology and society in minute detail. However, while applied ethics is characterized by a certain "technology blindness," the most influential approaches within STS show a "normative deficit" and display on agnostic or even antagonistic attitude toward ethics. To repair the blind spots of both applied ethics and STS, the authors sketch the contours of a pragmatist approach. They will explore the tasks and tools of a pragmatist ethics and pay special attention to the exploration of future worlds disclosed and shaped by technology and the management of deep value conflicts inherent in a pluralistic society.

  10. Family Counseling and Ethical Challenges with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered (GLBT) Clients: More Questions Than Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janson, Gregory R.; Steigerwald, Fran J.

    2002-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered (GLBT) persons and their families present unique ethical challenges for marriage and family counselors. A series of brief case vignettes touch on a range of ethical issues for couples and family counselors, including training, supervision, custody evaluation, ethical decision making, counselor bias,…

  11. Ethical aspects of genome diversity research: genome research into cultural diversity or cultural diversity in genome research?

    PubMed

    Ilkilic, Ilhan; Paul, Norbert W

    2009-03-01

    The goal of the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) was to reconstruct the history of human evolution and the historical and geographical distribution of populations with the help of scientific research. Through this kind of research, the entire spectrum of genetic diversity to be found in the human species was to be explored with the hope of generating a better understanding of the history of humankind. An important part of this genome diversity research consists in taking blood and tissue samples from indigenous populations. For various reasons, it has not been possible to execute this project in the planned scope and form to date. Nevertheless, genomic diversity research addresses complex issues which prove to be highly relevant from the perspective of research ethics, transcultural medical ethics, and cultural philosophy. In the article at hand, we discuss these ethical issues as illustrated by the HGDP. This investigation focuses on the confrontation of culturally diverse images of humans and their cosmologies within the framework of genome diversity research and the ethical questions it raises. We argue that in addition to complex questions pertaining to research ethics such as informed consent and autonomy of probands, genome diversity research also has a cultural-philosophical, meta-ethical, and phenomenological dimension which must be taken into account in ethical discourses. Acknowledging this fact, we attempt to show the limits of current guidelines used in international genome diversity studies, following this up by a formulation of theses designed to facilitate an appropriate inquiry and ethical evaluation of intercultural dimensions of genome research.

  12. Rhetorical Prudence and Ethics: Writing as Cultural Criticism vs. Writing as Moral and Civic Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Lisa

    Cultural approaches to composition, such as those forwarded by John Trimbur, John Schilb, and James Berlin have come under strong criticism for attempting to indoctrinate students into instructors' political beliefs. One attack on writing as cultural criticism has been voiced by Maxine Hairston, who has questioned its ethicality. At issue in…

  13. "We Share the Same Biology..." Cultivating Cross-Cultural Empathy and Global Ethics through Multilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolbin, Cyrus; Chiesa, Bruno Della

    2010-01-01

    The "language-culture tesseract" hypothesized in the September 2010 issue of "Mind, Brain, and Education" suggests successive links between non-native language (NNL) acquisition, the development of cross-cultural empathy, and prosocial global ethics. Invoking Goethe's (1833/1999) aphorism, "those who do not know other languages know nothing of…

  14. Ethical considerations in disease management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a cross-cultural, worldwide perspective.

    PubMed

    Russell, J A

    1998-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is universally fatal. Technological advances have provided a means to impact upon, without radically improving, the natural history of the disease. In addition, we now have the capability of potentially identifying patients who are pre-symptomatic carriers of the rare heritable forms of the disease. These capabilities provide the basis for the numerous ethical dilemmas that face patients, physicians, and agencies responsible for health care expenditures; dilemmas that can only be amplified between cultures. This paper attempts to address some of the major ethical issues germane to the care of ALS patients. It discusses the emergence of autonomy as the reigning principle of medical ethics in the United States and its potential conflict with the ethical dilemma of limited resource allocation. Finally, it attempts to compare and contrast, in an admittedly anecdotal and fragmentary fashion, the perspective of other cultures regarding the care of ALS patients.

  15. Exploring the Inner and Outer Cultural Landscapes of Counseling Candidates towards Diverse Students and Families through Self-Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes, Adonay A.; Rodriguez-Valls, Fernando; Schroeder, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an interpersonal methodology designed to increase the cultural awareness of counselor candidates. This methodology was implemented through a sequence of activities, which was part of a multicultural course in the counseling credential program in a university located in Southern California. The goal was to enrich future…

  16. Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla; Yeh, Christine; Russell, LyRyan

    2016-01-01

    Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, "Boys II Men," for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles,…

  17. Deaf Adults' Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results from a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults' motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf,…

  18. "You Look Like Them": Drawing on Counselling Theory and Practice to Reflexively Negotiate Cultural Difference in Research Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Located within a context of intercultural counselling research, this paper highlights the pertinence of the researcher's reflexivity and cultural awareness in relation to research relationships. It draws on an excerpt between a white European interviewer and an Asian trainee counsellor discussing the latter's experience of intercultural…

  19. Counselor Education Student Perceptions of the American Counseling Association Ethical Code as It Pertains to the Use of Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babb, Tanner A.

    2012-01-01

    Student use of online social networks has increased exponentially in the past five years. Facebook is one of the largest and most utilized by students. Many counseling students use Facebook on a regular basis to keep in touch with friends, family, and acquaintances. (Lenhart & Madden, 2007). Current American Counseling Association (ACA)…

  20. The ethical dimensions of delivering culturally congruent nursing and health care.

    PubMed

    Zoucha, R; Husted, G L

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the ethical parameters of giving culturally congruent care to individual patients by health care professionals. Leininger's Cultural Care Diversity and Universality theory (Leininger, 1995) is used to demonstrate the importance of culture in a person's life and Husted's and Husted's (1995) bioethical theory is used to create a mind-set of ethical interaction and to direct the analysis of a bioethical dilemma involving cultural differences between persons of the same culture, a depressed Mexican-American woman and her husband. The differences between transculturalism and multiculturalism are explored. We defend the position that a patient's culture is only a useful tool in caring for a patient if the individual person is made the primary focus of care.

  1. Creating Cultures of Integrity: Ethics Education in UK Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Emma; Caulfield, Paul; Hibbert, Paul; Jennings, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recent corporate scandals and responses by regulators have created an environment in which there is a heightened awareness of business ethics. This report presents a series of case studies exploring how the current curricula in UK business schools could be scoped differently to give new business leaders the tools required for strong ethical…

  2. Induced Abortion: An Ethical Conundrum for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Hanks, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most controversial moral issues in American culture, but counselor value struggles regarding abortion are seldom addressed in counseling literature. This article considers the conflictual nature of the ethical principles of autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as they can occur within the…

  3. "Does organizational culture influence the ethical behavior in the pharmaceutical industry?".

    PubMed

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2011-12-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured questionnaire. The research design is hypothesis testing. It is a cross-sectional and correlational study, conducted under non-contrived settings. Chi-square tests were shows that there is an association between the organizational culture and ethical behavior of medical representatives. In addition, the strength of the association is measured which report to Cramer's V of 63.1% and Phi Value of 2.749. Results indicate that multinational company medical reps are more ethical compared to domestic company medical representatives vast difference in both variance and in t test results. Through better organizational culture, pharmaceutical companies can create the most desirable behavior among their employees. Authors conclude that apart from organizational culture, the study of additional organizational, individual and external factors are imperative for better understanding of ethical behavior of medical representatives in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

  4. Tiny tweaks, big changes: An alternative strategy to empower ethical culture of human research in anesthesia (A Taiwan Acta Anesthesiologica Taiwanica-Ethics Review Task Force Report).

    PubMed

    Luk, Hsiang-Ning; Ennever, John F; Day, Yuan-Ji; Wong, Chih-Shung; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2015-03-01

    For this guidance article, the Ethics Review Task Force (ERTF) of the Journal reviewed and discussed the ethics issues related to publication of human research in the field of anesthesia. ERTF first introduced international ethics principles and minimal requirements of reporting of ethics practices, followed by discussing the universal problems of publication ethics. ERTF then compared the accountability and methodology of several medical journals in assuring authors' ethics compliance. Using the Taiwan Institutional Review Board system as an example, ERTF expressed the importance of institutional review board registration and accreditation to assure human participant protection. ERTF presented four major human research misconducts in the field of anesthesia in recent years. ERTF finally proposed a flow-chart to guide journal peer reviewers and editors in ethics review during the editorial process in publishing. Examples of template languages applied in the Ethics statement section in the manuscript are expected to strengthen the ethics compliance of the authors and to set an ethical culture for all the stakeholders involved in human research.

  5. The Impact of Corporate Culture, the Reward System, and Perceived Moral Intensity on Marketing Students' Ethical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nill, Alexander; Schibrowsky, John A.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study how marketing students' ethical decision making was influenced by their perceived moral intensity (PMI), corporate culture, and the reward system. The findings indicate that levels of awareness of the ethical consequences of a decision, the corporate culture, and the reward system all significantly affect…

  6. Core ethical values of radiological protection applied to Fukushima case: reflecting common morality and cultural diversities.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Chieko; Cho, Kunwoo; Toohey, Richard E

    2016-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established Task Group 94 (TG94) to develop a publication to clarify the ethical foundations of the radiological protection system it recommends. This TG identified four core ethical values which structure the system: beneficence and non-maleficence, prudence, justice, and dignity. Since the ICRP is an international organization, its recommendations and guidance should be globally applicable and acceptable. Therefore, first this paper presents the basic principles of the ICRP radiological protection system and its core ethical values, along with a reflection on the variation of these values in Western and Eastern cultural traditions. Secondly, this paper reflects upon how these values can be applied in difficult ethical dilemmas as in the case of the emergency and post-accident phases of a nuclear power plant accident, using the Fukushima case to illustrate the challenges at stake. We found that the core ethical values underlying the ICRP system of radiological protection seem to be quite common throughout the world, although there are some variations among various cultural contexts. Especially we found that 'prudence' would call for somewhat different implementation in each cultural context, balancing and integrating sometime conflicting values, but always with objectives to achieve the well-being of people, which is itself the ultimate aim of the radiological protection system.

  7. Complexity overlooked: enhancing cultural competency in the white lesbian counseling trainee through education and supervision.

    PubMed

    Davis, Deanna N

    2014-01-01

    Self-awareness is often associated with enhanced multicultural competency. Training programs must work to facilitate self-awareness in counseling trainees who hold both privileged and oppressed identities. In this article, I highlight a gap in the literature regarding how best to supervise white lesbian counseling trainees. Facilitating self-awareness through supervision will be explored as a tool for enhancing multicultural competency in the white lesbian counseling trainee. An exploration of understanding white privilege as well as the impact of oppression on lesbian counseling trainees, will be used to draw conclusions regarding effective supervision for this population. Additionally, suggestions for future research will be proposed.

  8. [Medical ethical aspects of culture in social interactions with Muslim patients].

    PubMed

    Ilkilic, I

    2007-07-30

    In today's world, the plurality of values is considered to be a constitutive feature of modern societies. In these societies, transcultural patient-physician relationships are a part of daily medical practice. Culturally determined value systems can be crucial for understanding the perception of notions such as "health" and "illness", leading to fundamental differences in assessing medical interventions and therapeutic objectives. Therefore, transcultural conflicts of interest are presenting medical ethical decision-making with new challenges. Time and again, medical practice demonstrates that cultural differences between physician and patient are correlated with the complexity of medical ethical conflicts, as can be seen in the relationship between Muslim patients and non-Muslim physicians in the German health care system. This paper discusses some of the central issues in these relationships like communication, sense of shame, religious duties, and medical end-of-life decisions, analyzing some concrete cases. Subsequently, a number of medical ethical theses relevant for multicultural societies will be discussed.

  9. Teaching Ethics and Religious Culture in Quebec High Schools: An Overview, Contextualization and Some Analytical Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rymarz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 Quebec introduced a new ethics and religious culture course. This marks a significant development in Canadian education as the mandated curriculum is intended for use in publically funded secular schools. In the past such courses have been in the domain of denominational schools. This new approach is examined in the context of the profound…

  10. Citizenship, Secularity and the Ethics and Religious Culture Program of Quebec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaver, Arzina; DeMartini, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on some of the broader complexities of citizenship in Quebec, paying particular attention to the Quiet Revolution and Bill 60 (Charter of Values) in order to understand how these historical events shape contemporary politics. Using a case study of the Ethics and Religious Culture Program (ERC) in Quebec, we seek to highlight…

  11. Wanted: Tesseract. One Hypothesis on Languages, Cultures, and Ethics for Mind, Brain, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della Chiesa, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    For potential consideration by the Mind, Brain, and Education community, here is a modest but provocative hypothesis regarding the relationships between acquisition of languages, awareness of cultures, and development of ethics in human beings. Starting from the basic idea according to which "a fish does not know what water is," and using both…

  12. Foundations Symposium: A Continued Dialogue on Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Ethical Aspects of the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    Seven articles are presented from a symposium on critical theory, cultural analysis, and the ethical aspects of the use of educational technology. Two papers deal with the educational philosophy of two modern thinkers, and others focus on educational technology in the modern or postmodern era. The following papers are included: (1) "Foucault…

  13. Perspectives on Child Abuse and Labour: Global Ethical Ideals Versus African Cultural Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, A. O.; Torimiro, D. O.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the global and African postures on the issues of child abuse and child labour. The global ethical ideals of the issues are characterized within their various theoretical perspectives while the African cultural realities are explored through the use of focus group discussion sessions, which were organized in six rural…

  14. Understanding Social Media Culture and its Ethical Challenges for Art Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; McNutt, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethics in the context of the participatory culture of social media as it relates to art therapy. The authors present the view that social media formats are important venues for expression that contribute to interpersonal connections and social learning via the active participation of their members. To make informed ethical…

  15. The Professional Stance of Ethics and Religious Culture Teachers in Québec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estivalèzes, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    In September 2008, a new Ethics and Religious Culture programme was implemented in Québec's elementary and secondary schools. One of the main pedagogical challenges of this new course has been the requirement that teachers adopt a professional stance of impartiality. Teachers must refrain from sharing their points of view, so as not to influence…

  16. Racial Identity Theory, Research, and Applications. Edited Conference Proceedings of the Annual Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cross-Cultural Counseling and Psychotherapy (8th, New York, New York, February 22-23, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert T., Ed.; Johnson, Samuel D., Jr., Ed.

    The 1991 Winter Roundtable on Cross Cultural Counseling was the first national conference devoted to the topic of racial identity in counseling and psychotherapy. Conference papers include: (1) "A Brief Continuing History of the Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cross-Cultural Counseling and Psychotherapy" (Samuel D. Johnson, Jr.); (2) "Racial…

  17. Culture and Ethics in First Nations Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Josiah; Plaice, Evie; Perley, Imelda

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we share phenomena experienced by a multi-cultural research team working collaboratively with Wolastoq (Maliseet) First Nations Elders to document rapidly disappearing Wolastoq language, culture, and knowledge. This knowledge will ultimately be stored in databanks for future educational, community, and heritage use. Embedded within…

  18. Multicultural genetic counseling: then, now, and in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Wang, V O

    2001-01-01

    Scholars, educators, and practitioners have argued that racial-cultural issues are obstacles for those seeking genetic counseling. When available, cross-cultural genetic counseling has focused on simplistic knowledge of client health beliefs and cultural customs, professional cultures, and biased theoretical models as reasons for failure to create realistic knowledge of members of racial-cultural groups in the United States. Recognizing the importance of meeting the needs for all who seek genetic counseling services, genetic counselors have been providing direction in cross-cultural genetic counseling research, practice, training, and developing competency, ethical, and professional guidelines. However, emanating from a cultural pluralism perspective, cross-cultural genetic counseling has often resulted in homogenized group stereotypes without attention to intragroup variation and individual differences. A transition from cross-cultural towards multicultural genetics shifts from culture-specific group norms to an integrated social, historical, psychological, and political perspective. By valuing the process of personal and professional racial-cultural identity development, the evolution from cross-cultural to multicultural genetic counseling that has occurred within the past quarter century is discussed.

  19. Developing Multicultural Counseling Competencies through Experiential Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Achenbach, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on experiential learning as a teaching and learning methodology to increase students' multicultural counseling competencies. Outlines ethical and practical suggestions for using experiential learning in multicultural counseling curriculum. (Contains 43 references.) (GCP)

  20. Cultivating engineering ethics and critical thinking: a systematic and cross-cultural education approach using problem-based learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pei-Fen; Wang, Dau-Chung

    2011-08-01

    In May 2008, the worst earthquake in more than three decades struck southwest China, killing more than 80,000 people. The complexity of this earthquake makes it an ideal case study to clarify the intertwined issues of ethics in engineering and to help cultivate critical thinking skills. This paper first explores the need to encourage engineering ethics within a cross-cultural context. Next, it presents a systematic model for designing an engineering ethics curriculum based on moral development theory and ethic dilemma analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data from students' oral and written work were collected and analysed to determine directions for improvement. The paper also presents results of an assessment of this interdisciplinary engineering ethics course. This investigation of a disaster is limited strictly to engineering ethics education; it is not intended to assign blame, but rather to spark debate about ethical issues.

  1. Ethics.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Edmund D

    In this brief annual review of ethical issues in medicine, Pellegrino focuses on two issues, AIDS and surrogate mothers. The AIDS epidemic has generated debate over public health needs vs. individual rights, modification of sexual practices, screening programs to detect infected persons, confidentiality of test results, experimental therapies, and the duty of physicians to care for AIDS patients. Surrogate motherhood arrangements have become one of the more controversial of the new reproductive technologies. The publicity that accompanied the custody battle over New Jersey's "Baby M" intensified debate over the commercialization of childbearing and the regulation of reproduction. Pellegrino concludes that physicians, along with ethicists and policymakers, have an obligation to "lead society in careful and judicious deliberation" of the ethical issues raised by AIDS and by reproductive technologies.

  2. Realizing good care within a context of cross-cultural diversity: an ethical guideline for healthcare organizations in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Denier, Yvonne; Gastmans, Chris

    2013-09-01

    In our globalizing world, health care professionals and organizations increasingly experience cross-cultural challenges in care relationships, which give rise to ethical questions regarding "the right thing to do" in such situations. For the time being, the international literature lacks examples of elaborated ethical guidelines for cross-cultural healthcare on the organizational level. As such, the ethical responsibility of healthcare organizations in realizing cross-cultural care remains underexposed. This paper aims to fill this gap by offering a case-study that illustrates the bioethical practice on a large-scale organizational level by presenting the ethical guideline developed in the period 2007-2011 by the Ethics Committee of Zorgnet Vlaanderen, a Christian-inspired umbrella organization for over 500 social profit healthcare organizations in Flanders, Belgium. The guideline offers an ethical framework within which fundamental ethical values are being analyzed within the context of cross-cultural care. The case study concludes with implications for healthcare practice on four different levels: (1) the level of the healthcare organization, (2) staff, (3) care receivers, and (4) the level of care supply. The study combines content-based ethics with process-based benchmarks.

  3. An analogue study of the effects of asian cultural values and counselor multicultural competence on counseling process.

    PubMed

    Li, Lisa C; Kim, Bryan S K; O'Brien, Karen M

    2007-03-01

    One-hundred-and-sixteen Asian American college students viewed analogue videotapes in which an actress portraying a European American female "counselor" expressed cultural values that were either consistent or inconsistent with Asian culture to an actress portraying an Asian American female "client." In addition, the counselor either acknowledged racial differences or did not acknowledge racial differences with the client. The results showed that when the counselor expressed values that were inconsistent with Asian culture, the counselor who acknowledged racial differences was perceived to be more cross-culturally competent than the counselor who did not acknowledge racial differences. Also, the results showed that observer-participants' adherence to the value of conformity to norms was positively associated with their ratings of counselor credibility and crosscultural counseling competence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Changing the Engineering Student Culture with Respect to Academic Integrity and Ethics.

    PubMed

    VanDeGrift, Tammy; Dillon, Heather; Camp, Loreal

    2016-11-09

    Engineers create airplanes, buildings, medical devices, and software, amongst many other things. Engineers abide by a professional code of ethics to uphold people's safety and the reputation of the profession. Likewise, students abide by a code of academic integrity while learning the knowledge and necessary skills to prepare them for the engineering and computing professions. This paper reports on studies designed to improve the engineering student culture with respect to academic integrity and ethics. To understand the existing culture at a university in the USA, a survey based on a national survey about cheating was administered to students. The incidences of self-reported cheating and incidences of not reporting others who cheat show the culture is similar to other institutions. Two interventions were designed and tested in an introduction to an engineering course: two case studies that students discussed in teams and the whole class, and a letter of recommendation assignment in which students wrote about themselves (character, strengths, examples of ethical decisions) three years into the future. Students were surveyed after the two interventions. Results show that first-year engineering students appreciate having a code of academic integrity and they want to earn their degree without cheating, yet less than half of the students would report on another cheating student. The letter of recommendation assignment had some impact on getting students to think about ethics, their character, and their actions. Future work in changing the student culture will continue in both a top-down (course interventions) and bottom-up (student-driven interventions) manner.

