Science.gov

Sample records for count making numbers

  1. Making Hawai'i's Kids Count. Issue Paper Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Manoa. Center on the Family.

    This issue paper from Hawai'i Kids Count addresses the issue of teen pregnancy and birth rates. The paper notes that teen pregnancy and birth rates are declining both nationally and in Hawaii and describes key risk factors associated with having a baby before age 20: (1) early school failure; (2) early behavioral problems; (3) family dysfunction;…

  2. Two and Two Make Zero: The Counting Numbers, Their Conceptualization, Symbolization, and Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaseen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    "Two and Two Make Zero" considers children's acquisition of numerical concepts from a wide range of perspectives including topics that are often overlooked, most notably: the principal properties of the counting numbers in and of themselves; the role that numerical symbols play in number acquisition; the underlying conceptual structure of number…

  3. Making stillbirths count, making numbers talk - Issues in data collection for stillbirths

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Stillbirths need to count. They constitute the majority of the world's perinatal deaths and yet, they are largely invisible. Simply counting stillbirths is only the first step in analysis and prevention. From a public health perspective, there is a need for information on timing and circumstances of death, associated conditions and underlying causes, and availability and quality of care. This information will guide efforts to prevent stillbirths and improve quality of care. Discussion In this report, we assess how different definitions and limits in registration affect data capture, and we discuss the specific challenges of stillbirth registration, with emphasis on implementation. We identify what data need to be captured, we suggest a dataset to cover core needs in registration and analysis of the different categories of stillbirths with causes and quality indicators, and we illustrate the experience in stillbirth registration from different cultural settings. Finally, we point out gaps that need attention in the International Classification of Diseases and review the qualities of alternative systems that have been tested in low- and middle-income settings. Summary Obtaining high-quality data will require consistent definitions for stillbirths, systematic population-based registration, better tools for surveys and verbal autopsies, capacity building and training in procedures to identify causes of death, locally adapted quality indicators, improved classification systems, and effective registration and reporting systems. PMID:20017922

  4. Counting on the mental number line to make a move: sensorimotor ('pen') control and numerical processing.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rebecca; van Rooijen, Maaike; Giles, Oscar; Mushtaq, Faisal; Steenbergen, Bert; Mon-Williams, Mark; Waterman, Amanda

    2017-07-27

    Mathematics is often conducted with a writing implement. But is there a relationship between numerical processing and sensorimotor 'pen' control? We asked participants to move a stylus so it crossed an unmarked line at a location specified by a symbolic number (1-9), where number colour indicated whether the line ran left-right ('normal') or vice versa ('reversed'). The task could be simplified through the use of a 'mental number line' (MNL). Many modern societies use number lines in mathematical education and the brain's representation of number appears to follow a culturally determined spatial organisation (so better task performance is associated with this culturally normal orientation-the MNL effect). Participants (counter-balanced) completed two consistent blocks of trials, 'normal' and 'reversed', followed by a mixed block where line direction varied randomly. Experiment 1 established that the MNL effect was robust, and showed that the cognitive load associated with reversing the MNL not only affected response selection but also the actual movement execution (indexed by duration) within the mixed trials. Experiment 2 showed that an individual's motor abilities predicted performance in the difficult (mixed) condition but not the easier blocks. These results suggest that numerical processing is not isolated from motor capabilities-a finding with applied consequences.

  5. Making Numbers Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrey, Deandrea

    2008-01-01

    Social justice issues have long had a strong presence in some content areas. History is often a chronicle of the struggle for peace and equity. In English, students can discover how language can be a catalyst for change, can bring clarity to protests against injustice and can enhance healing and reconciliation through authentic dialogue. Likewise,…

  6. Make Your Calories Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... intake. The exercises will help consumers use the food label to make decisions about which food choice is ... you: It's only three steps Glossary Definitions of food label and nutrition terms used in this presentation. Resources ...

  7. Making "Cute" Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dark, Denise

    2007-01-01

    A holiday quilt project in a kindergarten classroom becomes a focus for exploring patterns, shapes, measurement, spatial relationships, and number sense. Cooperative group work, problem solving, and communication of mathematical ideas enhance the completion of the project. (Contains 5 figures.)

  8. Making Accountability Really Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Lauren B.

    2006-01-01

    Standards-based education has now reached a stage where it is possible to evaluate its overall effectiveness. Several earlier papers in the special issue of "Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice" on "Test Scores and State Accountability" (Volume 24, Number 4) examined specific state policies and their effects on schools…

  9. Counting on Using a Number Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Counting all and counting on are distinct counting strategies that can be used to compute such quantities as the total number of objects in two sets (Wright, Martland, and Stafford 2010). Given five objects and three more objects, for example, children who use counting all to determine quantity will count both collections; that is, they count…

  10. Quantum abacus for counting and factorizing numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, M. V.; Lesovik, G. B.; Blatter, G.

    2011-05-15

    We generalize the binary quantum counting algorithm of Lesovik, Suslov, and Blatter [Phys. Rev. A 82, 012316 (2010)] to higher counting bases. The algorithm makes use of qubits, qutrits, and qudits to count numbers in a base-2, base-3, or base-d representation. In operating the algorithm, the number nnumber n in the base-d representation; the inverse transformation is fully quantum at the level of individual qudits, while a simpler semiclassical version can be used on the level of qudit registers. Combining registers of qubits, qutrits, and qudits, where d is a prime number, with a simpler single-shot measurement allows us to find the powers of 2, 3, and other primes d in the number n. We show that the counting task naturally leads to the shift operation and an algorithm based on the quantum Fourier transformation. We discuss possible implementations of the algorithm using quantum spin-d systems, d-well systems, and their emulation with spin-1/2 or double-well systems. We establish the analogy between our counting algorithm and the phase estimation algorithm and make use of the latter's performance analysis in stabilizing our scheme. Applications embrace a quantum metrological scheme to measure voltage (an analog to digital converter) and a simple procedure to entangle multiparticle states.

  11. Counting copy number and calories.

    PubMed

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index.

  12. Numbers, Counting, and Infinity in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meconi, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of middle-school students' natural understanding of large numbers to introduce the concept of infinity. Presents activities that investigate infinite sets by demonstrating a one-to-one correspondence between the counting numbers and the given set. Examples include prime numbers, Fibonacci numbers, fractions, even and odd numbers,…

  13. Early Concepts of Number and Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Katherine; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Before primitive man had grasped the concept of number, the written word or even speech, he was able to count. This was important for keeping track of food supplies, sending messages, trading between villages and even keeping track of how many animals were in their herd. Counting was done in various ways, but in all cases, the underlying principle…

  14. Making Academics Count: Action Guide. Successful Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Amanda Sodoma; Meeder, Hans; Rosen, Linda P.; Silver, Steve; Williams, Andra

    This document is intended to help communities plan and implement initiatives modeled after Making Academics Count, a campaign that was launched in 1997 by the Business Coalition for Education Reform (BCER) to encourage employers to ask job applicants for their school records and thereby help motivate students to achieve at higher levels. The guide…

  15. Making decisions from numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, E.

    1987-03-01

    Regulatory agencies require numbers to provide health protection. The manner in which these numbers are derived from animal experiments and human epidemiology is considered together with the limitations and inadequacies of these numbers. Some recent examples of risk assessment in Canada are given including asbestos, drinking water, and indoor air quality. The value of these numbers in providing a measure of the hazard in a wider perspective is stressed, although they can never be the sole determinant of public policy.

  16. The bispectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Durrer, Ruth; Marozzi, Giovanni; Montanari, Francesco E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@helsinki.fi

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the dominant terms of the relativistic galaxy number counts to second order in cosmological perturbation theory on sub-Hubble scales and on intermediate to large redshifts. In particular, we determine their contribution to the bispectrum. In addition to the terms already known from Newtonian second order perturbation theory, we find that there are a series of additional 'lensing-like' terms which contribute to the bispectrum. We derive analytical expressions for the full leading order bispectrum and we evaluate it numerically for different configurations, indicating how they can be measured with upcoming surveys. In particular, the new 'lensing-like' terms are not negligible for wide redshift bins and even dominate the bispectrum at well separated redshifts. This offers us the possibility to measure them in future surveys.

  17. Africa Counts: Number and Pattern in African Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaslavsky, Claudia

    This document describes the contributions of African peoples to the science of mathematics. The development of a number system is seen as related to need. Names of numbers, time reckoning, gesture counting, and counting materials are examined. Mystical beliefs about numbers and special meanings in pattern are presented. Reproductions of patterns,…

  18. Going Online to Make Learning Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Cathy; Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Adult students often come to higher education with college-level learning that they have acquired outside of the classroom--from the workplace, military service, self-study, or hobbies. For decades, many forward-thinking colleges and universities have been offering services to evaluate that learning and award it college credit that counts towards…

  19. Galaxy number counts to second order and their bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Durrer, Ruth; Marozzi, Giovanni; Montanari, Francesco E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch

    2014-12-01

    We determine the number counts to second order in cosmological perturbation theory in the Poisson gauge and allowing for anisotropic stress. The calculation is performed using an innovative approach based on the recently proposed ''geodesic light-cone'' gauge. This allows us to determine the number counts in a purely geometric way, without using Einstein's equation. The result is valid for general dark energy models and (most) modified gravity models. We then evaluate numerically some relevant contributions to the number counts bispectrum. In particular we consider the terms involving the density, redshift space distortion and lensing.

  20. Far-Ultraviolet Number Counts of Field Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voyer, Elysse N.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Siana, Brian D.; deMello, Duilia F.

    2010-01-01

    The Number counts of far-ultraviolet (FUV) galaxies as a function of magnitude provide a direct statistical measure of the density and evolution of star-forming galaxies. We report on the results of measurements of the rest-frame FUV number counts computed from data of several fields including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the GOODS-North and -South fields. These data were obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope Solar Blind Channel of the Advance Camera for Surveys. The number counts cover an AB magnitude range from 20-29 magnitudes, covering a total area of 15.9 arcmin'. We show that the number counts are lower than those in previous studies using smaller areas. The differences in the counts are likely the result of cosmic variance; our new data cover more area and more lines of sight than the previous studies. The slope of our number counts connects well with local FUV counts and they show good agreement with recent semi-analytical models based on dark matter "merger trees".

  1. Make Visits with Your Legislators Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The most influential communication one can have with an elected official is a face-to-face meeting. It gives one an opportunity to make one's case directly to the lawmaker and to discern his or her support or opposition on the issue. In this article, the author offers some tips to help one have successful meetings with one's state legislators or…

  2. Teacher Leadership: Making Your Voice Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Though principals play an important role in setting the vision for a school, and moving their staffs toward that vision, it is increasingly apparent that teachers must take on active decision-making and problem-solving roles. By sharing these responsibilities, schools can tap into the expertise of those most in tune with teaching and learning, and…

  3. Higher order relativistic galaxy number counts: dominating terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TrØst Nielsen, Jeppe; Durrer, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    We review the number counts to second order concentrating on the terms which dominate on sub horizon scales. We re-derive the result for these terms and compare it with the different versions found in the literature. We generalize our derivation to higher order terms, especially the third order number counts which are needed to compute the 1-loop contribution to the power spectrum.

  4. Achieving the Quality Difference: Making Customers Count

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-02

    the Conference. Welcome to the Conference Wednesday, May 31, 1989 Frank Hodsoll "The challenges are great, but -o are the creativity and dedication of...framework which will support this achievement. Mr. Hodsoll stressed that many challenges lie ahead in the pursuit of Total Quality; many changes w"".1 have to...problems faced by the organization are with these people, and it is important to involve them. His experience has also shown that by making oneself

  5. Effects of Counting and Matching on Conservation of Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuson, Karen C.; And Others

    Forty-five children aged four-and-a-half to five-and-a-half years old were given number conservation tasks in three conditions: (1) a count condition in which children were helped to count each set after the transformation; (2) a match condition in which children were helped to connect by a string each animal with its peanut; and (3) the standard…

  6. Investigating Children's Abilities to Count and Make Quantitative Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Md-Yunus, Sham'ah

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate children's abilities to count and make quantitative comparisons. In addition, this study utilized reasoning questions (i.e., how did you know?). Thirty-four preschoolers, mean age 4.5 years old, participated in the study. According to the results, 89% of the children (n = 30) were able to do rote counting and…

  7. Investigating Children's Abilities to Count and Make Quantitative Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Md-Yunus, Sham'ah

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate children's abilities to count and make quantitative comparisons. In addition, this study utilized reasoning questions (i.e., how did you know?). Thirty-four preschoolers, mean age 4.5 years old, participated in the study. According to the results, 89% of the children (n = 30) were able to do rote counting and…

  8. SUBMILLIMETER NUMBER COUNTS FROM STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF BLAST MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Patanchon, Guillaume; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We describe the application of a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts from confusion-limited observations by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). Our method is based on a maximum likelihood fit to the pixel histogram, sometimes called 'P(D)', an approach which has been used before to probe faint counts, the difference being that here we advocate its use even for sources with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios. This method has an advantage over standard techniques of source extraction in providing an unbiased estimate of the counts from the bright end down to flux densities well below the confusion limit. We specifically analyze BLAST observations of a roughly 10 deg{sup 2} map centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South field. We provide estimates of number counts at the three BLAST wavelengths 250, 350, and 500 mum; instead of counting sources in flux bins we estimate the counts at several flux density nodes connected with power laws. We observe a generally very steep slope for the counts of about -3.7 at 250 mum, and -4.5 at 350 and 500 mum, over the range approx0.02-0.5 Jy, breaking to a shallower slope below about 0.015 Jy at all three wavelengths. We also describe how to estimate the uncertainties and correlations in this method so that the results can be used for model-fitting. This method should be well suited for analysis of data from the Herschel satellite.

  9. Do Young Children Acquire Number Words through Subitizing or Counting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoit, Laurent; Lehalle, Henri; Jouen, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Two alternative hypotheses can be used to explain how young children acquire the cardinal meaning of small-number words. The first stresses the role of counting and predicts better performance when the items are presented in succession. The second considers the role of subitizing and predicts better performance when the items are presented…

  10. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Vivian M.; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers. PMID:24550795

  11. Time to Make the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surrena, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In order to inspire her students to work in mixed media, the author chose to highlight the art of Jasper Johns and Robert Indiana, both of whom used numbers and letters as a main focus in their art. In this article, the author describes a mixed-media printmaking project. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  12. Time to Make the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surrena, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In order to inspire her students to work in mixed media, the author chose to highlight the art of Jasper Johns and Robert Indiana, both of whom used numbers and letters as a main focus in their art. In this article, the author describes a mixed-media printmaking project. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  13. Clustering Effect on the Number Count of Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, K.

    1992-08-01

    We have tested the cosmological model of Ω0 = 1 and Λ = 0 against the faint galaxy number count taking the clustering effect of galaxies into account. The evolution of the large scale structure is simulated numerically by means of the particle mesh method in three dimensional space. We use 643 particles and the same number of mesh cells. We have found that the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model without the cosmological constant does not explain the excess of the number count observed by Tyson even if the clustering effect is taken into account, provided the cluster size and the correlation length among clusters are less than the simulation box size of 128 h-1 Mpc. The clustering on scales larger than 128 h-1 Mpc is also considered.

  14. Making It Count (First Offering). Course Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggert, John D.

    "Making It Count," a multimedia computer course designed to be offered on public television for college credit at the sophomore level, was offered by the State University of Nebraska in 1975. The course was developed by the Boeing Computer Services. The course enrollment was 79, with 64 enrolled for credit. The mean student age was 36.5,…

  15. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Making Afterschool Count, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the three 1999 issues of a journal highlighting the Making After-School Count Initiative, programs across the country wherein communities and schools cooperate to serve children during after-school hours. The February 1999 issue describes grassroots efforts by California parents and religious leaders to secure funding for…

  16. K-2 "Make It Count" Students' Views of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leder, Gilah; Forgasz, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Data from an attitude survey administered to students in grades K-2 from four schools participating in the "Make it Count" project are reported in this paper. Few differences were found in the attitudes and beliefs of the Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants. The relevance of these findings for students' longer term mathematics…

  17. Comparing Digital Sunspot Number Counts to the New International Sunspot Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Henry, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    The International Sunspot Numbers (ISN; Version 2) have been recently (2015) revised at the Sunspot Index and Long Term Solar Observations maintained at Royal Observatory of Belgium (http://www.sidc.be/silso/datafiles). ISN is a reconciled aggregate over several ground-based observatories, mostly using hand-drawn sunspot recordings. We make a detailed 10-year comparisons between the Improved Solar Observing Optical Network’s prototype digital data (2002-2011) and the ISN V1 (Version 1; pre-2015), and ISN V2. Over the ~ 10-year period, ISN V1 underestimates the sunspot number counts by up to 40% while the ISN V2 overestimates by a similar amount. We also compare the hand-drawn data from a single telescope at the National Solar Observatory with the digital data and ISN numbers. These comparisons reveal caveats that need to be taken into account, as sunspot numbers are used to forecast both the solar cycle and the near term climatology of solar cycle impacts on the space environment.

  18. Galaxy Number Counts as a Probe for Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucklein, B. K.; Moody, J. W.; Hintz, E. G.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the use of galaxy number counts (GNC) to probe for voids. As a first step, we create a toy model of a volume of space with a random distribution of galaxies. We then create voids in this distribution at different distances and with varying widths. As a diagnostic of the voids, we plot the log of the number of galaxies brighter than a given apparent magnitude versus the apparent magnitude. The technique turns out to be very sensitive to the distance, the size, and the type of void.

  19. Probing the primordial power spectrum with cluster number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Chantavat, Teeraparb; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph

    2009-04-15

    We investigate how well galaxy cluster number counts can constrain the primordial power spectrum. Measurements of the primary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background may be limited, by the presence of foregrounds from secondary sources, to probing the primordial power spectrum at wave numbers less than about 0.30h Mpc{sup -1}. We break up the primordial power spectrum into a number of nodes and interpolate linearly between each node. This allows us to show that cluster number counts could then extend the constraints on the form of the primordial power spectrum up to wave numbers of about 0.45h Mpc{sup -1}. We estimate combinations of constraints from PLANCK and SPT primary cosmic microwave background and their respective Sunyaev-Zeldovich surveys. We find that their constraining ability is limited by uncertainties in the mass-scaling relations. We also estimate the constraint from clusters detected from a SNAP-like gravitational lensing survey. As there is an unambiguous and simple relationship between the filtered shear of the lensing survey and the cluster mass, it may be possible to obtain much tighter constraints on the primordial power spectrum in this case.

  20. [Numbers, counting and calculating problems in view of cognitive neurology].

    PubMed

    Márkus, Attila

    2010-03-30

    The ability to count and calculate is a human-specific skill comprised of understanding numeric values and categories and performing numerical operations; it is an acoustic-verbal symbolic activity that may be expressed in writing and understood by reading. The neuronal bases and precursors of cognitive systems have been supplied to mankind by the process of evolution. Abilities to create symbols (speech, visual letter and number symbols) must have played a decisive role in the emergence of man from the world of primates. Although counting and calculating problems are classified into numerous types, two main forms of dyscalculia have practical importance: the acquired one (the loss of learned knowledge) and the developmental one (the disturbance of the acquisition of arithmetical knowledge).

  1. Every nurse has a duty to make every contact count.

    PubMed

    Graham, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    Make Every Contact Count is a public health strategy and not entirely a new idea in nursing, but one that all nurses need to be more conscious of when dealing with patients and the public. The strategy is based on the fact that it is simple and easy to be tactful in delivering correct, brief health advice of any kind, in any setting, whether as nursing students or nurse consultants. Such opportunistic intervention may be opposed or ignored, but could be the trigger that encourages people to change their behaviour positively and take responsibility for their health. A sustained change can reduce the potential negative effect of adverse habits on people's life or on the lives of their children, even in much later years. In this article, the author argues that it is every nurses' duty to make every contact count for the health of the population now and for the future, and thereby reduce the burdens on the NHS and social services.

  2. [Can electronic measurement of total cell number in bronchoalveolar lavage replace conventional chamber counting?].

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Breyer, O; Reinert, U

    1990-02-01

    On average, the electronic technique for counting cells employing a Coulter counter produces higher, though comparable, numbers of cells than does manual counting in a Neubauer counting chamber. On the basis of cell size distribution, electronic counting permits a rough preliminary differentiation to be made. Owing to the much larger number of cells counted, an appreciably improved statistical analysis proves possible.

  3. Particle number counting statistics in ideal Bose gases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, C; Wilkens, M

    1997-11-10

    We discuss the exact particle number counting statistics of degenerate ideal Bose gases in the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensemble, respectively, for various trapping potentials. We then invoke the Maxwell's Demon ensemble [Navez et el., Phys. Rev. Lett. (1997)] and show that for large total number of particles the root-mean-square fluctuation of the condensate occupation scales n0 / [T=Tc] r N s with scaling exponents r = 3=2, s = 1=2 for the3D harmonic oscillator trapping potential, and r = 1,s= 2=3 for the 3D box. We derive an explicit expression for r and s in terms of spatial dimension D and spectral index sigma of the single-particle energy spectrum. Our predictions also apply to systems where Bose-Einstein condensation does not occur. We point out that the condensate fluctuations in the microcanonical and canonical ensemble respect the principle of thermodynamic equivalence.

  4. Multiwavelength Number Counts of AGN in the GOODS Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. M.; Treister, E.; Chatzichristou, E. T.; Van Duyne, J.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Grogin, N. A.; Bergeron, J.; Stern, D.; Chary, R.-R.; Conselice, C. J.; Cristiani, S.

    2004-05-01

    We model the X-ray, optical, and far-infrared flux distributions of AGN in the GOODS fields, starting from hard X-ray luminosity functions and spectral energy distributions appropriate to the unified scheme for AGN. The deep optical counts measured from HST ACS images can be well explained by a unified scheme that postulates roughly 3 times as many obscured as unobscured AGN. This scenario is consistent with the observed spectroscopic and photometric redshift distributions of the GOODS AGN once selection effects are considered. The previously reported discrepancy between observed spectroscopic redshift distributions and the predictions of population synthesis models for the X-ray background (which include a similarly large number of obscured AGN) is explained by bias against the most heavily obscured AGN in both X-ray surveys and optical spectroscopic samples. We present the model predictions for the number counts of AGN in the Spitzer MIPS 24 micron and IRAC 3.6-8 micron bands. The GOODS Spitzer observations will verify whether large numbers of obscured AGN are indeed present in the early Universe; these will be very bright far-infrared sources, including some, missed by X-ray observations, that look like ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This work was supported by NASA grants HST-GO-09425(.01-A,.13-A,.26-A); NSF CAREER award AST 99-83783; NASA contract number 1224666 issued by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407; ASI grant I/R/088/02; and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship.

  5. Measuring the lensing potential with tomographic galaxy number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch

    2015-10-01

    We investigate how the lensing potential can be measured tomographically with future galaxy surveys using their number counts. Such a measurement is an independent test of the standard ΛCDM framework and can be used to discern modified theories of gravity. We perform a Fisher matrix forecast based on galaxy angular-redshift power spectra, assuming specifications consistent with future photometric Euclid-like surveys and spectroscopic SKA-like surveys. For the Euclid-like survey we derive a fitting formula for the magnification bias. Our analysis suggests that the cross correlation between different redshift bins is very sensitive to the lensing potential such that the survey can measure the amplitude of the lensing potential at the same level of precision as other standard ΛCDM cosmological parameters.

  6. You can count on the motor cortex: Finger counting habits modulate motor cortex activation evoked by numbers

    PubMed Central

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf; Fischer, Martin H.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    The embodied cognition framework suggests that neural systems for perception and action are engaged during higher cognitive processes. In an event-related fMRI study, we tested this claim for the abstract domain of numerical symbol processing: is the human cortical motor system part of the representation of numbers, and is organization of numerical knowledge influenced by individual finger counting habits? Developmental studies suggest a link between numerals and finger counting habits due to the acquisition of numerical skills through finger counting in childhood. In the present study, digits 1 to 9 and the corresponding number words were presented visually to adults with different finger counting habits, i.e. left- and right-starters who reported that they usually start counting small numbers with their left and right hand, respectively. Despite the absence of overt hand movements, the hemisphere contralateral to the hand used for counting small numbers was activated when small numbers were presented. The correspondence between finger counting habits and hemispheric motor activation is consistent with an intrinsic functional link between finger counting and number processing. PMID:22133748

  7. 34 CFR 222.34 - If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made? 222.34 Section 222.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.34 If...

  8. 34 CFR 222.34 - If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made? 222.34 Section 222.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.34 If...

  9. 34 CFR 222.34 - If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made? 222.34 Section 222.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.34 If...

  10. 34 CFR 222.34 - If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made? 222.34 Section 222.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.34 If...

  11. 34 CFR 222.34 - If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If an applicant makes a second membership count, when must that count be made? 222.34 Section 222.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.34 If...

  12. Determination of confidence limits for experiments with low numbers of counts. [Poisson-distributed photon counts from astrophysical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Burrows, David N.; Nousek, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Two different methods, classical and Bayesian, for determining confidence intervals involving Poisson-distributed data are compared. Particular consideration is given to cases where the number of counts observed is small and is comparable to the mean number of background counts. Reasons for preferring the Bayesian over the classical method are given. Tables of confidence limits calculated by the Bayesian method are provided for quick reference.

  13. Determination of confidence limits for experiments with low numbers of counts. [Poisson-distributed photon counts from astrophysical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Burrows, David N.; Nousek, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Two different methods, classical and Bayesian, for determining confidence intervals involving Poisson-distributed data are compared. Particular consideration is given to cases where the number of counts observed is small and is comparable to the mean number of background counts. Reasons for preferring the Bayesian over the classical method are given. Tables of confidence limits calculated by the Bayesian method are provided for quick reference.

  14. Counting Books Are More than Numbers: An Annotated Action Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Patricia L.

    Counting books offer children the time and the tools to develop the understanding needed to solve problems. Stimulated by these books, children may use mathematic language and talk about mathematics as they get involved with materials to move and manipulate, as they use supportive aids found in illustrations, and as they interact with materials to…

  15. By the Numbers. A New System Makes Every Student Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    When Mark Smith was principal of Houston's Anderson Elementary School in the early 1990s, he often ran up against a maddening mathematics problem. At the time, the Houston Independent School District doled out money to schools for nonteaching staff members--like assistant principals, clerks, and librarians--based on a set of enrollment formulas…

  16. By the Numbers. A New System Makes Every Student Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    When Mark Smith was principal of Houston's Anderson Elementary School in the early 1990s, he often ran up against a maddening mathematics problem. At the time, the Houston Independent School District doled out money to schools for nonteaching staff members--like assistant principals, clerks, and librarians--based on a set of enrollment formulas…

  17. Detecting and Number Counting of Single Engineered Nanoparticles by Digital Particle Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Paunescu, Daniela; Mora, Carlos A; Querci, Lorenzo; Heckel, Reinhard; Puddu, Michela; Hattendorf, Bodo; Günther, Detlef; Grass, Robert N

    2015-10-27

    The concentrations of nanoparticles present in colloidal dispersions are usually measured and given in mass concentration (e.g. mg/mL), and number concentrations can only be obtained by making assumptions about nanoparticle size and morphology. Additionally traditional nanoparticle concentration measures are not very sensitive, and only the presence/absence of millions/billions of particles occurring together can be obtained. Here, we describe a method, which not only intrinsically results in number concentrations, but is also sensitive enough to count individual nanoparticles, one by one. To make this possible, the sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was combined with a binary (=0/1, yes/no) measurement arrangement, binomial statistics and DNA comprising monodisperse silica nanoparticles. With this method, individual tagged particles in the range of 60-250 nm could be detected and counted in drinking water in absolute number, utilizing a standard qPCR device within 1.5 h of measurement time. For comparison, the method was validated with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICPMS).

  18. Policy as Numbers: Ac/Counting for Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an account and a critique of the rise of the contemporary policy as numbers phenomenon and considers its effects on policy and for educational research. Policy as numbers is located within the literatures on numbers in politics and the statistics/state relationship and, while recognising the longevity of the latter…

  19. Make Kids Count: The State of Arizona's Children, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, Elizabeth; Naimark, Dana Wolfe

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends between 1990 and 1998 in the well-being of Arizona's children. The statistical portrait is based on several indicators of well-being, including: (1) children in poverty; (2) babies born at risk; (3) children in families receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF); (4) children in…

  20. Make Kids Count in '97: Hawai'i Kids Count 1997 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsock, Marcia; Davidson, Dana; Greenfield, Theresa; Grogan, Beverley

    This Kids Count report is the third to examine statewide trends in the well-being of Hawaii's children. The bulk of this statistical report is comprised of indicator results and is divided into four major sections: (1) family composition and resources, including children in poverty, children in single parent families, births to single teens, and…

  1. Make Kids Count in '96: Hawai'i Kids Count 1996 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Kids Count, Honolulu.

    This KIDS COUNT statistical report is the second to examine indicators of children's well-being in Hawaii. The bulk of the report is comprised of the indicator results and is divided into four major sections: (1) family composition and resources, including children in poverty, children in single parent families, births to single teens, and…

  2. Make Kids Count in '95: Hawai'i Kids Count 1995 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Kids Count, Honolulu.

    This KIDS COUNT statistical report is the first to examine indicators of children's well-being in Hawaii. The bulk of the report is comprised of the indicator results and is divided into four major sections: (1) family composition and resources, including children in poverty, children in single parent families, births to single teens, and children…

  3. Make Kids Count in '99: Hawai'i Kids Count 1999 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsock, Marcia

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Hawaii's children. The bulk of this statistical report is comprised of indicator findings and is divided into four major sections: (1) family composition and resources, including children in poverty, family formation, births to teens, children in single-parent families, children…

  4. Loudness counts: Interactions between loudness, number magnitude, and space.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Matthias; Mast, Fred W

    2017-07-01

    ATOM (a theory of magnitude) suggests that magnitude information of different formats (numbers, space, and time) is processed within a generalized magnitude network. In this study we investigated whether loudness, as a possible indicator of intensity and magnitude, interacts with the processing of numbers. Small and large numbers, spoken in a quiet and a loud voice, were simultaneously presented to the left and right ear (Experiments 1a and 1b). Participants judged whether the number presented to the left or right ear was louder or larger. Responses were faster when the smaller number was spoken in a quiet voice, and the larger number in a loud voice. Thus, task-irrelevant numerical information influenced the processing of loudness and vice versa. This bi-directional link was also confirmed by classical SNARC paradigms (spatial-numerical association of response codes; Experiments 2a-2c) when participants again judged the magnitude or loudness of separately presented stimuli. In contrast, no loudness-number association was found in a parity judgment task. Regular SNARC effects were found in the magnitude and parity judgment task, but not in the loudness judgment task. Instead, in the latter task, response side was associated with loudness. Possible explanations for these results are discussed.

  5. The State of the World's Children 2014 in Numbers: Every Child Counts. Revealing Disparities, Advancing Children's Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslam, Abid; Grojec, Anna; Little, Céline; Maloney, Ticiana; Tamagni, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    "The State of the World's Children 2014 In Numbers: Every Child Counts" highlights the critical role data and monitoring play in realizing children's rights. Credible data, disseminated effectively and used correctly, make it possible to target interventions that help right the wrong of exclusion. Data do not, of themselves, change the…

  6. What counts in the development of young children's number knowledge?

    PubMed

    Levine, Susan C; Suriyakham, Linda Whealton; Rowe, Meredith L; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Gunderson, Elizabeth A

    2010-09-01

    Prior studies indicate that children vary widely in their mathematical knowledge by the time they enter preschool and that this variation predicts levels of achievement in elementary school. In a longitudinal study of a diverse sample of 44 preschool children, we examined the extent to which their understanding of the cardinal meanings of the number words (e.g., knowing that the word "four" refers to sets with 4 items) is predicted by the "number talk" they hear from their primary caregiver in the early home environment. Results from 5 visits showed substantial variation in parents' number talk to children between the ages of 14 and 30 months. Moreover, this variation predicted children's knowledge of the cardinal meanings of number words at 46 months, even when socioeconomic status and other measures of parent and child talk were controlled. These findings suggest that encouraging parents to talk about number with their toddlers, and providing them with effective ways to do so, may positively impact children's school achievement.

  7. Full counting statistics of information content and particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-01

    We consider a bipartite quantum conductor and discuss the joint probability distribution of a particle number in a subsystem and the self-information associated with the reduced density matrix of the subsystem. By extending the multicontour Keldysh Green-function technique, we calculate the Rényi entropy of a positive integer order M subjected to the particle number constraint, from which we derive the joint probability distribution. For energy-independent transmission, we derive the time dependence of the accessible entanglement entropy, or the conditional entropy. We analyze the joint probability distribution for energy-dependent transmission probability at the steady state under the coherent resonant tunneling and the incoherent sequential tunneling conditions. We also discuss the probability distribution of the efficiency, which measures the information content transferred by a single electron.

  8. Constraining thawing and freezing models with cluster number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, N. Chandrachani; Gonzalez, J.E.; Alcaniz, J.S. E-mail: javierernesto@on.br

    2014-06-01

    Measurements of the cluster abundance as a function of mass and redshift provide an important cosmological test that probe not only the expansion rate but also the growth of perturbations. In this paper we adopt a scalar field scenario which admits both thawing and freezing solutions from an appropriate choice of the model parameters and derived all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density. We discuss the ability of cluster observations to distinguish between these scalar field behaviors and the standard ΛCDM scenario by considering the eROSITA and SPT cluster surveys.

  9. Elementary counting of cardinal and ordinal numbers by persons with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Marx, M H

    1989-06-01

    Cardinal and ordinal counting skills were assessed in 37 mentally retarded adult workers and 42 school children with mental retardation. The major results were the very poor performance of the younger children (essentially at chance beyond the numbers 1 and 2) and the overall marked inferiority in ordinal compared with cardinal counting.

  10. Making Research Count at Minimbah Aboriginal Preschool, Armidale NSW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dianne; Power, Kerith

    This interview with Dianne Roberts, director of the Minimbah Aboriginal Preschool in Armidale, New South Wales (Australia), explores research issues, leadership styles, and how decision making and responsibilities are handled at Minimbah. Incoming researchers must show how research will benefit the community under study, how they will work in…

  11. Correlation of pollen counts and number of hospital visits of asthmatic and allergic rhinitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishtha; Singh, Udaiveer; Singh, Dimple; Daya, Mangal; Singh, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Environmental pollens are known to cause exacerbation of symptoms of patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. During pollen months, number of patients visiting hospital has been shown to increase in some studies. However, in India, such studies are lacking. Therefore, we aimed to study pollen counts and to find its correlation with number of new patients attending Asthma Bhawan for 2 years. Materials and Methods: Aerobiological sampling was done using Burkard 24 h spore trap system. The site selected for the entrapment of the air spore was the building of Asthma Bhawan situated at Vidhyadhar Nagar, Jaipur. New patients coming with problems of respiratory allergy such as AR or asthma were recruited in the study. Skin prick tests (SPTs) were carried out after obtaining consent in these patients. Monthly pollen counts of trees, weeds and grasses were correlated with the number of new patients. Pollen calendar was prepared for 2 years. Results: Average annual pollen count during 2011 and 2012 were 14,460.5. In the analysis, 37 types of species or families were identified. Pollen count showed two seasonal peaks during March–April and from August to October. January and June showed the lowest pollen counts in 2 years. Average monthly count of grass pollens showed significant correlation with number of new patients (r = 0.59). However, monthly pollen count of trees and weeds did not correlate. The correlation of the pollen count of individual pollen with the SPT positivity to that pollen showed significant correlation with Chenopodium album only. Conclusions: It can be concluded that there were two peaks of pollen count in a year during March–April and August–October. Average monthly pollen counts of grass were significantly correlated with the number of hospital visits of new patients. PMID:28360459

  12. Mediants Make (Number) Sense of Fraction Foibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    By the time they reach middle school, all students have been taught to add fractions. However, not all have "learned" to add fractions. The common mistake in adding fractions is to report that a/b + c/d is equal to (a + c)/(b + d). It is certainly necessary to correct this mistake when a student makes it. However, this occasion also…

  13. Mediants Make (Number) Sense of Fraction Foibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    By the time they reach middle school, all students have been taught to add fractions. However, not all have "learned" to add fractions. The common mistake in adding fractions is to report that a/b + c/d is equal to (a + c)/(b + d). It is certainly necessary to correct this mistake when a student makes it. However, this occasion also…

  14. The cognitive foundations of early arithmetic skills: It is counting and number judgment, but not finger gnosis, that count.

    PubMed

    Long, Imogen; Malone, Stephanie A; Tolan, Anne; Burgoyne, Kelly; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Witteveen, Kate; Hulme, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Following on from ideas developed by Gerstmann, a body of work has suggested that impairments in finger gnosis may be causally related to children's difficulties in learning arithmetic. We report a study with a large sample of typically developing children (N=197) in which we assessed finger gnosis and arithmetic along with a range of other relevant cognitive predictors of arithmetic skills (vocabulary, counting, and symbolic and nonsymbolic magnitude judgments). Contrary to some earlier claims, we found no meaningful association between finger gnosis and arithmetic skills. Counting and symbolic magnitude comparison were, however, powerful predictors of arithmetic skills, replicating a number of earlier findings. Our findings seriously question theories that posit either a simple association or a causal connection between finger gnosis and the development of arithmetic skills. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Number counts produced by the EGG (Schreiber+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Elbaz, D.; Pannella, M.; Merlin, E.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Cullen, F.; Dunlop, J.; Ferguson, H. C.; Michalowski, M. J.; Okumura, K.; Santini, P.; Shu, X. W.; Wang, T.; White, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Empirical Galaxy Generator (EGG) is a tool to produce mock galaxy catalogs for deep fields. This table compiles the number counts generated by the tool (v1.0.5) in multiple bands from the U band (0.35um) to the millimeter (2mm). These counts were generated from three different mock catalogs of increasing area and decreasing depth, to obtain a large dynamic range on the fluxes. The counts only include the contribution of the stellar and dust emission of galaxies. They do not account for emission from ionized/atomic/molecular gas, or active galactic nuclei, and they assume no attenuation by clouds from our own galaxy. Differential counts are defined as dN/dlog(flux)/dV. (1 data file).

  17. The Herschel-ATLAS: Extragalatic Number Counts from 250 to 500 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, D. L.; Rigby, E.; Maddox, S.; Dunne, L.; Mortier, A.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Bonfield, D.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Leeuw, L.; Sibthorpe, B.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims.The Herschel-ATLAS survey (H-ATLAS) will be the largest area survey to be undertaken by the Herschel Space Observatory. It will cover 550 sq. deg. of extragalactic sky at wavelengths of 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns when completed, reaching flux limits (50-) from 32 to 145mJy. We here present galaxy number counts obtained for SPIRE observations of the first -14 sq. deg. observed at 250, 350 and 500 m. Methods. Number counts are a fundamental tool in constraining models of galaxy evolution. We use source catalogs extracted from the H-ATLAS maps as the basis for such an analysis. Correction factors for completeness and flux boosting are derived by applying our extraction method to model catalogs and then applied to the raw observational counts. Results. We find a steep rise in the number counts at flux levels of 100-200mJy in all three SPIRE bands, consistent with results from BLAST. The counts are compared to a range of galaxy evolution models. None of the current models is an ideal fit to the data but all ascribe the steep rise to a population of luminous, rapidly evolving dusty galaxies at moderate to high redshift.

  18. Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique based on a photon-number-resolving photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baicheng; Miao, Quanlong; Wang, Shenyuan; Hui, Debin; Zhao, Tianqi; Liang, Kun; Yang, Ru; Han, Dejun

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we present Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique and its applications in time-correlated Raman spectroscopy. The main difference between TCPC and existing Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is that the TCPC employs a photon-number-resolving photodetector (SiPM, silicon photomultiplier) and measures exact photon number rather than counting single photon by reducing pulse light intensity, thus high measurement speed and efficiency can be expected. A home-made Raman spectrometer has demonstrated an Instrument Response Function (IRF) ~100ps (FWHM) based on TCPC with a strip SiPM (1mm×0.05mm, containing 500 micro cells), fast and weak Raman signals was separated from slow and strong fluorescence background of bulk trinitrotoluene TNT sample. The original Raman spectrum of bulk TNT, measured by TCPC technique, is compared with the result obtained by a commercial Micro-Raman Spectrometer.

  19. Optical Disector Counting in Cryosections and Vibratome Sections Underestimates Particle Numbers: Effects of Tissue Quality

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Tyson S.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Optical disector counting is currently applied most often to cryosections, followed in frequency by resin-embedded tissues, paraffin, and vibratome sections. The preservation quality of these embedding options differs considerably; yet, the effect of tissue morphology on numerical estimates is unknown. We tested whether different embedding media significantly influence numerical estimates in optical disector counting, using the previously calibrated trochlear motor nucleus of hatchling chickens. Animals were perfusion-fixed with paraformaldehyde (PFA) only or in addition with glutaraldehyde (GA), or by Methacarn immersion fixation. Brains were prepared for paraffin, cryo-, vibratome- or celloidin sectioning. Complete penetration of the thionin stain was verified by z-axis analysis. Neuronal nuclei were counted using an unbiased counting rule, numbers were averaged for each group and compared by ANOVA. In paraffin sections, 906 ± 12 (SEM) neurons were counted, similar to previous calibrated data series, and results obtained from fixation with Methacarn or PFA were statistically indistinguishable. In celloidin sections, 912 ± 28 neurons were counted—not statistically different from paraffin. In cryosections, 812 ± 12 neurons were counted (underestimate of 10.4%) when fixed with PFA only, but 867 ± 17 neurons were counted when fixed with PFA and GA. Vibratome sections had the most serious aberration with 729 ± 31 neurons—a deficit of 20%. Thus, our analysis shows that PFA-fixed cryosections and vibratome sections result in a substantial numerical deficit. The addition of GA to the PFA fixative significantly improved counts in cryosections. These results may explain, in part, the significant numerical differences reported from different labs and should help investigators select optimal conditions for quantitative morphological studies. PMID:17868132

  20. Everybody Counts, but Usually Just to 10! A Systematic Analysis of Number Representations in Children's Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Teachers and parents often use trade books to introduce or reinforce mathematics concepts. To date, an analysis of the early numeracy content of trade books has not been conducted. Consequently, this study evaluated the properties of numbers and counting within trade books. We coded 160 trade books targeted at establishing early…

  1. The Problem of Counting the Number of Molecules and Calculating Thermodynamic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Luis Alfonso; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experimental approach to illustrate that the thermodynamic properties of a system can be considered as the average of mechanical variables. Discusses the Knudsen effusion method to count the number of molecules, vapor pressure, the piezoelectric effect, the experimental setup, and sample experimental results. (JRH)

  2. The Problem of Counting the Number of Molecules and Calculating Thermodynamic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Luis Alfonso; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experimental approach to illustrate that the thermodynamic properties of a system can be considered as the average of mechanical variables. Discusses the Knudsen effusion method to count the number of molecules, vapor pressure, the piezoelectric effect, the experimental setup, and sample experimental results. (JRH)

  3. Everybody Counts, but Usually Just to 10! A Systematic Analysis of Number Representations in Children's Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Teachers and parents often use trade books to introduce or reinforce mathematics concepts. To date, an analysis of the early numeracy content of trade books has not been conducted. Consequently, this study evaluated the properties of numbers and counting within trade books. We coded 160 trade books targeted at establishing early…

  4. Some types of parent number talk count more than others: relations between parents' input and children's cardinal-number knowledge.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A; Levine, Susan C

    2011-09-01

    Before they enter preschool, children vary greatly in their numerical and mathematical knowledge, and this knowledge predicts their achievement throughout elementary school (e.g. Duncan et al., 2007; Ginsburg & Russell, 1981). Therefore, it is critical that we look to the home environment for parental inputs that may lead to these early variations. Recent work has shown that the amount of number talk that parents engage in with their children is robustly related to a critical aspect of mathematical development - cardinal-number knowledge (e.g. knowing that the word 'three' refers to sets of three entities; Levine, Suriyakham, Rowe, Huttenlocher & Gunderson, 2010). The present study characterizes the different types of number talk that parents produce and investigates which types are most predictive of children's later cardinal-number knowledge. We find that parents' number talk involving counting or labeling sets of present, visible objects is related to children's later cardinal-number knowledge, whereas other types of parent number talk are not. In addition, number talk that refers to large sets of present objects (i.e. sets of size 4 to 10 that fall outside children's ability to track individual objects) is more robustly predictive of children's later cardinal-number knowledge than talk about smaller sets. The relation between parents' number talk about large sets of present objects and children's cardinal-number knowledge remains significant even when controlling for factors such as parents' socioeconomic status and other measures of parents' number and non-number talk.

  5. Counting the number of excited states in organic semiconductor systems using topology

    SciTech Connect

    Catanzaro, Michael J.; Shi, Tian; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2015-02-28

    Exciton scattering theory attributes excited electronic states to standing waves in quasi-one-dimensional molecular materials by assuming a quasi-particle picture of optical excitations. The quasi-particle properties at branching centers are described by the corresponding scattering matrices. Here, we identify the topological invariant of a scattering center, referred to as its winding number, and apply topological intersection theory to count the number of quantum states in a quasi-one-dimensional system.

  6. Children's arithmetic development: it is number knowledge, not the approximate number sense, that counts.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Silke M; Watson, Sarah E; Lervåg, Arne; Hulme, Charles

    2014-03-01

    In this article, we present the results of an 11-month longitudinal study (beginning when children were 6 years old) focusing on measures of the approximate number sense (ANS) and knowledge of the Arabic numeral system as possible influences on the development of arithmetic skills. Multiple measures of symbolic and nonsymbolic magnitude judgment were shown to define a unitary factor that appears to index the efficiency of an ANS system, which is a strong longitudinal correlate of arithmetic skills. However, path models revealed that knowledge of Arabic numerals at 6 years was a powerful longitudinal predictor of the growth in arithmetic skills, whereas variations in magnitude-comparison ability played no additional role in predicting variations in arithmetic skills. These results suggest that verbal processes concerned with learning the labels for Arabic numerals, and the ability to translate between Arabic numerals and verbal codes, place critical constraints on arithmetic development.

  7. Counting Birds at the Grassroots: Making a Census into "Citizen Science," Naturalists Share Their Findings Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, James

    2001-01-01

    The Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are promoting various "citizen science" projects in which amateur naturalists make local observations of birds, butterflies, or natural phenomena and report their observations to interactive databases on the World Wide Web. Events such as the Great Backyard Bird Count motivate people…

  8. 34 CFR 222.33 - When must an applicant make its first or only membership count?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must an applicant make its first or only membership count? 222.33 Section 222.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IMPACT AID PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section...

  9. Making Every Day Count: Boys & Girls Clubs' Role in Promoting Positive Outcomes for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbreton, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The third in a series of reports from P/PV's three-year study of the role Boys & Girls Clubs play in the lives of the youth they serve, "Making Every Day Count" examines how Club participation is related to youth's positive and healthy development in three outcome areas identified by Boys & Girls Clubs of America as central to its mission: good…

  10. Counting Birds at the Grassroots: Making a Census into "Citizen Science," Naturalists Share Their Findings Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, James

    2001-01-01

    The Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are promoting various "citizen science" projects in which amateur naturalists make local observations of birds, butterflies, or natural phenomena and report their observations to interactive databases on the World Wide Web. Events such as the Great Backyard Bird Count motivate people…

  11. 34 CFR 222.33 - When must an applicant make its first or only membership count?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When must an applicant make its first or only membership count? 222.33 Section 222.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.33 When must an applicant...

  12. Making Pre-K Count: Improving Math Instruction in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Pamela A.; Mattera, Shira K.; Maier, Michelle F.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of a persistent achievement lag among low-income children despite substantial investments in early education, policymakers and practitioners continue to seek ways to improve the quality of children's preschool experiences. The Making Pre-K Count study addresses whether strengthening prekindergarten (pre-K) instruction in math,…

  13. Making Every Day Count: Boys & Girls Clubs' Role in Promoting Positive Outcomes for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbreton, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The third in a series of reports from P/PV's three-year study of the role Boys & Girls Clubs play in the lives of the youth they serve, "Making Every Day Count" examines how Club participation is related to youth's positive and healthy development in three outcome areas identified by Boys & Girls Clubs of America as central to its mission: good…

  14. What counts in preschool number knowledge? A Bayes factor analytic approach toward theoretical model development.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Berteletti, Ilaria; Hyde, Daniel C

    2017-09-06

    Preschool children vary tremendously in their numerical knowledge, and these individual differences strongly predict later mathematics achievement. To better understand the sources of these individual differences, we measured a variety of cognitive and linguistic abilities motivated by previous literature to be important and then analyzed which combination of these variables best explained individual differences in actual number knowledge. Through various data-driven Bayesian model comparison and selection strategies on competing multiple regression models, our analyses identified five variables of unique importance to explaining individual differences in preschool children's symbolic number knowledge: knowledge of the count list, nonverbal approximate numerical ability, working memory, executive conflict processing, and knowledge of letters and words. Furthermore, our analyses revealed that knowledge of the count list, likely a proxy for explicit practice or experience with numbers, and nonverbal approximate numerical ability were much more important to explaining individual differences in number knowledge than general cognitive and language abilities. These findings suggest that children use a diverse set of number-specific, general cognitive, and language abilities to learn about symbolic numbers, but the contribution of number-specific abilities may overshadow that of more general cognitive abilities in the learning process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: 850 μm maps, catalogues and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, J. E.; Dunlop, J. S.; Halpern, M.; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Almaini, O.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Banerji, M.; Beanlands, J.; Best, P. N.; Blain, A. W.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Chen, C.-C.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Clements, D. L.; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cowley, W. I.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Eales, S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Gibb, A.; Harrison, C. M.; Hine, N. K.; Hughes, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jenness, T.; Jones, S. F.; Karim, A.; Koprowski, M.; Knudsen, K. K.; Lacey, C. G.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; McAlpine, K.; McMahon, R.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Rigopoulou, D.; Robson, E. I.; Roseboom, I.; Rotermund, K.; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, S.; Simpson, C.; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Stanley, F.; Stevens, J. A.; Swinbank, A. M.; Targett, T.; Thomson, A. P.; Valiante, E.; Wake, D. A.; Webb, T. M. A.; Willott, C.; Zavala, J. A.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a catalogue of ˜3000 submillimetre sources detected (≥3.5σ) at 850 μm over ˜5 deg2 surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850 μm, increasing the sample size of 850 μm selected submillimetre galaxies by an order of magnitude. The wide 850 μm survey component of S2CLS covers the extragalactic fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1σ depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy beam-1, approaching the SCUBA-2 850 μm confusion limit, which we determine to be σc ≈ 0.8 mJy beam-1. We measure the 850 μm number counts, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4 per cent at S850 ≈ 3 mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5°-1° scales are generally within 50 per cent of the S2CLS mean for S850 > 3 mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2σ) density enhancement in GOODS-North. The observed counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models, although determining the shape of the faint-end slope (S850 < 3 mJy) remains a key test. The large solid angle of S2CLS allows us to measure the bright-end counts: at S850 > 10 mJy there are approximately 10 sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850 μm emission, and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. All calibrated maps and the catalogue are made publicly available.

  16. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Number Counts and Submillimeter Flux Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox L.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Barger, Amy J.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2016-09-01

    We present deep number counts at 450 and 850 μm using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We combine data for six lensing cluster fields and three blank fields to measure the counts over a wide flux range at each wavelength. Thanks to the lensing magnification, our measurements extend to fluxes fainter than 1 mJy and 0.2 mJy at 450 μm and 850 μm, respectively. Our combined data highly constrain the faint end of the number counts. Integrating our counts shows that the majority of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at each wavelength is contributed by faint sources with L IR < 1012 L ⊙, corresponding to luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) or normal galaxies. By comparing our result with the 500 μm stacking of K-selected sources from the literature, we conclude that the K-selected LIRGs and normal galaxies still cannot fully account for the EBL that originates from sources with L IR < 1012 L ⊙. This suggests that many faint submillimeter galaxies may not be included in the UV star formation history. We also explore the submillimeter flux ratio between the two bands for our 450 μm and 850 μm selected sources. At 850 μm, we find a clear relation between the flux ratio and the observed flux. This relation can be explained by a redshift evolution, where galaxies at higher redshifts have higher luminosities and star formation rates. In contrast, at 450 μm, we do not see a clear relation between the flux ratio and the observed flux.

  17. Effects of abundant species on the ability of observers to make accurate counts of birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J. Michael; Ramsey, Fred L.

    1981-01-01

    Bird numbers can be estimated using a variety of methods (Emlen 1971, Berthold 1976, Reynolds et al. 1980). The number of birds counted is frequently reported in relation to some measure of effort: e.g. per unit area, per count period, per observer day, or per km of trail. The numbers recorded are sometimes those of only a single species (Kepler and Kepler 1973, Mayfield 1973, Van Riper et al. 1978), but more frequently the numbers of all species encountered are recorded. In 16 of 18 articles in which estimated numbers of birds were reported in the 1973-1978 issues of The Auk and The Condor, observers recorded all birds encountered. In the other two studies, the numbers of only one species were estimated. The stated or implicit assumption in those studies reporting all species is that there is no loss of information with the added responsibility of keeping track of a larger number of species. The ability of a single person to record accurately all individuals and species has been challenged by Carney and Petrides (1957), Lack (1976), and Preston (1979). The question is: Are the data recorded by an observer who must record all species (generalist) less accurate than those recorded by an individual who has the responsibility for recording only a subset of the community (specialist)?

  18. Identifying influential spreaders and efficiently estimating infection numbers in epidemic models: A walk counting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Frank; Lizier, Joseph T.

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a new method to efficiently approximate the number of infections resulting from a given initially infected node in a network of susceptible individuals. Our approach is based on counting the number of possible infection walks of various lengths to each other node in the network. We analytically study the properties of our method, in particular demonstrating different forms for SIS and SIR disease spreading (e.g., under the SIR model our method counts self-avoiding walks). In comparison to existing methods to infer the spreading efficiency of different nodes in the network (based on degree, k-shell decomposition analysis and different centrality measures), our method directly considers the spreading process and, as such, is unique in providing estimation of actual numbers of infections. Crucially, in simulating infections on various real-world networks with the SIR model, we show that our walks-based method improves the inference of the effectiveness of nodes over a wide range of infection rates compared to existing methods. We also analyse the trade-off between estimate accuracy and computational cost, showing that the better accuracy here can still be obtained at a comparable computational cost to other methods.

  19. A distortion of very-high-redshift galaxy number counts by gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Yan, Haojing; Windhorst, Rogier A; Mao, Shude

    2011-01-13

    The observed number counts of high-redshift galaxy candidates have been used to build up a statistical description of star-forming activity at redshift z ≳ 7, when galaxies reionized the Universe. Standard models predict that a high incidence of gravitational lensing will probably distort measurements of flux and number of these earliest galaxies. The raw probability of this happening has been estimated to be ∼0.5 per cent (refs 11, 12), but can be larger owing to observational biases. Here we report that gravitational lensing is likely to dominate the observed properties of galaxies with redshifts of z ≳ 12, when the instrumental limiting magnitude is expected to be brighter than the characteristic magnitude of the galaxy sample. The number counts could be modified by an order of magnitude, with most galaxies being part of multiply imaged systems, located less than 1 arcsec from brighter foreground galaxies at z ≈ 2. This lens-induced association of high-redshift and foreground galaxies has perhaps already been observed among a sample of galaxy candidates identified at z ≈ 10.6. Future surveys will need to be designed to account for a significant gravitational lensing bias in high-redshift galaxy samples.

  20. A novel method to accurately locate and count large numbers of steps by photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Custer, Thomas C.; Jashnsaz, Hossein; Walter, Nils G.; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Photobleaching event counting is a single-molecule fluorescence technique that is increasingly being used to determine the stoichiometry of protein and RNA complexes composed of many subunits in vivo as well as in vitro. By tagging protein or RNA subunits with fluorophores, activating them, and subsequently observing as the fluorophores photobleach, one obtains information on the number of subunits in a complex. The noise properties in a photobleaching time trace depend on the number of active fluorescent subunits. Thus, as fluorophores stochastically photobleach, noise properties of the time trace change stochastically, and these varying noise properties have created a challenge in identifying photobleaching steps in a time trace. Although photobleaching steps are often detected by eye, this method only works for high individual fluorophore emission signal-to-noise ratios and small numbers of fluorophores. With filtering methods or currently available algorithms, it is possible to reliably identify photobleaching steps for up to 20–30 fluorophores and signal-to-noise ratios down to ∼1. Here we present a new Bayesian method of counting steps in photobleaching time traces that takes into account stochastic noise variation in addition to complications such as overlapping photobleaching events that may arise from fluorophore interactions, as well as on-off blinking. Our method is capable of detecting ≥50 photobleaching steps even for signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.1, can find up to ≥500 steps for more favorable noise profiles, and is computationally inexpensive. PMID:27654946

  1. Full counting statistics for the number of electrons in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent real-time electron counting experiments, we evaluate the full counting statistics for the probability distribution of the electron number inside a quantum dot which is weakly coupled to source and drain leads. A non-Gaussian exponential distribution appears when there is no dot state close to the lead chemical potentials. We propose the measurement of the joint probability distribution of current and electron number, which reveals correlations between the two observables. We also show that for increasing strength of tunneling, the quantum fluctuations qualitatively change the probability distribution of the electron number. In this paper, we derive the cumulant generating functions (CGFs) of the joint probability distribution for several cases. The Keldysh generating functional approach is adopted to obtain the CGFs for the resonant-level model and for the single-electron transistor in the intermediate conductance regime. The general form for the CGF of the joint probability distribution is provided within the Markov approximation in an extension of the master equation approach [D. A. Bagrets and Yu. V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. B 67, 085316 (2003)].

  2. Spherical collapse model and cluster number counts in power-law f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekjani, M.; Basilakos, S.; Heidari, N.

    2017-04-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the framework of spatially flat power law f(T) ∝ (- T)b gravity model. We find that the linear and non-linear growth of spherical overdensities of this particular f(T) model are affected by the power-law parameter b. Finally, we compute the predicted number counts of virialized haloes in order to distinguish the current f(T) model from the expectations of the concordance Λ cosmology. Specifically, the present analysis suggests that the f(T) gravity model with positive (negative) b predicts more (less) virialized objects with respect to those of Λ cold dark matter.

  3. The number counts and infrared backgrounds from infrared-bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, P. B.; Soifer, B. T.

    1991-01-01

    Extragalactic number counts and diffuse backgrounds at 25, 60, and 100 microns are predicted using new luminosity functions and improved spectral-energy distribution density functions derived from IRAS observations of nearby galaxies. Galaxies at redshifts z less than 3 that are like those in the local universe should produce a minimum diffuse background of 0.0085, 0.038, and 0.13 MJy/sr at 25, 60, and 100 microns, respectively. Models with significant luminosity evolution predict backgrounds about a factor of 4 greater than this minimum.

  4. The number counts and infrared backgrounds from infrared-bright galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hacking, P.B.; Soifer, B.T. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-02-01

    Extragalactic number counts and diffuse backgrounds at 25, 60, and 100 microns are predicted using new luminosity functions and improved spectral-energy distribution density functions derived from IRAS observations of nearby galaxies. Galaxies at redshifts z less than 3 that are like those in the local universe should produce a minimum diffuse background of 0.0085, 0.038, and 0.13 MJy/sr at 25, 60, and 100 microns, respectively. Models with significant luminosity evolution predict backgrounds about a factor of 4 greater than this minimum. 22 refs.

  5. Student Count Mechanisms for Funding Purposes. Education Policy Brief, Volume 10, Number 2, Spring 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Lindsi M.; Spradlin, Terry E.; Wodicka, Christopher Y.

    2012-01-01

    This Education Policy Brief provides an overview of the student count mechanisms that are currently employed by states. It then reviews Indiana's outgoing count mechanism, the Single Count Date, and compares it with the newly enacted Multiple Count Dates mechanism. To conclude the discussion, the brief examines how other states use the Multiple…

  6. Making Afterschool Programs Better. Policy Brief Number 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Denise; Dietel, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The number of students attending afterschool programs has skyrocketed in recent years, currently serving an estimated 8.4 million children (Afterschool Alliance, 2009). Consequently, the demand for high quality afterschool programs, and to learn from successful ones, has never been greater. This "Making Afterschool Programs Better"…

  7. Mastery of the logic of natural numbers is not the result of mastery of counting: evidence from late counters.

    PubMed

    Jara-Ettinger, Julian; Piantadosi, Steve; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Levy, Roger; Gibson, Edward

    2016-08-21

    To master the natural number system, children must understand both the concepts that number words capture and the counting procedure by which they are applied. These two types of knowledge develop in childhood, but their connection is poorly understood. Here we explore the relationship between the mastery of counting and the mastery of exact numerical equality (one central aspect of natural number) in the Tsimane', a farming-foraging group whose children master counting at a delayed age and with higher variability than do children in industrialized societies. By taking advantage of this variation, we can better understand how counting and exact equality relate to each other, while controlling for age and education. We find that the Tsimane' come to understand exact equality at later and variable ages. This understanding correlates with their mastery of number words and counting, controlling for age and education. However, some children who have mastered counting lack an understanding of exact equality, and some children who have not mastered counting have achieved this understanding. These results suggest that understanding of counting and of natural number concepts are at least partially distinct achievements, and that both draw on inputs and resources whose distribution and availability differ across cultures.

  8. New method for counting the number of spanning trees in a two-tree network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuzhi; Zhao, Haixing

    2013-10-01

    The number of spanning trees is an important quantity characterizing the reliability of a network. Generally, the number of spanning trees in a network can be obtained by directly calculating a related determinant corresponding to the network. However, for a large network, evaluating the relevant determinant is intractable. In this paper, we investigate the number of spanning trees in two-tree networks. We first give a new algorithm which avoids the laborious computation of the determinant for counting the number of spanning trees. Using the algorithm, we can obtain the number of spanning trees of any two-tree network in linear time. The result shows that the computation complexity is O(n), which is better than that of the matrix tree theorem with O(n2), where n is the number of steps. We then characterize two-tree networks with the maximum and minimum numbers of spanning trees. Denote by P(t) and K(t), respectively, the two-tree networks of t+2 vertices with the maximum and minimum numbers of spanning trees. Denote by PA and EN, respectively, the two-tree network of t+2 vertices generated by preferential attachment and by equiprobability attachment. By algorithmic analysis and through simulations, we conjecture that NST(K(t))≤NST(PA)≤NST(EN)≤NST(P(t)) as t tends to infinity, where NST(G) is the number of spanning trees of G. As an application of the algorithm, we give the formula of the number of spanning trees of a particular small-world network.

  9. The Effects of Strategic Counting Instruction, with and without Deliberate Practice, on Number Combination Skill among Students with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effects of strategic counting instruction, with and without deliberate practice with those counting strategies, on number combination (NC) skill among students with mathematics difficulties (MD). Students (n = 150) were stratified on MD status (i.e., MD alone versus MD with reading difficulty)…

  10. A Z-number-based decision making procedure with ranking fuzzy numbers method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Daud; Shaharani, Saidatull Akma; Kamis, Nor Hanimah

    2014-12-01

    The theory of fuzzy set has been in the limelight of various applications in decision making problems due to its usefulness in portraying human perception and subjectivity. Generally, the evaluation in the decision making process is represented in the form of linguistic terms and the calculation is performed using fuzzy numbers. In 2011, Zadeh has extended this concept by presenting the idea of Z-number, a 2-tuple fuzzy numbers that describes the restriction and the reliability of the evaluation. The element of reliability in the evaluation is essential as it will affect the final result. Since this concept can still be considered as new, available methods that incorporate reliability for solving decision making problems is still scarce. In this paper, a decision making procedure based on Z-numbers is proposed. Due to the limitation of its basic properties, Z-numbers will be first transformed to fuzzy numbers for simpler calculations. A method of ranking fuzzy number is later used to prioritize the alternatives. A risk analysis problem is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this proposed procedure.

  11. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOUTH ECLIPTIC POLE FIELD: NUMBER COUNTS AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Valiante, Elisabetta; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie

    2010-12-15

    We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg{sup 2} field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m. The median 1{sigma} depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4, and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89, and 61 sources with S/N {>=}4 at 250, 350, 500 {mu}m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources with a significance {>=}4{sigma} in at least one BLAST band. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

  12. Galaxy Number Counts Applied to a Semi-Analytic Galaxy Model in the Millennium Run Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucklein, Brian; Moody, J. W.; Hintz, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Millennium Run simulation used more than 10 billion particles to trace the evolution of the dark matter distribution in a ΛCDM cosmology in a cubic region of the Universe over 2 billion light-years on a side. This data was used by Croton et al. as the basis of a semi-analytic galaxy model, allowing the region to be populated with more than 9 million galaxies brighter than Mr = -17.4. We visually analyze this galaxy catalog searching for significant voids and then apply galaxy number count (GNC) analysis to the lines-of-sight to these voids. Using Wolf plots, we investigate whether GNC analysis would allow us to locate voids within the sample without the need to first find them visually.

  13. Unknown selection effect simulates redshift periodicity in quasar number counts from Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, J. G.

    2009-11-01

    Discrete Fourier analysis on the quasar number count, as a function of redshift, z, calculated from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 release appears to indicate that quasars have preferred periodic redshifts with redshift intervals of 0.258, 0.312, 0.44, 0.63, and 1.1. However the same periods are found in the mean of the zConf parameter used to flag the reliability of the spectroscopic measurements. It follows that these redshift periods must result from some selection effect, as yet undetermined. It does not signal any intrinsic (quantized) redshifts in the quasars in Sloan survey data. However this result does not rule out the possibility as found in earlier studies of other data.

  14. Observer error structure in bull trout redd counts in Montana streams: Implications for inference on true redd numbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Taper, Mark L.; Staples, David F.; Shepard, Bradley B.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of redd counts to monitor trends in salmonid populations, few studies have evaluated the uncertainties in observed counts. We assessed the variability in redd counts for migratory bull trout Salvelinus confluentus among experienced observers in Lion and Goat creeks, which are tributaries to the Swan River, Montana. We documented substantially lower observer variability in bull trout redd counts than did previous studies. Observer counts ranged from 78% to 107% of our best estimates of true redd numbers in Lion Creek and from 90% to 130% of our best estimates in Goat Creek. Observers made both errors of omission and errors of false identification, and we modeled this combination by use of a binomial probability of detection and a Poisson count distribution of false identifications. Redd detection probabilities were high (mean = 83%) and exhibited no significant variation among observers (SD = 8%). We applied this error structure to annual redd counts in the Swan River basin (1982–2004) to correct for observer error and thus derived more accurate estimates of redd numbers and associated confidence intervals. Our results indicate that bias in redd counts can be reduced if experienced observers are used to conduct annual redd counts. Future studies should assess both sources of observer error to increase the validity of using redd counts for inferring true redd numbers in different basins. This information will help fisheries biologists to more precisely monitor population trends, identify recovery and extinction thresholds for conservation and recovery programs, ascertain and predict how management actions influence distribution and abundance, and examine effects of recovery and restoration activities.

  15. The 4 Ms CHANDRA Deep Field-South Number Counts Apportioned by Source Class: Pervasive Active Galactic Nuclei and the Ascent of Normal Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, Bret D.; Xue, Y. Q.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Luo, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present 0.5-2 keV, 2-8 keV, 4-8 keV, and 0.5-8 keV (hereafter soft, hard, ultra-hard, and full bands, respectively) cumulative and differential number-count (log N-log S ) measurements for the recently completed approx. equal to 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey, the deepest X-ray survey to date. We implement a new Bayesian approach, which allows reliable calculation of number counts down to flux limits that are factors of approx. equal to 1.9-4.3 times fainter than the previously deepest number-count investigations. In the soft band (SB), the most sensitive bandpass in our analysis, the approx. equal to 4 Ms CDF-S reaches a maximum source density of approx. equal to 27,800 deg(sup -2). By virtue of the exquisite X-ray and multiwavelength data available in the CDF-S, we are able to measure the number counts from a variety of source populations (active galactic nuclei (AGNs), normal galaxies, and Galactic stars) and subpopulations (as a function of redshift, AGN absorption, luminosity, and galaxy morphology) and test models that describe their evolution. We find that AGNs still dominate the X-ray number counts down to the faintest flux levels for all bands and reach a limiting SB source density of approx. equal to 14,900 deg(sup -2), the highest reliable AGN source density measured at any wavelength. We find that the normal-galaxy counts rise rapidly near the flux limits and, at the limiting SB flux, reach source densities of approx. equal to 12,700 deg(sup -2) and make up 46% plus or minus 5% of the total number counts. The rapid rise of the galaxy counts toward faint fluxes, as well as significant normal-galaxy contributions to the overall number counts, indicates that normal galaxies will overtake AGNs just below the approx. equal to 4 Ms SB flux limit and will provide a numerically significant new X-ray source population in future surveys that reach below the approx. equal to 4 Ms sensitivity limit. We show that a future approx. equal to 10 Ms CDF

  16. ALMA Deep Field in SSA22: Source Catalog and Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kato, Yuta; Ikarashi, Soh; Matsuda, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Seiji; Iono, Daisuke; Lee, Minju; Steidel, Charles C.; Saito, Tomoki; Alexander, D. M.; Yun, Min S.; Kubo, Mariko

    2017-01-01

    We present results from a deep 2‧ × 3‧ (comoving scale of 3.7 Mpc × 5.5 Mpc at z = 3) survey at 1.1 mm, taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the SSA22 field. We observe the core region of a z = 3.09 protocluster, achieving a typical rms sensitivity of 60 μJy beam-1 at a spatial resolution of 0.″7. We detect 18 robust ALMA sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 5. Comparison between the ALMA map and a 1.1 mm map, taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE), indicates that three submillimeter sources discovered by the AzTEC/ASTE survey are resolved into eight individual submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) by ALMA. At least 10 of our 18 ALMA SMGs have spectroscopic redshifts of z ≃ 3.09, placing them in the protocluster. This shows that a number of dusty starburst galaxies are forming simultaneously in the core of the protocluster. The nine brightest ALMA SMGs with S/N > 10 have a median intrinsic angular size of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} {32}-0.06+0.13 ({2.4}-0.4+1.0 physical kpc at z = 3.09), which is consistent with previous size measurements of SMGs in other fields. As expected, the source counts show a possible excess compared to the counts in the general fields at S1.1mm ≥ 1.0 mJy, due to the protocluster. Our contiguous mm mapping highlights the importance of large-scale structures on the formation of dusty starburst galaxies.

  17. The effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on suppression of habitual counting during random number generation.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M; Profice, P; Brown, R G; Ridding, M C; Dirnberger, G; Rothwell, J C

    1998-08-01

    Random number generation is an attention-demanding task that engages working memory and executive processes. Random number generation requires holding information 'on line', suppression of habitual counting, internally driven response generation and monitoring of responses. Evidence from PET studies suggests that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is involved in the generation of random responses. We examined the effects of short trains of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left or right DLPFC or medial frontal cortex on random number generation in healthy normal participants. As in previous evidence, in control trials without stimulation participants performed poorly on the random number generation task, showing repetition avoidance and a tendency to count. Brief disruption of processing with TMS over the left DLPFC changed the balance of the individuals' counting bias, increasing the most habitual counting in ones and reducing the lower probability response of counting in twos. This differential effect of TMS over the left DLPFC on the balance of the subject's counting bias was not obtained with TMS over the right DLPFC or the medial frontal cortex. The results suggest that, with disruption of the left DLPFC with TMS, habitual counting in ones that has previously been suppressed is released from inhibition. From these findings a network modulation model of random number generation is proposed, whereby suppression of habitual responses is achieved through the modulatory influence of the left DLPFC over a number-associative network in the superior temporal cortex. To allow emergence of appropriate random responses, the left DLPFC inhibits the superior temporal cortex to prevent spreading activation and habitual counting in ones.

  18. A Deep Multicolor Survey. II. Initial Spectroscopy and Comparison with Expected Quasar Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Patrick B.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Green, Richard F.; Porter, Alain C.; Warren, Stephen J.

    1996-05-01

    We have used the KPNO 4 m Mayall telescope to image 0.83 deg^2^ of sky in six fields at high Galactic latitude in six filters spanning 3000- 10000 A to magnitude limits ranging from 22.1 to 23.8. As a first use of this database, we have conducted a multicolor survey for quasars. We discuss various methods of selecting outliers in different color-color diagrams and multicolor space that have been used to identify quasars at all redshifts from their colors alone. We discuss the initial results of our program of spectroscopic identification which has so far resulted in the identification of over 40 faint quasars, including one at z > 4, a similar number of compact narrow emission-line galaxies, and a number of unusual and potentially interesting stars. We use these spectroscopic results, along with extensive simulations of quasar spectra, to study the efficiency of our candidate selection procedures. Finally, we compare the number counts of our quasars and quasar candidates to the expected numbers based on previous studies of the quasar luminosity function. The agreement of our observations with these expectations is good in most cases. However, we do estimate that our survey contains more quasars with B < 21 and z < 2.3 than expected from the results published by Koo & Kron in 1988 and more z > 3 quasars than expected from the results published by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer in 1994, both at the 3 σ level. Additional spectroscopic observations will be required to confirm or refute these excesses.

  19. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G.; Ammann, Robin R.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of ≈2 × 104 cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell–cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell–cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization. PMID:11818526

  20. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G; Ammann, Robin R; Gomer, Richard H

    2002-02-05

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of approximately 2 x 10(4) cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell-cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell-cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization.

  1. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVII. SPIRE point-source catalogs and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Ciro; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Hunt, Leslie; Zibetti, Stefano; Corbelli, Edvige; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Grossi, Marco; Davies, Jonathan; Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Pohlen, Michael; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Verstappen, Joris; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Cortese, Luca; Hughes, Thomas; Viaene, Sebastien; Bizzocchi, Luca; Clemens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We present three independent catalogs of point-sources extracted from SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm, acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory as a part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). The catalogs have been cross-correlated to consistently extract the photometry at SPIRE wavelengths for each object. Methods: Sources have been detected using an iterative loop. The source positions are determined by estimating the likelihood to be a real source for each peak on the maps, according to the criterion defined in the sourceExtractorSussextractor task. The flux densities are estimated using the sourceExtractorTimeline, a timeline-based point source fitter that also determines the fitting procedure with the width of the Gaussian that best reproduces the source considered. Afterwards, each source is subtracted from the maps, removing a Gaussian function in every position with the full width half maximum equal to that estimated in sourceExtractorTimeline. This procedure improves the robustness of our algorithm in terms of source identification. We calculate the completeness and the flux accuracy by injecting artificial sources in the timeline and estimate the reliability of the catalog using a permutation method. Results: The HeViCS catalogs contain about 52 000, 42 200, and 18 700 sources selected at 250, 350, and 500 μm above 3σ and are ~75%, 62%, and 50% complete at flux densities of 20 mJy at 250, 350, 500 μm, respectively. We then measured source number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm and compare them with previous data and semi-analytical models. We also cross-correlated the catalogs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the redshift distribution of the nearby sources. From this cross-correlation, we select ~2000 sources with reliable fluxes and a high signal-to-noise ratio, finding an average redshift z ~ 0.3 ± 0.22 and 0.25 (16-84 percentile). Conclusions: The number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm show an increase in

  2. Combined analysis of galaxy cluster number count, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich power spectrum, and bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurier, G.; Lacasa, F.

    2017-08-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect is a powerful probe of the evolution of structures in the universe, and is thus highly sensitive to cosmological parameters σ8 and Ωm, though its power is hampered by the current uncertainties on the cluster mass calibration. In this analysis we revisit constraints on these cosmological parameters as well as the hydrostatic mass bias, by performing (i) a robust estimation of the tSZ power-spectrum, (ii) a complete modeling and analysis of the tSZ bispectrum, and (iii) a combined analysis of galaxy clusters number count, tSZ power spectrum, and tSZ bispectrum. From this analysis, we derive as final constraints σ8 = 0.79 ± 0.02, Ωm = 0.29 ± 0.02, and (1-b) = 0.71 ± 0.07. These results favor a high value for the hydrostatic mass bias compared to numerical simulations and weak-lensing based estimations. They are furthermore consistent with both previous tSZ analyses, CMB derived cosmological parameters, and ancillary estimations of the hydrostatic mass bias.

  3. A Deep Multicolor Survey. II. Initial Spectroscopy and Comparison with Expected Quasar Number Counts: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Patrick B.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Green, Richard F.; Porter, Alain C.; Warren, Stephen J.

    1996-11-01

    In the paper "A Deep Multicolor Survey. II. Initial Spectroscopy and Comparison with Expected Quasar Number Counts" by Patrick B. Hall, Patrick S. Osmer, Richard F. Green, Alain C. Porter, and Stephen J. Warren (ApJ, 462,614 [1996]), some of the figures were inadvertently printed with poor resolution. The full information conveyed in the images is thus difficult to perceive. Here we present high-resolution versions of the affected figures (Fig. 1 and Figs. 10-15). In all diagrams, objects from the catalog are plotted as error bars, with only half the full error bars plotted, for clarity. Error ban extending off the diagram indicate upper limits. Spectroscopically confirmed quasars, compact narrow emission-line galaxies (CNELGs), and stars are plotted as filled boxes, open boxes, and inverted triangles, respectively. Spectroscopically observed but unidentified candidates are plotted as crosses and simulated quasar colors as dots. The line of simulated quasar points at U- V = 3.0 in Figure 11a and the similar lines in other color-color diagrams indicate that the simulated colors are lower limits. The reader should also note that Figures 16b and 16c were incorrectly switched with each other in the paper.