  5. The Battlefield Health and Trauma Research Institute Scientific Ethics Committee: An Evolving Model for Fostering a Culture of Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    The Battlefield Health and Trauma Research Institute Scientific Ethics Committee: An evolving model for fostering a culture of integrity Kathy L...which he acted as a paid consultant.4 The article that launched the concern that the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine causes autism has re- cently...The Battlefield Health and Trauma Research Institute Scientific Ethics Committee: An evolving model for fostering a culture of integrity 5a. CONTRACT

  6. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display.

  7. Educators' perceptions and attitudes toward school counseling and student personnel services: A cultural perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Sidney A.

    1985-12-01

    This study was designed to survey and compare attitudes and perceptions toward school counseling and student personnel programs as held by educators in the Caribbean. The subjects in the study comprised 275 teachers and administrators employed in public and private junior and senior high schools in Nassau, Bahamas. The statistical tests used to analyze the data were the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and the Friedman two-way analysis for repeated measures. The findings indicate that administrators at all levels expressed significantly more favorable attitudes and perceptions toward counseling and student personnel programs in the schools than teachers. Teachers in the study expressed the following: (a) serious concern regarding the competency of practicing counselors in their schools; (b) a need for clarification of their role and function in the guidance process and a clarification of the counselor's role; and (c) minimum acceptable standards should be established for school counseling positions.

  8. Facebook: Maintaining Ethical Practice in the Cyberspace Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birky, Ian; Collins, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Current technology provides counseling center clinicians regular and immediate access to the students they work with via social networking. Focusing on Facebook in particular, this article discusses the opportunities and challenges this access creates and specifically explores how utilization of ethical, clinical, and cultural lenses might affect…

  9. A Grounded Theory of Relational Competencies and Creativity in Counseling: Beginning the Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Thelma; Haberstroh, Shane; Trepal, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Counselors and counselor educators are ethically bound to lifelong development of knowledge and skills that promote personal growth and relational development. The Association for Creativity in Counseling (ACC) was established on the principles of relational-cultural theory (RCT), which addresses the role of relational competency in…

  10. Blending Genetics and Sociocultural Historical Inquiry: Ethics, Culture, and Human Subjects Protection in International Cross Cultural Research

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Deborah A.; Caldwell, Dennis; Taylor, Andre D.; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the implementation and difficulties when conducting genetics research in a rural, traditional West African culture within the frame of the United States’ grounded research ethics. Research challenges are highlighted by Western researchers following U.S. Institutional Review Board (IRB) guidelines and practices in a non-Western country. IRB concepts are culture bound in Western ideals that may not have synchronicity and compatibility with non-Western cultures. Differences in sociocultural norms, traditions, language, and geography were influencing factors that can affect application of IRB principles. Suggestions for change are offered, which will potentially aid researchers considering application of IRB requirements when conducting research in non-Westernized, non-industrialized countries. PMID:23482512

  11. Ecologically Based, Culturally Concordant Responding Following Disasters: The Counseling Psychologist's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spokane, Arnold R.; Inman, Arpana G.; Weatherford, Ryan D.; Davidson, Anju Kaduvettoor; Straw, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the existing theory, research, policy, and practice of disaster mental health and the role of counseling psychology in post-disaster and catastrophic situations, all from a social justice perspective. Specifically, we discuss the phases and stages, social ecology, and individual reactions to disasters. A case study is…

  12. Food and Culture: A Pedagogical Approach to Contextualizing Food-Based Activities in Multicultural Counseling Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Carol A.; Rush, Lee Covington; Ingene, Daphne H.

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogic approaches that draw on reflective practices and experiential activities are valued for their perceived ability to enhance multicultural understanding. The use of food-based assignments is not uncommon in multicultural counseling courses; however, the authors contend that although these activities may be experiential in nature, they are…

  13. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Genetic counseling Genetic counseling E-mail to a friend Please fill ... a genetic counselor in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , ...

  14. Cultural imperatives and the ethics of verbal autopsies in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Aborigo, Raymond A.; Allotey, Pascale; Tindana, Paulina; Azongo, Daniel; Debpuur, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to a paucity of statistics from vital registration systems in developing countries, the verbal autopsy (VA) approach has been used to obtain cause-specific mortality data by interviewing lay respondents on the signs and symptoms experienced by the deceased prior to death. In societies where the culture of mourning is adhered to, the use of VA could clash with traditional norms, thus warranting ethical consideration by researchers. Objective The study was designed to explore the ethics and cultural context of collecting VA information through a demographic and health surveillance system in the Kassena-Nankana District (KND) of Ghana. Study Design Data were collected through qualitative in-depth interviews (IDIs) with four field staff involved in the routine conduct of VAs, four physicians who code VAs, 20 selected respondents to the VA tool, and eight opinion leaders in the KND. The interviews were supplemented with observation by the researchers and with the field notes of field workers. Interviews were audio-recorded, and local language versions transcribed into English. Thematic analysis was performed using QSR NVivo 8 software. Results The data indicate that cultural sensitivities in VA procedures at both the individual and family levels need greater consideration not only for ethical reasons but also to ensure the quality of the data. Discussions of some deaths are culturally prohibited and therefore lead to refusal of interviews. Families were also concerned about the confidentiality of information because of the potential of blame for the death. VA teams do not necessarily engage in culturally appropriate bereavement practices such as the presentation of tokens. The desire by families for feedback on the cause of death, which is currently not provided by researchers, was frequently expressed. Finally, no standard exists on the culturally acceptable time interval between death and VA interviews. Conclusion Ethical issues need to be given greater

  15. The Affordable Care Act: the ethical call to transform the organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will require health care leaders and managers to develop strategies and implement organizational tactics for their organization to survive and thrive under the federal mandates of this new health care law. Successful health care organizations and health care systems will be defined by their adaptability in the new value-based marketplace created by the Affordable Care Act. The most critical underlining challenge for this success will be the effective transformation of the organizational culture. Transformational value-based leadership is now needed to answer the ethical call for transforming the organizational culture. This article provides a model and recommendations to influence change in the most difficult leadership duty-transforming the organizational culture.

  16. Values and Social Justice in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crethar, Hugh C.; Winterowd, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    The construct of social justice in counseling is defined and operationalized in this article. This is followed by a discussion about the intersection between social justice in counseling and philosophy, ethics, and spirituality. A call to action for counseling professionals is offered. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Ethics in brain injury rehabilitation: existential choices among western cultural beliefs.

    PubMed

    Malec, J F

    1993-01-01

    The following issues in the practice of brain injury rehabilitation are explored: (1) validity of support for efficacy based on experience in clinical practice, (2) validity of support for efficacy based on research, (3) consumer protection, (4) qualifications and regulation of individual providers, (5) regulation of programme development and marketing. Ethical responses to these issues from each of three cultural belief systems (humanism, science and self-interest) are examined from a metaphilosophical perspective based on contemporary cognitive psychology and on philosophies of social constructionism and existentialism.

  18. Pregnancy in a hemodialysis patient with an ethical/cultural challenge.

    PubMed

    Ralph, C

    2000-01-01

    Each year, one in 200 women of child-bearing age conceive while on dialysis. Of those pregnancies not electively terminated, 46% result in a surviving infant. Late pregnancy losses are common with 25% ending in second trimester spontaneous abortion, stillbirth or neonatal death (Hou & Firanek, 1998). Despite these alarming statistics, there has been an increase in the number of successful pregnancies reported in the literature (Bagon et al., 1998; Romao et al., 1998). This case study presentation will allow readers to appreciate both clinical challenges and ethical issues associated with a pregnant, hemodialysis-dependent woman. Despite being given information about the risks of pregnancy while on dialysis, Mrs. T. was determined to have a second child (she has a two-year-old son). Her strong religious beliefs led her to believe that Allah would protect her and her child from harm. This created an ethical conflict with many members of the interdisciplinary health care team, who were of the opinion that a pregnancy would be detrimental to Mrs. T's health. Five months after initiation of hemodialysis, Mrs. T. did become pregnant. The unique nature of an Arabic-speaking Muslim woman who was pregnant and on dialysis provided an opportunity for the health care team to become more familiar with cultural and ethical issues that impacted greatly on her care. At 36 weeks, Mrs. T. delivered a healthy 2362 gram (5.1 lb.) baby girl with an apgar score of four and eight.

  19. Bioethical dimensions of cultural psychosomatics: the need for an ethical research approach.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary psychosomatics is a research-based technical discipline and its social power depends on how scientific knowledge is obtained and applied in practice, considering cultural contexts. This article presents the view that the dialogical principles on which bioethical discourse is based are more inclusive than professional ethics and philosophical reflection. The distinction is advanced between rule-guided behavior and norm-justifiable acts (substantiation and justification). The practical implications of good practices in the generation of valid, reliable, generalizable and applicable knowledge are emphasized. For practitioners and researchers, the need to reflect on the distinction between patient and research participant can avoid the therapeutic misunderstanding, a form of abuse of the doctor-patient relationship. In addition, in resource-poor settings, the dilemma presented by the know-do gap (inapplicability of research results due to financial or social constraints) is part of the ethics' realm of the profession. Future prospects include a wider use of research results in practice, but avoidance of the know-do gap (the disparity between what is known and what can be done, particularly in settings with limited resources) requires a synthetic and holistic approach to medical ethics, combining moral reflection, theoretical analysis and empirical data.

  20. Medical geneticists confront ethical dilemmas: cross-cultural comparisons among 18 nations.

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, D C; Fletcher, J C; Mulvihill, J J

    1990-01-01

    To provide a basis for international discussion of ethical problems, we studied responses of medical geneticists in 18 countries to questionnaires about 14 clinical cases and five screening situations. Of 1,053 asked to participate, 677 (64%) responded. There was greater than or equal to 75% consensus on five cases involving (1) disclosure of (1) conflicting diagnostic findings, (2) disclosure of ambiguous results, (3) disclosure of controversial interpretations, (4) protection of mother's confidentiality in cases of false paternity, and (5) nondirective counseling about 45,X and XYY syndrome. A majority (51%-60%) would disclose the diagnosis to relatives at risk for Huntington disease or hemophilia A, against the patient's wishes; would disclose which parent carries a translocation causing Down syndrome; and would disclose XY genotype in a female. As reproductive options for patients with disorders not diagnosable prenatally, 84% would discuss artificial insemination by a donor, 66% would discuss in vitro fertilization with donor egg, and 46% would discuss surrogate motherhood. In all, 85% would perform prenatal diagnosis for (or would refer) parents who refuse abortion, 75% for maternal anxiety, and 42% for selection of fetal sex. Screening questions showed that 72% believed that workplace screening should be voluntary and that results should be confidential. PMID:2339711

  1. Graduate Counseling Students' Learning, Development, and Retention of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Ieva, Kara P.; Mullen, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated 52 graduate counseling students' levels of ethical and legal knowledge (Lambie, Hagedorn, & Ieva, 2010) and social-cognitive development (Hy & Loevinger, 1996) at three points: (a) prior to a counseling ethics course, (b) at the completion of the course, and (c) four months later. Students' ethical and legal…

  2. Crisis Counseling: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Scott, Amy Nicole; Padilla, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists working in schools are often the first contacts for children experiencing a potentially traumatizing event or change in status. This article reviews basic concepts in crisis counseling and describes the components of psychological first aid. This form of counseling must be developmentally and culturally appropriate as well as…

  3. Counseling in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Soo Yin; Neihart, Maureen F.

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, a tiny island nation, rose from 3rd- to 1st-world status in just 3 decades. Unlike in most developed countries, counseling in Singapore has a short history with faith-based beginnings and currently faces challenges to remain culturally relevant. The authors trace the development of Singapore's counseling services, provide an update…

  4. Ethnic Identity and Parenting Stress in South Asian Families: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shariff, Aneesa

    2009-01-01

    The South Asian culture is one in which family obligation and loyalty, as well as self-sacrifice and obedience toward one's elders, are paramount. These values can be different from those of the more individualistically oriented Euro-Canadian dominant culture, and can prompt challenges of cultural adjustment among Canadian-born South Asian youth…

  5. Training for Competence in Cross-Cultural Counseling and Psychotherapy. The Teachers College Winter Roundtable Conference Proceedings (10th, New York, New York, February 19-20, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samuel D., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of papers from the 1993 Teachers College Winter Roundtable focus on training for competence in cross-cultural counseling and psychotherapy. Each paper approaches an issue in effective practice from a theoretical or applied perspective. The following are included: (1) "African-American Identity: A Causal and a Noncausal…

  6. Counseling on the Information Highway: Future Possibilities and Potential Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; Kolodinsky, Robert W.; Greeno, Brian P.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews features of the Internet and some of its available counseling applications, such as marketing and delivering counseling services. Discusses the results of an analysis of counseling applications on the Internet and explores potential problems with counseling applications on computer networks, including ethical concerns and relationship…

  7. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

  8. Female genital cutting (FGC) and the ethics of care: community engagement and cultural sensitivity at the interface of migration experiences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Female Genital Cutting (FGC) anchored in a complex socio-cultural context becomes significant at the interface of access of health and social services in host countries. The practice of FGC at times, understood as a form of gender-based violence, may result in unjustifiable consequences among girls and women; yet, these practices are culturally engrained traditions with complex meanings calling for ethically and culturally sensitive health and social service provision. Intents and meanings of FGC practice need to be well understood before before any policies that criminalize and condemn are derived and implemented. FGC is addressed as a global public health issue with complex legal and ethical dimensions which impacts ability to access services, far beyond gender sensitivity. The ethics of terminology are addressed, building on the sustained controversial debate in regards to the delicate issue of conceptualization. An overview of international policies is provided, identifying the current trend of condemnation of FGC practices. Socio-cultural and ethical challenges are discussed in light of selected findings from a community-based research project. The illustrative examples provided focus on Western countries, with a specific emphasis on Canada. Discussion The examples provided converge with the literature confirming the utmost necessity to engage with the FGC practicing communities allowing for ethically sensitive strategies, reduction of harm in relation to systems of care, and prevention of the risk of systematic gendered stigmatization. A culturally competent, gender and ethically sensitive approach is argued for to ensure the provision of quality ethical care for migrant families in host countries. We argue that socio-cultural determinants such as ethnicity, migration, sex and gender need to be accounted for as integral to the social construction of FGC. Summary Working partnerships between the public health sector and community based organisations

  9. Postmortem Confidentiality: An Ethical Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret; Kabell, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    In an era of increased need and expectation for confidentiality, the counseling record of the deceased client challenges confidentiality. Using ethical codes and legal mandates, the authors explore whether the counseling record of a deceased client should be released when the client's will and the client's counseling records are silent on this…

  10. A Troubled Past? Reassessing Ethics in the History of Tissue Culture.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Recent books, articles and plays about the 'immortal' HeLa cell line have prompted renewed interest in the history of tissue culture methods that were first employed in 1907 and became common experimental tools during the twentieth century. Many of these sources claim tissue cultures like HeLa had a "troubled past" because medical researchers did not seek informed consent before using tissues in research, contravening a long held desire for self-determination on the part of patients and the public. In this article, I argue these claims are unfair and misleading. No professional guidelines required informed consent for tissue culture during the early and mid twentieth century, and popular sources expressed no concern at the widespread use of human tissues in research. When calls for informed consent did emerge in the 1970s and 1980s, moreover, they reflected specific political changes and often emanated from medical researchers themselves. I conclude by arguing that more balanced histories of tissue culture can make a decisive contribution to public debates today: by refuting a false dichotomy between science and its publics, and showing how ethical concepts such as informed consent arise from a historically specific engagement between professional and social groups.

  11. Reducing cultural and psychological barriers to Latino enrollment in HIV-prevention counseling: initial data on an enrollment meta-intervention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kristina; Durantini, Marta R; Albarracín, Julia; Crause, Candi; Albarracín, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of Latino culture (e.g., machismo, marianism) can act as barriers to enrollment in HIV-prevention programs. To lift these barriers, a culturally appropriate meta-intervention was designed to increase intentions to enroll in HIV-prevention counseling by Latinos. Latino participants (N=41) were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to either an experimental or control meta-intervention condition that varied the introduction to a HIV-prevention counseling program. Following the meta-intervention, participants were issued an invitation to take part in HIV-prevention counseling. The outcome measure was the intention to enroll in a HIV-prevention counseling session. Findings indicated that enrollment intentions were higher in the experimental meta-intervention condition (96%) than in the control meta-intervention condition (53%). In addition, the effects of the meta-intervention were comparable across genders and participant ages. Findings suggest that the use of a culturally appropriate meta-intervention may be an effective strategy for increasing Latino enrollment in HIV-prevention programs. These promising findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy and effectiveness of this meta-intervention.

  12. Reducing cultural and psychological barriers to Latino enrollment in HIV-prevention counseling: Initial data on an enrollment meta-intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kristina; Durantini, Marta R.; Albarracín, Julia; Crause, Candi; Albarracín, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of Latino culture (e.g., machismo, marianism) can act as barriers to enrollment in HIV-prevention programs. To lift these barriers, a culturally appropriate meta-intervention was designed to increase intentions to enroll in HIV-prevention counseling by Latinos. Latino participants (N = 41) were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to either an experimental or control meta-intervention condition that varied the introduction to a HIV-prevention counseling program. Following the meta-intervention, participants were issued an invitation to take part in HIV-prevention counseling. The outcome measure was the intention to enroll in a HIV-prevention counseling session. Findings indicated that enrollment intentions were higher in the experimental meta-intervention condition (96%) than in the control meta-intervention condition (53%). In addition, the effects of the meta-intervention were comparable across genders and participant ages. Findings suggest that the use of a culturally appropriate meta-intervention may be an effective strategy for increasing Latino enrollment in HIV-prevention programs. These promising findings warrant further investigation into the efficacy and effectiveness of this meta-intervention. PMID:23398305

  13. The Complexities of Neutrality in Teaching Religious Education: The Ethics and Religious Culture Program as Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaver, Arzina

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Québec Ministry of Education introduced the Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) program. Though the ERC is a positive step forward in promoting and fostering much-needed religious literacy skills, the implications of a "neutral" professional posture asked of its teachers have been difficult to translate into the classroom.…

  14. Right and Wrong and Cultural Diversity: Replication of the 2002 NAS/Zogby Poll on Business Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlum, Marty; Mascaloinov, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    In April 2002, a NAS/Zogby poll found that only a quarter of sampled students perceived uniform standards of "right and wrong" and that most students felt that ethical behavior depends on cultural diversity. In this effort to replicate those findings in a larger sample of American college students, the authors obtained results that…

  15. Ethical, social, and cultural considerations for site selection for research with genetically modified mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lavery, James V; Harrington, Laura C; Scott, Thomas W

    2008-09-01

    Recent advances in technology have made strategies for disease control using genetically modified (GM) vectors more plausible. Selecting an appropriate field site for research with GM mosquitoes may be one of the most complex and significant aspects of the research process. Among the key considerations of the process is the need to address ethical, legal, and cultural (ESC) issues. No guidelines have been developed to date for this complicated and sensitive process. In this paper, we describe a site selection process and a set of preliminary considerations for addressing the ESC aspects of a research program involving genetic strategies for the control of mosquitoes as vectors for dengue viruses. These considerations reflect some of the key ESC issues for site selection decisions for research with GM vectors.

  16. The Impact of Creativity in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    2008-01-01

    Creativity is a crucial component in the advancement of all major cultural entities, including effective counseling. It is through creativity that major theories of counseling and skills in counseling have been developed. Creativity is longitudinal in its impact. If counseling is to progress in the future, it is essential that counselors be…

  17. COUNSELING PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WATERLOO, GLENN E.

    THE NEED FOR COUNSELING IS EMPHASIZED BY THE FACT THAT 875,000 CHILDREN IN THE UNITED STATES HAVE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL IMPEDIMENTS TO LEARNING. TYPICAL COUNSELING PRACTICES ARE PROBLEM-CENTERED COUNSELING, EXCLUSIVELY "VOCATIONAL" OR "EDUCATIONAL" COUNSELING WITH LITTLE CONCERN FOR THE WHOLE INDIVIDUAL, EXTREME DIRECTIVE OR…

  18. Legal and Ethical Issues Related to the Management of Cultural Heritage in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Justin

    in space. The United Nations Outer Space Treaty of 1967 -the primary document governing how nations act in outer space -is now hopelessly out-of-date. There is no mention in the treaty of cultural heritage (the UNESCO convention that concerns international protection of cultural heritage on Earth was not completed until 1970), nor was there any recognition of the role private groups and individuals might play in space exploration. This paper will outline key legal and ethical issues related to cultural heritage management and protection. It will also suggest some ways in which culturally significant sites in space can be protected for future study and even touristic appreciation.

  19. Ethical Decision-Making by Educational Leaders: Its Foundations, Culture and More Recent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Steven; Trabichet, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The belief that educational leaders need to be ethical decision-makers is recent. Thomas and Bainbridge suggest that an educational leader needs to develop technical competency in ethical leadership. Yet few leaders in schools have been trained in conflict resolution of an ethical nature and little importance has been given to this within existing…

  20. Second Language Acquisition: Cultural, Cognitive, and Clinical Considerations for Counseling Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Ivers, John J., Sr.; Duffey, Thelma

    2013-01-01

    The non-English-speaking population of the United States has increased by 140% since 1980 (Shin & Kominski, 2010). To serve this growing population, it is important that counselors increase their multicultural and multilingual competence. Through the lens of multicultural theory and relational-cultural theory, we analyze potential benefits of…

  1. International Student Depression during Cultural Adjustment: Two Counseling Approaches and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pheny Zhou

    The growing number of international students and exchange scholars enrolled in American colleges and universities each year has called attention to the need to provide special mental health services to help international students adjust to the host culture and solve various mental health problems. According to Alderian therapy, people are…

  2. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Counseling: Mental Health Conceptions in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Othman

    The general societal pattern in Malaysia is reflected by the distinct multi-racial composition of the population, comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. In Malaysia, ethnicity determines the varied differences in the socio-cultural and religious diversity of the population. Organized modern medical services have existed in Malaysia since…

  3. Improving Intercultural Interactions. Modules for Cross-Cultural Training Programs. Multicultural Aspects of Counseling Series 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brislin, Richard W., Ed.; Yoshida, Tomoko, Ed.

    This book contains modules for use in cross-cultural training programs. A module differs from a chapter in that it is a collection of materials that guide the reader both on the content of a defined unit of training and the method of delivery of that content. The modules are grouped into four sections, three corresponding to organizations in which…

  4. Understanding the Depth and Richness of the Cultural Context in Career Counseling through the Cultural Formulation Approach (CFA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, Mary J.; Fu, Chu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Cultural Formulation Approach (CFA) proposed by Leong and his colleagues, and the strong and insightful applications of the approach offered by Leong, Arthur, Juntunen, Byars-Winston, and Flores. They think this model has phenomenal possibilities in providing a methodology for counselors to be able to…

  5. Translating global recommendations on HIV and infant feeding to the local context: the development of culturally sensitive counselling tools in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Leshabari, Sebalda C; Koniz-Booher, Peggy; Åstrøm, Anne N; de Paoli, Marina M; Moland, Karen M

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper describes the process used to develop an integrated set of culturally sensitive, evidence-based counselling tools (job aids) by using qualitative participatory research. The aim of the intervention was to contribute to improving infant feeding counselling services for HIV positive women in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. Methods Formative research using a combination of qualitative methods preceded the development of the intervention and mapped existing practices, perceptions and attitudes towards HIV and infant feeding (HIV/IF) among mothers, counsellors and community members. Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol guided the development of the overall intervention strategy. Theories of behaviour change, a review of the international HIV/IF guidelines and formative research findings contributed to the definition of performance and learning objectives. Key communication messages and colourful graphic illustrations related to infant feeding in the context of HIV were then developed and/or adapted from existing generic materials. Draft materials were field tested with intended audiences and subjected to stakeholder technical review. Results An integrated set of infant feeding counselling tools, referred to as 'job aids', was developed and included brochures on feeding methods that were found to be socially and culturally acceptable, a Question and Answer Guide for counsellors, a counselling card on the risk of transmission of HIV, and an infant feeding toolbox for demonstration. Each brochure describes the steps to ensure safer infant feeding using simple language and images based on local ideas and resources. The brochures are meant to serve as both a reference material during infant feeding counselling in the ongoing prevention of mother to child transmission (pMTCT) of HIV programme and as take home material for the mother. Conclusion The study underscores the importance of formative research and a systematic theory based approach to

  6. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certain responsibilities, including that of providing ethics counseling regarding the application of this.... Disclosures made by an employee to an agency ethics official are not protected by an attorney-client...

  7. Guidelines for Teaching Cross-Cultural Clinical Ethics: Critiquing Ideology and Confronting Power in the Service of a Principles-Based Pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Brunger, Fern

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a pedagogical framework for teaching cross-cultural clinical ethics. The approach, offered at the intersection of anthropology and bioethics, is innovative in that it takes on the "social sciences versus bioethics" debate that has been ongoing in North America for three decades. The argument is made that this debate is flawed on both sides and, moreover, that the application of cross-cultural thinking to clinical ethics requires using the tools of the social sciences (such as the critique of the universality of the Euro-American construct of "autonomy") within (rather than in opposition to) a principles-based framework for clinical ethics. This paper introduces the curriculum and provides guidelines for how to teach cross-cultural clinical ethics. The learning points that are introduced emphasize culture in its relation to power and underscore the importance of viewing both biomedicine and bioethics as culturally constructed.

  8. Cultural Conundrums: The Ethics of Epidemiology and the Problems of Population in Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The impending implementation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has prompted complicated bioethical and public health ethics concerns regarding the moral distribution of antiretroviral medications (ARVs) to ostensibly healthy populations as a form of HIV prevention when millions of HIV-positive people still lack access to ARVs globally. This manuscript argues that these questions are, in part, concerns over the ethics of epidemiological science and knowledge production practices. Questions of distribution, and their attendant cost-benefit calculations, will rely on a number of presupposed, and therefore, normatively cultural assumptions within the science of epidemiology specifically regarding the ability of epidemiological surveillance to produce accurate maps of HIV throughout national populations. Specifically, ethical questions around PrEP will focus on who should receive ARVs given the fact that global demand will far exceed supply. Given that sexual transmission is one of the main modes of HIV transmission, these questions of “who” are inextricably linked to knowledge about sex, gender and sexuality. As a result, the ethics of epidemiology, and how the epidemiology of HIV in particular conceives, classifies and constructs sexual populations will become a critical point of reflection and contestation for bioethicists, health activists, physicians, nurses, and researchers in the medical humanities and biomedicine. This paper examines how cultural conundrums within the fields of bio- and public health ethics are directly implicated within the ethics of PrEP, by analyzing the problems of population inaugurated by the construction of the men who have sex with men (MSM) epidemiological category in the specific national context of South Africa. PMID:24373050

  9. Cultural conundrums: the ethics of epidemiology and the problems of population in implementing pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Fiereck, Kirk

    2015-04-01

    The impending implementation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has prompted complicated bioethical and public health ethics concerns regarding the moral distribution of antiretroviral medications (ARVs) to ostensibly healthy populations as a form of HIV prevention when millions of HIV-positive people still lack access to ARVs globally. This manuscript argues that these questions are, in part, concerns over the ethics of the knowledge production practices of epidemiology. Questions of distribution, and their attendant cost-benefit calculations, will rely on a number of presupposed, and therefore, normatively cultural assumptions within the science of epidemiology specifically regarding the ability of epidemiologic surveillance to produce accurate maps of HIV throughout national populations. Specifically, ethical questions around PrEP will focus on who should receive ARVs given the fact that global demand will far exceed supply. Given that sexual transmission is one of the main modes of HIV transmission, these questions of 'who' are inextricably linked to knowledge about sexual personhood. As a result, the ethics of epidemiology, and how the epidemiology of HIV in particular conceives, classifies and constructs sexual populations will become a critical point of reflection and contestation for bioethicists, health activists, physicians, nurses, and researchers in the multi-disciplinary field of global health. This paper examines how cultural conundrums within the fields of bioethics and public health ethics are directly implicated within the ethics of PrEP, by analyzing the problems of population inaugurated by the construction of the men who have sex with men (MSM) epidemiologic category in the specific national context of South Africa.

  10. The Career Counseling with Underserved Populations Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Providing effective career counseling to culturally diverse individuals is not the same as helping those from majority cultures. The Career Counseling With Underserved Populations model aids career counselors in supporting underserved populations as they strive to address their important career counseling issues.

  11. The Ethical Implications of Cultural Intervention by Space-faring Civilizations -- What Science Fiction Has to Say

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupa, M.

    Science fiction (Scifi) plays out the concerns of our possible scientistic futures; it is a source for exploring the deep rooted psychological concerns of mankind with science and the humanities. In this paper it is proposed Scifi is a valid source of hypotheses to examine, not as "evidence", but as candidate ­ often cautionary ­ notions, i.e., scenarios to be studied. Scifi represents a kind of Jungian mythological based story-telling, putting forward tales that express our conscious/unconscious concerns. Thus, when looking into ethical questions like, "where will techno-progressive futures take us?", we import into them these archetypes, hopes and fears, as a result they frequently reappear as familiar tropes. In this respect it is appropriate not to ignore them, but to openly challenge/appreciate them: to see what scenarios are indeed likely and how they may impact us reciprocally. This paper examines some of these aspects, and provides examples of how they are represented in the Scifi genre, in particular with consideration of the ethical implications of cultural intervention by space-faring civilizations. Given the specific analysis/examples provided, it concludes with an ethical scenario analysis (a dialectic argument), within the limiting conditions of the Drake Equation, Fermi Paradox and Cultural History. It comments on the potential existential risk of the Active SETI programmes recently initiated, indeed the need for an ethical exosociological review of all proposed Interstellar projects that express an "Intervention-Propensity".

  12. Models of genetic counseling and their effects on multicultural genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Linwood J

    2002-06-01

    This theoretical paper examines challenges to multicultural genetic counseling, counseling between culturally different clients and counselors, in the context of Kessler's typology of models of genetic counseling (Kessler S (1997) J Genet Counsel 6:287-295). It is suggested that challenges such as resistance to multicultural genetic counseling education may be due to conceptions about genetic counseling as a biomedical field that transcends questions of culture as well as lack of multicultural training or prejudice. Directions for future research and recommendations for multicultural genetic counseling education are briefly explored.

  13. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  14. Cultural diversity in pastoral care.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Mary A; Sevig, Todd D

    2004-01-01

    Fukuyama and Sevig are counseling psychologists who have a particular interest in the integration of spirituality into multicultural counseling and training. In this article the authors address the complexity of integrating religious and cultural diversity and spirituality into chaplaincy care in the context of an increasingly diverse society. By posing a series of questions, the authors systematically clarify definitions and meanings of culture, spirituality, cultural diversity and multiculturalism, multicultural and spiritual competencies in counseling, and ethical considerations. The authors discuss clinical applications in the context of a "spirituality and health movement," and provide suggestions for continuing professional development. The authors support the notion that multicultural engagement is spiritually synergistic, and encourage health care providers to communicate across professional disciplines to broaden and enrich discourse on these topics.

  15. Existential Authenticity: A Foundational Value for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miars, Russell D.

    2002-01-01

    The author challenges the view that adopting an existential perspective in counseling is inapplicable or a luxury for most clients. The concept of existential authenticity is presented as an organizing ethic that can bring out the positive side of existentialism in counseling. Specific values and conditions are presented that can be adopted to…

  16. Four Step Model for Experiential Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Vonda; Scherer, David

    As experiential counseling gains wider acceptance, it becomes more important to operate from a structural framework promoting effective and ethical practices. This paper outlines a four-part model of experiential counseling: theoretical foundations, experiential activity and personnel, processing and communication skills, and prerequisites for…

  17. Counseling Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Murray, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Contains 16 articles about counseling males including: (1) gender role conflict; (2) sex-role development; (3) counseling adolescent, adult, and gay males; (4) teenage fathers; (5) female therapists and male clients; (6) career development; (7) hypermasculinity; (8) counseling physically abusive men, uncoupling men; (9) group therapy, men's…

  18. Counseling Endorphins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry

    1994-01-01

    The author introduces, through personal narrative, the idea that the experience of counseling another person can create "counseling endorphins" and invites other mental health professionals to enter into a dialogue about the possibility of a counseling "high" and about how to design research to explore this phenomenon. (Author/JPS)

  19. Lost in transformation? Reviving ethics of care in hospital cultures of evidence-based healthcare.

    PubMed

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente

    2017-01-12

    Drawing on previous empirical research, we provide an exemplary narrative to illustrate how patients have experienced hospital care organized according to evidence-based fast-track programmes. The aim of this paper was to analyse and discuss if and how it is possible to include patients' individual perspectives in an evidence-based practice as seen from the point of view of nursing theory. The paper highlights two conflicting courses of development. One is a course of standardization founded on evidence-based recommendations, which specify a set of rules that the patient must follow rigorously. The other is a course of democratization based on patients' involvement in care. Referring to the analysis of the narrative, we argue that, in the current implementation of evidence-based practice, the proposed involvement of patients resembles empty rhetoric. We argue that the principles and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as 'one best way'. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today's evidence practice as the fundamental values of nursing may potentially bridge conflicts between evidence-based practice and the ideals of patient participation thus preventing a practice of 'McNursing'.

  20. School Counseling Programs as Spiritual and Religious Safe Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stloukal, Merit E.; Wickman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a model for creating spiritual and religious safe zones in school counseling programs that implements the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling's (ASERVIC; 2009) "Competencies for Addressing Spiritual and Religious Issues in Counseling" in a school setting. The authors frame the model within the…

  1. Teaching Research Integrity in the Field of Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Kelly L.

    2007-01-01

    Little has been done in terms of teaching or writing about research integrity or research ethics in the counseling field. Because of the continual push for research in counseling to maintain evidence-based practices, there is a need for education in the area of research integrity in order for professionals in the counseling field to conduct…

  2. Parents' refusal of medical treatment based on religious and/or cultural beliefs: the law, ethical principles, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Linnard-Palmer, Luanne; Kools, Susan

    2004-10-01

    When parents apply religious or cultural beliefs concerning spiritual healing, faith healing, or preference for prayer over traditional health care for children, concerns develop. Medical care is considered one of the most basic of all human needs, and yet parents may elect to apply religious or cultural beliefs in place of traditional Western medical care for their children. Because memberships in religious groups that have beliefs concerning prayer and health care for children are increasing, the topic is of great importance for pediatric health professionals. This article describes parental refusal of medical care, and it discusses the legal, ethical, and clinical implications.

  3. Details of the 1988 AACD Ethical Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Virginia B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses newest (1988) revisions of the American Association for Counseling and Development Ethical Standards, section by section. Various sections deal with general ethics, the counseling relationship, measurement and evaluation, research and publication, consulting, private practice, personnel administration, and preparation standards.…

  4. 31 CFR 0.105 - Deputy Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deputy Ethics Official. 0.105 Section... EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.105 Deputy Ethics Official. The Chief Counsel or Legal Counsel for a bureau, or a designee, is the Deputy Ethics Official for that bureau....

  5. 31 CFR 0.105 - Deputy Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deputy Ethics Official. 0.105 Section... EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.105 Deputy Ethics Official. The Chief Counsel or Legal Counsel for a bureau, or a designee, is the Deputy Ethics Official for that bureau....

  6. 31 CFR 0.105 - Deputy Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deputy Ethics Official. 0.105 Section... EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.105 Deputy Ethics Official. The Chief Counsel or Legal Counsel for a bureau, or a designee, is the Deputy Ethics Official for that bureau....

  7. 31 CFR 0.105 - Deputy Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deputy Ethics Official. 0.105 Section... EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.105 Deputy Ethics Official. The Chief Counsel or Legal Counsel for a bureau, or a designee, is the Deputy Ethics Official for that bureau....

  8. 31 CFR 0.105 - Deputy Ethics Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deputy Ethics Official. 0.105 Section... EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.105 Deputy Ethics Official. The Chief Counsel or Legal Counsel for a bureau, or a designee, is the Deputy Ethics Official for that bureau....

  9. Social-Cognitive Development, Ethical and Legal Knowledge, and Ethical Decision Making of Counselor Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Ieva, Kara P.

    2010-01-01

    Counselors are required to have high levels of social-cognitive development, significant knowledge regarding ethical and legal practice, and sound ethical decision-making processes to provide effective and ethical services to their clients. This study investigated the effect of two counseling ethics courses on 64 master's-level counselor education…

  10. Practical, Ethical, and Legal Considerations regarding Videocounseling in College and University Counseling Centers: A Response to Quarto's "Influencing College Students' Perceptions of Videocounseling"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menzano, Silvestro; Goodwin, Alan; Rockett, Geraldine; Morris, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous factors and concerns to take into consideration when implementing new technology into a counseling center's practice. These factors--informed consent, confidentiality, record-keeping, licensure, technical issues, eligibility, emergencies, and staff perceptions--are legitimate and must be addressed and resolved before…

  11. Why Do Staff of Joint-Use Libraries Sometimes Fail to Integrate? Investigating Cultures and Ethics in a Public-Tertiary Joint-Use Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Philip James

    2010-01-01

    Joint-use libraries have identified staff integration as a problem. Using focus groups, this project investigated the culture, professional ethics, and attitudes of staff in a public-tertiary joint-use library in Auckland, New Zealand. Findings show some difference in organizational cultures, but more variation at the lower level of roles and…

  12. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  13. Intersections of care: an analysis of culturally competent care, client centered care, and the feminist ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Black, Roxie M

    2005-01-01

    Many of us work within a healthcare field, but do we think about the meaning of the care that we provide? This paper examines three approaches to practices in the caring professions; culturally competent care, client centered care, and the feminist ethic of care, in an effort to discover if and where the three intersect. Although philosophically similar, the essence of caring practice discovered in this examination resulted in the simple equation: Provider knowledge and skills + client respect = client empowerment. An examination of the meaning of this formula and its implication for practice is included.

  14. Transcultural Counseling. Second edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, John, Ed.

    New trends in transcultural theory, expanded cultural paradigms, innovative counseling techniques for working with diverse ethnic groups, and a comprehensive discussion of professional issues are presented in this second edition of a popular text. This edition is designed to support curriculum changes in counselor education programs to maximize…

  15. Multicultural Issues in Counseling: New Approaches to Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C., Ed.; Richardson, Bernard L., Ed.

    This book was written to provide counseling and human development professionals with specific guidelines for becoming more culturally responsive. It looks at the evolution of multicultural counseling, addresses ideas and concepts for culturally responsive counseling interventions, and examines the implications of cultural diversity for future…

  16. Counselors' Perceptions of Ethical Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neukrug, Edward S.; Milliken, Tammi

    2011-01-01

    A random sample of American Counseling Association members was asked to respond to a 77-item survey of counselor behaviors and identify whether each behavior was ethical or unethical. Results are categorized by behaviors in which 90% of counselors agreed, 75% to 90% agreed, and 25% to 50% disagreed. Also, changes in ethics education were reviewed…

  17. "You need to know where we're coming from": Canadian Aboriginal women's perspectives on culturally appropriate HIV counseling and testing.

    PubMed

    Bucharski, Dawn; Reutter, Linda I; Ogilvie, Linda D

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine Canadian Aboriginal women's perspectives on culturally appropriate HIV counseling and testing. Data were collected through semistructured individual interviews with 7 Aboriginal women, and one focus group, in a western Canadian city. Four major categories were elucidated through thematic content analysis: Aboriginal women's life experiences that may influence their risk of HIV infection and their response to testing; barriers to HIV testing; guiding principles of the ideal HIV testing situation; and characteristics of culturally appropriate HIV testing. The fear of being judged by both the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities and the need for sensitivity to the historical and current context of Aboriginal women's life experiences were pervasive themes throughout the findings.

  18. Cultural Values and Attitudes towards Guidance and Counselling Services in One Secondary School in Malaysia: The Role of a School Cultural System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daud, Nurul Ain Mohd; Bond, Tim

    2013-01-01

    This narrative ethnographic study aims to explore students' attitudes towards guidance and counselling services in one secondary school in Malaysia. Semi-structured individual interviews, group interviews and observations were conducted with school students of different racial backgrounds. They were identified as referred clients, self-referred…

  19. The Role of Race, Culture, and National Origin in Adoption. Adoption and Ethics, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freundlich, Madelyn

    The controversies in adoption have extended across a spectrum of policy and practice issues, and although the issues have become clear, resolution has not been achieved nor has consensus developed regarding a framework on which to improve the quality of adoption policy and practice. This book is the first in a series to use an ethics-based…

  20. Cultural and ethical considerations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in chinese patients with cancer at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Meng-Lei; Gu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Wen-Wu

    2015-03-01

    End-of-life (EOL) decision making is based on the values and wishes of terminally ill patients. However, little is known on the extent to which cultural factors affect personal attitudes toward life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China. This study evaluated the cultural and ethical considerations during EOL decisions and assessed the factors that affect pursuing LSTs in China. We used a case-control study design and compared their baseline characteristics with the provided EOL care and treatments. The CPR treatment among patients with cancer at EOL was affected by Chinese family traditions and Western influences. Our results reflect the need to improve EOL care and treatment in China.