  4. New technique to count mosquito adults: using ImageJ software to estimate number of mosquito adults in a trap.

    PubMed

    Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Dickson, Sammie

    2012-12-01

    A new technique is described here to count mosquitoes using open-source software. We wanted to develop a protocol that would estimate the total number of mosquitoes from a picture using ImageJ. Adult mosquitoes from CO2-baited traps were spread on a tray and photographed. The total number of mosquitoes in a picture was estimated using various calibrations on ImageJ, and results were compared with manual counting to identify the ideal calibration. The average trap count was 1,541, and the average difference between the manual count and the best calibration was 174.11 +/- 21.59, with 93% correlation. Subsequently, contents of a trap were photographed 5 different times after they were shuffled between each picture to alter the picture pattern of adult mosquitoes. The standard error among variations stayed below 50, indicating limited variation for total count between pictures of the same trap when the pictures were processed through ImageJ. These results indicate the software could be utilized efficiently to estimate total number of mosquitoes from traps.

  5. Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts-A practical and sensitive method for counting and manipulating small numbers.

    PubMed

    Ongerth, Jerry E; Saaed, Frhat M A

    2017-05-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method is described for accurate and reproducible counting and manipulating small numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts. From a suspension of oocysts or cysts at concentration from 1000 to 5000/mL (1-5/μL), replicate 5μL droplets are micro pipetted onto the edge of a microscope slide. Unstained oocysts or cysts in each droplet can be counted in a few minutes and replicated for statistical strength. The concentration of the suspension can then be verified by pipetting desired volumes containing approximately desired numbers onto confined 13mm membranes for IFA staining and counting with replication as desired. Requiring only a micropipette, analytical balance, and a microscope, this provides a useful tool accessible to virtually any microbiology laboratory.

  6. Number of warning information sources and decision making during tornadoes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianjun; Cong, Zhen; Liang, Daan

    2015-03-01

    Taking proper protective action upon receiving tornado warnings is critical to reducing casualties. With more warning information sources becoming available, how the number of such information sources affects decision making should be quantitatively investigated. To examine how the number of warning information sources affected individuals' decisions to take protective action during tornadoes. A telephone survey using random sampling was conducted in 2012 with residents in Tuscaloosa AL and Joplin MO, resulting in a working sample of 782 respondents. Both cities were struck by violent tornadoes (Enhanced Fujita Scale [EF]4 and EF5) in 2011. The analysis was conducted in 2013. Logistic regression analysis showed that relative to having only one warning information source, having two and three or more warning information sources significantly increased the odds of taking protective action in Joplin but not in Tuscaloosa; having three or more sources had a significantly stronger effect on taking protective action in Joplin than in Tuscaloosa. Having an emergency preparation plan in both cities and being white in Tuscaloosa significantly increased the odds of taking protective action, whereas being divorced in Joplin reduced these odds. Receiving warnings from more warning information sources might be more beneficial in places with less previous exposure to tornadoes and for populations with lower awareness of a potential tornado and higher probability of receiving no warnings. Emergency management agencies and public health officials should give priority to these places and populations when formulating disaster mitigation decisions and policies. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rhythm in number: exploring the affective, social and mathematical dimensions of using TouchCounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Chorney, Sean; Rodney, Sheree

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the mathematical, social and affective nature of children's engagement with TouchCounts, a multitouch application for counting and doing arithmetic. In order to study these dimensions of engagement in a way that recognizes their fundamental intertwinement, we use rhythm as a primary unit of analysis. Drawing on over 8 hours of research sessions with children aged 6, 7 and 8 years old, we show how various rhythms emerged from their interactions and how these rhythms changed over time—moving from the particular to the more general. We also show how important rhythm is to children's carrying of activity, which relates to aspects of interest and motivation.

  8. Preparing to Launch: Early Childhood's Academic Countdown. Quality Counts, 2015. Education Week. Volume 34, Number 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This 19th annual edition of "Quality Counts" takes a broad look at the issues and forces shaping the discussion around early-childhood education. It examines how new academic demands and the push for accountability are changing the nature of early-childhood education for school administrators, teachers, and children alike. Reporters…

  9. Evaluating most probable number method to count and isolate viable methylotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, S

    2011-01-01

    Nine different receptacles were tested with the MPN method to determine which receptacle was most reliable and economical for MPN counts. Results showed that 96 well PCR plate were the best vessels for this type of analysis and facilitated the isolation of viable Methylotrophs.

  10. Preparing to Launch: Early Childhood's Academic Countdown. Quality Counts, 2015. Education Week. Volume 34, Number 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This 19th annual edition of "Quality Counts" takes a broad look at the issues and forces shaping the discussion around early-childhood education. It examines how new academic demands and the push for accountability are changing the nature of early-childhood education for school administrators, teachers, and children alike. Reporters…

  11. WBC count

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocyte count; White blood cell count ... blood is 4,500 to 11,000 white blood cells per microliter (mcL) or 4.5 to 11. ... LOW WHITE BLOOD CELL (WBC) COUNT A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. A WBC count below 4500 is below normal ...

  12. Deep imaging of high redshift QSO fields below the Lyman limit. II - Number counts and colors of field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Hamilton, Donald

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the number counts and colors of faint galaxies to about 26.5 mag in the fields of two high Galactic latitude, very-high-redshift QSOs. We concentrate on the general properties of the field galaxies at faint magnitudes. In particular, we readdress the faint galaxy number counts and colors as a function of apparent magnitude and we reexamine the possible contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies to the faint samples. We find that the number counts to R = 26 are well fitted by the relation log N(m) = 0.31R + C. The G-band counts for the same galaxies are consistent with the same slope fainter than G about 23.5, but exhibit a much steeper slope at brighter magnitudes. At R = 25.5, the differential number counts have reached about 1.2 x 10 exp 5/sq deg; the same surface density of galaxies is reached at G = 26.5. We confirm the existence of a gradual 'blueing' trend of the field galaxies toward fainter apparent magnitude; however, the blueing trend appears to extend only as faint as G about 24, fainter than which both the (G-R) and (U sub n-G) colors appear to level off. The mean colors of faint galaxies are considerably redder than flat spectrum. There are essentially no objects to R = 26 which have spectral energy distributions which are bluer than flat spectrum. The potential contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies may have been underestimated in previous analyses; the current data are consistent with the same population of relatively luminous galaxies at z about 3 as exist at z about 0.7.

  13. The Effects of Strategic Counting Instruction, with and without Deliberate Practice, on Number Combination Skill among Students with Mathematics Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Fuchs, Douglas; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effects of strategic counting instruction, with and without deliberate practice with those counting strategies, on number combination (NC) skill among students with mathematics difficulties (MD). Students (n = 150) were stratified on MD status (i.e., MD alone vs. MD with reading difficulty) and site (proximal vs. distal to the intervention developer) and then randomly assigned to control (no tutoring) or 1 of 2 variants of NC remediation. Both remediations were embedded in the same validated word-problem tutoring protocol (i.e., Pirate Math). In 1 variant, the focus on NCs was limited to a single lesson that taught strategic counting. In the other variant, 4–6 min of practice per session was added to the other variant. Tutoring occurred for 16 weeks, 3 sessions per week for 20–30 min per session. Strategic counting without deliberate practice produced superior NC fluency compared to control; however, strategic counting with deliberate practice effected superior NC fluency and transfer to procedural calculations compared with both competing conditions. Also, the efficacy of Pirate Math word-problem tutoring was replicated. PMID:20383313

  14. Designing Studies to Test Causal Questions About Early Math: The Development of Making Pre-K Count.

    PubMed

    Mattera, Shira K; Morris, Pamela A; Jacob, Robin; Maier, Michelle; Rojas, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated that early math skills are associated with later outcomes for children. This research has generated interest in improving children's early math competencies as a pathway to improved outcomes for children in elementary school. The Making Pre-K Count study was designed to test the effects of an early math intervention for preschoolers. Its design was unique in that, in addition to causally testing the effects of early math skills, it also allowed for the examination of a number of additional questions about scale-up, the influence of contextual factors and the counterfactual environment, the mechanism of long-term fade-out, and the role of measurement in early childhood intervention findings. This chapter outlines some of the design considerations and decisions put in place to create a rigorous test of the causal effects of early math skills that is also able to answer these questions in early childhood mathematics and intervention. The study serves as a potential model for how to advance science in the fields of preschool intervention and early mathematics. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The statistical distribution of the number of counted scintillation photons in digital silicon photomultipliers: model and validation.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-08-07

    In the design and application of scintillation detectors based on silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), e.g. in positron emission tomography imaging, it is important to understand and quantify the non-proportionality of the SiPM response due to saturation, crosstalk and dark counts. A new type of SiPM, the so-called digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM), has recently been introduced. Here, we develop a model of the probability distribution of the number of fired microcells, i.e. the number of counted scintillation photons, in response to a given amount of energy deposited in a scintillator optically coupled to a dSiPM. Based on physical and functional principles, the model elucidates the statistical behavior of dSiPMs. The model takes into account the photon detection efficiency of the detector; the light yield, excess variance and time profile of the scintillator; and the crosstalk probability, dark count rate, integration time and the number of microcells of the dSiPM. Furthermore, relations for the expectation value and the variance of the number of fired cells are deduced. These relations are applied in the experimental validation of the model using a dSiPM coupled to a LSO:Ce,Ca scintillator. Finally, we propose an accurate method for the correction of energy spectra measured with dSiPM-based scintillation detectors.

  16. Too Much to Count On: Impaired Very Small Numbers in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Casey; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Cross, Katy; Grossman, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) have calculation impairments. This study examined whether impaired number knowledge depends on verbal mediation. We focused particularly on knowledge of very small numbers, where there is a precise relationship between a cardinality and its number concept, but little hypothesized role for verbal…

  17. Too Much to Count On: Impaired Very Small Numbers in Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Casey; Clark, Robin; Moore, Peachie; Cross, Katy; Grossman, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) have calculation impairments. This study examined whether impaired number knowledge depends on verbal mediation. We focused particularly on knowledge of very small numbers, where there is a precise relationship between a cardinality and its number concept, but little hypothesized role for verbal…

  18. Child Care and Utah's Economy: Making the Connection. A Special Utah KIDS COUNT Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah Children, Salt Lake City.

    Recent growth in high technology and substantial entrepreneurial activity in Utah has resulted in an economic boom in different regions of the state. This boom has led to economic prosperity for many, but also economic decline for others, and subsequent increasing economic inequality throughout the state. This special KIDS COUNT report presents an…

  19. Making Online Instruction Count: Statistical Reporting of Web-Based Library Instruction Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottorff, Tim; Todd, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Statistical reporting of library instruction (LI) activities has historically focused on measures relevant to face-to-face (F2F) settings. However, newer forms of LI conducted in the online realm may be difficult to count in traditional ways, leading to inaccurate reporting to both internal and external stakeholders. A thorough literature review…

  20. Making Online Instruction Count: Statistical Reporting of Web-Based Library Instruction Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottorff, Tim; Todd, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Statistical reporting of library instruction (LI) activities has historically focused on measures relevant to face-to-face (F2F) settings. However, newer forms of LI conducted in the online realm may be difficult to count in traditional ways, leading to inaccurate reporting to both internal and external stakeholders. A thorough literature review…

  1. Making Sense of Test Scores. Assessment Brief. Number 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Lincoln

    2004-01-01

    It is challenging for parents and the general public to make sense of the reports on test scores that appear in the mass media. This article offers some things for readers to consider as they bring a critical eye to what is read in the papers. Usually reports on test scores in the media are quite short and focus on one or two aspects of test…

  2. Making Sense of Test Scores. Assessment Brief. Number 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Lincoln

    2004-01-01

    It is challenging for parents and the general public to make sense of the reports on test scores that appear in the mass media. This article offers some things for readers to consider as they bring a critical eye to what is read in the papers. Usually reports on test scores in the media are quite short and focus on one or two aspects of test…

  3. Females in School Administration: Making Sense of the Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Norma T.

    1991-01-01

    Addresses some theoretical, logistical, and methodological problems involved in researching the numbers of females in educational administration. The primary problem is absence of reliable national database and systematic data-gathering processes on national and state levels. Without such data, the research is incomplete, less reliable, and…

  4. The Hawk-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS): Survey design and deep K-band number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Paris, D.; Targett, T. A.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; McLure, R.; Merlin, E.; Pentericci, L.; Wuyts, S.; Almaini, O.; Caputi, K.; Chary, R.-R.; Cirasuolo, M.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Faber, S. M.; Fazio, G.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Hathi, N.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lucas, R. A.; Nonino, M.; Rix, H. W.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Santini, P.; Scarlata, C.; Sommariva, V.; Stark, D. P.; van der Wel, A.; Vanzella, E.; Wild, V.; Yan, H.; Zibetti, S.

    2014-10-01

    of even the faintest galaxies detected in the CANDELS H-band images are also detected in HUGS. Finally we present the K-band galaxy number counts produced by combining the HUGS data from the two fields. We show that the slope of the number counts depends sensitively on the assumed distribution of galaxy sizes, with potential impact on the estimated extra-galactic background light. All the HUGS images and catalogues are made publicly available at the ASTRODEEP website (http://www.astrodeep.eu) as well as from the ESO archive.Full Table 3 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A11

  5. Inter-rater reliability for movement pattern analysis (MPA): measuring patterning of behaviors versus discrete behavior counts as indicators of decision-making style

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Brenda L.; Rende, Richard; Colton, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The unique yield of collecting observational data on human movement has received increasing attention in a number of domains, including the study of decision-making style. As such, interest has grown in the nuances of core methodological issues, including the best ways of assessing inter-rater reliability. In this paper we focus on one key topic – the distinction between establishing reliability for the patterning of behaviors as opposed to the computation of raw counts – and suggest that reliability for each be compared empirically rather than determined a priori. We illustrate by assessing inter-rater reliability for key outcome measures derived from movement pattern analysis (MPA), an observational methodology that records body movements as indicators of decision-making style with demonstrated predictive validity. While reliability ranged from moderate to good for raw counts of behaviors reflecting each of two Overall Factors generated within MPA (Assertion and Perspective), inter-rater reliability for patterning (proportional indicators of each factor) was significantly higher and excellent (ICC = 0.89). Furthermore, patterning, as compared to raw counts, provided better prediction of observable decision-making process assessed in the laboratory. These analyses support the utility of using an empirical approach to inform the consideration of measuring patterning versus discrete behavioral counts of behaviors when determining inter-rater reliability of observable behavior. They also speak to the substantial reliability that may be achieved via application of theoretically grounded observational systems such as MPA that reveal thinking and action motivations via visible movement patterns. PMID:24999336

  6. Counting the number of master integrals for sunrise diagrams via the Mellin-Barnes representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2017-07-01

    A number of irreducible master integrals for L-loop sunrise and bubble Feynman diagrams with generic values of masses and external momenta are explicitly evaluated via the Mellin-Barnes representation.

  7. [Method for an absolute count of the number of parasitic protozoa in fish].

    PubMed

    Sous', S M

    1976-01-01

    A new technique is given of the absolute calculation of parasitic Protozoa in fishes. The mucus from the body and gills of fishes was mixed with such volume of water (V) that the drop of mixture (v) was clearly seen under themicroscope. The calculation of Protozoa was done in a sample from three drops of mixture covered with three slides (S). From 50 to 100 viewing fields were seen the them and an average number of Protozoa in one field was calculated. The total number of Protozoa in one fish (N) was equal to an average number of parasites in a viewing field (n) multiplied by the total number of viewing fields (m) which could be obtained at the examination of the whole mixture. The latter was calculated conventionally (see articles).

  8. Black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity: a number-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J Fernando; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernández-Borja, Enrique; Villaseñor, Eduardo J S

    2008-05-30

    We give an efficient method, combining number-theoretic and combinatorial ideas, to exactly compute black hole entropy in the framework of loop quantum gravity. Along the way we provide a complete characterization of the relevant sector of the spectrum of the area operator, including degeneracies, and explicitly determine the number of solutions to the projection constraint. We use a computer implementation of the proposed algorithm to confirm and extend previous results on the detailed structure of the black hole degeneracy spectrum.

  9. Object naming is a more sensitive measure of speech localization than number counting: Converging evidence from direct cortical stimulation and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Petrovich Brennan, Nicole M; Whalen, Stephen; de Morales Branco, Daniel; O'shea, James P; Norton, Isaiah H; Golby, Alexandra J

    2007-01-01

    Using direct cortical stimulation to map language function during awake craniotomy is a well-described and useful technique. However, the optimum neuropsychological tasks to use have not been detailed. We used both functional MRI (fMRI) and direct cortical stimulation to compare the sensitivity of two behavioral paradigms, number counting and object naming, in the demonstration of eloquent cortical language areas. Fifteen patients with left hemisphere lesions and seven healthy control subjects participated. Patients had both preoperative fMRI at 3 T and direct cortical stimulation. Patients and controls performed object naming and number counting during fMRI at 3 T. Laterality indices were calculated from the fMRI maps for the Number-counting>Object-naming and Object-naming>Number-counting contrasts. The same number-counting and object-naming paradigms were tested during awake craniotomy and assessed for sensitivity to speech disruption. In all patients during intraoperative cortical stimulation, speech disruption occurred at more sites during object naming than during number counting. Subtle speech errors were only elicited with the object-naming paradigm, whereas only speech arrest and/or hypophonia were measured using the number counting paradigm. In both patients and controls, fMRI activation maps demonstrated greater left lateralization for object naming as compared to number counting in both frontal and temporal language areas. Number counting resulted in a more bihemispheric distribution of activations than object naming. Both cortical stimulation testing and fMRI suggest that automated speech tasks such as number counting may not fully engage putative language networks and therefore are not optimal for language localization for surgical planning.

  10. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: I. Main result

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We present the galaxy number overdensity up to second order in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order that arise from observing on the past light cone, including all redshift effects, lensing distortions from convergence and shear, and contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW and time-delay terms. This result will be important for accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates, introduced by nonlinear projection effects.

  11. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: II. Derivation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the observed galaxy number over-density on cosmological scales up to second order in perturbation theory. We include all relativistic effects that arise from observing on the past lightcone. The derivation is in a general gauge, and applies to all dark energy models (including interacting dark energy) and to metric theories of modified gravity. The result will be important for accurate cosmological parameter estimation, including non-Gaussianity, since all projection effects need to be taken into account. It also offers the potential for new probes of General Relativity, dark energy and modified gravity. This paper accompanies Paper I which presents the key results for the concordance model in Poisson gauge.

  12. Number-counts slope estimation in the presence of Poisson noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Juergen H. M. M.; Maccacaro, Tommaso

    1986-01-01

    The slope determination of a power-law number flux relationship in the case of photon-limited sampling. This case is important for high-sensitivity X-ray surveys with imaging telescopes, where the error in an individual source measurement depends on integrated flux and is Poisson, rather than Gaussian, distributed. A bias-free method of slope estimation is developed that takes into account the exact error distribution, the influence of background noise, and the effects of varying limiting sensitivities. It is shown that the resulting bias corrections are quite insensitive to the bias correction procedures applied, as long as only sources with signal-to-noise ratio five or greater are considered. However, if sources with signal-to-noise ratio five or less are included, the derived bias corrections depend sensitively on the shape of the error distribution.

  13. Development of alternative support system for viable count of cyanobacteria by most probable number method.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, R; Saxena, A K; Jaiswal, P; Nayak, S

    2006-01-01

    A technique was developed to evaluate alternative support systems to test tubes used in the standard most probable number technique, for simultaneous isolation and enumeration of cyanobacteria. Five different support systems were tested for their suitability in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, economics and ease of handling. PCR plates with 96 wells and carrying capacity of 300 microL per well were found to be most sensitive, besides being cost- and time-effective. This technique can also be useful for isolation of cyanobacteria, due to immobilization of colonies in the gel matrix and storage of samples at room temperature, without loss of viability for 5-6 weeks. This technique can help to process large sample size with ease--both for enumeration and isolation and can be extended for enumeration of other microorganisms from diverse sources.

  14. Do chromosome numbers reflect phylogeny? New counts for Bombacoideae and a review of Malvaceae s.l.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Rafaela C; Mendes-Rodrigues, Clesnan; Balao, Francisco; Ortiz, Pedro L; Yamagishi-Costa, Júlia; Bonetti, Ana M; Oliveira, Paulo E

    2014-09-01

    • Whole genome duplication (WGD) and specific polyploidy events marked turning points for angiosperm genome structure and evolution. Therefore, cytogenetic studies of polyploidy-prone groups such as the tropical Malvaceae and plant formations such as as the Brazilian Cerrado have gained further importance. We present new chromosome counts for Cerrado Bombacoideae and revised chromosome numbers for the Malvaceae s.l., compare these between subfamilies, and relate them to phylogenetic signal.• We studied the chromosome number of Eriotheca candolleana, E. gracilipes, E. pubescens, Pachira glabra, Pseudobombax longiflorum, and P. tomentosum. We also compared Eriotheca species ploidy levels using flow cytometry. We compiled chromosome numbers for 557 species of Malvaceae s.l., including 37 Bombacoideae species. We included this information in a phylogenetic reconstruction based on chloroplast matK-trnK DNA to evaluate chromosome evolution of the Malvaceae s.l. and the Bombacoideae in particular.• The Cerrado Bombacoideae presented consistently high chromosome numbers. Numbers for Eriotheca species were among the highest and varied among populations. Flow cytometry analyses showed similar 1Cx DNA for all cytotypes and indicated neopolyploidy. Chromosome numbers differed between subfamilies, with the lowest numbers in the Malvoideae and Byttnerioideae and the highest in Tilioideae. Chromosome numbers had significant phylogenetic signal for Bombacoideae but not for Malvoideae or Malvaceae s.l.• Clearly distinct chromosome numbers allied to monophyly provide some support for a circumscription of the Bombacoideae and distinction within the Malvaceae. The phylogenetic signal for chromosome number supports the idea of an ancient WGD and further neopolyploidy events as important evolutionary trends for the Bombacoideae. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  15. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 4, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  16. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 1, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  17. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 6, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  18. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 2, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  19. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This guide is first of a series of curriculum guides dealing with nutrition education in grades K-6. The curriculum guide was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting…

  20. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 3, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  1. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 5, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  2. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 6, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  3. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This guide is first of a series of curriculum guides dealing with nutrition education in grades K-6. The curriculum guide was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting…

  4. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 5, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  5. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 1, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  6. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 2, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  7. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 3, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  8. Making Nutrition Education Count: A Guide for Nutrition Education K-6. Grade 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratky, Patricia; Haigh, Lois

    This curriculum guide for nutrition education grade 4, was designed to incorporate knowledge of thirteen concepts into the child's decision-making processes as a food consumer. These concepts, as covered by the guide, are: affecting bodily well-being through nutrition; affecting dental health through nutrition; models for diet selection;…

  9. Hiring Smart: An Employer's Guide to Using School Records. Making Academics Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document, which is intended for employers, explains the benefits of and strategies for using school records in making hiring decisions. The document begins with a discussion of the benefits reaped by employers, students, and parents when employers use school records. Discussed next are the objectives and potential benefits of the Making…

  10. Pilot evaluation of the Making Employment Needs [MEN] count intervention: addressing behavioral and structural HIV risks in heterosexual black men.

    PubMed

    Raj, Anita; Dasgupta, Anindita; Goldson, Irvienne; Lafontant, Dumas; Freeman, Elmer; Silverman, Jay G

    2014-02-01

    Few community-based HIV interventions exist for Black men at heterosexual risk for HIV. None focus on structural HIV risks such as unemployment and unstable housing. This study involved a pilot evaluation of the MEN (Making Employment Needs) Count HIV intervention, a three session peer counselor-delivered program of HIV risk reduction and gender-equity counseling, and employment and housing case management. A single-arm intervention trial of MEN Count was conducted with Black men recruited from a community men's clinic and social services program. Eligible men were those who reported two or more sex partners in the past six months and current unemployment and/or recent homelessness. Most participants (68%) had a history of incarceration. Participants (N = 50) were surveyed on outcomes at baseline (Time 1), posttest (Time 2; 60-90 days after baseline), and two-month follow-up (Time 3). The majority of participants were retained in the program (86%) and the final follow-up survey (76%). McNemar tests revealed significant reductions in the past 30-day unprotected sex from Time 1 (74%) to Time 2 (47%) and to Time 3 (47%), and in homelessness from Time 1 (58%) to Time 3 (32%). Significant increases in employment from Time 1 (8%) to Time 2 (29%) and Time 3 (32%) were also seen. Participants completed a brief participant satisfaction survey at posttest. Most (n=28, 65%) rated the program as excellent, and an additional 10 (23%) rated it as good. Although there was no significant reduction in multiple sex partners, a trend was observed from Time 1 (56%) to Time 2 (44%) and Time 3 (42%). Findings suggest that the MEN Count model is a feasible and promising HIV prevention program for Black men at heterosexual risk for HIV. Larger scale implementation and more rigorous evaluation of MEN Count are needed to confirm the study findings.

  11. Shared Decision-making in the Emergency Department: Respecting Patient Autonomy When Seconds Count.

    PubMed

    Hess, Erik P; Grudzen, Corita R; Thomson, Richard; Raja, Ali S; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2015-07-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM), a collaborative process in which patients and providers make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient's values and preferences, is being increasingly advocated as the optimal approach to decision-making for many health care decisions. The rapidly paced and often chaotic environment of the emergency department (ED), however, is a unique clinical setting that offers many practical and contextual challenges. Despite these challenges, in a recent survey emergency physicians reported there to be more than one reasonable management option for over 50% of their patients and that they take an SDM approach in 58% of such patients. SDM has also been selected as the topic on which to develop a future research agenda at the 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Shared Decision-making in the Emergency Department: Development of a Policy-relevant Patient-centered Research Agenda" (http://www.saem.org/annual-meeting/education/2016-aem-consensus-conference). In this paper the authors describe the conceptual model of SDM as originally conceived by Charles and Gafni and highlight aspects of the model relevant to the practice of emergency medicine. In addition, through the use of vignettes from the authors' clinical practices, the applicability of SDM to contemporary EM practice is illustrated and the ethical and pragmatic implications of taking an SDM approach are explored. It is hoped that this document will be read in advance of the 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, to facilitate group discussions at the conference.

  12. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA Resolves the Bright-end of the Sub-millimeter Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Geach, J. E.; Ivison, R. J.; Thomson, A. P.; Aretxaga, I.; Blain, A. W.; Cowley, W. I.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dunlop, J. S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Karim, A.; Knudsen, K. K.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2015-07-01

    We present high-resolution 870 μm Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1 degree2 850 μm maps from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the brightest sources in the field (median {S}{SCUBA-2} = 8.7 ± 0.4 mJy). We detect 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) at >4σ significance in our 30 ALMA maps. In {61}-15+19% of the ALMA maps the single-dish source comprises a blend of ≥2 SMGs, where the secondary SMGs are Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with {L}{IR} ≳ 1012 {\\text{}}{L}⊙ . The brightest SMG contributes on average {80}-2+6% of the single-dish flux density, and in the ALMA maps containing ≥2 SMGs the secondary SMG contributes {25}-5+1% of the integrated ALMA flux. We construct source counts and show that multiplicity boosts the apparent single-dish cumulative counts by 20% at S870 > 7.5 mJy, and by 60% at S870 > 12 mJy. We combine our sample with previous ALMA studies of fainter SMGs and show that the counts are well-described by a double power law with a break at 8.5 ± 0.6 mJy. The break corresponds to a luminosity of ˜6 × 1012 {\\text{}}{L}⊙ or a star formation rate (SFR) of ˜103 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. For the typical sizes of these SMGs, which are resolved in our ALMA data with {R}{{e}} = 1.2 ± 0.1 kpc, this yields a limiting SFR density of ˜100 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 Finally, the number density of S870 ≳ 2 mJy SMGs is 80 ± 30 times higher than that derived from blank-field counts. An over-abundance of faint SMGs is inconsistent with line-of-sight projections dominating multiplicity in the brightest SMGs, and indicates that a significant proportion of these high-redshift ULIRGs are likely to be physically associated.

  13. The Origin of Mathematics and Number Sense in the Cerebellum: with Implications for Finger Counting and Dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Vandervert, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Mathematicians and scientists have struggled to adequately describe the ultimate foundations of mathematics. Nobel laureates Albert Einstein and Eugene Wigner were perplexed by this issue, with Wigner concluding that the workability of mathematics in the real world is a mystery we cannot explain. In response to this classic enigma, the major purpose of this article is to provide a theoretical model of the ultimate origin of mathematics and "number sense" (as defined by S. Dehaene) that is proposed to involve the learning of inverse dynamics models through the collaboration of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex (but prominently cerebellum-driven). This model is based upon (1) the modern definition of mathematics as the "science of patterns," (2) cerebellar sequence (pattern) detection, and (3) findings that the manipulation of numbers is automated in the cerebellum. This cerebro-cerebellar approach does not necessarily conflict with mathematics or number sense models that focus on brain functions associated with especially the intraparietal sulcus region of the cerebral cortex. A direct corollary purpose of this article is to offer a cerebellar inner speech explanation for difficulty in developing "number sense" in developmental dyscalculia. It is argued that during infancy the cerebellum learns (1) a first tier of internal models for a primitive physics that constitutes the foundations of visual-spatial working memory, and (2) a second (and more abstract) tier of internal models based on (1) that learns "number" and relationships among dimensions across the primitive physics of the first tier. Within this context it is further argued that difficulty in the early development of the second tier of abstraction (and "number sense") is based on the more demanding attentional requirements imposed on cerebellar inner speech executive control during the learning of cerebellar inverse dynamics models. Finally, it is argued that finger counting improves (does not

  14. Galaxy Number Counts in a Universe with a Scalar Field Having a Null Stage at the Time of Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, K.; Matsushita, E.; Komiya, Z.; Hirano, K.; Yamamoto, N.

    As a part of the effort to investigate the viability of a model universe possessing the Morikawa scalar field (Morikawa, 1991; Kashino and Kawabata, 1994), we have sought a model that has a negligibly small scalar field for a certain period of time around the time of nucleosynthesis, following Quevedo et al. (1997), and can yet attain a sufficiently large cosmological age under the constraint that an oscillation of the value of the gravitational constant induced by the scalar field be within the ranges permitted by the Viking Lander observation (Reasenberg, 1979). To narrow down the possible ranges of the values of the cosmological parameters, the galaxy number count N versus their apparent magnitude m relation (viz., the N-m relation) as well as the number count N versus their redshift z relation (viz., N-z relation) have also been computed with the E-, K-, and gravity (G)-corrections. Special attention has been paid to reproducing the spatial periodicity observed through the pencil-beam surveys (Broadhurst et al. 1990; Koo and Ellman, 1993; Martinez and Saar 2002). In addition, simulations of the apparent magnitude versus redshift z relations observed for some type Ia supernovae in B, V, and I bands, as well as an N-body simulation of the large scale structure, have been carried out, to see if they can further constrain the values of the essential parameters. We show that it is in fact possible to obtain a model universe with an oscillating scalar field that is capable of accounting for a variety of observed features.

  15. Making It Count: Improving Estimates of the Size of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Populations.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-06-01

    An accurate estimate of the number of transgender and gender nonconforming people is essential to inform policy and funding priorities and decisions. Historical reports of population sizes of 1 in 4000 to 1 in 50,000 have been based on clinical populations and likely underestimate the size of the transgender population. More recent population-based studies have found a 10- to 100-fold increase in population size. Studies that estimate population size should be population based, employ the two-step method to allow for collection of both gender identity and sex assigned at birth, and include measures to capture the range of transgender people with nonbinary gender identities.

  16. Methods of legitimation: how ethics committees decide which reasons count in public policy decision-making.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kyle T

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, liberal democratic societies have struggled with the question of how best to balance expertise and democratic participation in the regulation of emerging technologies. This study aims to explain how national deliberative ethics committees handle the practical tension between scientific expertise, ethical expertise, expert patient input, and lay public input by explaining two institutions' processes for determining the legitimacy or illegitimacy of reasons in public policy decision-making: that of the United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and the United States' American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). The articulation of these 'methods of legitimation' draws on 13 in-depth interviews with HFEA and ASRM members and staff conducted in January and February 2012 in London and over Skype, as well as observation of an HFEA deliberation. This study finds that these two institutions employ different methods in rendering certain arguments legitimate and others illegitimate: while the HFEA attempts to 'balance' competing reasons but ultimately legitimizes arguments based on health and welfare concerns, the ASRM seeks to 'filter' out arguments that challenge reproductive autonomy. The notably different structures and missions of each institution may explain these divergent approaches, as may what Sheila Jasanoff (2005) terms the distinctive 'civic epistemologies' of the US and the UK. Significantly for policy makers designing such deliberative committees, each method differs substantially from that explicitly or implicitly endorsed by the institution.

  17. How to make DNA count: DNA-based diagnostic tools in veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Lello, J

    2012-05-04

    Traditional methods for the diagnosis of parasitic helminth infections of livestock have a number of limitations, such as the inability to distinguish mixed-species infections, a heavy reliance on technical experience and also sub-sampling errors. Some of these limitations may be overcome through the development of rapid and accurate DNA-based tests. For example, DNA-based tests can specifically detect individual species in a mixed infection at either the larval or egg stages, in the absence of morphological differences among species. Even so, some diagnostic problems remain the same, irrespective of whether a DNA-based or traditional method is used. For example, sub-sampling errors from an aggregated distribution are likely to persist. It is proposed, however, that DNA-based diagnostic technologies offer an opportunity to expand diagnostic capabilities, and are discussed in the current review. The future introduction of DNA-based diagnostic technologies into routine diagnostic settings will also be discussed.

  18. What Counts as "Truth" -- Reason Versus Emotion in Vaccine Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnookin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Vaccines are without question one of the most successful public health interventions the world has ever known. Despite this, for the past decade-and-a-half, industrialized countries around the world, from the United States to Germany and from Australia to Israel, have been confronted with specious panics about vaccine safety and efficacy, many of which center around claims that vaccines can cause autism. These fears can be traced to two events: a since-retracted paper published by a disgraced gastroenterologist claiming the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine was linked to a gut disease which, in turn, was linked to autism; and the United States's decision to remove a mercury-based preservative called thimerosal from standard pediatric vaccines in the late 1990s. The effects of these scares are being felt worldwide. Each year for the past several years, the US has had more measles outbreaks than at any time since the mid-1990s, a fact which is especially frightening given that the WHO declared measles eliminated from North America in 2000. In France, a nationwide measles outbreak has caused thousands of hospitalizations and a number of deaths. I will address several issues central to this topic: Given the overwhelming amount of evidence showing vaccines are safe and the total lack of evidence showing they cause autism, why do these fears persist, and what can be done to combat them? Has the public health establishment's response to these fears been sufficient? To what extent do concerns about vaccines function as proxies for more opaque concerns regarding modern-day health care? And finally, what is the effect of a lack of evidence-based research on the best way to combat misinformation?

  19. Determining the count median diameter of nanoaerosols by simultaneously measuring their number and lung-deposited surface area concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, S.; Witschger, O.; Gensdarmes, F.; Thomas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the increasing use of nanomaterials in research and product development, it is probable that the number of situations of occupational exposure to them is also rising. The same is true for the number of workers. Although current research in nanotoxicology is far from conclusive, it is clear that relying on mass concentration and chemical composition alone is not appropriate in all cases and alternative measurement methods and approaches need to be developed. In this work, we propose a method based on simultaneous size-integrated measurements of two particle concentrations (number and lung-deposited surface area, CNC/NSAM), and on the estimation of the average size of potentially inhaled particles from the combination of these measurements. The proposed method could be part of a measurement strategy that is practical as it would use field-portable, commercially available aerosol instruments. In the absence of instruments providing real-time size-resolved measurements, this original approach can be carried out as considering that the ratio of these concentrations is a monotonous function of particle size. Indeed, the latter function depends only on the geometric standard deviation of airborne particle number size distribution, assumed to be lognormal. Compared to SMPS data for polydisperse aerosols having three chemical natures with count median diameters ranging from 64 to 177 nm, experimental results were obtained with acceptable relative discrepancies of ±30 %. Though the method proposed is less accurate than traditional instruments like SMPS, it can be used for workplace air monitoring or as a screening tool to detect the presence of airborne nanoparticles.

  20. Reduced joint counts misclassify patients with oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis and miss significant numbers of patients with active disease.

    PubMed

    Coates, Laura C; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; McHugh, Neil; Mease, Philip; Strand, Vibeke; Helliwell, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate joint counts in patients with oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis (PsA) for their correlation with treatment decisions and to determine the proportion of patients in whom active disease was missed using reduced joint counts. The international Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Composite Exercise cohort was used for this study. Oligoarthritis was defined as <5 tender and/or swollen joints. At baseline, a tender joint count (TJC) using 68 joints and a swollen joint count (SJC) using 66 joints (66/68-joint counts) were assessed. Reduced joint counts designed for use in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including 28- and 44-joint counts, were analyzed. In addition, the following proposed joint counts for PsA were tested: the PsA-44 (which includes elbows, wrists, metacarpophalangeal joints, finger proximal interphalangeal [PIP] joints, distal interphalangeal joints, knees, and metatarsophalangeal joints) and the PsA-56 (which includes the same joints as those assessed for the PsA-44 plus ankles and toe PIP joints). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess whether joint counts predict treatment changes. The proportion of patients in whom active disease was missed using reduced joint counts designed for RA was also assessed. Among 503 patients recruited to the study, 266 (53%) had oligoarthritis. ROC curve analysis revealed that no TJC or active joint count (AJC), even a 66/68-joint count, predicted treatment change (for the TJC, area under the curve [AUC] 0.57, P = 0.125; for the AJC, AUC 0.56, P = 0.159). Use of the SJC in 66 joints did predict treatment change (AUC 0.62, P = 0.006), as did the SJC using the PsA-44 and the PsA-56 (P < 0.03). Neither of the reduced joint counts designed for RA predicted treatment change. A 28-joint count designed for RA missed 21% of patients with tender joints (n = 29) and 27% of patients with swollen joints (n = 23). The PsA-44 and PsA-56 joint counts missed

  1. LIFTING THE VEIL ON OBSCURED ACCRETION: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NUMBER COUNTS AND SURVEY STRATEGIES FOR IMAGING HARD X-RAY MISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Draper, A. R.; Madsen, K. K.; Rigby, J. R.; Treister, E.