  1. [Toward a practical ethic].

    PubMed

    Vanbelle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between ethics and philosophy and jurisdiction is described; different kinds of ethics are presented. The increasing pressure of liberal points of view has boosted the ethics of utility. The ethics of care oppose a too rational utilitarianism, taking into consideration relationships such as the caregiver-patient relationship. In the multicultural society ethics of care and virtue ethics are being criticised for not giving universal answers to ethical dilemmas. Can one still define "doing good"? Is "doing good" so culturally biased that it no longer provides the basis for ethical conduct? An accurate procedural assessment of values, sometimes interpreted quite differently in different cultures, could be a tool to judge values in a less relativistic way.

  2. Genetic Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kathryn J.; Sakati, Nadia; Prichard, Lorraine L.; Schneiderman, Lawrence J.; Jones, Oliver W.; Dixson, Barbara K.

    1976-01-01

    The geographic distribution of County Health Department clinic facilities in the state of California has made it readily possible to establish a regionalized program for genetic counseling services, using public health nurses as a major source of case-finding. From both consumer and health professional standpoints, regionalized satellite genetic counseling clinics have been successful, and in particular, the effectiveness of public health nurses in identifying clinical genetic problems is readily apparent. Long-term follow-up reinforcement of genetic counseling appears to be an important conclusion from these studies. It is our suggestion that reinforcement of counseling would best be accomplished through the health team member (physician, nurse and so forth) following the patient or family rather than through the consulting geneticist. PMID:946335

  3. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... VALUES, STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT, AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023)...

  4. 13 CFR 105.403 - Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Officials... Agency Ethics Officials. The Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates administer the program for... advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and...

  5. 13 CFR 105.403 - Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Officials... Agency Ethics Officials. The Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates administer the program for... advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and...

  6. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... VALUES, STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT, AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023)...

  7. 13 CFR 105.403 - Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Officials... Agency Ethics Officials. The Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates administer the program for... advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and...

  8. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023) is...

  9. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023) is...

  10. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023) is...

  11. 13 CFR 105.403 - Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Officials... Agency Ethics Officials. The Designated Agency Ethics Official and Alternates administer the program for... advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and...

  12. Geosciences: an important tool for the ethical advancement and the economic and cultural development of our society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito Graziano, Gian

    2013-04-01

    The development of a society in economic, cultural and ethical terms is always linked to the growth of the scientific and technical knowledge. It follows that the downsizing of the scientific research brings to a slower growth or even, as it is happening these days in Italy, a real cultural decay. The consequences of the economic crisis are evident to everyone, but it is precisely in times of crisis that the best strategies to restart the economy and give new cultural perspectives to society are studied. The crisis is also contrasted with ideas and ability to put them into practice. This, however, also presupposes a different cultural approach, which has to also include a review of values and beliefs, and a redefinition of the objectives to be pursued. This approach is modeled on the basis of several positive experiences that a country can boast. Among these experiences, there are those arising from the scientific culture: geology, for example, such as chemistry, biology or other sciences, can help to change vision. The research and practice of Earth sciences have important implications on the life and activities of the population and therefore the geoscientists, as active subjects in the society, should question their role and responsibilities. They should be at the service of society, especially in the fields of prevention from natural hazards and valorization of georesources. In this sense they can give important indications for economy and development of their country. The Italian Council of Geologists (Consiglio Nazionale dei Geologi - CNG) acts with the aim of highlighting the social role of geoscientists, hoping for a new cultural Renaissance, which leads to new researches, without obscurantism or prejudices. In an authoritative way, the CNG intends to put this social role before any demand from the professional category. Therefore, it has recently presented its political Manifesto, geared essentially to the good governance of the territory, to all the

  13. What can we Learn from Patients’ Ethical Thinking about the right ‘not to know’ in Genomics? Lessons from Cancer Genetic Testing for Genetic Counselling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article is based on a qualitative empirical project about a distinct kinship group who were among the first identified internationally as having a genetic susceptibility to cancer (Lynch Syndrome). 50 were invited to participate (42 were tested; eight declined genetic testing). 15, who had all accepted testing, were interviewed. They form a unique case study. This study aimed to explore interviewees’ experiences of genetic testing and how these influenced their family relationships. A key finding was that participants framed the decision to be tested as ‘common sense’; the idea of choice around the decision was negated and replaced by a moral imperative to be tested. Those who did not follow ‘common sense’ were judged to be imprudent. Family members who declined testing were discussed negatively by participants. The article addresses what is ethically problematic about how test decliners were discussed and whether these ethical concerns extend to others who are offered genetic testing. Discussions showed that genetic testing was viewed as both an autonomous choice and a responsibility. Yet the apparent conflict between the right to autonomy and the moral imperative of responsibility allowed participants to defend test decliners’ decisions by expressing a preference for or defending choice over responsibility. The ‘right not to know’ seemed an important moral construct to help ethically manage unpopular decisions made by close family who declined testing. In light of this research, the erosion of the ‘right not to know’ in the genomic age could have subtle yet profound consequences for family relationships. PMID:27523581

  14. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities.

  15. Racial and Ethnic Barriers in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontress, Clemmont E.

    There are numerous problems involved in counseling minority group members. Rapport is difficult to establish because of the racial and/or cultural attitudes client and counselor have toward one another; consequently the client often finds his own goals in opposition to those of counseling. The existing cultural gap also leads to different patterns…

  16. Counseling Immigrant Children in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Giselle B.; Keitel, Merle A.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses development of a culturally relevant school counseling program for immigrant children which includes needs assessment, inservice training, training school counselors in cross-cultural counseling, incorporation of interpreters and consultants, appropriate diagnostic procedures, preventive and intervention programs, an advocacy role for…

  17. Whatever Happened to Counseling in Counseling Psychology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.; Berman, Margit; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Conoley, Collie W.; Duan, Changming; Whiston, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    A suspected decline in published counseling-related research in "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP") and the "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP") was investigated through content analyses of the two journals from 1979 to 2008. A marked decline in counseling-related research may signify a shift in emphasis away from counseling as the most…

  18. Challenges of Cultural and Racial Diversity to Counseling: Volume 1. Great Britain and the United States. London Conference Proceedings (June 25-29, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Edwin L., Ed.; McFadden, John, Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of the first international conference sponsored by the American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) and the British Association for Counselling (BAC). The document contains a foreword by Robert Nejedlo; a preface by Edwin Herr and John McFadden; an overview of the language of counseling in the…

  19. 28 CFR 600.3 - Qualifications of the Special Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as Special Counsel shall take first precedence in their professional lives, and that it may be... appropriate background investigation and a detailed review of ethics and conflicts of interest issues....

  20. Asian Shades of Spirituality: Implications for Multicultural School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Fred J.; Green, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the current practice of school counseling, little consideration is given to the spiritual background of students of Asian cultures. Although there is a body of literature on Asian culture in counseling, the authors could find remarkably few articles pertaining to counseling students in the context of Asian religious and spiritual traditions. In…

  1. The Relationship of Organizational Corruption with Organizational Culture, Attitude towards Work and Work Ethics: A Search on Turkish High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balci, Ali; Ozdemir, Murat; Apaydin, Cigdem; Ozen, Fatmanur

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse organizational corruption and to determine its level of relation to attitude towards work, work ethics and organizational culture. The data in study have been collected from 441 public high school teachers employed in the central districts of Ankara in the school year of 2008-2009. Data have been collected…

  2. Sports Counseling: A New Counseling Specialty Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gary M.; Wooten, H. Ray, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Provides background information about sports counseling for student-athletes. Presents a proposal for a Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs specialty training area for sports counseling. (Author)

  3. Sociobiology, Dogma, and Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berghe, Pierre L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes ways in which sociobiology can throw some light on the study of ethics, including recognition of the fact that human behavior, culture, and ethics do not exist in a biological vacuum. Topics discussed are sociobiology as ideology, culture and genes, and enlightened self interest. For journal availability, see SO 505 653. (Author/DB)

  4. Ethics and professional responsibility: Essential dimensions of planned home birth.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B; Grünebaum, Amos; Arabin, Birgit; Brent, Robert L; Levene, Malcolm I; Chervenak, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    Planned home birth is a paradigmatic case study of the importance of ethics and professionalism in contemporary perinatology. In this article we provide a summary of recent analyses of the Centers for Disease Control database on attendants and birth outcomes in the United States. This summary documents the increased risks of neonatal mortality and morbidity of planned home birth as well as bias in Apgar scoring. We then describe the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, which is based on the professional medical ethics of two major figures in the history of medical ethics, Drs. John Gregory of Scotland and Thomas Percival of England. This model emphasizes the identification and careful balancing of the perinatologist's ethical obligations to pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. This model stands in sharp contrast to one-dimensional maternal-rights-based reductionist model of obstetric ethics, which is based solely on the pregnant woman's rights. We then identify the implications of the professional responsibility model for the perinatologist's role in directive counseling of women who express an interest in or ask about planned home birth. Perinatologists should explain the evidence of the increased, preventable perinatal risks of planned home birth, recommend against it, and recommend planned hospital birth. Perinatologists have the professional responsibility to create and sustain a strong culture of safety committed to a home-birth-like experience in the hospital. By routinely fulfilling these professional responsibilities perinatologists can help to prevent the documented, increased risks planned home birth.

  5. Publishing ethics in paediatric research: a cross-cultural comparative review.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Inger

    2012-03-01

    The present article aims to scrutinize publishing ethics in the fields of paediatrics and paediatric nursing. Full-text readings of all original research articles in paediatrics from a high-income economy, i.e. Sweden, and from all low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, were reviewed as they were indexed and stored in Web of Science for the search period from 1 January 2007 to 7 October 2009. The application of quantitative and qualitative content analysis revealed a marked discrepancy in publishing frequencies between the two contrasting economies. Authors from 16 low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, with at least one article stored, were obviously closely linked to co-authorships and foreign funding sources, predominantly from Europe and the USA. Statements concerning conflicts of interest were frequently missing (both regions), even when multiple financial sources, including companies, were involved. It is necessary to be aware of possible systematic bias when using electronic databases to search for certain topics and regions. Further research regarding publishing ethics in paediatrics and paediatric nursing is emphasized.

  6. 77 FR 13490 - Rules of Organization; Conduct and Ethics; and Information and Requests

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 200 Rules of Organization; Conduct and Ethics; and Information and Requests AGENCY..., 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shira Pavis Minton, Ethics Counsel, 202-551-7938, Office of the Ethics Counsel, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC...

  7. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  8. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and Cultural Competence: What Does Anne Fadiman's The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down Teach Us Today?

    PubMed

    Hebenstreit, Haylee

    2017-03-04

    This article discusses limitations in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics conceptualization of "cultural competence." It uses the case example presented in Anne Fadiman's classic (2012) work, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures, to explore the conventional markers of cultural competence, as taught in contemporary graduate-level social work education curricula, and their implications for socially just practice. Furthermore, it proposes that an expanded commitment to antiracist practice is necessary to deliver care and craft policies that, in the spirit of the NASW Code of Ethics, truly respect the "dignity and worth" of the individual.

  9. Key Ethical Issues Discussed at CDC-Sponsored International, Regional Meetings to Explore Cultural Perspectives and Contexts on Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response

    PubMed Central

    Lor, Aun; Thomas, James C.; Barrett, Drue H.; Ortmann, Leonard W.; Herrera Guibert, Dionisio J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recognizing the importance of having a broad exploration of how cultural perspectives may shape thinking about ethical considerations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded four regional meetings in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Eastern Mediterranean to explore these perspectives relevant to pandemic influenza preparedness and response. The meetings were attended by 168 health professionals, scientists, academics, ethicists, religious leaders, and other community members representing 40 countries in these regions. Methods: We reviewed the meeting reports, notes and stories and mapped outcomes to the key ethical challenges for pandemic influenza response described in the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) guidance, Ethical Considerations in Developing a Public Health Response to Pandemic Influenza: transparency and public engagement, allocation of resources, social distancing, obligations to and of healthcare workers, and international collaboration. Results: The important role of transparency and public engagement were widely accepted among participants. However, there was general agreement that no "one size fits all" approach to allocating resources can address the variety of economic, cultural and other contextual factors that must be taken into account. The importance of social distancing as a tool to limit disease transmission was also recognized, but the difficulties associated with this measure were acknowledged. There was agreement that healthcare workers often have competing obligations and that government has a responsibility to assist healthcare workers in doing their job by providing appropriate training and equipment. Finally, there was agreement about the importance of international collaboration for combating global health threats. Conclusion: Although some cultural differences in the values that frame pandemic preparedness and response efforts were observed, participants generally agreed on the key

  10. ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN PHYSICIAN-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IN A MULTI-CULTURAL SOCIETY.

    PubMed

    Waitzman, Rotem

    2014-12-01

    Israel is a multicultural state that has absorbed, and is continually absorbing people of different cultures who immigrate to Israel, a situation that could create conflicts in the physician-patient relationship. In this article, I will present several cases in which diversity of culture can lead to conflict, and suggest a way of communication that can help prevent the conflicts arising from those situations.

  11. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Anne Foss; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California’s Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes. PMID:26828076

  12. Diet counseling in a multicultural society.

    PubMed

    Kittler, P G; Sucher, K P

    1990-01-01

    Successful diet counseling is dependent on culturally sensitive communication strategies. Health care practitioners can improve cross-cultured counseling through a four-step process. First, they must become familiar with their own cultural heritages. Second, they must become acquainted with the cultural background of each client. Third, through an in-depth cross-cultural interview, they must establish the client's cultural background, food habit adaptations made in the United States, and personal preferences. Fourth, they must modify diets based on unbiased analysis of the dietary data. The best chance for compliance occurs when diets are modified with consideration for client's cultural and personal preferences.

  13. Computer Applications in Guidance and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Robert I.

    The purpose of this discussion is to acquaint pupil personnel workers with some of the applications of computer based information processing systems for pupil services and also to consider some of the legal and ethical concerns relative to data processing in counseling and guidance. Some of the uses discussed are: (1) scheduling; (2) student…

  14. Religious Counseling at Public Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Don; And Others

    A questionnaire was mailed to 802 Deans of Students in public two-year colleges during January 1977 in order to determine the extent to which religious counseling--that service dealing with a person's spiritual, moral, or ethical development--was available in community colleges. Of those surveyed, 68% responded. Results of the survey showed: (1)…

  15. TOWARD AN INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL FOR COUNSELING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SORENSON, GARTH

    THE AUTHOR BELIEVES THAT BY BORROWING IDEAS AND PROCEDURES FROM CONTEMPORARY MOVEMENTS IN EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY INDLUDING--DEFINITION OF EDUCATIONAL GOALS IN BEHAVIORAL TERMS, PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION, DISCOVERY LEARNING, AND COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY THEORIES, A USABLE COUNSELING MODEL CAN BE CONSTRUCTED. RELEVANT ETHICAL ASSUMPTIONS, INCLUDING THE…

  16. Directions in Substance Abuse Counseling, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam W., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of six lessons provides expert information on a variety of issues in substance abuse counseling. The lessons, which may be applied toward continuing education credits, are: (1) "Ethics in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation" (Robert L. Hewes); (2) "Addressing the Needs of Clients with Traumatic Injury and Alcoholism"…

  17. Recruitment and Support of Culturally Distinct Students. Ethical and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godard, James M.

    Recently, colleges and universities have been recruiting and admitting students whose poverty-neighborhood environments and educational and ethnic backgrounds may have prevented the continuation of their education beyond high school. We already know that these "culturally distinct students" have college adjustment problems that traditional…

  18. Ethics, Identity and Culture: Some Implications of the Moral Philosophy of Iris Murdoch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weldhen, Margaret

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the work of Iris Murdoch, a moral philosopher who maintains that the work of moral education is the recognition of the phenomenology of inner moral experience and the struggle to express it. Shows how important this view of the inner meaning of moral experience, often expressed as metaphor, is to identity, culture, and education.…

  19. An Ethical Solution to the Challenges in Teaching Anatomy with Dissection in the Chinese Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Luqing; Wang, Yunfeng; Xiao, Ming; Han, Qunying; Ding, Jiong

    2008-01-01

    Universities and medical schools in China are faced with an ongoing shortage of cadavers for education and research because of insufficient numbers of cadaver donations. This article will examine the main obstacles to cadaver donation in the Chinese culture. These include superstitious traditional views about the body, a lack of legislation…

  20. Ethics and International Curriculum Work: The Challenges of Culture and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Terrence C., Ed.; Helfenbein, Robert J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The widely cited, though highly contested, idea that "the world is flat" (Friedman, 2004) carries with it a call for education to provide a leveling effect across continents and cultures Students in Skokie or in Skopje, as the theory goes, are expected to experience a school curriculum that shares certain common elements, goals, and…

  1. Using Biography to Counsel Gifted Young Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.

    1995-01-01

    The use of biographies in counseling young men who are gifted is recommended, to assist them in dealing with such issues as underachievement, self-inflicted pressure in athletics, cultural alienation, and father-son relationships. Biographical works that may be used and strategies for using this counseling approach are examined, including case…

  2. Transcultural Counseling: Bilateral and International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, John, Ed.

    Many of the problems of the world find their expression in the microcosm of the counseling profession. Counselors must be able to look beyond the current field of cross-cultural and multicultural counseling and develop skills and knowledge relevant to international interaction of multiple languages, races, ethnicities, and lifestyles. This book…

  3. Venezuelan Counseling: Advancement and Current Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, George Davy

    2011-01-01

    In the worldwide community it is not well known that counseling and guidance professional practices have a long tradition in Venezuela. Therefore, this contribution's main purpose is to inform the international audience about past and contemporary counseling in Venezuela. Geographic, demographic, and cultural facts about Venezuela are provided.…

  4. The Impact of Culture on Moral and Ethical Decision-Making: An Integrative Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    impact the process of MEDM? And what aspects of culture are important to MEDM? Are these consistent across nations? Can MEDM processes be predicted on...war, doctrine After establishing the core concepts, primary keywords were then developed. The latter terms were the most important words used in the...Burkina Faso, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, France, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Indonesia , Ireland, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Malaysia

  5. Ethical Considerations of Social Networking for Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, William Edgar Vernon

    2010-01-01

    The use of online social networking websites has increased among Canadians in recent years. There are many professional and ethical implications for counsellors who use these sites (Boyd, 2007). Although they offer advantages to counsellors, their use can also raise issues around ethical conduct. Because the counselling literature has not yet…

  6. The Journal of College Admission Ethics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Elaina C., Ed.; Raynor, Joyce, Ed.

    This book is the first significant body of literature on ethics in college admission published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. The series is a select compilation of articles on ethics published in the Journal of College Admission in 1998 and 1999. The book is a source of information for the beginning and experienced…

  7. Ethical and Legal Responsibilities of Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennen, Robert E.

    In the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, each profession is reviewing its ethical practices. This paper assists in this renewal by citing the code of ethical standards of APGA; reviewing the laws of the State of Nevada regarding privileged communications; and covering the legal aspects which relate to counseling situations. (Author)

  8. Counseling Psychology Licensure in Taiwan: Development, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li-fei; Kwan, Kwong-Liem K.; Huang, Su-Fei

    2011-01-01

    The development and consequences of licensure for counseling psychologists in Taiwan are presented to promote cross-cultural awareness surrounding issues in the counseling psychology profession. The national licensure statute for counseling psychologists in Taiwan was established by the Taiwanese Legislature in 2001. While the licensing system…

  9. Disguised Ideologies in Counseling and Social Justice Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrist, Steve; Richardson, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    A social justice orientation for counseling is appealing to many but appears to some to violate counselor neutrality and respect for client freedom and rights. Confusion about neutrality and advocacy in the counseling field seems to reflect confused assumptions and values in the wider culture. As a result, counseling is guided more by a disguised…

  10. School Counseling for African American Adolescents: The Alfred Adler Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Marty

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how Adlerian counseling can be used as a form of school counseling for African American adolescents. Moreover, school counseling for African American adolescents is discussed within the context of African American culture. Due to the strength-based nature of Adlerian approach, it can capitalize on African American…

  11. Counseling Taiwan Chinese in America: Training Issues for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri; Yang, Julia; Chen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines cultural influences (such as Confucianism, family, and immigration) on Taiwan Chinese in America who seek counseling. Addresses typical counseling struggles, effective counseling strategies and theoretical approaches, and training implications. Uses a case study to elaborate on the above themes. (RJM)

  12. Counselors Abroad: Outcomes of an International Counseling Institute in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McAuliffe, Garrett; Michalak, Megan

    2014-01-01

    As the counseling profession continues to build an international community, the need to examine cultural competence training also increases. This quantitative study examined the impact of the Diversity and Counseling Institute in Ireland (DCII) on participants' multicultural counseling competencies. Two instruments were utilized to examine…

  13. Legal, Professional and Ethical Issues: The Use of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drier, Harry N.