    2011-07-20

    Finding and characterizing the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that produces the X-ray background (XRB) is necessary to connect the history of accretion to observations of galaxy evolution at longer wavelengths. The year 2012 will see the deployment of the first hard X-ray imaging telescope which, through deep extragalactic surveys, will be able to measure the AGN population at the energies where the XRB peaks ({approx}20-30 keV). Here, we present predictions of AGN number counts in three hard X-ray bandpasses: 6-10 keV, 10-30 keV, and 30-60 keV. Separate predictions are presented for the number counts of Compton thick AGNs, the most heavily obscured active galaxies. The number counts are calculated for five different models of the XRB that differ in the assumed hard X-ray luminosity function, the evolution of the Compton thick AGNs, and the underlying AGN spectral model. The majority of the hard X-ray number counts will be Compton thin AGNs, but there is a greater than tenfold increase in the Compton thick number counts from the 6-10 keV to the 10-30 keV band. The Compton thick population shows enough variation that a hard X-ray number counts measurement will constrain the models. The computed number counts are used to consider various survey strategies for the NuSTAR mission, assuming a total exposure time of 6.2 Ms. We find that multiple surveys will allow a measurement of Compton thick evolution. The predictions presented here should be useful for all future imaging hard X-ray missions.

  2. Impact of Article Page Count and Number of Authors on Citations in Disability Related Fields: A Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    AHMED, Abubakar; ADAM, Mastura; GHAFAR, Norafida A.; MUHAMMAD, Murtala; EBRAHIM, Nader Ale

    2016-01-01

    Background: Citation metrics and total publications in a field has become the gold standard for rating researchers and viability of a field. Hence, stimulating demand for citation has led to a search for useful strategies to improve performance metric index. Meanwhile, title, abstract and morphologic qualities of the articles attract researchers to scientific publications. Yet, there is relatively little understanding of the citation trend in disability related fields. We aimed to provide an insight into the factors associated with citation increase in this field. Additionally, we tried to know at what page number an article might appear attractive to disability researchers needs. Thus, our focus is placed on the article page count and the number of authors contributing to the fields per article. Methods: To this end, we evaluated the quantitative characteristics of top cited articles in the fields with a total citation (≥50) in the Web of Science (WoS) database. Using one-way independent ANOVA, data extracted spanning a period of 1980–2015 were analyzed, while the non-parametric data analysis uses Kruskal-Walis test. Results: Articles with 11 to 20 pages attract more citations followed by those within the range of zero to 10. Articles with upward 21 pages are the least cited. Surprisingly, articles with more than two authors are significantly (P<0.05) less cited and the citation decreases as the number of authors increased. Conclusion: Collaborative studies enjoy wider utilization and more citation, yet discounted merit of additional pages and limited collaborative research in disability field is revealed in this study. PMID:27957456

  3. Impact of Article Page Count and Number of Authors on Citations in Disability Related Fields: A Systematic Review Article.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abubakar; Adam, Mastura; Ghafar, Norafida A; Muhammad, Murtala; Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2016-09-01

    Citation metrics and total publications in a field has become the gold standard for rating researchers and viability of a field. Hence, stimulating demand for citation has led to a search for useful strategies to improve performance metric index. Meanwhile, title, abstract and morphologic qualities of the articles attract researchers to scientific publications. Yet, there is relatively little understanding of the citation trend in disability related fields. We aimed to provide an insight into the factors associated with citation increase in this field. Additionally, we tried to know at what page number an article might appear attractive to disability researchers needs. Thus, our focus is placed on the article page count and the number of authors contributing to the fields per article. To this end, we evaluated the quantitative characteristics of top cited articles in the fields with a total citation (≥50) in the Web of Science (WoS) database. Using one-way independent ANOVA, data extracted spanning a period of 1980-2015 were analyzed, while the non-parametric data analysis uses Kruskal-Walis test. Articles with 11 to 20 pages attract more citations followed by those within the range of zero to 10. Articles with upward 21 pages are the least cited. Surprisingly, articles with more than two authors are significantly (P<0.05) less cited and the citation decreases as the number of authors increased. Collaborative studies enjoy wider utilization and more citation, yet discounted merit of additional pages and limited collaborative research in disability field is revealed in this study.

  4. Making Career Readiness Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreamer, Kate Blosveren; O'Hara, Marie; Curl, Cory

    2014-01-01

    There is growing consensus in states across the nation that the goal of the K-12 education system is to "prepare all students to graduate from high school ready for college and careers". Yet, in all but a handful of states, the priority goals set to drive student performance toward and beyond college and career readiness sputter out…

  5. Making Academics Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, John F.

    1975-01-01

    Basic ideas of reinforcement may be more easily applied in the classroom if three common teacher errors: noncontingent reinforcement, ambiguity of rules, and restriction of earnings, are avoided. (Author/SDH)

  6. Galaxy formation in Lambda greater than 0 Friedmann models: Consequences for the number counts versus redshift test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, Hugo

    1994-01-01

    We study the effect of the cosmological constant Lambda on galaxy formation using a simple spherical top-hat overdensity model. We consider models with Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 (where Omega(sub 0) is the density parameter, and lambda(sub 0) identically equal Lambda/3 H(sub 0 exp 2) where H(sub 0) is the Hubble constant). We adjust the initial power spectrum amplitude so that both models reproduce the same large-scale structures. The galaxy formation era in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model occurs early (z approximately 6) and is very short, whereas in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model the galaxy formation era starts later (z approximately 4), and last much longer, possibly all the way to the present. Consequently, galaxies at low redshift (z less than 1) are significantly more evolved in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model than in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model. This result implies that previous attempts to determine Lambda using the number counts versus redshift test are probably unreliable.

  7. Galaxy formation in Lambda greater than 0 Friedmann models: Consequences for the number counts versus redshift test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, Hugo

    1994-01-01

    We study the effect of the cosmological constant Lambda on galaxy formation using a simple spherical top-hat overdensity model. We consider models with Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 (where Omega(sub 0) is the density parameter, and lambda(sub 0) identically equal Lambda/3 H(sub 0 exp 2) where H(sub 0) is the Hubble constant). We adjust the initial power spectrum amplitude so that both models reproduce the same large-scale structures. The galaxy formation era in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model occurs early (z approximately 6) and is very short, whereas in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model the galaxy formation era starts later (z approximately 4), and last much longer, possibly all the way to the present. Consequently, galaxies at low redshift (z less than 1) are significantly more evolved in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model than in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model. This result implies that previous attempts to determine Lambda using the number counts versus redshift test are probably unreliable.

  8. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey . I. Selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Chaves-Montero, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Molino, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Vilella-Rojo, G.; Ascaso, B.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cerviño, M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Oteo, I.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, J. F.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so-called dropout technique or Ly-α selection. However, the availability of multifilter data now allows the dropout selections to be replaced by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims: Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing to the study of the brightest, least frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods: The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results: Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z = 2.5,3.0,3.5,4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at mUV(AB) = 24, where mUV refers to the first ALHAMBRA filter redwards of the Ly-α line. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute to the study of the brightest ends of these counts, accurately sampling the surface densities down to mUV(AB) = 21-22. Conclusions: We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a very clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that it is better to do statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination issues in a

  9. Coming to an Understanding of the Signed Numbers: How Second and Third Grade Students Make Sense of the Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research has been to generate learning environments that surrounded second and third grade students with bi-directional counting experiences, leading them to discover and come to an understanding of opposite numbers. While engaged in games and bi-directional activities, these young students eagerly counted, by jumping frogs…

  10. Coming to an Understanding of the Signed Numbers: How Second and Third Grade Students Make Sense of the Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research has been to generate learning environments that surrounded second and third grade students with bi-directional counting experiences, leading them to discover and come to an understanding of opposite numbers. While engaged in games and bi-directional activities, these young students eagerly counted, by jumping frogs…

  11. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Almeida, Julia; Nieto, Wendy G; Teodosio, Cristina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Romero, Alfonso; López, Antonio; Fernandez-Navarro, Paulino; Vega, Tomas; Perez-Andres, Martin; Valent, Peter; Jäger, Ulrich; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.Little is known about the distribution of normal lymphoid cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood (PB) of subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). In our study, we compared the absolute number of PB lymphoid cells and their subpopulations in 95 MBL cases with normal lymphocyte counts vs. 617 age-/sex-matched non-MBL healthy subjects (controls), using highly sensitive flow cytometry. MBL cases showed significantly reduced numbers of normal circulating B-cells, at the expense of immature and naive B-cells; in addition, CD4+CD8+ double-positive T-cells and CD8+ T-cells were significantly lower and higher vs. controls, respectively. Moreover, most normal B-cell subsets were significantly decreased in PB at >1% MBL-counts, vs. "low-count" MBL cases, and lower amounts of immature/naive B-cells were detected in biclonal (particularly in cases with coexisting CLL-like- and non-CLL-like B-cell clones) vs. monoclonal MBL subjects. In summary, our results show imbalanced (reduced) absolute numbers of recently produced normal circulating B-cells (e.g., immature and naıve B-cells) in MBL, which becomes more pronounced as the MBL cell count increases.

  12. Generalized seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models for count data with application to malaria time series with low case numbers.

    PubMed

    Briët, Olivier J T; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    With the renewed drive towards malaria elimination, there is a need for improved surveillance tools. While time series analysis is an important tool for surveillance, prediction and for measuring interventions' impact, approximations by commonly used Gaussian methods are prone to inaccuracies when case counts are low. Therefore, statistical methods appropriate for count data are required, especially during "consolidation" and "pre-elimination" phases. Generalized autoregressive moving average (GARMA) models were extended to generalized seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (GSARIMA) models for parsimonious observation-driven modelling of non Gaussian, non stationary and/or seasonal time series of count data. The models were applied to monthly malaria case time series in a district in Sri Lanka, where malaria has decreased dramatically in recent years. The malaria series showed long-term changes in the mean, unstable variance and seasonality. After fitting negative-binomial Bayesian models, both a GSARIMA and a GARIMA deterministic seasonality model were selected based on different criteria. Posterior predictive distributions indicated that negative-binomial models provided better predictions than Gaussian models, especially when counts were low. The G(S)ARIMA models were able to capture the autocorrelation in the series. G(S)ARIMA models may be particularly useful in the drive towards malaria elimination, since episode count series are often seasonal and non-stationary, especially when control is increased. Although building and fitting GSARIMA models is laborious, they may provide more realistic prediction distributions than do Gaussian methods and may be more suitable when counts are low.

  13. Dependence of the Number of Counts in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes on the Source-to-satellite Radial Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, S. J.; Xu, W.; Pasko, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    . Specifically, we investigate the expected number of counts in TGFs as a function of the source-to-satellite radial distance and compare our simulation results with satellite observations.

  14. Photon counting with photon number resolution through superconducting nanowires coupled to a multi-channel TDC in FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusardi, N.; Los, J. W. N.; Gourgues, R. B. M.; Bulgarini, G.; Geraci, A.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a system for measuring photon statistics and photon timing in the few-photon regime down to the single-photon level. The measurement system is based on superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and a time-to-digital converter implemented into a programmable device. The combination of these devices gives high performance to the system in terms of resolution and adaptability to the actual experimental conditions. As a case of application, we present the measurement of photon statistics for coherent light states. In this measurement, we make use of 8th order single photon correlations to reconstruct with high fidelity the statistics of a coherent state with average photon number up to 4. The processing is performed by means of a tapped-delay-line time-to-digital converter architecture that also hosts an asynchronous-correlated-digital-counter implemented in a field programmable gate array device and specifically designed for performance optimization in multi-channel usage.

  15. Photon counting with photon number resolution through superconducting nanowires coupled to a multi-channel TDC in FPGA.

    PubMed

    Lusardi, N; Los, J W N; Gourgues, R B M; Bulgarini, G; Geraci, A

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a system for measuring photon statistics and photon timing in the few-photon regime down to the single-photon level. The measurement system is based on superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and a time-to-digital converter implemented into a programmable device. The combination of these devices gives high performance to the system in terms of resolution and adaptability to the actual experimental conditions. As a case of application, we present the measurement of photon statistics for coherent light states. In this measurement, we make use of 8th order single photon correlations to reconstruct with high fidelity the statistics of a coherent state with average photon number up to 4. The processing is performed by means of a tapped-delay-line time-to-digital converter architecture that also hosts an asynchronous-correlated-digital-counter implemented in a field programmable gate array device and specifically designed for performance optimization in multi-channel usage.

  16. Minimum number of days required for a reliable estimate of daily step count and energy expenditure, in people with MS who walk unaided.

    PubMed

    Norris, Michelle; Anderson, Ross; Motl, Robert W; Hayes, Sara; Coote, Susan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the minimum number of days needed to reliably estimate daily step count and energy expenditure (EE), in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who walked unaided. Seven days of activity monitor data were collected for 26 participants with MS (age=44.5±11.9years; time since diagnosis=6.5±6.2years; Patient Determined Disease Steps=≤3). Mean daily step count and mean daily EE (kcal) were calculated for all combinations of days (127 combinations), and compared to the respective 7-day mean daily step count or mean daily EE using intra-class correlations (ICC), the Generalizability Theory and Bland-Altman. For step count, ICC values of 0.94-0.98 and a G-coefficient of 0.81 indicate a minimum of any random 2-day combination is required to reliably calculate mean daily step count. For EE, ICC values of 0.96-0.99 and a G-coefficient of 0.83 indicate a minimum of any random 4-day combination is required to reliably calculate mean daily EE. For Bland-Altman analyses all combinations of days, bar single day combinations, resulted in a mean bias within ±10%, when expressed as a percentage of the 7-day mean daily step count or mean daily EE. A minimum of 2days for step count and 4days for EE, regardless of day type, is needed to reliably estimate daily step count and daily EE, in people with MS who walk unaided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing the Development of Australian and German 7-Year-Old and 8-Year-Old's Counting and Whole Number Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervasoni, Ann; Peter-Koop, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the counting and whole number knowledge and skills of primary school children in Australia and Germany at the end of Grade 1 and Grade 2. Children's learning was assessed using the Early Numeracy Interview and associated Growth Point Framework. The findings highlight substantial differences between the two groups that vary for…

  18. Mice can count and optimize count-based decisions.

    PubMed

    Çavdaroğlu, Bilgehan; Balcı, Fuat

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies showed that rats and pigeons can count their responses, and the resultant count-based judgments exhibit the scalar property (also known as Weber's Law), a psychophysical property that also characterizes interval-timing behavior. Animals were found to take a nearly normative account of these well-established endogenous uncertainty characteristics in their time-based decision-making. On the other hand, no study has yet tested the implications of scalar property of numerosity representations for reward-rate maximization in count-based decision-making. The current study tested mice on a task that required them to press one lever for a minimum number of times before pressing the second lever to collect the armed reward (fixed consecutive number schedule, FCN). Fewer than necessary number of responses reset the response count without reinforcement, whereas emitting responses at least for the minimum number of times reset the response counter with reinforcement. Each mouse was tested with three different FCN schedules (FCN10, FCN20, FCN40). The number of responses emitted on the first lever before pressing the second lever constituted the main unit of analysis. Our findings for the first time showed that mice count their responses with scalar property. We then defined the reward-rate maximizing numerical decision strategies in this task based on the subject-based estimates of the endogenous counting uncertainty. Our results showed that mice learn to maximize the reward-rate by incorporating the uncertainty in their numerosity judgments into their count-based decisions. Our findings extend the scope of optimal temporal risk-assessment to the domain of count-based decision-making.

  19. A Multicriteria Decision Making Approach for Estimating the Number of Clusters in a Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Zhang, Yong; Kou, Gang; Shi, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Determining the number of clusters in a data set is an essential yet difficult step in cluster analysis. Since this task involves more than one criterion, it can be modeled as a multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problem. This paper proposes a multiple criteria decision making (MCDM)-based approach to estimate the number of clusters for a given data set. In this approach, MCDM methods consider different numbers of clusters as alternatives and the outputs of any clustering algorithm on validity measures as criteria. The proposed method is examined by an experimental study using three MCDM methods, the well-known clustering algorithm–k-means, ten relative measures, and fifteen public-domain UCI machine learning data sets. The results show that MCDM methods work fairly well in estimating the number of clusters in the data and outperform the ten relative measures considered in the study. PMID:22870181

  20. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: The Number Counts of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Resolved Fraction of the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. A.; Aird, J.; Civano, F.; Lansbury, G.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Barret, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Baloković, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Forster, K.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Treister, E.; Walton, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33%-39% of the X-ray background in the 8-24 keV band, directly identifying AGNs with obscuring columns up to ˜ {10}25 {{cm}}-2. In the softer 3-8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range 5× {10}-15 ≲ S(3-8 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12 probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8-24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range 2× {10}-14 ≲ S(8-24 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12, a factor ˜100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8-24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15-55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes (S(15-55 keV) ≳ 10-11 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2), reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local (z\\lt 0.1) sample and NuSTAR’s z˜ 1 sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGNs at low redshifts.

  1. A Deep Multicolor Survey.III.Additional Spectroscopy and Implications for the Number Counts of Faint Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Julia D.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Green, Richard F.

    1997-12-01

    We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614). We have identified 9 new quasars with O.3<ζ<2.8 and l6.8<Β<21.6, all from the group of candidates with ultraviolet excess (UVX). No new quasars with ζ >3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B - R) and (V- R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3<ζ<2, nine with 2<ζ<3, three with 3<ζ<4, and 1 at ζ=4.3. One new quasar, DMS 0059-0055, is very bright with Β 16.8 and ζ=0.3, making its detection by our survey very unexpected. Including this new spectroscopy, the results of the DMS are converging with the predicted space densities of other surveys. In particular, we no longer find an excess of quasars with ζ<2.3 and Β<21 in the survey over predictions based on models by Koo & Kron (1988, ApJ, 325, 92). Also, the excess in the number of quasars seen at z>3 over predictions based on models by Warren et al. (1994, ApJ, 421, 412) is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.

  2. Schools Struggling to Meet Key Goal on Accountability: Number Failing to Make AYP Rises 28 Percent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Almost 30,000 schools in the United States failed to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act in the 2007-2008 school year. For states with comparable data for the 2006-2007 school year, the number of such schools increased by 28%. Half those schools missed their achievement goals for two or more years, putting…

  3. Schools Struggling to Meet Key Goal on Accountability: Number Failing to Make AYP Rises 28 Percent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Almost 30,000 schools in the United States failed to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act in the 2007-2008 school year. For states with comparable data for the 2006-2007 school year, the number of such schools increased by 28%. Half those schools missed their achievement goals for two or more years, putting…

  4. Tower counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  5. Spatial Variations of Galaxy Number Counts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. II. Test of Galactic Extinction in High-Extinction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Naoki; Fukugita, Masataka; Schneider, Donald P.

    2007-08-01

    Galactic extinction is tested using galaxy number counts at low Galactic latitude obtained from five-band photometry of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The spatial variation of galaxy number counts for low-extinction regions of E(B-V)<0.15 is consistent with the all-sky reddening map of Schlegel and coworkers and the standard extinction law. For higher extinction regions of E(B-V)>0.15, however, the map of Schlegel and coworkers overestimates the reddening by a factor of up to 1.4, which can likely be ascribed to the departure from proportionality of reddening to infrared emissivity of dust. This result is consistent with the analysis of Arce & Goodman for the Taurus dark cloud complex.

  6. Connectivity and HIV-1 infection: role of CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 RNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Padierna-Olivos, L; Moreno-Altamirano, M M; Sánchez-Colón, S; Massó-Rojas, F; Sánchez-García, F J

    2000-12-01

    Following primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, antibodies against specific HIV-1 epitopes are elicited. However, non-HIV-1 specific antibodies, including autoantibodies, also arise. In fact, it has been proposed that such autoantibodies have an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Because an imbalance in connectivity has been associated with autoimmune processes, we investigated the connectivity status of HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, we tested the possible role of viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts, in connectivity, because these parameters appear to be important in the prognosis of HIV-1 infection. Results show that indeed, there is an alteration in connectivity in these patients, both for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM, which is an immune alteration not previously identified in HIV-1 infection. In addition, our results show that viral load and CD4(+) T-cell counts are both equally important in defining the characteristic pattern of connectivity in HIV-1-infected individuals, and that neither is independently responsible for alterations in patient connectivity status.

  7. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  8. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  9. The examination of relationship between socioeconomic factors and number of tuberculosis using quantile regression model for count data in Iran 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Sarvi, Fatemeh; Momenian, Somayeh; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Pahlavanzadeh, Bagher; Nasehi, Mahshid; Sekhavati, Eghbal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poverty and low socioeconomic status are the most important reasons of increasing the global burden of tuberculosis, not only in developing countries but also in developed countries for particular groups. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between socioeconomic factors and the number of tuberculosis patients using quantile regression for count data. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 11,320 tuberculosis patients from March 2010 to March 201 in Iran. Data was gathered from the 345 sections of Iran by Ministry of Health and Medical Education and Statistical Center of Iran. The jittering method was applied for smoothing, and then, the quantile regression for count data was fitted. The AIC was used to compare the fitness of quantile regression for count data model and Poisson log-linear model. The R (3.0.1) software and Quantreg and AER packages were used for all analysis and modeling of the data. Results: The results of fitting the quantile regression for count data showed that in all percentiles, the more increase in immigration rate, illiteracy rate, unemployment and urbanization rates, the more tuberculosis morbidity rate was increased. The maximum increase of tuberculosis due to immigration rate, urbanization rate, unemployment rate, and illiteracy rate was in 95th percentile (β^=0.315), 85'Th percentile (β^=0.162), 75'Th percentile (β^=0.114 ), and 95'Th percentile (β^=0.304), respectively. For 50th percentiles and higher percentiles, with increasing the sum of physicians to the number of population, the tuberculosis morbidity rate was decreased, and the maximum decrease was in 95'Th percentile ( β^=-0.1). For all percentiles, the AIC showed that quantile regression for count data had been a better fit to data. Conclusion: With respect to the relationship between socioeconomic factors and TB rate, health care observers should pay close attention to improving these factors in Iran to reduce the TB mortality

  10. Quantity judgments in the context of risk/reward decision making in striped field mice: first "count," then hunt.

    PubMed

    Panteleeva, Sofia; Reznikova, Zhanna; Vygonyailova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We simulated the situation of risky hunting in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius in order to examine whether these animals are able to make a choice between small and large quantities of live prey (ants). In the first (preliminary) experiment we investigated to what extent mice were interested in ants as a live prey and how their hunting activity depended on the quantity of these edible but rather aggressive insects. We placed mice one by one into arenas together with ant groups of different quantities, from 10 to 60. Surprisingly, animals, both wild-caught and laboratory-reared, displayed rather skilled predatory attacks: mice killed and ate from 0.37 ± 003 to 4 ± 0.5 ants per minute. However, there was a threshold number of ants in the arenas when rodents expressed signs of discomfort and started to panic, likely because ants bit them. This threshold corresponds to the dynamic density (about 400 individuals per m(2) per min) in the vicinity of anthills and ants' routes in natural environment. In the second experiment mice had to choose between different quantities of ants placed in two transparent tunnels. Ants here served both as food items and as a source of danger. As far as we know, this is the first experimental paradigm based on evaluation of quantity judgments in the context of risk/reward decision making where the animals face a trade-off between the hedonistic value of the prey and the danger it presents. We found that when mice have to choose between 5 vs. 15, 5 vs. 30, and 10 vs. 30 ants, they always tend to prefer the smaller quantity, thus displaying the capacity for distinguishing more from less in order to ensure comfortable hunting. The results of this study are ecologically relevant as they reflect situations and challenges faced by free-living small rodents.

  11. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: The Number Counts of Active Galactic Nuclei and The Resolved Fraction of The Cosmic X-Ray Background

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, F. A.; Aird, J.; Civano, F.; ...

    2016-11-07

    Here, we present the 3–8 keV and 8–24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33%–39% of the X-ray background in the 8–24 keV band, directly identifying AGNs with obscuring columns up tomore » $$\\sim {10}^{25}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$. In the softer 3–8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range $$5\\times {10}^{-15}\\,\\lesssim $$ S(3–8 keV)/$$\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}\\,\\lesssim \\,{10}^{-12}$$ probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8–24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range $$2\\times {10}^{-14}\\,\\lesssim $$ S(8–24 keV)/$$\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}\\,\\lesssim \\,{10}^{-12}$$, a factor ~100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8–24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15–55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes (S(15–55 keV) gsim 10-11 $$\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$$), reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local ($$z\\lt 0.1$$) sample and NuSTAR's $$z\\sim 1$$ sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGNs at low redshifts.« less

  12. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: The Number Counts of Active Galactic Nuclei and The Resolved Fraction of The Cosmic X-Ray Background

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F. A.; Aird, J.; Civano, F.; Lansbury, G.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Barret, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Baloković, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Moro, A. Del; Forster, K.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Treister, E.; Walton, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.

    2016-11-07

    Here, we present the 3–8 keV and 8–24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33%–39% of the X-ray background in the 8–24 keV band, directly identifying AGNs with obscuring columns up to $\\sim {10}^{25}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$. In the softer 3–8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range $5\\times {10}^{-15}\\,\\lesssim $ S(3–8 keV)/$\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}\\,\\lesssim \\,{10}^{-12}$ probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8–24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range $2\\times {10}^{-14}\\,\\lesssim $ S(8–24 keV)/$\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}\\,\\lesssim \\,{10}^{-12}$, a factor ~100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8–24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15–55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes (S(15–55 keV) gsim 10-11 $\\mathrm{erg}\\,{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}\\,{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-2}$), reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local ($z\\lt 0.1$) sample and NuSTAR's $z\\sim 1$ sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGNs at low redshifts.

  13. The search for true numbers of neurons and glial cells in the human brain: A review of 150 years of cell counting.

    PubMed

    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Bahney, Jami; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-12-15

    For half a century, the human brain was believed to contain about 100 billion neurons and one trillion glial cells, with a glia:neuron ratio of 10:1. A new counting method, the isotropic fractionator, has challenged the notion that glia outnumber neurons and revived a question that was widely thought to have been resolved. The recently validated isotropic fractionator demonstrates a glia:neuron ratio of less than 1:1 and a total number of less than 100 billion glial cells in the human brain. A survey of original evidence shows that histological data always supported a 1:1 ratio of glia to neurons in the entire human brain, and a range of 40-130 billion glial cells. We review how the claim of one trillion glial cells originated, was perpetuated, and eventually refuted. We compile how numbers of neurons and glial cells in the adult human brain were reported and we examine the reasons for an erroneous consensus about the relative abundance of glial cells in human brains that persisted for half a century. Our review includes a brief history of cell counting in human brains, types of counting methods that were and are employed, ranges of previous estimates, and the current status of knowledge about the number of cells. We also discuss implications and consequences of the new insights into true numbers of glial cells in the human brain, and the promise and potential impact of the newly validated isotropic fractionator for reliable quantification of glia and neurons in neurological and psychiatric diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3865-3895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. How Many Pixels Does It Take to Make a Good 4"×6" Print? Pixel Count Wars Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    Digital still cameras emerged following the introduction of the Sony Mavica analog prototype camera in 1981. These early cameras produced poor image quality and did not challenge film cameras for overall quality. By 1995 digital still cameras in expensive SLR formats had 6 mega-pixels and produced high quality images (with significant image processing). In 2005 significant improvement in image quality was apparent and lower prices for digital still cameras (DSCs) started a rapid decline in film usage and film camera sells. By 2010 film usage was mostly limited to professionals and the motion picture industry. The rise of DSCs was marked by a “pixel war” where the driving feature of the cameras was the pixel count where even moderate cost, ˜120, DSCs would have 14 mega-pixels. The improvement of CMOS technology pushed this trend of lower prices and higher pixel counts. Only the single lens reflex cameras had large sensors and large pixels. The drive for smaller pixels hurt the quality aspects of the final image (sharpness, noise, speed, and exposure latitude). Only today are camera manufactures starting to reverse their course and producing DSCs with larger sensors and pixels. This paper will explore why larger pixels and sensors are key to the future of DSCs.

  15. The influence of number of counts in the myocardium in the determination of reproducible functional parameters in gated-SPECT studies simulated with GATE.

    PubMed

    Vieira, L; Costa, D C; Almeida, P

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion gated-single photon emission computed tomography (gated-SPECT) imaging is used for the combined evaluation of myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of counts/pixel and concomitantly the total counts in the myocardium for the calculation of myocardial functional parameters. Gated-SPECT studies were performed using a Monte Carlo GATE simulation package and the NCAT phantom. The simulations of these studies use the radiopharmaceutical (99m)Tc-labeled tracers (250, 350, 450 and 680 MBq) for standard patient types, effectively corresponding to the following activities of myocardium: 3, 4.2, 5.4-8.2 MBq. All studies were simulated using 15 and 30s/projection. The simulated data were reconstructed and processed by quantitative-gated-SPECT software, and the analysis of functional parameters in gated-SPECT images was done by using Bland-Altman test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. In studies simulated using different times (15 and 30s/projection), it was noted that for the activities for full body: 250 and 350 MBq, there were statistically significant differences in parameters Motility and Thickness. For the left ventricular ejection fractio n (LVEF), end-systolic volume (ESV) it was only for 250 MBq, and 350 MBq in the end-diastolic volume (EDV), while the simulated studies with 450 and 680MBq showed no statistically significant differences for global functional parameters: LVEF, EDV and ESV. The number of counts/pixel and, concomitantly, the total counts per simulation do not significantly interfere with the determination of gated-SPECT functional parameters, when using the administered average activity of 450 MBq, corresponding to the 5.4 MBq of the myocardium, for standard patient types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. Artificial Neural Network to Modeling Zero-inflated Count Data: Application to Predicting Number of Return to Blood Donation.

    PubMed

    Haghani, Shima; Sedehi, Morteza; Kheiri, Soleiman

    2017-09-02

    Traditional statistical models often are based on certain presuppositions and limitations that may not presence in actual data and lead to turbulence in estimation or prediction. In these situations, artificial neural networks (ANNs) could be suitable alternative rather than classical statistical methods.  A prospective cohort study. The study was conducted in Shahrekord Blood Transfusion Center, Shahrekord, central Iran, on blood donors from 2008-2009. The accuracy of the proposed model to prediction of number of return to blood donations was compared with classical statistical models. A number of 864 donors who had a first-time successful donation were followed for five years. Number of return for blood donation was considered as response variable. Poisson regression (PR), negative binomial regression (NBR), zero-inflated Poisson regression (ZIPR) and zero-inflated negative binomial regression (ZINBR) as well as ANN model were fitted to data. MSE criterion was used to compare models. To fitting the models, STATISTICA 10 and, R 3.2.2 was used RESULTS: The MSE of PR, NBR, ZIPR, ZINBR and ANN models was obtained 2.71, 1.01, 1.54, 0.094 and 0.056 for the training and 4.05, 9.89, 3.99, 2.53 and 0.27 for the test data, respectively. The ANN model had the least MSE in both training, and test data set and has a better performance than classic models. ANN could be a suitable alternative for modeling such data because of fewer restrictions.

  17. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  18. Some Muirhead Mean Operators for Intuitionistic Fuzzy Numbers and Their Applications to Group Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peide; Li, Dengfeng

    2017-01-01

    Muirhead mean (MM) is a well-known aggregation operator which can consider interrelationships among any number of arguments assigned by a variable vector. Besides, it is a universal operator since it can contain other general operators by assigning some special parameter values. However, the MM can only process the crisp numbers. Inspired by the MM' advantages, the aim of this paper is to extend MM to process the intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs) and then to solve the multi-attribute group decision making (MAGDM) problems. Firstly, we develop some intuitionistic fuzzy Muirhead mean (IFMM) operators by extending MM to intuitionistic fuzzy information. Then, we prove some properties and discuss some special cases with respect to the parameter vector. Moreover, we present two new methods to deal with MAGDM problems with the intuitionistic fuzzy information based on the proposed MM operators. Finally, we verify the validity and reliability of our methods by using an application example, and analyze the advantages of our methods by comparing with other existing methods.

  19. Some Muirhead Mean Operators for Intuitionistic Fuzzy Numbers and Their Applications to Group Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Muirhead mean (MM) is a well-known aggregation operator which can consider interrelationships among any number of arguments assigned by a variable vector. Besides, it is a universal operator since it can contain other general operators by assigning some special parameter values. However, the MM can only process the crisp numbers. Inspired by the MM’ advantages, the aim of this paper is to extend MM to process the intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs) and then to solve the multi-attribute group decision making (MAGDM) problems. Firstly, we develop some intuitionistic fuzzy Muirhead mean (IFMM) operators by extending MM to intuitionistic fuzzy information. Then, we prove some properties and discuss some special cases with respect to the parameter vector. Moreover, we present two new methods to deal with MAGDM problems with the intuitionistic fuzzy information based on the proposed MM operators. Finally, we verify the validity and reliability of our methods by using an application example, and analyze the advantages of our methods by comparing with other existing methods. PMID:28103244

  20. Fluctuations in Tat copy number when it counts the most: a possible mechanism to battle the HIV latency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 virus can enter a dormant state and become inactive, which reduces accessibility by antiviral drugs. We approach this latency problem from an unconventional point of view, with the focus on understanding how intrinsic chemical noise (copy number fluctuations of the Tat protein) can be used to assist the activation process of the latent virus. Several phase diagrams have been constructed in order to visualize in which regions of the parameter space noise can drive the activation process. Essential to the study is the use of a hyperbolic coordinate system, which greatly facilitates quantification of how the various reaction rate combinations shape the noise behavior of the Tat protein feedback system. We have designed a mathematical manual of how to approach the problem of activation quantitatively, and introduce the notion of an “operating point” of the virus. For both noise-free and noise-based strategies we show how operating point off-sets induce changes in the number of Tat molecules. The major result of the analysis is that for every noise-free strategy there is a noise-based strategy that requires lower dosage, but achieves the same anti-latency effect. It appears that the noise-based activation is advantageous for every operating point. PMID:23497153

  1. Making Numbers Come to Life: Two Scoring Methods for Creativity in Aurora's Cartoon Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Mei; Mourgues, Catalina; Bolden, David S.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    Although creativity has long been recognized as an important aspect of mathematical thinking, both for the advancement of the field and in students' developing expertise in mathematics, assessments of student creativity in that domain have been limited in number and focus. This article presents an assessment developed for creativity that…

  2. Making Numbers Come to Life: Two Scoring Methods for Creativity in Aurora's Cartoon Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Mei; Mourgues, Catalina; Bolden, David S.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    Although creativity has long been recognized as an important aspect of mathematical thinking, both for the advancement of the field and in students' developing expertise in mathematics, assessments of student creativity in that domain have been limited in number and focus. This article presents an assessment developed for creativity that…

  3. Counting the number of magnesium ions bound to the surface-immobilized thymine oligonucleotides that comprise spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stephanie R; Young, Kaylie L; Holland, Joseph G; Gieseck, Richard L; Mirkin, Chad A; Geiger, Franz M

    2013-11-20

    Label-free studies carried out under aqueous phase conditions quantify the number of Mg(2+) ions binding to surface-immobilized T40 sequences, the subsequent reordering of DNA on the surface, and the consequences of Mg(2+) binding for DNA-DNA interactions. Second harmonic generation measurements indicate that, within error, 18-20 Mg(2+) ions are bound to the T40 strand at saturation and that the metal-DNA interaction is associated with a near 30% length contraction of the strand. Structural reordering, evaluated using vibrational sum frequency generation, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering, is attributed to increased charge screening as the Mg(2+) ions bind to the negatively charged DNA, reducing repulsive Coulomb forces between nucleotides and allowing the DNA single strands to collapse or coil upon themselves. The impact of Mg(2+) binding on DNA hybridization and duplex stability is assessed with spherical nucleic acid (SNA) gold nanoparticle conjugates in order to determine an optimal working range of Mg(2+) concentrations for DNA-DNA interactions in the absence of NaCl. The findings are consistent with a charge titration effect in which, in the absence of NaCl, (1) hybridization does not occur at room temperature if an average of 17.5 or less Mg(2+) ions are bound per T40 strand, which is not reached until the bulk Mg(2+) concentration approaches 0.5 mM; (2) hybridization proceeds, albeit with low duplex stability having an average Tm of 31(3)°C, if an average of 17.5-18.0 Mg(2+) ions are bound; and (3) highly stable duplexes having a Tm of 64(2)°C form if 18.5-19.0 Mg(2+) ions are bound, corresponding to saturation of the T40 strand.

  4. Modeling prevalence and counts from most probable number in a bayesian framework: an application to Salmonella typhimurium in fresh pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Barron, Ursula; Redmond, Grainne; Butler, Francis

    2010-08-01

    Prevalence and counts of Salmonella Typhimurium in fresh pork sausage packs at the point of retail were modeled by using Irish and United Kingdom retail surveys' data. A methodology for modeling a second-order distribution for the initial Salmonella concentration (lambda0) in pork sausage at retail was presented considering the uncertainty originated from the most probable-number (MPN) serial dilutions. A conditional probability of observing the tube counts given true Salmonella concentration in a contaminated pack was built from the MPN triplets of every sausage tested. A posterior distribution was then modeled under the assumption that the counts from each of the portions of sausage mix stuffed into casings (and subsequently packed) are Poisson distributed. In order to model the variability of lambda0 among contaminated sausage packs, MPN uncertainties were propagated to a predefined lognormal distribution. Because the sausage samples from the Irish survey were frozen prior to MPN analysis (which is expected to cause reduction in viable cells), the resulting distribution for lambda0 appeared greatly underestimated (mean: 0.514 CFU/g; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02 to 2.74 CFU/g). The lambda0 distribution produced with the United Kingdom survey data (mean: 69.7 CFU/g; 95% CI: 15 to 200 CFU/g) was, however, more conservative, and is to be used along with the fitted distribution for prevalence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pork sausage packs in Ireland (gamma[37.997, 0.0013]; mean: 0.046; 95% CI: 0.032 to 0.064) as the main inputs of a stochastic consumer-phase exposure assessment model.

  5. Making HIV Prevention Programming Count: Identifying Predictors of Success in a Parent-Based HIV Prevention Program for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kim S.; Forehand, Rex; Wiegand, Ryan; Fasula, Amy M.; Armistead, Lisa; Long, Nicholas; Wyckoff, Sarah C.

    2011-01-01

    Predictors of change in the number of sexual topics parents discussed and responsiveness during sex communication with their preadolescent after participating in a five-session sexual risk reduction intervention for parents were examined. Data were from 339 African American parents of preadolescents enrolled in the intervention arm of a…

  6. Making HIV Prevention Programming Count: Identifying Predictors of Success in a Parent-Based HIV Prevention Program for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kim S.; Forehand, Rex; Wiegand, Ryan; Fasula, Amy M.; Armistead, Lisa; Long, Nicholas; Wyckoff, Sarah C.

    2011-01-01

    Predictors of change in the number of sexual topics parents discussed and responsiveness during sex communication with their preadolescent after participating in a five-session sexual risk reduction intervention for parents were examined. Data were from 339 African American parents of preadolescents enrolled in the intervention arm of a…

  7. Evaluation of a method using survey counts and tag data to estimate the number of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) using a coastal haulout in northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaile, Brian; Jay, Chadwick V.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Fischbach, Anthony S.