    This monograph deals with normative ethics, or the application of ethical principles in judging the rightness or wrongness of actions. Specifically, the monograph addresses normative ethics in the use of automated systems in the field and practice of counseling and guidance. It is noted that the immense growth planned for computer applications in…

  14. Ethical Considerations in Maintaining Confidentiality with Dangerous Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, J. Kelley

    This paper discusses ethical considerations involved in breach of confidentiality in counseling dangerous clients, i.e., those who have the potential to inflict bodily harm on others. The ethical basis for confidentiality is presented in a model for decision making in ethical dilemmas which encompasses three evaluative levels or tiers: ethical…

  15. The Impact of Perception of Performance Appraisal and Distributive Justice Fairness on Employees' Ethical Decision Making in Paternalist Organizational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goksoy, Asli; Alayoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Ethics in decision making has been an issue for academics, practitioners, and governmental regulators for decades. In the last decade, numerous scandals and consequently many corporate crises in the global business world have added credence to the criticisms of business ethics. Therefore, it is vital to understand the factors affecting employees'…

  16. [Communication skills for prenatal counselling].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, J; Tschudin, S; Holzgreve, W; Tercanli, S

    2007-04-18

    Prenatal counselling is characterized by specific characteristics: A):The communication is about the values of the pregnant woman and her relationship with the child to be. B) The communication deals with patient's images and emotions. C) It is a communication about risks, numbers and statistics. D) Physician and patient deal with important ethical issues. In this specific setting of prenatal diagnosis and care physicians should therefore learn to apply basic principles of patient-centred communication with elements of non directive counselling, patient education and shared decision making. These elements are integrated into a process which comprises the following "steps": 1. Clarification of the patient's objectives and the obstetrician's mandate. 2. The providing of individualized information and education about prenatal tests and investigations. 3. Shared decision making regarding tests and investigations 4. Eventually Breaking (bad, ambivalent) news. 5. Caring for patients with an affected child.

  17. Therapy and Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... trained in psychotherapy include professionals representing psychiatry, clinical psychology, mental health counseling, clinical social work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, and ...

  18. Workshop V: Cultural Perception and Bias/Science Practice and Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Kwek Leong; Lin, Jauyn Grace; Pierron-Bohnes, Veronique; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2015-12-01

    Despite the objectivity of science, the local work environment affects the daily activities of scientists. Differences in cultural perception can affect female scientists in the workplace directly. The pressure currently exerted on researchers, on the other hand, is altering how science is practiced and seems to affect women and men differently. In this paper we summarize the discussions that took place on this topic in Workshop V of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics. We present some of the results of the 2010 Global Survey of Physicists analyzed by region and data from France and Taiwan. We also include the recommendations that were formulated at the end of the workshop.

  19. Multicultural Counseling: An Appalachian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyers, Kathleen M.; Ritchie, Martin H.

    2006-01-01

    Appalachians have been referred to as the forgotten people and are often overlooked in multicultural counseling. A case study is presented using the extended case method to enhance counselor awareness and demonstrate how counselors can apply knowledge of the Appalachian culture in the provision of best practices for this population.

  20. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  1. Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

  2. Preventive Ethics Through Expanding Education.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anita; MacDonald, Lisa Mei-Hwa; Unger, David

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare institutions have been making increasing efforts to standardize consultation methodology and to accredit both bioethics training programs and the consultants accordingly. The focus has traditionally been on the ethics consultation as the relevant unit of ethics intervention. Outcome measures are studied in relation to consultations, and the hidden assumption is that consultations are the preferred or best way to address day-to-day ethical dilemmas. Reflecting on the data from an internal quality improvement survey and the literature, we argue that having general ethics education as a key function of ethics services may be more important in meeting the contemporaneous needs of acute care settings. An expanded and varied ethics education, with attention to the time constraints of healthcare workers' schedules, was a key recommendation brought forward by survey respondents. Promoting ethical reflection and creating a culture of ethics may serve to prevent ethical dilemmas or mitigate their effects.

  3. Commentary: how individual and profession-level factors influence discussion of disability in prenatal genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jan; Weil, Jon

    2012-02-01

    Hodgson and Weil (Journal of Genetic Counseling, 2011) reports on two interactive workshops in which genetic counselors identified a broad set of counseling issues that may be impediments to promoting an adequate discussion of disability in prenatal genetic counseling. The present commentary discusses two factors that we infer underlie these counseling issues. First, countertransference concerning disability, which is normal and expected, may influence genetic counselors' decisions about raising and exploring the complex topic of disability in prenatal genetic counseling. Second, the limited involvement of the profession of genetic counseling in the complex social and ethical issues of disability provide little guidance to the individual genetic counselor with respect to discussing disability in prenatal diagnosis counseling. We suggest both factors must be acknowledged and addressed in order to adequately implement the recommendations presented in Hodgson and Weil (Journal of Genetic Counseling, 2011) as well as other efforts to increase discussion of disability in prenatal diagnosis counseling in the service of informed decision making.

  4. Ethics Standards (HRPP) and Public Partnership (PARTAKE) to Address Clinical Research Concerns in India: Moving Toward Ethical, Responsible, Culturally Sensitive, and Community-Engaging Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Tal; Gupta, Yogendra K; Mehta, Nalin; Swamy, Nagendra; Sovani, Vishwas; Speers, Marjorie A

    2014-01-01

    Like other emerging economies, India’s quest for independent, evidence-based, and affordable healthcare has led to robust and promising growth in the clinical research sector, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20.4% between 2005 and 2010. However, while the fundamental drivers and strengths are still strong, the past few years witnessed a declining trend (CAGR −16.7%) amid regulatory concerns, activist protests, and sponsor departure. And although India accounts for 17.5% of the world’s population, it currently conducts only 1% of clinical trials. Indian and international experts and public stakeholders gathered for a 2-day conference in June 2013 in New Delhi to discuss the challenges facing clinical research in India and to explore solutions. The main themes discussed were ethical standards, regulatory oversight, and partnerships with public stakeholders. The meeting was a collaboration of AAHRPP (Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs)—aimed at establishing responsible and ethical clinical research standards—and PARTAKE (Public Awareness of Research for Therapeutic Advancements through Knowledge and Empowerment)—aimed at informing and engaging the public in clinical research. The present article covers recent clinical research developments in India as well as associated expectations, challenges, and suggestions for future directions. AAHRPP and PARTAKE provide etiologically based solutions to protect, inform, and engage the public and medical research sponsors. PMID:25558428

  5. Substance Abuse and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos, Ed.

    This book focuses on the identification of practical knowledge and skills needed for counseling individuals with substance abuse problems. It is a resource for practitioners, students, and faculty in school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, mental health counseling, school psychology, or social work in recognizing, preventing, and treating…

  6. The Choreography of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Sterling K.; Purkey, William W.

    1997-01-01

    Compares counseling to the choreography of dance. Reviews other counseling structures, such as the scientific process, and then introduces the "choreography of counseling." Claims that counseling, as in a dance performance, involves an introduction, exploration, exposition, and resolution. Offers principles and techniques for success in each of…

  7. Counseling Torture Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Shaun R.

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the psychological effects of torture (including solitary confinement) and the implications of torture for counseling and the counseling psychology profession. Discusses counseling issues related to diagnosis of torture victims, treatment, special considerations for counselors, use of testimony as counseling technique, and prognosis.…

  8. Ethical issues and Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kromberg, Jennifer G R; Wessels, Tina-Marié

    2013-10-11

    The practice of genetic counselling gives rise to many ethical dilemmas, and counsellors need to be familiar with the principles of biomedical ethics. The primary principles include respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. A case of identical twins at 50% risk for Huntington's disease, in which only one twin sought predictive testing for this dominantly inherited disease, created several ethical dilemmas. Another case where predictive testing was carried out on two young children, at high risk, by a laboratory at the request of an adoption agency and a doctor, with a view to giving information to the foster parents, also posed many ethical conundrums for the counsellor. The ethical issues that arose in these cases are discussed in this paper. 

  9. Ethics in reproductive genetics.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J C; Evans, M I

    1992-12-01

    Ethics in reproductive genetics comprise descriptive ethics and normative ethics. Ethical problems before prenatal diagnosis involve genetic counseling and informed consent for the choice patients must make. Prenatal diagnosis using amniocentesis is controversial. An international survey of geneticists showed that 25% would do prenatal diagnosis for sex selection, and 17% would refer the couple elsewhere. Hungary (60%), India (37%), the US (34%), Canada (30%), Greece (29%), and Sweden (28%) would do prenatal diagnosis. The statistical incidence of positive findings after prenatal diagnosis does not exceed 4% of all cases when most couples choose abortion. Respect for parental choice and for nondirective counseling was supported in responses to 3 cases in the international survey that also had disclosure dilemmas included with abortion choices. 84% of respondents would be nondirective for XYY and 88% for XO. In India, Hungary, Turkey, and Norway, 46%, 40%, 40%, and 33%, respectively, would advise aborting an XO (Turner) fetus. A survey of 737 genetics and obstetricians and ethicists and clergy showed acceptability of abortion in singleton pregnancies and in twins associated strongly with the trimester of pregnancy, indication for selective termination, and fetal number. Prior group review of risks and benefits of experimental fetal therapy, case selection for experimental fetal therapy, the optimal informed-consent process for fetal therapy, twin pregnancies, refusal of proven fetal therapy, the lack of federal support for research in fetal diagnosis (preimplantation embryo diagnosis) and therapy, and sources of a moral obligation are also addressed. The Belmont Report on the ethics of biomedical research in the US proposed ethical principles to guide research with human subjects including the fetus: respect for parsons, beneficence, and justice.

  10. Report of the Aca Ethics Committee: 2003-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocet, Michael M.; Freeman, Larry T.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethics Committee during the period of July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2004. Summary data of the complaints filed and the inquiries received are presented.

  11. Content analysis of acculturation research in counseling and counseling psychology: a 22-year review.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eunju; Langrehr, Kimberly; Ong, Lee Za

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a 22-year (1988–2009) content analysis of quantitative empirical research that included acculturation and/or enculturation as a study variable(s). A total of 138 studies in 134 articles were systematically evaluated from 5 major American Psychological Association and American Counseling Association journals in counseling and counseling psychology, including Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, Journal of Counseling and Development, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. To guide the analysis, the authors conceptualized acculturation/enculturation as a “bilinear” (i.e., developing cultural orientations to both majority and ethnic cultures) and “multidimensional” (i.e., across multiple areas such as behaviors, values, identity, and knowledge) cultural socialization process that occurs in interaction with “social contexts” (e.g., home, school, work, West Coast, Midwest). Findings include the patterns and trends of acculturation/enculturation research in (a) conceptualization and use of acculturation/enculturation variable(s), (b) research designs (e.g., sample characteristics, instruments, data collection, and analysis methods), (c) content areas, and (d) changes in total publications and trends over time. Additionally, meta-analyses were conducted on the relationship of acculturation/enculturation and a few key variables of mental health, adjustment, and well-being. Major findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  12. UNESCO's activities in ethics.

    PubMed

    ten Have, Henk A M J

    2010-03-01

    UNESCO is an intergovernmental organization with 193 Member States. It is concerned with a broad range of issues regarding education, science and culture. It is the only UN organisation with a mandate in science. Since 1993 it is addressing ethics of science and technology, with special emphasis on bioethics. One major objective of the ethics programme is the development of international normative standards. This is particularly important since many Member States only have a limited infrastructure in bioethics, lacking expertise, educational programs, bioethics committees and legal frameworks. UNESCO has recently adopted the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. The focus of current activities is now on implementation of this Declaration. Three activities are discussed that aim at improving and reinforcing the ethics infrastructure in relation to science and technology: the Global Ethics Observatory, the Ethics Education Programme and the Assisting Bioethics Committees project.

  13. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Genetic Counseling Print ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  14. Challenges of Cultural and Racial Diversity to Counseling: Volume 2. Latin America and the United States. Mexico City Conference Proceedings (June 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M., Ed.; and Others

    Papers from the second international conference of the American Counseling Association held in Mexico City in June 1990 are included in this book. The book is divided into four parts: community, diversity, communication, and spirituality. The following papers are included: (1) Myths, Realities, and Implications of the English Only Movement in the…

  15. Cultivating Engineering Ethics and Critical Thinking: A Systematic and Cross-Cultural Education Approach Using Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Pei-Fen; Wang, Dau-Chung

    2011-01-01

    In May 2008, the worst earthquake in more than three decades struck southwest China, killing more than 80,000 people. The complexity of this earthquake makes it an ideal case study to clarify the intertwined issues of ethics in engineering and to help cultivate critical thinking skills. This paper first explores the need to encourage engineering…

  16. An Investigation of the Ethical Decision-Making of Preschool Teachers: A Cultural Study of a Sample in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Safak

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the ethical decision-making of preschool teachers (N = 26) in Samsun, on the northern coast of Turkey, was examined. For this analysis, six real-life dilemmas were prepared, chosen from the problems that most often arise in kindergartens in Turkey. These dilemmas addressed the commitment of the teacher to the child, to self, to the…

  17. When Values and Ethics Conflict: The Counselor's Role and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Glenda R.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the core conditions of client-centered counseling and supported by aspects of psychodynamic, cognitive developmental, and behavioral theories, a perspective is introduced that provides a resolution to the dilemma experienced by counselors and counseling students whose personal values and beliefs conflict with the ethical guidelines of the…

  18. Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Holm, Jessica M.; Daly, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students experience mental health distress. The authors investigated the benefits of required counseling services at a training clinic for students enrolled in counseling courses. Results indicated that after receiving services, students ("N" = 55) reported decreases in overall problems, depressive symptoms, and anxiety…

  19. Multicultural Counseling: Knowledge Is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.; Borgers, Sherry B.

    There is a growing awareness of a sensitivity to ethnic and cultural issues in the helping professions. For the last decade a variety of multicultural concerns have been receiving increased attention. Although there is awareness, the mental health fields have not really addressed the issues involved in the counseling of culturally diverse…

  20. Teaching Counselling in Universities: Match or Mismatch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Mary; Woolfe, Ray

    1997-01-01

    Raises questions about the match between the culture of counseling and the culture of universities, with a particular emphasis on traditional university styles of pedagogy and the learning requirements of trainee counselors. Drawing on Kolb's model of experiential learning, examines issues relating to teaching methods and assessment procedures.…

  1. School Guidance and Counseling in Kenya: Historical Development, Current Status, and Future Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambu, Grace W.; Fisher, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the government's emphasis on guidance and counseling program implementation in Kenyan schools and a rapid increase in the number of trained school counselors, lack of standardized training curriculums, ethical standards, counseling models, and role ambiguity persist. This article reviews the historical development of guidance and…

  2. A Collaborative Process Model for Promoting Successful Referrals in College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarussi, Melanie M.; Shaw, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    The need to refer students to off-campus mental health providers is common in college counseling. Such referrals can be challenging for college counselors who strive to meet students' counseling needs while adhering to ethical and center policy guidelines. In this article, the authors explore the nature and challenges of referral in college…

  3. Race and Ethnicity: An 11-Year Content Analysis of "Counseling and Values"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Caroline A.; Bowen, Nikol V.; Butler, J. Yasmine; Shavers, Marjorie C.

    2013-01-01

    Using the Dimensions of Personal Identity Model proposed by Arredondo and Glauner (as cited in Arredondo et al., 1996), the authors reviewed the last 11 years of the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling's journal, "Counseling and Values", specifically regarding the "A" dimensions of race and ethnicity. Twenty-five…

  4. Counseling with Deaf People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Allen E., Ed.; Stewart, Larry G., Ed.

    The book presents information on effective counseling with deaf people by discussing issues that confront counselors and administrators involved in providing counseling services to deaf people. A basic assumption of the book is that deaf people of all ages have been frequently denied counseling services due to communication problems between…

  5. Leisure Counseling. A Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epperson, Arlin; And Others

    This set of materials intended for use in the development of programs in leisure services and a vocational counseling contains information about a Leisure Counseling Media Kit, with directions for ordering a slide-tape program. Order forms and additional information about leisure counseling supplies are also included. A brief pamphlet describes…

  6. Counseling Psychology's Public Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zytowski, Donald G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents summary of several working papers on counseling psychology's public image presented at Third National Conference for Counseling Psychology. Approaches issues surrounding public image of counseling by providing an overview of literature and by forwarding recommendations or action plans for the development and promotion of a positive…

  7. High Tech Counseling: Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christina Mann; Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    This article includes a discussion of technology's use in counseling. It contains reviews and implications of 4 articles that appeared in the Journal of Technology in Counseling (JTC) and provides a discussion of the future of technology in the counseling profession.

  8. Workplace Counseling Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Woody, Connie; Burns, Naomi; Howard, Sherrie; Rice, Misty

    This publication describes counseling approaches supervisors and human resource professionals can use to help marginal employees become better adjusted and more productive in the workplace. Three case studies are also provided for training purposes. The counseling tools are as follows: (1) Adlerian counseling, involving the belief that humans'…

  9. Social and ethical implications of BRCA testing.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2011-01-01

    Oncologists are asked with increasing frequency to counsel their patients with respect to the medical, psychological and social repercussions of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility that may have been prescribed by physicians or carried out through direct-to-consumer tests. This article critically reviews the main ethical and social implications of BRCA testing, focusing on genetic responsibility and genetic discrimination. Genetic responsibility toward oneself and others is a highly debated implication of genetic testing for cancer predisposition that requires broad considerations of the boundaries between individual and community rights and a reappraisal of the notion of autonomy as relational. Physicians' duty to warn 'at risk' relatives can be an ethical quandary, yet confidentiality is key to the patient-doctor relationship. Mutation carriers may be subject to different forms and degrees of genetic discrimination and many individuals at risk have forgone BRCA testing to avoid potential discrimination. The scientific and medical community, together with patients and the public, has actively engaged against genetic discrimination. The legislation in many countries now protects against genetic discrimination by insurance companies and employers. Legal and regulatory issues are not the final answer to discrimination and profound cultural changes are required to create understanding and acceptance of all differences.

  10. The Ethics of Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Alyssa; VanderWalde, Lindi; Brackett, Craig; Dominici, Laura; Eisenhauer, Thomas; Johnson, Nathalie; Kong, Amanda; Ludwig, Kandice; O'Neill, Jennifer; Pugliese, Matthew; Teller, Paige; Sarantou, Terry

    2015-10-01

    Breast surgery has evolved as a subspecialty of general surgery and requires a working knowledge of benign and malignant diseases, surgical techniques, shared decision-making with patients, collaboration with a multi-disciplinary team, and a basic foundation in surgical ethics. Ethics is defined as the practice of analyzing, evaluating, and promoting best conduct based upon available standards. As new information is obtained or as cultural values change, best conduct may be re-defined. In 2014, the Ethics Committee of the ASBrS acknowledged numerous ethical issues, specific to the practice of breast surgery. This independent review of ethical concerns was created by the Ethics Committee to provide a resource for ASBrS members as well as other surgeons who perform breast surgery. In this review, the professional, clinical, research and technology considerations that breast surgeons face are reviewed with guidelines for ethical physician behavior.

  11. A comparative analysis of ethical and professional challenges experienced by Australian and U.S. genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Alliman, Sarah; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Bartels, Dianne M; Lian, Fengqin; James, Carolyn; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2009-08-01

    Ethical issues are an inevitable part of genetic counseling practice. Prior research identified 16 domains of ethical and professional challenges encountered by practitioners in the United States. In order to further validate these domains, the present study surveyed Australian genetic counselors. Sixty-three respondents rated the frequency with which they encountered each domain, and 39 individuals also provided personal anecdotes detailing their most challenging ethical and professional dilemmas. Every domain reportedly was experienced by the Australian sample. However, there were some differences between Australian respondents and U.S. genetic counselors in frequencies of domain occurrence, and in strategies recommended for resolving them. Several anecdotes illustrate challenging situations due to Australia's geography, universal healthcare system, and the genetic counseling profession's evolution in that country. The results generally validate domains identified for U.S. genetic counselors. They further suggest that certain ethical issues may manifest in ways unique to a given country, and therefore they must be addressed in a culturally-appropriate manner.

  12. Ethical Dilemmas of Turkish Counsellors: A Critical Incidents Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivis-Cetinkaya, Rahsan

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas from a national purposive sample of Turkish counsellors (N = 172) were collected using critical incidents technique. Content analysis was performed with open coding guided by the classification of American Counseling Association code of ethics. Incidents regarding confidentiality and privacy (56.4%), with 37.1% involving incidents…

  13. 13 CFR 105.403 - Designated Agency Ethics Officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... advice and counsel regarding matters relating to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 and its... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated Agency Ethics Officials. 105.403 Section 105.403 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS...