    2017-01-01

    Increased periods of sparse sea ice over the continental shelf of the Chukchi Sea in late summer have reduced offshore haulout habitat for Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and increased opportunities for human activities in the region. Knowing how many walruses could be affected by human activities would be useful to conservation decisions. Currently, there are no adequate estimates of walrus abundance in the northeastern Chukchi Sea during summer–early autumn. Estimating abundance in autumn might be possible from coastal surveys of hauled out walruses during periods when offshore sea ice is unavailable to walruses. We evaluated methods to estimate the size of the walrus population that was using a haulout on the coast of northwestern Alaska in autumn by using aerial photography to count the number of hauled out walruses (herd size) and data from 37 tagged walruses to estimate availability (proportion of population hauled out). We used two methods to estimate availability, direct proportions of hauled out tagged walruses and smoothed proportions using local polynomial regression. Point estimates of herd size (4200–38,000 walruses) and total population size (76,000–287,000 walruses) ranged widely among days and between the two methods of estimating availability. Estimates of population size were influenced most by variation in estimates of availability. Coastal surveys might be improved most by counting walruses when the greatest numbers are hauled out, thereby reducing the influence of availability on population size estimates. The chance of collecting data during peak haulout periods would be improved by conducting multiple surveys.

  8. How many pixels does it take to make a good 4"×6" print? Pixel count wars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1980's the future of conventional silver-halide photographic systems was of great concern due to the potential introduction of electronic imaging systems then typified by the Sony Mavica analog electronic camera. The focus was on the quality of film-based systems as expressed in the number of equivalent number pixels and bits-per-pixel, and how many pixels would be required to create an equivalent quality image from a digital camera. It was found that 35-mm frames, for ISO 100 color negative film, contained equivalent pixels of 12 microns for a total of 18 million pixels per frame (6 million pixels per layer) with about 6 bits of information per pixel; the introduction of new emulsion technology, tabular AgX grains, increased the value to 8 bit per pixel. Higher ISO speed films had larger equivalent pixels, fewer pixels per frame, but retained the 8 bits per pixel. Further work found that a high quality 3.5" x 5.25" print could be obtained from a three layer system containing 1300 x 1950 pixels per layer or about 7.6 million pixels in all. In short, it became clear that when a digital camera contained about 6 million pixels (in a single layer using a color filter array and appropriate image processing) that digital systems would challenge and replace conventional film-based system for the consumer market. By 2005 this became the reality. Since 2005 there has been a "pixel war" raging amongst digital camera makers. The question arises about just how many pixels are required and are all pixels equal? This paper will provide a practical look at how many pixels are needed for a good print based on the form factor of the sensor (sensor size) and the effective optical modulation transfer function (optical spread function) of the camera lens. Is it better to have 16 million, 5.7-micron pixels or 6 million 7.8-micron pixels? How does intrinsic (no electronic boost) ISO speed and exposure latitude vary with pixel size? A systematic review of these issues will

  9. Are we counting mitoses correctly?

    PubMed

    Yigit, Nuri; Gunal, Armagan; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Onguru, Onder; Ozcan, Ayhan

    2013-12-01

    The number of mitotic figures in a predefined area is essential in pathologic evaluation for most tumors. This information sometimes provides clues in differentiating neoplastic lesions from nonneoplastic ones and sometimes in defining and grading of the tumors as well as prognosticating expected lifetime of the patient. As a generally accepted concept, scanning a certain number of consecutive nonoverlapping areas that are rich in viable tumor cells is required. Invasion fronts or the periphery of the tumors is preferred for counting mitosis. The target area to be counted for mitotic activity for various tumors is standardized as the number of mitosis in an established number of high-power fields. However, suggested mitotic counts, which constitute the basis of these studies, were obtained via the old microscopes, which usually had narrower visual fields than the state-of-the-art microscopes. Because the visual fields of the present microscopes provide larger areas compared with the older ones, corrections in mitosis counting are needed to make them compatible with the criteria, which had been put forward in the original reference studies.

  10. ACOG committee opinion. Surgery and patient choice: the ethics of decision making. Number 289, November 2003.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to provide the obstetrician-gynecologist with an approach to decision making based on ethics in an environment of increased patient information, recognition of patient autonomy, direct-to-consumer marketing, and many alternative or investigational treatments. A process for ethical decision making in surgery is discussed, illustrated by an example of elective cesarean delivery.

  11. Make Each Five Minutes Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1973-01-01

    Every day contains those unavoidable waiting periods, but they need not be unproductive. You can convert waiting time to learning with the help of sponge activities---learning activities which "sop up" those precious droplets of time that would otherwise be lost. (Author)

  12. Greg Tang: Making Math Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierpont, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Greg Tang has a resume that could get his foot in the door to a lot of places. A graduate of Harvard with both a B.A. and M.A. in economics, Tang has found success as a business executive, a speechwriter, a software designer and owner of a Tae Kwon Do school. After the publication of his first best-selling book for children, "The Grapes of Math"…

  13. Make Each Five Minutes Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1973-01-01

    Every day contains those unavoidable waiting periods, but they need not be unproductive. You can convert waiting time to learning with the help of sponge activities---learning activities which "sop up" those precious droplets of time that would otherwise be lost. (Author)

  14. Greg Tang: Making Math Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierpont, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Greg Tang has a resume that could get his foot in the door to a lot of places. A graduate of Harvard with both a B.A. and M.A. in economics, Tang has found success as a business executive, a speechwriter, a software designer and owner of a Tae Kwon Do school. After the publication of his first best-selling book for children, "The Grapes of Math"…

  15. HerMES: a search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - catalogue, number counts and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asboth, V.; Conley, A.; Sayers, J.; Béthermin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maloney, P. R.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S. R.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wheeler, J.

    2016-10-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg2 of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities S500 > S350 > S250 and a 5σ cut-off S500 > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these `red' sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The redshifts z = 5.1 and 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.

  16. List-Making and Categorizing: The Neglected Step in Classification. Development Report Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbetts, Charlene

    A necessary but neglected step in teaching classification to inexperienced writers is list making and categorizing. Learning that step gives the untrained writer practical experience in learning that a good writer classifies for a purpose and that a relationship exists between the evidence, the categories, the outline, the paragraph, and the whole…

  17. List-Making and Categorizing: The Neglected Step in Classification. Development Report Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbetts, Charlene

    A necessary but neglected step in teaching classification to inexperienced writers is list making and categorizing. Learning that step gives the untrained writer practical experience in learning that a good writer classifies for a purpose and that a relationship exists between the evidence, the categories, the outline, the paragraph, and the whole…

  18. What Numbers Do Teachers Need to Know to Make Sense of Political Campaigns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelett, George; Schug, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    The rhetoric of political campaigns is loaded with references about the economy. Terms such as unemployment, recession, and GDP are often used carelessly, without regard to definitions or qualifications. That makes economists cringe and is a special problem for social studies teachers who are expected to know about such things. In this article,…

  19. Making Educational Technology Work: State Policies in the North Central Region. NCREL Policy Issues. Number 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris

    2004-01-01

    As the responsibility for allocating resources for technology shifts from federal administrators to state and local education agencies, state and local policymakers face greater accountability for making fiscally and educationally sound decisions. North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), the research and development arm of Learning…

  20. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  1. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  2. Complexities of Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Bernadine Evans

    This document focuses on one child's skip counting methods. The pupil, a second grade student at Steuben School, in Kankakee, Illinois, was interviewed as she made several attempts at counting twenty-five poker chips on a circular piece of paper. The interview was part of a larger study of "Children's Conceptions of Number and Numeral,"…

  3. Math in Action. Number-Sense Fun: Solving Riddles, Making Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresser, Rusty; Sheffield, Stephanie; Burns, Marilyn, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Presents two activities for teaching elementary level mathematics by immersing students in worthwhile literature (the Hello Math Reader series) while introducing them to real-life mathematics. The primary level activity teaches students to use number relationships to solve math riddles. The intermediate level activity has students explore…

  4. Controversies and Decision Making in Difficult Economic Times. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziech, Billie Wright, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The essays in this collection provide contrasting points of view on a number of community college issues that have become more pressing during periods of economic constraint. The volume contains: (1) "Part-Time Faculty: The Value of the Resource," by William R. C. Munsey; (2) "Part-Time Faculty, Full-Time Problems," by David Hartleb and William…

  5. Making Sense of Number Sense: Implications for Children With Mathematical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berch, Daniel B.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on various approaches to the study of mathematics learning, Gersten, Jordan, and Flojo (in this issue) explore the implications of this research for identifying children at risk for developing mathematical disabilities. One of the key topics Gersten et al. consider in their review is that of "number sense." I expand on their…

  6. Math in Action. Number-Sense Fun: Solving Riddles, Making Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresser, Rusty; Sheffield, Stephanie; Burns, Marilyn, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Presents two activities for teaching elementary level mathematics by immersing students in worthwhile literature (the Hello Math Reader series) while introducing them to real-life mathematics. The primary level activity teaches students to use number relationships to solve math riddles. The intermediate level activity has students explore…

  7. Infants Use Different Mechanisms to Make Small and Large Number Ordinal Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vanMarle, Kristy

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown indirectly that infants may use two different mechanisms-an object tracking system and an analog magnitude mechanism--to represent small (less than 4) and large (greater than or equal to 4) numbers of objects, respectively. The current study directly tested this hypothesis in an ordinal choice task by presenting 10- to…

  8. Infants Use Different Mechanisms to Make Small and Large Number Ordinal Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vanMarle, Kristy

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown indirectly that infants may use two different mechanisms-an object tracking system and an analog magnitude mechanism--to represent small (less than 4) and large (greater than or equal to 4) numbers of objects, respectively. The current study directly tested this hypothesis in an ordinal choice task by presenting 10- to…

  9. Making up the numbers: The molecular control of mammalian dental formula.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    Teeth develop in the mammalian embryo via a series of interactions between odontogenic epithelium and neural crest-derived ectomesenchyme of the early jaw primordia. The molecular interactions required to generate a tooth are mediated by families of signalling molecules, which often act reiteratively in both a temporal and spatial manner. Whilst considerable information is now available on how these molecules interact to produce an individual tooth, much less is known about the processes that control overall tooth number within the dentition. However, a number of mouse models are now starting to provide some insight into the mechanisms that achieve this. In particular, co-ordinated restriction of signalling molecule activity is important in ensuring appropriate tooth number and there are different requirements for this suppression in epithelial and mesenchymal tissues, both along different axes of individual jaws and between the jaws themselves. There are a number of fundamental mechanisms that facilitate supernumerary tooth formation in these mice. A key process appears to be the early death of vestigial tooth primordia present in the embryo, achieved through the suppression of Shh signalling within these early teeth. However, restriction of WNT signalling is also important in controlling tooth number, with increased transduction being capable of generating multiple tooth buds from the oral epithelium or existing teeth themselves, in both embryonic and adult tissues. Indeed, uncontrolled activity of this pathway can lead to the formation of odontogenic tumours containing multiple odontogenic tissues and poorly formed teeth. Finally, disrupted patterning along the buccal-lingual aspect of the jaws can produce extra teeth directly from the oral epithelium in a duplicated row. Together, all of these findings have relevance for human populations, where supernumerary teeth are seen in association with both the primary and permanent dentitions. Moreover, they are also

  10. The trace of a substantial assembly of massive E-S0 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.5 in galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Mercedes; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen

    2015-08-01

    K-band galaxy number counts (GNCs) exhibit a slope change at K ˜ 17.5 mag not present in optical bands. To unveil the nature of this feature, we have derived the contribution of different galaxy types to the total K-band GNCs at 0.3 < z < 1.5 by redshift bins and compared the results with expectations from several galaxy evolutionary models. We show that the slope change is caused by a sudden swap of the galaxy population that numerically dominates the total GNCs (from quiescent E-S0's at K < 17.5 mag to blue star-forming discs at fainter magnitudes), and that it is associated with a flattening of the contribution of the E-S0's at 0.6 < z < 1 to the total GNCs. We confirm previous studies showing that models in which the bulk of massive E-S0's have evolved passively since z > 2 cannot predict the slope change, whereas those imposing a relatively late assembly on them (z < 1.5) can reproduce it. The K-band GNCs by redshift bins and morphological types point to a progressively definitive build-up of ˜50 per cent of this galaxy population at 0.8 < z < 1.5, which can be explained only through the major mergers reported by observations. We conclude that the slope change in total K-band GNCs is a vestige of the definitive assembly of a substantial fraction of present-day massive E-S0's at 0.8 < z < 1.5.

  11. The Trace of the Assembly of Massive E-S0 Galaxies at 0.8Number Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, M.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    K-band galaxy number counts (GNCs) exhibit a slope change at K˜ 17.5 mag not present in optical bands. To unveil the nature of this feature we have derived the contribution of different galaxy types to the total K-band GNCs at 0.32) and evolved passively since then cannot predict the slope change, whereas models that impose a late definitive assembly for them (at z<1.5) can reproduce it. We conclude that the slope change in total K-band GNCs is thus nothing other than a vestige of the definitive assembly of a substantial fraction (˜ 50%) of present-day massive E-S0s at 0.8

  12. Do First Graders Make Efficient Use of External Number Representations? The Case of the Twenty-Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obersteiner, Andreas; Reiss, Kristina; Ufer, Stefan; Luwel, Koen; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    External number representations are commonly used throughout the first years of instruction. The twenty-frame is a grid that contains two rows of 10 dots each, and within each row, dots are organized in two groups of five. The assumption is that children can make use of these structures for enumerating the dots, rather than relying on one-by-one…

  13. Do First Graders Make Efficient Use of External Number Representations? The Case of the Twenty-Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obersteiner, Andreas; Reiss, Kristina; Ufer, Stefan; Luwel, Koen; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    External number representations are commonly used throughout the first years of instruction. The twenty-frame is a grid that contains two rows of 10 dots each, and within each row, dots are organized in two groups of five. The assumption is that children can make use of these structures for enumerating the dots, rather than relying on one-by-one…

  14. Number needed to sacrifice: statistical taboo or decision-making tool?

    PubMed Central

    Trewby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The percentage that benefit from medical preventive measures is small but all are exposed to the risk of side effects so most of those harmed would never benefit from their use. There is no expression or acronym to describe the ratio of harm to benefit nor discussion of what level of harm is acceptable for what benefit. Here we describe the harm to benefit ratio (HBR) expressed as number harmed (H) for 100 to benefit (B) and calculated for commonly used medical interventions. For post TIA carotid endarterectomy the HBR is 25 (25 postoperative strokes or deaths are caused for 100 to be stroke free at 5 years); warfarin in atrial fibrillation in patients aged under 65 results in 400 intracerebral haemorrhages for every 100 saved from a thromboembolic event; fibrinolytic treatment for stroke causes 44 symptomatic intracranial haemorrhages for every 100 that have minimal disability at 3 months; aspirin in high risk patients causes 33 major bleeds for every 100 occlusive vascular events prevented; routine inpatient thromboprophylaxis causes 133 additional bleeds for every 100 pulmonary emboli prevented; breast cancer screening causes 1000 unnecessary cancer treatments for 100 cancer deaths to be prevented. Conclusion: The HBR or number needed to sacrifice is larger than most imagine. Its wider use would allow us better to recognise the number harmed, allow better informed consent, compare different preventive strategies and understand the risks as well as benefits of preventive treatments. PMID:23560221

  15. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  16. Mathematics in the Early Grades: Counting & Cardinality. Interactive STEM Research + Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., 2016

    2016-01-01

    In the domain of "Counting & Cardinality," Common Core State Standards indicate that by the time students leave kindergarten, they should know the names and sequence of number words up to 100, be able to count to determine the number of objects in a small set (up to 20), and make comparisons between small sets of objects (National…

  17. Mathematics in the Early Grades: Counting & Cardinality. Interactive STEM Research + Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., 2016

    2016-01-01

    In the domain of "Counting & Cardinality," Common Core State Standards indicate that by the time students leave kindergarten, they should know the names and sequence of number words up to 100, be able to count to determine the number of objects in a small set (up to 20), and make comparisons between small sets of objects (National…

  18. A Model Comparison for Count Data with a Positively Skewed Distribution with an Application to the Number of University Mathematics Courses Completed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2009-01-01

    The current study examines three regression models: OLS (ordinary least square) linear regression, Poisson regression, and negative binomial regression for analyzing count data. Simulation results show that the OLS regression model performed better than the others, since it did not produce more false statistically significant relationships than…

  19. Indicator-Assisted Evaluation and Funding of Research: Visualizing the Influence of Grants on the Number and Citation Counts of Research Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyack, Kevin W.; Borner, Katy

    2003-01-01

    Reports research on analyzing and visualizing the impact of government funding on the amount and citation counts of research publications. Provides an example using grant and publication data from Behavioral and Social Science Research at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) using the VxInsight[R] visualization tool. (Author/LRW)

  20. Indicator-Assisted Evaluation and Funding of Research: Visualizing the Influence of Grants on the Number and Citation Counts of Research Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyack, Kevin W.; Borner, Katy

    2003-01-01

    Reports research on analyzing and visualizing the impact of government funding on the amount and citation counts of research publications. Provides an example using grant and publication data from Behavioral and Social Science Research at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) using the VxInsight[R] visualization tool. (Author/LRW)

  1. The Role of Vision in the Development of Finger-Number Interactions: Finger-Counting and Finger-Montring in Blind Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crollen, Virginie; Mahe, Rachel; Collignon, Olivier; Seron, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of the fingers may play a functional role in the development of a mature counting system. However, the role of developmental vision in the elaboration of a finger numeral representation remains unexplored. In the current study, 14 congenitally blind children and 14 matched sighted controls undertook…

  2. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  3. A Case Study in Using Explicit Instruction to Teach Young Children Counting Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Vanessa; Stroizer, Shaunita; Flores, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Number sense is one's ability to understand what numbers mean, perform mental mathematics, and look at the world and make comparisons. Researchers show instruction that teaches children how to classify numbers, put numbers in sequence, conserve numbers effectively, and count builds their number sense skills. Targeted instruction that teaches…

  4. A Case Study in Using Explicit Instruction to Teach Young Children Counting Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Vanessa; Stroizer, Shaunita; Flores, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Number sense is one's ability to understand what numbers mean, perform mental mathematics, and look at the world and make comparisons. Researchers show instruction that teaches children how to classify numbers, put numbers in sequence, conserve numbers effectively, and count builds their number sense skills. Targeted instruction that teaches…

  5. Reticulocyte count

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - reticulocyte ... A higher than normal reticulocytes count may indicate: Anemia due to red blood cells being destroyed earlier than normal ( hemolytic anemia ) Bleeding Blood disorder in a fetus or newborn ( ...

  6. A Value and Ambiguity-Based Ranking Method of Trapezoidal Intuitionistic Fuzzy Numbers and Application to Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang-tian; Li, Deng-feng; Yu, Gao-feng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a method for ranking trapezoidal intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (TrIFNs) in the process of decision making in the intuitionistic fuzzy environment. Firstly, the concept of TrIFNs is introduced. Arithmetic operations and cut sets over TrIFNs are investigated. Then, the values and ambiguities of the membership degree and the nonmembership degree for TrIFNs are defined as well as the value-index and ambiguity-index. Finally, a value and ambiguity-based ranking method is developed and applied to solve multiattribute decision making problems in which the ratings of alternatives on attributes are expressed using TrIFNs. A numerical example is examined to demonstrate the implementation process and applicability of the method proposed in this paper. Furthermore, comparison analysis of the proposed method is conducted to show its advantages over other similar methods. PMID:25147854

  7. Does Learning to Count Involve a Semantic Induction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kathryn; Eng, Kortney; Barner, David

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, when children learn to correctly count sets, they make a semantic induction about the meanings of their number words. We tested the logical understanding of number words in 84 children that were classified as "cardinal-principle knowers" by the criteria set forth by Wynn (1992). Results show that these children often…

  8. Does Learning to Count Involve a Semantic Induction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kathryn; Eng, Kortney; Barner, David

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, when children learn to correctly count sets, they make a semantic induction about the meanings of their number words. We tested the logical understanding of number words in 84 children that were classified as "cardinal-principle knowers" by the criteria set forth by Wynn (1992). Results show that these children often…

  9. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  10. Quantity judgments in the context of risk/reward decision making in striped field mice: first “count,” then hunt

    PubMed Central

    Panteleeva, Sofia; Reznikova, Zhanna; Vygonyailova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We simulated the situation of risky hunting in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius in order to examine whether these animals are able to make a choice between small and large quantities of live prey (ants). In the first (preliminary) experiment we investigated to what extent mice were interested in ants as a live prey and how their hunting activity depended on the quantity of these edible but rather aggressive insects. We placed mice one by one into arenas together with ant groups of different quantities, from 10 to 60. Surprisingly, animals, both wild-caught and laboratory-reared, displayed rather skilled predatory attacks: mice killed and ate from 0.37 ± 003 to 4 ± 0.5 ants per minute. However, there was a threshold number of ants in the arenas when rodents expressed signs of discomfort and started to panic, likely because ants bit them. This threshold corresponds to the dynamic density (about 400 individuals per m2 per min) in the vicinity of anthills and ants' routes in natural environment. In the second experiment mice had to choose between different quantities of ants placed in two transparent tunnels. Ants here served both as food items and as a source of danger. As far as we know, this is the first experimental paradigm based on evaluation of quantity judgments in the context of risk/reward decision making where the animals face a trade-off between the hedonistic value of the prey and the danger it presents. We found that when mice have to choose between 5 vs. 15, 5 vs. 30, and 10 vs. 30 ants, they always tend to prefer the smaller quantity, thus displaying the capacity for distinguishing more from less in order to ensure comfortable hunting. The results of this study are ecologically relevant as they reflect situations and challenges faced by free-living small rodents. PMID:23407476

  11. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  12. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  13. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  14. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  15. Galactic Extinction and Reddening from the South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey: u-band Galaxy Number Counts and u ‑ r  Color Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linlin; Shen, Shiyin; Hou, Jinliang; Yuan, Fangting; Zhong, Jing; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Zhaoji; Peng, Xiyan; Fan, Dongwei; Fan, Xiaohui; Fan, Zhou; He, Boliang; Jing, Yipeng; Lesser, Michael; Li, Cheng; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jundan; Wang, Jiali; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    We study the integral Galactic extinction and reddening based on the galaxy catalog of the South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS), where u-band galaxy number counts and u ‑ r color distribution are used to derive the Galactic extinction and reddening respectively. We compare these independent statistical measurements with the reddening map of Schlegel et al. (SFD) and find that both the extinction and reddening from the number counts and color distribution are in good agreement with the SFD results at low extinction regions (E{(B-V)}{SFD}< 0.12 mag). However, for high extinction regions (E{(B-V)}{SFD}> 0.12 mag), the SFD map overestimates the Galactic reddening systematically, which can be approximated by a linear relation {{Δ }}E{(B-V)=0.43[E(B-V)}{SFD}-0.12]. By combining the results from galaxy number counts and color distribution, we find that the shape of the Galactic extinction curve is in good agreement with the standard RV = 3.1 extinction law of O’Donnell.

  16. Accounting for What Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph O.; Ferran, Joan E.; Martin, Katharine Y.

    2003-01-01

    No Child Left Behind legislation makes it clear that outside evaluators determine what gets taught in the classroom. It is important to ensure they measure what truly counts in school. This fact is poignantly and sadly true for the under funded, poorly resourced, "low performing" schools that may be hammered by administration accountants…

  17. The comparison of FLOTAC, FECPAK and McMaster techniques for nematode egg counts in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Antonio; Rinaldi, Laura; Maurelli, Maria P; Musella, Vincenzo; Coles, Gerald C; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    Three methods, FLOTAC, FECPAK and McMaster were compared for accuracy and sensitivity for counting numbers of nematode eggs in faeces of naturally infected cattle with high or low nematode egg counts. Only FLOTAC gave positive results for 12 replicates from pooled samples with low egg counts making it more sensitive than FECPAK (67%) and McMaster (41.7%). FLOTAC resulted in generally higher egg counts and lower coefficients of variation than the other two methods used. The reliability of FECPAK and McMaster is depended on the area under the slide counted. All three methods can be used for making decisions whether to treat but FLOTAC or Mini-FLOTAC should be used for faecal egg count reduction tests when lower egg counts are present.

  18. Cell number counts--the fw2.2 and CNR genes and implications for controlling plant fruit and organ size.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Simmons, Carl R

    2011-07-01

    Two key determinants of plant and organ size are cell number and cell size, and altering either one may affect the plant organ size, but cell number control often plays a predominant role in natural populations. Domesticated crops usually have larger fruit and harvested organ sizes than wild progenitors. Crop yields have increased significantly by breeding, often via heterosis, which is associated with increased plant and organ size primarily achieved by cell number increases. A small class of genes is now known that control plant and organ sizes though cell number or cell size. The fw2.2 gene was found to control a major QTL for tomato fruit size by negatively affecting cell numbers. Orthologs to these fw2.2 genes underlie QTLs for fruit sizes in other species, and their expression can be negatively correlated with increased cell number. In maize decreased or increased expression of the fw2.2 ortholog ZmCNR1, increases or decreases cell number, respectively, thereby affecting maize organ size throughout the plant and thus also whole plant size. Therefore, these genes should now be considered as more general regulators of plant cell number and organ size. The exact molecular function of these transmembrane domain proteins remains unknown, as does any clear relationship to the cell cycle. Because these genes control organ sizes in diverse plants and important crop species, and because they can affect whole plant size, interest arose into how effects of such genes could parallel agronomic crop improvements, in particular that by heterosis, as it also affects cell number. In joining these subjects here in discussion we speculate on how single gene cell number regulation and heterosis may cooperate in crop improvement.

  19. Inference about the number of contributors to a DNA mixture: Comparative analyses of a Bayesian network approach and the maximum allele count method.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Konis, K; Taroni, F

    2012-12-01

    In the forensic examination of DNA mixtures, the question of how to set the total number of contributors (N) presents a topic of ongoing interest. Part of the discussion gravitates around issues of bias, in particular when assessments of the number of contributors are not made prior to considering the genotypic configuration of potential donors. Further complication may stem from the observation that, in some cases, there may be numbers of contributors that are incompatible with the set of alleles seen in the profile of a mixed crime stain, given the genotype of a potential contributor. In such situations, procedures that take a single and fixed number contributors as their output can lead to inferential impasses. Assessing the number of contributors within a probabilistic framework can help avoiding such complication. Using elements of decision theory, this paper analyses two strategies for inference on the number of contributors. One procedure is deterministic and focuses on the minimum number of contributors required to 'explain' an observed set of alleles. The other procedure is probabilistic using Bayes' theorem and provides a probability distribution for a set of numbers of contributors, based on the set of observed alleles as well as their respective rates of occurrence. The discussion concentrates on mixed stains of varying quality (i.e., different numbers of loci for which genotyping information is available). A so-called qualitative interpretation is pursued since quantitative information such as peak area and height data are not taken into account. The competing procedures are compared using a standard scoring rule that penalizes the degree of divergence between a given agreed value for N, that is the number of contributors, and the actual value taken by N. Using only modest assumptions and a discussion with reference to a casework example, this paper reports on analyses using simulation techniques and graphical models (i.e., Bayesian networks) to

  20. WY Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

    This WY Kids Count brochure uses the metaphor of children's building blocks to present information on the current well-being of Wyoming children and to advocate enhancing the lives of young children. Each block (i.e., each develop the brochure) presents concerns in a separate area: (1) poverty, highlighting the number of children living in…

  1. 7 CFR 993.105 - Size count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size count. 993.105 Section 993.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Administrative Rules and Regulations Definitions § 993.105 Size count. Size count means the count or number of...

  2. 7 CFR 993.502 - Size count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size count. 993.502 Section 993.502 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Pack Specification as to Size Definitions § 993.502 Size count. Size count means the count or number of...

  3. Single particle counting diagnostic system for measuring fine particulates at high number densities in research and industrial applications. Final report summarizing instrument development, validation and operating instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Holve, D.J.

    1983-10-01

    Optical methods for particle size distribution measurements in practical high temperature environments have achieved feasibility and offer significant advantages over conventional sampling methods. The present report describes a mobile electro-optical system which has been designed for general use in a wide range of research and industrial environments. Specific features of this system include a method of providing in situ alignment and incorporation of an extinction measurement for application to optically thick aerosol flows. The instrument has demonstrated capability for measuring individual particles in the size range 0.25 to 100 microns at number densities up to 10/sup 12//m/sup 3/. In addition to demonstration of the system's wide dynamic range, we show the utility of the in situ alignment method in hot (1100 K) turbulent flows where beam steering can be a problem. As an example of the instrument's application, number and mass frequency distribution measurements of flyash and pulverized coal obtained in an atmospheric combustion exhaust simulator show that the raw pulverized coal contains large numbers of submicron particles similar to the flyash formed after combustion.

  4. What Makes Grassroots Conservation Organizations Resilient? An Empirical Analysis of Diversity, Organizational Memory, and the Number of Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baral, Nabin

    2013-03-01

    Conservation Area Management Committees (CAMCs)—the functional decision-making units consisting entirely of local villagers—are grassroots organizations legally established to manage the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. These committees suffered due to the decade-long Maoist insurgency, but they survived. The paper attempts to test what factors contributed to their resiliency. For this, I surveyed 30 CAMCs during the summer of 2007 and conducted semi-structured interviews of 190 executive members of the CAMCs and 13 park officials who closely monitor the CAMCs. Regression results showed that the number of leaders ( b = 0.44, t = 2.38, P = .027) was the most critical variable for building the resilience of CAMCs to the Maoist insurgency, i.e., retaining the same function, structure, and identity of the committees. As there were no reported conflicts among leaders and they were involved in negotiations and devising contingency plans, CAMCs actually benefited from having more leaders. Of the three diversity indices, the quadratic terms of age diversity ( b = -5.42, t = 1.95, P = .064) and ethnic diversity ( b = -4.05, t = 1.78, P = .075) had a negative impact on the CAMCs' resilience. Skill diversity and organizational memory had no significant influence on the CAMCs' resilience ( t < 1.48, P > .10). These results have important implications for building resilience in community-based conservation.

  5. Counting children at risk: exploring a method to estimate the number of children exposed to parental mental illness using adult health survey data.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Diego Garcia; Padoin, Cintia Vontobel; Veldhuizen, Scott

    2008-11-01

    Children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders have an increased risk of several psychiatric disorders, impaired development, behavioural problems, injuries, physical illness and mortality. Even though this high-risk group has been shown to benefit from health promotion and preventive interventions, estimates of the size of the population at risk are not available. Estimating the number of exposed children using adult survey data will likely generate valuable information for health policy, planning, and advocacy. In this paper, the authors present a method to indirectly estimate the size of this population using secondary data. A Canadian adult health survey and the Census were combined to estimate the prevalence of exposure of children less than 12 years to parental and non-parental psychiatric disorders. A method to combine census and survey data is presented and tested under varying degrees of data availability. Results are compared to the actual number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders and discussed. The most accurate estimates were obtained when the most complete survey was combined with relatively detailed census information. Incomplete survey simulations produced substantial underestimates of the prevalence of exposure even when combined with detailed census information.

  6. Influence of amount and type of dietary fat on deposition, adipocyte count and iodine number of abdominal fat in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Wongsuthavas, S; Terapuntuwat, S; Wongsrikeaw, W; Katawatin, S; Yuangklang, C; Beynen, A C

    2008-02-01

    This study described the relation between the type and amount of dietary fat on the deposition of abdominal fat by broiler chickens. It was hypothesized that at higher fat intakes, the well-known lowering effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the deposition of abdominal fat would be diminished. Experimental diets were formulated to contain three levels of added fat (3%, 6% and 9%). Each level had different proportions of the saturated fatty acids (SFA) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) by installing the ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and 1:5 with the use of tallow and soybean oil. Arbor Acres chicks, aged 7 days, were fed one of the 15 experimental diets until they were aged 42 days. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. There was no systematic effect of the dietary fat type and the amount on the weight gain and the feed intake. The lowest SFA:UFA ratio of 1:5 produced the lowest feed conversion rates, irrespective of the amount of the fat in the diet. The abdominal fat deposition was similar in the birds fed on diets containing either 3% or 6% added fat, but deposition was lower than in those fed 9% fat. A decrease in the SFA:UFA ratio of the diet was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in abdominal fat, irrespective of the amount of fat in the diet. This observation leads to the rejection of the hypothesis stated above. A decrease in the dietary SFA:UFA from 1:1 to 1:4 caused a decrease in the number of the fat cells per surface unit of breast meat. It is concluded that an increased intake of soybean oil at the expense of tallow reduced the abdominal fat deposition and the number of fat cells in the breast meat of broiler chickens.

  7. Making every Australian count: challenges for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and the equal inclusion of homeless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with neurocognitive disability.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Clare; White, Paul; Cullen, Jennifer; Wright, Courtney J; Zeeman, Heidi

    2017-03-30

    This article highlights the dearth of accurate evidence available to inform the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) regarding the extent and nature of neurocognitive disability amongst homeless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Without accurate prevalence rates of neurocognitive disability, homeless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are in danger of not being counted by the NDIS and not receiving supports to which they are entitled. Addressing this knowledge gap is challenged by a range of factors, including: (1) the long-term effect of profound intergenerational disenfranchisement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; (2) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural perspectives around disability; (3) the generally unrecognised and poorly understood nature of neurocognitive disability; (4) the use of research methods that are not culturally safe; (5) research logistics; and (6) the absence of culturally appropriate assessment tools to identify prevalence. It is argued that an accurate evidence base that is informed by culturally safe research methods and assessment tools is needed to accurately guide the Commonwealth government and the National Disability Insurance Agency about the expected level of need for the NDIS. Research within this framework will contribute to the realisation of a truly inclusive NDIS.

  8. What makes grassroots conservation organizations resilient? An empirical analysis of diversity, organizational memory, and the number of leaders.

    PubMed

    Baral, Nabin

    2013-03-01

    Conservation Area Management Committees (CAMCs)-the functional decision-making units consisting entirely of local villagers-are grassroots organizations legally established to manage the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. These committees suffered due to the decade-long Maoist insurgency, but they survived. The paper attempts to test what factors contributed to their resiliency. For this, I surveyed 30 CAMCs during the summer of 2007 and conducted semi-structured interviews of 190 executive members of the CAMCs and 13 park officials who closely monitor the CAMCs. Regression results showed that the number of leaders (b = 0.44, t = 2.38, P = .027) was the most critical variable for building the resilience of CAMCs to the Maoist insurgency, i.e., retaining the same function, structure, and identity of the committees. As there were no reported conflicts among leaders and they were involved in negotiations and devising contingency plans, CAMCs actually benefited from having more leaders. Of the three diversity indices, the quadratic terms of age diversity (b = -5.42, t = 1.95, P = .064) and ethnic diversity (b = -4.05, t = 1.78, P = .075) had a negative impact on the CAMCs' resilience. Skill diversity and organizational memory had no significant influence on the CAMCs' resilience (t < 1.48, P > .10). These results have important implications for building resilience in community-based conservation.

  9. Deep Count: Fruit Counting Based on Deep Simulated Learning.

    PubMed

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Sheppard, Clay

    2017-04-20

    Recent years have witnessed significant advancement in computer vision research based on deep learning. Success of these tasks largely depends on the availability of a large amount of training samples. Labeling the training samples is an expensive process. In this paper, we present a simulated deep convolutional neural network for yield estimation. Knowing the exact number of fruits, flowers, and trees helps farmers to make better decisions on cultivation practices, plant disease prevention, and the size of harvest labor force. The current practice of yield estimation based on the manual counting of fruits or flowers by workers is a very time consuming and expensive process and it is not practical for big fields. Automatic yield estimation based on robotic agriculture provides a viable solution in this regard. Our network is trained entirely on synthetic data and tested on real data. To capture features on multiple scales, we used a modified version of the Inception-ResNet architecture. Our algorithm counts efficiently even if fruits are under shadow, occluded by foliage, branches, or if there is some degree of overlap amongst fruits. Experimental results show a 91% average test accuracy on real images and 93% on synthetic images.

  10. A Vacuum-Aspirator for Counting Termites

    Treesearch

    Susan C. Jones; Joe K. Mauldin

    1983-01-01

    An aspirator-system powered by a vacuum cleaner is described for manually counting termites. It is significantly faster and termite survival is at least as high as when using a mouth-aspirator for counting large numbers of termites.

  11. Who Calls the Shots? Sports and University Leadership, Culture, and Decision Making. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estler, Suzanne E., Ed.; Nelson, Laurie J., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This monograph seeks, through a synthesis of existing literature, to understand better how external forces operating through an enterprise on the academic margins can lead institutions and their leaders to make decisions that appear to many observers to make little sense relative to the institution's mission. Through the athletics enterprise, the…

  12. Who Calls the Shots? Sports and University Leadership, Culture, and Decision Making. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estler, Suzanne E., Ed.; Nelson, Laurie J., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This monograph seeks, through a synthesis of existing literature, to understand better how external forces operating through an enterprise on the academic margins can lead institutions and their leaders to make decisions that appear to many observers to make little sense relative to the institution's mission. Through the athletics enterprise, the…

  13. Conversation Counts.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is a hallmark of good old-fashioned patient care. But some Texas physicians and hospitals are finding ways to use the process as an opportunity to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. The Texas Medical Disclosure Panel - the state regulatory body overseeing informed consent for medical treatments - is taking steps to make state forms even more understandable for patients at a time when health literacy rates are low.

  14. Counting Triangles to Sum Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaio, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Counting complete subgraphs of three vertices in complete graphs, yields combinatorial arguments for identities for sums of squares of integers, odd integers, even integers and sums of the triangular numbers.

  15. Increased count, motility, and total motile sperm cells collected across three consecutive ejaculations within 24 h of oocyte retrieval: implications for management of men presenting with low numbers of motile sperm for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Said, Al-Hasen; Reed, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate changes in seminal volume, sperm count, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile sperm cells per ejaculate, across three consecutive ejaculates collected from individuals within 24 h preceding an IVF cycle. Men presenting with oligoasthenozoospermia or asthenozoospemia attempted three ejaculates within 24 h preceding IVF. Ejaculate 1 was produced the afternoon prior to oocyte retrieval, and ejaculates 2 and 3 were produced the morning of oocyte retrieval with 2-3 h between collections. Ejaculates 1 and 2 were extended 1:1 v/v with room temperature rTYBS. Test tubes were placed into a beaker of room temperature water, then placed at 4 °C for gradual cooling. Ejaculate 3 was not extended, but pooled with ejaculates 1 and 2 and processed for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Out of 109 oocyte retrievals, 28 men were asked to attempt multiple consecutive ejaculations. Among this population, 25/28 (89.3 %) were successful, and 3/28 men (10.7 %) could only produce two ejaculates. Mean volumes for ejaculates 1, 2, and 3 were significantly different from each other (p < 0.01); the volume decreased for each ejaculate. Mean sperm counts, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile cells per ejaculate for the ejaculates1, 2, and 3 demonstrated the following: ejaculates 2 and 3 were not significantly different, but counts, motility, and total motile sperm were improved over ejaculate 1 (p < 0.01). Pooling three consecutive ejaculates within 24 h increased the numbers of available motile sperm in this population by 8-fold compared to the first ejaculate alone, facilitating avoidance of sperm cryopreservation and additional centrifugation steps that could affect sperm viability and/or function.

  16. Revisiting the NVSS number count dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Nusser, Adi E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.il

    2016-03-01

    We present a realistic modeling of the dipole component of the projected sky distribution of NVSS radio galaxies. The modeling relies on mock catalogs generated within the context of ΛCDM cosmology, in the linear regime of structure formation. After removing the contribution from the solar motion, the mocks show that the remaining observed signal is mostly (70%) due to structures within z ∼< 0.1. The amplitude of the model signal depends on the bias factor b of the NVSS mock galaxies. For sources with flux density, S > 15 mJy, the bias recipe inferred from higher order moments is consistent with the observed dipole signal at 2.12σ. Flux thresholds above 20 mJy yield a disagreement close to the 3σ level. A constant high bias, b = 3 is needed to mitigate the tension to the ∼ 2.3σ level.

  17. Revisiting the NVSS number count dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Nusser, Adi

    2016-03-01

    We present a realistic modeling of the dipole component of the projected sky distribution of NVSS radio galaxies. The modeling relies on mock catalogs generated within the context of ΛCDM cosmology, in the linear regime of structure formation. After removing the contribution from the solar motion, the mocks show that the remaining observed signal is mostly (70%) due to structures within z lesssim 0.1. The amplitude of the model signal depends on the bias factor b of the NVSS mock galaxies. For sources with flux density, S > 15 mJy, the bias recipe inferred from higher order moments is consistent with the observed dipole signal at 2.12σ. Flux thresholds above 20 mJy yield a disagreement close to the 3σ level. A constant high bias, b = 3 is needed to mitigate the tension to the ~ 2.3σ level.

  18. Grid analysis improves reliability in follicle counts made by ultrasonography in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Marla E; Brooks, Eric D; Kepley, Anna L; Chizen, Donna R; Pierson, Roger A; Peppin, Andrew K

    2010-05-01

    Poor reliability has been reported when counting the total number of follicles in polycystic ovaries using conventional two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound viewing methods. In the current study, we report good reliability in follicle counts when observers imposed a programmable grid system over the viewing window. Four observers estimated total follicle counts in 45 ovarian ultrasound scans by compartmentalizing the ovary into 9 to 12 grid sections and performing focused follicle counts per section. The mean number of follicles counted per ovary was 44.6 +/- 2.3. The level of inter-observer agreement when making follicle counts was 0.82 and total follicle counts did not differ among observers. The level of intra-observer agreement was 0.93 which further corroborated the utility of this method for making dependable follicle counts. In summary, the ability to obtain reproducible follicle counts will help to establish reliable diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Head counts.

    PubMed

    Wattenberg, B

    1994-08-24

    A fellow at the American Enterprise Institute remarked that population growth slowed from 1.73% to 1.57% during 1990 to 1994. In Eastern Europe alone population declined by 1 million in the past 4 years. Fertility decline is evident even in Africa and a rapid fertility transition has appeared in Iran. The data are based on figures recently generated by the UN and published in "World Population Prospects: 1994 revision." The projected medium fertility variant was 9.8 billion by 2050 and 10 billion in 2054. UN statisticians have reported that the real numbers are likely to be even higher despite their own reports of fertility decline. The UN believes that sustaining 2.1 children per woman at replacement level will not be allowed by countries. The more developed countries are now at or below replacement: Japan at 1.5, Korea at 1.7, Germany at 1.3, and Italians at 1.3. Large population numbers threaten stability and are related to famine, pollution, war, and animal and plant species decimation. The evidence from Rwanda and Bosnia is clear. A more desirable and realistic estimate should be 7-8 billion by 2050. World population in preparation for the International Conference on Population and Development is being publicized as a problem so that the UN and environmentalists can increase their funding and attain a high spot on the global agenda. The author's experience as part of the US delegation to the International Population Conference in Mexico City in 1984 led to the conclusion that these international policy conferences are really public relations events. Gloom and doom predictions are constantly being modified; for instance, what was the "coming ice age" is now "global warming." The world has survived thus far, while the numbers have been increasing. If the world does not prosper in the years ahead, it is unlikely to be due to too many people.

  20. Making every SAR point count: the development of Chemistry Connect for the large-scale integration of structure and bioactivity data.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Sorel; Petrov, Plamen; Southan, Christopher; Kjellberg, Magnus J; Kogej, Thierry; Tyrchan, Christian; Varkonyi, Peter; Xie, Paul Hongxing

    2011-12-01

    The increase in drug research output from patent applications, together with the expansion of public data collections, such as ChEMBL and PubChem BioAssay, has made it essential for pharmaceutical companies to integrate both internal and external 'SAR estate'. The AstraZeneca response has been the development of an enterprise application, Chemistry Connect, containing 45 million unique chemical structures from 18 internal and external data sources. It includes merged compound-to-assay-to-result-to-target relationships extracted from patents, papers and internal data. Users can explore connections between these by searching using drug names or synonyms, chemical structures, patent numbers and target protein identifiers at a scale not previously available. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the EGS deep field - I. Deep number counts and the redshift distribution of the recovered cosmic infrared background at 450 and 850 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, J. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Geach, J. E.; Hughes, D. H.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Clements, D. L.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; Michałowski, M. J.; Robson, E. I.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present deep observations at 450 and 850 μm in the Extended Groth Strip field taken with the SCUBA-2 camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the deep SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), achieving a central instrumental depth of σ450 = 1.2 mJy beam-1 and σ850 = 0.2 mJy beam-1. We detect 57 sources at 450 μm and 90 at 850 μm with signal-to-noise ratio >3.5 over ˜70 arcmin2. From these detections, we derive the number counts at flux densities S450 > 4.0 mJy and S850 > 0.9 mJy, which represent the deepest number counts at these wavelengths derived using directly extracted sources from only blank-field observations with a single-dish telescope. Our measurements smoothly connect the gap between previous shallower blank-field single-dish observations and deep interferometric ALMA results. We estimate the contribution of our SCUBA-2 detected galaxies to the cosmic infrared background (CIB), as well as the contribution of 24 μm-selected galaxies through a stacking technique, which add a total of 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.07 ± 0.01 MJy sr-1, at 450 and 850 μm, respectively. These surface brightnesses correspond to 60 ± 20 and 50 ± 20 per cent of the total CIB measurements, where the errors are dominated by those of the total CIB. Using the photometric redshifts of the 24 μm-selected sample and the redshift distributions of the submillimetre galaxies, we find that the redshift distribution of the recovered CIB is different at each wavelength, with a peak at z ˜ 1 for 450 μm and at z ˜ 2 for 850 μm, consistent with previous observations and theoretical models.

  2. Eosinophil count in nasal mucosa is more suitable than the number of ICAM-1-positive nasal epithelial cells to evaluate the severity of house dust mite-sensitive allergic rhinitis: a clinical correlation study.

    PubMed

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Wannakrairot, Pongsak; Ruangvejvorachai, Preecha; Phanupak, Praphan

    2003-09-01

    House dust mite (HDM)-sensitive allergic rhinitis is a perennial rhinitis with persistent nasal inflammation. Currently, there are no reliable parameters to monitor the severity of perennial allergic rhinitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with HDM-sensitive allergic rhinitis. We measured nasal symptoms, did the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der P) skin prick test (SPT), evaluated the Der P allergen nasal challenge threshold, and laboratory parameters [(1) inflammatory cell count from nasal mucosal scraping specimens: eosinophils and neutrophils and (2) immunocytochemistry: ICAM-1 expression on nasal epithelial cells] in 20 cases of HDM-sensitive allergic rhinitis and performed correlation tests between all parameters. The wheal diameter induced by Der P SPT was significantly correlated with the Der P allergen nasal challenge threshold (p = 0.001). The number of eosinophils from nasal mucosal scrapping specimens was correlated with the ICAM-1 expression on nasal epithelial cells (p = 0.039), the number of neutrophils from nasal mucosal scrapping specimens (p = 0.001), and nasal stuffiness (p = 0.037) but did not correlate with total nasal symptom scores. Clinical symptoms of HDM-sensitive allergic rhinitis showed a poor correlation with inflammatory parameters. The eosinophil count in nasal mucosa is correlated with ICAM-1 expression and more suitable than ICAM-1 levels to evaluate the severity of HDM-sensitive allergic rhinitis. This study also supports the role of the SPT in the diagnosis of nasal allergy to HDM. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Cooking in the Vocational School as Training for Home Making. Bulletin, 1915, No. 1. Whole Number 625

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Iris Prouty

    1915-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the teaching of cooking for home-making purposes in the day and evening classes of the vocational school. Throughout the bulletin "vocational school" will be used as a term which includes both industrial schools and household-arts schools. Vocational schools include all agricultural, industrial, commercial, and…

  4. 7 CFR 51.564 - Requirements as to count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Count § 51.564 Requirements as to count. (a) The number of stalks of celery in the container may be specified by numerical count or in terms of dozens or...

  5. 7 CFR 51.564 - Requirements as to count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Count § 51.564 Requirements as to count. (a) The number of stalks of celery in the container may be specified by numerical count or in terms of dozens or...

  6. 7 CFR 51.564 - Requirements as to count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Count § 51.564 Requirements as to count. (a) The number of stalks of celery in the container may be specified by numerical count or in terms of dozens or...

  7. 7 CFR 51.564 - Requirements as to count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Count § 51.564 Requirements as to count. (a) The number of stalks of celery in the container may be specified by numerical count...

  8. 7 CFR 51.564 - Requirements as to count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Count § 51.564 Requirements as to count. (a) The number of stalks of celery in the container may be specified by numerical count...

  9. DC KIDS COUNT e-Databook Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DC Action for Children, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents indicators that are included in DC Action for Children's 2012 KIDS COUNT e-databook, their definitions and sources and the rationale for their selection. The indicators for DC KIDS COUNT represent a mix of traditional KIDS COUNT indicators of child well-being, such as the number of children living in poverty, and indicators of…

  10. Count-doubling time safety circuit

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.; Keefe, Donald J.; McDowell, William P.

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a nuclear reactor count-factor-increase time monitoring circuit which includes a pulse-type neutron detector, and means for counting the number of detected pulses during specific time periods. Counts are compared and the comparison is utilized to develop a reactor scram signal, if necessary.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Plan, E L

    2014-01-01

    Count data, or number of events per time interval, are discrete data arising from repeated time to event observations. Their mean count, or piecewise constant event rate, can be evaluated by discrete probability distributions from the Poisson model family. Clinical trial data characterization often involves population count analysis. This tutorial presents the basics and diagnostics of count modeling and simulation in the context of pharmacometrics. Consideration is given to overdispersion, underdispersion, autocorrelation, and inhomogeneity. PMID:25116273

  13. Confidence intervals for low-level, paired counting

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, W.E.

    1999-11-01

    Fong and Alvarez (1997) make clear the lack of precision at MDA for paired counting. Confidence intervals provide a way of expressing a measurement process that lacks precision. Neyman-Pearson principles are briefly discussed and 95% confidence intervals of the form [0, {number_sign}{number_sign}.{number_sign}{number_sign}] are presented. Use is made of the fact that the probability of the difference of two random variables, each with a Poisson distribution, can be expressed in terms of modified Bessel functions of integral order and elementary functions. The validity of the values is discussed.

  14. NemaCount: quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior in a browser.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-06-01

    Nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans offer a very effective and tractable system to probe the underlying mechanisms of diverse sensory behaviors. Numerous platforms exist for quantifying nematode behavior and often require separate dependencies or software. Here I describe a novel and simple tool called NemaCount that provides a versatile solution for the quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior. The ease of installation and user-friendly interface makes NemaCount a practical tool for measuring diverse behaviors and image features of nematodes such as C. elegans. The main advantage of NemaCount is that it operates from within a modern browser such as Google Chrome or Apple Safari. Any features that change in total number, size, shape, or angular distance between control and experimental preparations are suited to NemaCount for image analysis, while commonly used chemotaxis assays can be quantified, and statistically analyzed using a suite of functions from within NemaCount. NemaCount also offers image filtering options that allow the user to improve object detection and measurements. NemaCount was validated by examining nematode chemotaxis behavior; angular distances of locomotory tracks in C. elegans; and body lengths of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora nematodes. Apart from a modern browser, no additional software is required to operate NemaCount, making NemaCount a cheap, simple option for the analysis of nematode images and chemotaxis behavior.

  15. Making whitefly and natural enemy counts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato whitefly is a key insect pests affecting multiple crops in the southwestern U.S., including cotton during the summer months. Extensive research has demonstrated that arthropod natural enemies, particularly predators, can have a significant impact on whitefly population dynamics and can...

  16. Teacher Leadership: Making Your Voice Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Today, more than ever, teachers must work effectively and efficiently to meet seemingly contradictory demands placed on them by society. On the one hand, school personnel are tasked with attaining and publicly reporting high levels of student achievement in response to No Child Left Behind. On the other, school personnel must ensure that students…

  17. Substitute Teachers: Making Lost Days Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    True, Charlene; Butler, Kyle; Sefton, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    As K-12 teachers and administrators grow increasingly concerned with issues of accountability, research-based methods, and intervention strategies, little discussion exists on the impact of substitute teachers in the classroom. In the rush to analyze test scores, are the days covered by substitute teachers even considered? Though districts are…

  18. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Continuum Number Counts, Resolved 1.2 mm Extragalactic Background, and Properties of the Faintest Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, M.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Da Cunha, E.; Bauer, F. E.; Carilli, C. L.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Weiss, A.; Anguita, T.; Assef, R. J.; Bell, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Bacon, R.; Bouwens, R.; Cortes, P.; Cox, P.; Gónzalez-López, J.; Hodge, J.; Ibar, E.; Inami, H.; Infante, L.; Karim, A.; Le Le Fèvre, O.; Magnelli, B.; Ota, K.; Popping, G.; Sheth, K.; van der Werf, P.; Wagg, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present an analysis of a deep (1σ = 13 μJy) cosmological 1.2 mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin2 covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at \\gt 3.5σ significance at 1.2 mm. Our ALMA-selected sample has a median redshift of z=1.6+/- 0.4, with only one galaxy detected at z > 2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cutoff and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates (SFRs) similar to that of main-sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and SFRs of 4.0× {10}10 {M}⊙ and ˜ 40 {M}⊙ yr-1, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the interstellar medium (ISM) mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from ˜0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than those using CO-based ISM estimates by a factor of ˜2. The 1 mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover 55% ± 4% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover 80% ± 7% of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at z˜ 1{--}2, with stellar masses of (1-3) × 1010 M {}⊙ . For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.

  19. Uncertainty in measurements by counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bich, Walter; Pennecchi, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Counting is at the base of many high-level measurements, such as, for example, frequency measurements. In some instances the measurand itself is a number of events, such as spontaneous decays in activity measurements, or objects, such as colonies of bacteria in microbiology. Countings also play a fundamental role in everyday life. In any case, a counting is a measurement. A measurement result, according to its present definition, as given in the 'International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and general concepts and associated terms (VIM)', must include a specification concerning the estimated uncertainty. As concerns measurements by counting, this specification is not easy to encompass in the well-known framework of the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement', known as GUM, in which there is no guidance on the topic. Furthermore, the issue of uncertainty in countings has received little or no attention in the literature, so that it is commonly accepted that this category of measurements constitutes an exception in which the concept of uncertainty is not applicable, or, alternatively, that results of measurements by counting have essentially no uncertainty. In this paper we propose a general model for measurements by counting which allows an uncertainty evaluation compliant with the general framework of the GUM.

  20. The origins of counting algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cantlon, Jessica F; Piantadosi, Steven T; Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Barnard, Allison M

    2015-06-01

    Humans' ability to count by verbally labeling discrete quantities is unique in animal cognition. The evolutionary origins of counting algorithms are not understood. We report that nonhuman primates exhibit a cognitive ability that is algorithmically and logically similar to human counting. Monkeys were given the task of choosing between two food caches. First, they saw one cache baited with some number of food items, one item at a time. Then, a second cache was baited with food items, one at a time. At the point when the second set was approximately equal to the first set, the monkeys spontaneously moved to choose the second set even before that cache was completely baited. Using a novel Bayesian analysis, we show that the monkeys used an approximate counting algorithm for comparing quantities in sequence that is incremental, iterative, and condition controlled. This proto-counting algorithm is structurally similar to formal counting in humans and thus may have been an important evolutionary precursor to human counting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  2. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and…

  3. Workjobs II: Number Activities for Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta-Lorton, Mary

    This curriculum guide presents a program of 20 open-ended math activities to be used to supplement the math programs in kindergarten, first, or second grade classrooms. The program consists of child-oriented counters and gameboards used to explore the concept of number from counting to making up and solving addition and subtraction equations. Each…

  4. Counts of galaxies in a merger model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, P.; Schramm, D. N.; Peimbert, M.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the photometric evolution of galaxies has been developed and has been applied to the problem of galaxy counts. The integrated colors of galaxies are calculated using the most recently computed evolutionary tracks from Maeder and collaborators complemented with evolutionary tracks derived by other authors. The asymptotic giant branch lifetime is left as a free parameter. A series of cosmological models using different values of the cosmological constant, lambda(sub 0), and the density parameter, omega(sub 0), have been computed. The universality hypothesis of the luminosity function of galaxies has been abandoned. The influence of galaxy merging on the counts has been considered in a simple manner by assuming that the number of strongly interacting galaxies in a comoving volume increases with redshift as a power law given by (1 + z)(exp 3.8). Taking a Schechter parametrization for the luminosity function of the different types of galaxies, we are able to reproduce the observations reasonably well. We have also considered models with a Gaussian distribution for the luminosity function of the brighter galaxies that provide a poorer fit to the observations. It is shown that galaxy count data are not yet able to make unambiguous cosmological statements since evolutionary assumptions are critical. In particular, an omega(sub 0) = 1, lambda(sub 0) = 0 cosmology is shown to be consistent with the data.

  5. What Counts as Knowing? The Development of Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Counting from Kindergarten through Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Smith-Chant, Brenda L.; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Sargla, Erin; Arnup, Jesse S.; Penner-Wilger, Marcie; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Kamawar, Deepthi

    2006-01-01

    The development of conceptual and procedural knowledge about counting was explored for children in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2 (N = 255). Conceptual knowledge was assessed by asking children to make judgments about three types of counts modeled by an animated frog: standard (correct) left-to-right counts, incorrect counts, and unusual…

  6. What Counts as Knowing? The Development of Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Counting from Kindergarten through Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Smith-Chant, Brenda L.; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Sargla, Erin; Arnup, Jesse S.; Penner-Wilger, Marcie; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Kamawar, Deepthi

    2006-01-01

    The development of conceptual and procedural knowledge about counting was explored for children in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2 (N = 255). Conceptual knowledge was assessed by asking children to make judgments about three types of counts modeled by an animated frog: standard (correct) left-to-right counts, incorrect counts, and unusual…

  7. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  8. Neural networks counting chimes.

    PubMed Central

    Amit, D J

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the ideas that led to neural networks capable of recalling associatively and asynchronously temporal sequences of patterns can be extended to produce a neural network that automatically counts the cardinal number in a sequence of identical external stimuli. The network is explicitly constructed, analyzed, and simulated. Such a network may account for the cognitive effect of the automatic counting of chimes to tell the hour. A more general implication is that different electrophysiological responses to identical stimuli, at certain stages of cortical processing, do not necessarily imply synaptic modification, a la Hebb. Such differences may arise from the fact that consecutive identical inputs find the network in different stages of an active temporal sequence of cognitive states. These types of networks are then situated within a program for the study of cognition, which assigns the detection of meaning as the primary role of attractor neural networks rather than computation, in contrast to the parallel distributed processing attitude to the connectionist project. This interpretation is free of homunculus, as well as from the criticism raised against the cognitive model of symbol manipulation. Computation is then identified as the syntax of temporal sequences of quasi-attractors. PMID:3353371

  9. "Knots on a Counting Rope": Teaching Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, Daphne

    2001-01-01

    Argues that reflecting on important "marker" stories in people's lives by using counting ropes (based on the children's book "Knots on a Counting Rope" by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault) helps students and teachers make sense of their complex worlds. Describes how they are used in the author's language arts methods course. Describes a…

  10. Make your trappings count: The mathematics of pest insect monitoring. Comment on “Multiscale approach to pest insect monitoring: Random walks, pattern formation, synchronization, and networks” by Petrovskii et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasius, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    Since the beginnings of agriculture the production of crops is characterized by an ongoing battle between farmers and pests [1]. Already during biblical times swarms of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, were known as major pest that can devour a field of corn within an hour. Even today, harmful organisms have the potential to threaten food production worldwide. It is estimated that about 37% of all potential crops are destroyed by pests. Harmful insects alone destroy 13%, causing financial losses in the agricultural industry of millions of dollars each year [2-4]. These numbers emphasize the importance of pest insect monitoring as a crucial step of integrated pest management [1]. The main approach to gain information about infestation levels is based on trapping, which leads to the question of how to extrapolate the sparse population counts at singularly disposed traps to a spatial representation of the pest species distribution. In their review Petrovskii et al. provide a mathematical framework to tackle this problem [5]. Their analysis reveals that this seemingly inconspicuous problem gives rise to surprisingly deep mathematical challenges that touch several modern contemporary concepts of statistical physics and complex systems theory. The review does not aim for a collection of numerical recipes to support crop growers in the analysis of their trapping data. Instead the review identifies the relevant biological and physical processes that are involved in pest insect monitoring and it presents the mathematical techniques that are required to capture these processes.

  11. Verbal Counting in Bilingual Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donevska-Todorova, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Informal experiences in mathematics often include playful competitions among young children in counting numbers in as many as possible different languages. Can these enjoyable experiences result with excellence in the formal processes of education? This article discusses connections between mathematical achievements and natural languages within…

  12. Counting coalescent histories.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Noah A

    2007-04-01

    Given a species tree and a gene tree, a valid coalescent history is a list of the branches of the species tree on which coalescences in the gene tree take place. I develop a recursion for the number of valid coalescent histories that exist for an arbitrary gene tree/species tree pair, when one gene lineage is studied per species. The result is obtained by defining a concept of m-extended coalescent histories, enumerating and counting these histories, and taking the special case of m = 1. As a sum over valid coalescent histories appears in a formula for the probability that a random gene tree evolving along the branches of a fixed species tree has a specified labeled topology, the enumeration of valid coalescent histories can considerably reduce the effort required for evaluating this formula.

  13. 7 CFR 51.1242 - Count per pound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1242 Count per pound. Count per pound means the number of peanuts in a pound. When determining the count per pound, one single kernel peanut shall be counted as one-half peanut. ...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1242 - Count per pound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1242 Count per pound. Count per pound means the number of peanuts in a pound. When determining the count per pound, one single kernel peanut shall be counted as one-half peanut. ...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1242 - Count per pound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1242 Count per pound. Count per pound means the number of peanuts in a pound. When determining the count per pound, one single kernel peanut shall be counted as one-half peanut. ...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1242 - Count per pound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1242 Count per pound. Count per pound means the number of peanuts in a pound. When determining the count per pound, one single kernel peanut shall be counted as one-half peanut. ...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1242 - Count per pound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1242 Count per pound. Count per pound means the number of peanuts in a pound. When determining the count per pound, one single kernel peanut shall be counted as one-half peanut. ...

  18. Who does the numbers? The role of third-party technology assessment to inform health systems' decision-making about the funding of health technologies.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Marco; Hawkins, Neil; Sculpher, Mark

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing number of health-care systems using economic evaluations to inform decisions about the reimbursement of health technologies. There are usually two separate elements of this process: assembling relevant evidence and undertaking analyses (technology assessment), and decision-making. In most systems, technology assessment is undertaken by the manufacturer of the technology. In a few, "third-party" assessment is used. In the United Kingdom, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence used a combination of third-party and manufacturer assessments between 1999 and 2005. After this point, a Single Technology Appraisal program (using manufacturer-based assessment) was instituted for some technologies. Here the role of third-party assessment is considered in this from of decision-making. The article reviews the requirements of economic evaluation to support decision-making, and considers the extent to which each type of assessment is likely to meet these requirements. It also attempts to address whether the two forms of assessment differ in their impact on decision-making using a comparison of the decisions made by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (under its multiple-technology appraisal system) and the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC), which relies on manufacturer assessment. The comparison is limited by the small number of technologies considered by both bodies. Nevertheless, it suggests that there are potentially important differences between the two bodies, with NICE generally placing more restrictions of the use of technologies. The article concludes that there are potential advantages to third-party assessment, but its cost and timing may preclude its use for all new technologies. A hybrid arrangement is suggested where third-party assessment is used in particular circumstances.

  19. KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2016: State Trends in Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Annie E. Casey Foundation's "2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book" finds today's youth--Generation Z--are healthier and completing high school on time despite mounting economic inequality and increasingly unaffordable college tuition. Aided by smart policies and investments in prevention, a record number of teens are making positive choices.…

  20. Is It Counting, or Is It Adding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Fisher, Molly H.; Thomas, Jonathan; Schack, Edna O.; Tassell, Janet; Yoder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) expect second grade students to "fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies" (2.OA.B.2). Most children begin with number word sequences and counting approximations and then develop greater skill with counting. But do all teachers really understand how this…

  1. Is It Counting, or Is It Adding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Fisher, Molly H.; Thomas, Jonathan; Schack, Edna O.; Tassell, Janet; Yoder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) expect second grade students to "fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies" (2.OA.B.2). Most children begin with number word sequences and counting approximations and then develop greater skill with counting. But do all teachers really understand how this…

  2. Observer variability in pinniped counts: Ground-based enumeration of walruses at haul-out sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, M.S.; Jay, C.V.; Cody, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Pinnipeds are often monitored by counting individuals at haul-out sites, but the often large numbers of densely packed individuals at these sites are difficult to enumerate accurately. Errors in enumeration can induce bias and reduce precision in estimates of population size and trend. We used data from paired observers monitoring walrus haul-outs in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to quantify observer variability and assess its relative importance. The probability of a pair of observers making identical counts was 50 individuals. Mean count differences ranged up to 25% for the largest counts, depending on beach and observers. In at least some cases, there was a clear tendency for counts of one observer to be consistently greater than counts of the other observer in a pair, indicating that counts of at least one of the observers were biased. These results suggest that efforts to improve accuracy of counts will be worthwhile. However, we also found that variation among observers was relatively small compared to variation among visits to a beach so that efforts to account for other sources of variation will be more important.

  3. Spanish Multicenter Normative Studies (NEURONORMA Project): norms for verbal span, visuospatial span, letter and number sequencing, trail making test, and symbol digit modalities test.

    PubMed

    Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Quiñones-Ubeda, Sonia; Quintana-Aparicio, María; Aguilar, Miquel; Badenes, Dolors; Molinuevo, José Luis; Torner, Laura; Robles, Alfredo; Barquero, María Sagrario; Villanueva, Clara; Antúnez, Carmen; Martínez-Parra, Carlos; Frank-García, Anna; Sanz, Azucena; Fernández, Manuel; Alfonso, Verónica; Sol, Josep M; Blesa, Rafael

    2009-06-01

    As part of the Spanish Multicenter Normative Studies (NEURONORMA project), we provide age- and education-adjusted norms for the following instruments: verbal span (digits), visuospatial span (Corsi's test), letter-number sequencing (WAIS-III), trail making test, and symbol digit modalities test. The sample consists of 354 participants who are cognitively normal, community-dwelling, and age ranging from 50 to 90 years. Tables are provided to convert raw scores to age-adjusted scaled scores. These were further converted into education-adjusted scaled scores by applying regression-based adjustments. The current norms should provide clinically useful data for evaluating elderly Spanish people. These data may be of considerable use for comparisons with other normative studies. Limitations of these normative data are mainly related to the techniques of recruitment and stratification employed.

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  5. Counting Heron Triangles with Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-25

    A3 INTEGERS 13 (2013) COUNTING HERON TRIANGLES WITH CONSTRAINTS Pantelimon Stănică Applied Mathematics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey...12, Revised: 10/12/12, Accepted: 1/13/13, Published: 1/25/13 Abstract Heron triangles have the property that all three of their sides as well as their...area are positive integers. In this paper, we give some estimates for the number of Heron triangles with two of their sides fixed. We provide a

  6. Anarthria impairs subvocal counting.

    PubMed

    Cubelli, R; Nichelli, P; Pentore, R

    1993-12-01

    We studied subvocal counting in two pure anarthric patients. Analysis showed that they performed definitively worse than normal subjects free to articulate subvocally and their scores were in the lower bounds of the performances of subjects suppressing articulation. These results suggest that subvocal counting is impaired after anarthria.

  7. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  8. Averaging of TNTC counts.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, C N; Heller, B

    1988-01-01

    When plate count methods are used for microbial enumeration, if too-numerous-to-count results occur, they are commonly discarded. In this paper, a method for consideration of such results in computation of an average microbial density is developed, and its use is illustrated by example. PMID:3178211

  9. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  10. Quick Reads: The Unit Makes All the Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollick, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    "What's the unit?" The answer to this question makes all the difference. A young child who is asked to count shoes needs to know if the unit to be counted is "pairs" of shoes or individual shoes. A middle school student who is asked for the length of a table will want to know if the number should be in inches, feet, or…

  11. Quick Reads: The Unit Makes All the Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollick, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    "What's the unit?" The answer to this question makes all the difference. A young child who is asked to count shoes needs to know if the unit to be counted is "pairs" of shoes or individual shoes. A middle school student who is asked for the length of a table will want to know if the number should be in inches, feet, or…

  12. Supporting First Grade Students Learning Number Facts up to 10 Using a Parrot Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putra, Zetra Hainul; Darmawijoyo; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; den Hertog, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Knowing number facts up to 10 become crucial if we want students to solve addition and subtraction problems using more abbreviated strategies. Otherwise, students will keep counting one-by-one until they get an answer. One of important number facts is number pairs that make ten because it is an important "benchmark" that students will…

  13. Giving the Boot to the Bootstrap: How Not to Learn the Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rips, Lance J.; Asmuth, Jennifer; Bloomfield, Amber

    2006-01-01

    According to one theory about how children learn the concept of natural numbers, they first determine that "one", "two", and "three" denote the size of sets containing the relevant number of items. They then make the following inductive inference (the Bootstrap): The next number word in the counting series denotes the size of the sets you get by…

  14. Chippy's Computer Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Suzanne; Willing, Kathlene R.

    Intended for young children just becoming familiar with computers, this counting book introduces and reinforces new computer vocabulary and concepts. The numbers, from one to twelve, are presented along with words and illustrations from the world of computers, allowing for different activities in which children can count or match and name the…

  15. B Counting at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  16. AUTOMATIC COUNTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Howell, W.D.

    1957-08-20

    An apparatus for automatically recording the results of counting operations on trains of electrical pulses is described. The disadvantages of prior devices utilizing the two common methods of obtaining the count rate are overcome by this apparatus; in the case of time controlled operation, the disclosed system automatically records amy information stored by the scaler but not transferred to the printer at the end of the predetermined time controlled operations and, in the case of count controlled operation, provision is made to prevent a weak sample from occupying the apparatus for an excessively long period of time.

  17. Preverbal and verbal counting and computation.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Gelman, R

    1992-08-01

    We describe the preverbal system of counting and arithmetic reasoning revealed by experiments on numerical representations in animals. In this system, numerosities are represented by magnitudes, which are rapidly but inaccurately generated by the Meck and Church (1983) preverbal counting mechanism. We suggest the following. (1) The preverbal counting mechanism is the source of the implicit principles that guide the acquisition of verbal counting. (2) The preverbal system of arithmetic computation provides the framework for the assimilation of the verbal system. (3) Learning to count involves, in part, learning a mapping from the preverbal numerical magnitudes to the verbal and written number symbols and the inverse mappings from these symbols to the preverbal magnitudes. (4) Subitizing is the use of the preverbal counting process and the mapping from the resulting magnitudes to number words in order to generate rapidly the number words for small numerosities. (5) The retrieval of the number facts, which plays a central role in verbal computation, is mediated via the inverse mappings from verbal and written numbers to the preverbal magnitudes and the use of these magnitudes to find the appropriate cells in tabular arrangements of the answers. (6) This model of the fact retrieval process accounts for the salient features of the reaction time differences and error patterns revealed by experiments on mental arithmetic. (7) The application of verbal and written computational algorithms goes on in parallel with, and is to some extent guided by, preverbal computations, both in the child and in the adult.

  18. Predicting U.S. tuberculosis case counts through 2020.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Rachel S Y E L K; Winston, Carla A; Miramontes, Roque

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, foreign-born persons accounted for 60% of all tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States. Understanding which national groups make up the highest proportion of TB cases will assist TB control programs in concentrating limited resources where they can provide the greatest impact on preventing transmission of TB disease. The objective of our study was to predict through 2020 the numbers of U.S. TB cases among U.S.-born, foreign-born and foreign-born persons from selected countries of birth. TB case counts reported through the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System from 2000-2010 were log-transformed, and linear regression was performed to calculate predicted annual case counts and 95% prediction intervals for 2011-2020. Data were analyzed in 2011 before 2011 case counts were known. Decreases were predicted between 2010 observed and 2020 predicted counts for total TB cases (11,182 to 8,117 [95% prediction interval 7,262-9,073]) as well as TB cases among foreign-born persons from Mexico (1,541 to 1,420 [1,066-1,892]), the Philippines (740 to 724 [569-922]), India (578 to 553 [455-672]), Vietnam (532 to 429 [367-502]) and China (364 to 328 [249-433]). TB cases among persons who are U.S.-born and foreign-born were predicted to decline 47% (4,393 to 2,338 [2,113-2,586]) and 6% (6,720 to 6,343 [5,382-7,476]), respectively. Assuming rates of declines observed from 2000-2010 continue until 2020, a widening gap between the numbers of U.S.-born and foreign-born TB cases was predicted. TB case count predictions will help TB control programs identify needs for cultural competency, such as languages and interpreters needed for translating materials or engaging in appropriate community outreach.

  19. How to Use Image Analysis for Islet Counting

    PubMed Central

    Girman, Peter; Berkova, Zuzana; Dobolilova, Eva; Saudek, Frantisek

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assessment of islet mass before islet transplantation requires a reliable technique to enable exact analysis of islet volume. This study aimed to test the applicability of digital image analysis (DIA) for evaluation of samples of purified and non-purified islets. METHODS: Pancreatic islets were isolated from 10 Lewis rats. Samples of purified (n = 10) and non-purified islets (n = 30) were counted conventionally and by using a computerized method. The equipment for the computerized counting consisted of a digital camera installed on a stereomicroscope and connected to a personal computer. Images of 2272x1704 pixels were processed using a previously described non-commercial program originally developed for this purpose. Islets were converted to equivalents using globe and ellipsoid models. The insulin content of purified islets was assessed using radioimmunoassay and was correlated to the absolute and standardized islet number. RESULTS: Mean absolute numbers of purified islets ± SD were 908 ± 130 and 1049 ± 230 (manually and DIA respectively). Mean insulin content ± SD obtained from purified islets was 161 ± 45 mU. The mean equivalents of purified islets (1589 ± 555 for globe and 1219 ± 452 for ellipsoid) significantly correlated with insulin content. However, this correlation was not significant when absolute islet numbers were used, counted using either method. There was no significant difference in absolute non-purified islet numbers assessed by manual and computerized methods (average ± SD in 50 µl samples; 12.6 ± 4.1 and 13.3 ± 5.3 respectively; p = 0.22). The manual method showed a significantly higher yield of islet equivalents (IE; p < 0.001 for both globe and ellipsoid). CONCLUSION: The computer-based system for islet counting correlated better to insulin content than conventional islet estimation and prevented overestimation. Reproducibility and ease of assessment make it potentially applicable to clinical islet transplantation. PMID

  20. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach.

  1. Counting Knights and Knaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin,Oscar; Roberts, Gerri M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand better some of the classic knights and knaves puzzles, we count them. Doing so reveals a surprising connection between puzzles and solutions, and highlights some beautiful combinatorial identities.

  2. Understanding Blood Counts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart, Kidneys, Liver and Lung Function Infections Iron Overload Low Blood Counts Pain Disease- and Treatment-Related ... cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. Privacy Policy Security Copyright Link ...

  3. Neutron counting with cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  4. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Method of bacterial count. 1210.16 Section 1210.16... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of...

  5. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Method of bacterial count. 1210.16 Section 1210.16... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of...

  6. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Method of bacterial count. 1210.16 Section 1210.16... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of...

  7. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Method of bacterial count. 1210.16 Section 1210.16... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of...

  8. Differential Counting in Mixed Cultures with Coulter Counters

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J. F.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    A critical comparison of Coulter, viable, and microscope counts for several mixed cultures of microorganisms has been made. This investigation shows that Coulter counting can provide reliable estimates of microbial numbers in mixed cultures. Precautions and limitations of Coulter counting in mixed cultures are discussed. PMID:4199341

  9. Temporal differences in point counts of bottomland forest landbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.P.; Twedt, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared number of avian species and individuals in morning and evening point counts during the breeding season and during winter in a bottomland hardwood forest in west-central Mississippi. USA. In both seasons, more species and individuals were recorded during morning counts than during evening counts. We also compared morning and evening detections for 18 species during the breeding season and 9 species during winter. Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata), Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura), and Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) were detected significantly more often in morning counts than in evening counts during the breeding season. Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) was recorded more often in morning Counts than evening counts during the breeding season and during winter. No species was detected more often in evening counts. Thus, evening point counts of birds during either the breeding season or winter will likely underestimate species richness, overall avian abundance, and the abundance of some individual species in bottomland hardwood forests.

  10. A rapid method for counting nucleated erythrocytes on stained blood smears by digital image analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gering, E.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Measures of parasitemia by intraerythrocytic hematozoan parasites are normally expressed as the number of infected erythrocytes per n erythrocytes and are notoriously tedious and time consuming to measure. We describe a protocol for generating rapid counts of nucleated erythrocytes from digital micrographs of thin blood smears that can be used to estimate intensity of hematozoan infections in nonmammalian vertebrate hosts. This method takes advantage of the bold contrast and relatively uniform size and morphology of erythrocyte nuclei on Giemsa-stained blood smears and uses ImageJ, a java-based image analysis program developed at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and available on the internet, to recognize and count these nuclei. This technique makes feasible rapid and accurate counts of total erythrocytes in large numbers of microscope fields, which can be used in the calculation of peripheral parasitemias in low-intensity infections.