  14. Steps to strengthen ethics in organizations: research findings, ethics placebos, and what works.

    PubMed

    Pope, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that many organizations overlook needs and opportunities to strengthen ethics. Barriers can make it hard to see the need for stronger ethics and even harder to take effective action. These barriers include the organization's misleading use of language, misuse of an ethics code, culture of silence, strategies of justification, institutional betrayal, and ethical fallacies. Ethics placebos tend to take the place of steps to see, solve, and prevent problems. This article reviews relevant research and specific steps that create change.

  15. Ethical Guidelines for Counselors when Working with Clients with Terminal Illness Requesting Physician Aid in Dying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Layla J.; Piazza, Nick J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the American Counseling Association (ACA) introduced a new ethical standard for counselors working with clients with terminal illness who are considering hastened death options. The authors' purpose is to inform counselors of the Death With Dignity Act and explore relevant ethical guidelines in the "ACA Code of Ethics" (ACA, 2005).

  16. 41 CFR 105-53.130-2 - Office of Ethics and Civil Rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Civil Rights. 105-53.130-2 Section 105-53.130-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.130-2 Office of Ethics and Civil Rights. The Office of Ethics and Civil Rights, headed by the Special Counsel for Ethics and Civil Rights, is responsible...

  17. Ideas on the Margins: Professional Counseling and Ideological Insularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to professionalize counseling practice have yielded extraordinary benefits to counselors. However, professionalization has also caused counselors to adopt strict definitions of their education, practices, and ethics. In order to combat the ideological insularity brought on by professionalization, several marginalized ideas are considered.…

  18. 17 CFR 200.21 - The General Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The General Counsel. 200.21 Section 200.21 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General...

  19. Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling: Procedures and Techniques. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    2006-01-01

    "Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling" discusses procedures that are useful to rehabilitation professionals working in many settings. Specifically, this book reviews the finer points relating to diagnosing, arranging services, monitoring program outcomes, arranging for placement, planning for accommodations, ethical decision making,…

  20. Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counseling Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and as discussed in the Guidelines and…

  1. Influence of Familial Spirituality: Implications for School Counseling Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith M.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Ieva, Kara P.

    2011-01-01

    This article (a) addresses the importance of familial spirituality on students' holistic development; (b) explores professional ethical codes, standards, and counseling competencies relating to students' familial spirituality; (c) introduces educational activities to assist school counselors in increasing their understanding and appreciation of…

  2. Ethics in an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Regina L. Garza

    2009-01-01

    The blending of technology and education introduces ethical issues for colleges. In particular, those involved with online education may encounter unique dilemmas that have collegewide implications. In order for ethical decisions to be made in regard to online education, colleges must cultivate a culture of trust, define clearly the correct and…

  3. Genetic counseling services and development of training programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juliana Mei-Har; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2013-12-01

    Genetic counseling service is urgently required in developing countries. In Malaysia, the first medical genetic service was introduced in 1994 at one of the main teaching hospitals in Kuala Lumpur. Two decades later, the medical genetic services have improved with the availability of genetic counseling, genetic testing and diagnosis, for both paediatric conditions and adult-onset inherited conditions, at four main centers of medical genetic services in Malaysia. Prenatal diagnosis services and assisted reproductive technologies are available at tertiary centres and private medical facilities. Positive developments include governmental recognition of Clinical Genetics as a subspecialty, increased funding for genetics services, development of medical ethics guidelines, and establishment of support groups. However, the country lacked qualified genetic counselors. Proposals were presented to policy-makers to develop genetic counseling courses. Challenges encountered included limited resources and public awareness, ethical dilemmas such as religious and social issues and inadequate genetic health professionals especially genetic counselors.

  4. Ethical challenges in everyday practice for healthcare lawyers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L D; Pomerance, P L

    2001-01-01

    A lawyer representing healthcare clients confronts numerous ethical issues in day-to-day practice. The authors, practicing healthcare attorneys, first give a quick overview of the history of today's rules of legal ethics, and then turn to hypothetical (but realistic) scenarios to examine counsel's duties under various circumstances. The Article concludes with an examination of the overriding duties of confidentiality and privilege, which guide the analysis of ethical concerns in all areas.

  5. Ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues.

  6. Servant Leadership as a Teachable Ethical Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahone, Marty

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers a different approach for developing ethical organizations. It argues that the practice of servant leadership provides a systematic training approach that should develop a more ethical culture. Servant leadership can serve as a "character ethic" that is teachable to individuals or organizations. The advantages and…

  7. Research Ethics in Sign Language Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Raychelle; Holmes, Heidi M.; Mertens, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    Codes of ethics exist for most professional associations whose members do research on, for, or with sign language communities. However, these ethical codes are silent regarding the need to frame research ethics from a cultural standpoint, an issue of particular salience for sign language communities. Scholars who write from the perspective of…

  8. Service Learning in Graduate Counselor Education: Developing Multicultural Counseling Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.; Hamel, Dennis; Long, Lynn L.

    2004-01-01

    Service learning integrates classroom instruction with community service to enhance learning. This article describes the service-learning model used in a multicultural counseling course. The feedback received indicated service learning enhanced multicultural counseling knowledge, increased examination of cultural bias, increased community feelings…

  9. Counseling and Psychoanalysis: Advancing the Value of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Arguably, the defining feature of the counseling profession is an appreciation for human diversity. Early counseling movements emphasized individual diversity, while multiculturalism and social justice highlighted cultural diversity. The author maintains that contemporary psychoanalytic thought can supply a needed intraindividual diversity…

  10. American Counseling in the Mind of a Chinese Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Weijun

    1994-01-01

    Illustrating three instances he encountered here in the United States, the Chinese counselor argues that American counseling is deeply rooted in rugged individualism, and often at the expense of the family and community. The suitability of American counseling for other cultures is thus questioned. (Author/NB)

  11. Ethical Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical impotence occurs when one wants to act ethically but feels powerless to do anything about the perceived unethical behavior. One may feel that one's actions will have no impact or that those actions actually will have harmful consequences to oneself and/or others. Ethical impotence can be understood in terms of an eight-step model of…

  12. [Ethics, medical ethics, and occupational medicine: is their dialogue possible?].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, Elisa

    2016-01-20

    Today's medicine faces some critical moral challenges, yet the medical class suffers from an increasingly evident malaise: a growing dissatisfaction with an ethical demand often perceived as a cumbersome burden of rules and prohibitions, which risk to erode the fiduciary relations with patients. Such a negative appraisal is partly due to a narrow interpretation of the meaning of ethics, a misconception whose roots are in the positivistic stance that permeates our culture, and in its almost exclusively technological bent. This radical orientation of our culture shows itself in the vanishing of the idea of an intrinsic ethical dimension of medicine and consequent eclipse of traditional medical ethics, currently all but assimilated by bioethics. Maintaining a clear distinction between medical ethics and bioethics is a fundamental condition for guaranteeing an original ethical reflection in medicine, thereby fostering a constructive dialogue between philosophical and medical ethics. In this sense, occupational medicine holds a very propitious position, at the cross-roads to some of the most important dimensions in human life and society: health, work, environment. In a milieu which is too often inclined to efface the living human being and the deepest needs of humanity, the moral commitment of medical profession to the care of the integral reality of the embodied human person is one of the most important ethical challenges facing occupational medicine and a most valuable contribution to the current ethical debate.

  13. International Counseling Trainees' Experiences and Perceptions of Their Multicultural Counseling Training in the United States: A Mixed Method Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shannon D.; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2009-01-01

    This study examined international counseling students' (ICTs) experiences and perceptions of their multicultural counseling training (MCT) in the United States. The focus was on (a) relevance of the training, (b) effectiveness of the training methods, and (c) development of cross-cultural competence as trainees. Major findings indicated that ICTs…

  14. A 40-Year Review of Multicultural Counseling Outcome Research: Outlining a Future Research Agenda for the Multicultural Counseling Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael; Heckman, Elizabeth Foster

    2008-01-01

    This study represents a 40-year review of multicultural counseling outcome research that has been done in the mental health professions. Particular attention is directed to the outcomes that ensue from counseling situations that are composed of counselors and clients from different racial/cultural backgrounds and identities in individual, group,…

  15. 32 CFR 776.84 - Ethics investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ethics investigation: (1) To request a hearing before the investigating officer (IO); (2) To inspect all... be assisted by counsel (see paragraph (c) of this section); (6) To challenge the IO for cause (such... available. (d) If a hearing is requested, the IO will conduct the hearing after reasonable notice to...

  16. 32 CFR 776.84 - Ethics investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ethics investigation: (1) To request a hearing before the investigating officer (IO); (2) To inspect all... be assisted by counsel (see paragraph (c) of this section); (6) To challenge the IO for cause (such... available. (d) If a hearing is requested, the IO will conduct the hearing after reasonable notice to...

  17. 32 CFR 776.84 - Ethics investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ethics investigation: (1) To request a hearing before the investigating officer (IO); (2) To inspect all... be assisted by counsel (see paragraph (c) of this section); (6) To challenge the IO for cause (such... available. (d) If a hearing is requested, the IO will conduct the hearing after reasonable notice to...

  18. 32 CFR 776.84 - Ethics investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ethics investigation: (1) To request a hearing before the investigating officer (IO); (2) To inspect all... be assisted by counsel (see paragraph (c) of this section); (6) To challenge the IO for cause (such... available. (d) If a hearing is requested, the IO will conduct the hearing after reasonable notice to...

  19. 32 CFR 776.84 - Ethics investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ethics investigation: (1) To request a hearing before the investigating officer (IO); (2) To inspect all... be assisted by counsel (see paragraph (c) of this section); (6) To challenge the IO for cause (such... available. (d) If a hearing is requested, the IO will conduct the hearing after reasonable notice to...

  20. [Medical ethics as professional ethics].

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ivo

    2012-09-25

    Contemporary medical ethics is far from the traditional concept of "In-Sul (benevolent art)" or "Yul-Li (倫, ethics), which emphasizes so much the personality or the character of a doctor. Nowadays, medical ethics should be considered as "professional ethics" which regulates the acts and medical practices of ordinary doctors in their daily practice. The key concepts of the professional ethics are "autonomy", "integrity", and "professional standard" established by medical organizations such as medical societies or associations. Most of Korean doctors have not been familiar with the concept of professional ethics or professionalism, which is due to the modern history of Korea. However, the concept of professional ethics is really critical to Korean doctors from the perspective of professional dignity and social respect to this profession. The current healthcare system of Korea is suffering from many problems of both private and public sector. Nonetheless, the professional ethics is urgently demanded for that very reason.

  1. The Development of the Counseling Profession in Japan: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabosky, Tomoko Kudo; Ishii, Harue; Mase, Shizuno

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a sociohistorical overview of the development of the counseling profession in Japan. They describe Japan's major social, cultural, and political changes; growing psychological problems in Japanese society; and an increased need for counseling services. Historical overviews and the current state of counseling are presented with…

  2. The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senyonyi, Ruth M.; Ochieng, Lois A.; Sells, James

    2012-01-01

    Professional counseling in Uganda has foundations in traditional cultures of its peoples, guidance offered in schools, and counseling to curb the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Currently, a definitive professional counselor profile in Uganda is being established. The Uganda Counselling Association continues the process of seeking legal authority to regulate…

  3. FIGO's ethical recommendations on female sterilisation will do more harm than good: a commentary

    PubMed Central

    Verkuyl, D A A

    2015-01-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Committee for the Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction and Women's Health advises against tubal occlusion (TO) performed at the time of caesarean section (CS/TO) or following a vaginal delivery (VD/TO) if this sterilisation has not been discussed with the woman in an earlier phase of her pregnancy. This advice is neither in accordance with existing medical custom nor evidence based. Particularly in less-resourced locations, adherence to it would deny much wanted one-off sterilisation opportunities to hundreds of thousands of women, many of whom have no reliable contraceptive alternative. To be sure, a well-timed discussion in pregnancy about a potential peripartum TO is preferable and, if conducted as a matter of course (as the Committee appears to promote), would represent an enormous improvement on current practice. Earlier counselling has the advantage that it results in fewer women who regret having rejected the CS/TO or VD/TO option. However, there is no evidence that earlier counselling leads to a smaller proportion of regretted sterilisations. Consequently, where early TO counselling has been impossible, forgotten or deliberately omitted on pronatalist, traditional, financial, cultural or religious grounds, offering a perinatal sterilisation belatedly and in an unbiased, culturally sensitive manner is often verifiably better than not presenting that option at all, notably where high parity and uterine scars are particularly dangerous. Belated counselling, as will be demonstrated in this paper, saves many lives. The Committee's blanket rejection of belated counselling on perinatal sterilisation is therefore unjustified. PMID:25009073

  4. Group Counseling with Traumatized East African Refugee Women in the United States: Using the "Kaffa" Ceremony Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Michael I.; Williams, DiAnna Toliver; Keleta, Aster

    2002-01-01

    The Kaffa ceremony is a unique, culturally appropriate, group counseling intervention for female East African refugees. A counseling group is described in which the Kaffa ceremony was instrumental in helping to bridge the gap between Western counseling and East African culture, providing a context for the group members to resolve long-held trauma.…

  5. Genetic counseling and testing for Huntington's disease: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Nance, Martha A

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes the ways in which genetic counseling has evolved since John Pearson and Sheldon Reed first promoted "a genetic education" in the 1950s as a voluntary, non-directive clinical tool for permitting individual decision making. It reviews how the emergence of Huntington's disease (HD) registries and patient support organizations, genetic testing, and the discovery of a disease-causing CAG repeat expansion changed the contours of genetic counseling for families with HD. It also reviews the guidelines, outcomes, ethical and laboratory challenges, and uptake of predictive, prenatal, and preimplantation testing, and it casts a vision for how clinicians can better make use of genetic counseling to reach a broader pool of families that may be affected by HD and to ensure that genetic counseling is associated with the best levels of care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ethical Considerations in Designing the International Business Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, David A.

    As awareness of the need for ethical business behavior increases, businesspeople must address the issue of an ethical standard acceptable for use in international business or, in individual situations, which country's ethical standards will be respected. Ethical absolutes cannot be determined without cultural bias. Legalistic, religious, and…

  7. An African ethic for nursing?

    PubMed

    Haegert, S

    2000-11-01

    This article derives from a doctoral thesis in which a particular discourse was used as a 'paradigm case'. From this discourse an ethic set within a South African culture arose. Using many cultural 'voices' to aid the understanding of this narrative, the ethic shows that one can build on both a 'justice' and a 'care' ethic. With further development based on African culture one can take the ethic of care deeper and reveal 'layers of understanding'. Care, together with compassion, forms the foundation of morality. Nursing ethics has followed particular western moral philosophers. Often nursing ethics has been taught along the lines of Kohlberg's theory of morality, with its emphasis on rules, rights, duties and general obligations. These principles were universalistic, masculine and noncontextual. However, there is a new ethical movement among Thomist philosophers along the lines to be expounded in this article. Nurses such as Benner, Bevis, Dunlop, Fry and Gadow--to name but a few--have welcomed the concept of an 'ethic of care'. Gilligan's work gave a feminist view and situated ethics in the everyday aspects of responsiveness, responsibility, context and concern. Shutte's search for a 'philosophy for Africa' has resulted in finding similarities in Setiloane and in Senghor with those of Thomist philosophers. Using this African philosophy and a research participant's narrative, an African ethic evolves out of the African proverb: 'A person is a person through other persons', or its alternative rendering: 'I am because we are: we are because I am.' This hermeneutic narrative reveals 'the way affect imbues activity with ethical meaning' within the context of a black nursing sister in a rural South African hospital. It expands upon the above proverb and incorporates the South African constitutional idea of 'Ubuntu' (compassion and justice or humanness).

  8. The Schooling of Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    Growing concern about a shrinking cultural consensus on values, coupled with religious pluralisation and the realisation that schooling is not, and cannot be, value-neutral, have led to proposals to teach ethics in schools, interpreted as a contribution of the discipline of philosophy to the common curriculum. To the extent that this approach is…

  9. Facing Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace: A Qualitative Study of HR Managers' Perceptions of the Influences on Their Behavior and the Implications for Building an Ethical Culture in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaMontagne, Ramona Marie

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions of human resource managers who had faced ethical dilemmas in the workplace, to gain an understanding of how they felt their life experiences shaped their values in making ethical decisions. The experiences of ten human resource managers who believed they chose a right course of action when faced with…

  10. Ethical issues in infertility.

    PubMed

    Serour, Gamal I; Serour, Ahmed G

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a global medico-socio-cultural problem with gender-based suffering particularly in developing countries. Conventional methods of treatment for infertility do not usually raise ethical concerns. However, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has initiated considerable ethical debate, disagreement, and controversy. There are three ethical principles that provide an ethical basis for ART: the principle of liberty, principle of utility, and principle of justice. Medical ethics are based on the moral, religious, and philosophical ideas and principles of the society and are influenced by economics, policies, and law. This creates tension between the principles of justice and utility, which can result in disparity in the availability of and access to ART services between the rich and the poor. The moral status of the embryo is the key for all the ethical considerations and law regarding ART in different societies. This has resulted in cross-border ART. Conscientious objection of healthcare providers should not deprive couples from having access to a required ART service.

  11. Critical Issues in International Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the world come from collectivistic group-oriented cultures. As the world becomes more globalized it is inevitable that group counseling will be a major choice of healing and psychological intervention internationally. However, a review of scholarly articles from "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" and…

  12. Discourse Analysis in Career Counseling and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stead, Graham B.; Bakker, Terri M.

    2010-01-01

    Discourse analysis can be used to understand and interpret culturally and socially produced meanings regarding work and to outline how specific rules and conventions can configure meaning production of work in context. The implications of some core concepts in discourse analysis pertinent to career counseling are explored, including discourse,…

  13. Best Advice and Counsel to Art Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke

    1993-01-01

    Provides a series of recommendations to prospective and current art teachers. Contends that studying art of prehistoric and preliterate cultures helps teachers understand art produced by their students. Encourages art teachers to resist temptations to change their career path toward counseling or administration. (CFR)

  14. Understanding and Counseling Asian American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandras, Kananur V.

    Asian American students who encounter personal problems may hesitate to utilize counseling and mental health facilities on campuses, being fearful that family, friends and/or relatives may consider them emotionally unstable. Counselors and mental health workers may lack understanding of language and cultural background of Asian-American students,…

  15. Model for multicultural nutrition counseling competencies.

    PubMed

    Harris-Davis, E; Haughton, B

    2000-10-01

    A model for multicultural nutrition counseling competencies for registered dietitians was developed and tested. Six hundred four registered dietitians who were members of The American Dietetic Association Public Health Nutrition Practice Group or directors of dietetic internships and didactic programs in dietetics were selected by a stratified random sample method and were mailed a survey. Respondents rated each of 46 competencies using a Likert scale to delineate how essential each competency will be for entry-level dietitians in the next 10 years. Of the 60% who responded (n=363), 94.4% met the study selection criteria. Most were white (85.7%), spoke English as their primary language (96.8%), and had a master's degree (64.4%). Many (37.9%) worked in community/public health facilities or organizations, and 50.4% provided nutrition counseling or education to clients culturally different from themselves. Exploratory principal components analysis extracted 3 factors with 28 competencies loading on them: multicultural nutrition counseling skills, multicultural awareness, and multicultural food and nutrition knowledge. Subjects responded similarly whether or not they provided nutrition counseling to culturally different clients. Secondary analysis revealed no significant interaction or differences between how bilingual dietitians and those of color scored items in the 3 factors. The resulting model is a guideline that can be used by educators to enhance dietetics education and training and by public health nutritionists as a basis for self-evaluation and selection of continuing education opportunities to enhance their multicultural nutrition counseling competence.

  16. Counseling and Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, John R.

    Increasingly, helpers are asked to counsel the dying and their relatives. The research and other literature are reviewed for information and ideas that might be helpful to a counselor; for example, research and speculation about fears of death are examined. While an awareness of such information may reassure the counselor who tries to counsel in…

  17. Intangibles in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, C. Gratton

    This book emphasized the beliefs and values of the counselee which affect the counseling relationship. Philosophical and religious tenets give each person an inner will and choice. Any change in behavior sought through counseling must involve the person's total value system. Such complex intangibles as will, anxiety, love, symbols, and…

  18. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  19. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  20. Counseling in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malikiosi-Loizos, Maria; Ivey, Allen E.

    2012-01-01

    There is rapid growth in Greece's professional and research activity in counseling, despite the lack of a clear professional identity for the field. It is hoped this will be overcome through the newly started graduate programs. Opportunities, objectives, and strategies for counseling's advancement should be directed toward close and essential…

  1. Counseling Exceptional People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Libby; Walz, Garry R.

    This guide offers counselors and special education and classroom teachers assistance in counseling handicapped children. Major articles focus on counseling children who are mentally retarded, emotionally, visually and hearing impaired, learning disabled, and gifted. Additional information is provided on: (1) sexual fulfillment for the handicapped;…

  2. High Tech Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    Includes a discussion of technology's use in counseling at the beginning of the new millennium. Contains reviews and implications of several articles that appeared in the first issue of the "Journal of Technology in Counseling" and some recent technology related developments by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision and…

  3. Islamic approach in counseling.

    PubMed

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah.