  11. Taxonomic counts of cognition in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Louis

    2011-01-01

    In 1985, Kummer & Goodall pleaded for an ecology of intelligence and proposed that innovations might be a good way to measure cognition in the wild. Counts of innovation per taxonomic group are now available in hundreds of avian and primate species, as are counts of tactical deception, tool use and social learning. Robust evidence suggests that innovation rate and its neural correlates allow birds and mammals to cope better with environmental change. The positive correlations between taxonomic counts, and the increasing number of cognitive and neural measures found to be associated with ecological variables, suggest that domain general processes might be more pervasive than previously thought in the evolution of intelligence. PMID:20719769

  12. A miniaturized counting technique for anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, A N; Pettipher, G L; Lloyd, G R

    1976-12-01

    A miniaturized counting technique gave results as good as the pour-plate and Most Probable Number (MPN) techniques for enumeration of clostridia spp. and anaerobic isolates from the gut. Highest counts were obtained when ascorbic acid (1%) and dithiothreitol (0.015%) were added to the reinforced clostridial medium used for counting. This minimized the effect of exposure to air before incubation. The miniature technique allowed up to 40 samples to be plated and incubated in one McIntosh-Filde's-type anaerobic jar, compared with 3 or 4 by the normal pour plate.

  13. Bacterial colony counting by Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alessandro; Lombardi, Stefano; Signoroni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Counting bacterial colonies on microbiological culture plates is a time-consuming, error-prone, nevertheless fundamental task in microbiology. Computer vision based approaches can increase the efficiency and the reliability of the process, but accurate counting is challenging, due to the high degree of variability of agglomerated colonies. In this paper, we propose a solution which adopts Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) for counting the number of colonies contained in confluent agglomerates, that scored an overall accuracy of the 92.8% on a large challenging dataset. The proposed CNN-based technique for estimating the cardinality of colony aggregates outperforms traditional image processing approaches, becoming a promising approach to many related applications.

  14. Clicks counting system for a riflescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    A very useful requirement for a zoom aiming scope with high magnification used for long range rifle shooting is counting and display of knob's clicks number needed for elevation corrections. The paper analyzes one method for clicks counting usable with existing mechanical knobs and describes a microcontroller based system that implements it. Practical aspects like required changes in mechanical construction, influence of perturbations, complexity of electronics or power consumption are also analyzed.

  15. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E.

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  16. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  17. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations.

    PubMed

    Erdős, Péter L; Kiss, Sándor Z; Miklós, István; Soukup, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations.

  18. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations. PMID:26161994

  19. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  20. Whose interests count?

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Lantos, John D

    2014-10-01

    Whose interests should count and how should various interests be balanced at the pediatric patient's bedside? The interests of the child patient clearly count. Recently, however, many authors have argued that the family's interests also count. But how should we think about the interests of others? What does it mean to talk about "the family" in this context? Does it really just mean the interests of each individual family member? Or is the family itself a moral entity that has interests of its own independent of the interests of each of its members? Are such interests important only as they affect the patient's interest or also for their own sake? In this special supplement to Pediatrics, a group of pediatricians, philosophers, and lawyers grapple with these questions. They examine these issues from different angles and reach different conclusions. Jointly, they demonstrate the ethical importance and, above all, the ethical complexity of the family's role at the bedside.

  1. Interpretation of galaxy counts

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsely, B.M.

    1980-10-01

    New models are presented for the interpretation of recent counts of galaxies to 24th magnitude, and predictions are shown to 28th magnitude for future comparison with data from the Space Telescope. The results supersede earlier, more schematic models by the author. Tyson and Jarvis found in their counts a ''local'' density enhancement at 17th magnitude, on comparison with the earlier models; the excess is no longer significant when a more realistic mixture of galaxy colors is used. Bruzual and Kron's conclusion that Kron's counts show evidence for evolution at faint magnitudes is confirmed, and it is predicted that some 23d magnitude galaxies have redshifts greater than unity. These may include spheroidal systems, elliptical galaxies, and the bulges of early-type spirals and S0's, seen during their primeval rapid star formation.

  2. Kids Count in Nebraska: 1995 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ. Medical Center, Omaha.

    While a vast majority of children in Nebraska are experiencing a safe, healthy, and nurturing childhood, a significant number are not, and some of these numbers are growing. This Kids Count report is the third annual comprehensive review of available data in nine areas of child health and well-being in the state. Presented with these statistics…

  3. The Remarkable Number "1"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-01-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

  4. The Remarkable Number "1"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-01-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

  5. An audit of half-count myocardial perfusion imaging using resolution recovery software.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Richard S; White, Duncan; Nijran, Kuldip; Cade, Sarah C; Hall, David O; Kenny, Bob; Knight, Andy; Livieratos, Lefteris; Murray, Anthony; Towey, David

    2014-05-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Software Quality Group of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine has conducted a multicentre, multivendor audit to evaluate the use of resolution recovery software from several manufacturers when applied to myocardial perfusion data with half the normal counts acquired under a variety of clinical protocols in a range of departments. The objective was to determine whether centres could obtain clinical results with half-count data processed with resolution recovery software that were equivalent to those obtained using their normal protocols. Sixteen centres selected 50 routine myocardial perfusion studies each, from which the Nuclear Medicine Software Quality Group generated simulated half-count studies using Poisson resampling. These half-count studies were reconstructed using resolution recovery and the clinical reports compared with the original reports from the full-count data. A total of 769 patient studies were processed and compared. Eight centres found only a small number of clinically relevant discrepancies between the two reports, whereas eight had an unacceptably high number of discrepancies. There were no significant differences in acquisition parameters between the two groups, although centres finding a high number of discrepancies were more likely to perform both rest and stress scans on normal studies. Half of the participating centres could potentially make use of resolution recovery to reduce the administered activity for myocardial perfusion scans without changing their routine acquisition protocols. The other half could consider adjusting the reconstruction parameters used with their resolution recovery software if they wish to use reduced activity successfully.

  6. Examine Counting Procedure among Students with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Case of Penang Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibat, Adiat B.; Ahmad, Aznan Che; Ghazali, Munirah

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates counting procedure in number counting based on gender among students with mild intellectual disability. Quantitative approach was used for testing counting procedure in number counting among these students. The samples for the study comprise fifteen male and fifteen female students with intellectual disability. Descriptive…

  7. Nutsedge Counts Predict Meloidogyne incognita Juvenile Counts in an Integrated Management System.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhining; Murray, Leigh; Thomas, Stephen H; Schroeder, Jill; Libbin, James

    2008-06-01

    The southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) and purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) are important pests in crops grown in the southern US. Management of the individual pests rather than the pest complex is often unsuccessful due to mutually beneficial pest interactions. In an integrated pest management scheme using alfalfa to suppress nutsedges and M. incognita, we evaluated quadratic polynomial regression models for prediction of the number of M. incognita J2 in soil samples as a function of yellow and purple nutsedge plant counts, squares of nutsedge counts and the cross-product between nutsedge counts . In May 2005, purple nutsedge plant count was a significant predictor of M. incognita count. In July and September 2005, counts of both nutsedges and the cross-product were significant predictors. In 2006, the second year of the alfalfa rotation, counts of all three species were reduced. As a likely consequence, the predictive relationship between nutsedges and M. incognita was not significant for May and July. In September 2006, purple nutsedge was a significant predictor of M. incognita. These results lead us to conclude that nutsedge plant counts in a field infested with the M. incognita-nutsedge pest complex can be used as a visual predictor of M. incognita J2 populations, unless the numbers of nutsedge plants and M. incognita are all very low.

  8. Counting “exotics”

    Treesearch

    Qinfeng Guo

    2011-01-01

    An introduced or exotic species is commonly defined as an organism accidentally or intentionally introduced to a new location by human activity (Williamson 1996; Richardson et al. 2000; Guo and Ricklefs 2010). However, the counting of exotics is often inconsistent. For example, in the US, previously published plant richness data for each state are only those either...

  9. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  10. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  11. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  12. Carbohydrate counting of food.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Karin; Heiber, Stefanie; Brändle, Michael; Christ, Emanuel; Keller, Ulrich

    2011-07-07

    Carbohydrate counting is a principal strategy in nutritional management of type 1 diabetes. The Nutri-Learn buffet (NLB) is a new computer-based tool for patient instruction in carbohydrate counting. It is based on food dummies made of plastic equipped with a microchip containing relevant food content data. The tool enables the dietician to assess the patient's food counting abilities and the patient to learn in a hands-on interactive manner to estimate food contents such as carbohydrate content. Multicentre randomised controlled trial in 134 patients with type 1 diabetes comparing the use of the Nutri-Learn buffet in determining and improving ability to estimate the carbohydrate content of food with the use of conventional counselling tools (i.e. pictures and tables). The NLB group showed significantly better carbohydrate estimation values than the control group. In particular, there was a significant improvement in estimation of starches, fruits and sweets. The NLB was preferred by patients and dieticians in that rating of carbohydrate was closer to reality than the use of conventional tools, and since the tool has a play element, is interactive and adjustable, and can be used with only minimal knowledge of a specific language. Adjustment of preprandial insulin doses to the amounts of dietary carbohydrates ingested during the subsequent meal resulted in improved metabolic control in previous studies. The present study demonstrated that the new tool (Nutri-Learn buffet) improved teaching and learning of carbohydrate counting. In addition, it allowed an objective assessment of the carbohydrate counting skills of patients by the dietician. The findings therefore suggest that the tool is helpful in nutritional counselling of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  13. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pisania, Anna; Papas, Klearchos K.; Powers, Daryl E.; Rappel, Michael J.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Colton, Clark K.

    2010-01-01

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, and we combined it with morphological analysis by light microscopy (LM) for estimating the volume fraction of islets in impure preparations. Cells and islets were disrupted with lysis solution and shear, and accuracy of counting successively diluted nuclei suspensions was verified with: (1) visual counting in a hemacytometer after staining with crystal violet, and automatic counting by (2) aperture electrical resistance measurement and (3) flow cytometer measurement after staining with 7-aminoactinomycin-D. DNA content averaged 6.5 and 6.9 pg DNA/cell for rat and human islets, respectively, in agreement with literature estimates. With pure rat islet preparations, precision improved with increasing counts, and samples with about 160 or more islets provided a coefficient of variation of about 6%. Aliquots of human islet preparations were processed for LM analysis by stereological point counting. Total nuclei counts and islet volume fraction from LM analysis were combined to obtain the number of islet equivalents (IE). Total number of IE by the standard method of dithizone staining/manual counting was overestimated by about 90% compared to LM/nuclei counting for 12 freshly isolated human islet research preparations. Nuclei counting combined with islet volume fraction measurements from light microscopy is a novel method for achieving accurate islet enumeration. PMID:20697375

  14. Power counting to better jet observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2014-12-01

    Optimized jet substructure observables for identifying boosted topologies will play an essential role in maximizing the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider. Ideally, the design of discriminating variables would be informed by analytic calculations in perturbative QCD. Unfortunately, explicit calculations are often not feasible due to the complexity of the observables used for discrimination, and so many validation studies rely heavily, and solely, on Monte Carlo. In this paper we show how methods based on the parametric power counting of the dynamics of QCD, familiar from effective theory analyses, can be used to design, understand, and make robust predictions for the behavior of jet substructure variables. As a concrete example, we apply power counting for discriminating boosted Z bosons from massive QCD jets using observables formed from the n-point energy correlation functions. We show that power counting alone gives a definite prediction for the observable that optimally separates the background-rich from the signal-rich regions of phase space. Power counting can also be used to understand effects of phase space cuts and the effect of contamination from pile-up, which we discuss. As these arguments rely only on the parametric scaling of QCD, the predictions from power counting must be reproduced by any Monte Carlo, which we verify using Pythia 8 and Herwig++. We also use the example of quark versus gluon discrimination to demonstrate the limits of the power counting technique.

  15. Numeracy and Medicare Part D: the importance of choice and literacy for numbers in optimizing decision making for Medicare's prescription drug program.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stacey; Hanoch, Yaniv; Barnes, Andrew; Liu, Pi-Ju; Cummings, Janet; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Rice, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Studies on decision making have come to challenge the idea that having more choice is necessarily better. The Medicare prescription drug program (Part D) has been designed to maximize choice for the consumer but has simultaneously created a highly complex decision task with dozens of options. In this study, in a sample of 121 adults, we examined the impact that increasing choice options has on decision-making abilities in older versus younger adults. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that participants performed better with less choice versus more choice, and that older adults performed worse than younger adults across conditions. We further examined the role that numeracy may play in making these decisions and the role of more traditional cognitive variables such as working memory, executive functioning, intelligence, and education. Finally, we examined how personality style may interact with cognitive variables and age in decision making. Regression analysis revealed that numeracy is related to performance across the lifespan. When controlling for additional measures of cognitive ability, we found that although age was no longer associated with performance, numeracy remained significant. In terms of decision style, personality characteristics were not related to performance. Our results add to the mounting evidence for the critical role of numeracy in decision making across decision domains and across the lifespan.

  16. Increasing point-count duration increases standard error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.P.; Twedt, D.J.; Hamel, P.B.; Ford, R.P.; Wiedenfeld, D.A.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined data from point counts of varying duration in bottomland forests of west Tennessee and the Mississippi Alluvial Valley to determine if counting interval influenced sampling efficiency. Estimates of standard error increased as point count duration increased both for cumulative number of individuals and species in both locations. Although point counts appear to yield data with standard errors proportional to means, a square root transformation of the data may stabilize the variance. Using long (>10 min) point counts may reduce sample size and increase sampling error, both of which diminish statistical power and thereby the ability to detect meaningful changes in avian populations.

  17. The Watt Count System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Watt Count System combines aerospace and computer technology, an engineering systems design approach and the environmental control expertise of a group of engineers who worked on Apollo. First step of the system is a computerized energy consumption analysis based on plans for a new home. Company calculates heating and cooling loads and customizes the most energy efficient system for the particular structure analyzed. A quality control engineer assures that insulation and ducting are installed to specifications. Analysis and design techniques are so accurate that company is able to give homeowner a two-year guarantee that the home's energy consumption will not exceed the kilowatt hour level determined by the computer in step one. In an annual energy performance comparison, a Watt Count home used 45 percent less energy than a conventionally equipped home.

  18. What counts as knowing? The development of conceptual and procedural knowledge of counting from kindergarten through Grade 2.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Smith-Chant, Brenda L; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Sargla, Erin; Arnup, Jesse S; Penner-Wilger, Marcie; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Kamawar, Deepthi

    2006-04-01

    The development of conceptual and procedural knowledge about counting was explored for children in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2 (N = 255). Conceptual knowledge was assessed by asking children to make judgments about three types of counts modeled by an animated frog: standard (correct) left-to-right counts, incorrect counts, and unusual counts. On incorrect counts, the frog violated the word-object correspondence principle. On unusual counts, the frog violated a conventional but inessential feature of counting, for example, starting in the middle of the array of objects. Procedural knowledge was assessed using speed and accuracy in counting objects. The patterns of change for procedural knowledge and conceptual knowledge were different. Counting speed and accuracy (procedural knowledge) improved with grade. In contrast, there was a curvilinear relation between conceptual knowledge and grade that was further moderated by children's numeration skills (as measured by a standardized test); the most skilled children gradually increased their acceptance of unusual counts over grade, whereas the least skilled children decreased their acceptance of these counts. These results have implications for studying conceptual and procedural knowledge about mathematics.

  19. How To Make Transfer Work: Recommendations from the Literature. Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education Briefing Paper, Number 4, Spring 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Adult and Technical Education.

    In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on making the transfer process more effective and ensuring that all students are able to complete a Bachelor's degree. The Transfer Education Commission of the National Center for Academic Achievement and Transfer (NCAAT), for example, has issued an agenda that identifies academic practices and policy…

  20. Applying standard perikymata profiles to Pongo pygmaeus canines to estimate perikymata counts between linear enamel hypoplasias.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Mackie

    2017-05-01

    Recently, studies have interpreted regular spacing and average number of perikymata between dental enamel defects in orangutans to reflect seasonal episodes of physiological stress. To estimate the amount of time between developmental defects (enamel hypoplasia), studies have relied on perikymata counts. Unfortunately, perikymata are frequently not continuously visible between defects, significantly reducing data sets. A method is presented here for estimating the number of perikymata between defects using standard perikymata profiles (SPP) that allow the number of perikymata between all pairs of defects across a tooth to be analyzed. The SPP method should allow the entire complement of defects to be analyzed within the context of an individual's crown formation time. The average number of perikymata were established per decile and charted to create male and female Pongo pygmaeus SPPs. The position of the beginning of each defect was recorded for lower canines from males (n = 6) and females (n = 17). The number of perikymata between defects estimated by the SPP was compared to the actual count (where perikymata were continuously visible). The number of perikymata between defects estimated by the SPPs was accurate within three perikymata and highly correlated with the actual counts, significantly increasing the number of analyzable defect pairs. SPPs allow all defect pairs to be included in studies of defect timing, not just those with continuously visible perikymata. Establishing an individual's entire complement of dental defects makes it possible to calculate the regularity (and potential seasonality) of defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Using DNA to test the utility of pellet-group counts as an index of deer counts

    Treesearch

    T. J. Brinkman; D. K. Person; W. Smith; F. Stuart Chapin; K. McCoy; M. Leonawicz; K. Hundertmark

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread use of fecal pellet-group counts as an index of ungulate density, techniques used to convert pellet-group numbers to ungulate numbers rarely are based on counts of known individuals, seldom evaluated across spatial and temporal scales, and precision is infrequently quantified. Using DNA from fecal pellets to identify individual deer, we evaluated the...

  2. A minimal apparatus method for counting bacteria: comparison with reference method in surveying beef carcasses at three commercial abattoirs.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, W. R.; Roberts, T. A.; Whelehan, O. P.

    1983-01-01

    In two surveys of three commercial abattoirs a minimal apparatus method for making bacterial counts, the "loop-tile' method, detected the same trends in bacterial numbers on beef carcasses as the ISO reference method applied to the same samples. Both methods showed the carcasses from one abattoir, that with an export license, to carry consistently higher numbers of bacteria, and one of the four sites sampled on each carcass to be consistently dirtier than the other three. PMID:6363526

  3. Counting does not improve the accuracy of long time productions.

    PubMed

    Thönes, Sven; Hecht, Heiko

    2017-08-29

    It is common to use counting strategies to produce time intervals accurately. Does counting improve the accuracy (deviation of produced duration from veridical duration) and precision (variability of produced duration) of time productions in the range of seconds to minutes? In a series of experiments, we compared chronometric counting to intuitive timing (no counting) and to attentional control (simultaneously performing mental arithmetic). In a field experiment, participants had to produce time intervals of 60-s duration in a classroom setting. Relative to intuitive timing, counting did not improve the accuracy (absolute error) of time productions but led to overproduction of duration (larger constant error). In four laboratory experiments, we tested the effects of counting on time production of 10-, 30-, 45-, 60-, and 90-s intervals. Consistently, counting did not improve the accuracy of time production. The relative overproduction due to counting was replicated for long intervals (60 and 90 s) but disappeared at shorter intervals. However, across all intervals tested, counting had positive effects on the precision of time production. As expected, mental arithmetic impaired accuracy and precision and led to overproduction of duration, indicating that participants followed instructions. Based on the experimental data, the overproduction of longer intervals due to counting can neither be explained in terms of attentional processes nor by means of a word-length effect when counting multisyllabic numbers or when participants switch their pace of counting from mono- to multisyllables.

  4. High Count Rate Electron Probe Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geller, Joseph D; Herrington, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Reducing the measurement uncertainty of quantitative analyses made using electron probe microanalyzers (EPMA) requires a careful study of the individual uncertainties from each definable step of the measurement. Those steps include measuring the incident electron beam current and voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections. This paper discusses the collection and counting of the emitted x rays, which are diffracted into the gas flow or sealed proportional x-ray detectors. The representation of the uncertainty in the number of collected x rays collected reduces as the number of counts increase. The uncertainty of the collected signal is fully described by Poisson statistics. Increasing the number of x rays collected involves either counting longer or at a higher counting rate. Counting longer means the analysis time increases and may become excessive to get to the desired uncertainty. Instrument drift also becomes an issue. Counting at higher rates has its limitations, which are a function of the detector physics and the detecting electronics. Since the beginning of EPMA analysis, analog electronics have been used to amplify and discriminate the x-ray induced ionizations within the proportional counter. This paper will discuss the use of digital electronics for this purpose. These electronics are similar to that used for energy dispersive analysis of x rays with either Si(Li) or Ge(Li) detectors except that the shaping time constants are much smaller.

  5. Internalization of Character Traits by Those Who Teach Character Counts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Kristyn; Fritz, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Cooperative extension personnel (n=53) completed a Web-based survey analyzing the impact of the Character Counts! program on extension, their personal lives, and society. Results demonstrated that extension educators and assistants were more likely to make ethical decisions as a result of teaching Character Counts! The need for increased…

  6. To count or not to count: the effect of instructions on expecting a break in timing.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Rémi; Fortin, Claudette

    2013-04-01

    When a break is expected during a time interval production, longer intervals are produced as the break occurs later during the interval. This effect of break location was interpreted as a result of distraction related to break expectancy in previous studies. In the present study, the influence of target duration and of instructions about chronometric counting strategies on the break location effect was examined. Using a strategy such as chronometric counting enhances the reliability of temporal processing, typically in terms of reduced variability, and could influence how timing is affected by break expectancy, especially when relatively long target durations are used. In two experiments, results show that time productions lengthened with increasing value of break location at various target durations and that variability was greater in the no-counting than in the counting instruction condition. More important, the break location effect was stronger in the no-counting than in the counting instruction condition. We conclude that chronometric counting orients attention toward timing processes, making them less likely to be disrupted by concurrent nontemporal processes.

  7. Counting white blood cells using morphological granulometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theera-Umpon, Nipon; Gader, Paul D.

    2000-04-01

    We describe a modification of the mixture proportion estimation algorithm based on the granulometric mixing theorem. The modified algorithm is applied to the problem of counting different types of white blood cells in bone marrow images. In principle, the algorithm can be used to count the proportion of cells in each class without explicitly segmenting and classifying them. The direct application of the original algorithm does not converge well for more than two classes. The modified algorithm uses prior statistics to initially segment the mixed pattern spectrum and then applies the one-primitive estimation algorithm to each initial component. Applying the algorithm to one class at a time results in better convergence. The counts produced by the modified algorithm on six classes of cells--myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte, band, and PolyMorphoNuclear--are very close to the human expert's numbers; the deviation of the algorithm counts is similar to the deviation of counts produced by human experts. The important technical contributions are that the modified algorithm uses prior statistics for each shape class in place or prior knowledge of the total number of objects in an image, and it allows for more than one primitive from each class.

  8. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  9. Kids Count in Nebraska: 1997 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentz, Cara Anderson

    This Kids Count report is the fifth to examine statewide trends and county data on the well-being of Nebraska's children. The bulk of this statistical report presents findings on 32 indicators of well-being in 8 areas: (1) juvenile justice, including juvenile arrests, and numbers committed to youth rehabilitation and treatment centers; (2)…

  10. Illinois Kids Count 2001: Envisioning the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Brenda; Familia, Yahaira; Gifford, Amy; Knowlton, Gretchen; Matakis, Brian; Olson, Melissa; Owens, Tracy; Zasadny, Julie

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Illinois' children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the areas of family, education and child care, arts and recreation, safety, health, and economic security. The indicators are: (1) percent of children living in poverty; (2) number of children enrolled in…

  11. KidsCount in Colorado! 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines statewide, countywide, and citywide trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. Following a brief foreword, the report presents state data and city data for 15 major cities in the form of a report card. The report cards relay: demographic data related to number of children by age and race; indicators of child…

  12. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  13. Determining the Number of Factors to Retain in EFA: Using the SPSS R-Menu v2.0 to Make More Judicious Estimations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Matthew Gordon Ray

    2013-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is a common technique utilized in the development of assessment instruments. The key question when performing this procedure is how to best estimate the number of factors to retain. This is especially important as under- or over-extraction may lead to erroneous conclusions. Although recent advancements have been…

  14. Determining the Number of Factors to Retain in EFA: Using the SPSS R-Menu v2.0 to Make More Judicious Estimations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Matthew Gordon Ray

    2013-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is a common technique utilized in the development of assessment instruments. The key question when performing this procedure is how to best estimate the number of factors to retain. This is especially important as under- or over-extraction may lead to erroneous conclusions. Although recent advancements have been…

  15. How Informal Out-of-School Mathematics Can Help Students Make Sense of Formal In-School Mathematics: The Case of Multiplying by Decimal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonotto, Cinzia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a teaching experiment on the relationship between informal out-of-school and formal in-school mathematics, and the ways each can inform the other in the development of abstract mathematical knowledge. This study concerns the understanding of some aspects of the multiplicative structure of decimal numbers. It involved a series…

  16. Developing Meaning for Algebraic Procedures: An Exploration of the Connections Undergraduate Students Make between Algebraic Rational Expressions and Basic Number Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yantz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The attainment and retention of later algebra skills in high school has been identified as a factor significantly impacting the postsecondary success of students majoring in STEM fields. Researchers maintain that learners develop meaning for algebraic procedures by forming connections to the basic number system properties. The present study…

  17. Knowledge of counting principles: how relevant is order irrelevance?

    PubMed

    Kamawar, Deepthi; Lefevre, Jo-Anne; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Smith-Chant, Brenda; Penner-Wilger, Marcie

    2010-01-01

    Most children who are older than 6 years of age apply essential counting principles when they enumerate a set of objects. Essential principles include (a) one-to-one correspondence between items and count words, (b) stable order of the count words, and (c) cardinality-that the last number refers to numerosity. We found that the acquisition of a fourth principle, that the order in which items are counted is irrelevant, follows a different trajectory. The majority of 5- to 11-year-olds indicated that the order in which objects were counted was relevant, favoring a left-to-right, top-to-bottom order of counting. Only some 10- and 11-year-olds applied the principle of order irrelevance, and this knowledge was unrelated to their numeration skill. We conclude that the order irrelevance principle might not play an important role in the development of children's conceptual knowledge of counting.

  18. Comparing methods for analyzing overdispersed count data in aquatic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Noe, Douglas A; Bailer, A John; Noble, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Endpoints in aquatic toxicity tests can be measured using a variety of measurement scales including dichotomous (survival), continuous (growth) and count (number of young). A distribution is assumed for an endpoint and analyses proceed accordingly. In certain situations, the assumed distribution may be incorrect and this may lead to incorrect statistical inference. The present study considers the analysis of count effects, here motivated by the Ceriodaphnia dubia reproduction study. While the Poisson probability model is a common starting point, this distribution assumes that the mean and variance are the same. This will not be the case if there is some extraneous source of variability in the system, and in this case, the variability may exceed the mean. A computer simulation study was used to examine the impact of overdispersion or outliers on the analysis of count data. Methods that assumed Poisson or negative binomially distributed outcomes were compared to methods that accommodated this potential overdispersion using quasi-likelihood (QL) or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM). If the data were truly Poisson, the adjusted methods still performed at nominal type I error rates. In the cases of overdispersed counts, the Poisson assumed methods resulted in rejection rates that exceeded nominal levels and standard errors for regression coefficients that were too narrow. The negative binomial methods worked best in the case when the data were, in fact, negative binomial but did not maintain nominal characteristics in other situations. In general, the QL and GLMM methods performed reasonably based on the present study, although all procedures suffered some impact in the presence of potential outliers. In particular, the QL is arguably preferred because it makes fewer assumptions than the GLMM and performed well over the range of conditions considered.

  19. Fully integrated sub 100ps photon counting platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, S. J.; Bellis, S. J.; Rosinger, P.; Jackson, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    Current state of the art high resolution counting modules, specifically designed for high timing resolution applications, are largely based on a computer card format. This has tended to result in a costly solution that is restricted to the computer it resides in. We describe a four channel timing module that interfaces to a computer via a USB port and operates with a resolution of less than 100 picoseconds. The core design of the system is an advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) interfacing to a precision time interval measurement module, mass memory block and a high speed USB 2.0 serial data port. The FPGA design allows the module to operate in a number of modes allowing both continuous recording of photon events (time-tagging) and repetitive time binning. In time-tag mode the system reports, for each photon event, the high resolution time along with the chronological time (macro time) and the channel ID. The time-tags are uploaded in real time to a host computer via a high speed USB port allowing continuous storage to computer memory of up to 4 millions photons per second. In time-bin mode, binning is carried out with count rates up to 10 million photons per second. Each curve resides in a block of 128,000 time-bins each with a resolution programmable down to less than 100 picoseconds. Each bin has a limit of 65535 hits allowing autonomous curve recording until a bin reaches the maximum count or the system is commanded to halt. Due to the large memory storage, several curves/experiments can be stored in the system prior to uploading to the host computer for analysis. This makes this module ideal for integration into high timing resolution specific applications such as laser ranging and fluorescence lifetime imaging using techniques such as time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC).

  20. Numerosity and number signs in deaf Nicaraguan adults

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Molly; Senghas, Ann

    2012-01-01

    What abilities are entailed in being numerate? Certainly, one is the ability to hold the exact quantity of a set in mind, even as it changes, and even after its members can no longer be perceived. Is counting language necessary to track and reproduce exact quantities? Previous work with speakers of languages that lack number words involved participants only from non-numerate cultures. Deaf Nicaraguan adults all live in a richly numerate culture, but vary in counting ability, allowing us to experimentally differentiate the contribution of these two factors. Thirty deaf and 10 hearing participants performed 11 one-to-one matching and counting tasks. Results suggest that immersion in a numerate culture is not enough to make one fully numerate. A memorized sequence of number symbols is required, though even an unconventional, iconic system is sufficient. Additionally, we find that within a numerate culture, the ability to track precise quantities can be acquired in adulthood. PMID:21899832

  1. Numerosity and number signs in deaf Nicaraguan adults.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Molly; Senghas, Ann

    2011-12-01

    What abilities are entailed in being numerate? Certainly, one is the ability to hold the exact quantity of a set in mind, even as it changes, and even after its members can no longer be perceived. Is counting language necessary to track and reproduce exact quantities? Previous work with speakers of languages that lack number words involved participants only from non-numerate cultures. Deaf Nicaraguan adults all live in a richly numerate culture, but vary in counting ability, allowing us to experimentally differentiate the contribution of these two factors. Thirty deaf and 10 hearing participants performed 11 one-to-one matching and counting tasks. Results suggest that immersion in a numerate culture is not enough to make one fully numerate. A memorized sequence of number symbols is required, though even an unconventional, iconic system is sufficient. Additionally, we find that within a numerate culture, the ability to track precise quantities can be acquired in adulthood.

  2. Counting signal processing and counting level normalization techniques of polarization-insensitive fiber-optic Michelson interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chu; Lin, Hermann

    2006-12-01

    A counting signal processing technique of the fiber-optic interferometric sensor is proposed. The technique is capable of counting the numbers of the maximum and minimum of the output interferometric signal in a specific time duration, and it can be used as the basis to distinguish the sensing phase signal. It can also be used as a signal detector on applications such as intrusion detection. All sensors are subject to aging of the optical components and bending loss, and therefore the output signal of each sensor may vary with time. We propose a counting level normalization technique to compensate for these variations and to obtain the correct counting numbers.

  3. A conceptual guide to detection probability for point counts and other count-based survey methods

    Treesearch

    D. Archibald McCallum

    2005-01-01

    Accurate and precise estimates of numbers of animals are vitally needed both to assess population status and to evaluate management decisions. Various methods exist for counting birds, but most of those used with territorial landbirds yield only indices, not true estimates of population size. The need for valid density estimates has spawned a number of models for...

  4. Optimizing the duration of point counts for monitoring trends in bird populations

    Treesearch

    Jared Verner

    1988-01-01

    Minute-by-minute analysis of point counts of birds in mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra National Forest, central California, showed that cumulative counts of species and individuals increased in a curvilinear fashion but did not reach asymptotes after 10 minutes of counting. Comparison of the expected number of individuals counted per hour with various combinations...

  5. A THUMBNAIL HISTORY OF HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT (HPC) METHODOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 100 years, the method of determining the number of bacteria in water, foods or other materials has been termed variously as: bacterial plate count, total plate count, total viable plate count, aerobic plate count, standard plate cound and more recently, heterotrophi...

  6. A THUMBNAIL HISTORY OF HETEROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT (HPC) METHODOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 100 years, the method of determining the number of bacteria in water, foods or other materials has been termed variously as: bacterial plate count, total plate count, total viable plate count, aerobic plate count, standard plate cound and more recently, heterotrophi...

  7. Counting RG flows

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerfulmore » enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.« less

  8. Counting RG flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerful enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.

  9. Increased numbers of Australian Indigenous nurses would make a significant contribution to 'closing the gap' in Indigenous health: what is getting in the way?

    PubMed

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The provision of a well trained and culturally safe health workforce is critical to the alleviation of health inequities for Australian Indigenous peoples. Educating and graduating significant numbers of Indigenous registered nurses is one way the 'Close the Gap' initiative succeeds. Indigenous nurses bring a set of unique skills, knowledge and understanding to health service delivery. Their contribution has the potential to enhance future outcomes for Indigenous people by improving access to health services, ensure services are culturally appropriate and respectful, and assist non-Indigenous nurses to deliver culturally appropriate care. This paper discusses the background to the current numbers of Indigenous undergraduate nursing students enrolled in and completing tertiary nursing courses, with a focus on Queensland nursing programs. A range of identified barriers impede Indigenous nursing students' successful completion of their studies. We propose recommendations for education, research and employment to help overcome these problems, and ensure greater Indigenous participation in the nursing workforce.

  10. Are socio-economically disadvantaged Australians making more or less use of the Enhanced Primary Care Medicare Benefit Schedule item numbers?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; McElroy, Heather; Beilby, Justin; Mott, Kathy; Price, Kay; Morey, Sue; Best, John

    2003-01-01

    We aimed to examine the relationship between levels of socio-economic disadvantage (measured by the Socio Economic Indexes for Areas [SEIFA] used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics) and uptake of the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) item numbers on the Medicare Benefits Schedule. Health services are often less likely to reach those that most need them and so it is important to monitor whether disadvantaged communities are accessing EPC The rates of health assessments, care plans and case conferences are similar in each SEIFA quartile (from advantaged to disadvantaged populations), favouring the more disadvantaged quartiles in some cases. These national trends are not observed in each state and territory. For all EPC services combined, the lowest number of doctors that provide EPC services are found in the 2 most disadvantaged quartiles, yet more EPC services are provided in these quartiles, due to the higher mean and median number of services provided by general practitioners in these quartiles. Overall, populations living in the most disadvantaged quartiles have similar or higher levels of EPC uptake, apparently due, at least in part, to greater than average use of EPC services by general practitioners in these areas.

  11. How Parents Read Counting Books and Non-numerical Books to Their Preverbal Infants: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alison; Cole, Thomas; Cordes, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Studies have stressed the importance of counting with children to promote formal numeracy abilities; however, little work has investigated when parents begin to engage in this behavior with their young children. In the current study, we investigated whether parents elaborated on numerical information when reading a counting book to their preverbal infants and whether developmental differences in numerical input exist even in the 1st year of life. Parents and their 5-10 months old infants were asked to read, as they would at home, two books to their infants: a counting book and another book that did not have numerical content. Parents' spontaneous statements rarely focused on number and those that did consisted primarily of counting, with little emphasis on labeling the cardinality of the set. However, developmental differences were observed even in this age range, such that parents were more likely to make numerical utterances when reading to older infants. Together, results are the first to characterize naturalistic reading behaviors between parents and their preverbal infants in the context of counting books, suggesting that although counting books promote numerical language in parents, infants still receive very little in the way of numerical input before the end of the 1st year of life. While little is known regarding the impact of number talk on the cognitive development of young infants, the current results may guide future work in this area by providing the first assessment of the characteristics of parental numerical input to preverbal infants.

  12. How Parents Read Counting Books and Non-numerical Books to Their Preverbal Infants: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Alison; Cole, Thomas; Cordes, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Studies have stressed the importance of counting with children to promote formal numeracy abilities; however, little work has investigated when parents begin to engage in this behavior with their young children. In the current study, we investigated whether parents elaborated on numerical information when reading a counting book to their preverbal infants and whether developmental differences in numerical input exist even in the 1st year of life. Parents and their 5–10 months old infants were asked to read, as they would at home, two books to their infants: a counting book and another book that did not have numerical content. Parents’ spontaneous statements rarely focused on number and those that did consisted primarily of counting, with little emphasis on labeling the cardinality of the set. However, developmental differences were observed even in this age range, such that parents were more likely to make numerical utterances when reading to older infants. Together, results are the first to characterize naturalistic reading behaviors between parents and their preverbal infants in the context of counting books, suggesting that although counting books promote numerical language in parents, infants still receive very little in the way of numerical input before the end of the 1st year of life. While little is known regarding the impact of number talk on the cognitive development of young infants, the current results may guide future work in this area by providing the first assessment of the characteristics of parental numerical input to preverbal infants. PMID:27493639

  13. Optimal allocation of point-count sampling effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.J.; Sauer, J.R.; Link, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Both unlimited and fixedradius point counts only provide indices to population size. Because longer count durations lead to counting a higher proportion of individuals at the point, proper design of these surveys must incorporate both count duration and sampling characteristics of population size. Using information about the relationship between proportion of individuals detected at a point and count duration, we present a method of optimizing a pointcount survey given a fixed total time for surveying and travelling between count points. The optimization can be based on several quantities that measure precision, accuracy, or power of tests based on counts, including (1) meansquare error of estimated population change; (2) mean-square error of average count; (3) maximum expected total count; or (4) power of a test for differences in average counts. Optimal solutions depend on a function that relates count duration at a point to the proportion of animals detected. We model this function using exponential and Weibull distributions, and use numerical techniques to conduct the optimization. We provide an example of the procedure in which the function is estimated from data of cumulative number of individual birds seen for different count durations for three species of Hawaiian forest birds. In the example, optimal count duration at a point can differ greatly depending on the quantities that are optimized. Optimization of the mean-square error or of tests based on average counts generally requires longer count durations than does estimation of population change. A clear formulation of the goals of the study is a critical step in the optimization process.

  14. Counting Statistics and Ion Interval Density in AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Ognibene, T; Palmblad, M; Reimer, P

    2004-08-03

    Confidence in the precisions of AMS and decay measurements must be comparable for the application of the {sup 14}C calibration to age determinations using both technologies. We confirmed the random nature of the temporal distribution of {sup 14}C ions in an AMS spectrometer for a number of sample counting rates and properties of the sputtering process. The temporal distribution of ion counts was also measured to confirm the applicability of traditional counting statistics.

  15. Predicting U.S. Tuberculosis Case Counts through 2020

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Rachel S. Y e l k; Winston, Carla A.; Miramontes, Roque

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, foreign-born persons accounted for 60% of all tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States. Understanding which national groups make up the highest proportion of TB cases will assist TB control programs in concentrating limited resources where they can provide the greatest impact on preventing transmission of TB disease. The objective of our study was to predict through 2020 the numbers of U.S. TB cases among U.S.-born, foreign-born and foreign-born persons from selected countries of birth. TB case counts reported through the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System from 2000–2010 were log-transformed, and linear regression was performed to calculate predicted annual case counts and 95% prediction intervals for 2011–2020. Data were analyzed in 2011 before 2011 case counts were known. Decreases were predicted between 2010 observed and 2020 predicted counts for total TB cases (11,182 to 8,117 [95% prediction interval 7,262–9,073]) as well as TB cases among foreign-born persons from Mexico (1,541 to 1,420 [1,066–1,892]), the Philippines (740 to 724 [569–922]), India (578 to 553 [455–672]), Vietnam (532 to 429 [367–502]) and China (364 to 328 [249–433]). TB cases among persons who are U.S.-born and foreign-born were predicted to decline 47% (4,393 to 2,338 [2,113–2,586]) and 6% (6,720 to 6,343 [5,382–7,476]), respectively. Assuming rates of declines observed from 2000–2010 continue until 2020, a widening gap between the numbers of U.S.-born and foreign-born TB cases was predicted. TB case count predictions will help TB control programs identify needs for cultural competency, such as languages and interpreters needed for translating materials or engaging in appropriate community outreach. PMID:23785416

  16. Invited Commentary: Little Steps Lead to Huge Steps-It's Time to Make Physical Inactivity Our Number 1 Public Health Enemy.

    PubMed

    Church, Timothy S

    2016-11-01

    The analysis plan and article in this issue of the Journal by Evenson et al. (Am J Epidemiol 2016;184(9):621-632) is well-conceived, thoughtfully conducted, and tightly written. The authors utilized the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set to examine the association between accelerometer-measured physical activity level and mortality and found that meeting the 2013 federal Physical Activity Guidelines resulted in a 35% reduction in risk of mortality. The timing of these findings could not be better, given the ubiquitous nature of personal accelerometer devices. The masses are already equipped to routinely quantify their activity, and now we have the opportunity and responsibility to provide evidenced-based, tailored physical activity goals. We have evidenced-based physical activity guidelines, mass distribution of devices to track activity, and now scientific support indicating that meeting the physical activity goal, as assessed by these devices, has substantial health benefits. All of the pieces are in place to make physical inactivity a national priority, and we now have the opportunity to positively affect the health of millions of Americans.

  17. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  18. Probiotics and clinical effects: is the number what counts?

    PubMed

    Bertazzoni, Elisa; Donelli, Gianfranco; Midtvedt, Tore; Nicoli, Jacques; Sanz, Yolanda

    2013-08-01

    Probiotics are defined as 'live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host', underlining the need of microbial viability and the requirement of a suitable dose to obtain a health benefit. The dose and the administration regimen are critical issues for probiotics either ingested as foods claiming health benefits or used as drugs in clinics. In fact, regulatory authorities demand to guarantee consumers that a probiotic is effective in the recommended conditions of use and responds to its specific claims. Thus, a proper identification of probiotic strain(s), a definition of the amount of microorganisms surviving by the end of the product shelf-life, and a demonstration of their beneficial effects by appropriate human trials are required. The current knowledge on the effective dose of different probiotic strains used for several disorders is here reviewed.

  19. Reducing the Number of Disconnected Youth. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    As they move toward adulthood, most young Americans are either in school, in the workforce, or in the military. Their lives are shaped by the challenges and routines of these anchoring institutions and by the social networks they encounter there. But far too many are disconnected from the roles and relationships that set young people on pathways…

  20. What Counts in the Development of Young Children's Number Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Susan C.; Suriyakham, Linda Whealton; Rowe, Meredith L.; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Gunderson, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that children vary widely in their mathematical knowledge by the time they enter preschool and that this variation predicts levels of achievement in elementary school. In a longitudinal study of a diverse sample of 44 preschool children, we examined the extent to which their understanding of the cardinal meanings of the…

  1. Confronting dark energy models using galaxy cluster number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2010-10-15

    The mass function of cluster-size halos and their redshift distribution are computed for 12 distinct accelerating cosmological scenarios and confronted to the predictions of the conventional flat {Lambda}CDM model. The comparison with {Lambda}CDM is performed by a two-step process. First, we determine the free parameters of all models through a joint analysis involving the latest cosmological data, using supernovae type Ia, the cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Apart from a braneworld inspired cosmology, it is found that the derived Hubble relation of the remaining models reproduces the {Lambda}CDM results approximately with the same degree of statistical confidence. Second, in order to attempt to distinguish the different dark energy models from the expectations of {Lambda}CDM, we analyze the predicted cluster-size halo redshift distribution on the basis of two future cluster surveys: (i) an X-ray survey based on the eROSITA satellite, and (ii) a Sunayev-Zeldovich survey based on the South Pole Telescope. As a result, we find that the predictions of 8 out of 12 dark energy models can be clearly distinguished from the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, while the predictions of 4 models are statistically equivalent to those of the {Lambda}CDM model, as far as the expected cluster mass function and redshift distribution are concerned. The present analysis suggests that such a technique appears to be very competitive to independent tests probing the late time evolution of the Universe and the associated dark energy effects.

  2. Method of detecting and counting bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for determining bacterial levels, especially in samples of aqueous physiological fluids. The method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of nonbacterial ATP. The bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay. A concentration technique is included to make the method more sensitive. It is particularly useful where the fluid to be measured contains an unknown or low bacteria count.

  3. The effect of a multifaceted empowerment strategy on decision making about the number of embryos transferred in in vitro fertilisation: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Peperstraten, Arno; Nelen, Willianne; Grol, Richard; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Adang, Eddy; Stalmeier, Peep; Hermens, Rosella; Kremer, Jan

    2010-09-30

    To evaluate the effects of a multifaceted empowerment strategy on the actual use of single embryo transfer after in vitro fertilisation. Randomised controlled trial. Five in vitro fertilisation clinics in the Netherlands. 308 couples (women aged <40) on the waiting list for a first in vitro fertilisation cycle. The multifaceted strategy aimed to empower couples in deciding how many embryos should be transferred. The strategy consisted of a decision aid, support of a nurse specialising in in vitro fertilisation, and the offer of reimbursement by way of an extra treatment cycle. The control group received standard care for in vitro fertilisation. Use of single embryo transfer in the first and second treatment cycles as well as decision making variables and costs of the empowerment strategy. After the first treatment cycle, single embryo transfer was used by 43% (65/152) of couples in the intervention group and 32% (50/156) in the control group (difference 11%, 95% confidence interval 0% to 22%; P=0.05). After the second treatment cycle, single embryo transfer was used by 26% (14/154) of couples in the intervention group compared with 16% (8/51) in the control group (difference 10%, -6% to 26%; P=0.20). Compared with couples receiving standard care, those receiving the empowerment strategy had significantly higher empowerment and knowledge levels but no differences in anxiety levels. Mean total savings per couple in the intervention group were calculated to be €169.75 (£146.77; $219.12). A multifaceted empowerment strategy encouraged use of single embryo transfer, increased patients' knowledge, reduced costs, and had no effect on levels of anxiety or depression. This strategy could therefore be an important tool to reduce the twin pregnancy rate after in vitro fertilisation. This trial did not, however, demonstrate the anticipated 25% difference in use of single embryo transfer of the power calculation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00315029.

  4. Magnitude Representations and Counting Skills in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Sophie; Keeble, Sarah; Gilmore, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    When children learn to count, they map newly acquired symbolic representations of number onto preexisting nonsymbolic representations. The nature and timing of this mapping is currently unclear. Some researchers have suggested this mapping process helps children understand the cardinal principle of counting, while other evidence suggests that this…

  5. Comparison of Point Count Sampling Regimes for Monitoring Forest Birds

    Treesearch

    William H. Buskirk; Jennifer L. McDonald

    1995-01-01

    A set of 255 counts was compiled for 13 points using 10-minute periods subtallied at 3 and 6 minutes. The data from each point were subsampled using combinations of count periods, numbers, and schedules to compare the effectiveness of these different regimes at per point coverage. Interspecifically, detection frequencies differed in level and pattern as a function of...

  6. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  7. 21 CFR 1210.16 - Method of bacterial count.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL IMPORT MILK ACT Inspection and Testing § 1210.16 Method of bacterial count. The bacterial count of milk and cream refers to the number of viable bacteria as determined by the standard plate method of... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  8. Cell Counts in Cerebral Cortex of an Autistic Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Paul D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Numbers of neurons and glia were counted in the cerebral cortex of one case of autism and two age- and sex-matched controls. Cell counts were made in primary auditory cortex, Broca's speech area, and auditory association cortex. No consistent differences in cell density were found between brains of autistic and control patients. (Author/CL)

  9. Estimating population diversity with unreliable low frequency counts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We consider the classical population diversity estimation scenario based on frequency count data (the number of classes or taxa represented once, twice, etc. in the sample), but with the proviso that the lowest frequency counts, especially the singletons, may not be reliably observed. This arises es...

  10. The effect of a multifaceted empowerment strategy on decision making about the number of embryos transferred in in vitro fertilisation: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nelen, Willianne; Grol, Richard; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Adang, Eddy; Stalmeier, Peep; Hermens, Rosella; Kremer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of a multifaceted empowerment strategy on the actual use of single embryo transfer after in vitro fertilisation. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Five in vitro fertilisation clinics in the Netherlands. Participants 308 couples (women aged <40) on the waiting list for a first in vitro fertilisation cycle. Interventions The multifaceted strategy aimed to empower couples in deciding how many embryos should be transferred. The strategy consisted of a decision aid, support of a nurse specialising in in vitro fertilisation, and the offer of reimbursement by way of an extra treatment cycle. The control group received standard care for in vitro fertilisation. Main outcome measures Use of single embryo transfer in the first and second treatment cycles as well as decision making variables and costs of the empowerment strategy. Results After the first treatment cycle, single embryo transfer was used by 43% (65/152) of couples in the intervention group and 32% (50/156) in the control group (difference 11%, 95% confidence interval 0% to 22%; P=0.05). After the second treatment cycle, single embryo transfer was used by 26% (14/154) of couples in the intervention group compared with 16% (8/51) in the control group (difference 10%, −6% to 26%; P=0.20). Compared with couples receiving standard care, those receiving the empowerment strategy had significantly higher empowerment and knowledge levels but no differences in anxiety levels. Mean total savings per couple in the intervention group were calculated to be €169.75 (£146.77; $219.12). Conclusions A multifaceted empowerment strategy encouraged use of single embryo transfer, increased patients’ knowledge, reduced costs, and had no effect on levels of anxiety or depression. This strategy could therefore be an important tool to reduce the twin pregnancy rate after in vitro fertilisation. This trial did not, however, demonstrate the anticipated 25% difference in use of single embryo

  11. Region counting algorithm based on region labeling automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sudi; Gu, Guoqing

    2007-12-01

    Region counting is a conception in computer graphics and image analysis, and it has many applications in medical area recently. The existing region-counting algorithms are almost based on filling method. Although filling algorithm has been improved well, the speed of these algorithms used to count regions is not satisfied. A region counting algorithm based on region labeling automaton is proposed in this paper. By tracing the boundaries of the regions, the number of the region can be obtained fast. And the proposed method was found to be fastest and requiring less memory.

  12. What's in a Number? Examining the Effect of a Dedicated Research Year on H-Index and Fellowship Decision-making.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, Carrie M; Finkelstein, Julia B; Onyeji, Ifeanyi C; Van Batavia, Jason P; Rosoff, James S; Badalato, Gina M

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effect of a dedicated research year on the h-indices of residents and the pursuit of fellowship within a heterogeneous group of urology programs. We previously demonstrated that urology residents with a dedicated research year produce more than 2 times the number of publications than their counterparts in 5-year programs. However, we did not give consideration to the impact of these publications. We obtained information on the publication output and pursuit of fellowship of graduates from the New York Section urology residency programs from 2009 to 2013. Data on peer-reviewed publications were obtained by PubMed query and h-index was documented from the Scopus database. During the 5-year study period, 148 individuals (116 M, 32 F) graduated from New York Section urology programs. The mean h-index was 4.6 for residents in 5-year programs compared with 8.1 for those in 6-year programs (P < .001). Residents with a dedicated research year were more likely to pursue fellowship training (79.3% vs 58.8%, P = .023) with no difference in the pursuit of accredited fellowship programs. Those residents who went on to fellowship training had a significantly higher h-index (6.2 vs 3.6, P = .001). Urology residents with a dedicated research year have almost 2 times the h-indices of their counterparts. Residents who pursue fellowship training also have higher h-indices. Residents who completed a dedicated research year were more likely to pursue fellowship training, although the accreditation status of these programs was variable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Counting or Chunking?

    PubMed Central

    Spotorno, Nicola; McMillan, Corey T.; Powers, John P.; Clark, Robin; Grossman, Murray

    2014-01-01

    A growing amount of empirical data is showing that the ability to manipulate quantities in a precise and efficient fashion is rooted in cognitive mechanisms devoted to specific aspects of numbers processing. The Analog number system (ANS) has a reasonable representation of quantities up to about 4, and represents larger quantities on the basis of a numerical ratio between quantities. In order to represent the precise cardinality of a number, the ANS may be supported by external algorithms such as language, leading to a “Precise Number System”. In the setting of limited language, other number-related systems can appear. For example the Parallel Individuation system (PIS) supports a “chunking mechanism” that clusters units of larger numerosities into smaller subsets. In the present study we investigated number processing in non-aphasic patients with Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS) and Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA), two neurodegenerative conditions that are associated with progressive parietal atrophy. The present study investigated these number systems in CBS and PCA by assessing the property of the ANS associated with smaller and larger numerosities, and the chunking property of the PIS. The results revealed that CBS/PCA patients are impaired in simple calculations (e.g., addition and subtraction) and that their performance strongly correlates with the size of the numbers involved in these calculations, revealing a clear magnitude effect. This magnitude effect correlated with gray matter atrophy in parietal regions. Moreover, a numeral-dots transcoding task showed that CBS/PCA patients are able to take advantage of clustering in the spatial distribution of the dots of the array. The relative advantage associated with chunking compared to a random spatial distribution correlated with both parietal and prefrontal regions. These results shed light on the properties of systems for representing number knowledge in non-aphasic patients with CBS and PCA. PMID

  14. Quality Coaching Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  15. Quality Coaching Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  16. The relationship between compost bedded pack performance, management, and bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Black, R A; Taraba, J L; Day, G B; Damasceno, F A; Newman, M C; Akers, K A; Wood, C L; McQuerry, K J; Bewley, J M

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationships among temperature, moisture, carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio, space per cow, and bacterial counts from bedding material collected from compost bedded pack (CBP) barns. A field survey of 42 routinely aerated CBP barns was conducted in Kentucky between October 2010 and March 2011. Two bedding material samples of 1,064.7 cm(3) each were collected during a single site visit from 9 evenly distributed locations throughout each barn and thoroughly mixed to create a composite sample representative of the entire CBP. Bacterial counts were determined for coliforms, Escherichia coli, streptococci, staphylococci, and Bacillus spp. University of Kentucky Regulatory Services (Lexington) laboratory personnel performed nutrient analyses to determine moisture, carbon, and nitrogen contents. Surface and 10.2-cm pack depth temperatures were collected for each of the 9 evenly distributed locations and the mean calculated to produce a composite temperature. Space per cow was calculated as the total CBP area divided by number of cows housed on the CBP. The GLM procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) generated models to describe factors affecting bacterial counts. Bacterial counts were 6.3 ± 0.6, 6.0 ± 0.6, 7.2 ± 0.7, 7.9 ± 0.5, and 7.6 ± 0.5 log 10 cfu/g of dry matter for coliform, Escherichia coli, streptococci, staphylococci, and Bacillus spp., respectively. Composite temperature, CBP moisture, C:N ratio, and space per cow had no effect on coliform counts. Escherichia coli reached a peak concentration when the C:N ratio was between 30:1 and 35:1. Staphylococci counts increased as ambient temperature increased. Streptococci counts decreased with increased space per cow and composite temperature and increased with increasing ambient temperature and moisture. Streptococci counts peaked at a C:N ratio ranging from 16:1 to 18:1. Bacillus spp. counts were reduced with increasing moisture, C:N ratio, and ambient

  17. Analogies for Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poskozim, Paul S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews analogies used to try to capture the concept of the magnitude of Avogadro's number, including analogies related to small/tiny objects, counting, people, water, and money. Also presents several new ones which are based on modern computers and printers. (JN)

  18. Number in Classifier Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomoto, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Classifier languages are often described as lacking genuine number morphology and treating all common nouns, including those conceptually count, as an unindividuated mass. This study argues that neither of these popular assumptions is true, and presents new generalizations and analyses gained by abandoning them. I claim that no difference exists…

  19. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Results Mean A high number of eosinophils (eosinophilia) are often linked to a variety of disorders. ... Accessed March 29, 2017. Klion AD, Weller PF. Eosinophilia and eosinophil-related disorders. In: Adkinson NF, Bochner ...

  20. Accurate atom counting in mesoscopic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hume, D B; Stroescu, I; Joos, M; Muessel, W; Strobel, H; Oberthaler, M K

    2013-12-20

    Many cold atom experiments rely on precise atom number detection, especially in the context of quantum-enhanced metrology where effects at the single particle level are important. Here, we investigate the limits of atom number counting via resonant fluorescence detection for mesoscopic samples of trapped atoms. We characterize the precision of these fluorescence measurements beginning from the single-atom level up to more than one thousand. By investigating the primary noise sources, we obtain single-atom resolution for atom numbers as high as 1200. This capability is an essential prerequisite for future experiments with highly entangled states of mesoscopic atomic ensembles.

  1. Accurate Atom Counting in Mesoscopic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Stroescu, I.; Joos, M.; Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Many cold atom experiments rely on precise atom number detection, especially in the context of quantum-enhanced metrology where effects at the single particle level are important. Here, we investigate the limits of atom number counting via resonant fluorescence detection for mesoscopic samples of trapped atoms. We characterize the precision of these fluorescence measurements beginning from the single-atom level up to more than one thousand. By investigating the primary noise sources, we obtain single-atom resolution for atom numbers as high as 1200. This capability is an essential prerequisite for future experiments with highly entangled states of mesoscopic atomic ensembles.

  2. "Just" Counting: Young Children's Oral Counting and Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John; Bruce, Bob

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the specific skills and abilities of young children in oral counting and enumeration. Responses to an oral counting task and an enumeration task by a sample (n=93) of 3- and 4-year old children attending a range of pre-five establishments in an urban district of northern England are described. The findings, whilst providing…

  3. Kids Count [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Carl, Ed.; Wilson, Nancy, Ed.

    This Kids Count report is combined with Families Count, and provides information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The first statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen deaths; (6) juvenile…

  4. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  5. Accuracy and reliability of naevus self-counts.

    PubMed

    Fiessler, Cornelia; Pfahlberg, Annette; Li, Jiang; Uter, Wolfgang; Gefeller, Olaf

    2014-12-01

    A high number of melanocytic naevi is one of the major risk factors for cutaneous melanoma. Therefore, counting the number of acquired naevi could be a useful strategy to identify individuals at an increased risk for targeted skin cancer screening. The aim of this study was to assess agreement between naevus self-counts and counts of trained examiners as well as to analyse potential determinants of the magnitude of agreement. In a large cross-sectional survey (n=1772), university students counted their naevi on both arms and were additionally examined by specifically trained examiners in a mutually blinded manner. Further data on other melanoma risk factors such as skin phototype, hair colour or freckling were collected by a questionnaire. The relative difference between the two naevus counts and the ratio of the counts were calculated to quantify agreement. Regression modelling was performed to identify independent determinants of agreement. The overall agreement was moderate, with participants counting on average 14% more naevi than the examiners. In terms of the potential determinants associated with agreement, skin type and medical education showed a strong effect. The difference in naevus counts was significantly larger for individuals with lighter skin types compared with those with a dark skin (Fitzpatrick type IV), and medical students yielded a naevus count more similar to the examiner's count than nonmedical students. Naevus self-counts can only provide a rough estimate of the number of naevi, but may not be accurate enough to reliably identify a high-risk group for melanoma screening, especially in individuals with light skin types.

  6. Counting the ions surrounding nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nucleic acids are strongly negatively charged, and thus electrostatic interactions—screened by ions in solution—play an important role in governing their ability to fold and participate in biomolecular interactions. The negative charge creates a region, known as the ion atmosphere, in which cation and anion concentrations are perturbed from their bulk values. Ion counting experiments quantify the ion atmosphere by measuring the preferential ion interaction coefficient: the net total number of excess ions above, or below, the number expected due to the bulk concentration. The results of such studies provide important constraints on theories, which typically predict the full three-dimensional distribution of the screening cloud. This article reviews the state of nucleic acid ion counting measurements and critically analyzes their ability to test both analytical and simulation-based models. PMID:28034959

  7. A Comparison of Methods for Counting Viruses in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bettarel, Yvan; Sime-Ngando, Telesphore; Amblard, Christian; Laveran, Henri

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we compared different methods—including transmission electron microscopy—and various nucleic acid labeling methods in which we used the fluorochromes 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), 4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-oxazole)-2-methylmethyledene]-1-(3′-trimethyl ammoniumpropyl)-quinilinium diioide (YOPRO-1), and SYBR Green I, which can be detected by epifluorescence microscopy (EM), for counting viruses in samples obtained from freshwater ecosystems whose trophic status varied and from a culture of T7 phages. From a quantitative and qualitative viewpoint, our results showed that the greatest efficiency for all ecosystems was obtained when we used the EM counting protocol in which YOPRO-1 was the label, as this fluorochrome exhibited strong and very stable fluorescence. A modification of the original protocol in which YOPRO-1 was used is recommended, because this modification makes the protocol faster and allows it to be used for routine analysis of fixed samples. Because SYBR Green I fades very quickly, the use of this fluorochrome is not recommended for systems in which the viral content is very high (>108 particles/ml), such as treated domestic sewage effluents. Experiments in which we used DNase and RNase revealed that the number of viruses determined by EM was slightly overestimated (by approximately 15%) because of interference caused by the presence of free nucleic acids. PMID:10831400

  8. Young Children Counting at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Rose

    2007-01-01

    Learning to count is something that most children start to do by the time they are about two, and parents know from first-hand experience that family members play a big part in helping with this complex process. In this article, the author describes a project involving families sharing effective counting activities. The project called…

  9. Low White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Low white blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A low white blood cell count (leukopenia) is a decrease in disease-fighting cells ( ... a decrease in a certain type of white blood cell (neutrophil). The definition of low white blood cell ...

  10. Using Christmas Bird Count data in analysis of population change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Link, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    The scientific credibility of Christmas Bird Count (CBC) results depend on the development and implementation of appropriate methods of statistical analysis. The key to any successful analysis of CBC data is to begin with a careful review of how the limitations of the data are likely to influence the results of the analysis, then to choose methods of analysis that accommodate as much as possible the limitations of the survey. For our analyses of CBC data, we develop a flexible model for effort adjustment and use information from the data to guide the selection of the best model. We include geographic structuring to accommodate the regional variation in number of samples, use a model that allows for overdispersed poisson data appropriate for counts, and employ empirical Bayes procedures to accommodate differences in quality of information in regional summaries. This generalized linear model approach is very flexible, and can be applied to a variety of studies focused on factors influencing wintering bird populations. In particular, the model can be easily modified to contain covariates, allowing for assessment of associations between CBC counts and winter weather, disturbance, and a variety of other environmental factors. These new survey analysis methods have added value in that they provide insights into changes in survey design that can enhance the value of the information. The CBC has been extremely successful as a tool for increasing public interest in birding and bird conservation. Use of the information for bird conservation creates new demands on quality of information, and it is important to maintain a dialogue between users of the information, information needs for the analyses, and survey coordinators and participants. Our work as survey analysts emphasizes the value and limitations of existing data, and provides some indications of what features of the survey could be modified to make the survey a more reliable source of bird population data. Surveys

  11. Counting Dependence Predictors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-02

    and operand communication among cores uses a number of two-dimensional wormhole -routed meshes. Each block owner has the PCs of all in-flight blocks...predictor according to the description in Chrysos and Emer’s paper [2]. This implementation is ideal in that message latencies are not modeled and access to

  12. Does Effort Still Count?: More on What Makes the Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Tracy E.; Magnotti, John F.; Marchuk, Kimberly; Schultz, Bridget S.; Luther, Andrew; Varfolomeeva, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has examined differences between students and faculty regarding the weight of effort in assigning grades. Here, students and faculty responded to questions regarding the relative weight of performance and effort on final grades and what letter grades faculty should assign across different types of courses. The authors asked these…

  13. Making Civics Count: Citizenship Education for a New Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David E., Ed.; Levinson, Meira, Ed.; Hess, Frederick M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "By nearly every measure, Americans are less engaged in their communities and political activity than generations past." So write the editors of this volume, who survey the current practices and history of citizenship education in the United States. They argue that the current period of "creative destruction"--when schools are…

  14. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Ann

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of three issues from 2000 of a journal highlighting notable after-school programs, many funded by 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) grants, and the school-community collaboration they entail. The June 2000 issue features a cover story on the successful inclusion of parents in various after-school initiatives;…

  15. Make Evaluation Count: To Assess Impact, Know What to Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendray, Amy; Crockett, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    How do educators at a systems level know that professional learning is impacting teacher practice in a way that leads to improved student outcomes? California's Long Beach Unified School District, a member of Learning Forward's Redesign PD Community of Practice, partnered with other districts from across the country to answer that question. As…

  16. Make Kids Count: Giving Babies a Smart Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Anne, Ed.

    The Smart Beginnings project in Arizona is designed to increase public awareness and parent education about early childhood development and family support resources. The program is intended to identify, link, establish, and expand a public/private family support system and improve the quality and increase availability of infant and toddler child…

  17. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Andrea; Yost, Ann

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the single 2001 issue of a journal highlighting notable after-school programs, many funded by 21st Century Community Learning Center grants, and the school-community collaboration they entail. Articles in this issue on literacy are: (1) "Literacy and Afterschool: A Perfect Fit," focusing on literacy programs…

  18. Making Afterschool Count: Communities & Schools Working Together, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Ann

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of three issues from 2000 of a journal highlighting notable after-school programs, many funded by 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) grants, and the school-community collaboration they entail. The June 2000 issue features a cover story on the successful inclusion of parents in various after-school initiatives;…

  19. Making Data Sharing Count: A Publication-Based Solution

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Margulies, Daniel S.; Milham, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The neuroimaging community has been increasingly called up to openly share data. Although data sharing has been a cornerstone of large-scale data consortia, the incentive for the individual researcher remains unclear. Other fields have benefited from embracing a data publication form – the data paper – that allows researchers to publish their datasets as a citable scientific publication. Such publishing mechanisms both give credit that is recognizable within the scientific ecosystem, and also ensure the quality of the published data and metadata through the peer review process. We discuss the specific challenges of adapting data papers to the needs of the neuroimaging community, and we propose guidelines for the structure as well as review process. PMID:23390412

  20. The academic welfare state: making peer-review count.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Diogo; Roberts, David L

    2013-11-01

    The peer-review process is a central pillar of academic publishing. However, the work that goes into ensuring the quality of published content is rarely recognised. Here we present a correction factor for the h-index, one of the most popular metrics for quantifying academic output, that will allow for the inclusion of peer-review effort in the evaluation of the outputs produced by an academic.

  1. Making Civics Count: Citizenship Education for a New Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David E., Ed.; Levinson, Meira, Ed.; Hess, Frederick M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "By nearly every measure, Americans are less engaged in their communities and political activity than generations past." So write the editors of this volume, who survey the current practices and history of citizenship education in the United States. They argue that the current period of "creative destruction"--when schools are…

  2. Making Summer Count: How Summer Programs Can Boost Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Augustine, Catherine; Schwartz, Heather; Bodilly, Susan; McInnis, Brian; Lichter, Dahlia; Cross, Amanda Brown

    2012-01-01

    During summer vacation, many students lose knowledge and skills. By the end of summer, students perform, on average, one month behind where they left off in the spring. Participation in summer learning programs should mitigate learning loss and could even produce achievement gains. Indeed, educators and policymakers increasingly promote summer…

  3. The science of muscle hypertrophy: making dietary protein count.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2011-02-01

    Growing evidence supports the conclusion that consumption of protein in close temporal proximity to the performance of resistance exercise promotes greater muscular hypertrophy. We can also state with good certainty that merely consuming energy, as carbohydrate for example, is also not sufficient to maximise muscle protein synthesis leading to anabolism and net new muscle protein accretion. Recent work also indicates that certain types of proteins, particular those that are rapidly digested and high in leucine content (i.e. whey protein), appear to be more efficient at stimulating muscle protein synthesis. Continued practice of consumption of these types or proteins after exercise should lead to greater hypertrophy. Reviews of numerous training studies indicate that studies in which milk proteins and principally whey protein show an advantage of these proteins over and above isoenergetic carbohydrate and soya protein in promoting hypertrophy. Thus, the combined evidence suggests a strategic advantage of practising early post-exercise consumption of whey protein or dairy-based protein to promote muscle protein synthesis, net muscle protein accretion and ultimately hypertrophy.

  4. Making Education Count: Developing and Using International Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The chapters in this book were prepared during the second phase of a study conducted by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development to develop a set of International Indicators of Education Systems (INES). They were among the many studies presented at the General Assembly of the INES Project in Lugano (Switzerland), September 16-18,…

  5. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  6. Making Summer Count: How Summer Programs Can Boost Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Augustine, Catherine; Schwartz, Heather; Bodilly, Susan; McInnis, Brian; Lichter, Dahlia; Cross, Amanda Brown

    2012-01-01

    During summer vacation, many students lose knowledge and skills. By the end of summer, students perform, on average, one month behind where they left off in the spring. Participation in summer learning programs should mitigate learning loss and could even produce achievement gains. Indeed, educators and policymakers increasingly promote summer…

  7. Making management recommendations from annual bird point count data

    Treesearch

    Gary M. Peters

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, more than one hundred thousand breeding bird occurrences have been recorded on Southern National Forests in the United Sates. The majority of these occurrences have been geo-referenced using global positioning satellite (GPS) technology. This spatial information is available for use as a coverage in several geographic information system (GIS)...

  8. Make Evaluation Count: To Assess Impact, Know What to Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendray, Amy; Crockett, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    How do educators at a systems level know that professional learning is impacting teacher practice in a way that leads to improved student outcomes? California's Long Beach Unified School District, a member of Learning Forward's Redesign PD Community of Practice, partnered with other districts from across the country to answer that question. As…

  9. Making every gram count - Big measurements from tiny platforms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, C. S.; Neilsen, T. L.; Stromberg, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The most significant advances in Earth, solar, and space physics over the next decades will originate from new, system-level observational techniques. The most promising technique to still be fully developed and exploited requires conducting multi-point or distributed constellation-based observations. This system-level observational approach is required to understand the 'big picture' coupling between disparate regions such as the solar-wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, upper atmosphere, land, and ocean. The national research council, NASA science mission directorate, and the larger heliophysics community have repeatedly identified the pressing need for multipoint scientific investigations to be implemented via satellite constellations. The NASA Solar Terrestrial Probes Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission and NASA Earth Science Division's 'A-train', consisting of the AQUA, CloudSat, CALIPSO and AURA satellites, are examples of such constellations. However, the costs to date of these and other similar proposed constellations have been prohibitive given the 'large satellite' architectures and the multiple launch vehicles required for implementing the constellations. Financially sustainable development and deployment of multi-spacecraft constellations can only be achieved through the use of small spacecraft that allow for multiple hostings per launch vehicle. The revolution in commercial mobile and other battery powered consumer technology has helped enable researchers in recent years to build and fly very small yet capable satellites, principally CubeSats. A majority of the CubeSat activity and development to date has come from international academia and the amateur radio satellite community, but several of the typical large-satellite vendors have developed CubeSats as well. Recent government-sponsored CubeSat initiatives, such as the NRO Colony, NSF CubeSat Space Weather, NASA Office of Chief Technologist Edison and CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) Educational Launch of Nanosatellites Educational Launch of Nano-satellites (ELaNa), the Air Force Space Environmental NanoSat Experiment (SENSE), and the ESA QB50 programs have spurred the development of very proficient miniature space sensors and technologies that enable technology demonstration, space and earth science research, and operational CubeSat based missions. In this paper we will review many of the small, low cost sensor and instrumentation technologies that have been developed to date as part of the CubeSat movement and examine how these new CubeSat based technologies are helping us do more with less.

  10. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  11. Are We Making Education Count in Remote Australian Communities or Just Counting Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John

    2013-01-01

    For quite some time the achievements of students in remote Australian schools have been lamented. There is not necessarily anything new about the relative difference between the results of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in remote communities and their counterparts in urban, regional and rural schools across Australia. However, in…

  12. Dissent in Numbers: Making Strong Anonymity Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    While anytrust is not a new idea, Dissent rethinks DC-nets communication [14] around this model by sharing secret “ coins ” only between client/server...group wishes to share a message with fellow group members. To exchange a 1-bit message, every member shares a secret random coin with each of the other N...1 members. Every pair together first flips their shared coin , agreeing on the outcome. Then each member individually XORs together the values of all

  13. Making Connections: A "Number Curriculum" for Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Ruth

    This paper discusses a one-page curriculum outline for a preschool mathematics program in Israel. The curriculum was developed in the course of preservice and inservice teacher education programs in Israel, and the mathematics activities offered to support the curriculum were developed by student teachers there. The curriculum starts from…

  14. The Sun Makes You Number One!

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Marianne; Luckyanova, Maria; Manke, Kara

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of S3TEC is advancing fundamental science and developing materials to harness heat from the sun and convert this heat into electricity via solid-state thermoelectric and thermophotovoltaic technologies.

  15. Cell counting system by using single fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Joo Ha; Choi, Eun Seo

    2017-02-01

    We proposed a cell-counting method using optical fiber interferometer and demonstrated the performance of the proposed method. The cell counting means the counting or the quantification of individual cells. Its application ranges from the biological research to practical disease diagnosis. As a conventional approach for cell counting, various methods are employed. Among them, flow cytometry is quite accurate and exact method but it uses bulk and expensive optical equipment. When image-based methods are exploited, the limited field of view obtained by microscope is considered for cell counting. From this reason, problem of time consuming for whole cell counting is to be solved. The proposed method utilized single-mode optical fiber and high-speed spectrometer. Light beam having broad spectral bandwidth over 100 nm at 850-nm central wavelength is irradiated to a flow channel through fiber from top to bottom. Different optical path length differences are made whether the cell is passing though the flow channel across the beam area or not. The difference of optical path lengths in the beam area due to the cell induces interference signal depending on optical thickness of the cell. By measuring a series of interferences, the number of cells can be analyzed. The proposed system can be implemented without any expensive and perform the cell counting in the absence of complex image analysis. Interferometer-based cell counting can be a good alternative to the reported cell-counting methods.

  16. Bacterial counts associated with poultry processing at different sampling times.

    PubMed

    Geornaras, I; von Holy, A

    2000-01-01

    Aerobic plate counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts and Pseudomonas counts were performed on neck skin samples from six processing steps in a poultry abattoir at three different sampling times. Sampling time 1 was shortly after start-up of processing operations, time 2 after a tea break which was preceded by a cold water rinse-down of equipment surfaces, and time 3 before shut-down. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in microbial numbers of neck skin samples were observed between the three sampling times at the six sampling sites. At this particular processing plant, therefore, sampling at any time of the processing shift would thus not lead to significantly different bacterial counts of neck skins. The lowest aerobic plate counts, over all three sampling times, were obtained for neck skins sampled after spray washing, and the highest for neck skins sampled after packaging. This indicated the efficacy of the washing step in reducing microbial contamination but subsequent re-contamination of carcasses. Despite the Pseudomonas counts of neck skins being lower than the Enterobacteriaceae counts at the beginning of processing, packaging of carcasses resulted in Pseudomonas counts that were higher than the Enterobacteriaceae counts.

  17. Counting Primitive Pythagorean Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2005-01-01

    A triple (x,y,z) of natural numbers is called a Primitive Pythagorean Triple (PPT) if it satisfies two conditions: (1) x[squared] + y[squared] = z[squared]; and (2) x, y, and z have no common factor other than one. All the PPT's are given by the parametric equations: (1) x = m[squared] - n[squared]; (2) y = 2mn; and (3) z = m[squared] +…

  18. Using counts to simultaneously estimate abundance and detection probabilities in a salamander community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodd, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    A critical variable in both ecological and conservation field studies is determining how many individuals of a species are present within a defined sampling area. Labor intensive techniques such as capture-mark-recapture and removal sampling may provide estimates of abundance, but there are many logistical constraints to their widespread application. Many studies on terrestrial and aquatic salamanders use counts as an index of abundance, assuming that detection remains constant while sampling. If this constancy is violated, determination of detection probabilities is critical to the accurate estimation of abundance. Recently, a model was developed that provides a statistical approach that allows abundance and detection to be estimated simultaneously from spatially and temporally replicated counts. We adapted this model to estimate these parameters for salamanders sampled over a six vear period in area-constrained plots in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Estimates of salamander abundance varied among years, but annual changes in abundance did not vary uniformly among species. Except for one species, abundance estimates were not correlated with site covariates (elevation/soil and water pH, conductivity, air and water temperature). The uncertainty in the estimates was so large as to make correlations ineffectual in predicting which covariates might influence abundance. Detection probabilities also varied among species and sometimes among years for the six species examined. We found such a high degree of variation in our counts and in estimates of detection among species, sites, and years as to cast doubt upon the appropriateness of using count data to monitor population trends using a small number of area-constrained survey plots. Still, the model provided reasonable estimates of abundance that could make it useful in estimating population size from count surveys.

  19. Counting planar diagrams with various restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    Explicit expressions are considered for the generating functions concerning the number of planar diagrams with given numbers of 3- and 4-point vertices. It is observed that planar renormalization theory requires diagrams with restrictions, in the sense that one wishes to omit 'tadpole' insertions and 'seagull' insertions; at a later stage also self-energy insertions are to be removed, and finally also the dressed 3-point insertions and the dressed 4-point insertions. Diagrams with such restrictions can all be counted exactly. This results in various critical lines in the λ- g plane, where λ and g are effective zero-dimensional coupling constants. These lines can be localized exactly.

  20. Monitoring of interfacial tensions by drop counting

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Boring, C.P.; McLaughlin, J.F.; Harless, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    A capillary tube device was shown to provide a rapid means of measuring the interfacial tension between water and Freon-113. The measurement technique is based on counting the number of drops that form when a fixed volume of water passes through the capillary tube into the bulk Freon. The interfacial tension is predicted to be proportional to the number of drops to the negative 2/3 power. Calibration curves were obtained for Freon-water samples containing known concentrations of a surfactant. A standard Gibbs adsorption curve was obtained. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.