  4. The Marketing of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R.

    Counseling and human services in the 1990s will be different from counseling today. Among the changes to be expected will be a shift of emphasis from a client specialty focus to a focus on life decisions and planning; from a traditional case load approach to a demand for high output and performance; and from a professional services orientation to…

  5. [Between nihilism and fanaticism: the ethics of prevention].

    PubMed

    Fabre, J; Allaz, A F

    1990-12-15

    Opinions diverge on the ethics of preventive medicine. A balance needs to be struck between nihilism (doing nothing) and fanaticism (doing too much). The authors consider the ethical aspects of preventive medicine from the practising physician's viewpoint. Various aspects can be identified: SCIENTIFIC AND METHODOLOGICAL: Like any medical act, preventive practice relies on good scientific data. The epidemiologic studies should be clinically relevant and their recommendations must be interpreted critically before being incorporated into clinical practice. It should not be forgotten that we are dealing with patients and their behaviour. Tactful dialogue and personalized intervention are essential. DEONTOLOGICAL: Modern medicine is oriented toward health maintenance and promotion, thus including prevention. Although the community has drawn obvious benefits from preventive practices such as the use of vaccines, prevention must not be allowed to become a medical tyranny. Respect for the individual should remain its central concern. ETHICAL: The "meaning of life" must not be forgotten. Factors such as quality of life should always be kept in mind in measuring the benefits of prevention. By providing objective information and tailored counselling, the aim of prevention is to encourage expression of the individual's own responsibility for her/his own health. FINANCIAL: Preventive medicine is not covered by health insurance schemes. Cost-benefit analysis should consider not only the economic aspects of prevention but also its positive impacts on the entire social field. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL: The findings of epidemiologic studies must be adapted to precise socio-cultural environments. In our culture, for example, caregivers should be the first to practise what they preach. It must also be remembered that at the present time the basic preventive measures are still not accessible to everyone.

  6. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  7. What is good medical ethics? A clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wing May

    2015-01-01

    Speaking from the perspective of a clinician and teacher, good medical ethics needs to make medicine better. Over the past 50 years medical ethics has helped shape the culture in medicine and medical practice for the better. However, recent healthcare scandals in the UK suggest more needs to be done to translate ethical reasoning into ethical practice. Focusing on clinical practice and individual patient care, I will argue that, to be good, medical ethics needs to become integral to the activities of health professionals and healthcare organisations. Ethics is like a language which brings a way of thinking and responding to the world. For ethics to become embedded in clinical practice, health professionals need to progress from classroom learners to fluent social speakers through ethical dialogue, ethical reflection and ethical actions. I will end by discussing three areas that need to be addressed to enable medical ethics to flourish and bring about change in everyday clinical care.

  8. Iconoclastic ethics.

    PubMed

    Black, D

    1984-12-01

    Arguments are advanced, on a pragmatic basis, for preferring a 'situational' approach to medical ethical problems, rather than an approach based on any one of the dogmatic formulations on offer. The consequences of such a preference are exemplified in relation to confidentiality; and in relation to the ethical dilemmas which surround the beginning and the end of terrestrial human life.

  9. Internet Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmans, Cindy

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the issue of ethical use of the Internet in schools, and suggests that by devising and implementing acceptable use policies, and providing students with a set of ethical guidelines, schools and libraries can deal with the situation before it becomes a problem. Discusses and the need for parents to be included in policy formation and to…

  10. "Ethics Shock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knefelkamp, L. Lee

    1990-01-01

    Four books focusing on ethical issues in collegiate sports are reviewed: "Paterno by the Book,""Personal Fouls,""Never Too Young to Die: The Death of Len Bias," and "Rules of the Game: Ethics in College Sport." The themes of academic standards, student responsibility, the coach's role and responsibilities,…

  11. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. Objective The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. Methods A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. Results A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased

  12. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  13. Directed Art Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, John; Clark, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Describes the use of art counseling in elementary schools, illustrated with a case study. The sessions involved serial drawing, in which the counselor asks the child to draw a house, tree, and person, as well as free drawings. (JAC)

  14. Is Group Counseling Neglected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Susanne M.

    1972-01-01

    Group counseling is valuable for the psychological and social readjustment of newly disabled persons and their families, with the counselor and physician having major roles in personal rehabilitation. (AG)

  15. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  16. The professional responsibility of lawyers: emotional competence, multiculturalism and ethics.

    PubMed

    Silver, Marjorie A

    2006-05-01

    Traditional legal education and the Socratic method it utilises are by and large successful at training lawyers to think, reason and analyse. The cultivation of lawyers' intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, however, has been, at best, neglected by the profession. All lawyers, like all human beings, are emotional. Emotions affect who they are and how they practise law, whether or not they are conscious of them. As emotions cannot be removed from the practice of law, it is essential that lawyers learn to understand and manage their emotions, as well as learn to be attuned to their clients' emotional lives. Ignorance of concepts such as countertransference, denial and unconscious bias adversely impact the lawyer-client relationship. Lawyers who understand basic psychological principles and behaviours, who are aware of their own psychological makeup, understand their cultural perspective and recognise and credit their clients' differences, will enhance their effectiveness as counsellors. The client whose lawyer has these competencies will enjoy a therapeutically superior counselling or representational experience. The neglect of either the lawyer's or the client's emotional life threatens to sabotage the lawyer's ability, and thus professional responsibility, to render competent and impartial legal advice. Through drawing parallels to the training and practice in other counselling disciplines and relationships, this article argues that psychological-mindedness and multicultural competence are essential elements of ethically responsible legal representation.

  17. Ethical challenges in the management of multiple pregnancies: the professional responsibility model of perinatal ethics.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ethics is an essential component for the responsible clinical management of multiple gestation and decision-making about such pregnancies with pregnant women. The ethical concept of the fetus as a patient is presented as the basis for identifying a professionally responsible approach to selective termination, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, and to discordant beneficence-based obligations that exist when one or more fetuses are adversely affected by a fetal anomaly or complication of pregnancy. The roles for directive counseling, i.e., making evidence-based recommendations, and for non-directive counseling, i.e., offering evidence-based alternatives but making no recommendations, are described. The professional responsibility model of perinatal ethics creates a practical framework to guide the clinical judgment of perinatologists and the informed process about the clinical management of multiple pregnancies.

  18. Perspectives of Taiwanese pastoral counselors on the use of scripture and prayer in the counseling process.

    PubMed

    Der Pan, Peter Jen; Deng, Liang-Yu F; Tsai, Shiou Ling; Yuan, S S Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Interviews were carried out with 10 Christian pastoral counselors to explore their perspectives on the use of Scripture and prayer in the counseling process. Grounded Theory was utilized. Five main categories including a theological framework of pastoral counseling, counselors' considerations of using Scripture and prayer, preparation for Christian spiritual intervention, implications of spiritual resources, and ethical issues in the pastoral counseling process were generated. The results suggest the theological framework of pastoral counseling is crucial to the use of Scripture and prayer, and the issue of a neutral response should first be clarified for clients. Basic guidelines for ethically using Scripture and prayer for working with Christian clients are proposed for further pastoral counselor training, practice, and research.

  19. Ethical Issues and Considerations for Working with Community College Students with Severe and Persistent Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Perry C.; Abbassi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Students with severe and persistent mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders; moderate to severe mood, anxiety, dissociative, eating, or personality disorders) are attending community colleges in increasing numbers. Their need for counseling services presents counseling centers with unique ethical issues to consider. This…

  20. The Relationships among School Counselors' Multicultural Competence, Demographic Data and Ethical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships, if any, among school counselors' multicultural competence, demographic data and ethical decision-making ability. The participants (N=160) for this study were members of the American Counseling Association (ACA) who designated their area of practice as school counseling. Participant's…

  1. Responding to Messages of Adolescents on the Internet: Theoretical, Practical, and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shtarkshall, Ronny

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the policy and guidelines, which evolved over the last four years, for answering questions and giving counsel on an Internet site dedicated to sexuality and intimate relations of adolescents. The theoretical framework employed is that of non-directive counseling. Some ethical, legal, and practical issues are discussed. The…

  2. Ethical Considerations in the Use of Technology for Marriage and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Given increases in the use of technology in counseling, family counselors must become aware of the ethical considerations for infusing technology in their training and practice methods. Standards for Internet counseling practice, supervision practice, and the training of family counselors have not kept pace with the advances in technology. An…

  3. Personal Ethics versus Professional Ethics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Colorado Springs, Colo.: Navpress, 1978). 2. Quoted in Andrew Stark, “What’s the Matter with Business Ethics?” Harvard Business Review , May–June 1993...39. 3. Ibid., 40. 4. Kenneth R. Andrews, “Ethics in Practice,” Harvard Business Review , September–October 1989, 99. 5. Quoted in Perspective: A

  4. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  5. The Ethics of Globalizing Bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Stuart; Mupenda, Bavon

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been efforts to globalize the field of bioethics, particularly in developing countries, where biomedical and other research is increasingly taking place. We describe and evaluate some key ethical criticisms directed towards these initiatives, and argue that while they may be marked by ethical, practical, and political tensions and pitfalls, they can nevertheless play an important role in stimulating critical bioethics culture in countries vulnerable to exploitation by foreign agencies and/or their own authorities. PMID:25632370

  6. A Content Analysis of Multicultural Counseling Syllabi from Rehabilitation Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebnicki, Mark; Cubero, Chris

    2008-01-01

    A content analysis of multicultural counseling syllabi from the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited programs was conducted. Using CORE accreditation standards that apply to Social and Cultural Diversity knowledge and outcome areas (Section C.2) and Middleton et al. (2000) proposed multicultural competencies and standards for…

  7. HIV counseling for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Grinstead, O A

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a framework for discussion in the working group on HIV Counseling for Behavior Change at the Third USAID HIV/AIDS Prevention Conference. The paper begins with a section defining HIV counseling and describing different types of HIV counseling. Next, points of consensus and controversy regarding the conduct and evaluation of HIV counseling are discussed. This is followed by a section outlining findings to date on the effectiveness of HIV counseling, and a discussion of methodological issues in evaluating counseling outcomes. Finally, the paper includes a list of key issues for further research.

  8. The Ghosts of Counseling Psychology: Is Counseling Research Really Dead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. offer an interesting analysis on the publication rate of counseling-related research articles in counseling psychology's two major journals. In this reaction to their work, the author considers various aspects of their results and contemplates possible explanations for the decline of counseling-related publications. The author…

  9. Attitudes toward Counseling and Counseling Willingness of Air Force Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, Gilbert W., Jr.

    This study attempts to measure the attitudes of Air Force personnel toward counseling, the willingness of Air Force personnel to seek counseling for personal problems, and the relationships which exist between selected variables and attitude-counseling willingness. The variables examined were technical versus non-technical occupations, length of…

  10. Changes in Counseling Response Preference Among Rehabilitation Counseling Interns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert M.; O'Connor, James B.

    1974-01-01

    Counseling response preferences of graduate students completing internship requirements were assessed. It was hypothesized that at the end of the internship the students would show a significant increase in preference for active counseling responses. Five counseling responses were evaluated, and change did occur as hypothesized. (Author)

  11. Introduction to the Major Contribution: Counseling Psychology and Online Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the Major Contribution, which focuses on online counseling. Several acronyms and terms are presented to familiarize the reader with distance-communication technology, including a definition of online counseling. The authors show how counseling psychology provides a framework for specific questions related to the theory,…

  12. Health counseling of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Joffe, A; Radius, S M

    1991-05-01

    Health counseling is a fundamental aspect of health care for adolescents and is a natural extension of the concept of anticipatory guidance. It is a dynamic process involving active participation by adolescents. Pediatricians are a valued source of health-relevant information, but must also recognize how their attitudes and beliefs can affect the counseling process. Knowledge of the multitude of changes occurring during adolescence and an understanding of the role of health-risking behaviors in meeting various developmental needs are critical to successful counseling. Particular attention must be focused on ways to help adolescents develop the skills necessary to maintain health-promoting lifestyles and to resist peer pressure to engage in health-risking behaviors.

  13. Ethical Principles and Standards: A Racial-Ethnic Minority Research Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, J. Manuel; Thompson, Chalmer E.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses American Psychological Association's (APA, 1990) "Ethical Principles" and American Association for Counseling and Development's (AACD, 1988) "Ethical Standards" as they relate to racial-ethnic minorities. Contends that philosophical premises that underlie these principles and standards reflect solely majority culture…

  14. Displacing the Psychology of the Individual in Ethical Decision-Making: The Social Constructivism Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottone, R. Rocco

    2004-01-01

    A social constructivism model of ethical decision-making is summarized and related to the Canadian Counseling Association Code of Ethics. Social constructivism is described as an intellectual movement that allows for a biological and social conception of human understanding, thereby superceding or displacing psychological theory. The theoretical…

  15. Counselor and Theological Identity Formation and the Ethic of Inclusion for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study used interpretative phenomenological analysis to examine how Christian counselors-in-training engaged their theological beliefs about sexual orientation in relation to the Code of Ethics of the American Counseling Association (ACA). The ACA Code of Ethics requires counselors to refrain from imposing their personal values on…

  16. Humor in Counseling: Leader Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Eugene; Bordan, Terry; Araoz, Daniel L.; Gladding, Samuel T.; Kaplan, David; Krumboltz, John; Lazarus, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the existence of humor in counseling from the perspectives of several leaders in the field. Specifically, the last 5 authors describe some of their thoughts and experiences regarding the emergence of humor in counseling.

  17. Kierkegaard's Philosophy: Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopson, Lorraine; Gade, Eldon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses how the philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard can provide useful guidelines for the study of the counseling process. Compares Kierkegaard's philosophy with selected contributions of Freud, Skinner, Rogers, and May and with four common themes of counseling and psychotherapy. (Author)

  18. Steps to Strengthen Ethics in Organizations: Research Findings, Ethics Placebos, and What Works

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that many organizations overlook needs and opportunities to strengthen ethics. Barriers can make it hard to see the need for stronger ethics and even harder to take effective action. These barriers include the organization’s misleading use of language, misuse of an ethics code, culture of silence, strategies of justification, institutional betrayal, and ethical fallacies. Ethics placebos tend to take the place of steps to see, solve, and prevent problems. This article reviews relevant research and specific steps that create change. PMID:25602131

  19. Quality issues concerning genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing: a European Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Skirton, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing is complex, bringing both ethical and practical questions. There are protocols for counselling but a scarcity of literature regarding quality assessment of such counselling practice. Generic quality assessment tools for genetic services are not specific to presymptomatic testing (PST). Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify aspects of effective counselling practice in PST for late-onset neurological disorders. We used the Delphi method to ascertain the views of relevant European experts in genetic counselling practice, ascertained via published literature and nomination by practitioners. Ethical approval was obtained. Questionnaires were sent electronically to a list of 45 experts, (Medical Doctors, Geneticists, Genetic Counsellors and Genetic Nurses), who each contributed to one to three rounds. In the first round, we provided a list of relevant indicators of quality of practice from a literature review. Experts were requested to evaluate topics in four domains: (a) professional standards; (b) service standards; (c) the consultant's perspective; and (d) protocol standards. We then removed items receiving less than 65% approval and added new issues suggested by experts. The second round was performed for the refinement of issues and the last round was aimed at achieving final consensus on high-standard indicators of quality, for inclusion in the assessment tool. The most relevant indicators were related to (1) consultant-centred practice and (2) advanced counselling and interpersonal skills of professionals. Defined high-standard indicators can be used for the development of a new tool for quality assessment of PST counselling practice.

  20. [Counseling work with foreign families].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, U

    1992-03-01

    In spite of informations about a rapid change of behavioral patterns, immigrant children, youth and families have problems to keep their identity and being understood in the guest countries. Assistance of any kind and especially counseling in intrapsychic and social conflicts has to follow special topics. There are not only language barriers, the adviser has to take care of the ethnological background and the social-cultural conditions of the home country, he has to know about loyalty mechanisms to the family of origin, to manage closeness and distance in interactional relationship. Often he has also to help children and adult persons to experience self-confidence and self-conciousness in solving psychological problems instead of helplessness and waiting for magic and mystic help.

  1. Counseling in the U.S.-Mexico Border Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Todd T.; Madrigal, Julio F.

    Residents of the U. S.-Mexico border region have the immense task of reconciling two different and often incompatible cultures, traditions, and languages. The cultural and environmental conditions of the South Texas border region are briefly described, and economic and social conditions are reviewed. The unique counseling needs of borderlanders of…

  2. Conflict in Multicultural Counseling Relationships: Source and Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Hardin L. K.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines Hardin L. K. Coleman's model of six strategies that individuals use to cope with cultural diversity. Suggests that conflict in multicultural counseling relationships is often the result of divergence in the strategies used by counselors and clients to cope with cultural diversity. Suggests two ways of resolving such conflicts. (RJM)

  3. Ethics in Distance Education: Developing Ethical Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearhart, Deb

    2001-01-01

    Examines the changing world of education through distance education and discusses the need for ethics in distance education. Explains how to ethically develop policy for distance education, including Internet ethics, good practices guidelines, and involving faculty. (LRW)

  4. Counseling Gifted and Talented Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas

    This monograph provides research-based information on the counseling needs of gifted and talented students, as well as effective counseling approaches to meeting those needs. Following an historical overview of counseling programs for the gifted, sections specifically address the self-concept of gifted and talented students, at-risk students,…

  5. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  6. Contemporary Counseling: Services, Applications, Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Charles W.

    This book was written to serve as a basic text in courses that overview the use of counseling services and to serve as a useful reference for counseling practitioners. It is designed to stress counseling services in different settings (social agencies, mental health centers, schools, business/industry, correctional institutions, and private…

  7. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  8. Adult Career Counseling Center Seventeenth Annual Report, September 1999-June 2000. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Brian, Ed.; Naik, Reetu, Ed.; Quinn, Kelly, Ed.; Rancour, Paulette, Ed.

    For 17 years, the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, has provided computer-assisted career guidance systems and career counseling services to a culturally diverse clientele of more than 11,000 adults living in the local community. The ACCC's goals are as follows: (1) provide career exploration and…

  9. Technology in Art Therapy: Ethical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alders, Amanda; Beck, Liz; Allen, Pat B.; Mosinski, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    As technology advances, art therapy practices are adapting to the demands of a new cultural climate. Art therapists face a number of ethical challenges as they interact with increasingly diverse populations and employ new media. This article addresses some of the ethical and professional issues related to the use of technology in clinical…

  10. First Cycle Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darska, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Investigations are described that were carried out by the Centre d'Information de Documentation et d'Orientation of the Rene Descartes University to find an answer to the counseling problems arising from student admission, through coursework, and upon leaving the university to start a career. (Author/MLW)

  11. Assessing Campus Counseling Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrar, William R.; Affsprung, Eric H.; Long, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Campus mental health needs are in the spotlight. Whether the nature and severity of problems presenting in college counseling centers are increasing or not, it is important to provide appropriate services for the campus as a whole. By surveying the general campus population, a better basis for determining the needs of students can be established…

  12. Existentialism in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Leona E.

    1971-01-01

    The counselor, in working with students, can make each choice a means through which the person clarifies his purposes and designs his own future. Every commitment of time is a serious undertaking. This, the author sees, is the fundamental message of existentialism for counseling. (Author)

  13. Rehabilitation Counseling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stude, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 10-week paid summer internship for a rehabilitation counseling faculty in a state vocational rehabilitation agency is described. The benefits of the internship in relation to increasing faculty relevance in and outside the classroom are discussed, and recommendations for improving the internship are presented. (Author)

  14. The Counseling & Guidance Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Counseling and guidance services are vital in any school curriculum. Counselors may themselves be dealing with students of diverse abilities and handicaps. Counselors may have to work with students affected by drug addiction, fetal alcohol syndrome, homelessness, poverty, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and divorce. Students may present…

  15. Writing as Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Alice G.

    1987-01-01

    Promotes writing as a counseling technique to enhance a child's psychological growth. Notes that writing enhances awareness by helping individuals organize their inner selves, contributing to personal integration and self-validation, and providing a cathartic emotional release. Describes current therapeutic writing practices and a therapeutic…

  16. Buddhism and Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Silva, Padmal

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the relevance of the principles and practices of Buddhism to the field of counseling. As Buddhism espouses the notion of a productive and healthy life, it offers ways of dealing with problems and difficulties, and of improving psychological well-being. Cites examples of relevant Buddhist techniques and their application. (JPS)

  17. Counseling in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  18. Credentialing in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Fred O., Ed.

    This document discusses all aspects of credentialing from both a past and present perspective, considers the future of counselor credentialing, and provides a synopsis of the credentialing movement in counseling. Seven chapters are included: (1) "Counselor Credentialing: Purpose and Origin" (Thomas J. Sweeney); (2) "Counselor Certification"…

  19. Group Counseling: Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Johnnie

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes and sickle cell anemia (SCA) are two health-related characteristics that distinguish young people from their peers. This article outlines the problems of children with diabetes and SCA and presents the goals and format for group counseling of these populations and their parents. (Author/BEF)

  20. Counselling for Occupational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwamuo, P. A.; Ugonna, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the general attitude which senior secondary school students display towards counselling for occupational development while determining gender difference in students' attitude towards occupational information. It is also aimed at discovering whether these students seek vocational guidance in their choice of…

  1. Problem Classification in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimes, Rudolf E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for counselors that will help them classify personal and social problems of clients for base-line and end-line comparisons. Counseling's goal, as presented here, is to help individuals for a lifetime; therapy is not seen as the giving of advice or solutions, but as a teaching process through which clients become…

  2. Counseling Skills for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.; Kottler, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    By necessity, today's teachers do much more than deliver instruction. In the classroom, on the playground, or even in the parking lot, teachers are often called upon to respond quickly and appropriately to students' social and emotional needs, drawing from instinct more than anything else. In this second edition of "Counseling Skills for…

  3. Counseling and Transcendental Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donceel, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    An acquaintance with the different philosophies of human nature is an invaluable asset for counseling. The author presents a modern Christian concept of man with emphasis on contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas and elements from modern philosophy. Its two main concerns are man's spirit and man's knowledge and will. (Author/CG)

  4. The Counseling Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Leonard

    This volume seeks to answer the basic question "What does a counselor or therapist need to know in order to become a Licensed Professional Counselor?" Containing all the basic information that is taught in the counseling and therapy classes in major universities across the United States, this book places a special emphasis on those…

  5. Current principles and practice of ethics and law in perinatal medicine.

    PubMed

    Berceanu, C; Albu, Simona Elena; BoȚ, Mihaela; Ghelase, M Șt

    2014-01-01

    One of the most controversial discussion topics in modern bioethics, science or philosophy is represented by the beginning of the individual human life. It is ethically, medically and scientifically correct that the human conception product to be born, so to gain personality and individuality, to be treated as a patient since the intrauterine life. Intrauterine foetal interventions, performed in various therapeutic purposes are still in the experimental stage even in centres with rich experience in perinatal medicine. Progresses truly outstanding are present especially in the prenatal diagnostic methods. Non invasive prenatal testing represents without a doubt a great progress in prenatal diagnosis, but from this point of view, the role of practitioners in the field of perinatal medicine, on counselling and addressing the indication of this test becomes essential. Beyond cultural, national, social or related differences, in perinatal medicine practice is particularly important to respect and permanently reassess the ethical codes. Our paper is targeting to spotlight the essential principles and practice of ethics and law in perinatal medicine nowadays on one hand, and to bring an update review on a controversial topic on the other hand.

  6. For Researchers on Animals, Ethics Training Is Sparse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2008-01-01

    While the past several decades have brought federal regulations that are designed to make animal research more humane, ethics courses still form only a patchwork across colleges. The amount and types of ethical training available to students vary widely by program and the culture of an institution. Now discussions about animal-research ethics that…

  7. Teaching Ethics in International Business Courses: The Impacts of Religions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle

    2008-01-01

    Implicit in most comparative ethical studies is the assumption that cultural and religious differences between countries are the major reasons behind the variations in ethical beliefs and business practice across nations. This article examines research on the international ethical issues and the common moral concerns that permeate differing…

  8. Online ethics discussion forum facilitates medical center clinical ethics case reviews.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, David J; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Anderson-Shaw, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants are increasingly called upon to give counsel in the clinical arena on issues including but not limited to withdrawal or withholding of specific medical treatments, assisting minors and mentally impaired patients with care decisions, working with difficult patients and families, identifying appropriate surrogate decision makers, and executing advance directives and end-of-life decisions. Often, the consultant may need to convene the ethics committee members to review and provide feedback for a given case. This process may be difficult to schedule in a timely way because of member's clinical and other work-related obligations. To this end, the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago has set up a unique Web board to facilitate ongoing case discussions via a secured, password-protected ethics committee online forum. This allows for real-time review by all ethics committee members. We will explain our online process as well as discuss our clinical case experiences.

  9. The Importance of Ethical Training for the Improvement of Ethical Decision-Making: Evidence from Germany and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottig, Daniel; Heischmidt, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Based on three independent samples from Germany and the United States, this exploratory, cross-cultural study examines empirically the importance of ethical training for the improvement of ethical decision-making. The results of the study reveal a significant difference in the use of corporate codes of conduct and ethical training, as well as…

  10. Vietnamese Cross-Cultural Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuong, Joseph Trung

    This report provides information that will help Americans deal with or counsel Vietnamese refugees. The following topics are covered: (1) history and geography of Vietnam; (2) culture of Vietnam; (3) differences between American and Vietnamese culture; (4) counseling recommendations; (5) differences between American and Vietnamese students; and…

  11. Engineering ethics beyond engineers' ethics.

    PubMed

    Basart, Josep M; Serra, Montse

    2013-03-01

    Engineering ethics is usually focused on engineers' ethics, engineers acting as individuals. Certainly, these professionals play a central role in the matter, but engineers are not a singularity inside engineering; they exist and operate as a part of a complex network of mutual relationships between many other people, organizations and groups. When engineering ethics and engineers' ethics are taken as one and the same thing the paradigm of the ethical engineer which prevails is that of the heroic engineer, a certain model of the ideal engineer: someone both quite individualistic and strong enough to deal with all the moral challenges that could arise. We argue that this is not the best approach, at least today in our interrelated world. We have achieved a high degree of independence from nature by means of technology. In exchange for this autonomy we have become increasingly tied up with very complex systems to which we constantly delegate new tasks and powers. Concerns about safety keep growing everywhere due to the fact that now we have a sensitive awareness of the huge amount of power we are both consuming and deploying, thus, new forms of dialogue and consensus have to be incorporated at different levels, in different forums and at different times. Within these democratic channels of participation not just the needs and interests, but also the responsibilities and mutual commitments of all parties should be taken into account.

  12. Forensic Ethics and Indirect Practice for the Rehabilitation Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros-Bailey, Mary; Carlisle, Jeffrey; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, the specialty area of forensics has emerged as an established practice setting in rehabilitation counseling, and it is predicted to be the fastest-growing area of practice in the profession. Reflecting the increased number of practitioners in the specialty, the revised "Code for Professional Ethics of Rehabilitation…

  13. Ethical Responsibilities in Training Marriage and Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Dana Heller

    2004-01-01

    Graduate programs in marriage and family counseling must adhere to ethical codes and standards for training students. A question arises concerning the amount of specialized training that should be included within the larger counselor education discipline. This article addresses the standards for training and competence as set forth by the Council…

  14. Pilot Study: The Role of Predeployment Ethics Training, Professional Ethics, and Religious Values on Naval Physicians' Ethical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Gaidry, Alicia D; Hoehner, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Military physicians serving overseas in cross-cultural settings face the challenge of meeting patients' needs and adhering to their personal and professional ethics while abiding by military obligations and duties. Predeployment ethics training for Naval physicians continues to be received in many forms, if received at all, and has largely not addressed their specific roles as medical providers in the military. This study explores the perceived effectiveness of predeployment ethics training received by Naval physicians. Additionally, it considers the contribution of different types of ethics training, religious values, and the professional ethics on Naval physicians' perceived ability to effectively manage ethically challenging scenarios while on deployment. A total of 49 Naval physicians participated in an online survey. 16.3% reported not receiving any form of ethics training before deployment. Of those that reported receiving ethics training before deployment, 92.7% found the ethics training received was helpful in some way while on deployment. While a medical school course was most contributory overall to their ability to handle ethically difficult situations while on deployment (70.7%), what most Naval physicians felt would help them better handle these types of situations would be a mandatory military training/military course (63.2%) or personal mentorship (57.9%).

  15. Ethical accountability in the cyberspace

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, K.L.; Strohmaier, M.

    1994-12-31

    Conformance with ethical behavior consists of adherence to the standards of conduct for any given group. When standards are not formalized, there can exist ethical disparity from which many diverse problems can result. These problems are especially evident in the cyberspace. Within the cyberspace, the {open_quote}given group{close_quote} is culturally and ethnically diverse. As such, it $8 difficult to hold the individuals to a nonformalized set of standards. Several important issues need to be addressed in order to balance each individual`s dual needs for freedom of expression and protection in the cyberspace. These issues include development of formalized standards, a general protocol for cross- cultural interaction, and ethical accountability.

  16. Nutrition: ethical issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Robert B; Rucker, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    For nutrition and its associated disciplines, ethical considerations related to research are often complicated by factors that range from the use of experimental research designs that are overly holistic to inextricable links between nutrition research and marketing. As a consequence, there is the need for constant vigilance to assess and deal with apparent conflicts of interest. Also, there are few scientific disciplines that are defined by cultural, religious, or political codifications as is nutrition. Accordingly, examples of historical, cultural, and political events are described that have influenced ethical approaches related to nutrition research. Furthermore, nutrition research questions are often multifaceted and require dealing with complex variables. In this regard, ethical principles and perspectives that have relevance to data acquisition, the publication and translation of nutrition research, and the marketing of nutritional products and concepts are highlighted.

  17. Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis: a multicultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Puñales-Morejon, D

    1997-01-01

    More and more women are using prenatal tests to obtain specific information on the health of the developing fetus. The objective of genetic counseling is not to decrease the occurrence of genetic disease, it is to help individuals and families adjust to their genetic risks and make their own decisions in line with their reproductive goals and world views. Choices made by parent(s) will reflect their own intrapsychic processes as well as their own cultural and social understanding of genetic risk and disease. As prenatal testing continues to diagnose an ever growing number of genetic disorders, genetic counseling faces greater and greater challenges. Now more than ever before, genetic counseling must incorporate both psychological counseling and multiculturalism in order to serve diverse individuals and families at risk for genetic disease.

  18. An ethical dilemma in school nursing.

    PubMed

    Levitt, E; Taylor, S

    1999-10-01

    School nurses must consider the ethical principles that guide everyday practice. Autonomy, beneficence, justice, and nonmaleficence are the ethical principles most often confronted in the school setting. When beneficent care-giving begins to conflict with the family's decision-making autonomy, paternalism, a form of beneficence, affects the family's autonomy. This creates an ethical dilemma for the school nurse who guides his or her practice by ethical principles but who also must decide when it is appropriate to refer a child or family to a medical provider for further evaluation. A case study is presented to illustrate a specific ethical dilemma. The ethical dilemma is described using a model that examines external factors, professional responsibilities, and possible courses of action. The discussion includes cultural considerations and barriers pertinent to the case example.

  19. Participatory action research: considerations for ethical review.

    PubMed

    Khanlou, N; Peter, E

    2005-05-01

    This paper addresses the distinctive nature of participatory action research (PAR) in relation to ethical review requirements. As a framework for conducting research and reducing health disparities, PAR is gaining increased attention in community and public health research. As a result, PAR researchers and members of Research Ethics Boards could benefit from an increased understanding of the array of ethical concerns that can arise. We discuss these concerns in light of commonly held ethical requirements for clinical research (social or scientific value, scientific validity, fair subject/participant selection, favourable risk-benefit ratio, independent review, informed consent, and respect for potential and enrolled participants) and refer to guidelines specifically developed for participatory research in health promotion. We draw from our community-based experiences in mental health promotion research with immigrant and culturally diverse youth to illustrate the ethical advantages and challenges of applying a PAR approach. We conclude with process suggestions for Research Ethics Boards.

  20. Incorporating global components into ethics education.

    PubMed

    Wang, George; Thompson, Russell G

    2013-03-01

    Ethics is central to science and engineering. Young engineers need to be grounded in how corporate social responsibility principles can be applied to engineering organizations to better serve the broader community. This is crucial in times of climate change and ecological challenges where the vulnerable can be impacted by engineering activities. Taking a global perspective in ethics education will help ensure that scientists and engineers can make a more substantial contribution to development throughout the world. This paper presents the importance of incorporating the global and cross culture components in the ethic education. The authors bring up a question to educators on ethics education in science and engineering in the globalized world, and its importance, necessity, and impendency. The paper presents several methods for discussion that can be used to identify the differences in ethics standards and practices in different countries; enhance the student's knowledge of ethics in a global arena.

  1. Ethical Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, John M.

    1970-01-01

    Eight key areas suggested for discussion by the APA and APGA as bases for formulation of ethical standards are: (1) leader qualifications; (2) limits on procedure; (3) confidentiality of group participants; (4) participant selection; (5) informed consent of participants; (6) freedom of client to withdraw; (7) safeguards for participants against…

  2. Ethical coding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Barry I

    2009-01-01

    It is ethical, legal, and proper for a dermatologist to maximize income through proper coding of patient encounters and procedures. The overzealous physician can misinterpret reimbursement requirements or receive bad advice from other physicians and cross the line from aggressive coding to coding fraud. Several of the more common problem areas are discussed.

  3. Medical Ethics

    MedlinePlus

    ... donate an organ to a sick relative? Your personal health information: who has access to your records? Patient rights: Do you have the right to refuse treatment? When you talk with your doctor, is it ethical for her to withhold information from you or your family?

  4. Ethical Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael; Posavac, Emil; Russ-Eft, Darlene

    1999-01-01

    The article and commentary in this special section consider the ethical implications of a remark by an employee in a business being evaluated that employees have been advised to make the program look good. Explores the implications for the evaluation and its usefulness. (SLD)

  5. Counseling and Testing: What Counselors Need to Know about State Laws on Assessment and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naugle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses testing in counseling, the history of psychology's attempts to restrict access to testing, and the potential impact on the public. Counselors are encouraged to obtain appropriate training in assessment and to understand that testing is not only consistent with fair testing policies but also essential for ethical practice.…

  6. Attachment Theory and Religiosity: A Summary of Empirical Research with Implications for Counseling Christian Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Duane F.; Edwards, Carla E.; Hendrix, Rebecca R.

    2009-01-01

    The authors summarize the growing body of empirical research literature in the area of psychology of religion that has been guided by attachment theory and indicate implications for counseling, including practical suggestions for case conceptualization, possible spiritual interventions, and ethical guidelines for practice. Attachment theory…

  7. Instrument Construction and Initial Validation: Professional Identity Scale in Counseling (PISC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Hong Ryun

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of having a strong professional identity include ethical performances, promoted wellness, and increased awareness of roles and functions among individual counselors (Brott & Myers, 1999; Grimmit & Paisley, 2008; Ponton & Duba, 2009). Scholars in the counseling field have underscored the importance of unified professional…

  8. A Supervisory Issue When Utilizing the ASCA National Model Framework in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant-Young, Necole; Bell, Catherine A.; Davis, Kalena M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss a supervisory issue, in that, the ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs does not emphasize on-going supervision where ethical expectations of supervisors and supervisees in a school setting are clearly defined. Subsequently, the authors highlight supervisor expectations stated with the ASCA National…

  9. Developing the Counselor as a Person and as a Professional: Attitudinal Changes in Core Counseling Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Kenneth M.; Doumas, Diana M.; Trotter, Ann; Freeman, Brenda J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative pilot study examined changes in counseling students' professional attitudes in 3 master's-level core courses. Results indicated significantly more change occurred during an ethics course than during the other courses. Changes occurred in attitudes consistent with humanistic philosophy, including self-awareness, professional…

  10. School Counseling Websites: Do They Have Content That Serves Diverse Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Stephen D.; Baker, Stanley B.

    2015-01-01

    The 12 diversity dimensions of the ASCA Ethical Standards (ASCA, 2010) provided a framework for examining whether a statewide sample of high school counseling websites (N = 312) had content for diverse students and their families. Many websites offered little content related to those dimensions, and content was especially low for some groups…

  11. Counseling Student Computer Competency Skills: Effects of Technology Course in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Yolanda V.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Bethea, James

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this article is to assess counseling student computer competency level as an effect of a one-credit hour introductory course in computer technology. Results indicate student computer competencies increased after completing the computer technology course in the following areas: ethics, assisting clients with internet searches,…

  12. Reexamining the Ethics of Nuclear Technology.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Andrei; Kanke, Victor; Kuptsov, Ilya; Murogov, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes the present status, development trends, and problems in the ethics of nuclear technology in light of a possible revision of its conceptual foundations. First, to better recognize the current state of nuclear technology ethics and related problems, this article focuses on presenting a picture of the evolution of the concepts and recent achievements related to technoethics, based on the ethics of responsibility. The term 'ethics of nuclear technology' describes a multidisciplinary endeavor to examine the problems associated with nuclear technology through ethical frameworks and paradigms. Second, to identify the reasons for the intensification of efforts to develop ethics in relation to nuclear technology, this article presents an analysis of the recent situation and future prospects of nuclear technology deployment. This includes contradictions that have aggravated nuclear dilemmas and debates stimulated by the shortcomings of nuclear technology, as well as the need for the further development of a nuclear culture paradigm that is able to provide a conceptual framework to overcome nuclear challenges. Third, efforts in the field of nuclear technology ethics are presented as a short overview of particular examples, and the major findings regarding obstacles to the development of nuclear technology ethics are also summarized. Finally, a potential methodological course is proposed to overcome inaction in this field; the proposed course provides for the further development of nuclear technology ethics, assuming the axiological multidisciplinary problematization of the main concepts in nuclear engineering through the basic ethical paradigms: analytical, hermeneutical, and poststructuralist.

  13. Robot companions and ethics a pragmatic approach of ethical design.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Gérard

    2013-12-01

    From his experience as ethical expert for two Robot Companion prototype projects aiming at empowering older MCI persons to remain at home and to support their family carers, Gerard Cornet, Gerontologist, review the ethical rules, principles and pragmatic approaches in different cultures. The ethical process of these two funded projects, one European, Companionable (FP7 e-inclusion call1), the other French, Quo vadis (ANR tecsan) are described from the inclusion of the targeted end users in the process, to the assessment and ranking of their main needs and whishes to design the specifications, test the performance expected. Obstacles to turn round and limits for risks evaluation (directs or implicit), acceptability, utility, respect of intimacy and dignity, and balance with freedom and security and frontiers to artificial intelligence are discussed As quoted in the discussion with the French and Japanese experts attending the Toulouse Robotics and medicine symposium (March 26th 2011), the need of a new ethical approach, going further the present ethical rules is needed for the design and social status of ethical robots, having capacity cas factor of progress and global quality of innovation design in an ageing society.

  14. Do Ethics Classes Teach Ethics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curzer, Howard J.; Sattler, Sabrina; DuPree, Devin G.; Smith-Genthôs, K. Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    The ethics assessment industry is currently dominated by the second version of the Defining Issues Test (DIT2). In this article, we describe an alternative assessment instrument called the Sphere-Specific Moral Reasoning and Theory Survey (SMARTS), which measures the respondent's level of moral development in several respects. We describe eight…

  15. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  16. The Effect of Bilingualism on Self-Perceived Multicultural Counseling Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Villalba, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic and linguistic minorities continue to underutilize and prematurely terminate counseling services at higher rates than their ethnic majority counterparts. To improve the provision of counseling services to culturally diverse clients, new avenues supported by theory and research need to be uncovered. One factor that has received little…

  17. Counseling for Diversity. A Guide for School Counselors and Related Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C., Ed.

    This book provides practicing school counselors and their colleagues in related professions with direction for developing, implementing, and evaluating counseling programs for culturally diverse student groups. It also serves as a useful methods textbook for counselor training. Intervention strategies and counseling techniques are presented in the…

  18. Individualism and Collectivism: What Do They Have to Do with Counseling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John

    2005-01-01

    The author defines individualism and collectivism before examining how they are integral parts of the counseling process for clients and counselors. Although individualism has been assumed to be the norm for the counseling culture in the United States, recent work notes the influence of collectivism on professionals and clients in the counseling…

  19. Multicultural Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale: Re-Exploration and Refinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Junfei

    2017-01-01

    This study refined the "Multicultural Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale" (MCKAS; Ponterotto et al. "Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development," 30, 153-180, 2002) in response to concerns in the literature (e.g., Constantine et al. "Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology," 8(4), 334-345,…

  20. The Influence of Multicultural Training on Perceived Multicultural Counseling Competencies and Implicit Racial Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.; Brossart, Daniel F.; Reyes, Carla J.; Conoley, Collie W.; Phoummarath, Marion J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of multicultural training on multicultural counseling competencies and implicit racial prejudice. Results of a multilevel modeling analysis showed that only the multicultural counseling course was related to a decrease in implicit racial prejudice and an increase in cultural self-awareness. Implications for…